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Week Sep 16, 1911

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 r
Everitt Motor
Car
lanover-Trotter Motor
Co.
iwroom, 931 View St.   Phone 2346
The
A British Columbia Newspaper aad
PnblUhed at Victoria, B. 6.
Hall Sf Walker
Agents
Wellington Colliery
Company's Coal
1232 Gov't. St.
Telephone 83
i, IX.   No. 37
Ninth Year
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 191
One Dollar Per Annum
It Is Her Own Soul That
66
99
Canada Risks To-day
"Once that soul is pawned- for any consideration, Canada must inevitably conform to the commercial, legal, financial, social, and ethical standards of the United States," says Rudyard Kipling.
By Special Cable from the Special Correspondent to the Montreal Star \
LONDON, Sept. 7—Mr. Rudyard Kipling sends the following message to the Canadian people through the Montreal Star:;
Batemans, Burwash, Sussex, England, September 6th
"To the Editor of the Montreal Star:
"I do not understand how nine million people can enter into such arrangements as are proposed with ninety million strangers
on an open frontier of four thousand miles, and at the same time preserve their national integrity. Ten to one is too heavy odds.
No single Canadian would accept such odds in any private matter that was as vital to him personally as this issue is to the nation.
"It is her.own soul that Canada risks today. Once that soul is pawned for any consideration, Canada must inevitably conform to the
commercial, legal, financial social and ethical standards which will be imposed upon her by the sheer admitted weight of United States.
"She might, for example, be compelled later on to admit reciprocity in the murder rate of the United States, which at present, I believe, is something over one hundred and fifty per million per annum.
"If these proposals had been made a generation ago, or if the Dominion were to-day poor, depressed, and without hope, one
would perhaps understand their being discussed; but Canada is none of these things. She is a nation, and as the lives of nations are
reckoned, will ere long be among the great nations.
"Why, then, when she has made herself what she is, should she throw the enormous gifts of her inheritance and her future
into the hands of a people, who by their haste and waste, have so dissipated their own resources that even before national middle age
they are driven to seek virgin fields for cheaper food and living?
"Whatever the United States may gain, and I presume that the United States' proposals are not wholly altruistic, I see nothing
for Canada in reciprocity except a little ready money which she does not need, and a very long repentance.—Rudyard Kipling"
The Song of the Sons
One from the ends of the earth—gifts at an open door—
Treason has much, but we, Mother, thy sons have more!
From the whine of a dying man, from the snarl of a wolf-pack freed,
Turn for the world is thine.   Mother be proud of thy seed I
Count, are we feeble or few?   Hear, is our speech so rude?
Look, are we poor in the land?   Judged arc we men of the blood?
Those that have stayed at thy knees, Mother,* go call them in—
We that were bred overseas wait and would speak with our kin.
Not in the dark do we fight—haggle and flout and gibe;
Selling our love for a price, loaning our hearts for a bribe.
Gifts have we only to-day—Love without promise or fee—
Hear, for thy children speak,; from the uttermost parts of the sea:
The Song of the Cities
HALIFAX
Into  the  mist my guardian  prows  put  forth,
Behind the mist my virgin ramparts lie,
The Warden of the Honour of thc North,
Sleepless and veiled am I!
QUEBEC   AND   MONTREAL
Peace is our portion. Yet a whisper rose,
Foolish arid careless,  half in jest, half hate,
Now wake we and remember mighty blows,
And fearing no man, wait I
VICTORIA
From East to West the circling word has passed,
Till West is East beside our land-locked blue;
From East to West the tested chain holds fast,
The welt-forged link rings true!
CAPETOWN
Hail!    Snatched and bartered oft from hand to hand,
I dream 'my dream, by rock and hearth and pine,
Of Empire to the northward.    Ay, one land.
From Lion's head to Line!
—Kipling.
England's Answer
Truly ye come of the blood;   slower to bless than to ban;
Little used to lie down at the bidding of any man.
Flesh of the flesh that I bred, bone of the bone that I bare;
Stark as your  sons  shall  bc—stern  as  your  fathers were.
Deeper than speech our love, stronger than life our tether,
But we do not fall on the neck nor kiss when we come together.
My arm is nothing weak, my strength is not gone by;
Sons,  I  havc borne many sons but my dugs are  not dry.
Look, I have made ye a place and opened wide -the doors,
That ye may walk together, your Karons and Councillors—
Wards of the Outer March, Lords of the Lower Seas,
Ay, ta.k to your gray mother that bore you on her knees!—
That ye may  talk together,  brother  to  brother's  face—
Thus for thc good of your people—thus for the Pride of the Race.
Also, we will  make  promise.   So long as the  Blood endures,
I shall know that your good is mine;   yc shall feel that my strength is yours.
In the day of Armageddon, at the last great fight of all,
That Our House stand together and the pillars do not fall.
Draw now the three-fold knot firm on the nine-fold bands,
And the Law that ye make shall be law after thc rule of lands.
This  for  the  waxen  Heath, and  that  for  the  Wattlcbloom,
This for thc Maple-leaf,, and that for the Southern  Broom.
The Law that ye make shall be law and I do not press my will.
Because ye are Sons of the Blood and call mc Mother still.
Now must ye speak to your kinsmen and they to you,
After the use of the  English, in straight-flung words and few,
Go to your work and be strong, halting not in your ways,
Baulking the tnd half-won for an instant dole of praise.
Stand to your work and be wise—certain of sword and pen,
Who are neither qhildrcn nor Gods, but men in a workl of men I
—Kipling.
RUDYARD KIPLING
!:,!,/y,-,!l!'-!.:.■
ir.'Hin*: r*i.M' THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1911
STREET PAVING—The attention of
the public is again directed to the
important subject of street paving. It
will hardly be disputed that at the moment
this is by far the most important item of
public works under way. Its extent and
the expenditure involved cause it to overshadow all pther works. '!■ The Week has
had occasion beforetime to complain of the
inspection. There is a case on Fort Street
where through lax supervision only five
inches of vertical height was left in which
to put eight inches of paving material.
The effect of this was to save the contractors three-eighths of the most expensive portion of the work. This aspect of
the case has been emphasized during the
present week by the action of the Chief Inspector who asked that his work should be
divided. There is undoubtedly plenty of
room for two inspectors; one to supervise
the grading, the other the paving. But the
point is that there is more than a little
reason to doubt whether the inspection up
to date has been as thorough in all departments as it should have been. Once a
street is paved any flaw underneath the
surface is covered up and its weakness will
not develop until later. Apart, however,
from the question of structure The Week
wishes to call attention to the quality and
^composition of the asphalt being used by
the Canadian Mineral Rubber Company.
There are two factors which chiefly determine the quality of asphalt for paving purposes ; the one is the actual grade of the
asphaltum used and the other the percentage of carbonate. With reference to the
letter all English authorities are agreed that
the percentage should not exceed three or
four. A larger proportion causes the
asphalt to lose its elasticity and adhesiveness and to crumble. This condition has
been evidenced on several occasions during
the progress of paving in Victoria, where
small quantities have had to be taken out
and relaid, for instance, at the lower end
•of Cook Street and on St. Charles Street.
An examination of the portions removed
show that it is "crumbling" and non-adhesive through an over percentage of carbonate. The Week is informed that the
average percentage of carbonate in asphalt
as laid by the Canadian Mineral Rubber
Company is much higher than three or four
per cent., in some cases ten or fifteen. The
other point, as to the quality of the
asphaltum is one that should receive careful attention. It is alleged that the Canadian Mineral Rubber Company is purchasing its sorcalled asphaltum from the
B. C. Refining Company of Vancouver,
which is simply a refiner of crude Californian coal oil. The Week is informed
by a very high authority that this product
has been condemned in Vancouver for paving purposes and that it bears no comparison whatever to the well-known asphaltum
of Trinidad, which is the standard for paving purposes. These are matters well worth
the attention of the City Engineer and the
Council and in view of the manner in which
the Council has conducted the business of
the city with the Canadian Mineral Rubber Company the matter cannot be investigated too soon. It is doubtful whether it
is possible to live up to the latest contract
ancl comply faithfully with every requirement of the specification at the contract
price. If not, the sooner the ratepayers
know it the better. It will be poor satisfaction to get a cheap job in which the con--
tractors have to make their profit out of
variations in the specifications.
EX-CAPTAIN SEARS—The Report
of the Special Commission appointed by the Dominion Government to
enquire into the loss of the "Iroquois" has
been published and no one will doubt that
the Court over which Mr. Justice Martin
presided so ably, has done substantial justice to all concerned. Captain Sears has
been deprived of his certificate for failing
to perform his duty in either personally
making a more determined effort to rescue
the people in the water or alternatively in
staying by the wreck to the last, and sending the mate to their assistance. Also for
not having ordered any alteration after discovering the negligent and improper manner in which the cargo had been stowed,
and finally for allowing the boats to leave
the wreck in a damaged and unseaworthy
condition. These .are the very points seized
upon by the press and the public at the
time pf the disaster, and although Captain
Sears escaped criminal punishment, he must
realise that he was extremely lucky in doing so in view of the finding of the investigating Commission. It is further satisfactory to read the condemnation of the
' all along, anjd,proves cc--ncii|sively tliat the
law of supply and demand, in respect to
labour only operates upon that margin of
the wage which is a surplus'above the cost
of living, but that the actual standard is
determined by the cost of living. With
wages, as with every other marketable commodity the first charge is the actual cost of
production and the cost of producing labour
is determined by the cost, of living. Apart
altogether from political considerations the
article in question is invaluable at the present time and should be carefully studied
by every wage-earner.
DO IT IN VICTORIA — Everybody
is so thoroughly ashamed of the
fraud perpetrated on the citizens of
Victoria that perhaps the' least said, is
soonest mended. The Mayor pursued a
very proper course in stopping the exhibition in the middle of the week. The only
regret is that a more careful investigation
was not made before the so-called carnival
Was sanctioned. The whole thing was a
fraud from beginning to end and the least
that can be said is that the authorities and
the citizens were imposed upon. Just what
the imposition will cost the city in cold cash
flUiJLA
POORLY  BALANCED-Ah Wilf Spills Things
manner in which Inspector Kinghorn performed, or neglected to perform, his duties;
undoubtedly he has proved himself to be
unfitted for his position, and in the interests of the public safety should be dismissed. The outcome of this and the
"Sechelt" enquiry cannot fail to be satisfactory, since it condemns the use of vessels of the type of the "Iroquois" and the
"Sechelt" in our inland waters, and also
emphasizes the important matter of more
careful and competent inspection. There
cannot be a doubt that the expert finding
of such a tribunal will be accepted and acted
upon by the Government.
COST OF LIVING —The Week
wishes to direct attention to a very
important article appearing on page
12 of current issue on the relation of the
cost of living to wages. The article was
written specially for The Week by a Professor of Economics of Oxford University,
who recently spent a few days in Victoria.
The writer was a pupil of Professor Jevons,
undoubtedly one of the highest living authorities on Economics. In England he is a
Liberal and a Free Trader. The article is
without any political bias whatever; indeed
it could not be otherwise coming from such
a man. It was written by request, for the
sole purpose of elucidating the relation between the cost of living and wages, and
does so in a remarkably lucid and effective
manner. Those of our readers who will
take the trouble to peruse the article will
see that it practically endorses the stand
which' Ther Week has- taken on this subject
remains to be seen and can only be revealed
by a careful examination of the accounts,
but it has cost a good deal in loss of reputation. Even if the promoters had lived
up to their promises it is doubtful whether
the city would have benefited, because the
class of trippers who would have been attracted by such cheap-jack methods are
those who spend little or no money in the
town and bring their lunch in a basket.
The whole project was a grafting scheme
of the worst kind and can never be repeated in Victoria. If our cousins across
the Line have any good ideas to offer they
will always receive fair consideration, but
it is quite obvious that Reciprocity in
"potlatches" and "carnivals" would not be
a popular move.
FRANCE AND GERMANY—The
Canadian papers, no doubt owing to
the exigencies of an electoral campaign, have hot dealt in an adequate manner with the Franco-German emeute. Instead of keeping the public posted with all
the available details of the negotiations
pending between the two governments, they
have contented themselves with more or
less disquieting references and vague predictions. It is doubtful if there has been a
crisis or anything approaching one. The
disquiet which existed in the public mind
was due to the fact that a misunderstanding existed between the two countries which
might possibly precipitate a crisis. To one
not versed in diplomatic negotiation it
would appear fhafr^here*was*no reasonable;
ground for alarm and that neither
had shown a disposition to provoke hi
ties, but the public is never fully equi
to form a judgment oh the possible
of international differences, and atj
times the money market is at once thel
sensitive and reliable barometer.   Thf
turbing elements have been the heavy
tuations in the stock market and thej
withdrawals of money from Germany!
latest advices would indicate an ami
settlement which will be due largely
firm stand taken by the British Govern
supported by both political parties.
THE SAANICH LINE—The
of the B. C. Electric Compal
letting the contract for thei
eighteen miles of the Saanich ExtJ
removes all doubt as to the early conl
tion of what has been wanted for J
years past. It is the fair fulfilment
promise made by the resident manaa
the company when the city conclude
Jordan River Agreement and will hal
effect of making the whole of the SJ
Peninsula what Nature intended it tq
the hinterland of Victoria. The eid
miles contracted for is to be built wil
year and no doubt the balance of tha
to Deep Cove, some seven miles, wil
low on. This line will alter the wholf
plexion of the beautiful country nol
Victoria; it will convert large farn
fruit orchards and residential homel
furnish Victorians with an opportun
living in the country while conducting
business in the city. Those who havl
fortunate enough to secure a little 11
Saanich may now fairly congratulate!
selves on their foresight and anticij
quick service by the end of next su|
FIRE CHIEF DAVIS—A few
ago our respected Chief of
Mr. John Langley, was honou
his compeers by being appointed PrJ
of  the   Association  tq  which  all
Chiefs belong.    Now it is a veryl
pleasure to report that a similar comfi
has been paid to Fire Chief Davis, J
remarkable record in Victoria is evi
known on the outside.   It is an old
to tell how the Chief has revolutioniJ
Department during the last three yea
in doing so earned a reputation sec|
none in the Dominion.   In fact it
come a synonym in the city to speak I
Fire Chief and Efficiency, and everyd"
cognises that the one desideratum in|
departments of the public service is :
the same calibre—men who thorough!
derstand their work, who are fearlel
incorruptible and who cannot be intej
with in the discharge of their leg!
duties even by a Mayor and CouncilJ
toria wants more of the same kind
vice as the Fire Chief renders and I
be a happy day when it succeeds in gelj
TENNIS EXPERTS—If Lara
Wright   play   tennis   in
thanks   will   be   due   to
Schwengers who secured their cond
promise when he was in the East, ail
will be the first-fruits of a trip wll
many ways has benefited British Col
and helped on the splendid game of
It  is  needless  to  say that  Larnel
Wright are the two finest exponents [
game on this Continent—possibly
world.   At any rate they have defeat|
English champions and unless the
Hans are at their very best the Amd
will win the Davis Cup.   If we sho|
fortunate enough to see them here,
be a revelation even to Victoria eJ
No such scientific play has ever beel
outside the American championship!
it is greatly to be hoped that theif
will materialise.
EMPLOYMENT AGENCIES-
action in   the   local police
still pending, emphasizes the
of the course adopted by the TacomJ
Council in abolishing Employment Ag
within the municipality.   It is just pd
that the exception to this rule will
to be agencies for dealing with dol
servants.   Apart from this, however,!
is little doubt that more harm thanl
has been done by the almost innuml
organizations    which    have    succesT
wheedled stray dollars from the pock|
-those who' eOtrld ill Afford* to spare THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1911
JTIE
ladame Griselda's Concert
Iwas  unfortunate  that  the  wet
ier of Friday night,  September
should   have  occasioned   a   few
seats at the concert given by
iGriselda at the Alexandra Club,
event  had  been  eagerly looked
|rd  to  by  the  music  lovers  of
Ha and those who defied the ele-
were well rewarded.    The vis-
artiste's wide range of voice, its
one and delightful freshness were
ntly suited by the Bach-Gounod
ation "Ave Maria" and Goetz'
sande in  the  Wood."   Madame
Ida  was  ably assisted  by  Miss
s   Shrapnel,    who    played  the
obligato to the former  song
Mr. Bynn Alden, Miss Ora Wolf,
Miss Margaret Doyle, Mr. Fred Horn.
The scenery and properties will be
all western in tone, and a complete
and effective performance will be
given.
The Empress Theatre
The best turn in a somewhat mediocre bill this week is that contributed by Rice & Cady, two German
comedians who excel in cheap wit and
eccentricity of costume, the net result being an amusing ten minutes
which leaves the audience in high
good humour. Weston' & Lynch present a novelty in the shape of a one-
act farce entitled "The Fainting Girl,"
which affords the male member of the
a coupon on which to register a guess
at the figures and the lucky winner
will be the recipient of $50.00. A
powerful film has been one produced
by Pathe Freres, entitled "Father and
Son," whilst the Selig Company have
been amusing the crowds with
a comedy whereof the name is
"Willie."
Sousa and His Band
John Philip Sousa composed a new
march during the tour of his band
in Australia and he dedicated it to
the commonwealth. It was named by
the premier of Australia and it will
be one of the features of his tour of
the Pacific Coast and the Southwest,
when he and his band arrive in Van-
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SCENE OF CORONATION AS SHOWN BY "KINEMACOLOR" AT THE VICTORIA THEATRE, SEPTEMBER 22, 23, 26, 27, 29, 30
feeling, and by Mr. Paul Ed-
whose fine baritone voice was
|to advantage. Before the close
entertainment  Madame   Gris-
vas  the  recipient of two  bou-
I Mack-Leone Stock Company
k companies are somewhat like
ttle girl in the poem:—when
ire good they are very, very
but when they are bad they
Hul. The stock company whicii
Victoria this week must of
ity be placed in tlle latter cate-
and that their engagement was
ort is to the credit of Manager
im, who was quick to recog-
lie type of company that does
_me up to the high standard
tded     by    Victorian     theatre-
The Princess Theatre
Ianoke," at the Princess Theatre
eek is giving great satisfaction
•y  large audiences.
bill  for the  coming week  is
lessee's    Pardner,"    a    western
Mr. Williams has had several
tts for a western play, and in
puence  has selected the above
of the best.    It has an excel-
Ilot, a beautiful little love  story
ig all through    the    play, and
of the scenes and incidents are
intense.    Miss  Pinkie  Mullally
seen as a demure little western
Mr. Van Dyke and Mr. Sweat-
is partners and joint owners in
ine.   Mr. Arthur Cyril will be
:o good advantage in a comedy
Mr. Robinson, the new mem-
|f the company, is cast, as also
company an opportunity to perform
a clever wrestling stunt a la Gotch.
Ida Barr made a big hit with her
congs and has been responding to repeated encores. A dancing turn and
a musical act neither of which make
any claim to distinction complete the
programme.
Romano's Theatre
The Tharihauser Company have
been responsible for a feature film
this week which represents a beautiful story, if not a Shakespearean
one, entitled "Romeo and Juliet."
The general trend of the story is
based on the Bard's play and is well
staged. Other attractions have been
"The Temptation," a picture based on
a short story by a well-known author
and a series of picturesque views
taken in Colorado.
The Majestic Theatre
The Majestic Theatre on Yates
Street is now open continuously from
one o'clock in the afternoon till
eleven o'clock at night, fact whicii
has been much appreciated by those
who have a spare hour to while away
before the dinner hour. There would
seem to be a little less comedy offering in moving-picture houses lately,
and in consequence "The Return of
Widow Pogson's Husband," a smart
comedy, proved most acceptable.
The  Crystal Theatre
Great interest is being entertained
with regard to the guessing compe-'
tition as to the majority in the coming election. The purchaser of three
tickets at the  Crystal  is  entitled to
couver on their return from a tour of
the world. Mr. Sousa is frequently
asked which is his favorite composition and his reply is invariably the
same. "I like all of them," he declares with quiet decision.
The House Next Door
If Christianity and Judaism took
the commandment "Love Thy Neighbour as Thyself," and contented
themselves with interpreting the
word "neighbour" in a somewhat limited way, by applying it to the one
who lives in "The House Next Door"
then the sentiment of race hatred
around which this beautiful entertaining and morally educating comedy has been woven would be a thing
of the past. It could no longer be
the mainspring of a modern play. But
alas, this is not the case and racial
prejudice above all — of Gentile
against the Jew—is a sad but real
fact in life.
Therefore, both Christian and Jew
should be thankful for an opportunity
to witness a performance of "The
House Next Door." It is a play that
on the whole should prove an efficient force on behalf of sympathy
and Good will between Christian and
Jew. Both in seeing it will derive
much pleasure and cannot possibly
escape moral profit. While it aims
merely to entertain it incidentally inculcates mutual understanding and
amity between the two. The play as
given at the Gaiety Theatre in New
York city will be seen at Victoria
Theatre Thursday, September 21st.
(Continued on Page 13)
The Crystal Theatre
Broad Street
The Largest, Best Furnished and Most
Comfortable Picture Theatre
in the City
Watch Jor Constant Improvements^Appointments and Service.
Majestic
Theatre
Change of Programme Three
Times a Week, Monday,
Wednesday  and
Friday
High^Class
MOTION
PICTURES
Shown for the first time
in Victoria"
We Cater to Ladies and
Children*
^mpress|
WEEK SEPTEMBER 18TH
JOHN R. GORDON & CO.
Presenting
"What Would You Do?"
DE ALMA & MAE
Classic and Popular Melodies on
the Banjo
SHECK & D'ARVILLE
In Character Songs, Dances and
Physical Feats
The Country Cut-Up
HERBERT HODGE
as "The Yokel"
KRAMER & ROSS
The Nimble-Footed Boys
THE EMPRESSCOPE
M. NAGEL'S ORCHESTRA
Victoria Theatre
THURSDAY EVENING
SEPTEMBER 21ST
Cohan and Harris' Gaiety Theatre
N. Y. Success
"The House Next Door"
By J. Hartley Manners
THE   PLAY   THAT   ALL   NEW
YORK WENT TO SEE
Direction Edwin W. Rowland and
Wm. T. Gaskill
Prices—$1.50, $1.00, 75c, and 50c.
Seats on sale Tuesday, September 19.
Mail Orders now received.
Curtain 8.30
Victoria Theatre
SEPTEMBER
22—23—26—27—29—30
(Twice daily except 22nd)
Matinees 2.30.   Evenings 8.30
First Public Exhibition in Victoria of
Kinemacolor
Showing the Coronation preparations,
ceremonies and processions in
NATURAL COLOURS
Change of Program  Wednesday,
September 27
PRICES:
Matinees   50c, 25c
Evenings  75c, 50c, 25c
Seats on Sale Wednesday, Sept. 20th
Princess
Theatre
A. O. U.W.Hall
Yates St.
Week of Sept. 18th
Williams Stock
Co. presenting
The Great Western
Drama
Tennessee's Pardner
Prices 10, 20 and 30 cts.
Seat Sale opens on Monday at
11a. m., Box Office.   Seats may
also be booked at Messrs. Dean
& Hiscocks, Druggists, cor.
Yates & Broad Sts.
Victoria Theatre
Sousa      Sousa
On Wednesday Evening
September 20th, at
at 8.30 p.m.
The World's Greatest Bandmaster
and his
Band ol Sixty
Prices: $2.00, $1.50, $1.00, 75c, 50c.
Seats on Sale, Monday, Sept. 18
Mail Orders Now Received
Sousa      Sousa THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1911
The Week
A   Provincial   Newspaper   and   Revi?w
published every Saturday by
"The Week" Publishing
Company, Limited
Published  at   1208   Government   St,
Victoria, B. C, Canada
W. BLAKEMORE, Editor
PUBLISHER'S ANNOUNCEMENT
We have pleasure in awarding the
$20 prize for the most artistic solution of the puzzle in "The Munificent
Gift" to Miss Dorothy E. Patterson,
1318 Broad Street. While a number
of other competitors were correct
none took the trouble to couch their
reply in such an artistic form as Miss
Patterson. As suggested in the story
the solution is given near the end of
the last column. Miss Patterson's
solution was neatly written and beautifully bound together with a coloured photograph of the Inner Harbour and Parliament Buildings, which
gave special point to the lines which
follow:
Seattle and Vancouver
With many things are blest.
"Never-the-less"
I like Victoria best.
A  cheque  for  $20  has  been  forwarded to Miss Patterson.
Sir James Douglas
K. C. B.
Written Specially for the Week
by Gilbert Malcolm Sproat
(Continued from Sept. 9th)
But if, as said, above  (that is, in
your last issue), a little caution, on
the  part  of  biographers,  in  valuing
•the testimony of  neighbours, is  desirable,—on the other hand, owing to
the inherent complexity of the subject, rapid characterisation of an individual, by purely outside observers,
is seldom informative.    Inapt similes
and   extravagant   epithets   leave   the
personage still in  the position of a
stranger.    For  instance,  John  Morley, famous in  literature and  statesmanship (now Lord Morley of Blackburn),   after   being   at   the    White
House,  in   Washington   City,  for  a
few days, some years ago, said, or
was reported to have said,  "I have
seen two tremendous works  of Nature   in   America;   one   is   Niagara
Falls, and the other is the President
of  the  United   States,"   (Roosevelt).
This  interested  me  by  recalling,  in
my  own   experience,   before   coming
here  in   i860,  my vague  impression,
as the result of inquiries, in England,
about this part of the  Empire, that
. its leading features were the  Rocky
Mountains, James  Douglas,  and the
Pacific Ocean.    Needless to say, that
this incongruous  collection  was  not
adopted by people here, nor by their
neighbours  in  Oregon;  nevertheless,
as a fact, ample justice was awarded,
reciprocally, to eminent men on both
sides of the International line, after
the bitterness of putting the Treaty
of  1846 in   force  was  more  or  less
soothed by Time.
Among our men,    Dr.    J°'—   " <•
Laughlin (who had embraced American  citizenship)  came  to  be  spoken
of as the "Father" of the new Oregon.   James  Douglas,  a true  Briton1
of  Britons,  received  equal  appreciation, though he had been only second
in   command  under   McLaughlin,   in
the Prc-Treaty period.   (There was a
Board of Management at Fort Vancouver, of which, at one time, additionally to    the    above    named, the
"canny" Dr. Tolmie, and  the  genial
"Daddy"  Work,  well  known  to  old
Victorians, were respected members).
One of the later Oregonians  (Jesse
Applegate, I think) in describing the
qualities of Douglas, added, as to his
personal   carriage,   that   he   left,   on
some interviewers, the impression of
a personage who might be seven feet
high   in   stature.    That   would   have
overtopped, by nearly half a foot, the
magnificent  Virginian,  General  Win-
field Scott (diplomatic visitor here at
the time of the  San Juan  difficulty,
1859),   whom   Sydney   Smith,   seeing
him in London, described as a "Walking Cathedral."    Memorable, indeed,
as some old "busters" of 181.9 have
told me, was it, to follow with the
eye, such specimens of manhood as
Scott, Douglas, and Harney, slowly
striding in Government street, typical sons of Tartaros and Ge, in the
Greek, or as described in the more
familiar tongue-clicking lingo of the
observers,—"delate hy-as se-ahms":
Thought I, from the description, not
knowing much English then, they
Viicht a' bin Gallowa men, the haill
three."
In fact, James Douglas' height was
six feet two inches. He was large
boned, but not what is called "bony";
erect, square-built and muscular—hair
in youth, black, though, in middle
age when I knew him, "Du" "glas,"
or "dark-grey." All noticed his fine
eyes, very dark brown with slumbering lustre, also, his rhythmic, stately walk. I could not conceive Douglas "running" in any circumstances,
but the late John Tod of Oak Bay,
who knew him in 1825, in new Caledonia, told me that, though not
speedy, he, then, like other 22-year-
old youths, could "get' a good move
on," if necessary.
A little reminiscence of my own, after Douglas had retired from official
life, shows the effect of his unstinted
bearing on a roomful of rather critical observers. Breakfasting, on one
occasion, at the Westminster Palace
Hotel, London, frequented by many
persons of distinction, with Isaac
Butt, M.P. (the Irish Home Rule
pioneer-leader), my back to the main
entrance, I became subconscious—as
men, even when busy over their
plates, occasionally will—that something unusual was happening, many
indeed, looking fixedly towards the
door. The attraction was Sir James,
who had arrived in London the night
before, coming in for breakfast in his
quiet, natural way, as he would have
done at home.
But tell us more of his "manner,"
says the impatient reader, "manner,"
which does not go, necessarily, with
one's "appearance," but is  an invisible something, at its very best, not
noticeable at all, either in cottage or
mansion!    To say true, a few of us
youngsters,    perhaps    poor    judges,
opined that the good governor's manner, occasionally, was just a little bit
pompous.      Being    in    those    days
wickeder than now, I had repute for
"offering  an   apple"   to   a   supposed
visitor, with the correct gubernatorial
manner and  phraseology.    A  better
judgment, no    doubt,    however, was
that of Lord Dufferin, when here in
1876, "Douglas' manner is exquisite,"
exclaimed     Dufferin     in     surprise.
Where  can  he  have  got  it?"    "Natural in him is it," was the reply, "the
manner of a self-poised, grave, kindly man, possibly as natural to him as
his  breathing,  and, similarly,  helped
by exercise."    (I  noticed in  Duffer-
in's own conversation, rather a fondness for superlatives, but anyway, he
must have meant, by the term "exquisite," something very good).    He
seemed   interested   in  my  statement
that, as the Indians were betetr mannered than the English, and, of course,
the    Scots    (I said   nothing   of   the
Irish),   frank   intercourse   with   the
higher class  of natives had an  educational advantage in that respect.
