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Week Dec 23, 1911

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 SPECIAL CHRISTMAS NUMBER
For Prize Limerick.
Competition, see
Page 12
The Week
A British (Solnmbia Newspaper and Review.
Published at Victoria, B. e.
Hall & Walker
Agents
Wellington Colliery
Company's Coal
1232 Gov't St. Telephone 83
Vol. IX.   No. 51
Ninth Year
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
Ninth Year
One Dollar Per Annum
&HUU
RISTMAS
Gfrteiscm-fls^oses'
Vjhere are roses and forqer-me-nots and flowers with kearfs
of amber,
ihere are flowers with perfumed petals and with Kearts like beaten
"There are wme-dark purple blossoms on yon wall where creepers
clamber,
And I ealth -the scenfof heather as 1stroll across the wold j&
SWe are flowers like bloodied banners, -tfvere are flowers of"
moon^whife wonder,
There are lillies where -i'he bee-birds smqalove sonq, sweet"
and clear;
ihere are dew-pearled mists of bracken with blue hair-bells
lurking under,
Whilst-me qolden crocus front's -Me sun r iqht* early inihe year,
Shere are flowers •thar qlow like sunsets.-there are primroses
in meadows
And tne stately tlqer lillies like a-flame of coloured fire,
'There arc weird barbanr blossoms, bendmq heads in shifting
shadows,
There are poppies m -the cornfields all asfir with qay desire
Sut" I -turn from every blossom, -from Hrfve fairesf, sweetest"
posies
•-Char e'er qlow in sprinq or summer, or in dutumn time
aredear,
for my heart" has learnt fo listen.and ib seek for Christmas
looses,
for rhe blessed dnqel's f^essa^e af the passing of Hie Year THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
EDITORIAL
otherwise complete and admirable report.
In any event it would be reassuring to have
his opinion on the subject.
best that can be said for what is now proposed to be done is that it will be "a thing J
of shreds and patches."
STORMING THE CITADEL—Mrs.
Pankhurst came and saw.   Whether
she conquered or not is another question,   about   which   the   impartial   judge
might have doubts,   lt is only fair to say
that the lady is a clever, fluent, entertaining
talker.    In   fact,   the  word   "talker"   describes her better than any other.    She is
mentally alert, vivacious and keen, as all
her questioners found to their disadvantage.
If there is one thing she enjoys more than
another it is being heckled, for every question she has a ready retort, which is none
the less amusing because it often has "nothing to do with the case."   Who can help
smiling, or even applauding, when one of
the weaker sex   discomfits   that supreme
egotist "Man" in a wordy encounter?   Mrs.
Pankhurst is a practised platform speaker
and she has been in the business so long
that there is probably neither a man nor a
woman living to whom she cannot give
points.    The  audience which  about half
filled the theatre, was composed mainly of
supporters of the  Suffragette movement,
and   applauded   vociferously   when   Mrs.
Pankhurst defended the deeds of violence to
which her followers in England have resorted.   It was highly diverting to hear her
justifying this conduct on the ground that
women were simply following the example
of men, that no reforms had been gained
without acts of violence and that they were
only used as a "dernier resort."   Perhaps
it was perfectly natural that in this connection she omitted to point out that none
of the great women reformers of the past,
who have really achieved  something for
the uplifting of their sex and the race,
such as* Elizabeth Fry, Florence Nightingale, Josephine Butler or Frances Willard,
found it necessary to abandon the dignified
methods which self-respecting women in all
ages have found sufficient for their purposes.   But that is a mere detail.   There
is another important omission in respect
to which the seeker after truth would be
glad to hear Mrs. Pankhurst's explanation
and that is why the women who have votes
cease to take any interest in the matter as
soon as they get them.   Why for instance
fewer than ten per cent, of the women
voters of Toronto turned out on a recent
occasion to support a by-law for the restriction of drinking in saloons and other public places.    Why   the   State-Attorney of
Oklahoma, himself a supporter of the Suffragette movement for many years, stated
to the writer that women had used their
franchise to secure Prohibition, but would
not move a little finger afterwards to help
the authorities to support it;  and finally,
why it is generally more difficult to induce women than men to countenance and
assist those who have "fallen by the way"
to make a fresh start in life.    We 'have
heard a great deal about man's inhumanity
to man, but no newspaper would dare to
tell the truth  about woman's  inhumanity
to woman.   No doubt Mrs. Pankhurst believes that some benefits might result from
giving women universal suffrage.   It would
be strange if after twenty-eight years campaigning in the cause she had not convinced herself of this, but it is perfectly
obvious that  she has  failed  to convince
•even her own sex, because, when that is
achieved women will get votes, whether
they use them or not.   Perhaps the most
effective answer to Mrs. Pankhurst's propaganda is to be found in the altogether
admirable and conclusive argument of the
eminent Frenchman, M. Laflamme, who
must surely be clogging the footsteps of that
eminent Suffragette or he would not have
reached Victoria just in time to give the
Times an interview which should be read
by everyone desirous of fairly considering
both sides of the question before coming
to a conclusion.
