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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Feb 27, 1909

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Array iTfrrmnrv? * r_-_-nr__ uinfin
The Secret       5
of our success is. that we always give
you good goods for your good money.
Remember we give the utmost care to
our prescription department and have
the Confidence of ail the physicians.
@aeh
ehemlat
Fort & Douglas
Terry
The Week
A British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria,  B. C. Jg^
^-rmnnnnri»a»« * ihih rofm
HALL & WALKER
Agents
WELLING'ON   COLLI ERT
COMPANY'S COAL
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roh. VI.   No
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THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY ^1909
One Dollar Per Annum
4oblesse
)blige.
The Week is no more disposed to condone the offence
of the parties responsible
for the manipulated tele-
ram than is the Times. When the matter
[first leaked out it offered a criticism which
Hacked nothing in incisiveness and condemnation: but unlike the Times The Week is
lot prepared to disregard all the obliga-
|tions of decent journalism and, for political ends, to besmirch the character of an
lonored and beloved prelate of an historic
[church. The Times has always been notorious for the use of despicable weapons, and
[for using them in a despicable manner.
[Whilst one may dismiss this kind of news-
[paper warfare with a shrug of the shoulders as long as it is waged against professional politicians, remembering that it is
all in the game and they are prepared for
it, an entirely different aspect is imparted
when, without the slightest pretext the
same weapons are used against a Christian
clergyman for the sblei purpose of making
him a pawn in the game of discrediting a
political opponent. What are the facts of
the case in this deplorable affair as they
affsct Bishop Perrin? Simply that he received the confession of a man who went
to him in the guise of a penitent and
claimed the discharge of his sacred office;
not be it noted that he, the offender, might
receive absolution, but that blame might
[ be removed from the innocent Does the
Times contend that such a request would
appear unreasonable to a clergyman? It
would not be the first time that a like confession had been made with perfect truth.
If the confession were a spurious one it
would not be the first time that a similar
trick had been played upon men whose
sacred calling predisposes them to the exercise of mercy, and imposes upon them
the obligation to accept the confidences of
those in trouble. The Week is arguing
this matter solely from the standpoint of
the Bishop and of what he might reasonably infer from the confession. Does the
Times suggest that Bishop Perrin knew
that he was listening to a spurious confession, and that knowing this he deliberately
lent himself to its endorsation by drawing
inferences favorable to the parties whom it
sought to exculpate? Such a supposition
is inconceivable, even the Times would not
have the hardihood, to give it voice, and
yet unless it regards the Bishop's conduct
in this light the words it dares to use in
the concluding paragraphs of its article of
Tuesday last are. meaningless. It states
specifically that it finds it hard to discuss
his action "in respectful language." That
he has "sought to stifle inquiry by dragging in a spurious confession," and "to
lend his authority to an attempt to hush
tip legitimate curiosity on a subject regarding which a grievous wrong has been done
a great party in this city, and its candidate." Its final comment is "the whole
tone of the Bishop's letter leaves (sic) the
inevitable inference that he is more
anxious for the protection of the sinners
than he is for those against whom they
sinned." This is plain speaking, and unless the Times uses such language without
realizing its correct meaning it lays itself
open to the charge of wilfully misrepresenting Bishop Perin in the grossest possible manner. That there is no justification for these inferences goes without saying. If they contained a scintilla of truth
the Bishop would be unfit, not merely for
the sacred office which he has filled with
such credit to himself, and such advantage to his church and country; but he
would sink if possible beneath the level of
the editor of a scurrilous political sheet.
Unless The Week is greatly mistaken the
Times will have to take back every word
it has said with reference to His Lordship.
In its zeal to score a political advantage
it has committed a "faux pas" which will
not be overlooked either by the members
of the Anglican Church or by the general
public. Such an attack upon Bishop
Perrin is an outrage for which no warranty exists in the premises. It is a gratuitous insult from which a blameless life
and invaluable Christian service should
have held him exempt. There can be but
one result and that to deepen disgust at the
methods, which unfortunately are too
much in evidence now-a-days in the conduct of political warfare.
Attention has been called to
An Imperial the fact that Captain Clive
Navy. Phillips-Wolley has contri
buted to the February number of the National Beview an article on
The Imperial Navy, with special relation
to the Colonies. The article in question is
at once one of the most forceful and competent which has appeared on the subject.
Captain Wolley is not only intensely loyal
but he may be regarded as an expert on
the subject of Imperial Defence, in connection with which he enjoys an International reputation. His services in connection with the Navy League are too well
known to need recital. Among the many
loyal Britishers who keep alive the Imperial sentiment in this new Western country ne is the one stalwart, who never
wearies of his subject, and who is never
so effective as when he is dealing with it
either on the platform or in the press.
Captain Wolley rendered his first conspicuous service to the cause of Imperial
Federation when he penned one of the
finest patriotic poems of modern times
some sixteen years ago. . The Sea Queen
Wakes" is a poem upon which any writer
might well be content to rest his fame.
It fairly divides the palm with William
Watson's great paean "The Purple East."
Having put his hand to the plough, Captain Wolley never turns back. From time
to time he stirs the turgid waters of
Western journalism with his vigorous Imperialistic note, and there is little doubt
that it will go on sounding as long as he
lives. His incursion into English journals
have been more numerous of late, and today he is the one Canadian writer who
links the dawning spirit of Imperial aspiration in Canada to the awakened interest
of the Mother country. When Canada
makes its first practical contribution to
Imperial defence its achievement will be
due in no small measure to the advocacy
of Captain Clive Phillips-Wolley.
Evidence is accumulating
The Hudson's that the Hudson's Bay
Bay Route. Eoute is going to revolutionize the Canadian transportation problem. The Week makes no
excuse for keeping this great project in
the public eye. Its every movement is
followed not merely with National, but
almost with Universal interest, because it
means cheaper; bread for the millions of
toilers in the British Isles. In five years
from date, if not in less, a line will be
drawn due North and South through
Moose Jaw or thereabouts. Most of the
wheat grown East of that line will be
shipped to, Europe by way of Hudson's
Bay at a reduction in cost of at least ten
cents a bushel. Most of the wheat west
of tliat line will be shipped to Europe and
the Orient by way of Vancouver, Prince
Bupert or some other Pacific Coast port.
When these projects were first investigated
and endorsed fifteen years ago by Hugh
Sutherland he was scoffed at and dubbed
an impracticable visionary. When three
years ago Dr. A. P. Low, the respected
head of the Geological Department, reported that the route was feasible and the
great Inland Sea and its approaches
navigable for a sufficient period to admit
of shipping wheat, his critics declared that
he was dealing with a subject which he
did not understand. The best answer to
these pessimists is found in the fact that
already two railway charters have been
granted for railway construction from the
wheat fields of the Middle West to FOrt
Churchill. It is no longer a question of
destination but of route. And now comes
the pioneer settler of Fort Churchill, William Beech, who has reached Winnipeg
with two dog trains. Mr. Beech, who has
the experience of a life-time behind him,
laughs at the suggestion that Hudson's
Bay is only navigable for a short period
each year, and says that with the assistance Of ice breakers the route can he kept
open as long as the St. Lawrence route;
and no Canadian is likely to forget that a
very notorious icebreaker, the Montcalm,
is busily engaged in the St. Lawrence.
One by one the objections to the Hudson's
Bay route are disappearing and the conversion of the highway which the Adventurers of that great company have traversed for more than two centuries will
soon become the grain artery from the new
to the Old world.
Dr. .Young, the Provincial
The Civil Secretary, has succeeded in
Service Bill.     solving a difficult problem
affecting the regulation and
superannuation of Civil Servants. He
has brought to its consideration those high
qualities of intellect and training for
which he is distinguished and the result is
the production of a clean cut, definite,
measure which compares favorably with
any which has been introduced in the
Local Legislature. The Bill further enjoys
the distinction of being the pioneer
measure of its kind, for while the subject has been agitated in every province
of Canada, and is even now under consideration by the Federal Parliament this is
the first piece of legislation which has
been actually introduced Dr. Young's procedure has been characterized by caution
and thoroughness, and the result is an
amount of detail which, whilst perplexing
to a layman, is obviously necessary from
an administrative standpoint. The
measure provides for a graduating scale
of pay embracing every department of the
Civil Service, and the graduation is so
scientific that the weakness of the Englisji
system, which robs the lower branches of
the Service in order that the heads of departments may get large pensions is entirely obviated. The next sterling merit is
that whilst seniority counts in promotion it
only counts in conjunction with merit, so
that both on entering the Service and on
promotion adequate tests of character and
competency are provided for. It is not
necessary to discuss the equity of pensions,
the principle has been universally accepted, it only remains to see that it is applied
in a proper manner. In the present instance whilst the enforced retirement of a
number of old men in the local Service
will cause heavy demands to be made on
the Treasury as soon as the Bill conies
into operation there will be something
more than a corresponding advantage in
removing from the service so large a number of high priced officers, and in the end
the arrangement will prove not only equitable but economical. The Bill will be considered in fuller detail in next issue, but
a mere cursory glance is sufficient to emphasize the above advantages, and to satisfy the most exacting critic that it is not
only an honest but an able attempt to deal
with a difficult and pressing subject.
2
<
The defeat of the Conserva-
A Conservative tive party at the late elec-
Policy. tions in Canada is generally
admitted to be due to the
want of a definite policy, but the real reasons for the want of confidence shewn by
the people must be looked for much deeper.
The Party today is in the position of the
English  army  before  Agincourt,   it  is
starved and disheartened;   its weapons,
such as they are, hacked and bent;   its
armour is rusty, and that treacherous
lance,  Protection,  with which  it once
fought and won, is now flourished over its
astonished head by the exultant Liberals.
It is not too much to say that the future
of Canada today depends on the Conservative Party, for the future of the country
depends on the ordered development of her
natural resources, and it is, as always, to
the Conservatives that the people will look
for   that  far-seeing   statesmanship that,
while providing for the present, will not
sacrifice the future.    The Conservative
Party should by inheritance represent the
agricultural and land owning classes, and
those other real producers of wealth whose
interests are inalienably identified with the
products of nature.    For it is on the
natural productions of the country that its
prosperity depends.   The manufacturers,
the trades, and the common carriers, are
the conveniences of civilization organized
for the benefit of the undoubted wealth
producers of the state, but they create
nothing, and their occupation would be
gone if the natural resources of the country became exhausted.    It follows then
that the protection of industries becomes ______
a matter of trivial importance; for the ^ Q
wealth producers, having provided foAJ /
their own necessities, have obviously the
right to buy anything else they desire
wherever they like. This then is the opportunity of the Conservative Party, to
take as their policy the real interests of
Canada, and the question "When shall
England see again such a King Harry?"
may be answered here in our Dominion in
a larger and nobler sense by the leader
whose fiery words shall inspire the people
to snatch victory from their too confident
opponents, by insisting on that sane statesmanship which alone can give Canada that
prosperity and happiness which her position as the geographical centre of the Empire, and her resources give her every right
to expect. It may be asked how the resources of Canada are to be developed.
The Colonies were first planted "to provide a home for the surplus population of
England, and to become markets for her
manufactures," and as it is population that
Canada needs and England has a surplus
of, that difficulty is disposed of. The same
facts apply to manufactures. England is
suffering today from over-manufacturing,
and as Canada needs manufacturing centres to supply her own necessities, and provide markets for her farm products, English manufacturers should move to a country where they will obtain cheap land and
power, and abundant raw material, and be
able to house their work people on the
most, approved plans. The cry of the preference for foreign labour may be disre-
(Continued on Page Four.) THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBKUARY 27   1909.
ifif ifipifififififififipif
if *
* A Lady's Letter *
if " «#
if By  BABETTE. ^
♦ \ *
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Dear Madge:
How to keep a man when he wants
to go—that is a question that almost
every woman has to ask herself in
bitterness of spirit some time in her
life; and the tragedy of it is that
ninety-nine women in every hundred
answer it in the wrong way. They
have not that insight into human nature, and especially man's nature,
which would enable them to act in
the right way in a crisis of the emotions. A woman who does know
something of the secret springs of
action in a man's heart, Miss Emily
Cole gives advice to her sister-women. The only way to hold a man,
she declares, is to - let him go, and
this is how she explains the apparent
paradox:—
Be he husband or be he lover, when
a mail's affections begin to wane,
when his passion begins to grow cold,
there is absolutely nothing to be done
about it save to bow gracefully and
beautifully to the inevitable. All the
arts and artifices recommended by the
beauty specialists, all the subtle and
delicate strategy of the cleverest and
most beautiful Woman in the world,
will avail nothing with damsel or
dame when a man reaches that stage
of development in his relations with
her which she, recognizing with all
the quickness, of her woman's intuition, precipitately characterises in her
perturbed consciousness as a radical
change in the heart of he man himself.