A story-fragment, which, perhaps,
the reader, like myself, may prefer to
a whole page of exposition, is the late
Joseph Despard Pemberton's account
1" me of his first interview with
Douglas—(in 1851, I think)—in order
to present his letter of introduction
as a new arrival:
"Sorry to have kept you waiting,
Mr. Pemberton. A little matter of
discipline. Take a seat, Mr. Pemberton." He had been pummelilng a
French Canadian labourer in the yard
of the "Fort," as the courtly George
Washington used to thrash poachers
on his lands at Mount Vernon, yet,
said Pemberton to me, in telling the
story:—"Douglas' manner might have
suggested that of a British Foreign
Secretary, in conference with an
Ambassador, instead of the Company's coatless Chief Factor, receiving a letter to introduce a new surveyor."
Postcript
am only offering a few notes on personality, but I will state, next week,
the probable answer of an ordinary
Scot to her question, as far as memory serves, being here away from
books, and, anyway, too lazy to consult them. That reminds me—but
"no," the foot of the page is reached,
which is lucky for one who has less
hold of his words than of a wet eel
by the tail.
ii
Sotto Voce
The Week's Rumours and
Humours
(By "The Gadfly")
99
That neither of the daily papers
recognises the Socialist candidate,
who, however, is a good man.
That there is no question about it,
Victoria was "done."
That the Capital City never looked
so "cheap" as during the early part
of this week.
* *   *
That for once the action of Mayor
Morley in stopping the show was
unanimously endorsed.
* *   *
That the Victoria subscribers were
an "easy mark."
* *   *
That the ex-Lieutenant-Governor
came out of his latest law suit with
flying colours.
* *   *
That B. J. Perry saved the day, and
made an excellent witness.
* *   *
That it was unfortunate for Sir
William  Mackenzie   that   he   forgot
that "wave of the hand."
* *   *
That the case established a record
for a speedy hearing and a prompt
decision.
* *   *
That if the principals had not been
men whose time was precious it
would have dragged on for months.
* *   *
That the Junior Counsel on both
sides deserve much of the credit.
* *   *
That Mr. Templeman's Brotchie
Ledge breakwater will not protect
him from the storm on the 21st of
this month.
* *   *
That people are asking "If it has
taken Mr. Pugsley two and a half
years to "endorse the project," how
long will it take to build the breakwater?"
That the public wants to know
when the theatrical season will really
open.
That he may not cut much ice at
present, but he will rob somebody of
400 votes.
* *   *
That Sir William Whyte will be
Lord Strathcona's successor as High
Commissioner.
* *   *
That this is the best appointment
that could be made.
That the Times has exhausted its
expletives but will have a new stock
before  election  day.
* *   *
That the ex-captain of the "Iroquois" has found his level at last.
* *   *
That the Metchosin peaches which
figured at the Fair were grown by
Mrs. Dr. Watt.
* *   *
That they taste as good as they
look.
That with the exception of Henry
Miller the companies recently appearing have played "havoc" with the reputation of the Victoria Theatre.
* *   *
That Jove is having a double-
header in Victoria. Jupiter Pluvius
this week and Jumping Jupiter next-
Ball Jove!
* *   *
A kind correspondent
writes that she would like to know
what the word "Douglas" means, and,
also, something about the "Black"
and the "Red," of that name.    I am
That P. C. Dinworthy made a no
table capture this week which entitles
him to special recognition.
* *   ■*
That the steamship—lemon episode
is not yet closed.
* *   *
That the capacity of the tram-cars
was not over-stated by the high
figures printed in the cars some
months ago.
* *   *
That the large cars are now carrying 120 people regularly and the small
cars 93.
* *   *
That Victoria is growing.
* *   *
That the Victoria Canadian Club
did not entertain the visiting British
pressmen, although several of the
most notable remained in the city till
Monday mid-night.
* *   *
That   the   Vancouver   and   Nelson
Canadian Clubs were more wideawake.
* *   *
That the Victoria Canadian Club
also allowed Sir Walter Philimore to
not an authority on such matters, and ■ S"P through its fingers.
Beware the Ides
of March, 1911
(Anon)
The prophetic utterance which applied to Caesar and became fact on
14th March B. C. 44, might well be
taken as timely warning by ourselves.
The historic parallel loses none of
its force simply because what was
then intended as a warning to an in
dividual now seems to present food
for reflection to our Empire, even to
nations. In the eras of nations who
can tell what a single morrow may
have in store for individuals or how
soon that morrow may dawn.
Six months ago in England private
family reasons    called    the premier
away from the  House  of Commons
just when that community commenced
its general debate which formed the
prelude to the discussion on the Annual Army and Navy Estimates; the
duties of acting premier fell on Sir
Edward  Grey,    who    woke    up the
country with a very pointed speech.
He talked of "bleeding to death in
time  of peace"; he paid the American President a great compliment in
agreeing with him on a subject of a
treaty which would be of far greater
advantage to the United States than
to ourselves.    The press, judging by
head-lines   alone   gave   many  people
the idea that Mr. Balfour, still leading tlle Opposition, agreed with Sir
Edward Grey, but when one came to
analyse matters one soon found that
Mr. Balfour's sympathy amounted to
about one ounce in the pound.    All
were for peace, but all were not for
peace at any price;   all were for its
maintenance, but probably none were
for its continuance on the same lines
as the writer whose opinion it was
that there "never was a holy war nor
a disgraceful peace."
Just six weeks before the time
above mentioned Mr. Haldane, (not
yet then a peer) the War Minister,
said in a speech at Portsmouth that
he regarded the Foreign Secretary
as the real Commander in Chief of
the Forces; he based his opinion on
the fact that the Foreign Secretary
(Sir Edward Grey) was the person
who knew better and sooner than
anyone else the directions the affairs
of nations were moving towards,
storm or calm.
Well, to sum up briefly, Mr. Taft
wanted to preserve peace by jabber.
Mr. Balfour's method was of the
"para bellum" kind, whilst Sir Edward Grey preferred to sail a medium course for the sake of financial
economy.
Sir Edward Grey's statement
brought a resounding echo from an
honest German statesman who practically endorsed Mr. Balfour's opinion. This all occurred during the
Ides  of  March.
Now to finish with general principles and come to the present moment, let us look at Germany and the
chances of war.
In the August number of Twentieth
Century, Mr. J. Ellis Barker very
clearly points out German designs
in Africa; he notes the following
facts that as far back as 1876 and
again   in   1884   Bismarck   and   Paul
Kruger   discussed   the   Zululand
of   Sta.   Lucia   Bay  as   a   Ga
"pied   a   terre"   and   relations!
tween   Germany  and  the   Boer]
came   so   friendly   that   at   a
banquet  in   1895  Kruger  openlj
knowledged the  ties  to  be   suj
are natural between father and j
This statement could only
the outcome of some very con
understanding  which   doubtlessl
existed between    Germany    anl
Orange Free State (not then p{
pink on the map of South Aff
1895 saw the Kaiser building
but its construction did not meel
very hearty response from his]
people and he was in no positij
render any form of material hi
South African Republics in the [
of any army.    Things then went J
December (1895)   saw   the   Ja|
Raid followed by the Kaiser's
tulatory telegram to Kruger abo
defeat  of   British  Invaders   vi
appealing for   the   aid    of fr!
powers (German    sailors    had
brought to Delagoa Bay to
to the Transvaal and assist in
fence)   whilst  the   German   Fl
Minister officially announced tl
tain that the continuance of tl
dependence of the Boer Republi|
a German Interest!   1898 saw
mation of the German Navy
The    9th    October,    1899,
Kruger's ultimatum   and    thd
war,  but  Germany's fleet was|
and the Kaiser groaned, "we
bitter   need   of   a   strong
Navy," and blamed his people
being able to further their in|
overseas.
Mr.  Ellis   Barker mentions |
other facts like the above to
"German  Interests"    in    Afrid
German designs too, and not f
sarily directed against Great
and he scores a point by dis|
the connecting    link    between
two powers which is the weal
the   chain   of   good-fellowshr
quotes figures to show that
the population of Germany is
ing one million yearly that ofl
Britain is only increasing 400I
two-fifths of that, and whilst til
grants from Britain are goingf
velop  the   Empire   beyond  th
those    from    Germany    are
abroad  and  are leaving the
land never to return.
German  statesmen and  the]
ing German people are bringing
to every home in the Fatherlal
idea, which must in time appef
popular way to every class
many, that the real manhood 1
country is running to waste
eign  countries  where  their  b|
terests are being interfered
people over whom they can
control and that something
done to remedy such a state]
fairs.   Colonial  expansion is
medy—the idea    will    appeal J
people  and  become  a  very
one—given time and no otherl
of obtaining their   object   thi
have to  resort to force alias!
just war founded on scientific
ing,    and    therefore    religiouJ
Against   whom?—against   th<t
power that stops the way.
Must  Britain and Germany I
war over a petty matter whicl
cems neither in Morocco?    CeT
not!   Let the Great Powers s\
torily  settle  the  affairs  of  Pf
whose internal    arrangements J
gone   sadly    awry—divide
colonies and properly rule then
she can't home rule herself-
a great opportunity for GermJ
onial development and a contil
of peace in Europe for a lon|
to come.
BOOK NOTES
The Standard Stationery |
have just received a large
signment  of  the  Ninth   Cd
dian Edition of Richard Deh|
famous book, "The Dop
tor."    This book has recej
extensive   and   flattering
cisms in all the leading Eng
papers.
On sale at The Standard
tionery  Co.'s store,  1220
ernment St.   Price $1.50. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1911
McLaughlin-Buick    Pleasure   Cars,     Palmer
Singer   Pleasure   Cars,   Randolph   Delivery
Trucks, Rapid  Delivery Trucks.
"Rapid" 2 Ton Truck, Model IQI2
We have the best Repair  Shop  in town and the largest stock of
Repair  Parts,   Remy and  Splitdorf Magneto  parts, Goodyear
Tires in all sizes in stock.
'   Western Motor & Supply Co., Ltd.
1410 Broad Street       Telephone 695
Victoria, B. C.
WHITE
Gasoline Truck
None Better
WHITE
Garage
Cars of Quality
White Pleasure and Commercial
Cars
1218 Wharf St. Phone 2908*
Ask tor Demonstration
Thos. Plimley
Store, 730 Yates St.        Garage, 727 Johnson St.
New "Belsize" Delivery Van
Delivery Vans, all styles;   Gramm Trucks, Russell, Silent Knight,
Overland,   Hupmobiles,   Brush,   Belsize  and
Daimler Automobiles,
HITE
[WHITE POLICE PATROLS
ARE   ECONOMICAL
I The following quotation from an
Hide which appeared in The
■ aeon Telegraph of March oth,
Wis how a White Police Patrol is
living money for the taxpayers ot
llacon,   Ga.:
[ "The cost of the auto wagon was
p,6oo.oo. If the average for the
pst five months is kept up, thc
living to the city in sixteen
lonths will pay for it, and over,
lhe wagon went on duty on the
lh of October. The cost of oper-
lion for the month ending No-
Imber Gth was $17.40; December,
I1.80; January, $17.95; Febru-
fy, $18.28; March, $12.60; total
lerage for the five months, $78.93.
Verage   per   month,   $15.78.     Tne
s
iriber   of  police   calls   responded
in  the five months was  1,197;
Jyerage   of   239   calls   per   month.
Jhe  number  of  hospital  calls  was
■96;   average per month, 39-   The
lumber   of   miles   run   was   2,656;
■verage per month,  531.    The old
llack maria, drawn by two horses,
pquired the services of four men,
It $75.00 each, making $300.00 for
len,    and    allowing    $30.00    per
lonth   for    feed    ol   horses,   and
lio.oo for repairs and harness and
hoeing, makes up a total of $340.00
tr  month,  or  $4,080.00 per year.
lie auto patrol requires only two
len at $75.00 each, making $150.00
lid  operating  expenses  of  $ 15*78»
I total   of   $165.78,   or   $1,980.36
Ir year.    The saving to the city
1 one year is $2,090.64.    Thus in
kteen   months   the   saving   alone
111  pay the cost of the wagon."
hite Garage
"Cars of Quality"
Vhite Pleasure and Commercial
Cars
I18 WHARF ST.       Phone 2908
SPEED WELL
Model-11 F, Seven Passenger, 50 Horse Power, Special Touring Car
Victoria Motor Company
Sole Agents for Vancouver Island for Speedwell Pleasure Cars
and Speedwell Trucks
Garage and Salesroom, 926 Johnson St., Victoria, B. C.
Telephone 2861
WHITE
Delivery Car
The experience of Marshall Field
& Company of Chicago points a
moral that will guide or at least
encourage investigation. Marshall
Field & Company have always
known what each and every operation in their establishment costs
and what relation tlle cost of each
division of their business bore toward the whole. They have for
years maintained a cost system at
their stable and they knew the cost
of delivering each parcel each mile,
so when they began "a try out"
with a few motors they had a
basis for comparison.
"It is worth-, of note that their
experiment with a few motor
wagons led them to install many.
It has beeu the same with other
concerns where the cost has been
known—the motor Delivery Car
has stayed."
White Garage
Cars of Quality
White Pleasure and Commercial Cars.
1218 Wharf Street
Phone 2908
Everitt 30
"The Aristocrat" 110 in Wheel Base, 30 H. P. $1750
Hanover-Trotter Motor Co.
Distributors
Garage and Salesroom, 931 View Street
Telephone 2346
WHITE
A White "Six" for
1912
Ask For Demonstration
Believing that there was a demand unfilled for an American car
of practically unlimited power and
speed—built according to the best
engineering practice; a car tllat
would bc economical to maintain
and easy to operate—the WHITE
Company has built for 1012 a six-
cylinder "sixty" which has all of
the features which havc individualized the WHITE Gasoline
Car since its appearance.
White Garage
Cars of Quality
"White   Pleasure  and   Commercial Cars"
1218 WHARF STREET
Phone 2908
The Place to
Buy Your Furniture
Office Desks and Chairs
a Specialty
Our Prices are Right.
The New Furniture Store
734 Pandora Street, between
Douglas & Blanchard
Phone L2649 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1911
36.    Page    2
■'Marie  Corelli'
(Erratum:     Vol.    IX.   No
Col.   2,  11.  83  and  84.    For
read ''Edna Lyall.")
There! That is how it is done by
the best authors when they are caught
napping. I had hoped that nobody
would have noticed a little thing like
that, but of course a critic of public
modes and morals must expect to
"get it in the neck" when he gives
his readers the chance, and early on
Monday morning I was questioned
closely regarding the authorship of
"The Autobiography of a Slander" by
a constant reader of this paper, and
Tuesday's mail brought a brief reminder that I must be more careful
in future. All I can say is that if
Edna Lyall had not written the book
Marie Corelli would have done sn.
and in any case the authorship of the
book did not enter into the point of
the argument. However, I beg to
thank my critics for reading my lines
with such attention and for taking
the trouble to set me right.
* *   *
In these luxurious days of modern
civilization people become accustomed to having everything done for
them. An elevator boy takes them
to the top of a building; a street car
takes them to whatever part of the
city they desire to reach; a telephone
wire carries their orders to their
tradesmen—in short it would seem
as though all that were needed now-
a-days is for a person to keep alive
and civilization does the rest. I think,
however, that the civic authorities in
Victoria carry this doctrine to extreme lengths, for they not only provide a hospital for the treatment of
invalids but they try to provide the
invalids right at the hospital's door.
It is quite superfluous charity on their
part to undertake to maim and cripple visitors to the Jubilee Hospital
just because excellent accomodation
is afforded therein. Possibly it may
be a new advertising scheme, but if
it is I may state that it is not at all
appreciated by those who have occasion to go to the Hospital. The sidewalk leading to the main entrance
to the Jubilee Hospital is in a disgracefully dangerous state and needs
prompt attention.
* *   *
In many cities there is a by-law
whicii compels owners of automobiles to draw their machines right up
to the edge of the sidewalk before
they leave them standing there.
Whether such a by-law is in existence in Victoria I do not know, but
if it is not it would seem to me that
such a law might very well be passed.
Many men leave their cars out in the
street for hours together and though
this would cause little or no inconvenience if the-latter were pulled up
close to the curb, it often does cause
an inconvenience when they are left
some feet away from it. This point
was brought to my attention this
week by a man who can by no manner of means be called a "motorphobe." He merely suggested that
the matter should be brought to the
notice of« automobilists who would
immediately see the force of the contention.
*   *   *
I made some mention last week
with regard to the turning out of the
cluster lamps on our principal streets
at what seemed to me to be an absurdly early hour. It would appear
that there was another reason for
my suggestion than the one I gave,
viz., that it would be more merciful
to people who missed the last car to
extend the hour. I learn that within
the last few days two barber's poles
have been abstracted from their place
on Fort Street. One has since been
returned but the other, at the time
of writing—is not. Now I doubt
whether any person would have allowed his high spirits to run away
with him to this extent if the street
had been properly lighted. This sort
of abstraction is usually the outcome
of a sportive frame of mind induced
by the wine when it is red, and there
is always someone in the party who
shrinks from such a line of conduct
in the glare of a civic lamp. I do not
think it is asking too much if I put
in a plea for the extension of the
"lights out" hour to one o'clock a.m.
* * *
I have heard all sorts of opinions
expressed with respect to the sideshows which were erected on the
burnt area as a preliminary to the
carnival which is scheduled for this
week, and I have had all sorts of suggestions for items for this column.
But I think that it would be fairer
to refrain making any comment on
the matter till the week is over and
it is possible to take into consideration the whole scheme of the carnival. As my copy has to be turned
in long before the serious part of
the business is due to arrive, I have
made up my mind to say nothing at
all this week, but to devote a portion
of my space next week to a review
of the various items on the bill of
fare provided.
I have been much encouraged in
my campaign against the City authorities and David Spencer, Ltd., by
the receipt of the letter which I reproduce below. During the current
week the nuisance has not been so
pronounced, but I am inclined to
think that for this we have to be
thankful to Jupiter Pluvius rather
than to any change in the indifferent
attitude of the firm in question or
tiie City Council. I have noticed that
though Broad Street ceased for the
nonce to look like a bargain counter,
there were many packing-cases only
waiting for a temporary dry spell to
disgorge their contents. However,
this week I will let my correspondent
voice my complaints. His letter reads
as follows:—
Victoria, Sept. n, 1911.
Lounger,
The Week, Victoria.
My dear Lounger:
I'm glad- to see that there is someone in Victoria who can and is not
afraid to "kick," even if it has to be
registered through the columns of
The Week. What I refer to is the
privilege which seems to have been
granted to the D. Spencer Co. of
heaping the sidewalk on Broad street
with big packing cases. To look at
the street sometimes one would think
that Broad street at that point was
part of that so called "department
store," and that people were only tolerated on the sidewalk through the
beneficence of the D. Spencer Co.
Coming from the East and more
recently from Vancouver, I can profess to know something of conditions
in this regard in these places. In
both Toronto and Vancouver such a
bold-faced usurpation of the public's
rights would not be tolerated at all.
In most of the stores in these cities
all goods are brought ill and unpacked on the premises of the stores
—not on the public domain, ancl
more than tbat the delivering is done
during the wee small hours of the
morning so that the public is put to
no inconvenience. In Eaton's, Toronto, store goods are brought in
from the factory by means of a connecting tunnel under the street. In
Vancouver the regulations affecting
the unpacking of goods are strictly
enforced by the police and no firm
is specially privileged to make use
of the public highway. More than
this, most of the delivering is done
after business hours. All this is just
to show you how 'tis done in other
cities.
In Victoria, I understand that there
is a civic regulation dealing with this
nuisance, but why the D. Spencer Co.
should be without the pale of its enforcement is something whicii is
neither to the credit of the city nor
the methods of that firm. Why this
firm cannot have its goods delivered
in the evening after business hours,
or at least do their unpacking on
their own premises, is a puzzle to
me.
But what really prompted this
effusion and my commendation of
your "kicking" is the fact that I have
recently had practical experience with
one of the steel bindings whicii bind
the boxes. As I was going along the
narrow passageway, by courtesy allowed the public, dodging other pedestrians in a similar plight, one of
these wire bindings caught my overcoat and made a neat little rip over
an inch long. And I haven't had it
fixed yet. I can show it to you if
you wish. I hope you will keep up
your hammering until the proper
authorities realize that public opinion
is against this privileged disrespect
of our civic laws.
Yours truly,
PUBLIC OPINION.
Now that the glorious weather of
the last few weeks has broken and
there appears every probability of our
settling down to the average fall
weather when it is usually safer to
carry an umbrella than not, I would
beg for more consideration on the
part of those who use them. There
is one umbrella fiend who is fit to be
classed with the "road-hog," the
"boat-rocker" and sundry other pests,
and that is the man who persists in
carrying his "gamp" tucked under one
arm with the point sticking out behind. This is a failing which afflicts
the sterner sex only. To their credit
be it said that the ladies never carry
their umbrellas thus, and it is a bad
habit which seems to come wit!1 years.
The inveterate offender is almost always an elderly gentleman with an
extremely peppery temper. He is the
typical retired Indian officer as depicted by the novelists, who tell us
that he has been brought up on
curry and chutney and possesses the
Indian liver. I hasten to say that I
have no actual Victorian in my mind's
eye when I write this, nor do I wish
to cast a stigma on the Indian officer.
I use the character as the novelists
hand him to us. I confess that I
have a relative at home whose portrait I am using, but as he doesn't
subscribe to The Week he will not
mind, and as I know that I am not
mentioned in his will, I don't mind.
But there are many elderly men in
Victoria who do endanger the public
eye by their method of umbrella
carrying and it is to them that this
appeal is made by the
(&x
VTt*yi*,
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Vernon Court-house.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed "Tender for Court-house, Vernon," will be received by the Honourable the Minister of
Public Works up to 12 o'clock noon of
Thursday, the 21st day of September, 1911,
for thc erection and completion of a Courthouse at Vernon, B.C., in the Okanagan
Jilectoral   District.
Plans, specifications, bills of quantities, contract and forms of tender may bc seen on
or after the 31st day of August, 1911, at
the offices of the Government Agents, Vernon, Revelstoke, New Westminster, Nelson;
the Provincial Timber Inspector, Vancouver;
and the Department of Public Works, Parliament  Buildings,  Victoria,  B.C.
Intending tenderers can ,by applying to
the undersigned, obtain one copy of the
drawings and one copy of the specifications
and bills of guantities for the sum of twenty-
five dollars  ($25).
Each tender must be accompanied by an
accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made
payable to the Honourable the Minister of
Public Works, for a sum equal to five (5)
per cent, of liis tender, which shall be forfeited if the party tendering decline to enter
into contract when called upon to do so.
The cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them
upon the execution  of the contract.
Tenders   will    not    be    considered
made out on the forms supplied, signed with
the   actual   signature   of   the   tenderer,   "   '
unless
vith
and
enclosed in the envelopes furnished.
The  lowest  or  any  tender  not  necessarily
accepted.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C., August 24th, 1911.
sept. 2 sept. 16
What "Good Scotch"
Has Done
"Whusky an' parridge are the makin' o' a man.   Bruce
an' Wallace won __' their battles o' them.   Burns built his
poetry o'   them.    They   are   the   secret of   Scotland's
greatness."
Purest and best matured of all Scotch Whiskies is
Bonnie Scotland's favorite, known as Johnnie Walker's
Kilmarnock. It is absolutely pure and mellowed by age
—the standard of highest excellence. That's why every
first-class club, hotel, bar and restaurant in B. C stocks
"Johnnie Walker." Your dealer can supply you for home
use.   Insist upon getting Kilmarnock Scotch.
PITHER   &   LEISER
Sole Agents
Cor. Fort & Wharf Sts., Victoria, Water St., Vancouver,
and Nelson, B. C.
JAMES BUCHANAN & CO., by Royal Appointment
Purveyors to H. M. King George the V and the Royal Householl
Distillers of the popular
"Black & White" Scotch Whisk]
Unsurpassed in Purity, Age and Flavor
All DealeJ
Zh_
SONGHEE GRDJ
Is the talk of the town.    Music 6.30 to 8.30 p.r
and 10.30 to 12 midnight.    Courteous Waiters
Bright Lights & the best food, prepared
by the best Chef, and——Oh ! well
what's the use?   Go see for
yourself at
The Hotel Westholiw
Everybody Knows Where It Is
Huntley &? Palme
Are the greatest manufacturers of Biscuits in the world.
In 1878 and 1900 they were awarded the Grand Prize at the Pal
Exhibition.   The terms of the award were:
1878
"Unrivalled House, known throughout the world for its enormc
production and for the excellent quality of its manufactures."
1900
"This firm has not ceased to progress either in the extension I
its business or in the excellence of its manufactures."
We have just imported the finest assortment of H. & P. Biscul
ever brought to this city.
H. 0. Kirkham & Co., Lte
741, 743, 745 Fort Street
Grocery Store Butcher Shop Liquor Store
Tels. 178, 179 Tel. 2678 Tel. 2677
Headqua]
for First
Nursery
both Frui\
Ornamet,
A few more Responsible Ag)
wanted, resident Fruitgrower|
Horticulturists preferred.
Layritz Nurseries
Carey Road
Victoria, THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER lb, 1911
■«*^)!55^*i
BUILDING PERMITS
SEPTEMBER 7 TO 13
ptember 7—
Walsh & Bonnell—Moss St.—Dwelling $ 1,950
W. H. Jones—Maple St.—Store   100
A. Marshall—Cecil St.—Dwelling  1,500
Simmon & Hawkins—Cedar Hill Rd.—Dwelling  2,500
Geo. Jones—Chambers St.—Dwelling   1,950
W. B. Smith—Sunnyside Ave.—Dwelling  2,000
B. C. L. & I. Agency—Yates and Douglas—Store  2,450
Member 8—
W. B. Rivercomb—Belmont and Vining—Dwelling  5,400
M. Powell—Clarence St.—Garage   120
)tember 9—
McAdam & Gaudett—Beechwood St.—Dwelling  1,800
itember 11—
J. H. Sledge—Bank St.—Dwelling   3,000
[Wm. Bownass—Douglas St.—Dwelling  15,000
|H. S. Knott—Belmont ancl Gladstone—Dwelling   2,500
IW. H. Tippett—Blackwood—Dwelling   1,400
Ia. E. Newberry—Maple St.—Dwelling  750
[Edwin Noble—Shakespeare St.—Dwelling  1,000
ptember 12—
|R. E. Blakway—Rendall St.—Dwelling *.  1,600
|D. R. Kerr—Pandora and Cook—Store ancl Apt  3,800
Jos. Wiley—Edgeware St.—Dwelling  400
iVVm. Marshall—Fourth St.—Dwelling  400
JS. C. Pearce—Fifth St.—Dwelling  800
|M. B. Pollock—Mt. Tolmie Road—Dwelling   1,950
ID. G. McBeath—Andrew St.—Dwelling  2,800
Itember 13— '
|R. Endean—Cecil St.—Dwelling   1,800
A. Harris—Chandler St.—Dwelling  4,600
|D. S. Tait—Foul Bay Road—Dwelling  5,500
SIR WILLIAM WHYTE
| At sixty-eight, the strenuous' man requires a rest. Some think
-five and fifty old enough to retire from the brunt of business
lie Sir William Whyte is within two years of three score ancl ten,
lhas decided that at the end of the month he will endeavour to think
labout the technicalities of running the Western Canadian section
1 big railway. Since 1897, as vice-president of the Canadian Pacific
Iway he has managed their lines west of Fort William. It is
cult for a transportation genius such as Sir William to disentagle
pelf from the web of railroad steel which he has helped to spin.
It will not be an easy task to drop a railroading experience of nearly
1 a century to fritter away time and think of past achievements and
lacing the deck of semi-idleness. Even had Sir William a strong
re along that line, the Canadian Pacific Railway directors would
llike the benefit of his counsel.
|When the Western vice-president reached mile-post sixty-five on
[ailroad of life he was approached by Sir Shaughnessy, the presi-
and requested to remain in office a few years longer. This was
|narkable compliment to the vice-president, for those who preside
Jthe destinies of big railroad corporations think that at sixty-five
|isefulness of their officials should be rewarded by retirement,
are the words of Sir Thomas himself in making the announce-
at Winnipeg this week:—
J'The period at which the connection of Sir William Whyte, of
|ompany, might have been severed under the regulations was three
ago. At that time, at my urgent request ancl solicitation, he
bnted to remain in the service of the company a few years longer.
William has now advised me that he has decided to retire ancl to
Id the balance of his life in rest. It has consequently been agreed
lie board of directors that he should retire from the active control
lie lines in Western Canada on September 30th next. The Cana-
IPacific will not, however, lose the great benefit of the experience
lir William. It has been decided that he be elected to the board,
lie will continue his service to the company in that capacity."
IThus Sir William Whyte, whom King George made a Knight
|elor in June, becomes a member of the Canadian Pacific direc-
|e. His great interest in the welfare of the line will thus be main-
Id as it would have clone anyway.
sir William's career in Canada has been yet another example of
can be accomplished by a plodding individual who chooses a
bular avocation and sticks to it. Born in Scotland in 1843, he
to Canada as a young man of twenty years of age. After seven
^' service with the Grand Trunk Railway he was made freight
at Stratford, but in 1883 he resigned ancl became general super-
Ident of the Credit Valley Railway. He then became connected
Jthe Toronto, Grey and Bruce Railway, which later became part
le Canadian Pacific system. In 1886 he became general superin-
pnt of the western division, and in 1897 he was manager of Cana-
| Pacific lines west of Fort William. He is also a director of the
sh Columbia Southern Railway.