consistency which is so characteristic of
that large and militant body of his associates with whom he foregathered in the
Victoria Theatre on Wednesday night. If
the season of the year did not suggest the
use of milder terms one would almost be
disposed to say that His Worship can
"blow hot and cold." At one moment he
is blocking urgent and necessary expenditures on the ground of economy; the next
moment he would plunge the city into an
extravagant and uncertain outlay in order
to establish what is grandiloquently termed
a "new civic centre." This inconsistency
is further manifested in the refusal of His
Worship to allow the expressed wish of the
ratepayers to be carried out, and the $30,-
000 which they voted for the improvement
of the Police Quarters to be expended.
But this "mote" of extravagance is as nothing compared to the "beam" which would
create an ornamental pile of buildings in
which to house the civic government at a
cost ranging from one to possibly two million dollars. The Week is decidedly in
favour of new quarters; it was the first
to suggest, some two years ago, that the
present site might be sold at a good figure
and that the gore at the top of Pandora
Street, which is the property of the ratepayers, would make an admirable site for
a new City Hall. If this site were adopted
there would be nothing to pay for land and
the sale of the present City Hall property
would go a long way towards the erection
of the new buildings. It is probable that
this scheme would not involve an actual
outlay of more than $400,000. All the
other schemes suggested would be costly
and, in the opinion of The Week, unjustifiable. Once more a protest is lodged
against the present rate of expenditure by
the City Council, and a still more emphatic
protest against submitting a referendum
on the choice of civic sites before the ratepayers have declared themselves in favour
of the principle.
A CIVIC CENTRE—If it were not
the time when one naturally feels
like throwing the mantle of charity
over the deeds of all his fellows, it might
be permissible to suggest that the Mayor
of Victoria has caught a little of the in-
SOOKE LAKE CONTRACT—The
contract for the necessary works in
connection with bringing Sooke Lake
water to Victoria has been awarded to the
Westholme Lumber Company at a figure
slightly below $1,200,000. From the standpoint of cost this is extremely gratifying
ancl may fairly be considered as a triumph
for the hard ancl fast supporters of the
scheme. It is only fair, however, to point
out that the very great reduction from the
generally accepted estimate is largely clue
to the abandonment of the tunnel route,
which, in the opinion of the best judges,
would have added nearly half a million
dollars. It is satisfactory to find that Mr.
Wynne Meredith was able to locate the
pipe-line route and effect this great saving.
Indeed, the whole of his work has been
clone with a promptness and efficiency which
entitle him to the highest praise. It is
to be hoped that he will not be hampered
in any way in the carrying out of the necessary engineering works, for Sooke water
cannot be rendered available for use in the
city one moment too soon. It is the water
which the citizens have decided to have in
spite of a long and strenuous opposition.
The city is growing so fast that a new
source of supply is becoming more urgent
every clay. The Week has never favoured
the Sooke Scheme and does not now believe that it is the best, but it has no further
word of criticism to offer, ancl freely admits that the men who have to pay the
piper have a right to choose the tune. It
is regrettable that the repeated request of
The Week for a special investigation as to
the quality of Sooke water have been unheeded. The cost would have been slight
in comparison with the resultant benefit,
and there is only too goocl ground for believing that the water is not as pure as is
represented. It is rather singular that the
Mayor ancl Council should not have even
asked Mr. Wynne Meredith to incorporate
a report on the quality of the water in his
general report. The matter would not probably have added a cent to the cost of the
MR. G. M. BOSWORTH—This
week Victoria has received a visit
from a gentleman who is not as
well known in the Capital City as he ought
to be. The fact of the matter is that
throughout a strenuous life Mr. G. M.