As a matter of fact nothing of the
sort has necessarily happened at all.
The man is simply coming through
one of the perfectly natural arid, what
is more to the point in the scheme
of nature, entirely to be desired mutations in his sex relationship. What
every, woman doesn't know, and the
thing she cannot learn too soon if
She would have any modicum of happiness, is the inevitability pf this so-
called "change" arid the necessity that
she should on her part recognize it,
not as a terrible cataclysm, not as
something to be met with bitterness
and futile resistance, but as something wholesome and sane" and natural
as the first flush of love itself. She
has got to learn that true and honest
love constantly changes arid renews
itself in an endless succession of
guises and manifestations, precisely
as everything else in nature, including the human organism itself, moves
in endless mutations.
Every woman doesn't know, but she
ought to know, that if the man who
loves her, or who says he does
(which is the same thing really) is
not a scoundrel, she never need have
any fear of losing his love, provided
she does one thing. And that thing
is to meet this issue set forth above,
this crisis which will come sooner or
later—to meet it, not as though she
were a sentimental guinea pig, with
endless weeping and bitter recrimination, but as Nature intended it should
be met—like a woman.
That is, let the poor man go. Don't
try to make him play a role he is no
longer fitted to play. For Nature is
even now rehearsing him in another
and better role, and if you will but
give him a little time, he will eventually carry you oft your feet with an
altogether new and different, and, if
you will only believe it, better species of emotion. No, Nature never
designed that any one phase of emotional or spiritual development should
last a day, an hour, a single moment,
beyond its due tenure. And Nature, it
is well to remember, will always have
her way.
Rightly appreciating this psychological law, the woman of insight and
imagination will quickly adapt herself
to the altering conditions. Seeing
these changes coming—and any woman is quick enough to see them long
before the man has become consciously aware of their operations—what
does the average woman do?
Well, she does a variety of things
with the precision and invariability of
clockwork. The conduct of one woman in a situation of this kind is
the archetype of the conduct of all
women. For, while women are as
various and multi-colored as the flowers of the field in their love, they are
in their jealousies as monotonous and
uniform as peas in a pod.
Her first step is to resort to the
tortures and self-analysis of retro-
spec tion. How different it was a
year ago! two years ago! What did
I do, then, what did I leave undone
that is responsible for his change towards me? Did I weary him with too
much love, too much devotion? Or,
perchance, was I not sentimental
enough?—doubts planted in her mind
by a too liberal interpretation of these
psuedo-psychologists who write claptrap problem novels.
1 have already intimated that when
a man says he loves a woman, he
usually does, if a woman would only
have a little more faith in a man who
says, "I love you," she would be saved
a great deal of unhappiness. If women will only stop to think they will
recognise the truth of this statement.
For, contrary to the popular and ridiculous superstition, it is like pulling
teeth to make the average man—that
is, the average decent man—say those
thre little words, "I love you." He
may say anything else under the sun
without a blush for his mendacity;
he will swear solemn oaths that he
will be eternally faithful; he will declare until he is black in the face that
she and she alone is his one and only
love; he will commit suicide or take
to strong drink all for the love of her,
and yet all the while he may be lying
to her and know in his heart that he
lies. But these three simple little
words, "I love you," he has refrained
from saying, unless he meant them.
If then, some man has told you
that he loved you, told you- seriously
and earnestly so, and there has since
come over him a certain change of
feeling, there*is but one thing to do.
Don't rush to a beauty doctor or suddenly take to improving your mind.
I assume, of course, that up to date
you have paid the Ordinary attention'
such as any woman of breeding and
common-sense devotes to her intellect
and complexion. No.recalcitrant man
was ever ltired back by a sudden affectation of ribbon-run lingerie or as-
sumed-to-order smiles such as the
heart specialist recommends he shall
be greeted with upon his return from
an honest day's work. Nothing of the
sort. The impulse which most normal men feel when they run up
against obviously patent tactics of
this sort is to heave a brick.
All a man wants when he reaches
a crisis of this kind is to be let severely alone. He wants to talk about anything in the world save sentiment or
emotion, and he wants to do anything
in the world save to be obliged to
declare himself.
And this is what most women refuse to allow him to do. They insist
upon his laying bare his whole miserable, sick soul, and allowing them to
analyse it to the last degree, in the
vain hope that perhaps in some delicate and sensitive spot they may have
the satisfaction of seeing a quiver.
And this women do, not because they
are cruel, not because they consciously mean to be bores, but simply because they are vain, and their wounded vanity is soothed if they can succeed in arousing something of the old
responsiveness.
But what every woman doesn't
know is that this well-meant vivisection of a man's feelings is the most
dangerous of all the things which she
ought not to do. Just let him alone.
Let him alone and surprise him. He
doesn't expect you to let him alone.
By experience or by intuition he
knows only too well that you are not
going to let him alone. He has convinced himself that purgatory is ahead
of him. Surprise him, and thus produce a violent -reaction.
The result will be that all the
king's horses and all the king's men
couldn't pull him away from your
side. And the best of it all is that
he will never again go from your
side. You will enjoy a special advantage because in all probability he
has never met a woman like you—
one who had the tact to let him go I
when he wanted to.
_
3
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1.1 1  5  i^Ss
■*                             ";-■ .--5i
£?-__ui_.Jm-   1	
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Tea Room.
y We grow our own produce.       Parties catered to and tables reserved.
Cosy Corner Cafe and Tea Rooms
616 Fort Street. ' PHONE 1440
NOW OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.
The Victoria Turkish Baths
Situated at 821 Fort Street, were opened to the Publis last Tuesday.
The following are the prices that prevail:—
Turkish Baths $1.25, 10 Tickets, $10.00
Russian Baths, (Plain)  $1.25, 10 Tickets, $10.00
Russian Baths (with Pine.Oil)       $1.50
Electric Light Baths  .$1.50
Electric Light Baths, for Local Heating .$1.00
Salt Rub      "." ............f. .50c
Alcohol Rub .; 50c
Oil Rub 50c
Massage, Local — ,  $1.00
Body Massage, General $1.00
Vibration, Local 50c
Vibration, Body   .$1.50
Plain Tub Baths 25c
Needlesshower .25c
MEDICAL BATHS:
Salt Baths .".,..' 75c
Soda Baths '. :".  75c
Potash Baths 75c
Pine Needle Oil Baths  $1.00
Campfin Baths 75c
Malt Baths 75c
Bran Baths  .75c
Sulphur Baths  75c
Mustard Baths .-;.."•  ....75c
Manheim Baths   $1.50
NO TIPS ALLOWED. Phone 1856.
No, madam, he has not forgotten
you, he will not forget you. Be assured of that. Men never forget a
woman whom they have once sincerely and honestly loved, and for that
reason see to it, that his memories of
you are agreeable.
And remember that if the worst
does come to the worst, and you
should lose his love, see to it that
you do not lose his respect. For after all the most glorious and altogether desirable thing a woman can
wish for in the heart of a man who
iri the beginning has loved her with
mad passion is respect, an infinite and
awful respect. For respect, while it
cuts but a sorry figure before marriage, if after marriage the most
powerful weapon a woman can possess. For then respect is the charm
by which she binds him to her for all
the rest of her days, in sickness and
in health, in triumph and in adversity,
until death do then part.
True respect is only love spelled
backward, passion rarified. And the
one sure way for a woman to win it
from husband, sweetheart, or lover is
not to hold him when he wants to go.
Y. M. C. A.
40 BROAD STREET.
Smoke Dudleigh's
Famous Blend
THE PEER OF ALL
MIXTURES.
Do not be put off with any
other.
To be had only at
£i£L Richardson
Phone 346
MAPS
OF
Timber and Land.
The   kind   that   show   what's
taken  up and  what's  vacant.
Electric Blue Print & Map Co.
1218 Langley Street
Victoria. B. C.
Do You Dread
MaWe-mer?
Many people here dread even
the short sail to Vancouver or
Seattle because just a slight mo- i
.tion of the boat will cause them
distress.
SEASICKNESS
TABLETS '
PRICE—25c.
Not only cure mal-de-mar, but
positively prevent it. Call here
and let us supply you with a
box. These excellent Tablets
are the delight of sufferers who.
know.
GYRUS H BOWES.
CHEMIST
Govt. St., Near Yates.
VICTORIA, BC.
A Skin af Beauty ia a Joy Porerer
OB. T. PBUX OOUBAVS'I
Oriental Cream
ob K&axou BEinrmzi
Pnrlfles as well as Biautittss the Wa.
No other cosmetic will do It.
Romovos Tan, Pimples, Frscklts, Moth
Patches, Rash and Skin diseases, arid
•vary blemish on beauty, and defies detection. It has stood the test of (0
years; no other has, and Is se harmless—w« taste it to bs sure lt is pro-
parly made. Accept no counterfoil of
similar name. Tho distinguished Or. _
A. Sayrs said to a lady of tho haut-ton,
(a patient). "As you ladies will us*
thorn,*I recommend 'Oourand's Cream' as
tho loast harmful of all tho Skin preparations,"
For sale by all druggists and Fancy
Goods Dealers.
aOOBAUB'S OBXSST-U TOUXZ
POWSXB
For Infants and adults.   Exquisitely perfumed.'   Relievos Skin Irritations, euros
Sunburn and renders an excellent complexion.
Price as ooats, fcy mall.
OOtTBAUD'I  POUSSE ftUBHLB
Removes superfluous Hair.
Price «1.00, by mall.
PBBD. T. BOPXXVI, Prop.,
S7 Stoat Jeaes St,        How Tod
AT  HENDERSON  BROS
Wholesale Distributors.
Taaoonror aaa Tlotorla. B.O.
Stewart Williams.
E. E. Hardwick.
MESSRS.
Stewart Williams
& Co.
Auctioneers and Commission
Agents,
Beg to inform the public that
Mr. Nasr has arrived and is
disposing of his magnificent collection of
ORIENTAL RUGS,
EMBROIDERIES, and
BRASSWARE
at exceedingly low prices.
An Auction Sale will be held
tonight,
SATURDAY AT 8.30 p.m.
The Auctioneer
STEWART  WILLIAMS.
WING ON
Employment Agent.
Wood and Coal for Sale.
Also Scavenging.
1709 Government St. Phone __.
VICTORIA, B.C. THE WEKK SATURDAY FEBRUARY 27, 1909
Trust Us to Save
Your Money
CARNATION CREAM, two tins for  .25c
"CANADA FIRST" CREAM, two tins for....' 25c
ST. CHARLES CREAM, two tins for .25c
JERSEY CREAM, two tins for  25c
REINDEER MILK, two tins for  25c
COFFEE AND MILK, Regal 25c
COFFEE AND MILK, Reindeer 30c
EXTRACT OF COFFEE, per bottle  25c
PATENT BARLEY, per tin  23c
PATENT GROATS, per. tin .25c
PEA FLOUR, per sack  25c
DIXI H. ROSS CO.
Independent Grocers and Liquor Merchants.
The Silver Spring
Brewery, Ld,
Under New Management
Brewers of High Grade English Ale
and Stout.
Tate's Celebrated Ale.
The Silver Spring Brewery, Limited, has purchased the old
establisshed business of the Messrs. Fairall and is now prepared
to do a large domestic and export trade. THE HIGHEST
GRADE MALT AND HOPS ARE USED BY US.
Phone 893
VICTORIA, B. C.
Victoria Fuel Co.