Somehow Sir William has always been regarded as a Western
although in close touch with the chords that vibrate the national
liercial system.   He likes the West.   He knows its problems inti-
\y.   Only a few months ago he gave The Monetary Times his
Residence  Phone F1693
Business Phone 1804
W.D'O.RocMort
Architect
Plans and Specifications on
Application
Suite 407 Pemberton Block
The
Taylor Mill Co.
Limited
All kinds of Building Material
Lumber   .'   Sash   .'   Dooi
Telephone 564
North Government Street, Victoria
Blue Printing
Maps
Draughting
Surveyors'  Instruments  and
Drawing  Office  Supplies
Electric Blue Print & Map
Company
1218 Langley Street, Victoria, B. C.
ftfflpmi
THE BEST OrEVEBYTHING
IN THE HEART Or THE CUT
135RO0HSWlThBATt1-5Q5A_.PLEl.O0HS
You  Can  Keep  Posted on all  Developments
in  the  Peace  River, the  Cariboo  and
Fort George
Country, Reading Our
FREE Monthly
B. C. Bulletin of
Information
which gives all the news impartially, clipped
from the leading dailies, weeklies, and magazines; articles bearinsr on British Columbia,
covering Farm Lands, Fruit, Lumbering,
Mining, Fishing, New Railways; laso synopsis of Land, Lumber, Mining, Immigration
and other laws.
WE   ARE   JOINT   OWNERS   AND
SOLE AGENTS OF THE
FORT  GEORGE TOWNMTE
at thc junction of i ioo miles of navigable waterways, the strategic point for
the building of the second largest city of
British Columbia, having more varied and
important  natural   advantages  than   Spokane.
Seven  railroads building and projected.
One hundred million dollars (estimated)
will be spent in next five 'years in railroad
building   radiating   from   Fort   George.
Millions of agricultural acres waiting for
farmers.
Coal, timber lands, water power and rich
gold mining country all tributary to Fort
George.
Write us today. We don't ask you to
buy: just get posted—then do what you
think is wise.
Natural Resources
Securities Co.,
Ltd.
.__   BOWER   BLDj.,  VANCOUVER,   B.C.
643   PORT   ST.,   VICTORIA,   B.C.
Clover Hill
All Good High Lots-The
best buy in the City for a
Home.  Prices, $500 to $900
Terms: IO per cent Cash and io per cent Quarterly
Green & Burdick Bros.
Phone 1518
Cor. Broughton & Langley St.
CanadianOrientalLandlnvestment
Company, Limited
(To be Incorporated under the "Companies Act of British Columbia, 1910,"
with Amending Acts)
CAPITAL    -    -    -    $100,000.00
Divided into 10,000 Shares of $10.00 each.
DIRECTORS
CHARLES PASEDAG ALLAN, ESQ.,
Messrs. C. P. Allan & Co., Green Building, Victoria, B.C.
JAMES HERRICK McGREGOR, ESQ.,
Messrs.  Gore & McGregor,   1218  Langley  Street,  Victoria,   B.C.
REGINALD NOTON HINCKS, ESQ.,
Savoy Mansions, Victoria, B.C.
BIGGERSTAFF WILSON, ESQ.,
B. Wilson Company, Ltd., Herald Street, Victoria, B.C.
BANKERS      -     -     BANK OF BRITISH NORTH AMERICA
SOLICITORS     -     Messrs. EBERTS & TAYLOR, n 14 Langley St., Victoria, B.C.
AUDITOR     -     W. CURTIS SAMPSON, C.A., Langley St., Victoria, B.C.
GENERAL MANAGERS     ■     -     C. P. ALLAN & CO.,
HEAD OFFICE     -     -     GREEN BUILDING, VICTORIA, B.C.
Date of this Prospectus—July 25, ion.    Copies of the Prospectus together with
share-application forms may be obtained from thc Bankers, the Bank of British North
America, or from the General Managers, Messrs. C. P. ALLAN & CO., 31 Green Blk.
We desire to announce that we have opened offices in Rooms
304 and 305 Bailey Building, Handling, Seattle, Wash., handling
Stocks, Bonds, Grain and Cotton, strictly on a Commission Basis,
in the various markets of the world. Mr. Carl L. Miller, who has
long been connected with important brokerage firms in the west,
will be in charge.
We are members of the Chicago Board of Trade. Our
Eastern correspondents are S. B. Chapin & Co., and Logan &
Bryan, of Chicago and New York, members of all Exchanges.
Private leased wire connections enable quick dispatch in handling
all business intrusted to us for execution.
Having carried on a successful brokerage business in Victoria,
B.C., for the past 10 years, we refer you to any bank, firm or
individual of that city as to our standing and integrity.
Respectfully,
F. W. STEVENSON & CO.
Frank  W.   Stevenson
Walter   H.   Murphey
Seattle, March 6, ign.
Royal Bank Chambers
Vidtoria, B. C.
Thomas Hooper
jjrehited
522 Winch Building
Vancouver, B. C.
Give Your
Typist Good
Stationery
and She'll Give
You Better
Work
Baxter & Johnson Co.
Umllti
721 Yates St. Phone 730 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1911
views on what he termed the "wheat madness" of the Western Canadian farmer?   His advice is worth repeating:—
"There is one bad feature," he said, "in connection with farming
in the three prairie provinces, and that is that the farmers are 'wheat
mad'; that is, they are devoting the whole of their time and attention
to the growing of wheat to the exclusion of dairy products. As an
illustration: the Canadian Pacific imports nearly all chickens used in
its dining cars and hotels from the United States. Eighty carloads of
eggs came into Winnipeg from the United States last year. That
represents twelve millions of eggs. We are now importing cream into
Winnipeg from the United States. Celery and other vegetables are
imported, ancl butter is not infrequently imported from Ontario.
"This condition of affairs is to be deplored, because the money
that is sent from this country into the United States for articles that
can as well be produced in our own country is a great loss to the
country, but so long as the fanner can make the growing of wheat
profitable he will not, I fear, turn his attention to mixed farming,
because there is less labour attached to the growing of wheat than
mixed farming. The wheat-growing farmer, after he has disposed of
his wheat, has no further responsibility on his farm, except the care of
his horses, ancl this can be taken care of by a hired man, whereas if
he was following mixed farming to any extent he would have to live on
the farm all the year or hire a responsible man to look after the care
of the pigs, cattle, poultry, etc."
It is good to know that Sir William Whyte will still be among his
friends, both Eastern and Western, that he will still remain as a friend
ancl counsellor of the Canadian Pacific Railway and of the people of
Canada. There is every wish for the restful period of life which Sir
William has so well earned.
But it may be that that period will be spent in the office of the
High Commissioner for Canada in London.—The Monetary Times.
BRITISH  TRADE IN  CANADA
Mr. Richard Grigg, British Trade Commissioner in Canada, in his
recent report, while emphasising the necessity for greater enterprise on
the part of British manufacturers, points out that the successful development of closer trade relations between Canada and Great Britain
will depend quite as much upon a reasonable goodwill ancl support on
the part of Canadians being forthcoming. "Thus, for instance," says
Mr. Grigg, "in connection with the large growing needs of the municipal authorities throughout Canada, the period allowed to contractors in
England for sending in tenders is frequently too short, so that no
effective British tender can be rendered, and it has happened on many
occasions that excuses have been sought and found under which the
lowest British tender has not been accepted; and in one case a local
producer was allowed to address the council after learning that the
engineer had recommended the acceptance of a British tender. The
result in persisting in such a policy would obviously be that outside
tenders would cease when the tendering firms were convinced that
Grand Trunk Pacific
Investors
The construction of the new transcontinental railway—the Grand Trunk
Pacific—is to-day opening up new towns that in the very near future will be
large and important cities. Just as the advent of the pioneer transcontinental
line—The Canadian Pacific—opened and built up divisional points such as
Brandon, Regina, Calgary, Lethbridge, etc., so will the new line of the Grand
Trunk make large divisional points of the towns we now orier for sale.
We have secured the agency from the GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC RAILWAY CO. for the towns mentioned below and the shrewd investors who can
recognize the many advantages for investment in these towns at the prices of
today, will share in the large profits that will accrue as a result of their rapid
development. No other investment is so safe and profitable, and if you want
to get your portion of the wealth Western Canada's development is creating,
take advantage of this opportunity now before it is too late.
Prices of lots in all of these divisional points are $75, $100, $150, $200, $250
and $300 on easy monthly payments, no interest and no taxes till 1912, with a
5 per cent, discount for cash.
MELVILLE—The first Saskatchewan divisional point on the G. T. P. and
the largest new town on the line between Winnipeg and Edmonton, Located
in a rich agricultural district, an important railroad and distributing centre.
Melville bids fair to become one of the important cities of Western Canada.
WATROUS—The mecca of the health seeker, situate near the shores of
the famous Little Manitou Lake, and in the centre of one of the finest farming
sections of Saskatchewan.
BIGGAR—The opportunity of opportunities, located in the heart of a
wonderfully rich and fertile agricultural district, and with railway facilities that
guarantee a future, being not only one of the most important Grand Trunk
Pacific divisional points on the main line between Winnipeg and Edmonton, but
is the junction of the branch lines of the Grand Trunk Pacific to Battleford
and Calgary, which will be hurried to completion at an early date. The C. P. R.
runs through Biggar, and all C. P. R. trains stop there.
TOFIELD—The terminus of the branch line from Calgary, situate near the
shores of the Beaver Lake. The discovery of natural gas and of clay, and having
at its door several square miles underlaid with lignite coal, promise the development at Tofield of important manufacturing industries.
EDSON—The last prairie divisional point on main line of Grand Trunk
Pacific, and the gateway to the Peace River Country. Rich in natural resources,
Edson lots fulfill every requirement for safe and profitable investment.
REMEMBER THE PRICES, $75.00 to $300.00, and terms of one-tenth cash
and balance in nine equal monthly payments—no interest.
Pemberton & Son
Exclusive Agents for Victoria and Vancouver
CORNER FORT AND BROAD STREETS
F. KROEGER
ARTISTIC UPHOLSTER''
" Windowphanie"
Ma..es Stained Glass out of Plain Glasl
Has Removed to 721 Courtney Streei
Opposite Alexandra Clnb Telephone 114J
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
their labour was in vain; and there would follow an agreement among
local producers as to prices which could not be to the advantage of the
Canadian taxpayer, to say nothing of the reflection upon Canada's
credit and fair play in the financial centre of the Empire."
STEAMSHIP  THAT  USES   OIL
A novel cargo vessel for the Canadian Great Lakes has been
despatched from an English yard across the Atlantic under its own
power, which those who know say will revolutionise the carrying trade.
This vessel is equipped with a Diesel oil engine and measures 241 ft.,
has 42y_ ft. beam, a draught of 14 ft., and burns or explodes about 1-.4
tons of crude oil a day. Crude oil in Canada costs lj^d. a gallon,
whereas gasoline is worth lOd. Her fuel oil is carried like ballast, as
water is carried in other great freight boats. The advantages of this
new type of carrier are extra hold space, extra deadweight carrying
capacity, extra economy of fuel and of labour; no stokers are
necessary.
Vernon Court-house ,
NOTICE is hereby given that the timel
receiving tenders for Court-house, Vernonl
extended up to 12 o'clock noon, Friday, I
day of September, 1911, I
J.  E.  GRIFFITH,
Public Works EnginesJ
Department  of   Public  Works,
Victoria, B.C., uth September, 1911.
sept. 16 sepl
NOTICE is hereby given that under 1
pursuant to the Revised Statutes of CaJ
1906, Chapter 115, Robert Ward and (J
pany, Limited Liability, will apply tol
Governor-General in Council for approval
the plan and site for the erection of a Wofl
Wharf in front of Lot 1299, Block 46, 1
ley Farm Subdivision, City of Victoria.
A plan of the said p-oposed Wharf af
descriptjon by metes and bounds of thef
posed site of same have been deposited
the   Minister   of   Public   Works   at   OttL
and   duplicates   thereof  have  been   depot
in  the office of  the  R-gistrar  of  Deedf
the   said   City   of   Victoria,   the   same
the  Land Registry  Office at Victoria
said.
Dated  at  Victoria,   B.C.,   this   4th   dal
September, 1911.
A. S. INNES,
Solicitor for Robert Ward & ComJ
Limited Liability,   Applicant.
SAYWARD LAND DISTRICT
TAKE NOTICE that Harold Ware
ter of Hazelmere,  B.C., occupation Milll
intends to apply for permission  to purl
the   following  described lands:-—CommeJ
at a post planted at the southwest cornl
Lot 501, Sayward District, Province ofl
ish Columbia, thence north 35 chains; til
west   60   chains;   tbence   south   35   chi
thence east 60 chains to point of comml
ment, and containing 160 acres more orl
Dated  August   21st,   1911. r
HAROLD WARE HUNT!)
sept. 2
AN   APPOSITE  CASE
Teacher—"Sammy, in the sentcncl
have a book,' what is the case of thej
noun   'I'?"
Sammy  (promptly)—"Nominative easel
Teacher—"Next boy, tell me in what|
to put the noun 'book'."
Next   Boy   (thoughtfully)—"Bookcase j
The
a
Great White Way"
Let Victoria be known for its beautiful, well lighted
stores and streets. We stand ready to do our
part by extending favourable rates to all classes
of service. May we advise you on installing
hanging or roof signs, ancs or general lighting?
B. C. Electric Railway Co., Limited
P. O. Box 1580
Light and Power Department
Telephone 1609 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1911
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
I District of Coast, Range 3
I TAKE notice that John J. Harte, of Vic-
bria, occupation Clerk, intends to apply for
lermission to purchase the following described
lnds:—Commencing at a post planted about
Ive miles south of the south end of Pendosy
lake; thence east eighty chains; thence north
Ighty chains; thence west eighty chains;
lience south eighty chains to point of com-
lencement and containing 640 acres.
IDated   30th   May,   1911
JOHN J. HARTE;
lg. 12
rank  Hallett,  Agent,
oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
. District of Coast,  Range 3
ITAKE notice that Harry Catterall, of Vic-
Iria, occupation Contractor, intends to apply
p- permission to purchase the following de-
(ribed lands;—Commencing at a post plant-
about three miles south of the south end
Pendosy Lake-, thence east eighty chains;
lence   south   eighty   chains;    thence   west
ghty   chains;   thence   north   eighty   chains
point   of   commencement   and   containing
■0 acres.
■Dated 30th May. ign.
■ HARRY CATTERALL.
Frank  Hallett,  Agent,
i oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE   notice   that   Albert   L.   Petty,   of
ktoria, occupation Insurance Agent, intends
I apply for permission to purchase the foiling   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
kt planted on the northwest shore of the
Irrows between Morice and Pendosy Lake,
lnce north sixty chains, thence east eighty
bins,   more  or  less   to  the   west  shore  of
Irice Lake; thence following the west shore
[Morice Lake in a southerly and westerly
lection eighty chains more or less to point
[commencement, and containing three hun-
Id acres more or less.
Pated 28th May, iqii.
I ALBERT L. PETTY.
Frank  Hallett,  Agent.
:! oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 3
f AKE notice that John P. Hicks, of Vic-
la, occupation ■— , intends to apply
I permission to purchase the following de-
Ibed lands:—Commencing at a post plant-
lone-half mile south of the south end of
Idosy Lake; thence east eighty chains;
Vice south eighty chains; thence west
Ity chains; thence nortli eighty chains
■ point of commencement and containing
I acres.
fated 29th May, 1011,
r JOHN P. HICKS.
Frank  Hallett,   Agent,
oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
|AKE   notice   that   George   Ernest   Jubb,
victoria,   occupation   Real   Estate   Agent,
nds to apply for permission to purchase
I following described  lands:—Commencing
post planted on the south-east shore of
^ Bay, Morice Lake; thence south eighty
Ins;   thence   west   eighty   chains;   thence
|h eighty chains more or less to the south
of Atna Bay, Morice Lake; thence fol-
pig  the  south  bank  of  Atna   Bay  in  an
fcrly direction eighty chains more or less
lie point of commencement  and contain-
[640  acres more or  less.
lted 28th May,  1911.
' GEORGE ERNEST JUBB.
Frank  Hallett,  Agent,
oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
kKE notice that John G. Brown, of Vic
I occupation Dominion Architect, intends
nply for permission to purchase the fol-
Ig described lands:—Commencing at a
{planted about one-half miles south of
louth end of Pendosy Lake; thence east
ly chains; thence north eighty chains;
le west sixty chains more or less to the
Jbank of Pendosy Lake; thence follow-
■the east bank of Pendosy Lake sixty
Is more or less to a point due north
|oint   of   commencement;   thence   south
chains more or  less  to point of com-
lenient and containing 500 acres more or
lted 29th May, 1911.
JOHN G.  BROWN.
Frank  Hallett,  Agent,
oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
, District of Coast, Range 3
IKE notice that William C. Browne, of
Iria, occupation Insurance Agent, intends
Iply for permission to purchase the fol-
Tg described lands:—Commencing at a
jplanted on the south shore of Atna Bay,
|e Lake; thence east eighty chains;
north eighty cliains; thence west sixty
more or less to the east bank of Atna
Ithence following the east bank of Atna
In a southerly and westerly direction
I chains more or less to point of com-
■ment and containing 400 acres more or
td  28th  May,   1011.
WILLIAM C. BROWNE.
Frank   Hallett,   Agent,
oct. 7
I VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
ICE notice that Edwin M. Brown, of
■ ia, occupation Real Estate, intends to
for permission to purchase the fol-
- described lands:—Commencing at a
Jilanted on the south-west side of Pen-
Lake; thence south eighty chains; thence
leighty chains; thence north eighty
I more or less to the south-west bank of
■sy Lake; thence following the bank of
■sy Lake in an easterly direction eighty
I more or less to point of commence-
land containing 640 acres more or less,
pd 30th May,  ign.
EDWIN M. BROWN.
Frank   Hallett,  Agent,
oct. 7
I VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
_CE   notice   that   Alfred   C.   Lovick,   of
■ia,  occupation Clerk, intends to apply
■rmission to purchase the following de-
jl lands:—Commencing at a post plant-
Jout  one-half  mile   south   of   the   south
If   Pendosy   Lake;   thence   west   eighty
;   thence north  eighty chains more  or
the south-west bank of Pendosy Lake;
j following the bank of  Pendosy  Lake
■ easterly and southerly direction eighty
1 more or less to a point due north of
bf  commencement,   thence   soutli   forty
J more  or less to  point of commence-
land containing 400 acres more or less.
Id 28th May,  19:1. _.„.„„„
I ALFRED C. LOVICK.
Frank  Hallett,  Agent,
oct. 7
I VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
J District of Coast, Range 3 , ...
|_E notice that Clement Goss, of Vic-
I occupation Insurance Agent, intends
Iply for permission to purchase the
lng described lands:—Commencing at
I planted on the south shore of the
Ivs between Morice and Pendosy Lake,
T soutli eighty chains; thence west
■fchains, more or less to the east bank
■Idosy Lake; thence following the east
■of Pendosy Lake in a northerly and
ly direction eighty chains, more or
1 point of commencement and con-
300 acres more or less.
|d 28th May, ign.
CLEMENT  GOSS.
Frank   Hallett,   Agent,
oct. 7
■■ttAJtfi''""" * ___•
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE  notice  that  James   L.   Armson,   of
Victoria, occupation Retired, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted  about  one  mile  south-east  of Atna   Bay,
Morice    Lake;    thence   east   eighty   chains;
thence south eighty chains; thence west eighty
chains;   thence  north  eighty  chains  to point
of commencement  and  containing 640  acres,
more or less.
Dated 28th May,  1911.
JAMES L. ARMSON.
Frank  Hallett,  Agent,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range  .3
TAKE  notice  that  Albert   E.   Christie,   of
Victoria, occupation Banker, intends to apply
for permission  to  purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about three miles south of the south end
of Pendosy Lake; thence east eighty chains;
thence    south    eighty    chains;    thence    west
eighty   chains;   tnence   north   eighty   chains
to   point   of   commencement   and   containing
640 acres.
Dated  30th   May,   iqii,
ALBERT E. CHRISTIE.
Frank  Hallett,  Agent,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that John F. Mason, of Vic-
toria, occupation Merchant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about one-half mile south of the south
end of Pendosy Lake; thence west eighty
chains; thence south eighty chains; thence
east eighty chains; thence north eighty chains
to point of commencement and containing
640 acres.
Dated   29th   May,   iqii.
JOHN F. MASON.
Frank  Hallett,  Agent,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that William T. Williams, of
Victoria, occupation Merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
describea lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the south shore of the Narrows
between Morice and Pendosy Lake; thence
south eighty chains; thence east eighty chains;
thence north eighty chains more or less to
the south bank of Atna Bay; thence following the south bank of Atna Bayt eighty
chains more or less, in a westerly direction
to the point of commencement and containing
640 acres more or less.
Dated 28th  May,   1911.
WILLIAM T. WILLIAMS.
Frank  Hallett, Agent,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Peter Shandley, of Victoria, occupation Carpenter, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about three miles south of the south end of
Pendosy   Lake;   thence   east   eighty   chains;
thence    north    eighty    chains;    thence   west
eighty   chains;   thence   south   eighty   chains
to   point   of   commencement   and   containing
640 acres.
Dated 30th May, 1911.
PETER SHANDLEY.
Frank  Hallett,   Agent.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that H. Crawford Coates, of
Victoria, occupation Architect, intends to ap>
ply for permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about one-half mile south of the south end
of Pendosy Lake; thence east eighty chains;
thence   south   eighty   chains;    thence   west
eighty   chains;   tnence   north   eighty   chains
more or less to point of commencement and
containing 640 acres.
Dated 29th May, 1911.
H. CRRAWFORD COATES.
Frank   Hallett,   Agent,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that Fred. W. Jubb, of Victoria, occupation Real  Estate Agent, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post  planted  about  two  miles  south   of  the
south   end   of   Pendosy   Lake;   thence   east
eighty   chains;   thence   north   eighty   chains;
thence   west   eighty   chains;   tnence   south
eighty   chains;   to   point   of   commencement
and containing 640 acres.
Dated  30th   May,   1911,
FRED. W. JUBB.
Frank  Hallett,  Agent,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of  Coast,  Range  3
TAKE  notice  that   Maurice  M.   Meredith,
of Victoria, occupation Agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
describea    lands:—Commencing    at    a    post
planted about three miles south of the south
end   of   Pendosy   Lake;   thence   east   eighty
chains;   thence   north   eighty  chains;   thence
west    eighty   chains;    thence   south    eighty
chains   to  point  of  commencement   and   containing  640  acres  more  or  less.
Dated   30th   May.   iqii,
MAURICE M. MEREDITH.
Frank  Hallett,  Agent,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Edward Parsons, of Victoria, occupation  Clerk, intends to apply for
permission   to   purchase   the   following   described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about  two  miles south of the  south  end
of Pendosy Lake; thence north eighty chains;
thence west eighty chains; thence south eighty
chains;   thence   east   eighty_ chains   to   point
of commencement and containing 640 acres.
Dated  30th   May,   1911.
EDWARD PARSONS.
Frank   Hallett,   Agent,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE  notice  that  Gideon  Hicks,  of  Victoria, occupation  Merchant, intends to apply
for   permission   to   purchase   the   following
described   lands:—Commencing    at    a    post
planted   on   the   south   bank   of   Atna   Bay,
Morice   Lake,   thence   south   eighty   chains;
thence   east     eighty    chains;     thence   north
eighty   chains;   thence   west   eighty   chains,
more or less, to point of commencement, and
containing 640  acres more or less.
Dated 28th May,   1911.
GIDEON HICKS.
Frank  Hallett,   Agent,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Arthur Wheeler, Jr., of
Victoria, occupation Insurance Agent, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:-—Commencing at
a post planted on the north-west shore of
the Narrows between Morice and Pendosy
Lake; thence north sixty chains; thence west
eighty chains; thence south eighty chains
more or less to the north shore of Pendosy
Lake; thence following the north shore of
Pendosy Lake in an easterly direction eighty
chains more or less to point of commencement and containing 600 acres more or less.
Dated 28th  May,   ign.
ARTHUR WHEELER, JR.
Frank  Hallett,   Agent,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Ranee 3
TAKE notice that Richard W. Coleman,
of Victoria, occupation Real Estate, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about five miles south of the
south end of Pendosy Lake; thence west
eighty chains; thence north eighty chains;
thence east eighty chains; thence south eighty
chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres.
Dated 30th  May,   1911.
RICHARD W. COLEMAN.
Frank  Hallett,  Agent,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range  3
TAKE notice that Winifred Codd, of Victoria, occupation Married Woman, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about one-half mile south of
the south end of Pendosy Lake; thence
east eighty chains; thence north forty chains
more or less to the south bank of Pendosy
Lake; thence following the south bank of
Pendosy Lake in a westerly direction eighty
chains more or less to a point due north
of point of commencement; thence south
forty chains more or less to the point of
commencement and containing 300 acres more
or less.
Dated 29th May,  1911.
WINIFRED CODD.
Frank   Hallett,  Agent,
aug. 12 oct, 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Selby A.  Codd, of Regina, occupation  Merchant,  intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about  three  miles   south   of  the   south   end
of Pendosy Lake; thence west eighty chains;
thence    north    eighty    chainsj    thence   east
eighty chains;  thence south eighty chains to
point  of commencement  and  containing  640
acres.
Dated  30th  May,   iqii.
SELBY A. CODD.
Frank  Hallett,  Agent,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Roswell  Park, of London, Ontario, occupation Medical Student, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following clescribed lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the south-west corner of Lot
3i8t Coast District, Range 3; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence north
80   chains;   thence   east  80   chains  to  point
of commencement.
Dated June  7th,   iqii.
ROSWELL PARK.
aug 12 oct 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE  notice  that  Aubrey  Neff,  of  London,   Ontario, occupation  Doctor, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following
described    lands:—Commencing    at    a    post
planted at the south-west corner of Lot 318,
Coast   District,   Range   3;   thence   north   80
chains;t thence west 80 cnains; thence south
80  chains;   thence   east  80   chains  to  point
of commencement.
Dated June  7th,   iqii.
AUBREY  NEFF.
aug. 12 oct, 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Laura Lochner, of London. Ontario, occupation Spinster, intends to
apply for permission to'purchase the'following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted 2 miles west of south-west corner of
Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3, thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence northt 80 chains; thence east 80
chains,  to  point  of commencement.
Dated June 7th,  1911.
L"
aug. 12
AURA   LOCHNER
oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District   of   Coast,   Range   3
TAKE notice that Betrand La Verne Mc-
Caulley, of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation
Fireman M.C.R., intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted two
miles west of south-west corner of Lot 318,
Coast District, Range 3; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of comemncement.
Dated Tune  7th,   iqii,
BERTRAND LA VERNE McCAULLEY.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Roy Rich, of London,
Ontario, occupation Office Clerk, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted two miles west of south-west corner
of Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains, to
point of commencement.
Dated June 7th,   1911.
ROY   RICH.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that John Ginge, of London,
Ontario, occupation Traveler, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted  two miles west  of  south-west  corner  of
Lot   318,   Coast   District,   Range   3,   thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south  80  chains;   thence  west  80   chains,   to
point of commencement.
Dated  June  7th,   1911.
JOHN   GINGE.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that Meredith Dodrre Sud-
worth, of London, Ontario, occupation Medical Student, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted four miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3, thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated Tune 7th,   1911.
MEREDITH DODGE SUDWORTH.
aug. 12 oct, 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast,  Range  3
TAKE  notice   that  John   Thomson   Green,
of London, Ontario, occupation Clerk, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post  planted   four  miles   west   of  south-west
corner   of   Lot   318,    Coast   District,   Range
3,   thence   south   80  chains;   thence  west   80
cnains;  thence north  80  chains;   tnence  east
80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated  June  7th,   iqii.
JOHN THOMSON GREEN.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that Robert James Tobey, of
London, Ontario, occupation  Bank Clerk, intends   to   apply   for   permission   to   purchase
the  following  described   lands:—Commencing
at a post  planted four  miles  west  of southwest corner of Lot 318, Coast District, Range
3,   thence   north   80   chains;   thence   west   80
cnains;   thence  south  80  chfins;   thence  east
80  chains,  to  point  of  commencement.
Dated June 7th,  1911.
ROBERT  JAMES  TOBEY.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that Charles Garland Bell,
of London, Ontario, occupation Medical Student, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted four miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3, thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 cliains to point of commencement.
Dated June 7th,   1911.
CHARLES GARLAND BELL-
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Fred. Turner, of London, Ontario, occupation Medical Student,
intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted six miles west of southwest corner of Lot 318, Coast District, Range
3, thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 8p chains; thence west
80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June 7th,  ion.
FRED. TURNER.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Morley Clarence Man-
hard, of London, Ontario, occupation Bank
Clerk, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted six miles west
of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3,1 thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated June 7th, ion.
MORLEY CLARENCE MANHARD.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that Reginald Piers Hardman,
of London, Ontario, occupation Medical Student, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted six miles west of
south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast District,
Range 3, thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thenc* south 80 chains;
thence east 80 cnains, to point of commencement.
Dated June 7th,   1911.