Bosworth, third Vice-President of the C.
P. R., has been too busy attending to the
work of the various important departments
of which he has had charge, to make trips
which were not imposed upon him by his
duties. For this reason his visits to Victoria have been few and far between, ancl
it is four years since he was last here.
At that time there was no Empress Hotel,
only one decent ferry boat, the Princess
Victoria, no Grand Trunk clocks or line of
steamers, no railway construction on Vancouver Island, except the original E. & N,
to Nanaimo, no commencement on the
splendid modem blocks of which the "Pemberton" was the pioneer, which are now
springing up on every side. Indeed, on
this occasion Mr. Bosworth finds himself
in a new environment which has no doubt
made him rub his eyes. Those who are not
personally acquainted with Mr. Bosworth
ancl his work for the C. P. R. are not aware
of the important influence which he exercises at headquarters. There is no more
trusted officer in that great corporation,
ancl none to whom the eminent President
and Board of Directors listen with greater
attentiveness and interest. His visit at this
time is not without special significance.
While he is at the head of the great shipping and freighting departments, there is
no doubt that as Vice-President he will be
consulted on the important matter of terminal facilities and harbour arrangements
which are occupying everyone's attention,
and which will have to be dealt with by the
local Legislature at the coming session of
Parliament. For a busy man Mr. Bos-
worth's stay is a long one, running into the
best part of a week. Victoria could not
entertain a more welcome guest, and it
would be indeed surprising if the Capital
City does not benefit greatly as the result
of his keen observation ancl great personal
influence with the Corporation, which, when
all is said and clone, has practically made it.
SMITH'S HILL RESERVOIR—A
contract for the repair of Smith's
Hill Reservoir has been awarded by
the City Council, on the advice of the Engineer, to Mr. Thomas Stedham. The proposed repairs have been intelligently criticised in a letter addressed to the Colonist
by Mr. Roberts, to which the authorities
would have done well to pay heed. Mr.
Roberts is an experienced contractor and a
man of admitted capacity ancl reliability.
He points out that the work proposed to
be done will, at the best, be in the nature
of patch-work. A covering of one inch of
cement on the floor is altogether insufficient, especially as it is so irregular and
uneven; most of the tenderers were in favour of three or four inches. The work
on the side walls is so indefinitely clescribed
that it is almost impossible to tell just
what is proposed to be clone, but it is
obviously very little, having regard to the
price. A third objection is raised to the
specification for building a dividing wall
across the Reservoir. This was not included in the original demand and is an afterthought. If it is constructed properly and
securely, it will serve an excellent purpose
in keeping half the Reservoir available for
fire protection at all times. But the price
at which it is to be clone, $5,000 to $7,000,
precludes the possibility of making a first-
class job. Such a wall, ten feet high, would
require to be counter-sunk in the bottom
of the Reservoir ancl to be at least two feet
wide at the top ancl eight feet at the bottom. It is not proposed to counter-sink
it, nor is it intended to make it anything
like as thick as is necessary. In addition,
as Mr. Roberts points out, it will cost some
thousands of dollars to lay a new main half
the length of the Reservoir to connect with
the water on the other side of the wall.
When it comes to be analysed it will be
seen that the work proposed to be done
by Mr. Stedham will cost practically as
much as that of the other tenderers who
would have clone a first-class job, while the
THE MAYORALTY CONTEST—I
The   Mayoralty   contest   will   bel
short, sharp ancl decisive.   As soonl
as Christmas is over the various candidates!
for civic honours will be ready for thel
fray, ancl Christmas festivities will be fol-l
lowed closely by what ought to be a hotl
campaign.     It  is  a  poor  compliment  tol
civic government, and to the growing im-l
portance of a city, when the ratepayers ancl
property-owners do not take an active in-]
terest in elections.   When all is said ancl
done it is a business proposition, and ever}!
man with a stake in the city is affected!
beneficially or adversely, as the result of tha
elections.    It is too soon to forecast whd
the contestants  may  be  in the  differenl
wards, but it is pretty certain that the fighl
for chief honours   will   lie  between   Hi}
Worship, Mayor Morley ancl Mr. Beckwitl
The Week takes this opportunity of statl
ing that during the campaign Mr. Beckl
with will have its full support, for reasonj
which will be explained next week.