PHONE 1377
You want the best Coal, the "Burn all" kind, absolutely free
from Slate, Stones and Klinkers.
We are Sole Agents for The South Wellington Coal Mines
Company (Ltd.I.
THIS COAL is admitted by all to be the finest Domestic Coal
mined.
Let us know if you want it quick.
VICTORIA FUEL COMPANY
PHONE 1377 618 TROUNCE AVE.
When the wind doth blow and the rain doth soak
And the mercury dives its deepest
The theme most engaging to people is
SOKE
AND HOW TO BUY IT THE CHEAPEST.
Perhaps the cheapest is to send here for it; only $4 per ton that
way. But we deliver Coke anywhere within the city limits for
$5 per ton.
PHONE 123 IF YOU WOULD LIKE A TON SENT
TO YOUR HOUSE OR OFFICE.
Mix Coke with coal for furnace, stove or grate fires and your fuel
bills will be practically cut in half.
Victoria Gas Company, Limited
Corner Fort and Langley Streets.
OFFICE EQUIPMENT
TYPEWRITERS,
SAFES, DESKS,
■*   BAXTER & JOHNSON
CASH REGISTERS,
FILING CABINETS,
809 Government Street
Victoria, B. C.
If it's for the Office—aak us.
* Social and        *
t Personal. J
t ip
aI* t.MiT >m __.___.< »___■ im «_!>• —_—• _A\a _____________ __________» *<m *______*
Miss Olive Bryden returned home
from Vancouver, where she had been
staying with friends.
Mr. F. S. Hussey is progressing
favorably, and has left the hospital.
* . *   w.
Mrs. Nelson, Blanchard street, left
for England last Tuesday on an extended trip.
* *   *
Mrs. Cleghom is the guest of Mrs.
Fitzherbert  Bullen, Esquimalt.
* *   *
Mrs. Bridgeman and Miss Drake
leave shortly for England, where tliey
intend spending six months.
w   w   w
Miss Norie, of Duncans, was a visitor in Victoria during tne week.
* .*-  *
Miss Netta Heyland is spending a
month or so in Calgary.
Mrs. D. R. Ker entertained a few
friends at bridge last Tuesday.
* *  **,
Mrs. Percy Shallcross, Vancouver,,
after spending a few days with Mr.
and Mrs. Shallcross, Foul Bay road,
returned to Vancouver on Monday.
* *    W" '
Miss Evelyn Silton has been the
guest of Mrs. Hinde-iibwker, in Vancouver.
* *   *
Miss Winona Troupe left on Thursday for Vancouver to pay a short
visit.
* *   *
Miss Martan, of Vancouver, has
been the guest of ^rs. Roger Wilby,
Dunsmuir road, during the week.
* *   * ■
Mrs. Love, Burdette.. a venue, has
been the guest of Mrs. J. S. Vallace in
Vancouver, during the past week.
www
The Fives Court, Work Point Barracks, on Monday evening was the
scene of a most delightful dancer
when Major Bennet entertained his
friends. The courf was gracefully
draped with flags and bunting, the
platform being utilized for sitting out
purposes. .
The supper was served in 'the
officer's mess, which was also tastefully decorated for the occasion.
Among the invited guests were:
Mrs. Bodwell, Mrs. Eliot, Mrs. Genge,
Mrs. Edwardes, Mrs. Lampman, Mrs.
Hughes, Mrs. Parry, Mrs. Furlonger,
and the Misses Vera and Doris
Mason, M. Langley, F. Gillespie, F.
Drake, N. Bell, M. Butchart, N.
Coombe, N. Mara, M. Pitts, O. Bryden, Eva Holmes, Beth Irving, G.
Irving, A. Pooley, V. Pooley, Papla
Irving M. Dunsmuir, Muriel Dunsmuir, G. Perry, M. Little, and Captain
Parry, Captain Hughes, Captain Sullivan, Captain McDonald, Dr. Taylor,
Messrs. Hagerty Eaton, N. C. Dougal,
Bodwell, Davis, Wickham, Elliot,
Gore, Langton, Bromley, Johnson,
Rithet, Templeton, Landry, B. Irving,
B. Parker, T. James, Holland, W.
Todd, D. Gilespie, Furlonger, Hebden,
M. Mason, J. Cambie, D. Bullen, Monteith Lowry.
* *   *
The numerous friends of Miss Ellen
Tayleur, third daughter of the late
Mr. and Mrs. Henry T. Tayleur, of
Brynyffynon, Rutlin, North Wales,
will be interested to hear of her approaching marriage, which takes place
some time during March to Mr. A. E.
Lilly-Wynn, Esq., late of Christ-
church, New Zealand. Miss Tayleur,
who resided at Rocabella during her
visit to Victoria some sixteen years
ago, was extremely popular in Victoria society, and had a large circle of
friends here.
* * .*' *
Mr. and Mrs. P. 0. Dodds, of Chemainus,   were   visitors   in   Victoria
during the week.
* *   *
Major Bennett entertained a few
friends at dinner at the Empress on
Tuesday evening.
* *   *
Mrs.. S. Wise left by Tuesday's
boat for Vancouver to pay an extended visit.
* *   *
Mrs. Stretfield came in from Saanich for a few days this week.
* *   *
Mr. Jack Brown, on the staff of thc
Canadian Bank of Commerce in Vancouver, after eight weeks leave spent
in Honolulu and Victoria, returned to
his duties last Tuesday.
Mr. William Blakesm ire left last
Wednesday on the Seattle boat for
Portland and the south and will be
absent from the city about a week.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take  notice that David H.  Bale, or
Victoria, contractor, intends to apply for
permission   to   purchase   the  following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 3 miles south of Indian
house on Salmon River; thence south so
chains;  thence  east  40  chains;  thence
north SO chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commeneement.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
DAVID   H.   BALE.
Feb.   27 J.  R.  Morrison,  Agent.
Those who desire Claret, Sauterne or Burgundy at their best
should select the unique brands of G. Preller & Co. Preller's
Claret is the claret of our forbears—perfectly ripened, thoroughly aged, a dinner wine that cannot fail but please the
critical. Preller's Sauterne is a true test of the vintner's
skill and of his honesty—delicate, yet full flavored. Preller's
Burgundy is as rich as port wine and as delicate as champagne—the very essence of the perfect grape. Your dealer
can supply these unmatched wines. Call for them at your
cafe, club or hotel. Look for the name "G. Preller ft Co."
on the label. Imported direct by Pither ft Leiser, cor. Fort
and Wharf Sts., Victoria; Water St, Vancouver.
ROOFING SLATE
Pacific Slate Company, Ltd.
UNFADING BLUE BLACK
Non-Oxidizing
ALL STANDARD SIZES
HEAD  OFFICE-CHANCERY CHAMBERS
YARD-HUDSON'S BAY WHARF
■ For Prices and Particulars apply to
J. S. FLOYD, Secretary-Treasurer
f
♦■
♦
EMPRESS THEATRE
Cor. Government and Johnson Sts.
HIGH CLASS MOVING PICTURES   AND ILLUSTRATED SONGS.
COMPLETE  CHANGE OF PROGRAM   EACH   MONDAY
WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY.
CONTINUOUS PERFORMANCE.       a to 5.30. and 7 to 10:30 p.m.
Admission—10 cents.
Children's Matinee Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday—5 cents.
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
Chas Hayward, President. F. Caselton, Manager.
R. Hayward, Secretary.
We make a specialty of undertaking and can give the best
possible service, for the reason that we have everything modern
both for embalming and general work.
We carry the largest and best assortment of goods in our line
in British Columbia.
Ali calls are attended to promptly, by an experienced staff, day
or night, and our prices are always reasonable.
Phones—48, 594, 1905, 305 or 404.
1016 Qovernment St. Victoria, B. C.
JAMES BUCHANAN & CO.
By Royal Warrants
PURVEYORS TO THE ROYAL FAMILY.
Distillers of the
WORLD-FAMOUS RED SEAL AND BLACK AND WHITE
SCOTCH WHISKIES.
Unsurpassed for AGE, PURITY or FLAVOR.
For Sale by all Dealers.
General Agents for B.C. and the Yukon District.
RADIGER & JANION, THE WEEK, SATURDAY FEBRUARY ao, 1909
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"IHE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Pabllshed at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
83% Government Street.. .Victoria, B.C.
626     Hastings Street.. .Vancouver, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE..Manager and Editor
Life's Little
Ironies.
By Bohemian
It is a good many years since
Thomas Hardy wrote his famous skit
on "Life's Little Ironies." Human
nature has not changed in the interval
but the conditions under which we
live are in many respects essentially
different, and the result is to accentuate some of the older eccentricities
of human nature and to bring into
prominence others which are more or
less the product of latter day civilization.
Hardy was greatly impressed in
his day with the kind of experience
indicated by the Psalmist who regarded the greatest of life's little ironies
as experienced by the wicked man
who ''spread himself like a bay tree,"
while the God fearing, honest living
man often went supperless to bed.
If the Psalmist was unable to furnish
a satisfactory explanation it is not to
be wondered at the the seer of Wes-
sex failed. Both alike found no solution within the compass of time, and
would fain have us believe that thc
Divine controller of human events
would even up things in the hereafter
by the application of a vaguely surmised . law of compensation. For
three thousand years the less fortunate members of the race have comforted themselves with this theory,
and just now by all accounts they are
demanding as large a share of comfort as in any preceding age.
The occasion is furnished by the
marvellous rapidity and the not less
marvellous facility, with which the
few unworthy ones are able to appropriate the public domain. I am no
statistician and have but the vaguest
recollection of the figures which have
been carefully collated by coldblooded compilers as to the per cent-
age of people, say in the United
States and Canada, who are millionaires, but I know from my standpoint they are distressingly few, whilst
the figure which looms largest is that
which tells of the number of people
whose income is below one thousand
dollars a year.
It is proverbial that politics on this
continent are dirty, and it has again
and again been urged that no self-
respecting man can afford tp dabble in
them, but nothing is more striking
than the certainty with which those
who forge their way to the front in
political life become seized of extensive possessions. The funny part of
it is that while the press from ocean
to ocean reeks with charges of graft,
the matter is never pursued beyond
the most elementary stage, and in
Canada at any rate we have yet to
chronicle the first instance of a successful politician being compelled to
disgorge ill-gotten gains. Now the
irony of the situation appears to me
to be this, that according to the beautiful democratic idea which is
preached from every political platform on this continent the country
belongs to the people, with a capital
P. The people pay the taxes, the
people elect the government, the people sweat and toil, tear each others
hair, burst their collar buttons, and
indulge in much profain language in
the enunciation of, or for the defence
of, what their leaders are humorously
pleased to call political principles; but
when they have exhausted themselves
they find that they are minus many
oboli, and much expended energy,
whilst the infinitesimal few have
gathered in the spoils of wal. But
you may say if these facts are known
how does the game manage to go on?
The answer is very simple. No sooner
does one of the rank and file become
clever enough to get "next" than he
joins the smart brigade and passes
from the ranks of the impecunious
majority to those of the affluent minority.
Things, however, are carefully arranged so that the migration shall be
extremely limited, and not too frequent. The close season extends
over most of the year, and the portals
are carefully guarded. I think there
are few of my readers who will not
agree that this is one of "life's little
ironies," and there is another like
unto it, which is that in the rank and
file are found men "of far Higher personal character and endowments, far
greater intellectual ability, and far
greater aptitude for public service
than is to be found among nine tenths
of those who gravitate to the front
seats; but they are deficient in the
one esential which would make them
subservient to ignoble purposes.
Whenever I consider this subject
I have to fall back upon my inherent
streak of optimism which enables me
to smile at the cavortings of those
who, dressed in little brief authority,
fret and fume upon the stage of human affairs, whilst unconsciously the
very stage on which they move is
daily drifting nearer to that cataclysm
which will at no distant date engulf
the pernicious systems of political
chicanery which serve their day, but
whose doom is already indicated in
many a legislative asesmbly by "the
handwriting on the wall."
A CONSERVATIVE POLICY.
(Continued from Page One.)
garded. To the exploiting capitalist foreign labour may be preferable, but it is the business of statesmen to ensure the profitable employment of their own populace.