REGINALD PIERS HARDMAN.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Jack H. McRae, of London, Ontario, occupation Medical Student, intends   to   apply   for   permission   to   purchase
the  following described  lands:—Commencing
at a post planted six miles west of south-west
corner of Lot 318, Coast  District,  Range 3,
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence  south   80    chains;    thence    west  80
chains,  to  point  of  commencement.
Dated June  7th,   iqii.
JACK H.  McRAE.
aug. 12 oct, 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Wilfred Stewart Thur-
tell, of London, Ontario, occupation Medical Student, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following describea lands:—
Commencing at a post planted eight miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3, thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; tnence west 80 chains to point of
commencement.
Dated June 8th, ion.
WILFRED STEWART THURTELL.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Ernal Bice, of London,
Ontario, occupation Medical Student, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted eight mites west of south-west
corner of Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3,
thence soutli 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
Dated June 8th, 19 n.
ERNAL   BICE,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that John Colbern Grass, of
St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described Iands:—Commencing
at a post planted four miles west and two
miles north of south-west corner of Lot 3r8.
Coast District, Range 3. thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains, to point
of commencement.
Dated June oth,  iqii.
JOHN COLBERN GRASS.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Clifford Keillor, of London, Ontario, occupation Medical Student, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a
post  planted  eight  miles  west  of  south-west
corner of Lot 318, Coast District,  Range  3,
thence    south    80   chains;    thence    west    80
chains;  thence north  80 chains;  thence east
80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June 8th,  iqii.
CLIFFORD  KEILLOR,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of  Coast,  Range  3
TAKE notice that Edgar Thompson of
St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Lahorer, intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted four miles west and two
miles north of south-west corner of Lot 318,
Coast District, Range 3; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, to point rf
commencement.
Dated June 9th,   ion.
EDGAR   THOMPSON,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE   notice   that   Sarah   Titus,   of   St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Spinster, intends
to apply for permission  to  purchase  thc following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post  planted  nine  miles west  of  south-west
corner of Lot  318, Coast  District,  Range  3.
thence   north   80   chains;    thence   west   80
chains;  thence  south  80 chains:  thence cast
80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June 8th,  1911.
SARAH  TITUS,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DTSTRTCT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Marion Jane Bryce, of
St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Spinster, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted nine miles west of two miles
north of south-west comer of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; east 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated  June  8th,   1911.
MARION JANE  BRYCE.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that John Slough Haney, of
St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted nine miles west and two
miles north of south-west corner of Lot 318,
Coast District, Range 3; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, fti point of
commencement.
Dated June 8th, 1911.
JOHN SLOUGH HANEY.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that George Fleckinstien, of
St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted eight miles west and two miles
north of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence cast 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated June 8th, 1911.
ge6rge fleckinstien.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Mary Silverthorn, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Spinster, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted eight miles west and three miles
north of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3, thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of commence-
ment.
Dated June 8th, ion.
"\R"
aug. 12
MARY   SILVERTHORN.
oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that William Cameron, of St.
Thoams, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted eight miles west and two miles
north of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west So chains to point of commencement.
Dated June 8th, ion
wr
aug. 12
ILLIAM CAMERON,
oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that John Conley, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted eight miles west and two miles
north of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3, thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June 8th,  1911.
JOHN   CONLEY.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Louisa Clouse, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Spinster, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted six miles west and two miles
north of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated June 8th, 1911.
LOUISA CLOUSE.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Sarah Horton, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Spinster, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted six miles west and two miles
north of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north So chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June 8th, ion.
SARAH HORTON.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Ranee 3
TAKE notice that Mabel Styles, of bt.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Spinster, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted six miles west and two miles
north of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated June 8th,  iqii,
MABEL STYLES,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that Eliza Blackell, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Spinster, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted six miles west and two miles
north of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated Tune 8th,  1911.
ELIZA BLACKELL.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA  LAND DISTRICT
District of  Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that Blanche Louise Clark,
of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Spinster,
intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted four miles west and two
miles north of south-west corner of Lot 318,
Coast District, Range 3, thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence cast 80 chains, to point
of commencement.
Dated June oth,  1911.
BLANCHE LOUISE CLARK.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that  Elizabeth  Bice, of London, Ontario, occupation Spinster,  intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted nine miles west of south-west corner
of Lot 318,  Coast  District, Range 3, thence
south   80   chains;    thence   west   80   chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence ..ast 80 chains,
to point  of  commencement.
Dated Tunc 8th, ion,
ELIZABETH   BICE,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that Roy Washburn, of London, Ontario, occupation Medical Student, intends   to   apply   for   permission   to   purchase
thc   following  described   lands:—Commencing
at a post planted eight miles west of southwest corner of Lot 318, Coast District, Range
3,   thence   north   8n   chains;   ihence   west   80
chains;  thence  south  80  chains;   thence east
80   chains,   to   point   of   commencement.
Dated June 8th,   1911.
ROY  WASHBURN.
aug. 12 oct. 7 10
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1911
CANCELLATION  OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing over certain lands in Range 5,
Coast District, notice of which bearing date
of July 13th, 1908, and December 17th,
1908, were published in the British Columbia
Gazette in the issues of July 16th, 1908, and
December 17th, 1908, respectively, is cancelled in so far as the same relates to lands
surveyed as the east half and north-west
quarter section 8, west half section 8 and
north-east quarter section 9, section 14,
north half and south-east quarter section
15, north half and south-west quarter section
16 and section 17, fractional nort hhalf section 18, sections 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 23,
26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 and 36,
all in township 18, Range 5, Coast District.
ROBT. A.  RENWICK,
Deputy   Minister   of   Lands.
Department of  Lands,
Victoria,   B.C.,  June  16th,   1911.
june 24 sept 21
CANCELLATION  OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing over certain lands situated in
Range 5, Coast District, notice of which
bearing date of December 17th, 1908, was
published in the British Columbia Gazette,
in the issue of December 17th, t9o8, is cancelled in so far as the same relates to
lands surveyed as the north half and southwest quarter section 9, north half section
10, north half and south-east quarter section 11; sections 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18,
19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29 and
30, all in township 19, range 5, Coast District.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy   Minister   oi   Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria,  B.C.,  June  16th,   1911.
june 24 sept 21
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Neil Darrach, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Laundryman, intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted two miles south and nine
miles west of south-west corner of Lot 318,
Coast District, Range 3; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains, to point
of commencement.
Dated June   12th,  1911.
NEIL DARRACH.
aug. 12 oct. 7
CANCELLATION  OF  RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserves
existing upon Crown lands in Cariboo District, notices of wbich, bearing date of February 15th, 1910, and May _ sth, 1910^ re-
Eectively, were -published in the British
)lumbia Gazette in the issues of February
17th and May 5th, respectively, are cancelled
in so far as the same relate to the lands
surveyed as Lots 2978, 2957, 2936, 4318, 4321,
3876, 387s, .1871, 3872, 3873, 3866, 3842, 3865,
3881, 3864, 3882, 3879. 3878, 3639, 3638, W. 'A
2624, 3635, 3634, W. 'A 2617, 3630, 2636, W.
'A 2550, 2635, 2542, 2539, E. I. 2630, 2637A,
255*5, 2*537, 2548, 2549, 2540, 2541, 2532, 581,
580, 582, 583, 584, 585, 86s, 867, 868, 869,
608, 586, 2526, 2525, 2519, 2520, 2510, 2509,
577. 578, 579, 2518, 2662, 2664, 2466, 2465,
2640, 2482, 2666, 2488, 2490, 2489, 266s, 2661,
2471, 2469, 2468, 2475, 2476, 2481, 2487, 2491,
N. yi and S.W. 'A 2492, S. 'A and N.W. 'A
2493, N. 'A and S.E. 'A 2480, 2483, 2485,
2496, 2499, 2495, 2502, 2501, 2494, 2229, 2228,
2500, 2504, 2505, 2506, 2216, 2220, 2227, 2218,
2225, 2226, 2221, 2212, 2213, 2404, 2209, 2214,
2391, 2410, 2417, 2420, 2223, 2208, 2215, 2392,
2211, 2412, 2423, 2424, 2108, 2109, 2104, 2103,
2102, 2107, 2106, 2105, 209S, 2100, 4053, 4048,
4047, 4049, 4046, 4050, 4039, 4038, 4041, 4029,
4028, 4030, 4027, 4037. 4036, 4035, 4034i 4031,
4032, 4025, 4026, 2433, 2432, 2431, 2430, 2427,
3790, 3791, 3792, 3789, 3788, 3787, 3786, 3785,
3795, 3794, 3793, 379*5, 3809, 3824, 3816, 3815,
3812, 3811, 3810, 2429, 2428, 2423, 2437, 2438,
3784, 3783i 3999, 3992, 399'. 3989, 3988, 3987,
4001, 4000, 756, 757, 1806, 1811A, 1826, 2912A,
2912, 1837A, 2910, 2908, 2893, 2909, 2175,
2177, 2178, 2741, 2751, 2757, 2758, 2769, 2768,
2770, 2801, 2802, 2806, 2807, 2805, 2804, 2813,
2814, 2815, 2816, 2820, 2819, 2818, 2817, 2852,
2853. 2854, 2855, 2856, 2857, 2858, 2859, 2184,
2188, and 1566A, Cariboo District.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., August 16th, 1911.
aug. 19
nov. 18
CANCELLATION  OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing upon Lrown lands in Cariboo District, notice of which bearing date of May
5th, 1910, was published in the British Columbia Gazette of May 5th, 1910, is cancelled
in so far as the same relates to the lands
surveyed as Lots 888, 892, 893, 894, 895, 1554,
3215, 3216, 3217, 3218, 3219, 3220, 3221, E. y2
3222, W. 'A 3223, and 3223A, Cariboo District,
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., August 16th, 1911.
aug. 19 nov. 18
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Provincial  Home,  Kamloops,  East Wing
Addition.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed "Tender for East Wing Addition, Provincial Home,
Kamloops," will dc received by the Honourable the Minister of Public Works up to
12 o'clock noon of Wednesday, the 20th day
of September, 1911, for the erection and completion of an east wing addition to thc Provincial   Home,  Kamloops,   B.C.
Plans, specifications, contract, and forms of
tender may be seen at the offices of the Provincial Timber Inspector, Vancouver, B. C. -,
the Government Agents, Kamloops, New
Westminster, and Revelstoke; and at the Department of Public Works, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B. C.
Intending tenderers can, by applying to
the undersigned, obtain one copy of the
drawings and one copy of the specifications for the sum of twenty dollars |$2o).
Each tender must bc accompanied by an
accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit
on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the Honourable thc Minister of
Public Works, for the sum of $5,000, which
shall bc forfeited if thc party tendering decline to enter into contract when called upon
to do so, or if he fail to complete the work
contracted for. The cheques or certificates
of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will bc
returned to them upon the execution of the
contract.
The successful tenderer shall furnish a
bond of a guarantee company satisfactory to
the Minister of Public Works, equal to ten
(10) per cent, of thc contract amount, for
the due fulfilment of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless made
out on thc forms supplied, signed with the
actual signature of thc tenderer, and enclosed  in  the  envelopes  furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily
accepted.
J.   E.  GRIFFITH,
Public   Works   Engineer.
Public  Works  Department,
Victoria,  B.C., August 24th,  1911.
aug. 26
sept. 16
COAST LAND DISTRICT
District of, Range  1
TAKE  notice   that  I,  William   Waterston,
of Vancouver, occupation Broker, intends to
apply   for   permission   to   purchase   thc   following   descrihed   lands;—Commencing   at   a
post planted  about  70  chains westerly  from
northwest   corner   of   L.   530   and   about  one
mile  from  Homalko  River,  thence north 80
chainl; thence eaat 80 chains; thence south 80
chains;  thence  west 80 chains,  to  point  of
commencement, containing 640 acres, more or
less.
Dated August  nth,  1911.
WILLIAM WATERSTON.
Morton S. Jones, Agent,
aug. 26 oct. 21
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing upon vacant lands of the Crown in
Lillooet District, notice of which, bearing
date of May 5th, 1910, was published in the
British Columbia Gazette of May 5th, 1910, is
cancelled in so far as the same relates to the
lands surveyed as Lots 1387, 1403, 1887, 1888,
1889, 1890, 1891, 1892, and 1895 Lillooet
District.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., August 16th, 1911.
aug. 19 nov. 18
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing on cavant Crown lands in Range 5,
Coast District, notice of which, bearing date
of May 25th, 1910, was published in the British Columbia Gazette of May 26th, 1910, is
cancelled in so far as the same relates to the
lands surveyed as Lots 1876, 1878, 1879, 1890,
1891, 1893, 1894, 1895, 1896, 1897, 1898, 1900,
2507, 2508, 2509, 2510, 2511, and 2512, Range
5, Coast District.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., August 16th, 1911.
aug. 19 nov. 18
RENFREW (VICTORIA OFFICE)  LAND
DISTRICT
District of Renfrew
TAKE notice that I, Wm. Joseph MacDonald, a3 agent for Mabel Gresley, of Victoria, B.C., occupation Married Woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted on the east side of Nit Nat
Lake in the Renfrew District, commencing at
the north-west corner post of Lot 391, marked
S. E. post, running westerly 40 chains; thence
northerly 10 chains more or less to lake
shore; thence easterly 40 chains more or less
along lake shore; thence 10 chains more or
less along shore of bay to point of commencement, comprising 40 acres more or less.
Dated July 25th, 1911.
MABEL GRESLEY.
Per Wm. J. MacDonald, Agent,
aug. 19 oct. 14
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing by reason of a notice published in
the British Columbia Gazette of the 27th
December, 1907, over a parcel of land situated on Reed Island, known as Lot No. 452,
Sayward District, formerly covered by Timber License No. 36862, which license expired
on the 20th November, 1909, is cancelled,
and the said lands will "Be opened to location
by pre-emption only at midnight on Friday,
13th  October,   1911.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., 5th July, 1911.
July 15 oct   7
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserves
existing upon vacant Crown lands in Range
5, Coast District, and in Cariboo District,
notices of which, bearing date of December
17th, 1908, February 15th, 1910, and AR"1
3rd, 1911, were published in the British
Columbia Gazette in the issues of December
17th, 1908, February 17th, 191,4, and April
6th, 1911, respectively, arc cancelled in so far
as the same relate to the lands surveyed as
Lots 4.037A, 4,037, 4,o4oA, 4,038, 4,040, and
2,951, all in Range 5, Coast District, and Lots
4,038 A.R., 2,793 A.R., 2,828 K, 4,042 A....,
4,045 R, 4.046 A.R., 4,o44_R. 4,042 K, 4.046 R,
2 827 ll, 2,826 R, 4,048 R, 4,041 R, 4,043 g,
3,047 R, 4,051 R, 2,7835, 2,799 R, 4,049 R,
4;o53R: 4.052 R, 2,782 R, 2,798 K, 2,780 R,
4,050 R, 4,054, R, 4,055 i-, 4,056 R, 2,772 A.K.,
2,797 R, 2,796 R, 4,06o R, 4,059 R. 4.058 K,
4,057 R, 4,066 R, 2,776 R, 4,061 R, 4,070 A.R.,
4,062 R, 4,063 R, 4,064 R, 4,o65 g, 2,773 R,
2,775 R, 4,070 R, 4,069 R, 4,068 R, 4,067 R-
4,019 R, 2,774 ■*■•■•, 4,oi4 R. 4.015 R. 4>o>6 R,
4,017 R, 4,024 R, 4,023 R, 4.022 R, 4,021 K,
2.379. 2,380, 2,381, 2,382, 2,311, 2,310, 2,301,
2,300, 2,464, 2,463, 2,462, 2,461, 2,460, 2,459,
2,458, 2,457, 2,451, 2,452, 2,453, 2,454, 2,450,
2,449, 2,448, 2,447, 2,446, 2,445, 2,444, 2,443,
2,442, 2,441, 2,388, 2,387, 2,386, 2,385, 2,384,
2,383, 2,373, 2,374, 2,375, 2,376, 2,377, 2,378,
2,360, 2,359, 2,306, 2,307, 2,308, 2,309, 2,302,
2,303, 2,304, 2,305, 2,358, 2,357, 2,294, 2,295,
2,296, 2,297, 2,298, 2,288, 2,289, 2,290, 2,291,
2,292, 2,293, 2,356, 2,363, 3.841, 2,367, 2,364,
2,355, 2,281, 2,282, 2,283, 2,284, 2,285, 2,286,
2,275, 2,276, 2,277. 2,278, 2,279, 2,280, 2,354,
2,365, 2,366, 2,840, 3,843, 3.844. 3.839, 2,353,
2,340, 2,339, 2,326, 2,325, 2,312, 2,287, 2,271,
2,272, 2,273, 2,274, 2,267, 2,268, 2,269, 2,283,
2,266, 2,313, 2,324, 2,327, 2,338, 2,341, 2,352,
3.838, 3,845, 3,856, 3,855, 3,846, 3,837. 2,351,
2,342, 2,337, 2,328, 2,323, 2,314, 2,265, 2,259,
2,260, 2,261, 2,262, 2,263, 2,245, 2,246, 2,255,
2,256, 2,257, 2,258, 2,264, 2,315, 2,322, 2,329,
2.336. 2,343, 2,350, 3,836, 3,847, 3,854, 3,857,
3,853.   3,848,   3,835,   2,349,   2,344,   2,330,   2,321,
2,316, 2,317, 2,320, 2,331,  2,37*.  2,345, 2,348,
3,834, 3.849, 3,852, 3,883, 3,884, 3,851, 3,850,
3,833,  2,347, 2„v6,  2,333, 2,332,  2,319, 2,318,
3,869,  3,858, 3,859, 4,157,  4.160, 4,159, 4,158,
3,860,  3,861, 3,868,  3,867,  3,862,  3,863, 3,880,
3.641, 3,637, 3,667, 3,663, 3,659, 3,655, 3,654,
3.658, 3.662, 3,666, 3,665, 3,661, 3,657, 3,653,
3,652, 3,656, 3,660, 3,664, 3,633, 3,629, 2,66oA,
2,656, 2,652, 2,648, 2,644, 3,642, 2,651, 2,647,
2,643, 2,639, 3,669, 3,678,  -,677, 3,668, 2,638,
2.642, 2,646, 2,650, 2,244, 2,247, 2,254, 2,253,
2,248, 2,243, 2,242, 2,249, 2,259, 2,237, 2,238,
2,239, 2,241, 2,219, 2,232, 2,231, 2,230, 2,217,
2,221, 2,335, 2,224, 2,720, 2,719, 1,100, 1,101,
1,102, 1,103, 1,076, 1,160, 1,163, 1,164, 1,166,
1,167, 1.165, 1,097, 1,110, 1,109, 1,108, 1,107,
i,i74A, 1,095, 1,171, 1,162, 1,170, 1,099, 1,424,
1,089, 1,182, 1,178, I.I76A, i,t7oA, 1,180,
1,181, 1,183, 1.189, 1.188, 1,719, and 1,775, all
in Cariboo District.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., July 7th, 1911.
July 15 oct 14
CANCELLATION OF RESERVL
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
reserve existing on certain Crown Lands in
Pender Harbour, New Westminster District,
formerly held under special Timber License
No. 42713, by reason of the notice published in the British Columbia Gazette of
the 27th December, 1907, is cancelled, and
that the said lands will be open to entry
by pre-emption only on and after midnight
of November 3rd,  1911.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B.C., 31st July, 1911.
aug. 5 nov..(
COAST LAND DISTRICT
District of, Range  1
TAKE  notice  that   I,  William  J.   Cooper,
of Vancouver, occupation Electrician, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post  planted   about   one  mile   westerly  from
Homalko River, and at S.W. corner of L. 530,
thence   west   40   chains;    thence   north   40
chains;_ thence  east 40 chains;  thence south
40   chains   to  point  of  commencement,   containing  160 acres, more or less.
Dated August nth, 1911.
WILLIAM J. COOPER.
Morton S. Jones, Agent,
aug. 26 oct. 2i
COAST LAND DISTRICT
District of, Range 2
TAKE notice that Anker Berntzen, of Vancouver,   occupation  Shingler,   intends  to  apply for permission to purchase the following
described    lands:—Commencing    at    a   post
planted about 1 mile southerly from the mouth
of Upper Glacier creek, said creek runs into
Homalko   River   about    12   miles   from   its
mouth;  thence  east 80 chains;  thence north
80   chains;   thence   west   80   chains;   thence
south 80  chains  to point  of commencement,
containing  640  acres,  more  or  less.
Dated  August   nth,   1911.
ANKER  BERNTZEN.
Morton S. Jones, Agent,
aug. 26 oct. 21
COAST LAND DISTRICT
District of, Range  1
TAKE notice that I, James Grey Bennett,
of Vancouver, occupation Electrician, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about three-quarters of a mile
westerly from the north-west corner of L.
550 and about one mile from Homalko river,
thence north 40 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 40 chains; thence east
40 chains, to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more or less.
Dated August   nth,   1911.
JAMES GREY BENNETT.
aug. 26
Morton S. Jones, Agent,
oct. 21
COAST LAND DISTRICT
District of, Range  1
TAKE    notice    that    I,    George    Fredrik
Fraser, of Vancouver, occupation Electrician,
intends to  apply for permission  to purchase
the  following  described  lands:—Commencing
at   a   post   planted   one   mile   westerly   from
Homalko River, and at S.  W.  corner of L.
530, thence west 40 chains; thence south 60
chains;  thence east 40 chains; thence north
80   chains   to   point  of  commencement,   containing 320 acres, more or less.
Dated August  nth,  1911.
GEORGE FREDRIK FRASER.
Morton S. Jones, Agent,
aug. 26 oct. 21
COAST LAND DISTRICT
District of, Range  1
TAKE notice  that  I,  Arthur  L.   Spencer,
of Vancouver, occupation Electrician, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post   planted   about   one-half   mile   westerly
from  Homalko  River  and  at  the  north-west
corner   of   L.   530,   thence   west   40   chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more or less.
Dated August  nth,  1911.
ARTHUR L. SPENCER.
aug. 26
Morton S. Jones, Agent,
oct. 21
COAST LAND DISTRICT
District of, Range  1
TAKE   notice   that   I,   Michel   Zattoni,   of
Vancouver, occupation Miner, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
describea    lands:—Commencing    at    a    post
planted about three-quarters of a mile westerly from  north-west corner  of  L.   530  and
about one mile from Homalko River, thence
east 20 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west  20  chains;  thence  north  80  chains  to
point of commencement, containing 160 acres
more or less.
Dated August  nth,  1911.
MICHEL ZATTONI.
Morton S. Jones, Agent,
aug. 26 oct. 21
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserl
existing by reason of a notice published I
the British Columbia Gazette of the 27I
December, 1907, covering a parcel of Ial
situated at St. Vincent Bay, Jervis Inll
formerly held under 'limber License "
40624, is cancelled and the said lands
be open for location by pre-emption at ml
night on Friday, October 13th, 1911.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.|
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., 5th July, 1911.
July 15 octl
PUBLIC HIGHWAYS
Province of British  Columbia
NOTICE is  hereby  given  that  all  Pull
Highways  in  unorganized   Districts,   and f
Main Trunk Roads in organized Districts I
sixty-six   feet   wide,   and   have   a   width I
thirty-three  feet  on   each   side  of  the  ml
straight  centre line  of  the travelled roaq
THOMAS TAYLOR, I
Minister of Public Work|
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C., July 7th, 1911.
july 15
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the resi
existing by reason of a notice publisheif
the British Columbia Gazette of the T
December, 1907, over Lots Nos. 10183 L
10184, Group one, Kootenay District, wl
have Deen surrendered out of Timber f
cense No. 32590, is cancelled, and the f
lands will be open to location by pre-emd
only  at  midnight  on   Friday,   13th  Oct|
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lanj
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., 5th July, 1911.
July 15
MINERAL  ACT
(Form   F.)
Certificate   of   Improvements
NOTICE
Iron Alice, Iron Cross, Iron Hand, and Iron
Belle Mineral Claim, situate in the Victoria,  B.C.   Mining  Division  of  Renfrew
District.   Where located: Bugaboo Creek.
TAKE   NOTICE   that   L.   N.   Anderson,
F.M.C.    No.   54082B,   Agent  for   the   Estate
Sidney   Shore,   F.M.C.    No.   54090B;   Alexander   Lipsky,   F.M.C.   No.   49625B;   Oliver
Smith, F.M.C. No.  , intend, sixty days
from the date hereof, to apply to the Mining
Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements,
for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant
of the above claim.
And further take notice that action, under
Section 37, must be commenced before the
issuance of such Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 24th day of July, 1911, A.D. 1911.
L. N. ANDERSON,
july 29 sept. 23
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Henry Lindop, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Contractor, intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described landB:—Commencing
at a post planted two miles south and ten
miles west of south-west corner of Lot 318,
Coast District, Range 3; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated June 12th,  1911.
HENRY LINDOP.
aug. 12 oct. 7
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing on vacant lands of the Crown, notice
of which was published in the British Columbia Gazette in the issue of May 5th, 1910,
and bearing date of May 5th, 1910, is cancelled in so far as the same relates to the
lands surveyed as Lots 2317, 2318, 2319, 2320,
2321, 2322, 2323, 2324, 2325, 2326, 2327, 2329,
2330, 2331, 2332, 2334, 2335, 2336, 2337, 2339,
2341, 2342, 2343, 2347, 2348, 2348A, 2349,
2350, 2358, 2369, 2408, 3113, 3114, 3115, 3116,
3117, 3118, 3119, 3120, 3121, 3122, 3123, 3124,
3125, 3126, 3127, 3128, 3129, 3130, 3131, 3132,
3133, 3134, 3135, 3136, 3137, 3138, 3139, 3140,
3141, 3142, 3242A, 3143, 3144, 3145, 3146,
3147, 3148, 3148A, 3149, 3150, 3151. 3152,
3153, 3154, 3155, 3156, 3157, 3158, 3159, 3160,
3161, 3162, 3163, 3164, 3165, 3166, 3167, 3168,
3169, 3170, 3171, 3172, 3173, 3174, 3175, 3176,
3177, 3178, 3179, 3.184, 3186, 3187, and 3188,
Range 5, Coast District.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., August 16th, 1911.
aug. 19 nov. 18
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserves
existing over vacant Crown lands in Ranges 4
and 5, Coast District, notices of which, bearing dates of May 5th, 1910, and May 25th,
1910, respectively, were published in the
issues of the British Columbia Gazette of
May sth and May 26th, 1910, are cancelled
in so far as the same relate to the lands surveyed as Lots 785, 786, 787, 788, 789, 790,
791, 79iA, 792, 793, 794, 795, 856, 857, 858,
859, 860, 861, 862, 863, 864, 865, 866, 867,
868, 869, 870, 871, 872, 873. 1158, 1159, 1160,
1164, 1165, 1166, 1162, 1163, 1169, 467, 468,
847, 1174, 1176, 1182, 1189, 1191, 1192, 1201A,
1188, 1187, 1190, 782, 783, 781, 784, 780, 313.
777A, 70, and 1186, all in Range 4, Coast District; and Lots 2188A, 1020, 1023, 3814, and
3826, all in Range 5, Coast District.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., August 16th, 1911
aug. 19
TAKE NOTICE that I, Archie F.
nedy, of the City of Vancouver, ProvinJ
British Columbia, Waiter, intend to apnl
the Assistant Commissioner of Lands fl
license to prospect for Coal and Petrol
in the vicinity of Sutherland Bay, IF
Inlet, on and over the following descl
lands, beginning at a post marked A. Ff
N. E. Corner; thence running soutl
chains; thence west 80 chains; tiience I
80 chains; thence east 80 chains to por]
commencement.
14th August, 1911.
ARCHIE F. KENNEDY,
James Fulton, Ag|
aug. 19
TAKE NOTICE that I, Willie S. Kenl
of the City of Vancouver, Province of I
ish Columbia, Waiter, intende to apply tl
Assistant Commissioner of Lands for a lil
to prospect for Coal and Petroleum irT
vicinity of Sutherland Bay, Drury Inlel
and over the following described lands!
ginning at a post marked W. S. K., Nl
Corner; thence running east 80 chP
thence south 80 chains; thence wei
chains; thence north 80 chains to poi|
commencement.
14th  August,   1911,
WILLIE S. KENNEDY.
James Fulton, Ag|
aug. 19
COAST LAND DISTRICT
District of, Range 2
TAKE   notice   that   I,   Anna   MettlJ
Vancouver,   occupation   Married  Womal
tends   to   apply   for   permission   to   pui
the   followine  described   lands:—Commf
at a post planted about one-half mile ,
east of post marked "295  W.P.S. N.W
ner," being blazed south to creek abou
half mile,  said creek running into He]
River about 9 miles from its mouth;
north   80   chains;    thence   east   80
thence   south   80   chains;   thence   wd
chains to point of commencement, contj
640 acres, more or less.
Dated August  nth,  1911.
ANNA METTLER.
Morton S. Jones, A^
aug. 26
RENFREW  (VICTORIA OFFICE)
DISTRICT
District of Renfrew
TAKE notice that I, William Josephl
Donald, of Clo-oose, B.C., occupation!
cher, intends to apply for permission tl
chase the following described lands l-f
mencing at a post planted on an island \
east side of Nit Nat Lake, comprisinl
acre, more or less, situated about on*
south-east from the north-west cornea
of the Oyees Indian Reserve on thi
shore of Nit Nat Lake. f
Dated 28th July,   1911.