PARKS  BY-LAW—Alderman  Hurt
ber is determined to push his Parkl
By-law project, ancl in this he hal
the sympathy of The Week.   It was losl
before because it had not been properli
digested and because it was carrying tol
much "dead-wood."   It is altogether out ol
the question to vote money for anothel
park in the James' Bay District, which alf
ready possesses in Beacon Hill one of thi
finest natural parks on the Continent. Thf
ratepayers   will   favour   open   spaces
"lungs" for a growing city, but they mu^
be placed in the midst of what are,
soon will be, populous centres.   If a wi^|
discrimination is exercised in the selectiol
of localities, there will be no difficulty ij
carrying a by-law for this purpose at an
time, but the last one was too unwieldj
and   altogether   lacking   in   the   element
necessary .to commencl it to the public.
THE ICE RINK—The Week was t\\
first local paper to recognise the ini
portance of the really gigantic eif
terprise which the Messrs.  Patrick hav]
established in Victoria.   An ice rink sound!
almost like  an  anomaly  in a city  whicl
knows little of ice or snow, but enterpri/
and capital have brought to our doors ori
of the best recreations, and undoubtedly tlj
most exciting sport in the world.   Even
one in Victoria will want to skate on ic
ancl everyone in Victoria will want to wi|
ness the championship hockey matches,
those who have seen hockey matches in t|
East it is not necessary to say a word
recommendation, but to those who have n<|
The Week confidently guarantees the fine
ancl  most  exciting competition in  whi-J
trained athletes can  engage.   Ice  hocke
played by champion teams, has no rival.
XMAS SPORTS—The readers of Til
Week are urged to bear in mind til
various items of sport which wi
compete    for   their   favour   during   tlj
Christmas holidays.   First of all tliere wf
be the ice rink, to which reference has al
ready been made.   Then there is the pr<j
fessional soccer match at the Royal Athll
tic   Grounds   on   Saturday.   This   evea
should attract a large crowd, because til
quality of the football played by the pr<f
fessionals is far ahead of anything previoul
ly seen in Victoria.   A team which coul
beat Nanaimo at the Coal City would h_
to be reckoned with anywhere, and on Sa
urday it is known that the sturdy  la<
from the North intend, if possible, to tut
the tables.    Then on Christmas Day w
shall have the big Rugby match betwec
Victoria's picked team and the Californian
Every effort is being made to ensure
first-class    game.    The    strongest    tea
available will be placed in the field an
whichever bunch gets  the better of  tl
argument a close fight is certain.    It
hardly necessary to remind Victorians thi
the local Rugby Union incurred a heav
expenditure   in   bringing   the   America
team here.   The members of the Committc
have guaranteed $1,800, but if Victorian
do their duty it will not be necessary t
call on anyone. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
THEATRE BOOKINGS FOR THE HOLIDAYS FROM DATE TO JAN. 23RD
■oily o( the Circus Dec. 23
Cinemacolor Pictures Dec. 25, 26, 27
tone & Montgomery in "The Old Town"
     Dec.   28
'erformance by the Australian Boys now
touring the world  Dec. 29, 30
Ieven Days    Jan.   1
Itadame Sherry  Jan. 2
|)e Pachmann (under the auspices of the
Victoria Ladies' Musical Club)... .Jan. 3
Kinemacolor Pictures  Jan. 4, 5, 6
University of California Glee Club Jan. 8
llobert Hilliard in "A Fool There Was"
    Jan.   11
I'.inemacolor Pictures  Jan. 12, 13
Inna Held   Jan.  19
lhe Private  Secretary    Jan.  20
forbes Robertson    Jan. 22, 23
Lambardi Grand Opera Company
The Lambardi Grand Opera Com-
lany gave two performances in Vic-
l.ria this week. On Monday night
liey presented "Madame Butterfly"
Ind on Tuesday night "Faust." Both
|erformances  approached  perfection.
think it a just criticism to say
liat if it had been possible to have
libstitttted the never-to-be-forgotten
|:nor who sang here for the same
■ ompany in Lucia di Lammermoor
Ivo years ago, the most captious
ritic could not have found a single
lult.