Having provided for her own necessities Canada should await
calmly the would-be purchasers of
her surplus products. Her natural
products happen to be what all the
world wants, and will want in increasing ratio as the years go on.
What folly is it then that makes
treaties with foreign countries to
take products they must take in
any case ? Canada has no need to
make treaties. Placed as she is
with an ocean on -either hand, and
her back against the inviolate
north, what resources of agricultural land, of timber, of minerals,
of fish, does she lack. What concern has she with trade or traffic.
Let other people, less happily
placed, fetch and carry for her. It
is the happiness of her own kin,
to whom has been entrusted these
stores of wealth, that should be the
constant care of her statesmen, the
development of this wealth, not
feverishly or with waste, but according to the requirements of the
time, husbanding it for the good
of mankind.
A two year old child at Atlantic
City asked police headquarters
through the telephone to send an
officer to the house. When he arrived
the child said: "I told nurse I'd get
a policeman if she didn't let me sail
my brother's boat." The child wept
when her demands for the arrest of
her nurse were refused.
CORRESPONDENCE
The Week accepts no responsibility
for the views expressed by fts correspondents.
Communications will be Inserted
whether signed by the real name of
the writer or a nom de plume, but the
writer's name and address must be
given to the Editor as an evidence of
bona fides. In no case will it be
divulged without consent.
Note These Prices on
Sterling Silver
TEASPOONS, good weight (half-dozen)........... $4.05
heavy " "    5.15
extra " "    6.30
DESSERTSPOONS,   good " "       9.45
heavy " "  11.00
extra "-■ ."  13.05
TABLESPOONS,       good " "   13.50
heavy " " .....:  14.60
extra " "   16.20
DESSERT FORKS,    good " "     9.45
*"-..'-.  "*-;v ■:.-;.-•. ■ --heavy " " ........... 'mm
" " extra " " ........... 12.80
TABLE SPOONS,       good " "  13.50
" *f|'f| ..        f%    »«eavy ** .  ;",.'"  ...'..w,I. ^4.85.
"     •   " ;|     extra " " ........... 16.20
The above prices are exceptionally close and the goods of first
quality including among others the popular Louis XV. Strasbourg
and Newcastle patterns.
Challoner & Mitchell
Diamond Merchants and Silversmiths
1017 Qovernment Street
Victoria, B. C.
Conclusive Argument
"Would yer be kind enough to help
er poor man?   I ain't got nothin' in
de world but dis gun an' it's old an'
likely to. go off by itself any time."
Logical
"Do you play any instrument, Mr.
limp?"
"Yes, I'm a cornetist."
"And your sister?"
"She's a pianist."
"Does your mother play?"
.   "She's a zitherist."
"And your father?"
"He's a pessimist."
Prayer Was Answered
Little Dorothy, at the age of six,
was very thoughtless regarding the
care of her clothes and the many
admonitions she had received about
neatly arranging her clothes on a
chair each night before retiring were
daily forgotten.
One night, just as she was ready
for bed, her mother came in, and,
finding the little garments in a heap
on the floor, as usualTsaid, "Dorothy,
you may say your prayers and then
mother will have to punish you for
not minding her about your clothes."
Having said this she stepped into the
adjoining room and partially closed
the door.
In a few moments she heard Dorothy, who was a firm believer in the
power of prayer, repeat: "Now I lay
me," and after the "amen" she heard
this appeal: "And, dear Lord, if ever
you wanted to help a little kid, now's
your chance."
Editor The Week.
Dear Sir,—Can you spare me a
small space in which to ask you if
you can find any reason why passengers on the B. C. Electric cars to the
Willows should on reaching that point
be inconvenienced by the light being
turned off before allowing their passengers to get off. We are regular
passengers and have complained of
this nuisance several times, but have
only been insulted by the conductors
who reply: "Sit in the car until we
turn it on again." I have complained
at the office without result., Where
is the hurry when this particular car
has several minutes to wait? It is an
ill-lighted country road and consequently not very safe when you reach
the step to find you are suddenly
thrown into darnkess. Damages will
certainly be the result some day, as
we have already saved one old lady
from falling off the step. It seems
to me that in Victoria the employees
of the different firms do very much
as they choose, hence the disgust that
strangers often feel towards our city.
I do riot wish to imply that all the
conductors are insolent; far from it.
There are several of the old men
courteous and kind to their passengers. Why should the company not
insist upon all being the same, but
perhaps after all I am too hard; they
may, like other employees of the same
firm, be "over zealous in the interests
of their company."
A PASSENGER.
Rapid Transit
High Diplomacy
Mrs. Gramercy—You look all tired
out.
Mrs. Park—No wonder: It's so
trying to find out from your friends
what they'd like to have for Christmas without conveying the impression that they may expect it from you;
(Mrs. Blunder has just received a
telegram from India)—"What an admirable invention the telegram isl"
she exclaimed, "when you come to
consider that this message has come
a distance of thousands of miles, and
the gum on the envelope isn't dry
yet."
Natural Selection
Nan—What are you going to wear
to the party this evening?
Fan—Everything that you've told
me isn't becoming to me.
If at first you don't succeed, don't
fritter away your time explaining why.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT.
Coal Prospecting Notice—Tumbo Island.
Notice ls hereby given that Clarice
Blakemore will within 60 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Com-
mlsloner of Lands at Victoria, for a
License to prospect for Coal under the
area described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
extreme westerly end of Tumbo Island
at high water mark; thence north one
mile; thence west one mile; thence south
one mile; thence east one mile to plate
of beginning.
February llth, 1909.
apl 17 CLARICE BLAKEMORE.
38fi8S8888J
We eater
TO SUIT ALL FANCIES AND TASTES
3
Afternoon Teas
Light Lunches
WEDDING CAKES.   BIRTHDAY PARTIES.
Fresh Assortment of Choice Confectionery
and Home-made Chocolates.
©lay's
619 Port St. Phone 101
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88
C. Funeral Furnishing Co'y
1016 Qovernment Street, Victoria, B. C.
Chas. Hayward, Pres.
R. Hayward, Sec.
F. Oaselton, Manager
1
i:
Oldest and most up-to-date
Undertaking Establishment
in B.O.
Established 1867
f§ Telephones—48,   594,   1905,   305,   or   404.
i
I
I
I
I:
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT.
Coal Prospecting Notice—Tumbo Island..
Notice ls hereby given that William
Blakemore will within 60 days from
this date apply to the Assistant commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
License to prospect for Coal under the
area described as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
extreme easterly end of Tumbo Island
at high water mark; thence north one
mile; thence east one mile; thence south
one mile; thence west one mile to the
place of beginning.
February llth, 1909.
apl 17 WILLIAM BLAKEMORE.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT.
Coal Prospecting Notice-r-Tumbo Island.
Notice is hereby given that Barbara
Blakemore will within 60 dayp from
this date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
License to prospect for Coal under the
area described as follows:—
Commencing at a post made on a
stump at the centre of the north shore
of Tumbo Island at high water mark;
thence north one mile; thence east one
mile; thence south one mile; thence west
one mile to the place of beginning,
February llth, 1909.
apl 17 BARBARA BLAKEMORE. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1909
New Arrivals
in Leather
Furniture
Morris Chairs—Chief among the new
arrivals is the line of Morris Chairs.
In these we show many new designs.   The best artists in Mission
• Designing have contributed. Made
in Mission design and finished Early
English. Upholstered in Spanish
Leather.   Price, each $40.00
.Morris Chairs—Another line of Morris Chairs just in. A smaller design, but just as stylish and. worthy.
Priced at, each $35.00
Morris Chairs—Another line of these
popular chairs. These are priced
at a popular price. Selected oak,
leather upholstered.   Each...$30.00
Arm Chairs—A stylish chair style,
in Mission design. Frame is selected oak finished Early English.
Leather upholstered. Each. .*.$25.00
Arm Rockers—A fine rocker style in
both Early English and Golden Fin-:
ished Oak. Upholstered in leather.
Very comfortable.   Each 1.....$18.00
Arm Rockers—Here is a greaty large
rocker style *i» Early English ■finished oak frames. Large leather
cushions.   Price, each :...*... .$35.00
Arm Chairs—An excellent line of arm
chairs at* this price.    Frames are
selected  oak finished  Early  English.   Leather upholstered.
Each    ...,.....$18.00
Couch—In golden oak, upholstered in
either green or maroon leather. An
attractive furniture piece and comfortable, too.   Price, each—$45.00
Couch—A fine couch style in golden
oak. This one is upholstered in
green leather. Finest workmanship
throughout. Price is, each ... $50.00
Earl English finish.   Each. ..$80.00
Suite—A striking three-piece suite
consisting of settee, chair, and
rocker.   Very attractive design.
Davenport Sofa—A large . Davenport
sofa made of selected 6a}c finished
Early    English.     Upholstered ; in
leather.    A handsome piece.
Price   $85-00
Wonderful Showing of Beds
The Broadest Choice We Have Ever Shown
Just give us an opportunity to show you what we consider the grandest collection of handsome beds
ever shown here, a showing that would do credit to a city of much larger proportions. But its greatness
is not alone in its size-^-the superiority of the excellent designs shown would alone distinguish it. The
secret is' in controlling, through large purchase, the best designs of the leading bed factories. Let us show
you the finest stock and the best bed values in the city.
IRON BEDS FROM EACH $4.
Here is a price range on Iron and Iron and Brass
Beds which surely contains one to fit your purse.
Each and every bed from the lowest-priced to the
highest is a worthy one—well made, well finished
and of good design.   Prices range from $4 to $30.
BRASS BEDS AT MANY PRICES
In Brass Beds the choice of designs and the range
of prices is wide indeed. Broad as is the showing
in Iron-Beds, the Brass collection is its equal.
Superiority of design and construction distinguish
these brass beds of ours. Priced from, each $37.50
to $110.
THREE SPLENDID VALUES FROM THIS BIG STOCK
Brass Bedstead—The finest value
in Brass Beds in the city. Pillars 2 inches, top tubes 3-4 inch,
other tubes 5--8 inch. Low priced
at, each :...' $37-50
Iron Bedstead — Vernis Martin
(light gold bronze) finish, varnished. Continuous pillars. A
very attractive bed style. Price
is only--i*..-,-'..........*.......$11.00
Iron Bedstead—A  cream   enamel
finished   bed  with  brass  trim-
1 mings.   This is a very popular
:. style at a popular price.
| Each $18.00
Finest Mattress Values
In Mattresses we show a very complete range of
all styles from the finest hair jhattress to the common excelsior.. In each and every style we offer the
finest values.
We are sole agents for the "famous "Ostef mbor"
mattresses and for the "Restmore",: Mattresses.
These Mattresses are the very best values in .tbe
mattress line.
We sell the "Ostermoor" at Eastern prices—$15.00
Splendid Bedding Values.
■In Spring Mattresses, in cots, camp cots and all
kindred lines you'll find our stock a very complete
one, offering you a very wide choice.
In Bedding, the; Bedding Store will surprise you in
the completeness of its offerings. We sell the very
finest qualities, but the large purchases we make
erlables.us to offer these at easy prices.
Let us show yOu some of our offerings in these
lines.
New "White and Gold" and "Blue Willow" China.
You'll find here a full line of that delightful and popular China—the "White and Gold"—for we have
just received a shipment of those lines of which we were temporarily out of stock. If you have been
waiting for this news you'll be pleased to know that you may now get what you require. If you are
one who has never known this beautiful China we invite you to visit the China Shop and see it.
This is the finest English Bone China, and must not be confused with the common imitations of
this ware sold in competition. You'll find that our buying powers enable us to offer this superior quality
china at the prices Of the ordinary. i,
A shipment of "Blue Willow" has also just arrived, and you may now fill the breaks in this line from
a complete slock. -
TO RETAILERS
Isn't it poor business to
earry a large stock in your
little town when the quantities you require may be purchased from us on short
notice. We help you. Prompt
and satisfactory service guaranteed.
WEILER BROS
Complete Home Furnishers
VICTORIA, B. C.
A New Arrival-
Morris Chair.