WILLIAM JOSEPH MACDONAD
CANCELLATION   OF  RESERVI
NOTICE is hereby given that the
existing over Lots 31, 22 and 33, Norl
vision of Salt Spring Island, by real
the notice published in the British Col
Gazette of the 27th December, 1907/
land having been held under Timber II
No. 14891, whicii has expired, is cal
and the said land will be open to Iff
hy pre-emption only after midnight on f
day, December 7th,  1911.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of La]
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
September 2nd, 1911.
nov. 18 I sept. 9 r
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1911
11
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
lOTICE  IS  HEREBY  GIVEN that the
;rve existing upon Crown Lands in Cari-
District, notice of which was published
the British Columbia Gazette of the 15th
September, 1877, is cancelled in so far as
same relates to lands  surveyed as Lots
568, 360, 370, and 422, Group 1, Cariboo
trict, and that the lands embraced in said
wili be open for pre-emption entry after
night of November third,  1911.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department,
/ictoria, B.C., 31st July, 1911.
nov. 4
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
;rt
3TICE IS HEREBY  GIVEN that the
e  existing  over   Lot   110,   Rupert  Dis-
situated within the boundaries of Tim-
ricense  No.   40892   known  as Lot  212,
t District, is cancelled for the purpose
aking a saie of the said Lot no, Rupert
ict, to the Canadian North Pacific Fish-
Limited, such cancellation to take effect
third of November,   1911.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department,
ictoria, B.C., 31st July, 1911.
nov. 4
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
TICE  IS  HEREBY  GIVEN that the
e existing on Crown Lands in Asoyoos
on of Vale District, formerly embraced
Special   Timber. License   No.   31301,
-ason   of   the   notice   published   in   the
h  Columbia Gazette of December 27th,
is  cancelled,   and   that   the  lands  em-
1 within the said timber license will be
for   pre-emption   entry   only   on   and
midnight on  November third,  1911.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department,
.toria, B.C., 31st July, 1911.
nov. 4
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
CE notice that William Armstrong, of
homas, Ontario, occupation Chief of
intends to apply for permission to
se the following described lands:—
encing at a post planted the following
ed lands:—Commencing at a post
I two miles south and ten miles west
^th-west corner of Lot 318, Coast Dis-
Range 3, thence south 80 chains; thence
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
east 80 chains, to point of commence-
_d June 12th,  1911.
WILLIAM   ARMSTRONG,
oct. 7
RENFREW LAND DISTRICT
District of Jordan River
CE notice that I, Netta B. Moore, of
ia, occupation Married Woman, intends
ly for permission to purchase the fol-
described lands:—Commencing at a
lanted sixty chains distant in a west-
irection from the northeast corner of
Renferw District, being Netta B.
s S. E. Corner, thence north 40 chains;
west 34 chains; thence south 18.6
thence east 10 chains; thence soutli
ains; thence east 24 chains to place of
icement and containing one hundred
irteen and 6-10 acres, more or less.
August 2, 1911.
NETTA B. MOORE.
By William W. Stonmetz, Agent,
sept. 16
"LAND REGISTRY ACT"
matter of an Application for a fresh
•tificate of Title to that part of Sub-
ision Lot 4, of Section 12, Beckley
rm, Victoria City, Map 160, of which
_ne Lowe is the registered owner.
ICE is hereby given of my intention
expiration of one month from the first
tion hereof to issue a fresh Certificate
e in lieu of the Certificate of Title
to Skene Lowe on the 5th January,
nd numbered 8222 A,  which has been
destroyed,
i  at   Land   Registry   Office,   Victoria,
his 7th day of August, A.D., 1911.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar-General of Titles,
■ept. 16
COAST LAND DISTRICT
District of. Range 2
E  notice  that  I,   Peder   Berntzen,  of
ver, occupation Shingler, intends to ap-
permission   to   purchase   the   follow-
cribed lands:—Commencing at a post
about one-half mile north-east of
arked "295 W.P.S. N.W. corner," be-
ized south to creek about one-half
lid creek running into Homalko River,
I miles from its mouth, thence south
ins; thecen east 80 chains; thence
!o chains; thence west 80 chains to
[ commencement, containing 640 acres,
■ less.
1  August   nth,   1911.
PEDER BERNTZEN.
Morton S. Jones, Agent,
oct. 21
COAST LAND DISTRICT
District of. Range 2
E notice  that  1,  Samuel. G.  Mettler,
couver,  occupation  Machinist, intends
y for permission to purchase the fol-
described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
anted   about   one-half   mile   north-east
marked "295 W.P.S. N.W. corner,"
jlazed south to creek about one-half
lid creek running into Homalko River
) miles from its mouth; thence south
ins; thence west 40 chains; thence
io chains; thence east 40 chains, to
f commencement, containing 320 acres,
r less.
1 August 11th,  1911.
SAMUEL G. METTLER.
Morton S. Jones, Agent,
oct. 21
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Almeda Hart, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Music Teacher,
intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted two miles west and seven
miles north of south-west corner of Lot 318,
Coast District, Range 3; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated  June   nth,   1911.
ALMEDA HART,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Charles Isaac Styles, of
St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Laborer, intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted two miles south and one
mile west of south-west corner of Lot 318,
Coast District, Range 3; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement.
Dated June  nth,  1911.
CHARLES  ISAAC STYLES,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Peter Dickinson, of St.
Thomas, -Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted two miles south and one mile
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of commencement,
Dated June  nth,  iqii
aug. 12
PETER   DICKINSON,
oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE .lotice that David Henry Gooding,
of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Farmer,
intends tu apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted two miles south and three
miles west of south-west corner of Lot 318,
Coast District, Range 3; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated June   nth,   ton.
DAVID HENRY GOODING.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Margaret Neil Bryce, of
St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Spinster, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted two miles south and three miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3, thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated June  nth, 1911.
MARGARET   NEIL   BRYCE.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Charles Christopher
Nickerson, of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following describea lands:—
Commencing at a post planted two miles
south and five miles west of south-west corner
of Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains, to
point of commencement.
Dated   June   nth,   1911.
CHARLES CHRISTOPHER NICKERSON.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that William Mann, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Laborer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted two miles south and five miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated June  nth,  1911.
WILLIAM  MANN,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Mungo Donald McCrimmon, of Toronto, Ontario, occupation Law
Student, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted two miles
soutli and seven miles west of south-west
corner of Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June  nth,  1911.
MllNGO DONALD McCRlMMON.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
. District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that James Thomas Geddes,
of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Policeman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted two miles south
and seven miles west of southwest corner of
Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains east 80 chains to point
of commencement.
Date June  12th,  1911.
JAMES THOMAS GEDDES.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Andrew John Clark, of
St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Conveyancer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted two miles south and nine
miles west of south-west corner of Lot 318,
Coast District, Range 3; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, to point
of commencement.
Dated  June   12th,   1911.
ANDREW  JOHN   CLARK,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that Yin Lee, of St. Thomas,
Ontario,  occupation  Laundryman,  intends  to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted four miles north and two miles west
of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast  District, Range 3; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June 9th,  1911.
YIN LEE.
aug. 12 oct. 7
COAST LAND DISTRICT
District of, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE .that I, Simon Mettler, of
Vancouver,  occupation  Hotelman,  intends  to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about one-half mile north-east of post
marked   "295  W.   P.S.   N.W.   corner,"  being
blazed   south   to   creek  about   one-half   mile,
said creek running into Homalko River, about
9   miles   from   its   mouth,   thence   north   80
chains; thence west 40 chains;  thence south
80 chains; thence east 40 chains to point of
commencement, containing 320 acres, more or
less.
Dated August nth,  1911.
SIMON METTLER.
Morton S. Jones, Agent,
aug. 2*.* oct. 21
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Charles William Thompson, of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted four miles west
and two miles north of south-west corner
of Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains, to
point of commencement.'
Dated June  9th,   1911.
CHARLES WILLIAM THOMPSON,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Charles Orom Luton, of
Belmont, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted two miles west and two miles
north of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3, thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated June 9th,   1911.
CHARLES OROM LUTON,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Frederick Sutherland, of
St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Merchant,
intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands;—Commencing
at a post planted two miles west and two
miles north of south-west corner of Lot 318,
Coast District, Range 3, thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, to point
of commencement.
Dated June 9th,   1911.
FREDERICK SUTHERLAND,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Charles Treadwell, of
St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Insurance
Agent, intends to apply for. permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted two miles west and
two miles north of south-west corner of Lot
318, Coast District, Range 3; thence north
80 chatns; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains, to
point  of  commencement.
Dated June 9th, ion.
CHARLES TREADWELL.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that John Theoplulus Ellis,
of Berlin, Ontario, occupation Commercial
Traveler, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted two miles west
and two miles north of south-west corner of
Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement.
Dated June 9th,  1911.
JOHN  THEOPHILUS   ELLIS,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that William Samuel Martin,
of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Cigar
Dealer, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing, at a post planted four miles north
and two miles west of south-west corner of
Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains,  to  point  of commencement.
Dated June 9th,   1911.
WILLIAM SAMUEL MARTIN,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that George Atkins, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at. a
post planted four miles north and two miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence north 80 chajns;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June 9th, 1911.
GEORGE   ATKINS,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Hugh McConachie
Somerville, of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation
Bank Clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following describea lands.:—
Commencing at a post planted four miles
north and three miles west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3,
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June 9th,  1911.
HUGH McCONACHIE SOMERVILLE.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range j
TAKE notice that Isabella McCrimmon, of
St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Spinster, intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted two miles south and nine
miles west of south-west corner of Lot 318,
Coast District, Range 3; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, to point
of commencement.
Dated  June   12th,   1911.
ISABELLA McCRlMMON.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that James Clark, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Laborer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted four miles north and four miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated June 9th,   1911.
JAMES CLARK,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Robert Allen McCully,
of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Policeman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted two miles south
and seven miles west of south-west corner
of Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains,  to  point  of commencement.
Dated June 12th, 1911.
ROBERT ALLEN McCULLY.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that John Irwin, of London,
Ontario, occupation Book-keeper, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following; described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted two miles south and nine miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3, thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated June 12th,  1911.
JOHN  IRWIN.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Edward John Webster,
of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Liveryman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted four miles north
and four miles west of south-west corner of
Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3, thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains,
to  point of commencement.
Dated June  ioth,   1911.
EDWARD JOHN WEBSTER,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Daniel Barret, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted four miles north and six miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June   ioth,   1911.
DANIEL BARRET,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Frances Tyrcll, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Spinster, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted four miles north and six nines
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3, thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June ioth,  ion,
FRANCES TYRELL.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Bert Styles, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Laborer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted four miles north and six miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June  10th,  1911.
BERT STYLES,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Alex. Finlayson, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described Iands:—Commencing at a
post planted four miles north and six miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3, thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated June ioth, 1911.
ALEX.   FINLAYSON.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Harrison Lynn Martin,
of Toronto, Ontario, occupation Traveler, intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted four miles north and eight
miles west of south-west corner of Lot 318,
Coast District, Range 3, thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains, to point
of commencement.
Dated  June   ioth,   1911.
HARRISON LYNN MARTIN,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range ,*)
TAKE notice that Patrick i-'redenck Fagan,
of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Farmer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted 4 miles north and 8 miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3, thence south 80 chajns;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June ioth,   1911.
PATRICK FREDERICK FAGAN.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that John Hepinstall, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Student, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted four miles north and eight miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June 10th,  1911.
JOHN HEPINSTALL.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Martha Eyeland, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Spinster, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted four miles north and eight miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Ran°*e 3; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated June   ioth,   ior 1.
MARTHA EVELAND.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Emerela Fraser, of bt.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Spinster, intends
to apply for permission to purchase thc following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted four miles north and nine miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3, thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; tjience south 80
chains; thence cast 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated  June   ioth,   1911.
EMERELA FRASER.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Fanny Mitts, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Spinster, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted four miles north and nine miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated June   ioth,   1911.
FANNY MITTS,
aug. 12 oct 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that Ralph Oswald Babbit,
of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase thc
following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted nine miles west and six miles
north, of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3, thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence cast 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated June  10th,   1911.
RALPH OSWALD BABBIT,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Morris Jackson, of St
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted nine miles west and six miles
north of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June  ioth,  1911.
MORRIS JACKSON,
aug. 12 oct 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Iridell Kilally Johnston,
of St.. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Accountant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted eight miles west
and six miles nortli of south-west corner
of Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3; thence
south 80 chains; . thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains,
to point of commencement.
Dated June ioth, 1911.
IRIDELL KILALLY JOHNSTON,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that John White, of St
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted six miles west and six miles
north of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3, thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80 chainl;
thence east 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June ioth, 1911.
JOHN WHITE,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Josephine Gable, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Spinster, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted six miles west and six miles
north of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June ioth, 1911.
JOSEPHINE GABLE-
aug. 12 oct 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Edward Ellwood Mc-
Caulley, of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation
M.C.R.R. Fireman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted four
miles west and six miles north of south-west
corner of Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3,
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June  10th,  1911.
EDWARD ELLWOOD McCAULLEY.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that John Allen, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted four miles west and six miles
north of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3, thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June  nth,  1911.
JOHN ALLEN,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Charles Edward Kreiger,
of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation M.C.R.R.
Fireman, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted two miles west
and six miles nortli of south-west corner of
Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains,
to point  of commencement.
Dated June  nth,  1911.
CHARLES EDWARD KREIGER.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Harry Joseph Elleson
Young, of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation
Reporter, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:.—
Commencing at a post planted two miles west
and six miles north of south-west corner of
Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80 chainB,
to point of commencement.
Dated June  nth,  1911.
HARRY JOSEPH ELLESON YOUNG,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Mary Mills, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Spinster, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted two miles west and six miles
north, of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence north 80 chains;
thence cast 80 chains; thence.south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commence*
ment.
Dated June   nth,   1911.
MARY  MILLS,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE   notice   that   Donald   Campbell,   of
St. Thomas,  Ontario, occupation  Farmer, intends   to   apply   for.  permission   to   purchase
the  following  described   lands:—Commencing .
at   a   post   planted   two  miles  west   and   six
miles north of south-west corner of Lot 318,
Coast   District,   Range   3;   thence   north   80
chains;  thence west 80 chains;  thence south
80  chains;   thence  east  80   chains,   to  point
of commencement.
Dated June nth, 1911.
DOW
aug. 12
•\LD CAMPBELL,
oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that James Balkwell Squance,
of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation, Carriage
Builder, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted four miles north
and four miles west of south-west corner of
Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains, to
point   of  commencement.
Dated   Tune   9th,   1911.
JAMES   BALKWELL  SQUANCE.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Frederick Brooks, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at. a
post planted four miles north and four miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence, soutli 80 chains;
thence cast 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated  June  oth,   1911.
FREDE
DERICK   BROOKS,
oct. 7 12
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1911
Cost of Living and
Wages --A Memorandum
Written for the Week by An Oxford Professor of Economics
Correspondence
The statement lias repeatedly been
made, that the proposed agreement
with the United States will lower the
prices of the necessities of life, and
that the benefit of that reduction will
go to the workers. Both clauses in
tbat statement are false and misleading. The agreement will not
lower these prices, and if it did, the
workman would not get the benefit of
the lower prices for more than the
shortest space of time.
The first half of this claim is easily
disposed of. If the law of supply
and demand means anything, it
means that when the American
worker enters the B. C. market to
buy foodstuffs and other natural products, prices will not fall, but rise.
The prices of many natural products
are already high, because the supply
actually on the market is short, and
the addition of the American to the
B. C. demand is bound to raise those
prices  still further.
But we will suppose, for the sake
of argument, that a large increase in
the supply of natural products follows the agreement, and prices fall.
Even in that case the workman cannot hope to reap the benefit of the
lower scale for any length of time,
because wages will inevitably accommodate themselves to the lowered
cost of living.
The usual argument is something
like this;
"You B. C. workmen get high
wages, but you have to pay so much
for your keep that your wage is not
nearly as good as it looks. Pass Reciprocity and the cost of your living
will go down, while you pocket the
difference."
All this is very charming, but unfortunately quite illusory, for the
price of labour is determined not
only by demand and supply, but, like
every other price, by the cost of production. A manufacturer cannot go
on selling at an average price lower
than the average cost of production
of the thing he is making. The cost
of production of labour is the amount
of money which it takes to feed,
clothe, and house the worker, besides
supplying him with any luxuries he
may refuse to do without. If prices
are low, then that production—cost of
labour,—the minimum wage—,will be
low: if prices are high, then the
minimum wage will be high also.
This is the reason why wages are
normally higher where prices are
higher, as in the towns, and lower
where prices are lower, as in the
country these are facts well known
to all who do business in any form,
but they could be supported by the
authority of the most eminent economists, including Karl Marx.
In England living costs about two-
thirds of its cost here, and wages are
proportionately lower. They are further depressed by the over-supply of
labour, especially casual labour, so
that in this particular case the actual wages paid are not only influenced, but absolutely fixed by the
minimum upon which a man can keep
body  and  soul  together.
Let one instance suffice to illustrate the conditions in the Old
Country. The unskilled labour of
Glasgow is among the worst paid
labour in the United Kingdom.
Some time ago a number of
well-meaning people tried to help
these men by providing them with
cheap    housing    at    non-commercial
rates. The only consequence was a
further reduction of wages to follow
this decrease in the cost of living.
Or take an illustration nearer
home: Asiatic labour is normally
cheaper than European. If you care
to ask the next workman you meet
why that is so he will tell you pretty
vigorously that the Asiatic can live
on next to nothing. In other words,
the wage he is prepared to take is
regulated by his low standard of
living. He may make more in times
of exceptional scarcity of labour, but
he can always be obtained at a lower
rate than a white man of equal efficiency, because whether through
lower prices or parsimonious living,
he can exist on less.
To state the case quite generally:
Here is an employer wanting to buy
labour and a prospective employee
wanting to sell it. They meet in the
market, which is any place where
men are engaged. The employer
thinks of the most he can afford to
give, and of the least whicii the man
can be induced to take. These two
mental reservations, call them reserve
prices if you like, fix the limits inside which the wage will fluctuate according to that law of supply and demand so often quoted. The workman also fixes the least he will take,
at an amount governed by just the
same consideration, namely, what it
costs him to live, and will generally
include his little luxuries in his minimum. There are certain things he
will have. If their price is high the
minimum wage whicii he will accept
is high. If their price is low he will
take a lower minimum. Even while
a man may be thinking of the current rates rather than of these
maxima and minima, the wage which
he can get is none the less surely
lixed between those limits.
Within these two the law of supply and demand has play. If there
are a few labourers and many jobs,
wages are high and the workman
does well. But he does well out of
the margin above his minimum, and
not out of the whole. If there are
many labourers and few jobs then
wages will come down to the minimum level, which is the normal state
of affairs in most countries, since a
rise of wages anywhere attracts an
inrush of labour whenever it becomes
well known, and down comes the
margin to zero.
All this is very elementary, and it
should not be necessary to dwell upon it at any length. Neither is it
necessary for us to point out how
that margin may be affected by the
action of trade unionism. All that we
are here concerned with is that the
normal rate of wages in an open
market tends always to the actual
figure which represents the cost of
living, and in any case is absolutely
greater or less according to the
amount of that first charge.
We deny that an increased demand
on the men who are even now making an insufficient output of food can
do anything but increase price. We
assert without hesitation that the
most we can expect is an increase in
the supply to meet the new demand
and keep prices level; and we maintain that even if these prices should
fall, wages must inevitably take the
new scale as a minimum, and fluctuate somewhere above that, as they
did somewhere above the old. If you
lower prices you will soon lower
wages to match.
The Week accepts no responsibility for
the views expressed by its correspondents.
Communications will be inserted whether
signed by the real name of the writer
or a nom de plume, but the writer's
name and address must be given to the
Editor as an evidence of bona fides. In no
case will it be divulged without consent.
THE CHORAL SOCIETY
Phone 2235
The B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
Successor to Charles Hayward
Funeral Director and Embalmer
1016 Govt. St. Established 1867 Victoria, B. C.
To the Editor of The Week.
Sir,—On behalf of the Choral Society, Victoria, B.C., I desire, through
the medium of tllis letter in your columns, to bring the needs of the society to the notice of those persons
in this city who arc interested in the
doings of musical people who give
their time, talent and money for the
purposes of entertaining others and
bettering their own knowledge of
choral singing.
The Choral was formed in January,
1910, due to the indefatigable efforts
of a few music-lovers and has since,
under the able direction of Mr.
Gideon Hicks, given three concerts
April, 1910, November, 1910, and
May, 1911. Every person connected
with the society gives his or her services gratuitiously, and I merely
mention this to impress the fact that
the society is not trying to make
money. All the members subscribe
for their music and receive no tickets
for concerts.
In May last an extraordinary general meeting of the society was held
at which it was unanimously decided
to double the membership fee and
either give future concerts to a house
guaranteed on the same lines as those
for instance of the Arion Club, or go
out of business.
Personally, and my opinion is the
same as many others, I think it would
be a great mistake to give up the
work the society has so ably undertaken. The City Council evidently
appreciates the fact that a well conducted Choral Society is a distinct
asset to any community and therefore allows us the use of the Council
Chambers free of charge for practices.
Unfortunately the society has lost
money at both of the last two concerts and it will take all the subscriptions of the members for the current
year to clear up the indebtedness of
the society.
Within the next few weeks it is my
intention to mail to as many persons
as I know, notices in connection with
the proposed guaranteed houses for
concerts in future. Unfortunately,
however, I do not know everybody
who would be interested, nor can I
get the information necessary, and I
have therefore taken this method, believing that you, sir, are thoroughly
in accord with the aims and ambitions of the society.
Subscriptions will be asked for two
concerts per annum to be given in the
Victoria Theatre, one in mid-winter
and one about May ist. Tickets for
same will be allotted at $3.00 for two
tickets for each concert and so on in
proportion. I desire those who do
not receive notice direct to communicate with me, care P. 0. Box 167.
Only the very best music will be
taken in hand, the programme for our
next concert includes Coleridge-Taylor's "Hiawatha's Wedding Feast"
and glees by such authors as Mendelssohn and Sir Edward Edgar with
possibly the unsung portions of "Bonbon Suite," by Coleridge-Taylor,
which work we partly rendered last
May.
There are openings in the society
for active members. We want readers, if possible, and good singers, and
the younger ones particularly, for no
doubt they would derive great benefit as well as pleasure from taking
part in the rehearsals.
ARTHUR WHEELER, JR.,
Hon. Secretary.
MISTAKEN   IDENTITY
The teacher, after having taken great
trouble to explain the difference in the meanings of the words "dream" and "reverie," addressed the class. "Now could any of you
give mc a sentence with the word 'reverie'
in it?" A small youth put up his hand.
"You John!" she uttered in astonishment.
"Well, what is it?" "Please, ma'am," said
the urchin, "the 'reverie' blew his whus'le
and stopped the game."
E. S. STILES, Auctioneer W Valuator]
Upholstering, French Polishing, Packing
and Removing
Leather Work and Special Designs Made to Order
Loose Covers and Boat Cushions
nog Fort St.,
Victoria, B. C.
Phone 2I4Q\
Genuine!
Bargain;
R. RUTLE^
Ladies' Tailor]
is offering for sal^
some very smart anu
elaborate suits whicfl
will be sold at a greal
reduction. These garl
ments are made o|
English material and
they are  well
tailored.
Prices from $18|
to $40
Come, see and be cor
vinced.   All our wor|
is guaranteed.
Sayward BU
Rooms 408 & 40l
Cor. Douglas & Vie]
Sts., Victoria
A fence of this kind od
to  23c.   per  running!
Shipped in  rolls.    Al
can put it on the posts
out special tools.   We]
the originators of this!
Have sold hundreds of|
for enclosing parks,
gardens, cemeteries, chu
station   grounds,  etc.l
Supplied in any lengtlj
sired,   and   painted
white or green.   Also "■
Farm Fences and Gatesf
ting,  Baskets, Mats,
Tools, etc.   Ask for oui
catalog, the most coif
fence catalog ever pub!
MESSRS. E. Q. PRIOR & COMPANY
Victoria and Vancouver, B.O.
LIPTON'S TE;
OVER 2 MILLION PACKAGES SOLD WEEKLY THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1911
13
MUSIC AND STAGE
Continued from Page    3)
Kinemacolor
Commencing Friday September
[nd, 23rd, 26th, 27th, 29th, 30th, exhi-
[ions will be given at the Victoria
peatre of the work of Kinemacolor,
process for the presentation of mov-
pictures in the original colors of
Iture.
lany  have seen  coloured moving
Jtures before, but those were col-
red  by  artificial  means  either by
lid or by machinery.    Only simple
Itures could be so treated.    In the
[nemacolor   pictures   there   is   no
lid work of any description, for the
|ouring is done by the sun.
Jumping Jupiter
ichard (Himself) Carle is said to
I at his funniest in his new musical
nedy "Jumping Jupiter," in whicii
|will be seen here for the first time
/ictoria Theatre on September 28.
SOTHERN-MARLOWE
WEDDING
fhe   following   extract   from   the
fly Mail, Over-seas Edition, bear-
date   of  August   26   (Thursday
Ition),  will  be  of  interest  to  the
liy admirers of these two Shakes-
Irean artists:
[Mr. E. H. Sothern, the leading
lerican Shakespearean actor, and
\s Julia Marlowe, the equally fa-
US American actress, whose names
|e been associated on the stage
i many years, were secretly mar-
last Thursday at the offices of
Registrar of Marriages for the
fsh of St. George's, Hanover-
^re, London. The honeymoon is
lig spent in Devonshire.
Nlr. Sothern is a son of the fans actor who created the part of
|d Dundreary and originated the
indreary whiskers." He was edu-
|d at Dunchurch, Warwickshire,
Marylebone Grammar School,
|made his first stage appearance in
York in 1879.
lliss Julia Marlowe was born at
[lbeck, eight miles from Keswick,
Cumberland. She went to Ameri-
|ts a child of five, and first ap-
|ed in Irontown, Ohio, as a sailor
Pinafore' in 1882.
[n a very few years she had estab-
ld for. herself a position as the
Jug Shakespearean actress in the
led States."
lorrespondence
}he gulf mail service
Victoria, Sept. n, 1911.
Editor The Week, Victoria:
har Sir,—To show how much the
terate   and   inevitable   "kicker,"
JG.   W.  Dean,  knows  about the
Ids freight and passenger service
[lesire to say that our boat, the
adi,"  went  into  service  on  this
some little time before the C.
, so that his statement that the
R. put on a boat before we did,
fcs  that  he  knows  little  of  the
Dean's   other   statements  are
labout as reliable as this and as
the only one known to us who
Iraised an objection  to our serine won't do much  to help the
R.
think it would be well if Mr.
would   confine  his   "prattling"
Is own estate,
furs truly,
3ECKETT, MAJOR & CO.,
Per Frederick C. 'Beckett.
■HE GULF MAIL SERVICE
lEditor of The Week:
[ar Sir,—I noticed a little while
letter in your columns from the
(rs of the "Tuladi" gasoline boat
the Islands mail  service, and,
|mr last issue a reply from Mr.
W. 'Dean,  of  Ganges.   I  quite
with Mr. Dean that the Gov-
lent could have quashed the con-
Jfor the Islands mail delivery had
■wished to do so.    I am also quite
ped that  Mr.  Ralph  Smith will
j they had each time he holds a
Hng on these Islands, and more
■ill on the 21st inst.
am   informed   that   only   a   few
(ago the S.S. "City of Nanaimo"
ered a bag of mail to Victoria,
Itten on one of the wharves here.
they did deliver it is only one of
the many instances the C. P. R. have
shown of their desire to oblige the
people they serve.
We are now enjoying (thanks to
the C. P. R.) an admirable service at
reasonable rates, and we fully appreciate this, after all the inconveniences
we have suffered since the "Iroquois"
disaster. If, through failure to obtain the mail contract, the C. P. R.
is compelled to abandon this service,
you can imagine with what gratitude
we shall hail the next Liberal candidate.
If you do any prophesying do not
forget Mr. Shepherd as the man for
Nanaimo.
W. J. L. HAMILTON,
R.S.M., R.C.C., London.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Michel Zattoni of
Vancouver, B.C., Miner, intend to apply to
the Assistant Commissioner of Lands for a
licence to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and over the following described lands:—
Beginning at a post planted at the south-east
corner of Claim Number Three (3), which
lies between the extreme end of Drury Inlet
and Bradley Lagoon and the extension of
Blunden Harbor, thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated July   18th,   1911.
MICHEL ZATTONI.
James  Fulton,   Agent,
sept. 16 oct. 14
TAKE NOTICE that I, Michel Zattoni,
of Vancouver, B.C., Miner, intend to applv
to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum on
and over the following described lands:—
Beginning at a post planted at the northeast corner of Claim No. 4, which lies between the extreme end of Drury Inlet and
Bradley Lagoon and the extension of Blunden Harbor, thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or
less.
Dated  July   18th,   1911.
MICHEL ZATTONI.
James  Fulton,   Agent,
sept, 16 oct. 14
TAKE NOTICE that I, Michel Zattoni,
of Vancouver, B.C., Miner, intend to apply
to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands for a
license to prospect for coaj and petroleum on
and over the following described lands:—
Beginning at a post planted at the southeast corner of Claim No. 5, which lies south
and adjacent to Drury Inlet, tnence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres, more or
less.
Dated  July   13th,   1911.