I Possbily the lirst praise should go
the orchestra, which was  simply
|iperb.   The next honours undoubted-
belong to  Signor  Sabellico,  who
(ayed and sang Mephisto in a man-
pr which is rarely equalled on any
lage.    The signor possesses all the
lialifications for this classic charac-
Ir;   lie is a  man  of majestic  mien
Ld fine physique;   his voice is  not
Ily rich and musical, but powerful;
Is acting is as good as his singing
Jid he held the  Company together,
lipressing everyone by his magnet-
m and force.    His "Mocking" song
litside    Marguerite's    cottage    has
"ever been better done and was en-
liusiastically encored.
J The Valentine   of   Signor Giovac-
liini was the best I have ever heard,
Ihich is not to be wondered at see-
Ig  that  the   Signor  is  the  highest
Jid artist in the country and a per-
Ict master of the technique of his
It.    He  has  a baritone voice,  but
In easily sing the tenor music of
ligoletto" in   which   he   takes the
Tding part.   It is not often that a
|.r   is   assigned   to   the   secondary
jracter of Valentine, and it was a
lat.
|Mde. Jeanette Elvina sang the
ltsic of Marguerite. In some rejects she may be said to have been
Ightly disappointing, for her phy-
Jiue is poor and she was unfortun-
h\y indisposed. The consequence
Is that through all the earlier Acts
je had to sing with some restraint,
It in the final Trio in the Dungeon
le was simply magnificent. Indeed
[make bold to say that this great
l'io has never been rendered better
the Continent. It roused the audi-
Ice to the utmost enthusiasm and
Ls well deserving of all the ap-
Ituse which it received. I say this
Ith a full recollection of stellar per-
Tmances under Maurice Grau in the
l:tropolitan Opera House, New
lirk, but I say it without fear of
litradiction.
Irhe Faust of Signor Sciaretti was
Iher weak, but the Siebel of Mde.
Iana was of a very high order and
Itirely satisfactory in every respect.
lie somewhat limited chorus sang
111; indeed, superlatively well, even
I some exception could be taken to
|;m on other grounds.
Turning to "Madame Butterfly," it
lonly necessary to say that the title
|rt was splendidly sung and acted
Mde. Ida Fassio.    It can hardly
claimed that she looked the part,
It it is only fair to remember that
le was not cast for it, having to be
Ibstituted at the last moment for
Ide. Elvina.
IMde. Fassio is a very high class,
dramatic soprano. Like all Italians
she can act, and the amount of energy and fire whicii she put into the
part would have been impossible for
a woman of colder temperament. It
may not have been exactly in keeping with the Japanese character, but
as a histrionic and musical treat it
could hardly have been surpassed.
While all the other characters were
satisfactorily taken, there was no special ground for comment.
On the whole the engagement deserves to be chronicled as an unqualified success ancl the performance of
"Faust" one that can never be forgotten and will for long be pointed
to as a standard by those who were
fortunate   enough   to   witness   it.
A Pantomime Rehearsal
By common consent "The Pantomime Rehearsal" as presented by the
V. A. D. C. last week, was the best
amateur performance ever seen in
Victoria. This sounds like the proverbial "large order," but it is no
exaggeration. The happy result was
due to a combination of circumstances, which may be briefly summarised as an exceedingly interesting
ancl diversified programme, a bunch
of clever performers, and an admirable producer and manager, who is
so modest that he eschews notoriety
ancl even discards the title of "Hon."
Major Taylor is a quiet, unassuming, capable expert, who works all the
more effectively because he makes no
fuss. In a month he has trained and
drilled his performers so perfectly
that there was not a single hitch, and
it is no figure of speech to say that
the voice of the prompter was not
heard. Major Taylor's acting was as
artistic ancl effective as his management, and he may be safely counted
on to make his mark in any serious
dramatic selection in which he may
take part.
Every member of the company did
well. Among the ladies Mrs. Rochfort easily carried off first honours;
her singing, in spite of a weak voice,
was singularly sweet and attractive;
her dancing was a dream.
Miss Gray was a good second and
for a beginner her work was highly
meritorious. She has a winsome personality, a clear sweet voice and is
not troubled with stage fright. With
a little experience she will make a
very acceptable entertainer.
Miss Haggarty sang and looked
well as she always does, and Mrs.
Briggs gave one of her most popular
and successful songs.