Here is a new Morris Chair style-
that'll please you. A large, comfortable chair, made of selected oak,:
finished golden. The back is adjustable to five positions. Fitted
with velour cushions (choice of several colors). This chair has a special feature in the extension front*
or foot rest. This adds greatly to
the comfort-giving qualities of the
chair. Slipper holder, also. Excellent value at $14.00
New Hall Seat.
Here is a New Arrival in the Furniture Store—A Hall Seat. This is a
seat.worthy of special mention for
the design and general "get up" is
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Sporting Comment
I am pleased to see that the lacrosse
[ players of this city have at last started
j to work for 'the coming season. I
have advocated an early start for
some time past, as it is only by an
early start in the season that anything of a showing will be made. It
is also very gratifying to learn that
the local club intends to remain amateur. This is a wise move, as it can
easily be seen that at present professional lacrosse in this province
will not obtain much of a strong hold.
It is all very well for those players
who want to get paid for playing to
start up the cry, but in my opinion
they will find very little sympathy
from the general public. The situation in Victoria is admirably adapted
for a strong team representing the
blue and white, and it will be a great
surprise to me if the Victoria team
does not give both New Westminster
and Vancouver hard games.
Last season the delegates to thc
annual meeting of the B. C. A L. A,
had to beg to get the weakest team
to come to Victoria for their opening
game, but from what I know this w'U
not be the case this year, and it will
be rather surprising if the strongest
team is not asked for. There is one
thing certain, and that is if the Victoria lacrosse players get out and
practice as they should and get in
gbod shape, they will be supported,
-■Whether they win or lose. But when
the supporters of the club see members of the team parading up and
down the streets when practice is
supposed to be going on, it cannot
be expected that they will turn out
["■■to see a game despite anything the
press might say. The success of the
game in this city is up to the players
themselves, and I sincerely hope they
will take advantage of the opinion
that is before them.
Congratulations to Will Chandler of
Vancouver in his victory in Seattle
last Monday in the first real Marathon
race that has ever taken place on the
North Pacific coast. Although the
time was, very slow, he did not have
to exert .himself and it is very probable that had he been given a hard
race the time would have been better.
I was very much amused at the so-
called walking match that was billed
to take place at Oak Bay last Saturday, and to say that it was the greatest fizzle that has ever been perper-
trated on the long-suffering citizens
of Victoria. I quite agree with the
walking enthusiasts who are devoting
considerable of their-time towards
lifting this sport, but unless they can
arrange better matches than this, they
had better leave the game where it
is. Because two men take six or
seven months to walk across the continent, and incidentally I don't think
they would refuse a ride on the cars,
it is no reason why they should be
able to do a fast five miles. In fact,
there were spectators at the park on
Saturday in numbers who could have
done the same as Vaughan. Neither of
his competitors did a fair and square
heel and toe walk, and all they tried
to do was to keep within easy distance of Vaughan by trotting along
after the manner of a Chinaman.
On Saturday .morning the first of
the series for the Pointer cup took
place at Beacon Hill, the contesting
teams being boys' Central and Victoria West In the first half the
teams were pretty evenly matched,
but in the second Central had a slight
advantage, R. Davies putting in the
winning goal from a mix-up in front
of the West's goal. The Central lineup was as follows: Goal, (I. Clarke;
full-backs, R. Goodwin, C. Killpatrick;
half '■-!■ '-s, Parsons, R. Yates (Capt.)
anu _ jiverity; forwards, P. Ness, R.
Davies, A. Aird, N. Grant and R. Mc-
Brady.
If the Victoria Rugby football
players had displayed as much energy
in the matches against Vancouver as
they did against the Wallabies,, the
championship of B. C. would not now
be resting in the Terminal City. The
game at Oak Bay on Thursday afternoon was a great wind-up for a very
poor season, made poor by the apathy
of the players themselves. It is true
that the visitors outplayed the home
players there were times when the
locals gave their opponents all they
could do to hold them. The work of
the back division of the visitors was
a treat to witness, especially the defensive work of Prentice. No better
exhibition of defending the goal has
ever been seen in this city and the
locals can well take some lessons.
Another who was very prominent
was Woods. This player appeared
to be all over the field at the same
time. Although I have given considerable credit to the visitors, I cannot
overlook the brilliant work of some
of the local players. Lowery especially showed that his knowledge of
the game needs very little improving.
At all times he was sure, but the
best part of his work is that he does
it for the team and not for applause
from the grandstand, although at half
time he was treated to a regular ovation which he certainly deserved.
Billy Newcombe played his usual
good, clean, fast game and if the locals took a lesson from him there
would be more victories for the local
club. The secret of the success of
the visitors is the grand combination
work of the entire team and general
knowledge of the (game combined
with aggressiveness.   The locals on
the other hand were rather slow at
times and consequently lost some
chances, although from an impartial
standpoint the locals played iri extremely hard luck and if they had any
luck the score of the home team
would have been much larger.
UMPIRE.
Blakemore will within 60 days from this
date, apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a License to prospect for Coal under the
area described as follows:—
Commencing at a post on a stump at
the centre of the north shore of Tumbo
Island at high water mark; thence north
one mile; thence west one mile; thence
south one mile; thence east one mile
to place of beginning.
February llth, 1909.
apl 17        ARTHUR S. BLAKEMORE.
NOTICB.
NOTICE is hereby given that the Reserve on Lot 29a, Range 4, Coast District, is cancelled.
R. A. RENWICK, "
Deputy Commissioner of
Lands and Works.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., 16th October, 1908.
3 m	
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT.
Coal Prospecting Notice—Tumbo Island.
Notice is hereby given that Arthur S.
Letve Yaur laggag* Cheek* at tha
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 24*.      A. E. KENT, Proprietor
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I THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1909
Why Don't You Use a
GAS RANGE ?
It is so convenient.   It is always ready.   You can prepare a light luncheon or a large dinner with Gas with very little trouble and it is so clean to work with.. You don't
have to be shovelling coal all day like a fireman. 'Tis cooking makes the world go round, but let the stove be a poor, out-of-date one and the world wobbles from bad digestion.
Much time is wasted in chopping "kindling"
for coal or wood stoves, and carrying dusty
coal or ashes backwards and forwards.
A kitchen where a gas stove is in use is
always tidy, should be spic and span. Quick
as a wink you have your fire without
trouble of building—turn off the gas tap
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juices of the meat are retained; both sides
pf a steak are broiled in four minutes at a
trifling expense. With coal half the juice is
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figured.
fifSNGfeS
There is great comfort in good Gas heat.
Without any fuss or bother you can quickly
warm a cold or chilly room or hallway
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There may be some particular room in your
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imparts a healthful warmth and cosiness at
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You are most cordially welcome to visit our showrooms whether you desire to purchase or merely to look.    We will gladly explain the many advantages of gas for
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Victoria Gas Company, Limited
Cor. Fort and Langley Streets, Victoria, B. C.
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p By ri-lB LOUNUBK C
ty*\y»ff%/ni*\/»__m_\fi0mrfjlif^
1 took a run over to Vancouver to
see the Wallabies dress down the
local team. Nobody anticipated mor-;
than a feeble resistance to the star
players, but everybody got a surprise,
including the players themselves.
Not that at any stage of the game
there was any comparison between
the teams upon a scientific basis, but
because the combined Vanciuver and
Victoria men, by sheer determination
held down their opponents for the
first twenty minutes in a manner
which nonplussed players and lookers-
on. This was mainly" due to the
superb tackling of three or four men
on the local side, of whom McLorg
was the most conspicuous. The Wallaby captain told me afterwards that
they had never played against better
tackling. Of course, when they
found the strong point of their opponents, they altered their tactics and
protected their three-quarters by
long passing which quickly changed
the venue of play. Some people
thought that the Wallabies eased up a
little in the second half, and this may
be so because I imagine they were
getting prety stale at the end of such
a long and strenuous tour.
Thc features of the game were the
passing and the speed of the Wallabies. On one occasion I saw the ball
passed like lightening from one to
another until it reached the ninth man
on the extreme left wing, and he ran
home along the line scoring an easy
try. Their three-quarters easily outpaced the local men. There was more
finish and style, of course, about their
playing, and they put in a few dodging
runs that completely beat their opponents. They were remarkably good
at catching; it did not matter how
awkwardly  or  how  swiftly  the  ball
came they never once fumbled it and
they got rid of it the instant they
touched it. if danger threatened. All
these points were due to strategy and
practice, and serve to emphasize the
repeated suggestions of local experts
with respect to their own team.
On the combined team no man
played a better game than Lowry at
full back and the Wallaby captain
spoke to me about him in the highest
terms. He has strength, courage and
quickness, what he lacks is a little
more speed and a better knowledge
of the fine points of the game. He
made perhaps the best individual run
of the day in the second half on the
right wing, beating all his men until
he came to the back, when he made
the fatal error of clinging to the side
line and was forced over. A little
more speed and a quick dodge to the
left would have resulted in a certain
try.
Fyson played a brilliant game at
threc-guarters, and both the halfbacks did remarkably well against
such talent. The Wallabies' scrum
was much heavier than that of the
local team and the latter was forced
over nearly every time. This was
due partly to the greater weight of
their opponents and partly to the
fact that they had deeper cleats on
their boots. The game would have
presented a much more favorable appearance for the local team if they
could have got the ball out of the
scrum occasionally.
In one feature of the game the local
team entirely otushone their opponents, in the loose dribble, not once
did they fail to make ground on this
movement, and with a heavier forward pack it could be repeated with
advantage on Thursday.
I am writing these notes before thc
Victoria match takes place, and I
venture to say that if the selected
team plays, and good judgment is
used, it is possible to keep the Victoria score of the Wallabies lower
than the Vancouver score.
Whilst in Vancouver I took the
opportunity of picking up a few stray
ideas with respect to matters of in
terest to Victorians. I found an undoubted boom in real estate, there is
more business being done today than
at any time for two years, and it is
actual /business, not mere options. .
As an instance pf the appreciation of
values I may mention that nearly all
Point Grey lots which were sold by
the government a year and a half
ago now stand at six times their
cost price, and yet it was thought at
the time of the sale that the government have realised high figures. But
the end is not yet, and fortunate
holders are looking forward to still
further advances. Remembering that
the Vancouver boom of 1905-06 preceded a very substantial boom in Victoria, we may take heart. There is
no reason why increased activity
should not be observable in the Capital Gity. In one respect Victoria
even now does not play second fiddle
to Vancouver, and that is in the number of dwelling houses in course of
erection. I do not say that the number is actually equal, but in proportion
to population it undoubtedly is.
I notice that the Horse Show committee are building an enormous
structure for the show which opens
next month. I have no idea what
it is to cost, but as things go in the
West it is a most enterprising piece
of work, it is accessible and commodious and is being substantially
erected upon concrete foundation. I
have no doubt the committee will receive splendid support, and they certainly deserve it.
The last ttime I went to Vancouver
I noticed and commented on the
lower prices for food of every g.nd
which prevailed there as compared
with Victoria. The good work still
goes on, and I am informed by householders that during the last six
months the cost of living has sensibly
diminished, and this is no pun; I wish
one could say as much for Victoria,
which today enjoys the unenviable
distinction of being the dearest city
to live in of which Canada can
boast.
LOUNGER.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast
Take notice that Elsie Bell, of Victoria, married woman, intends to.apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 1 1-2 miles north
west of the north west eorner of Lot
27; thence north 20 chains; thence west
40 chains; thence south 20 chains; thence
east 40 chains to point of commencement.
Dated February 15th,  1909.
ELSIE BELL.
Feb.   27 J.   R.  Morrison,  Agent.
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VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Arthur Davies In
tends to apply for permission to purl
chase the following described lands:-!
Gomencing at a post planted at thi
south east corner of Lot 25, Anahanl
Lake; thence south 40 chains; thenci
west 40 chains; thence north 40 chainsl
thence east 40 chains to point of comf
mencement.
Dated February  15th,  1909.