MICHEL ZATTONI.
James   Fulton,   Agent,
sept. 16 oct. 14
iaKE NOTICE that I, Michel Zattoni,
of Vancouver, B.C., Miner, intend to apply
to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum on
and over the following described lands:—
Beginning at a post planted at the south-west
corner of Claim No. 6, which lies south and
adjacent to Drury Inlet; thence east
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres, more
or  less.
Dated July   18th,   1911.
MICHEL ZATTONI.
James   Fulton,   Agent,
sept. 16 • oct. id
TAKE NOTICE that I, Michel Zattoni,
of Vancouver, B.C., Miner, intend to apply
to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum on
auvd;'over the following described lands:—
Beginning at a post planted at the northeast corner of Claim No. 7, which lies south
and adjacent to Drury Inlet, thence west 80
chains; thence south So chains; thence east
80 chains; thence nortli 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres, more
or  less.
Dated July   i8th,   1911.
MICHEL ZATTONI.
James  Fulton,   Agent,
sept. 16 oct. 14
TAKE NOTICE that I, Michel Zattoni,
of Vancouver, B.C., Miner, intend to appl"
to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum on
and over tlie following described lands:—
Beginning at a post planted at the northwest corner of Claim 1N0. 8, which lies south
and adjacent to Drury Inlet, thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing 640. acres,
more  or  less.
Dated  July   18th,   1911.
MICHEL ZATTONI.
James  Fulton,   Agent,
sept. 16 oct. 14
TAKE NOTICE that I, Michel Zattoni,
of Vancouver, B.C., Miner, intend to appl"
to the assistant Commissioner of Lands for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum on
and over thc following described lands:—
Beginning at a nost planted at the southeast corner of Claim No. 9, adjacent to Bradley Lagoon, thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated  July   18th,   iqii.
MICHEL ZATTONI.
James   Fulton,   Agent,
sept. 16 oct. 14
Ta.. NOTICE that I, Michel Zattoni,
of Vancouver, B.C., Miner, intend to apply
to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum on
and over the foUowing described lands:—
Beginning at a post planted at the southwest corner of Claim No. 10 on Bradley La-
goon and north-west of the extreme end of
•rury Inlet, thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement, containine 640 acres, more or
less.
Dated July  18th,  1911
M~~
sept. 16
ICrfEL ZATTONI.
James  Fulton,   Agent,
oct. 14
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE   notice   that   Minnie   Anderson,   of
Vancouver,   occupation   Married   Woman,   intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a
post   planted   at   the   north-west   corner   of
Lot   546,    Salmon   River    Country;    thence
north   40   chains:   thence   west   80   chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated July  13,   ion,
MINNIE ANDERSON.
J. R. Morrison, Agent,
sept. 16 nov. 11
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that G. MacDonald, of Vancouver, occupation Labourer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 120 chains west of the N. W. corner
of Lot 547, Salmon River Country; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains:
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated July 13, ign.
GEORGE MACDONALD.
J. R. Morrison, Agent,
sept. 16 nov. n
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE   notice   that   J.   W.   Macfarlane,   of
Vancouver, occupation Timber Broker, intends
to   apply    for    permission    to   purchase    the
following   described   lands:—Commencing   at
a post planted  about  80  chains west of the
north-west corner of Lot 404, Anaham Lake
Country; thence south 80 chains; thence west
80  chains;   thence   north   80  chains;   thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated July  11,   1911.
JOHN WALTER MACFARLANE.
J. R. Morrison, Agent,
sept. 16 nov. 11
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Christina Morrison, of
Vancouver, occupation Married Woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted at the N. W. corner of Lot
546, Salmon River Country; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains to point
of commencement.
Dated July  13,   1911.
CHRISTINA ABERNETHY MORRISON.
J. R. Morrison, Agent.
sept. 16 nov. 11
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Malcolm MacDonald, of
Vancouver,   occupation   Labourer,  intends   to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 40  chains  west of the  S.  W.
corner  of  Lot   547,   Salmon  River  Country;
thence   south   80   chains;   thence   west   80
chains; thence north 80  chains; thence east
80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated July  13,   1911.
MALCOLM MACDONALD.
J. R. Morrison, Agent,
sept. 16 nov. 11
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Allan R. Macfarlane, of
Vancouver, occupation Commission Agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about four and one-half
miles in a south-westerly direction from
Lot 404, Anaham Lake Country, and near
the south shore of Ardroil Lake; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Dated July  n,   iqii.
ALLAN R. MACFARLANE.
J. R. Morrison, Agent,
nov. n
sept. 16
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Harry Anderson, of
Vancouver, occupation Teamster, intends to
apply for permission to purchase t the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 120 chains west of the
north-west corner of Lot 546, Salmon River
Country; thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chaii s to point of commencement.
Dated July   13,   1911.
HARRY ANDERSON.
J. R. Morrison, Agent,
sept. 16 nov. n
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Rachel Macfarlane, of
Vancouver, occupation Real Estate Agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 20 chains west of the
S. E- corner of Lot 405, Anaham Lake Country; thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated July  12,  1911.
RACHEL MACFARLANE.
J. R. Morrison, Agent,
sept. 16 nov. 11
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Eric L. Stenstrom, of
Vancouver, occupation Assistant Land Surveyor, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted near the south
shore of Charlotte Lake, about 15 miles south
of the Salmon River and about 2 miles west
of the head of the lake; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains to point
of commencement.
Dated July  14.  1911.
ERIC LAURENCE STENSTROM.
J. R. Morrison, Agent,
sept. 16 nov.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that  Marie C. Stenstrom, of
Vancouver, occupation  Nursemaid, intends to
apply   for   permission   to   purchase   the   following   described   lands:—CommencinK   at   a
post   planted   at   the   east   end   of   Charlotte
Lake, south of Salmon River, about 15 miles;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated July  14,  1911.
MARIE CHRISTINA STENSTROM.
J. R. Morrison, Agent.
sept. 16 nov. 11
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Lome M. Macfarlane,
of Vancouver, occupation Lumberman, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about three and one-half miles
in a south-westerly direction from Lot 4041
Anaham Lake Country; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement.
Dated July   n,   1911.
LORNE M. MACFARLANE.
J. R. Morrison, Agent,
sept. 16 ' nov. 11
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE   notice   that   R.   R.   Macfarlane,   of
Vancouver, occupation  Broker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described    lands:—Commencing    at    a    post
planted  on   east  shore  of  Ardroil   Lake  and
about 3 miles west of Lot 404, Anaham Lake
Country; tnence east 80 chains; thence south
80   chains;   thence   west   80   chains;   thence
north   80   chains   along   lake   shore  to   point
of commencement.
Dated July 11,  1911.
'    RODERICK R. MACFARLANE.
J. R. Morrison, Agent,
sept. 16 nov. 11
CANCELLATION  OF  RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing over Crown lands on the Morrice
River, Range 5, Coast District, notice of
which bearing date of May 5th, 1910, was
published in the British Columbia Gazette of
May sth, 1910, is cancelled in so far as it
relates to the lands surveyed as Lots 3881,
3882, 3883, 3884, 3885, 3886, 3887, 3888, 3889,
3890, 3891, 3892, 3893. 3894, 3895, 3896, 3897,
3898, 3899, 3900, 3901, 3902, 3903, 3904, 3905,
3906, 3907, 3908, 3909, and 3910.
ROBERT A.  RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands,
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C,
September   12,   1911.
sept. 16 dec. 16
CANCELLATION  OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing by reason ot the notice published in
the British Columbia Gazette of the 27th
December, 1907, covering a parcel of land
situated on Redonda Island, formerly held
under Timber License No. 4404^, which has
lapsed, is cancelled, and the said lands will
be open to location after midnight on the
14th  December,   1911.
ROBERT A.  RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C,
September   12,   1911.
sept. 16
dec. 16
"LAND   REGISTRY  ACT"
In the Matter of an Application for a fresh
Certificate of Title to that part of Lot 4
of Section 23, Spring Ridge, Victoria City.
Map  743,  of which  William  Moore and
Ernest W. Whittington are the registered
owners.
NOTICE is hereby given of my intention
at the expiration of one month from the first
publication hereof to issue a fresh Certificate
of   Title   in   lieu   of   the   Certificate   of   Title
issued   to   Wililam   Moore   and   Ernest   W.
Whittington on the 25th of April,  1902, and
numbered 7704 C, which has been lost.
Dated   at   Land   Registry   Office,   Victoria
British  Columbia,  this   30th  day  of August
191X' S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar General of Titles,
sept. 2 sept. 23
COAST LAND DISTRICT
District of. Range 2
TAKE  notice  that   I,  William   Brown,   of
Vancouver,  occupation  Sign   Painter,  intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post   planted   about   1   mile   southerly   from
the mouth of lower Glacier creek, said creek
runs into Homalko River about 9 miles from
its   mouth,   thence   north   80   chains;   thence
west  80  chains;   thence  south  40  chains  to
river;   thence meandering the  river to place
of commencement, containing 400 acres, more
or less.
Dated August   uth,   1911.
WILLIAM BROWN.
Morton S. Jones, Agent,
aug. 26 oct. 21
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE   notice   that   T.   K.   Macfarlane,   of
Vancouver, occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described    lands:—Commencing    at    a    post
planted about  120 chains in a north-westerly
direction   from    Lot    545 A,    Salmon    River
Country; thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated July  12,   iqii.
JAMES K. MACFARLANE.
J. R. Morrison, Agent,
sept. 16 nov. 11
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE  notice   that   Malcolm   MacLean,   of
Vancouver,   occupation   Labourer,   intends   to
apply  for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted  about  80  chains  west  of  the  northwest corner of Lot 547, Salmon River Country ;   thence   west   80   chains;   thence   north
80   chains;   thence   cast   80   chains;   thence
south   80 chains  to point of commencement.
Dated July 13,  1911.
MALCOLM MACLEAN.
J. R. Morrison, Agent,
sept. 16 nov, 11
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE   notice   that   Donald   MacLeod,   of
Vancouver,   occupation   Labourer,   intends   to
apply  for permission  to purchase  the following described  lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about three miles in a north-westerly
direction from Lot 546. Salmon  River Country; thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains;  thence north 80 chains;   thence east
80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated July  13,  1911.
DONALD MACLEOD.
sept, id
J. R. Morrison, Agent.
nov. n
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Alexander MacAulay, of
Vancouver, occupation Motorman, intenas to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 80 chains west of the S. W.
corner of Lot 547, Salmon River Country;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains,
to point of commencement.
Dated July  13,   19"-
ALEXANDER MACAULAY.
J. R. Morrison, Agent,
sept. 16 nov. 11
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that D. M. Macfarlane, of
Vancouver, occupation Lumberman, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the N. W corner of Lot 404,
Anaham Lake Country; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence cast 80 chains to point of
commencement.
Dated July  it,  1911.
DUNCAN M. MACFARLANE.
J. R. Morrison, Agent,
sept, 16 nov. 11
CANCELLATION   OF   RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing upon the lands on Cracroft Island,
formerly held under Timber License No.
31882, now expired, bjr reason of the notice
published in the British ' Columbia Gazette
of December 27th, 1907, is cancelled and the
said lands will be open to location by preemption only after midnight on Thursday,
November  30th,   1911.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C.,
August 30th,  1911.
sept. 2 n   ov. 25
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that an auction
sale of lots belonging to the Crown in the
Townsite of Quesnel will be held on Mon-
day, the 16th day of October next, at Quesnel.
All lots will be offered subject to an upset
?rice which will be announced at the sale,
'he terms of payment which will be one-
quarter cash at the sale and the balance in
three equal annual instalments with interest
at the rate of 6 per cent, per annum.
Plans of the Townsite may be seen at
the Land Office, Victoria, and at the oflice of
the   Government   Agent,   Quesnel.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
September 5th, iqii.
sept. 9
oct. 14
CANCELLATION  OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the Reserve
existing over the foreshore abutting on
the East Coast of Vancouver Island
from the head of Saanich Inlet to the
50th parallel of north latitude, as well
as the reserve of the coal under the sea
fronting the said foreshore, notice of
which bearing date January sth, 1910, was
published in the British Columbia Gazette
on January 6th, 1910, is cancelled, except in so far as the said reserve
relates to the foreshore in front. of Nelson
and Newcastle Districts and to the coal
under  the sea  fronting such  foreshore.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
August 30th, 1911.
sept. 2 dec. 2
"PUBLIC  INQUIRIES ACT"
HIS HONOUR the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council has been pleased to appoint thc Honourable Albert Edward McPhillips, K.C, President of thc Executive Cuuncil; the Honourable Price Ellison, Minister of Finance;
Charles Henry Lugrin, of the City of Victoria, Esquire; and William Harold Malkin,
of the City of Vancouver, Esquire, to be
Commissioners under the "Public Inquiries
Act" for the purpose of enquiring into and
reporting upon the operation of the "Assessment Act, 1903," with respect to its practical
bearings on the financial requirements of the
Province.
The said Commissioners will hold their
meetings on the dates and at the places mentioned   hereunder,   namely:—
Victoria at the Executive Council Chamber,
Parliament Buildings, Monday and
Tuesday, 25th and 26th September at
10 a.m. At the Court-house or the
Government Oflice at the following
places:—■
Nanaimo, Wednesday and Thursday, 27th
and  28th  September.
Vancouver, Friday and Saturday, 29th and
30th   September,
New Westminster, Monday, 2nd October.
Revelstoke,  Wednesday, 4th October.
Golden, Thursday, 5th October.
Cranbrook, Saturday, 7th October.
Fernie,   Monday,  9th  October.
Nelson, Wednesday,   nth October.
Rossland,   Thursday,   12th   October.
Grand   Forks,   Friday,   13th   October.
Princeton, Saturday, 14th October.
Merritt,  Monday,   16th  October.
Kamloops, Tuesday,  17th October.
Summerland, Thursday,   19th October.
Penticton, Friday, 20th October.
Kelowna, Saturday, 21st October.
Vernon, Monday, 23rd October.
It is requested that all persons who are
interested in the matter aforesaid, and who
desire to be heard, will not fail to be present
at the meetings of thc Commissioners.
PRICE ELLISON,
Chairman.
Treasury   Department,
13th   September,   1911.
sept. 16 oct. 21 14
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1911
Society
i    i
Mrs. Rowley Heyland was a visitor
in Vancouver during the past week.
* *   *
Mrs. Samuel McClure and children
are leaving shortly on a visit to Germany.
Mrs. and the Misses Lindsay from
Sarnia,  Out.,  are  visiting friends  in
Victoria.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Wrench, from
Vancouver, were guests in the city
during the week.
* *   *
Mrs. T. 0. Mackay and Miss Ross
Arbuthnot are visiting friends in Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr.   John   Cambie   is   enjoying   a
holiday at "'Finnerty's Beach."
* *   *
Mr. Wm. Monteith and the Misses
Monteith have returned from a visit
to Cowichan Lake.
* *   *
Mrs. J. K. Rebbeck from Vancouver is making a visit to friends in
the city.
* *   *
1  Mrs. John Hope, Vancouver, is the
guest of her parents,  Mr. and  Mrs.
James Dunsmuir, Hatley Park.
* *   *
Mrs. Burke, from Toronto, is visiting friends in the city, and is a guest
at the Alexandra Club.
Miss Keast of this city, is visiting
Mrs. Hubert Keast, Cowichan Lake.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Geiger are
the guests of Mr. Thomas Geiger,
Riverside Inn, Cowichan Lake.
* *   *
The Misses Macdonald from Vancouver, who have been visiting Miss
Troup, left for home on Tuesday last.
Miss Walker from Vancouver, is
the guest of Mrs. Fletcher, Carberry
Gardens.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Townshend have returned to their home in Nelson, after
a short stay in Victoria.
Mrs. John Pigott has issued invitations for an at home on Wednesday
next at the Alexandra Club.
Mrs. F. S. Hussey, who has been
making an extended visit to her rela-1
tives in the city, left on Saturday for
Vancouver.
* *   *    .
Mrs. Day and Miss Lily Day, who
have been visiting Mrs. R. S. Day,*
Rockland avenue, have left for their
home in Kelowna, Ireland.
* ■*■<   it-
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Cotton and
family, who have been making an extended visit in the city, left during
the week for England.
Mr. and Mrs. Daniels and the
Misses Daniels, Esquimalt, are enjoying a couple of weeks holiday at
Shawnigan Lake.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Girdwood,
Cowichan Lake, are guests in the city
and are leaving shortly on a visit to
the Old Country.
The committee and members of the
Pacific Club of Victoria have issued
invitations for an at home to be held
in the Club House on Thursday, September 14th.
* *   *
A poster-dance will be held in the
Alexandra Club ball-room ou Tuesday, October 3rd, under the auspices
of The  Daughters of the  Empire.
Mr. and Mrs. Thornton Fell and
family have returned from their cottage at Cadboro Bay, where they
have been spending the summer
months.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Morte Harley Craig,
Prince Rupert, have issued invitations
for the marriage of their daughter,
Emilie Lysle, to Mr. Douglas Duncan McTavish on Thursday evening,
September 28th, at St. Andrew's
Episcopal Church, Prince Rupert,
B.C. An at home will be given after
November   ist   at   1022   Pendergast
Street, Victoria, B.C.
* *   *
A very pleasant birthday party was
spent at the home of M. W. Beik,
1026 Yates street, on September II.
Amongst the invited guests were
Misses H. Longland, L. Peacock, E.
Peacock, F. Roberts, L. Roberts, Mrs.
Peacock, Mrs. Davis, Mrs. Finerty
and Miss M. Davis. Messrs. R.
Smith, T. Liddiard, W. Patterson, H.
Davis, C. Lancy, T. Savage, A. Long-
land and Mr. Finerty.
* st-     *
Mrs. E. H. Fletcher, Carberry
Gardens, was hostess recently of a
most enjoyable tea. The tea table
was daintily decorated with pink
sweet peas and gypophelia, with a
centre-piece of pale pink silk. Among
the guests present were: Mrs. Alister Robertson, Mrs. Stuart Williams, Mrs. Solly, Mrs. Lindsay (Ottawa), Mrs. Rome, Mrs. Blaiklock,
Mrs. Paterson, Mrs. Gavin Burns,
Mrs. Richard Jones, Mrs. Gresley and
others.
* *   *
A very pretty wedding was celebrated recently at the home of Captain and Mrs. Mcintosh, McBride
avenue, when their daughter, Miss
Ethel.  Maud  Mcintosh  was  married
>.-   -'-.?,-_
\. _»•■■<
.     «*    '
*_>■
*!-
-*
AlexandraCafe iTJti
COURTNEY STREET, TWO BLOCKS EAST OF POSTOFFICI
OPEN EVERY DAY AND SUNDAYS Phone 2978
Good Service,   Moderate Charges,   Dainty Meals,   Quiet Situatiotj
Table D'Hote or A La Carte
Breakfast 8 to 10 a.m.; Luncheon 12 to 2.30 p.m.; Dinner 6 to 8 p.m|
Afternoon Tea Strawberries and Cream Ice Cream
Special Dinners Catered For      Contracts Taken foi Entertainment!
to Mr. B. F. McKim of Vancouver.
The marriage ceremony was performed by the Rev. Leslie Clay. The bride
looked very pretty in a beautiful
gown of white crepe de chine over
taffeta trimmed with lace embroidered in seed pearls. She wore a wedding veil over a wreath of orange
blossoms and carried a bridal bouquet
of stephanotis, bride roses and ferns.
The bride's sister, Miss Helen Mcintosh, made a charming bridesmaid
and was tastefully gowned in champagne-coloured satin with an overdress of embroidered mousseline cle
soie. She carried a bouquet of pink
roses and ferns. The bridegroom's
brother, Mr. F. H. McKim, of Winnipeg, undertook the duties of best
man. The dining-room where the
guests were received was carried out
in decorations of pink ancl white sweet
Mrs. S. Shelton
Ye Old Country Dry Goodi_
Store, 734 Yates St.
English Ser^e Dress Skirts, navy ad
black.   Machine stitched bottoms!
$2.25 each.   Come and see.
peas and ferns, while the  drav
room   was  a  mass  of  white
tions, white asters and ferns,
and Mrs. McKim are spending
honeymoon   travelling   through |
United States and the Canadian
On their return they will make
home in Vancouver.   The bride
veiled in a smart navy blue ts|
made suit.
r>.
What Furniture, are You Going to Put Under Your Roof?
What sort of furniture are you going to put under YOUR ROOF? That's a big question for everybody ancl you should ponder before making any purchases.
Perhaps you have been planning all sorts of "economics" and have decided that you won't get elaborate but just cheap pieces. Well, it's all right to dispose
with the elaborate styles for they are not popular now, but it's mighty poor economy to get "cheap" furniture. Hundreds of people haye found that that
"Weiler Quality" furniture is the right sort to buy. It doesn't cost any more to completely equip the home from these stocks—the fact is that it costs less,
because Weiler'Fumiture lasts longer. Our styles are distinctive, materials and finish superior. You can furnish your home complete from here; everything
necessary is to be found under one roof—Carpets, Curtains, Linens, China, Glassware, Cutlery, Whiteware and Kitchen things. All these are here in great
variety.   Come in and see these stocks and learn why so many peoplehave found it pays to deal where thc most Furniture is shown and sold.
25c & 50c a Bottle
GLOSSINE
FURNITURE
-    POLISH
■.ryrrrtr
VICTORIA'S
Popular
flOML
RJRNIMRS'
■**^5iM
•r**wr
MM-,
EILER
•THE
11
ROS.
WMMgmmmM
.mpjMv'l
J^_____WW^__[W^___w^_\   "'""■
Victoria's
Popular
Nome
rjrni5her5
GLOSSINE
FURNITURE
POLISH
25c & 50c a Bottle THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1911
15
Tie White "Six"
for 1912
Believing that there was a demand
piled for an American .car of prac-
llly unlimited power and speed—
pt according to the best engineer-
practice; a car that would be
Inomical to maintain and easy to
Irate—the White Company has
It for 1912 a six-cylinder "sixty"
Ich has all of the features whicb
|e individualized the White Gaso-
Car since its appearance,
this car with its predecessors, the
Irty" and "forty" models and the
jety of open or enclosed bodies
Ich may be had on the various
psis, permits the White Company
present a most complete line for
|he reason why the White Gaso-
cars  have  performed   faultless-
lind cost so little to operate and
Intain is traceable to the design of
|engine which is of the long-stroke
: with cylinders cast en bloc. With
, construction, the fuel is made to
the maximum of power and the
Ine   is   so   simplified—so   many
plly troublesome parts are elimin-
-that fuel economy goes hand in
with economy of maintenance.
ie new White "six" has an engine
liis same design, with all the sim-
Ity and  ease of operation  which
Imarked the other White models.
Ise features will make the White
I' a desirable car to own—a car
the advantages of a "six" with-
Ithe disadvantages.
wrrespondence
\ny port in a storm
Victoria, Sept. 15.
Dr The Week:
J,—The writer derived some com-
Ifrom the Hon. Mr. Templeman's
lof Victoria harbour improvers but the Times' announcement
Evening has utterly dispelled the
Dn that the hon. gentleman has
Igiven the matter serious corjsid-
jin.
jy boy in a ward school could
such plans as those presented
|would naturally place the piers
ght angles to Dallas road. It is
a simple proposition. But why,
JI ask, is a sea-wall being built
I? It.is well known that with*a
pouth-west gale the spray washes
houses on Dallas Road at that
Just think what beautiful clean
a vessel would get under such
Itions along side piers as Mr.
lleman proposes. If Mr, Tem-
ln had studied his subject he
|l have placed his piers at right
to the Brotchie Ledge break-
along side which vessels could
j perfect shelter at all times, and
ners would also give additional
kth to the breakwater.
tn we are told that the electric
Blow run within two blocks of
jroposed new piers and that this
m can be made a feeder for all
Us reaching Victoria and util-
these proposed shipping facili-
JHas the Hon. Mr. Templeman
Idea of the length of trackage
red for the standing room only
Irs sufficient to carry the cargo
le fair size over-seas vessel? If
■then let him make some en-
Is and then try to picture the
Ible service under his proposals.
Tilly appears incredible that an
Itant subject like this should be
Id in such an elementary manner
(man in the Hon. Mr. Temple-
| position.
Brotchie Ledge project has
lalked of for years and if it has
pen positively "knocked" by the
I Mr. Templeman and his party
certainly been treated as too
place seriously before th.e Govr
lnt of Canada up tp the present
In that Government there are
Ibright and intelligent men and
ltizens of Victoria may only ex-
kssistance from that source by
lg a strong case in behalf of this
It, and it is unfortunate that the
IMr. Templeman has proclaimed
Iter unfitness to have anything
Iwith it.
DALLAS ROA.D.,,
Messrs. Stewart Williams & Co.
Duly instructed by Commander G. W. Vivian (on behalf of the
British Admiralty) will sell by PUBLIC AUCTION on
£gH3 Monday and Tuesday, October 8th and 9th
at 11 o'colck each day at the Naval Yard,
Esquimalt, near Victoria, B.C.
THE SINGLE SCREW SLOOP OF WAR, H.M.S. "EGERIA,"
also a quantity of Naval Stores, etc., including Steam Launch, 28 ft.
overall; Seven Boats and equipment, Diving Dress (complete), a
quantity of Ward Room Electro Plate, Wire and Manilla Rope, Hair
Mattresses, Ward Room Furniture, Pillows, Blankets, Curtains, Old
English Copper Coal Scuttles, Brass Boiler Tubes, Tents, Awnings,
Large Sails, Lanterns, Old Brass, Copper, Books, Compasses, Tripods,
Under-clothing, Provisions, Electric Cable and other goods too
numerous to mention.
On View Friday, October 6th, all day
Further particulars later, or can be obtained from
THE AUCTIONEER - -        STEWART WILLIAMS
637 Fort Street, Victoria, B. C.
IMPORTANTJAND SALE
Messrs. Stewart Williams & Co.
Duly instructed by the Hon. Edgar Dewdney, will sell by PUBLIC
AUCTION at their Auction Mart, 637 Fort Street, on
Thursday, September 28th
at 11 o'clock sharp the well known "COGAN'S" Farm, situated
between the Happy Valley Road and the Sooke Road, adjoining the
Luxton Ranch, through which the Canadian Northern Railway are
now building their road. It contains upwards of 410 acres, over 80 of
which are now under grain, producing crops unequalled on the Island.
There is a good Orchard, containing upwards of 100 trees, all fruit
bearing. It is one of The Ideal Spots on Vancouver Island for a Milk
Ranch, or it could easily be subdivided into small holdings and sold
at an enormous profit to poultry raisers, small fruit raisers, milkmen,
etc. Further particulars can be obtained from the Hon. Edgar
Dewdney, owner, Willow Park P. 0., or from
THE AUCTIONEER
STEWART WILLIAMS
821 Cormorant Street,
14th September, 1911.
To the Editor of The Week:
Dear Sir,—I beg to enclose herewith a copy of the resolution passed
by.the Men's Own,Class of the First
Congregational Church on Sunday,
loth inst., copies of whicli were sent
to Hon. Richard McBride, and Hon.
Thos. Taylor, Minister of Public
Works. We would be glad if you
would publish this in your next issue".
In name of the class.
■"■'• Yours respectfully, '"'•••'
WM. PATTERSON, Sec'y.
Resolved, "That this meeting desires to express its sense of the wrong
done to the public of Victoria and district by the flagrant trespass upon the
rights of the people, the gross pollution of the waters of Esquimalt Harbor, by dumping of crude oil and
other smelling material, and beg to
request that the Government of B. C.
as custodians of the people's rights,
take such steps as will effectually
prevent any further pollution of the
heritage of the people, especially in
the interests of private gain."
THE  FOUR BILLS
Sweedish Massage
Medical Gymnastics
Vibratory Treatment
G. Bjornsfelt, S.M.
Phone 1856     -  '   821 Fort St.
TELEPHONES
"S48 AND"249
A. E. KENT
PROPRIETOR
Pacific Transfer
Co.
Trucking and Expressing
Baggage Chtcktd and Furniture
Rimtvtd to any part of City
504 tf 5*06 FORT STREET
VICTORIA, B. C.
The fact that there are four Williams in the Cabinet at Ottawa—William Templeman, William Pugsley,
William Fielding and William Patterson—is meat for the platform wits.
According to the campaign joke they
are the four Bills, and each has a
nickname of his own. The Hon. William Templeman, Minister of Mines
and Inland Revenue, is Sleepy Bill;
the Hon. William Pugsley, Minister
of Public Works, is Slippery Bill, and
the Hon. William Fielding, Minister
of Finance, and the Hon. William
Patterson, Minister of Customs, are
the two Bills who went to Washington and brought back the Counterfeit
Bill which they are now trying to
pass.r^-Collier's Weekly.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE notice that Neil Sinclair Walker, of
Vancouver, occupation Clerk, intends to ap***.
ply fo*H permission to purchase" the follow-'
ing described lands:—Commencing'at • a -post
planted at the S. W. corner ,of ' Lot _4j,
Salmon River Country, thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains to point of commencement.
Dated July  13,   1911.
NEIL SINCLAIR WALKER.