A quartette in which Mr. and Mrs.
Gideon Hicks, Mrs. Briggs and Mr.
Hincks took part was well rendered,
but was entirely out of place and
should not have been included in the
programme. To use a slang phrase,
"it did not  belong."
Mrs. H. F. Langton, who in her
time has played many parts, essayed
a Spanish Fascination Dance, which
she had witnessed during het recent
sojourn in Mexico. Needless to say,
this versatile lady looked, dressed and
acted the part, and Mr. A. E. Craddock, who acted as foil to the fascinator, showed that he was duly impressed, as was the audience.
Among the men Mr. B. H. T.
Drake did splendidly; in fact, his acting was a revelation to those who
had not seen him before. He is a
natural born actor, reminding one cf
Charles Hawtrey and Laurence D'v >r-
say. He simply has to walk ou without the slightest make-up or preparation and his natural talents and high
gift of humour do the rest. Mr.
Drake may not know it, but he could
easily make his fortune as a monologue artist. He possesses that
drawling, infectious voice, that insouciant manner and that peculiar dry
humour which reminds one instinctively of Harry Paulton and Lionel
Brough.
There could not be a more complete contrast than that afforded by
Capt. Foukes. Versatile , volatile,
full of vim and energy, Capt. Foukes
sang and danced as few amateurs
can and infused an immense amount
of ginger into the show. He was ably
seconded by Mr. Craddock and Mr.
Hincks.
It must be recognised that "The
Pantomime Rehearsal" is almost entirely musical which furnishes little
opportunity for dramatic display, and
therefore it is not easy to determine
what kind of a success the same
cast would make in ordinary drama.
Music and dancing help out any entertainment.
If I may be permitted to make a
suggestion the next programme
should consist of a musical comedy
and a play. An hour of each would
make a splendid evening's entertainment and would enable Major Taylor, who in future will have charge
of the stage work of the Club, to
utilise all the talent available.
Nothing but congratulations can be
offered on the very successful first
appearance of "A Pantomime Rehearsal" and having found a competent manager, no time should be lost
in going ahead with a fresh selection. Far too much time has already
been frittered away unnecessarily.
MOMUS.
(For further  Dramatic Criticism
see Page- 9)
The Crystal Theatre
Broad Street
The Largest, Best Furnished and Most
Comfortable Picture Theatre
in the City
Watch jor Constant Improvements in Appointments and Service.
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Majestic
Theatre
The latest and best Motion
Pictures,   Funny   Comedies,
Western     Plays,     Thrilling
Adventures
Splendid Modern Dramas
Pictures    changed    Monday,
Wednesday, Friday
We Cater to Ladies and
Children
Continued Performance
1 to 11 p.m.
Victoria Theatre
THREE NIGHTS—MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY
DECEMBER 25, 26, 27.   MATINEES DAILY
Special Return Engagement
KINEMACOLOR
Natural Colors
Prices—75c, 50c, 25c. Matinee Xmas Day—75c, 50c, 25c.
Matinee Tuesday and Wednesday, 25c and 50c
Seats on sale Friday, December 22.   Matinee 2.30.   Night 8.30.
Special Matinee Christmas
jEmpress
WEEK DECEMBER 25
Initial     American    Tour,     Europe's
Cleverest Tricksters
WALTON & LESTER
Dispensers of Mirth and Muddlers of
Magic
Europe's   Eccentric   Instrumentalists
MAY FERNANDEZ DUO
Introducing  May   Fernandez,   whose
Voice has a Range of Four Octaves
"Believe  Mc"
NED (CORK) NORTON
"The Big Smoke"
Dispensing Minstrel Wit and Brunette
Humour
The  American  Nightingale
R. R. RAYMOTH
The   Silver-Voiced   Phenomenon
The Charming Comedienne
MARIE FITZGIBBON
Sprightly Songs and Characterizations
The Bijou
Theatre
One of the largest Picture Theatres in Western Canada. The House
has been thoroughly remodelled with sitting capacity increased to 700
seats. The Bijou is the first theatre opened with a 5c admission,
giving a show equal to any of the ioc shows in town. Our daily
performance consists of 4,000 ft. of film (4 reels), illustrated song and
a 3-pieced orchestra. We are running 24 reels weekly, almost everything that is produced. REMEMBER, we change our program
each and every day and admission only 5c.