ARTHUR   DAVIES.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent]
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that George C. Mesher, ol
Victoria, contractor, intends to apply foil
permision to purchase the following desl
cribed  lands:—Commencing  at  a  posi
planted about 4 miles south of Indian
ranch  on  Salmon River;  thence soutli
80 chains; thence east 40 chains; thenca
north 80 chains; thence west 40 chain:]
to point of commencement.
Dated February  15th,  1909.
GEORGE  C.  MESHER.      _____
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent|
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast
Take notice that Elizabeth M. Coultn-I
ard, of Victoria, widow, intends to ap-1
ply for permission to purchase the roi-l
lowing described lands:—Commencing!
at a post planted about 3 1-2 miles!
southerly from Indian ranch on Salmon!
River; thence south 80 chatns; thencel
east 40 chains; thence north 80 chains;!
thence west 40 chains to point of com-|
mencement.
Dated  February 15th,  1909.
ELIZABETH M. COULTHARD.
Feb.  27 J.   R.  Morrison,  Agent.|
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast
Take notice that Francis Barton, of
Victoria, merchant, intends to apply ior
permission  to   purchase  the  following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 1 mile south of Blayney's
pre-emption;  thence    south    80 chains*.
thence east 40 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 40 chains to point
of comencement.
Dated February  15th,  1909.
FRANCIS BARTON.
Feb.  27 J.   R.  Morrison,  Agent.|
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WABBSH   BCKOOX*   Or   OFESATOBB. | THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1909.
VICTORIA LAND DISTBICT
District  of  Coast .
lake notice that W. Wentworth Bell,
•Toronto, Ont., engineer, intends to
■ly for permission to purchase the
lowing described lands;—-Commencing
post planted about SO. chains north
It of the north west corner of Lot
IS.A.W. script; thence east 40 chains;
mice north 40 chains; thence west 40
lins, more or less, to lake; thence
Itherly along lake, 40 chains, more or
1, to point of commencement,
bated February  15th,  1909.
W.   WENTWORTH  BELL.
27 J.   R.  Morrison,   Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
fake notice that Lilias Boss, of Vic-
na, married woman, intends to apply
J permission to purchase the following
scribed lands:—Commencing at a post
Inted  about  20  chains  north  or  tue
1th west corner of Lot 28; thence west
Jchains;    thence    north    40  chains;
nee east 40 chains; thence south in
Litis to point of commencement,
bated February 16th, 1909.
LILIAS ROSS.
27 J.   R.   Morrison,   Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast
take notice  that William Fernie,  of
ctoria, capitalist, intends to aptly tor
(•mission   to   purchase   the   following
acribed lands:—Commencing at a post
anted  about  20  chains  north  of  the
Vth west corner of  Lot 26,  Anaham
ke;  thence  running west  80 chains;
fence south 40 chains; thehce east 80
tins; thence north 40 chains to point
■commencement,
Dated February 16th, 1909.
WILLIAM FERNIE.
|b.  27 J.   R.  Morrison,  Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast
rake notice that Edith Rose Scott, of
Incouver, B.C., spinster, intends to __i-
> for permission to purchase the folding described lands:—Commencing at
post planted about 20 chains north of
i north-west corner of Lot 26, Anaham
Ike; thence    east    80    chains; thence
Irth 40 chains; thence west 80 chains;
ence South 40 chains to point of com-
pneement.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
EDITH ROSE SCOTT.
27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
apply for permission to purchase the , described landp .---Commencing at a post
following described lands:—Commencing planted west of the'Salmon River, about
at a post planted about 8 miles east of 1 1-2 -miles from foot of Anaham Lake;
forks of Palmer trail and Morrison's thehce south 80 chains; thence east 40
trail   to   Lewis   Creek,   and  about   100   chains,  more or  less,   to  river;  thence
chains east of small lake lying north or
trail; thence nprth 40 ehains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 320 acres, more
or less.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
JANET E. MESHER.
Feb 27 j. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast
Take notice that Isabella Bell, of
Toronto, married woman, intends to ap.
ply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 8 miles east of
Fish trap on Palmer trail, and about 40
chains south of small lake near Lewis
Creek; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 40 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence east 40 chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more
or less.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
ISABELLA BELL.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
northerly 80. chains along river; thence
west 46 chains, hiOre or less, to" point
of commencement.
Dated February  16th; 1909.'
JOSEPH,D.  VIRTUE.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
NBCHACO BAND DISTBICT.
District of Coast
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast
Take notice that Mary L. Dupont, of
Victoria, married woman, Intends to apply for permision to purchase the following described lands:-—Commencing
at a post planted about 4 1-2 miles south
of the Indian ranch on Salmon River;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 40 chains to point of commencement.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
MARY L. DUPONT.
Feb 27 •■ J.R. Morrlron, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
[Take notice that Susan Mary Baiss, of
[ictoria, B.C., married woman, intenus
I apply for permission to purchase the
■llowing described lands:—Commencing
t a post planted about 3 miles east of
Mmon river and about 16 miles north
Anaham Lake; thence north 40
liains; thence east 40 chains; thence
outh 40 chains; thence west 40 chains
point of commencement.
iDated February 15th, 1909.
SUSAN MART BAISS.
|eb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent:
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  bf Coast
Take notice that Chartres C. Pember-
bn, of Victoria, B.C., lawyer, intends to
apply  for  permission  to  purchase  the
Tallowing described lands:—Commencing
It a post planted about 3 miles east ot
lalmon River and about 14 miles north
|f   Anaham    Lake;    thence   north    80
nains;  thence  east  40  chains;  thence:
louth 80 ohains; thence west 40 chains
In point of commencement.
Dated February  16th,  1909.
CHARTRES C. PEMBERTON.
(feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast
Take  notice that  Katherine  Phylliss
Burrell, of Victoria, marled woman, inlands to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
pommencing at a post planted about 3
niles   east  of  the   Salmon   River  and
libout 16 miles north of Anaham Lake;
Ihence north 80 chains; thence east 40
(hains; thence south 80 chains; thence
vest 40 chains  to point of commence-
nent.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
KATHERINE PHYLLISS BURRELL.
Feb 27
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast
Take notice that William S.  Maher,
bf Victoria, capitalist, intends to apply
Jfor permission to purchase the fellow-
ling   described   lands:—Commencing   at
post planted about 40 chains south of
[the south west corner of Lot 28, Ana-
liam    Lake;    thence    south 40 chains;
Ithence west 20 chains; thence north 40
chains; thence east 20 chains to point
pf commencement.
Dated February 16th,  1909.
WILLIAM S.  MAHER.
|Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast
Take notice that Michael Finnerty, of
Victoria, farmer, intends to apply for
permision to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 4 miles east of Salmon
River and about 7 miles north of Anaham Lake; thence west 40 chains! thence
south.40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of commencement,  containing  160  acres.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
MICHAEL FINNERTY.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND'DISTRICT
District  of Coast
Take notice that John D. Bell, of Victoria, banker, intends to apply for permision to purchase the following described lands:—Commericing at a post
planted on the east shore of Anaham
Lake, about 2 miles from head of lake;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 40
chains, more or less, to lake; thenct.
80 chains, more or less, south westerly
along lake to point of commencement,
containing 320  acres,  more or less.
Dated  February  15th,   1909.
JOHN   D.   BELL.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast
Take notice that George Edward Wilkerson, of Victoria, gardner, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted at the south east corner of Lot 26, near Anaham Lake; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 20 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence west 20
chains to point of commencement, containing 80 acres,  more-or less.
Dated   February   15tK,   1909.
GEORGE EDWARD- WILKERSON.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast
Take notice, that Charles C.  Revans,
of Victoria, farmer, intends to apply for
■permission   to  purchase   the   following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 4 miles north of Ananam
Lake;   thence  south  80  chains;  thence
west 40 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 40 chains to point of commencement.
Dated February  16th,  1909.
CHARLES C.  REVANS.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast
Take notice that Ellen S. Bell, of Victoria, widow, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands :-*-Commencing at a post
planted at the north east corner of Lot
27, S.A.W. script; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; Ihence
north 80 ohains; thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement; containing
640 acres.
Dated February 15th,  1909.
ELLEN S.  BELL.
Feb 27 J. R, Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that J. Stirling Floyd, or
Victoria, clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south west corner of
Lot 28, S.A.W. script, near Anaham
Lake; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
J.   STIRLING  FLOYD.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that James Stevenson
iBaiss, of Victoria, rancher, intends to
■ apply for permission to purchase the
I following desoribed lands:—Commenc-
llng at a post planted near Morrison
I trail to Lewis Creek (branch of Sai-
Imon River) and about 10 miles from
I forks of said trail and Palmer trail;
Ithence north 80 chains; thence east 80
Ichains; thence south 80 chains; thence
■west 80 chains to point of commence-
|ment, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated February 16th,  1909.
JAMES   STEVENSON   BAISS.
iFeb 27
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast
Take notice that Charles T. Dupont,
lof Victoria, capitalist, intends to apply
I for permission to purchase the following
described    lands:—Commencing    at    a
post  planted  about   4   miles   north  of
Fish  trap  where Palmer  trall  crosses
Salmon River; thence north 80 ohalns;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 40 chains to point of
commencement,   containing   320   acres,
more or less.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
CHARLES THOMAS DUPONT.
Feb 27
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast
Take notice that John V. Clegg, of
Victoria, accountant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 80 chains south oi
the south east corner of Lot 28, S.A.W.
script, near Anaham Lake; thence east
80 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 40
chains to point of commencement.
Dated February 15th,  1909.
JOHN V. CLEGG.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LANDDISTRICT
District  of Coast
Take notice that Jessie Clara Bell, of
Victoria, spinsteV, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:-—Commencing at a post
planted on Palmer trail, about 5 miles
north west of J. Lunos' ranch on Uppei
Salmon River and about 1 mile east of
Towdestan Lake; tbence south 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 40 chains to point of
commencement, containing 320 acres,
more or less.
Dated February., 15th,  1909.
JESSIE   CLARA   BELL.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
TAKE NOTICE that Edgar L. Blake,
of Fernie, B. C, engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Comemncing at a post planted at the
south-east corner of the north-east quarter of section 5, township 18, range 6,
thence north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence south 40 chains, thenpe
east 40 chains to point of commencement, and being the north-east quarter
of said section 5.
EDGAR E. BLAKE.
November 13th, 1908. feb 27.
LICENCE    TO   i AN   EXTBA-EROVIN-
CIAL COMPANY.
"Companies' Act, 1897."
NECHACO BAND DISTBICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Mary Blake, of
Fernie, B. C, married woman, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner of section 12, of
township 16, range 6; thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement and being the
north-west quarter of said section 12.
MARY BLAKE,
November 13th, 1908. feb27
NECHACO BAND DISTBICT.
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Anna Olson, of
Minneapolis, spinster, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following
described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of section 12, township 16, range 5; thence south 80 chains,
thence west 40 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 40 chains to place or
commencement, being the east half of
said section 12.
ANNA OLSON.
November 13th, 1908. feb27
NECHACO LAND DISTBICT.
District of Coast.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast
Take   notice   that   Frederick   Stewart
Burell, of Victoria, accountant,- iritehus
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted on the west bank of
Salmon ^River; about 10 ohains. north oi
ford on the Bella Coola Ootra Lake trail
and   near  the  foot   of  Anaham  Lake;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east  80 chains, more or
less,   to  river;   thence   northerly  along
river to point  of  eommeneement.
. Dated February 16th,  1909.
FREDERICK STEWART BURRELL.:
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agenvi
"LAND  REGISTRY  ACT."
In the matter of an Application for ai.
Duplicate Certificate of Tllie lo Lot
31, Range 3, Coast .-District.
Notice Is hereby given that it is my,
Intention at the expiration of one montn
from' the date of the lirst publication
hereof, to issue a Duplicate Certificate:
of Title to said lands issued lo Robert
Morris Thompson on the 15th January,
1903, and numbered  8398C.
Land   Registry   Oflice,   Victoria,   B.C.
the 3rd day of February, 1909.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
hich. 6 Registrar-General.