J. R. Morrison, Agent.
$®kM___Y7w.;....; km ■;*;; txm .;;*■• SSWft
Roy's   Art   Glass   Works   and   Store
848   Yates  St.,  Victoria,  B.C.
Albert F. Roy
Over   thirty   years'   experience   in
Art Glass
LEADED  LIGHTS
Sole manufacturer of Steel-Cored Lead
for   Churches,   Schools,   Public   Buildings and private Dwellings.    Plain and
Fancy Glass Sold.   Sashes Glazed by
Contract.   Estimates   free.    Phone 594
TAKE NOTICE that I, Michel Zattoni,
of Vancouver, B.C., Mirier, intend to appl"
to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands for a
license to prospect ior coal and petroleum on
and over the following described lanas :—
Beginning at a post planted at the northwest corner of Claim No. n, lying between
Drury inlet and Braden. Harbor, thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing 640
acres,  more or less.
Dated July   18th,   iqii.
MICHEL ZATTONI.
James   Fulton,   Agent,
sept. 16 oct. 14
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT    .
■ \ District  of  Victorlk f
; TAKE notice that I, James Lawson Raymur, of Victoria, B.C., occupation Accountant,
intends tot apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted at high water mark at the
southerly extremity of an Island lying distant
ninety-five (95) feet frjom, the intersection
of. the southerly boundary-6f ,Lot 1290/. Victoria ,City, and high; water^ mark; thence
following 1 high ('water mark nbrth-fehstqfly,1 40
feet;1 thence: north-westerly 50 >feet;-thence
south-westerly 50 feet; thence south-easterly
along high water mark to the point of commencement and. containing one-twenty-fourth
(1-24) of an acre.
Datea   13th  September,   iqii,
EDGAR SAXELBY PARR
Agent for James Lawson Raymur.
i^_^Mi_mmm/^m_m_9A_m.^
The Kardomah
Tea & Coffee Store
L. Overton, Prop.
1107 Fort Street Phone 2645
Oh Ladies, in thy hours of ease
Drink only of Kardomah Teas,
Whose qualities are unsurpassed
And keep their flavour unto the last.
Phone, or when passing call in and take 1 lb. of our Tea or Coffee
home.    You will be satisfied.    The goods are of the best.
Phone Orders Promptly Attended To
99
The "Modern
French Dry Cleaning
SPECIALISTS IN LADIES' FINE GARMENT
CLEANING AND PRESSING
Oflice and Finishing Rooms
1310 Government St, Opp. The "Grand"
Phone 1887
Call us up in regard to prices or any
information desired.
Four car tickets given free with each order of
One Dollar or more brought to us.
Men's Suits Cleaned and Pressed
HANAN
The Best of All
No one would willingly buy an indifferent
painting when for practically the same price
a real masterpiece could be secured. Neither
would anyone; if he or she knew it, buy a
shoe of indifferent style and incapable of
comfort when they could just as well own a
HANAN—a   real   masterpiece.
It is to you, who do not know it, we ire
speaking,   HANAN   Shoes   need   simply  an
introduction—that's
shapes.
All    styles,    all
H. B. Hammond
Shoe Company
Broadwalk Scuffers for Children
Sole  Agents:
Hanan & Son, Wichert & Gardiner,
N. Y. N. Y.
Pemberton Building, 621 Fort Street
Military Hair
Brushes for
Gentlemen
With solid wooden backs of
genuine Ebony, Rosewood, etc.
The bristles are of the best the
world affords, including the
celebrated Russian variety-*-**-
tightly secured, therefore will
stand washing in hot water.
Every gentleman should possess a pair of these, as a good
brush prevents dandruff and
stimulates growth of the hair.
Price $2.50 up       ' .
Cyrus H. Bowes
Chemist
1228 Government Street
Tels. 425 and 450
.'. *. 1 ...j.
...m Kjtgg 1 ...n.
Moving
Sale
We are obliged to move and
have taken a store in the Sayward Block.
For the next three weeks
we will allow 20 per
cent discount off all
cash purchases
This is only the second sale
we have held in forty-nine
years—is it not worth attending?;
Redfern & Sons
Oldest Diamond and Jewelery
House in Western Canada
1009 Gov't St. !
16
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 16,1911
N III
i 'i1-)
I i
THE CAMPAIQ^J—The last week of
a vigorous campaign is wearing on.
The enthusiasm increases at every
point; the leaders are s.s vigorous as ever
and in spite of his "age and grey hairs" it
looks as if Sir Wilfrid will be able to continue to the end of a fight which cannot
fail to recall the historic Midlothian, cam--
paign of Mr. Gladstone. For a man who
appealed to the voters of Quebec on the
ground of age and infirmity he has made
a remarkable showing. The Week doubts,
however, whether he has gained many converts and it does know that he has lost
many supporters.
Double Policy
The necessity of preaching a double
policy in Quebec and Ontario has proved
a heavy tax and it looks as if Sir Wilfrid's plaintive plea to his fellow-countrymen that after all the tidvy was "only a
little one" has failed to lull their susceptibilities, while such a statement in Quebec made it impossible to appeal to the
loyalists of Ontario with a claim that the
-■navy was anything more than an abortive
product.
Handwriting on tlie Wall,      .
The most significant handwriting on the
wall is to be found in the columns of the
Montreal Herald, a Government organ,
owned by the Hon. Sidney Fisher and managed and edited by Mr. J. S. Brierley, one
of the most capable and uncompromising
Liberals in the Dominion. After carefully
summing up the situation, the Herald concludes that Sir Wilfrid cannot have less
than thirty of a majority. An admission
from such a source that he will lose thirteen seats in the aggregate possesses the
highest significance, and may well be taken
to presage defeat.
Estimating thc Result
It is known that Mr. Borden has gained
ground in the Maritime Provinces and that
the Government will lose at least three
seats. Of course Quebec is an unknown
quantity, and it is idle to predict what the
result will be except to say that some inroad will undoubtedly be made on the Government majority. Assuming that the
West does no better for Mr. Borden than
it did last time, this leaves the battle to
be won in Ontario, and that is where both
political leaders are concentrating their
energies. There are several indications
that Ontario will give a large, if not an
overwhelming majority against Reciprocity.
Desperation of the Globe
One indication is the obvious desperation
of the Toronto Globe, which has never
been so dogmatic and illogical. Another
factor is the tremendous influence of some
of the leading business men of the Province who for the first time in their lives
will cast a Conservative vote; and the third
factor is the growing conviction in the
minds of the Ontario farmers that they
would lose more through the invasion of
their own home market than they would
gain by being able to send their products
across the Line free of duty.
Industrial Considerations
To this no doubt must be added the determined opposition of the manufacturing
and industrial interests which recognise
that the exploitation of Canadian natural
resources under. the Reciprocity Treaty
would be the beginning of a movement to
the other side of the Line, depleting Canadian cities and building up new industrial
centres in the American states. This appeals especially to the Province of Ontario
because it has become the great manufacturing province of the Dominion and it is
the development of manufacturing industries which has created the home market.
It will be a great surprise if Ontario does
not go overwhelmingly against Reciprocity
and furnish the majority which will turn
the scale in favour of a Conservative Government.
Haultain's Conversion
In Saskatchewan a noticeable incident
has occurred during the week. Mr. Fred.
Haultain, easily the most brilliant politician
in the Prairie Provinces, has come out flat-
footed against Reciprocity. He frankly admits that six months' investigation has convinced him that second thoughts are best.
When he pronounced in favour of Reciprocity in March last he did so under the belief that the farmers of Saskatchewan and
Alberta were in favour of it to a man. He
now finds that this is not the case and further that its National and Imperial aspects are so important that he must in any
event oppose it. The attitude of Mr. Haultain may fairly be regarded as a victory
for those who have always maintained
that in the ultimate issue Reciprocity would
be settled on this basis, and it cannot be
doubted that he is only one of many who
were at first enamoured of its economic
features but ultimately convinced that its
National and Imperial aspects far outweighed every other consideration.
Kipling's Message
Is it too much to say that the one event
of the week has been the publication of
Rudyard Kipling's magnificent message to
Canada? No man can read it without a
thrill, and no man who reads it should for-'
get that Kipling has at all times proved himself to be the one man with his finger on
the pulse of the Empire, and the one man
able to interpret the aspirations of the
British people. He was the first on the
occasion of his visit to Canada five years
ago to raise the standard of nationality and
to urge that the main duty of Canadians
was to subordinate personal gain to National interests. There could be no better
time to apply this great principle than in
the present crisis. It is essentially a time
for subordinating the possibility of a small
material gain to the maintenance of the
high ideals and the working out of the
loftiest destiny.
Templeman's Debacle
In Victoria there is no doubt of the result. Mr. Barnard will have a substantial
majority, thanks not only to the zeal and
enthusiasm of his own workers but also
to the ineptitude of Mr. Templeman,
the convincing manner in which he has
monstrated his inability to protect the
terests of the Province.   It now turns
that Mr. Templeman knew nothing abi|
the circular which was issued at the exprj
wish of the railway companies to ena
them to evade the Alien Labour Act, wh
means that in a matter directly affect]
British Columbia its only Minister was
consulted by his colleagues and was left]
ignorance of a matter which directly
fected his interests until he read it "in I
newspapers."   It is a humiliating posit)
for him and one which shows how li|
there is in the cry of the Victoria Tir,
"Vote for Templeman and a Portfolio.)
His Influence Nil
Mr. Templeman's failure to secure
provision for the building of a warship
the Canadian Navy on the Pacific C<J
has emphasized the conviction that his]
fluence at Ottawa is nil unless one ii
take the still more damning alterna|
that he is indifferent.
The Last Straw
But the last straw is the springing ofl
Brotchie Ledge breakwater project a
before the election. This was anticipJ
by The Week and specifically referrq
a month ago as one of the election "td
with which Mr. Templeman would seel
amuse the electorate. It comes beforl
now without any foundation other than!
assurance of Mr. Pugsley that he w-j
"endorse" the project. He said the
when he was here two and a half
ago, but from that day to this not a i\\
has he moved. How ill-digested a sch
it is is well shown by the fact that in|
same issue of the paper Mr. Thos. Sc
who is an authority on the subject, sub
an alternative plan and condemns |
Brotchie Ledge breakwater because!
would leave the harbour open to the i\_\
gales." No wonder that this latest
tion seals Mr. Templeman's fate;
'
>'
The Car That Beats Them All
A White "Six" for 1912.   Ask for Demonstration
White Pleasure and Commercial Cars
Cars of Quality ■
THE WHITE GARAGE
1218 Wharf Street, Victoria, B. C.
Telephone 2Q08
I
Our Repair Shop is one of the finest in the City.   All wort is guaranteed.    If you are looting for a sptare deal, bring your work to us. Jl
<JllL
AMPAIGN  EDITION
The Week
VICTORIA
from East to West the circling
word has passed,
Till West is East beside our
land-locked blue;
?rom East to West the tested
chain holds fast,
The   well-forged   link   rings
true. —Kipling.
A British eolnmbia Newspaper and Review.
Published at Victoria. B. e.
"It is her own soul
that Canada risks
to-day."
—Kipling's Message
|rOL. IX.   No. 37 ^\ Ninth Year
THE WEEK, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1911
Ninth Year
One Dollar Per Annum
EASQNS WHY Victoria Electors Should VOTE FOR BARNARD
Is the day of the election draws near the
les between the two political parties in
Joria have narrowed clown so that the
Ition will turn upon the attitude of the
|:lidates towards a few vital questions,
first of these is the record of Mr.
iard and Air. Templeman towards
lour. In this connection Mr. Barnard is
lunate since circumstances have worked
I the problem to his advantage.
THE  WORKING-MAN
It election times both political parties
fvate the working-man and claim to be
Natural protector.   This attitude of gen-
friendliness ancl interest amounts to
little unless it is backed up by some
|iite action which carries conviction to
' mind  of  the  working-man.    Recent
jits have placed both candidates in a very
r light in their relation to the true inks   of   Labour.    There   are   on   the
lute books of the Dominion two Acts
lng a direct bearing upon that phase of
[Labour question in which the working-
of British Columbia are most inter-
I—the Immigration Act and the Alien
fciir Act.   Early last month, before Mr.
liard left Victoria for Ottawa, he was
le acquainted with the fact that large
Ibers of American labourers were be-
limported from Seattle by local railway
tractors.   On his return to Ottawa he
light the matter before the House.   Air.
\.k Oliver, the Minister of the Interior,
Mr. Mackenzie King, the Minister for
|our, both denied that such was the case
promised special attention to the en-
lement of the Act.
Mr. Templeman Sat Quietly By
iMth this Air. Barnard had to be satisfied
jthe moment; he received no assistance
li Air. Templeman who sat quietly by
[took no part in the debate.   Later on
1 Provincial   Government   took   action
rist Grant, Smith & Company for ille-
importing alien labour and the firm
I convicted and fined.   During the hear-
lof the case it developed that in 1910
lin 1911 the Dominion Government had
fended the clauses of the Immigration
requiring immigrants to have $25 in
and to come direct from their coun-
lof origin.   They had clone this by cir-
Irs issued to their immigration agents,
l.py of which was produced in Court.
Iher of the Ministers mentioned this cir-
(stance when Air. Barnard raised the
fetion in the House.    A'Ir. Templeman
he did not know of it.   Air. Duncan
|s, a leading light in the Liberal Party,
it was clone at the request of the rail-
companies because they could not pro-
sufficient labour.   When Air. Temple-
did know   of it he expressed no sym-
Jiy with the action of Air. Barnard in
ling the question ancl offered no defence
lthe Government.   His organ, the Vic-
Times, in a most disingenuous argu-
, tried to show that because it was
J Immigration Act  and  not  the Alien
Jour Act   which   it   specifically altered
therefore the latter was not affected.
Facts are Stubborn Things
|ut facts are stubborn things ancl can-
be demolished by disingenuous argu-
it and the matter stands thus, that Air.
Inard raised the question in the House,
eived scant courtesy from the Govern-
rit, received no assistance from Mr.
Inpleman ancl yet but for A'Ir. Barnard's
Ion and the publicity which he gave to
the matter the public would never have
known of the Government circular, the suspension of certain clauses of the Immigration Act and the open breach of Canadian
law involved in conniving at a contravention of the Alien Labour Act.
SHIP-BUILDING AT ESQUIMALT
The contrast between Air. Barnard's attitude ancl that of Mr. Templeman in respect of ship-building at Esquimalt is just
as clear ciit as in the case of the Labour
interests. Time ancl again on the floor of
the Plouse  Air.  Barnard has  raised the
well as unfair, as to insist on building the
whole of the fleet on the Atlantic where
it is admitted by the Government that there
is no clanger and to ignore the claims of
the Pacific where alone it is expected to
be of practical use. But its claims have
been ignored, and A'Ir. Templeman was a
party to the ignoring, for when the advertisements for tenders were sent out
there was no specification as to the point
at which the vessels should be constructed,
and yet the Government knew perfectly
well that without such specification all ten-
question of the importance of Esquimalt
as a naval base, its great natural advantage as a harbour, its endorsation by the
Imperial Government ancl the desirability
of constructing at least a portion of the
Canadian Navy on the Pacific Coast. A'Ir.
Barnard's persistency in this matter greatly
annoyed the Government and he was repeatedly snubbed for refusing to be
"clowned."
No Aid From Mr. Templeman
On no occasion were his efforts seconded
by Air. Templeman nor on any single
occasion has Air. Templeman on his own
account raised the question on the floor of
the House. It is not necessary to enter
into any argument in favour of the wisdom and the importance of the policy advocated by Air. Barnard in this regard.
It means everything to the future of Victoria ancl nothing can be more illogical as
ders would naturally be based upon Eastern
prices, which are in the neighbourhood of
at least 30 per cent, lower than Western.
Sidetracked by the Government
Or in other words the failure to specify
that some of the vessels should be constructed on the Pacific barred the door
against anything but Atlantic construction.
Yet Air. Templeman calmly acquiesced. Pie
has not at any time registered a protest
against the action of the Government, nor
has he said one word in support of thc
case which Mr. Barnard put forward on
behalf of Esquimalt. Apart from the unfairness of this policy; apart from its
defective character from a National standpoint, it means depriving Victoria of a
large and profitable industry, whicii would
have found occupation for hundreds of men
ancl added some thousands to the population.
FISHERY PROTECTION
Mr. Barnard made himself a very unpopular member with the Government because during the last two sessions he has
given them no rest on the subject of
Fishery Protection. Whenever he has
urged that our fisheries were being depleted
by American poachers he has been told
across the floor of the House that his information was unreliable and that if there
was any poaching at all it was very little.
Government Denied Poaching
Almost up to the date of the campaign
Air. Templeman's organ deliberately gave
the lie to Mr. Barnard's charges in connection with poaching, and when the Conservative press published the details of the
capture of a pirate vessel off the West coast
of Vancouver Island by the Government
Fishery cruiser the Victoria Times denied
its truthfulness; but since the vessel was
actually captured and towed into port,
people had the evidence of their own eyes
to support the truth of the story, and the
Times then crawled down ancl admitted it.
In this matter it is never possible to arouse
Air. Templeman to the slightest degree of
interest; indeed, he denied the facts.
A Volte Face
Now that Reciprocity is thc issue A'Ir.
Templeman ancl the Liberal speakers have
discovered that our fisheries are valuable
and the removal of one cent a pound duty
would transfer the whole fishing fleet from
Seattle to Prince Rupert. But they say
nothing about the neglect of the Dominion
Government to protect existing fisheries,
ancl they fail to tell the electors that of the
265 boats said to ply from Seattle in this
interest, not sixty-live would exist as an
American fleet if supervision were strict
ancl they were not allowed to poach in
Canadian waters. Here again the respective attitude of Air. Barnard and Air. Templeman is clearly defined, and shows that
the Minister who claims to represent Victoria and the whole of the Province in his
Ministerial capacity has done nothing himself, ancl refrained from helping a man
who tried to do something.
CHINESE  IMMIGRATION
Perhaps, however, the greatest contrast
between the two candidates is to be found
in their attitude towards the question of
Oriental Immigration. In that fatal speech
which he made in the Victoria Theatre
more than a month ago Air. Templeman
clearly outlined his policy on this great
question. He favoured the abolition of the
head-tax and the substitution of an agreement of a similar character to that which
Mr. R. L. Drury negotiated with the Japanese Government.
Templeman and the Head-Tax
It is true that since then Air. Templeman has clone his best to remove the impression which hc created, but however indifferent and lethargic hc may be, hc is too
honest a man to lie about it, and all he
ventures to say is that he is not in favour
of removing the head-tax unless some other
restriction is imposed, and he thinks the restriction of a friendly agreement like that
of the Japanese would meet the case, From
this it is quite clear that Mr. Templeman
knows he has made a mistake and that he
has voiced opinions entirely at variance
with those held by the vast majority of the
people of British Columbia.
(Continued on Page 2) THE WEEK, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1911
The Keynote of the
Election
Newspapers may write for or against reciprocity; public
speakers may laud or decry tlie measure; and private citizens may
hold varying views on the subject. But who is better qualified to
know what it means than President Taft, the Chief Magistrate of
thc United States, the man who is chiefly responsible for the
reciprocity agreement, who used every effort tp get it adopted by
both Mouses of Congress, and who is eagerly waiting to see the
Canadian people accept the terms of the agreement? Surely the
views of this high authority are well worth considering at the
present time.
* In a speech at the joint banquet of the Associated Press and
the American Newspaper Publishers' Association, held in New
York on April 27th last, when it became necessary to explain to
the people of the United States just what was meant, just what
the President hoped for by the measure, he said:—
"I have said that this was a critical time in the solution of the
question of reciprocity. It is critical because, unless it is now
decided favourably to reciprocity, it is exceedingly probable that
no such opportunity will ever again come to the United States.
The forces which are at work in England and in Canada to separate
her by a Chinese wall from the United States, and to make her part
of an imperial commercial band reaching from England around
the world to England again by a system of preferential tariffs, will
derive an 'mpetus from the rejection of this treaty, and if we would
have reciprocity with all the advantages that I have described, and
that I earnestly and sincerely believe will follow its adoption, we
must take it now, or give it up forever."
From the same speech by President Taft;—"The bond uniting
the Dominion with the Mother Country i s light and almost
imperceptible."
RECIPROCITY means give and take—Canada to give everything and the United States to take it.
IF we get Reciprocity, Rudyard Kipling may honour us with
a poem on "Our Lady of the Woes."
Editorial
(Continued from  Page  1)
Mr. Barnard Adamant
Mr. Barnard's attitude is unmistakable and his stand adamant.
He belongs to the party which has
always been opposed to Oriental
Immigration, which through Premier McBride refused the overtures of the Dominion Government
ancl the Grand Trunk Pacific to
relax the regulations under which
Oriental labour could not be employed. Mr. Barnard said emphatically in his address: "I shall
oppose with all my power any effort
which might be made to do away
with the $500 head-tax on the
Chinese coming into Canada. I do
not consider that it would be possible for Canada to make a similar
arrangement vvith China to that
whicii exists with Japan, because
the Government of the former
Oriental Power is so unstable."
Barnard Speaks for B. C.
On this question Mr. Barnard
undoubtedly speaks for British
Columbia. Mr. Templeman speaks
for himself, the Dominion Government and the corporations in
whose interests he would relax the
laws whicii have been enacted for
the protection of while labour.
RECIPROCITY
Tbe last, and of course the
greatest, reason why the electors
should return Mr. Barnard is because he is the standard-bearer of
the party which is opposed to Reciprocity. It is impossible to-recapitulate even a few of the arguments whicii have been put forward
during one of the most strenuous
ancl brilliant campaigns ever conducted.
Profit and Loss
Suffice it to say that whatever
slight material gain might result
from the passing of the Reciprocity
Agreement such an advantage is
not worth consideration in view of
the other great issues involved.
Canada is prosperous; her continued prosperity depends mainly
upon the development of her agricultural resources. In British Columbia this specially applies to fruitgrowing. '
We Need More Men
What British Columbia most
needs is men; more men, and then
again more men. We need increased population to find a profitable home market for our producers ; we need increased population in order to ensure the establishment of manufacturing industries ancl anything which checks the
growth of population by making
labour less profitable is the greatest
enemy British Columbia could
have. It is obvious that if we are
to buy farm produce in increased
quantities from the States, we shall
produce less ourselves, and in producing less shall employ less
labour.
Wages Would Fall
With a lessened demand for labour will naturally come lower
wages, and if tliere were no other
great issue involved, affecting National and Imperial interests, this
alone is sufficient to stamp the Reciprocity Agreement as "a bad bargain," and to determine that the
interests of Victoria lie in supporting Mr. Barnard, the candidate
who is opposed to Reciprocity.
Do you buy more than six boxes
of apples a year? If not, you would
save just $1.50 under Reciprocity, or
the equivalent of half a day's wage.
Which is of the greater importance,
to import British settlers or American farm produce? You cannot do
the latter without checking the for-
TAFT'S ADVICE—"KEEP QUIET"
One of the most significant things
the president said was at the luncheon
with the New York State Fair commissioners at Syracuse, when he explained why he had not discussed reciprocity in his outdoor address to
several thousand city folks and farmers.
"I am not going to speak about
reciprocity," he said, "until after the
matter is settled in Canada. We have
done our part, and are waiting, and
it is just as well for us to keep quiet."
Mr. Barnard is in favour of building
the Pacific unit of the Canadian Navy
on the Pacific Coast. Mr. Templeman is not, if one is to judge from
his inaction in the matter.
Great Speech of Mr. Sifton
at Coburg
What is declared to have been one
of the greatest speeches yet delivered in the present political campaign
was made by Hon. Clifford Sifton at
Cobourg on the evening of September
-th.
At the outset of his address, Mr.
Sifton stated that he would not haggle
over prices, lie would endeavour to
confine himself to indisputable facts,
the truth of which was freely admitted by the advocates of reciprocity.
It was an indisputable fact that
from 85 to 90 per cent, of Canadian
farm products, apart from hard wheat,
was marketed in the Canadian home
market.
'Tf, therefore, you were to have the
American market offered you permanently you would get higher prices
for perhaps ten or twelve per. cent,
of your farm products," said Mr. Sifton. "But that's not the proposition. This market isn't offered to
you permanently. It will be taken
away from you just as soon as our
friends on the other side choose to
take it away. If they think that this
bargain is not turning out well for
them they will soon take away their
market for this ten or twelve per
cent, of our farm products.
Canada's Loss
"And in return for this, what are
you giving? In return for a possible,
gambling chance of getting a higher
price for ten or twelve per cent, of
your agricultural products, you are
asked to throw open your whole
home market to the United States, to
the twelve favoured nations, and to
the entire British Empire.
"My friend, Sir Wilfrid Laurier, has
had a good deal of fun with this favoured nations business. You know,
when you can't reply to an argument,
sometimes the best thing you can do
is to joke about it. (Laughter.) Sir
Wilfrid has said that this favoured
nations matter is not very serious,
that the competition of the favoured
nations in the Canadian home market
will not be worth considering. Just
let us look at that for a moment.
The United States has ninety millions of people. Last year the United
States raised enough agricultural products to feed that ninety millions of
people, and there remained four hundred and thirty-eight million dollars
worth of agricultural products for export. And what of the favoured nations? Russia produced $23,000,000
worth of butter last year; Australia
produced $11,500,000 worth of butter
last year; New Zealand produced $8,-
000,000 worth of butter last year;
Australia produced $3,500,000 worth of
beef last year; New Zealand produced
$2,750,000 worth of beef last year;
Argentine produced $20,000,000 worth
of beef last year; Australia produced
$6,000,000 worth of mutton and lambs
last year. And so it goes. These are
the very things which we are producing'. And there is not one of
these countries which cannot ship
these products to Canada at freight
rates whicii will be a comparative
trifle.
"Are they likely to do this? Why,
they are doing it already. They are
doing it in the very face of our present protective tariff. Last April and
May Australia shipped butter to Canada, over the tariff wall, in such
quantities that the price broke from
27^ to 19 cents a pound. Last April
and May we imported one million
dozen eggs from the United States
despite the tariff, and the result was
a break in the price of eggs. Last
April and May we imported 351,000
pounds of mutton and lamb from
Australia, 363,000 pounds of mutton
and lambs from the United States,
and so on, all in the face of our tariff.
Reasons for the Imports
'What accounts for these imports?
Simply the fact that the Canadian
farmer's home market has risen to
such a level that the United States,
Argentine , Australia and all these
other countries are even now the Canadian farmer's competitors in his
own home market, notwithstanding
the tariff whicii protects that market.
"Supporters of the reciprocity pact
say, with their fine, rolling platitudes
that sound sq well and mean so little,
that when the farmer is prosperous,
all people are prosperous. And how
do they propose to make the farmer
prosperous? Do they propose to
make the tariff higher, to protect him
from the outside competition, whicli
even now reaching him? No, they
propose to take away that tariff altogether, to take down the bars, to
allow tiie Canadian market to be
flooded with farm products from all
quarters of the earth. (Applause.)
What will be the effect if the markets of Canada are thrown open in
that way?"
A voice—We will get cents where
we now get dollars. (Prolonged applause.)
The Globe's Attack
"My friend the Globe newspaper,
says today, in making reference to
me, that the Liberal party will stand
by the consumer. Well, let us see
how they do it. They do it by fusing
our markets with the markets of the
United States. Ancl who controls the
markets of the United States? The
trusts. Every animal that stands on
a hoof in that country is controlled
by the beef trust of Chicago. And if
this treaty goes into effect, not more
than a week or ten days will elapse
before they will have their machinery
in order in this country. And there
are all the other big trusts—the warehousing trust, the poultry trust, the
cheese trust, aud so on. The whole
proposition works down to this, that
the produce markets of Canada, which
today are in the main free and open,
fluctuating according to supply and
demand, are to be handed over to the
United States trusts—to a jurisdiction
wholly and absolutely beyond any
Canadian control. (Applause.) These
facts are of common knowledge, ancl
I don't think there is any reason in
the world for supposing that any
benefit would accrue to the Canadian
consumer as a result of his being
handed over to the United States
trusts."
Effects of Reciprocity
Mr. Sifton then dealt with the effect
of reciprocity on Canadian manufacturers and the men in their employ.
"Your car works here in Cobourg
are building cars to send to the west,"
said he. "But cars made in Cobourg
will fail to find a market in the west
as soon as this agreement goes into
effect."
There were 82,000 fewer men on
United States payrolls now than a
year ago, and 30,000 to 35,000 more
were to be laid off within the next six
weeks.
"Careful observers think the United
States is now entering a long period
of depression," said Mr. Sifton. "But
T do not intend to say anything about
that. I am content to take the facts
as we find them now."
A Worthless Assurance
Sir Wilfrid's assurance that the
tariff on manufactured articles would
not be disturbed was worthless. Political contingencies would prove too
strong for the prime minister. Canadian farmers would not pay a duty
on manufactured articles when their
own market was flooded with farm
products from all parts of the world.
"It is contrary to all common sense
to think that you can have in the same
country a free trade dumping ground
for agricultural products and a protected closed market for manufactured articles. There is an inherent
impossibility in this proposition. The
supporters of reciprocity are compelled to base their whole argument
on the abuse of one class, on the
setting of one class against another.
They attack millers, fruit growers,
pork packers, manufacturers, and so
on. When they have to resort to setting one-half the population against
the other half the absurdity ancl illogical nature of the proposition is perceptible at once. It must be a radically unsound proposition and one not
worthy of support.   (Applause).
"The development of east and west
traffic by the construction of trans
continental railways. All this wc
be for naught if the reciprocity agij
ment came into force.