Watch for our Next Sensation
Johnson Street
Victoria, B. C.
THE EMPRESSCOPE
Victoria Theatre
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 28
Charles Dillingham presents for the
first time
Montgomery &
Stone
In Geo. Ade's Musical Comedy
Masterpiece
The Old Town
Music by Gustave  Luders
Company of Eighty-live. Cast of Excellence. The original beautiful production as given nearly all last season
at Mr. Dillingham's Globe Theatre,
New York City.
Seats on sale Tuesday, Dec. 26th.
Prices—$2,00, $1.50, $1.00, 75c and 50c. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
The Week
A   Provincial   Newspaper   and   Revbw
published every Saturday by
"The Week" Publishing
Company, Limited
Published at  1208  Government  St.,
Victoria, B.C., Canada
W. BLAKEMORE, Edit
The Dickens
Christmas
By Bohemian
I cannot improve on the time-
honoured salutation, "A Merry Christmas to you all," and on this, Dickens
Christmas, I must add Tiny Tim's
immortal wish, "God Bless Us
Everyone."
At the request of the Editor I have
undertaken to extend Christmas
Greetings to the readers of The
Week. I suppose he paid me this
compliment because I am a free-lance
and therefore not bound to observe
the conventionalities in what has
come to be recognised as a very conventional, not to say ceremonial, function.
We have entered the annual penumbra in which personal differences are
obscured, ancl every aura is a halo.
In Victoria at any rate the Scrooge
family has died out, and pretty nearly every face one sees wears "a
smile which will not come off." It
is the smile of kindliness, of geniality, of good-will and of prosperity;
a combination hard to match and impossible to beat in any part of the
world.
I know that human nature is the
same all the world over. The same
heart of kindness beats in millions of
breasts, and at Christmas time there
is the same universal desire to exchange kindly salutations and to
breathe the spirit of the season.
But I doubt if any other place presents a combination of conditions so
calculated to engender the Christmas
spirit in its truest sense. If there is
a deficiency it lies in the lack of those
extremes which stimulate the charitable, and furnish the occasion for that
lavish display of generosity, which in
older centres of population is so inseparable from Christmas observance.
It is a matter for congratulation and
yet it is not inconceivable that society misses a healthy tonic in the
excitation created by Want.
Victoria is full of Old Country people bound by a thousand ties to the
Motherland, saturated with her eu
toms ancl eager to maintain the historic features of the period. For this
reason no one need withhold their
hand because Victoria lacks objects
meet for charity.
There are scores of slums at home
to whicii we can send- our mite, ancl
in this way help those we have left
behind to perpetuate the good old
customs. That this has been clone in
thousands of instances there can be
no doubt. If wc cannot dispense
doles in Victoria, we can dispense
kind words, kind deeds and charitable
judgment. There is room for this
everywhere, even in a contented and
prosperous city, ancl because nf its
contentment ancl prosperity we can
thc less afford to carry over this
joyous season one unkind thought or
one harsh judgment.
It is at all times meet that Christmas should be a time of rejoicing, but
this Christmas of 1911 is the Dickens
Christmas ancl should bring with it
to everyone of us an added sense of
responsibility, the responsibility of
lightening the burden and smoothing
the path of those who find the way
hard, ancl there are some, even in
Victoria.
If there are any such among the
readers of The Week, let me on behalf of its Editor and the members of
the staff express our sincere sympathy
ancl at the same time tender thanks
for the kindness ancl consideration
whicii has been extended to us
throughout the year.
Allow me once more to ask pardon
for any thoughtless or unjust words
whicii may have found their way into
our columns during 191*1. To thoughtlessness we may have to plead guilty,
but  to  conscious injustice,  never.
Sir. James Douglas
K.C. B.