TAKE NOTICE that Frances T. Batt,
of Portsmouth, England, married woman,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner of section 13, township 16, range 6; thence west 80 chains,
thence north 60 chains more or less to
right bank of Nechaco river; thence following said river east 80 chains, thence
south 60 chains more or less to point of
commencement and being about 480
acres of said section 13.
FRANCES T. BATT.
November 13th, 1908.
November 13th, 1908. feb27
IN   THE  MATTER   OF  THE  ESTATE
OF PAULINE DOUGALL, Deceased.
NECHACO LAND DISTBICT.
District of Coast,
TAKE NOTICE that George Bateman,
of Moyie, B. G, rancher, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner of section 11, township 16, range 5; thence south 40 chains
thence east 80 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence west 80 chains to place of
commencement and being the north-half
of said section 11.
GEORGE BATEMAN.
November 13th, 1908. feb27
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that H. P. O'Farrell, of
rancher, intends to apply ror
permission   to   purchase   the   following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 40 chains north of Lewis
Creek  (branch of Salmon River)   at a
point  about  13   miles   from   mouth  of
creek;   thence  south  40  chains;   thence
west 40 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 40 chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more
or less.
Dated  February  16th,  1909.
HENRY PERCY O'FARRELL.
Feb 27
NBCHACO LAND DISTBICT.
All persons having any claims or demands against the Estate of Pauline
Dougall, late of. the City of Viotoria,
in the Province of British Columbia,
deceased, are hereby required to file
their names and addresses, with full
particulars of their claims and the nature of the securities, if any, held by
them, duly verified, on or before the
15th day of February, 1909.
And notice ia hereby given that after
the said date the Administrator will
proceed to distribute said Estate
amongst the parties entitled thereto,
having regard only to the claims uf
which he shall then have had notice,
or any part thereof, so distributed, to
any person of whose claim he has not
had notice at the time of the distribution thereof.
Dated this 30th day of December, A.D,
1908.
BODWELL & LAWSON,
Of No. f. Government Street, Victoria,
B.C., Solicitors for the Administrator.
Jan. 30.
Canada:
Provinoe of British Columbia.
No. 469.
This is to certify that the "Winnipeg
Oil  Company,  Limited,"  ls  authorised
and licensed to carry oh business within
the Province of British Columbia, and
to carry out or effect all or any of the
objects of the Company to which tne
legislative authority of the Legislature
of British Columbia extends.
The head office ot the Company is
situate at the City ot Winnipeg, ln tha
Province of Manitoba,
The amount of the capital of the
Company is fifty thousand dollars, divided into flve hundred shares of one
hundred dollars each.
The head offlce of the Company in tma
Province is situate at the City of Victoria, and Androw Wright, Financial
Agent, whose address is Victoria aforesaid, is the attorney for the company.
Given under my Hand and Seal of
Offlce at Victoria, Province of British
Columbia, this third day of February,,
one thousand nine hundred and nine.
(L. S). S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stook Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has been established and licensed are:
To purchase, acquire, hold, and operate oil refineries', plant and machinery
of all kinds; to carry on the buslne&o
of buying, leasing, letting and selling
petroleum and oil lands; buying, selling,
producing and manufacturing all kinds
of oil and all products and compounds
thereof, and all articles and' substances
of which oil is an ingredient; of sink-
ink, boring, making, putting down, aiid
building oil wells, and all buildings and
erections which may be requisite in connection therewith and of otherwise developing and operating upon petroleum
oil lands; of erecting, leasing, buying,
letting and selling oil refineries together
with all such buildings and works as
may be necessary in connection with thu
production and sale of oil products ami
all compounds thereof, and all substances and articles of which oil is an
ingredient; to manufacture, buy, soil,
and deal in oil producers, maoliluai'j,
supplies, and utensils of all kinds; io
carry on the business of storing, tanking and warehousing refined and crude
oil and all products and compound*
thereof, and all substances and article.*)
of which oil is an ingredient and granting warehouse receipts for the same;
to construct, equip and operate pi|-e
lines and other contrivances or appliances for the transportation of oil;
the doing of all such other acts anu
things as are incidental or conducive
to the attainment of any of the objects
aforesaid.
BRADSHAW & DAVIE
Solicitors for the said Company,
mch 20
i
IN  THE  MATTER  OF  THE  EST_
of DANIEL CARMODY, Deceased.
All persons having claims or demands
against the Estate of Daniel Carmody,
late of the City of Seattle, in the State
of Washington, deceased, are hereby
required to tile their names and addresses,; with if ull particulars of their
claims and the nature of the securities,
if any, held by them, duly verified, on
or before the 15th day of February,
1909.
And notice is hereby given that after
the said date the Executor will proceed to distribute said Estate amongst
the parties entitled thereto, having regard only to the claims of which he
shall then have had notice, and be shall
not be liable for the proceeds of the
said estate, or any part thereof, so distributed to any person of whose claims
he has not had notice at tlie time of
the. distribution thereof.
Dated this 3<>th <!ay of De^ber, AP,
1908.
BODWELL & LAWSON,
Of No. 918 Government Street, Victoria,
B.C., Solicitors for the Administrator.
Jan. 30.
&\
NOTICE.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that James S. Black,
of Chatham, Ontario, accountant, intends
to apply for permission to purchuse the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east coiner of section 14, township 16, range 5, thehce west 40 chains,
thence north 60 chains, more or less lo
right bank of Nechaco river, thence following said river east 40 chains,- thence
south 60 chains more or less to place of
beginning being about 200 aeres ot said
section 14.
JAMES S. BLACK.
November 13th, 1908. feb27
NECHACO BANS DISTBICT.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Charles Poole, of Vlc-
triao, laborer, intends to apply for permision  to purchase the following described   lands:—Comenclng   at   a   post
.planted  on   the   east  shore of Anaham
Lake, about 2 miles from head of lake;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains  to  lake;  thence westerly  along
I lake   80  chains,   more   or   less;   thence
I northerly along lake 80 chains, more ot
■ less, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
' Dated February 15th, 1909.
CHRALES POOL19.
f#eb 27
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast
Take notice that Janet E. Mesher, of
I Victoria,  married    woman,    intends  to
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Marlon Maher, oi
Victoria, married woman, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at
a post planted near the south bank of
Lewis Creek (branch of Salmon River)
and about 12 miles from mouth of creek;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated February 16th,  1909.
MARION MAHER.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Isabella McQuillan,
of Victoria, married woman, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:-—Commencing at a post planted at the narrows on
Salmon River, near the foot of Anaham Lake, on west bank of river; thenoe
west 40 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence east 40 chains, more or less to
lake; thence northerly along lake to
point of commencement.
Dated February  15th,  1909.
Isabella Mcquillan.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast
Take notice that Joseph D. Virtue, of
Victoria,   accountant,   intends  to  apply
for permission to purchase the following
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Harry W. Bunn.
of Hooply, N. D., agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted about
60 chains east of the north-east corner
of section 7, township 18, range 6, on
the right bank of the Nechaco river;
thence west 60 chains more or less to
the north-west corner of section 7,
thence south 80 chains, thence east 60
chains more or less to right bank of
Nechaco river, thence following said
river north 80 chains to point of commencement and being about 400 acres of
said section 7.
HARRY W. BUNN.
November 13th, 1908.       feb27
"LAND BEOISTBT ACT."
In the matter of an application for a
duplicate certificate of title to the
west-half of lot  27, of section 68,
(map 290), Victoria City.
NOTICE ls hereby given that it is my
Intention at the expiration of one month
from the date of the first publication
hereof to issue a duplicate certificate of
title   to  above   land   Issued, to  James
O'Keefe, on the 24 th day of December.
1906, and numbered 13645C.
S. R. WOOTON,
Registrar-General.
Land Office, Victoria, B. C,
,ne Uth day of January, 1909.     Janl6
NOTICB Is hereby given that the reserve placed upon certain lands ln the
vicinity of Lower Kootenay River, District of Kootenay, notice of which appeared In the British Columbia Gazette
of the 14th of August, 1884, ls cancelled, for the purpose of disposing of
such lands by public auction, and io
permit of giving effect to the recommendations contained in the report of
Mr. W. F. Teetzel, a commissioner appointed to adjudicate upon the claims of
certain squatters upon the said lands,
but for no other purpose,
ROBERT A.  RENWICK.
Deputy Commissioner of Lands and
Works, Lands and Works Department.
Victoria, B. C, 6th October, 1908.
janO.
"LAND REGISTRY ACT."
In the matter of an Application for a
Duplicate Certlflcate of Tltile to
Part (146 acres) of Section 3, Utter
District. •
NOTICE is hereby given that lt la
my intention at the expiration ot one
month from the date of the first publication hereof to Issue a Duplicate Certificate of Title to above lands Issued
to Joseph Plaement on the Uth day of
July, 1890, and numbered 10298a.
Land   Registry  Office,  Victoria,  B.C.,
the lst day of December, 1908.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Reglstra-General of Titles.
"LAND   REGISTRY   ACT."
&M
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE ls hereby given that the reserve covering the fractional sections
31, 32 and 33, Denman Island, notice
of which was published In the British
Columbia Gazette of October 21st, 1876,
is cancelled.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of
Lands and Works.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., December 17th, 1908.
Dec. 17
NECHACO  BAND DISTBICT.
District of Coaat
TAKE NOTICE that Jesse Bamford,
of Santa Rosa, California, baker, Intends
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted sixty
chains east of the south-west corner of
section 18, township 18, range 6, on the
right bank of the Nechaco River; thence
west 60 chains more or less to the southwest corner of section 18; thence north
60 chains more or less to right bank of
Nechaco River; thence following said
river down stream to point of commencement and being about 180 acres of
said section 18.
JESSE BAMFORD.
November 13th, 1908. feb27
In the matter of an Application for a
Duplicate Certlflcate of Title to Lot
30, Subdivision of Sections 3 and 4,
Fairfield Estate (Map 826) Victoria
City.
Notice is hereby given that It is my
intention at the expiration of one month
from the date of the first publication
hereof to issue a Duplicate Certificate
of Title to above land Issued to John
Sherburn on the ..a day of Augusi,
1908,   and  numbered   18349 C.
Land Registry Ottce, Victoria, B.C.,
tlie 19th day of January, 1909.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Feb. 27 Registrar-General of Titles.
FERRY, BELLA COOLA RIVER.
SEALED applications for a charter to
operate a ferry over the Bella Coola
river, about 25 miles above the mouth,
will be received by the Honorable the
Minister of Public Works up to and Including the first day of March next
Applicants must state the kind and
size of vessel It Is proposed to use, the
method of operating and the tolls
which It Is proposed to levy for the
carriage of passengers, horses, vehicles
and cattle, etc.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Publio Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C., 7th January, 1909.
Jan 30 THE WEEK, SATURDAY FEBRUARY 10, 1909,
ififtifitififififififififif
X Husic and
if
if
X   The Drama. I
if %> if if ifif if if if if ifif if
Slowly but surely the years have
winnowed the aspirations of classic
players, until but few representatives
of theatrical art in its strictly legitimate aspect are left behind. Even
the most efficient and intellectual
players of today are engaged to a
large extent in exploiting literary
novelties which entertain for a season
or two and are then dropped into the
manager's waste basket, In discussing the legitimate English-speaking
drama, the Shakespeare plays are
recognized as constituting its rock-
ribbed foundation today as in years,
decades, and even centuries gone by,
And it is a remarkable fact that
Charles B. Hanford apepared this season as the only star whose repertory
Was consistently Shakespearean. Mr.
Hanford has never assumed any lofty
ground in the matter, having at all
times evinced a willingness to try
plays whose qualities seemed suited to
his own; but the public has demanded
him in Shakespeare. Mr. Hanford is
appearing this season, as usual, under
the management of Mr. F. Lawrence
Walker, who reports the utmost enthusiasm concerning the new scenic,
revival of "the Winter's Tale" with
Mr. Hanford as Leontes and
Autolycus. Miss Marie Drofnah appears as Hermione and Perdita, both
of which roles may be expected to rest
gracefully upon an actress who has so
happily portrayed other types of
Shakespearean femininity. The costumes and scenery will be in keeping
with the Hanford reputation for liberality and artistic descernment in
such matters. The date of Mr. Hanford's appearance in "The Winter's
Tale,, at the Victoria theatre is Monday, March 1.
character, and others. While he is off
the stage, changing his. clothes between each number, a series of motion
pictures show the exact operation
going on in his dressing room. Other
good features will be Ellsworth and
Leyndon, in a rapid fire sketch entitled "His Day Off"; Elmer Tenley,
one of the best of comedians; Fougere
and Emerson, singers and dancers;
Thos. J. Price in illustrated song, and
new moving pictures end overture.