New Business Relations
"Under reciprocity we shall nel
sarily    cultivate   very   much    clef
business   relations   with   the Unj
States.   Your business men will
their business connections there,
we will be dependent on fluctuati]
there for the prices we shall get I
our products.   What will be the e_j
of  this?    The   conditions   goven|
the  prosperity of the two  count
will be common.   Without any _i
on the part of the United States vl
out any flourishing of the big s\
they will have the co-operation of
people of Canada, because the ill
ests of the one country will bef
interests of the other.   And when [
is the case when does it avail ul
boast that   we   are   an indepenf
people?
"What common interest will tl
be between Canada and other pari
the British empire when our pi
minister takes his place at the coil
board of the imperial conferel
Our prime minister will be disq|
lied from deliberating with the
representatives at the conferd
They will say to him, 'Your inte|
are not our interests. You are
bound up with another nation,
an alien, and you cannot discuss]
interests with us.'"
It is an immutable  law of
omics that any substantial redul
in the cost of living produces a lij
wage scale.
The law of supply and demand |
not   govern  wages  absolutely,
relatively, and the relation is tcj
cost of living.
WITH THE COMPLIMENTS
THE LIBERAL PRESS
The Liberal press is excelling
in the present campaign in tha
of choice epithets. Obviously
strength of the Liberal case is
verse ratio to the strength
epithets. One of the latest figur|
speech indulged in by the Viq
Times is to call Mr. Bowser a "bi|
liar."
A Vancouver Liberal organ!
scribes Mr. J. D. Taylor, the c|
date for New Westminster, al
shuffler, a quibbler, a coward al
liar."    What a bad man he musl
According to a Vancouver Lij
organ   Mr.  J.  D.  Taylor  is "oil
those liars who has lost the senl
truth  and  cannot  utter  it  whel
wants  to.    He had no more  t|
with the    adjustment    of the
steaders' claims   than   any unta
bob-tailed cur that roams the si
of New Westminster.   He is a ll
ful weakling with the kultus wl
From this it is logical to assumq
Mr.    Taylor's    opponent,    "Hc
John Oliver, is booked to lose h|
posit.
The desperation of the case ol
Senkler, the Liberal candidal!
Vancouver, may be gathered froil
compliments paid by the Lil
press to his opponent, Aldermanl
vens, who is thus described: 'f
for instance, if I said kultus StJ
everybody would understand trj
meant a little, ornery two-bit
two-bits worth of 'God help us|
would be a grotesque thing to I
this unuseful little club to Otl
His very appearance is againsj
man—pale, harmless eyes,
mouth, expressing futile injl
Presumably these are anti-Retj
city arguments.
Labour  is  like  every  other
modity.    Its  selling  price  is
mined by the cost of production!
the first item in the cost of prq
ing labour is the cost of living.
Mr. Templeman's platform orl
are nearly all Free-Traders.   Caij
nada afford the luxury of free
while she is exposed to the con
tion of the United States?
When did Uncle Sam ever
his neck to give Canada the be\
a deal?
Every American is in favoul
Reciprocity with Canada. Whenl
have figured out the explanation, |
accordingly. ,.._ THE WEEK, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1911
ir William Van Home's
Trenchant Attack on
Reciprocity
HOW    UNCLE    SAM    FULFILS
HIS TREATY OBLIGATIONS
am opposed to reciprocity:
Because it would destroy our fis-
|independence as regards our tar-
jlecause it would loosen the bonds
ch bind Canada to the Empire and
|nately destroy them;
jJecause the underlying idea on the
of our American neighbours is
j estrangement from the Empire,
ch would be a long step towards
I'xation;
am opposed to reciprocity:
because it would undermine the
Idations of our trade and mainlines which have been laid with
effort and success in the last
Ity-five   years;
jecause it would be a most dam-
fc blow to the magnificent Cana-
\ merchant marine which has been
up in these same years;
lecause our trade per capita is
1-fold that of the United States,
reciprocity and its natural results
Id surely bring a common level.
Ind I am opposed to reciprocity
|.ise we don't need it now, having
our own way to success and
ferity.
Isee many other reasons against
Id I do not see one single, real
unalloyed advantage in it to the
Iry at large.    There may be in-
lials here and there who might
Isly be  temporarily benefited in
1 way, and perhaps localities, but
■bt if there is a case where the
Its   would   compensate   for' the
vantages to follow.
fcre  in  the   Maritime  Provinces
par much about hay. ancl pota-
jttid apples and codfish;   but for
lese   there   are   better   markets
■those    of the    United    States.
my own knowledge I can say
2uba,   the   West   Indies  gener-
Itnd Central America and other
sh-American     countries     offer
J better markets for these things,
Jhese markets are wide open to
it only requires a little atten
|>n the part of the Government
able  us  to  reach  them.    It  is
liecessary to  secure the  estab-
lnt  of  regular   steamship   con-
lis.   There the profits would be
Id in dollars rather than in cents
the case of the American mar-
IAnd it is only dawning upon
people in New Brunswick that
pal is a better market for their
Is  than  can  be found  in  the
States and that American po-
lare brought there, in the face
1 duties, in quantities sufficient
|ern prices.
the individual and local point
Iv is a small-souled one, and
jild be a small man indeed who
I count the cents per barrel on
jnips one way or the other in
|:e of a question affecting the
[and well-being of his country,
all know how dead St. An-
r&s twenty years ago and how
Iges were here and how seldom
liese low wages could be got.
live seen your young men goto the States and in later
you have seen them coming
bain to their old homes or to
larts of Canada; and all over
ritime Provinces you have seen
|d towns of twenty years ago
to life and activity. This
In due to the general prosper-
[anada.
have seen our Canadian mer-
harine, including the tramp and
fed vessels employed in our
ncreased in tonnage about six
per cent., in the last twenty-
ars and its character vastly
bd at the same time—such an
as has never occurred with
ler country—and you have seen
Iway mileage increased within
lyears 309 per cent., an in-
jikewise unequalled.
these great things have re-
Irom the wise trade policy of
Jintry, whicii has been main-
lb y  both   political   parties   all
with all our manufacturing and commercial interests, are now endangered by the proposed change in that
policy. Canada is now the most
prosperous country on the face of
the earth ancl is increasing in prosperity from day to day and I say let
well enough alone and don't monkey
with the machine that has worked so
well.
"We have seen recently in a certain section of the Canadian Press
much about the millions that are being sent to Canada by the American
Trusts to defeat reciprocity. There
was never a more absurd and impudent story. I know a good deal of
these trusts and I do not hesitate to
say that there is not one of them,
with the exception of the International Paper Company, that is not
hotly in favour of reciprocity and
that any election contributions they
might make would go to carry it.
"We hear a great deal just now
about this, that, and the other prominent Canadian having at some time
favoured reciprocity. It does not
matter a rap what anybody thought
of reciprocity twenty or thirty years
ago, and it is silly to quote utterances of that time. The situation of
Canada has entirely changed since
then. She has found herself and
scorns the crumbs of her neighbours.
"And that Canada has found herself is largely due to the unneighbourly policy of the United States in
their McKinley tariff and their Ding-
ley tariff, the latter having been especially aimed at Canada and intended
to exclude her products.
"In such a thing as this reciprocity
agreement one party must lose what
the other gains. Do you imagine for
a minute or have you seen anything
in the commercial policy of the
United States towards Canada to indicate that they would press upon us
such a bargain for our advantage?
Not a bit of it. We shall lose in
money, in trade, in manufactures, in
independence, in self-respect and in
the respect of others.
"I do not wish to be understood as
saying anything disrespectful of the
United States. Far from it. They
have grown great by taking care of
their business just as we ought to do.
They very properly seek every advantage just as we should do, and in
the present case they are trying to
take advantage of us just as we
would, no doubt, take advantage of
them if we had a good chance.
"It was a saying long ago 'Beware
of the Greeks when they bring gifts.'
We here in Canada may well beware
of the Americans when they bring
tariff  concessions.
"I may sum up the whole situation
in this: Our trade is about $97.00 per
capita, and theirs $33.00 per capita.
In other words, the water in our
millpond stands at 97 and theirs at
33\ ancl they want us to take away
our dam. Shall we not say: 'Not by
a 'dam  sight!'"
But it is no new thing for the Americans to disregard both the spirit
and the letter of a treaty. We have
a case in point today. The Food
Fisheries Treaty of 1908 is to be
dropped by our Government because
the Americans will not live up to
their agreement. Under that treaty,
a Joint Commission was appointed to
draw up uniform regulations for the
control of the fisheries in waters contiguous to the two countries. The
Commission did its work. The regulations were not what we would have
liked, but they were better than the
old confusion and dangerous disputes.
Our Parliament at once authorised
the Government to put them in force.
But the American Senate, in spite
of the fact that its own Commissioner
had helped draw the regulations, refused to put them in force where
they pinched any American interest,
but was willing to accept them in
Eastern waters where no American
felt that they would be hurt. So our
Government, it is now said, will tear
up the entire treaty.
Then there is the Rush-Bagot
Treaty intended to keep the Great
Lakes, lying between Canada and the
United States, forever free from warships. That was a noble idea. But
how has it been carried out? Wc
have faithfully kept our side of it.
We have put no warships on the
Great Lakes. But the Americans
have turned its provisions into an exasperating farce. They have been constantly sending dismantled warships
of considerable power up through the
canals to the Great Lakes, and then
shipping their guns to them overland. The consequence is that there
are warships on the Great Lakes.
They are American warships only.
Mr. Barnard has taken a stand
which will be highly appreciated by
organized labour. He has promised
to consult with the duly authorised
representatives of labour on all matters connected with the welfare of
the working-man. This will at least
ensure his being posted as to their
wishes.
MR.    HENRY    CHAPLIN,    THE
GREAT  BRITISH  AGRICULTURIST, ON RECIPROCITY
■ears, and both our merchant
Mr. Templeman thinks that Chinese
immigration could be regulated by "a
friendly agreement" with China.   Mr. particularly"  tiie '"feelings
Poniard    _,-.._,     "U.!,-...    ...-    1_      111     _.    . °
Barnard says, "What we have we'll
hold," which suits the temper of the
people of British Columbia somewhat better.
MR. HAULTAIN'S CHANGE
Ex-Premier Haultain of the Northwest has come out squarely against
reciprocity. He has been moving
among the people and making investigation, and is now convinced that
the treaty will do no good, even to
the Saskatchewan farmer. It will be
remembered that Mr. Haultain at first
declined to consider the imperial aspect of the question, contending that
the prairie people had a right to
study their own interests alone. This
was too narrow a view for a man of
Mr. Haultain's position to take, but
he has found that even a Saskatchewan   First  politician   must   condemn
Mr. Chaplin says:—"As one of the
pioneers of tariff reform and of the
opposition to our present so-called
free trade system long before these
questions were taken up by Mr.
Chamberlain, I am deeply interested
in the question of reciprocity. Tariff
reform is the first great constructive
policy to which the Unionist Party
in this country is pledged, and the
sister policy, if I may so describe it,
of Mr. Chamberlain's great scheme
for Colonial preference, is and always
has been, the backbone of tariff reform. I do not hesitate to say that
the reciprocity proposal so greatly
favoured by Sir Wilfrid Laurier cannot be otherwise than most detrimental, if it is not fatal to the policy
of Colonial preference between the
United Kingdom and Canada, and to
that extent, prejudicial also to the
continued and increasing unity of the
Empire.    In  saying this I represent
of    the
Unionist party as a whole, and I believe, a large majority of the country also. Annexation, we know,
looms largely in the most influential
quarters in the United States and
the policy of reciprocity, if accepted,
must inevitably tend to closer unity
between Canada and that country and
lessen the relations between Canada
and the Motherland, leading as times
go on, to a diversity of interests."
Mr. Templeman's speakers tell us
that they favour Reciprocity because
it is the first instalment of Free
Trade. In Free Trade England according to Professor Mallock, there
are 350,000 families, comprising 1,-
750,000 persons, or four times the
population of British Columbia,
whose family income averages $150
a year. Booth says that in London
35.2 per cent, of the population earn
Mr. G. H. Barnard's
Address to the
Electors
If I am elected as the Conservative member for the City of
Victoria on September 21st, the following will be my policy: —
1. I pledge myself to make a standing fight on every opportunity which presents itself for the construction of all ships to be
stationed on the Pacific Coast at British Columbia shipyards. The
fact that higher wages are paid on the Pacific Coast than on the
Atlantic will not deter me from making a strong fight against the
construction of all the ships for the new Dominion navy on the
Atlantic Coast.
2. One of my first efforts shall be to secure a new post office
for Victoria. This is a need which has grown out of the rapidly
increasing population and the present building is entirely inadequate for the requirements of the city.
3. I shall strongly advocate the payment to post office employees of wages commensurate with the services rendered. The
present poor wages paid have led to the local post office being;
inadequately manned, and the service being consequently ineffi-i
cient, involving delays in the handling of mail matter which have
caused considerable inconvenience to the business community.
4. The need of harbour improvements in keeping with the
growth of the port is a matter of vital importance. This port
handles the second highest tonnage of any port in the Dominion.
I will use my efforts to secure adequate appropriations for harbour
improvements which will enable this port to take its proper rank
among the ports of the Dominion.
5. Included in the scheme of harbour improvements which I
will strongly advocate will be the building of a breakwater off the
harbour entrance. I consider that the time has arrived when this
scheme has become a port necessity, and even if it should cost the
Dominion Government the sum of $2,000,000 or more, I will
endeavour by every legitimate means to have it undertaken at the
earliest possible moment.
6. In the last Dominion House I outlined my attitude on the
need of an efficient fishery protection service. The wholesale
poaching carried on by American fishermen during the past few
weeks has further proved the utterly inadequate patrol which is
maintained on this coast. I shall urge that this fishery protection
patrol be increased by one or more fishery protection cruisers of a
thoroughly up-to-date character, and of a speed of not less than
sixteen knots.
7. I will urge with all my power that the fortifications of
Esquimalt shall be restored to and maintained at a strength satisfactory to the Imperial War Office, and will strongly advocate the
increase of the present force at Work Point Barracks to at least
the point of strength at which it was maintained by the Imperial
authorities.
8. The present Ottawa authorities have not lived up to their
promises to the men on board the cruisers Rainbow and Niobe in
the matter of giving extra pay for extra services. My policy shall
be to urge in the new Dominion House that these promises be
implemented, and that a similar scale of wages shall be maintained
both in the naval and fishery protection services of the Dominion.
9. I am in favour of the absolute enforcement of the Alien
Labour Act.
10. I shall oppose with all my power any effort which might
be made to do away with the $500 head tax on Chinese coming
into Canada. I do not consider that it would be possible for
Canada to make a similar arrangement with China as exists with
Japan because the Government of the former Oriental power is so
unstable.
11. As in the past in all matters connected with the welfare of
the workingman I will consult with the duly authorised representatives of labour in this city and wherever possible I will urge that
the wishes of these, as they affect labour, shall be given the utmost
consideration.
12. I shall oppose by every means in my power any relaxation
of the Immigration Laws, and will use my utmost endeavours to
see that they are carried out in their entirety.
13. In the matter of railway construction in British Columbia
I will urge that the Dominion Government shall bonus all legitimate undertakings which make for the benefit and prosperity of
the people of this Province and of the Dominion as a whole.
14. My attitude on Reciprocity between Canada and the
United States is well known. I shall continue to oppose Canada
entering into any trade arrangement with a foreign power which
may have a prejudicial influence on the ties which bind this country
to the Motherland.
15. Lastly—I am for British connection first, last and all the
time. I believe in Canada for the Canadians, and people of the
British race, and I believe that the highest destiny which we can
imagine for our country is to become the predominant partner in
the greatest Empire that the world has ever known.
G.  H.  BARNARD.
SUPREMEST FOLLY
To enter into a bargain with the
American Nation, whicii can only be
worked at all under a generous interpretation and in a spirit of mutual
concession, would be an act of the
sttpremest folly, ignoring the entire
history of thc relations of that nation
with our people, relying upon a faith
that has never been kept and seeking a friendliness that has never ex-
When Mr. Barnard stated in the
House that alien labour was being
illegally imported from Seattle, Mr.
Mackenzie King denied it, but at the
same time he knew that the notorious
circular had been issued.
Mr. Templeman says he never
knew of the circular issued by the
Dominion Government which varied
the Immigration regulations until he
"saw it in the newspapers," which
shows how foolish Victoria would be
to vote for "Mr. Templeman and a THE WEEK, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1911
Labour Unrest
Real Causes of Social Dissatisfaction
By Hector Macpherson
Now that the great strike in England is over it may not be amiss to
search for the causes of the widespread unrest among the working
classes. According to Lord Londonderry, in a speech the other day, there
is no mystery about the unrest. It
is all due to the wild utterances of
the Chancellor of the Exchequer during the Budget controversy. Anything Mr. Lloyd George said during
that controversy was mildness itself
compared with the incendiary language of leading Tories on the Home
Rule qesution. If the Tories think it
right to fight in Ireland over a
measure which they detest, how can
it be wrong for the workers to fight
in England to get redress of their
grievances? Let the Cecil section of
the Tories, the physical force section,
take the beam out of their own eye
before they attempt to take the mote
out of the Trade Union eye. No;
the causes of the strike lie deeper
than platform talk, however heated.
To find some of these causes one has
only to read Mr. Ramsay MacDon-
ald's new book, "The Socialist Movement," a book written with outstanding ability and displaying profound insight into the economic situation as
it exists today. One great cause of
the unrest is the unequal distribution
of the national income. Mr. Mal-
lock, who is an apologist for the capitalist class, has tabulated figures on
this point. Mr. MacDonald presses
him into his service as follows:—"Mr.
Mallock has to admit that 350,000
families, containing 1,750,000 persons, have a total family income of
£30 per annum., which works out at
a fraction over 2s. 3d. per head per
week, from whicii everything has to
be paid. There are in addition 1,200,-
000 with an average family income of
£94 per annum. In this figure Mr.
Mallock includes the incomes of the
members of those families who are
living out as domestic servants. Without them the income is £71, or about
6s. per head per week, an altogether
unsatisfactory figure, and a somewhat
miserable one even if it were earned
by a single breadwinner."
Under a Guinea Per Week
More reliable than Mr. Mallock's
are the figures of Mr. Booth and Mr.
Rowntree, to which Mr. MacDonald
also refers. Mr. Booth found 35.2 per
cent, of the people of the North of
London living on a family income of
under a guinea per week, and Mr.
Rowntree found that of the people
of York nearly thirty per cent, were
living in poverty. No one denies that
there has been improvement in working class conditions, but even in the
matter of wages die improvement of
several years ago has not been maintained. On this point Mr. MacDonald, quoting from Board of Trade
figures, shows at the end of 1909,
amongst the larger groups of Labour,
excluding agricultural labourers, seamen, and railway servants, nearly
£100,000 per week less were paid in
wages than in 1900, whilst increases
in 1910 only improved the 1909
figures by £14,000, so that the workers today are still well over £80,000
per week less well off in respect to
wages than they were in 1900, Another causes of the unrest whicii calls
for notice is the changed relations
between masters and men by the limited liability system, which has cut in
two the old personal tie. In the old
clays masters and men came into daily
contact, and, as in the case of Robert
Owen and John Bright, in times of
dull trade the works were run at a
loss, so that the men would not be
the losers. Now, when orders run
out, the first consideration is the effect on the dividends. The interest
of the shareholders, not the workers,
is the prime consideration, and thus
intimations are at once issued to discharge hundreds of men, who go to
swell the large army of the unemployed. When he looks around the
worker finds large numbers of his fellows employed by Municipalities, with
good wages, steady employment, and
pensions, and his mind naturally
turns  to the  question  of the  Muni-
A Paradise for Workers
He wants the State in some way
to come between him and the huge
capitalistic combinations. In other
words, he wants to get the State to
aid him in freeing Labour, just as the
manufacturers sixty years ago got the
State to aid them in freeing trade.
Over and above that, the spread of
education has made the working
classes more acutely sensitive of the
hardness of their lot. Education creates new desires and fosters a spirit
of discontent. In presence of the
glittering display of the rich, they ask
why they should be compelled to remain in the position of hewers of
wood and drawers of water to idlers
who do nothing but eat, drink, and
make merry on the unearned increment. Rightly or wrongly the workers cherish feelings of bitterness towards the capitalists, who are now
reaping a harvest of retribution for
their heartless despotism in the day
EVEN WITH DUTY U. S. APPLES
FLOOD WESTERN MARKETS
If apples are already being dumped
upon the Winnipeg market by U. S.
fruit growers, what will happen to the
hapless Canadian grower if reciprocity goes through?
The query naturally rises from the
statement made by President Elmer
Lake at the meeting of representatives of the Co-operative Association
of Fruit Growers of Ontario at the
Toronto Exhibition lately.
Mr. Lake said that the Winnipeg
apple market was being fairly flooded
by apple., from the United States.-
"J. J. Hill has reduced the freight
rate on apples from Arkansas and
Missouri to Winnipeg by one-third
the former rate. That serves to
equalize the 40 per cent, duty so that
the United States producers can compete there with Canadian products,"
he declared.
Mr. Templeman is trying to bribe
the constituency with a $3,000,000
breakwater to Brotchie Ledge. Mr.
Sorby, the Secretary of the Harbour
Commission, says it would be of no
use.   Which is right?
The Full Dinner Pail
A Liberal Seer
Who, for many a year,
Had been having his will in the land,
Met a Wise Workingman
With a full dinner can
And grasped him with warmth by the hand.
Said the Liberal Seer
To the Workman:   "Look here,
"Reciprocity'll benefit you.
"If you vote for the pact
"Rest assured, it's a fact
"You will cut your expenses in two."
Said the Wise Workingman
With the full dinner can:
"I reckon I'll stick by the Crown.
"Reciprocity may
"Help my living today—
"But my wages would also come down!"
Said the Liberal Seer
With a trace of a sneer:
"What matter if living is cheaper?"
Said the Wise Workingman:
"If I struck to your plan
"In the mire I'd sink deeper and deeper."
Now, the Seer has his say
And the Workman his pay
And a mighty nice home in the town.
And we know how he'll vote
For he wisely took note
That his wages would have to come down I
of their power. Capitalists complain
of the present Government for its
legislation on behalf of the poor .They
dislike what they term the grandmotherly schemes of Mr. Lloyd
George. Had they done their duty,
had they followed the noble example
of Robert Owen, who transformed his
works at New Lanark into a paradise
by treating his workers as human beings and using his surplus profits for
their elevation in the scale of being,
there would have been no need for
Lloyd George. In my book, "A
Century of Political Development,"
published three years ago, I made
some remarks Which, in view of recent events, have a ring of prophecy.
I said: "Whether we like it or not
—and some of us do not like it and
see social and industrial anarchy
ahead—we are on the eve of a revolution. Let the capitalist class take
warning. Unless they give greater
prominence to their duties, ancl be less
anxious about their rights, they will
find themselves face to face with another revolution—an economic revolution. It will be bloodless; it will
be fought with political weapons; but
before it is over it will shake the industrial world to its foundations."
Coming events are assuredly casting
WHAT  EDWARD BLAKE SAID
The opinion of Mr. Edward Blake,
who left his party because he saw that
Unrestricted Reciprocity meant Annexation, is worth considering at this
crisis. He said, in his famous letter
to the Liberal Convention of West
Durham:
"Whatever you or I may think on
that head, whether we like or dislike, believe or disbelieve, in political
union, must we not agree that the
subject is one of great moment towards the practical settlement of
which we should take no serious step
without reflecting on, or in ignorance of what we are doing? Assuming that absolute free trade with the
States, best described as commercial
union, may and ought to come, I believe that it can and should come
only as an incident, or at any rate as
a well-understood precursor of political union, for which indeed we
would be able to make better terms
before than after the surrender of
our commercial independence. Then,
so believing—believing that the decision of the trade question involves
that of the constitutional issue for
whicii we are unprepared and with
which you do not conceive yourselves to be dealing—how can I properly recommend you now to decide
Full Information for the
Workingman
In the face of a common danger,
menaced men get together and take
common counsel. At the present
moment, a common danger menaces
every man who depends for his profits or his wages upon a Canadian industry. It is no more than common
sense, then, that these men—employers and employes—should get together and come to a mutual understanding as to the situation which
confronts them.
This is no time for the most secretive "master" to stand on his dignity. His men have as many rights
as he has. The workingman or the
book-keeper, whose job is at stake,
has as much to lose—if not more—
than the manager or stockholder or
President of the Company.
The managers of our industries
should lose uo time in taking their
men fully into their confidence. If
they see storms ahead which are likely to dismantle or wreck the ship upon whicii they are all embarked, they
should warn the crew; for, in this
case, the crew can lend signal and
decisive assistance in averting the
storm. This they should do for their
own sakes, for the sake of their men,
for the sake of the country.
It must be remembered, too, that
the employes of an industry cannot,
in fairness, be asked to take their employer's word for the imminence of
the danger. There is an election in
progress in this country; and the
heads of manufacturies may be suspected of having "party leanings" as
well as the rest of us. If they depend upon their "say so" in dealing
with the men, they run the risk of
being suspected of trying to deceive
them into casting a party vote, and
they leave themselves open to this insinuation from the canvassers of the
opposing candidate.
The way to escape this peril, finally
and fully, is to be perfectly frank with
the man whose job is in danger. He
must not only be told that the menace is there; but he must be told
what tiie menace is, why it is a menace, and in what way it will cripple
the industry upon which he depends
for his wages. In two words, he
must be given complete information
upon whicii to make up his mind for
himself. Then he can decide as an
intelligent citizen which way he desires to vote.
ifi     , j-JC       >fi        afC        3(s
We began by saying that, in this
matter, the workingman has as many
rights as his employer. We do not
take that back. But we propose to
amplify it by saying that, in this matter, it is even more important that
the workingman be convinced of the
danger than that the employer be
convinced. The reason is clear. The
employer has one vote. The men in
his employ may have a thousand.
This is a case in which the safety
of the ship rests with the crew.   In
nine cases out of ten—in ninety-nine
cases out of a hundred—the reverse
is true. When it comes to a question
of markets, of prices, of machinery,
of methods, of selling devices, of all
the manifold ramifications of a big
business by which the product of the
workingman's toil is turned into
money, the employer is the man who
must do the judging. He must decide which is the best course to take.
He is an expert in planning his work
and marketing his goods. That is his
business. That is his contribution to
the success of "the works."
But, in this hundredth case, the
employer ceases to be the important
man. Knowing all the details of the
business and the intricacies of the
markets, he can see the effect of such
a change as Reciprocity would bring,
much more clearly than men confined
to one part of the productive work.
The danger is plain to him; but he
cannot save the ship. Let him turn
the helm as he will, the vessel will
go to disaster if the men do not join
in and save it. He is the expert navigator; he knows the shoals ancl he
is weather-wise; but this is an instance in which the ship must liter-
no better at the oar than the wc
paid man in his employ.
*       sts      *      *      *
We are apt to think chiefly of I
loss which the closing of an indu;|
brings to its owners.   They h&ve
barked their fortune in it; and t\
fortune is lost.   It is a striking
gedy, ancl our sympathies are toucj
But what of the workingman
has just  nicely  settled in life, I
pending upon his job in this in|
try?    Possibly,  he has venturecj
buy a home, and is calculating
paying for  it  in  a few years,
children   are   going  to  school
his wife has her friends and herl
sociations  here;   this  is "home"|
him and his.
Then the factory on which he
pended drops to half-time or lay!
half its men, himself among t|
Or it may close altogether, cru
by the competition of a huge Ail
can concern which is minded firj
capture    the    market    and    the
"charge all the traffic will bear.'!
not the case of the evicted worl
man quite as tragic as that ol
employer?   He is tied by the le|
cause of his payments on his
and  because   of  the  associatioi|
his wife  and  family.    It is  a
and costly thing for him to gof
where   to   seek   work.    Proball
means that the little surplusesl
decade will be wiped out, and h|
have to begin life again.   If hi
abroad, he will start once more]
"job-seeker"  at the end of th$
and will be compelled to take J
miserable wage may be flung h|
an "out-of-work."
The tragedy in the working!
home far surpasses that in th|
ployer's palace.
*T* ****** *N* 'r ■*!*■
So   we   say  that  the  workil
should   be   dealt   frankly  withl
should   be   told   exactly   how
risk for him there is in this prd
Reciprocity.   The men with the[
gation  charts    before    them,
share their knowledge with thi
in the engine-room and on thel
decks.    It is only fair—it is oii|
—it is only right between ma
man.
Mr. Barnard has gone on reel
being in favour of Harbour)
provements" and would maid
toria the finest port on the PJ
Mr. Barnard fought the ba|
the working-man on the fioor|
House   at   Ottawa.   Mr. Ten
"passed by on the other side.j
A VERY LITTLE ONI
There   can  be  no  doubt  tl|
most unpopular law on the \
book     from    the    French-Cl
standpoint is that respecting t\\
service of Canada whicii Sir
Laurier forced down the throal
eleventh Parliament during tl|
ion of 1909-10.   The Premier
recognizes   this   solid  wall
pathy, and his re.cent tour in |
tive province had for its ob
removal of these prejudices.
his audiences that the navy
amount to much; that it wasj
little one, and would not figh|
Empire's  wars without being
with an order in council rati
Parliament.    But even the p|
"it  was  only  a little  one"
succeeded in mollifying the
Canadians,  and fanned by tl
tionalist wind the flames off
ment threaten the Laurier citl
Nothing has yet been heard
Templeman  demanding   an
from his colleagues for keep|
in the dark about the Imn
circular.
Mr.   Templeman's  appeal
Pugsley came "too late."   All!
propriations had been allotte|
John.
In his telegram Mr. Pugslel
that he had shown Mr. Temn
telegram to Sir Wilfrid, but]
Wi]

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