A Dry Plant
Scene: Crystal Palace.
Yankee Visitor (addressing a policeman on duty)—I calculate, stranger,
that if they keep you much longer
under this glass roof, you'll be in a
fair way of sprouting.
Bobbie (despondingly)—No fear.of
that, guv'nor; they don't keep me
moist enough,
Wise Red Men
William Hanley, a well known Du
luth cruiser and timber man, tells a
good story of Indians and the importance of personal publicity to a
redskin. Hanley was in charge of a
big drive on the St. Croix river, and
in the vicinity of Taylor's Falls a
big jam occurred. Among the drivers
were half a dozen Indians. They
were good men on the river and held
up their end with the white men.
One day, while inspecting the jam,
Hanley passed the six Indians. In a
spirit of good nature he hailed thc
Indians and said:
"Break that jam, boys, and I'll put
your names in the paper."
"Ugh I" repsonded one, after a
pause. "Six Indians dead in paper,
but we no see it."
Look Out!
The coal man's smile
Grows broad, the while
His price goes up the flue!
But don't get mad
Just yet, bedad—
The plumber's grinning, tool
"A Stubborn Cinderella"
There is a magnetism and an intelligence about the performance oi
Mr. Mason who plays "Mac," a college
boy prince who wooes and wins the
Cinderella of that most captivating
and delightful of musical comedies.
"A Stubborn Cinderella," which is
hard to resist. His sincerity in the
serious moments developed through
his love affair with Cinderella is unquestioned. But, pn the other hand
his comedy is equally earnest and
equally capable. The sentiment of
clean manliness of the impregnated
instinct of the decency and class
which is imbued among all the young
colleg boys and girls who are the
heroes and heroines of the play is
shown most attractively by this ;...-
stance.     *
The hero, an irresponsible college
youth, feels bound to terminate 1
flirtation with the heroine, a Scotch
young lady of title but little e<c.)er-
ience in the ways oi the world, ,-,o lie
tells her the story c i Cinderella and
the Fairy Prince wri.i disappears at
stroke of twelve, leaving her with
only the momery of her happy dream.
The scene at whicli this takes place
is by an open fire in the midst of a
big desert of the far southwest, and,
with real;stic settings, and its open
fire, together with Mr. Masons boyish
earnestness, his costume of knee
breeches, long curls ,md brocaded
suit of sallet of Watt-_.au Shepherdesses, form a combination which is not
only unique, but far above anything
ever offered in musical comedy.
There are twenty son? hits in "A
Stubborn Cinderella," a beautiful
chorus of sixty. The new musical
comedy comes to the Victoria theatre
on Tuesday, March 2. The attraction
is under the personal direction of
Mort H. Singer, of Princess theatre,
Chicago.
"Ever notice two women compa.
ing notes?"
"Not particularly.    What do they
?»
say
"One always says she's a bundle of
nerves and the other announces herself as a perfect wreck."
Early Rising Problem
Tommy was a very sound Sleeper
and wouldn't get out of bed earlier
than 10 o'clock, no matter what his
mother said to him. So one morning
she tried coaxing and said to him:
"You have heard of the little boy
who got up at 6 o'clock in the morning, and when he went put he found
a purse of gold?"
"Oh, yes," said Tommy, "but what
about the little boy who got up before him and went out and lost it?"
Lisbon is fully up to date, the municipal grafting there amounting to
$7,000,000.
A wealthy young San Francisco
woman eloped with a waiter, who
must have got a tip from her that
she was willing.
Toronto has discovered footprints
50,000 years old. Somebody was
anxious to get away from that place
ip the long, long ago.
Somewhat Sarcastic
"Why don't you try to leave footprints on the sands of time?" asked
the earnest friend.
"What for?" rejoined Senator Sorghum, "to be measured by secret service detectives?"
That "Theodore" really means "the
gift of God" is much doubted by the
congressmen at Washington.
Adolph Zink, the former comedian
of the famous Lilliputians, an organization of midgets which toured America-for several seasons with great success, will be the big feature of next
week's bill at the new Grand. Zink,
who is only 30 inches tall, impersonates Sam Bernard, Day Templeton,
Pee.   Wee,   the   comi:    supplement
Discriminating Sentry
Sentry—'Alt.   'Oo goes there?
Private Jones—-Frien'—with bottle.
Sentry—Pass, friend, 'Alt bottle.
Unpardonable
"How did you get yourself disliked
by Miss De Style?"
"Why her pug dog was under the
mistletoe ,and I failed totake the
hint."
^psTHEATRi
MONDAY,  MARCH  ist
Engagement of the  Eminent  Actor
MR. CHARLES B. HANFORD
Accompanied by
MISS MARIE DROFUCH
In a Brilliant Scenic Production of
THE WINTER'S TALE
30—People in the Cast—30
Including a Chorus and Ballet.
Seats on sale 10 a.m. Friday, February 26th.
Prices—25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50.
TUESDAY,   MARCH   a.
The Princess Amusement Co. (Inc.)
Under Personal Direction
MORT. H. SINGER.
Book and Lyrics by Hough & Adams.
Music by Jos. E. Howard.
A STUBBORN CINDERELLA,
The Quality Musical Play.
With Homer B. Mason.
Lovers   of   Musical   Comedy   with
Catchy Music and  Pretty  Girls
Can't Afford to Miss It.
75—PEOPLE—75
A Positive Hit.
Prices—50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50.
Boxes—$2.00. i
Seat sale Saturday, February 27th.
WEEK MARCH ist
The New Grand
SNLMMN a Ctaaiiias,    Preailetar*.
■aa«c«.n«it ff HOT. JABItMH.
The World's Greatest Midget
Comedian
ADOLPH ZINK,
In a Series of Clever Impersonations.
ELLSWORTH and LYNDON
In a Farcical. Playlet
"HIS DAY OFF;"
ELMER TENLEY
America's Foremost Comedian.
In Song and Story.
FOUGERE and EMERSON
Eccentric Entertainers.
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrator
NEW MOVING PICTURES
OUR  OWN   ORCHESTRA.
M. Nagel, Director.
NEW PRICES:
Double Sided   85c
Single Sided           65c
12-inch Single  .$1.00
If you have not tried a Zono-
phone Record, get one next
time, and if you do not think it
as good as any other Disc Record, we will (if returned the
day after purchase), refund your
money.
M. VV. WAITT & CO.
LIMITED
Herbert Kent, Manager
1004 Government Street
DEVELOPE OUR
OWN RESOURCES
In 1908 the American paper mills were obliqued to import almost |
$8,000,000 of wood pulp, and in addition consumed 4,000,000 cords |
of four-foot wood, one-quarter of the amount having been secured |
from Canada. Great Britain imported over $15,000,000 of wood |
pulp.   Japan, $1,000,000, and other countries accordingly. a
The difficulty of securing sufficient Wood Pulp for the manu- 1
facture of paper has forced the price of news and wrapping paper |
up from 25 to 35 per cent, the world over. In 1906 news was sell-J
ing in the United States at from $38*00 to $40.00 per ton—today is**!
is difficult to secure it at $50.00 and $55.00. Experts have repeated- |
ly pointed out that at the present rate of cutting the American and |
European forests will be thoroughly depleted within the next 15 |
or 20 years. ■.'_ ,■ "1
In referring to the high price of news and wrapping paper, |
Mr. Alvah Miller, Vice-President St. Regis Paper Co., said: |
"At the rate news-paper is being consumed, I do not see where |
enough paper is to come from for the needs of the coming year. $
In this, as in all other lines, water will seek its own level. If a l
shortage of paper continues, and with it the necessarily high prices, |
the newspapers in time will have to adjust themselves to these |
conditions, and unquestionably will find a way of doing so." I
"Farmand," one of the Leading Trade Journals of Europe, in $
commenting on the Wood Pulp supply of Norway and Sweden, |
under date of April gth, 1908, said: |
"The consumption is very great, and the opinion of buyers as a
to the situation is best shown by the fact that a great percentage J
of the output of 1909 and 1910 has already been sold." |
Mr. Louis Chable, Secretary of the American Paper and Pulp |
Association, said: |
"Sp low are the paper stocks today, that under the most favorable conditions they could not be brought up to the normal under
two years. As the situation stands today, every maker is producing all the paper he can. The consumption in the United
States is about 5,000 tons a day. The demand is constantly in--
creasing. Removing the duty from paper will not solve the problem. If this were done immediately, it would take from two to
four years to build mills in Canada. The Canadian mills have a
small output, and this is sold for two or three years ahead."
(Special to Paper Trade Journal.)
"Montreal, Canada, Nov, 2, 1908.
"The scarcity of news-paper in Canada is becoming a serious
problem. At the present time there is not one carload of newspaper in the country. The situation will be somewhat improved,
by the mills at Sturgeon Falls, where the Imperial Paper Mills
have started two new machines on news-paper. Prices in all lines
are stiff er and there is no Wood Pulp to.be had."
It is not improbable that the entire output of the big mill which
we are now erecting at Quatsino Sound, Vancouver Island, will be
sold before the plant is completed. When complete this modern
mill will have a capacity of 600 tons of news and wrapping paper
per week. The entire erection of the plant is under the supervision
of Mr. Chas. B. Pride of Appleton, Wis., one of the most distinguished authorities on the erection of pulp and paper mills of
.the United States or Canada having built more than fifty of the
leading mills of the country. Mr. Pride is confident of having
the first unit of the mill with a capacity of ipp tons of wood pulp
in operation by December 1 of this year.
WE ARE NOW OFFERING FOR SUBSCRIPTION the remainder of the first issue of 300,000 Preference Shares in Blocks
of ioo shares at $1.00 per share. Payments: 15 per cent, on application, 15 per cent, in 30 days; balance 10 per cent, per month.
The Preference Shares are entitled to a cumulative annual
dividend of 7 per cent., but unlimited as to further dividends. We
are confident that the preferred stock will pay from 20 to 40 per
cent, annual dividends, and within 90 days from the opening of the
plant will be selling at a big premium.
Address all subscriptions direct to the Head Office, 638 View
Street, Victoria, B.C.
DIRECTORS:
COL. HENRY APPLETON, Royal .Engineer, retired, Director
British Canadian Wood Pulp & Paper Co., Ltd.
CHARLES J. V. SPRATT, President Victoria Machinery Depot.
Victoria.
DR. LEWIS HALL, Mayor of Victoria, B.C.
CHARLES LUGRIN, Editor "Colonist," Victoria, B.C .
W. K. HOUSTON, Member W. K. Houston & Co., Victoria.
JOSEPH McPHEE, Gen'l Merchant, Cumberland and Courtenay.
F. J. MARSHALL, formerly Asst. Manager National Bk. of India.
FREDERICK APPLETON, Director M. R. Smith & Co.. Ltd.,
GREELY KOLTS, Director and Fiscal Agent British Canadian
Wood Pulp & Paper Co., Ltd.
Western Canada Wood Pulp
and Paper Co.,-Ltd*
Meals, 25c and up.
Rooms, 25c and up.
We can serve you well.
Telephone 841.
Empire Hotel and
Restaurant
A. LIPSKY, Proprietor.
Will open today.
NONE BUT BEST BRANDS
OF WINES, LIQUORS
AND CIGARS.
Milne Block, 46-48 Johnson St.
VICTORIA, B.C.
JALLAND BROS.
Fine Groceries
FRESH  FRUIT  DAILY.
623 Yates St.    -    VICTORIA, B.C.
Houses Built
ON THE
Instalment
Plan
D. hTbale
Contractor and Builder.
Phone 1140.
Cor. Fort and Stadacona Streets

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