The Early History of Vancouver
Island
Written Specially for the Week
by Gilbert Malcolm Sproat
The tiny Island-colony, (1849), was
the pivot of British organised Dominion on the North Pacific seaboard
—the pioneer British Colony, indeed,
on the Continent, west of Upper Canada, if we exclude Rupert's Land,
which, through nominally, since
1670, a "plantation," hardly was, perhaps, a Colony proper, in the modern
sense. The attention of the House
of Commons was directed, in 1857, to
the Island Colony, as part of a larger
question. In that year, as I have said,
a very strong Select Committee was
appointed, the 19 members of which
included Gladstone, Lord Stanley,
Lord John Russell, Lowe, Pakington,
Ellice, Herbert, Goderich, Rolbuck,
and other notables. This seems old
history, but, not to me, for I remember some of the Committee's meetings. Its instructions were, to consider the state of the British possessions administered by the Hudson's Bay Company—Rupert's Land,
to wit—or in which, that Company
was licensed to trade, the inquiry
covering, in fact, nearly the whole
of British North America, west from
Hudson's Bay and the Great Lakes.
Technically, the Vancouver Island
Colony, though directly under thc
Crown, was included, as the Trade
Licence, there, to the Company, had
not, in fact, actually expired.
Suffice it to say, here, that the result, so far as the Pacific Seaboard
was concerned, mainly, was, a recommendation by the Committee, that
means should be provided for extending the existing Colony of Vancouver Island over the whole, or any
portion, of the neighbouring mainland, and, that, in the extended area,
the Company's exclusive Indian
Trade Licence should be revoked.
This was in the year next before the
occurrence of the "gold excitement"
on the mainland, which, for a short
time, threatened to disorganise the
California mining industry. The
common notion, consequently, is incorrect, that the colonisation of part
of the mainland was first suggested,
to the Home Government, by the
discovery of gold there, in paying
quantities. It is easy to appreciate
the Committee's above recommendation. The territory was distant from
thc Mother Country, and the means
nf communication slow and imperfect. Mainland affairs might be administered, for a time, without the
expense of duplicate establishments.
The chief work would be supervision
of thc Indians, whose lands were not
yet allotted. Questions, under the
Oregon Treaty of 1846, in connection
with the sea prolongation of the
boundary-line, along thc 49th parallel,
ancl, southerly, through the archipelago, might occur with thc United
States. In any diplomatic, or other,
emergency, concert would be easier
between a single Government, and
thc Senior Naval Officer on thc Station.
As to the gold, its presence iu
Queen Charlotte Island, was known
in 1851, but it was its more fruitful
discovery on the banks of the Thompson river, in 1857, (after the above
London Committee had risen., that
made the miners of California "get
up and talk." It is estimated that,
during three months of the next year,
20,000 of them arrived at Victoria,
ancl more made tlieir way, overland,
to the common objective areas along
the Thompson ancl Fraser rivers.
The   roughness   of   the   surface,   the
presence of Indians, the cost of living and transport, together with the
nature of much of the gold, first
found,—"small scale or dust" gold,
—caused, however, most ot the incomers to retreat soon; nevertheless,
several thousands got to work, chiefly on the Lower Fraser "Bars."
Some of these, moving about, found
coarser, and therefore more profitable gold, the higher they went up
river. This, really, was accidental,
or, peculiar in a section of the river,
but many of the miners thought it
showed that the source of all the gold
would be found still higher up. A
number of adventurous stragglers,
consequently, pushing on, midst
hardships, before long, reached Cariboo, some 400 miles from the sea.
There, luckily, in certain "creeks,"
rich deposits of alluvial, or "placer,"
coarse gold were found, and, also,
after search (sometimes, years of
search) by sinking on supposed old
channels of "creeks," long diverted.
For its area, the Cariboo district was
one of the richest placer-mining districts ever found, and its resources
are not yet exhausted. The subject
fascinates but is mentioned here, only
in relation to the action of the Home
Government, following, what Secretary of State for the Colonies, Sir E.
B, (afterwards Lord) Lytton, called
a "motley inundation of immigrant
diggers."
The sudden influx of a purely mining    population    created    conditions
which prevented the carrying out of
the above Committee's recommendation to add the mainland, or a portion
of it, to the Island Colony.   A separate colony was established on the
mainland.    The Island colony had a
representative system of government,
and  it  was  not   supposed   that  the
"motley," "come and go," new population would care for, or be able to
work,  such institutions  all at once.
Revenue for mainland purposes was
an immediate necessity, and, in the
Island,   a  Free  Trade   fiscal  policy
existed.   Legislative action also, was
hampered, in the Island, and likely,
for long, to be hampered, while the
Crown and the Hudson's  Bay Company discussed   matters    of account,
and the  reconveyance of the  Island
to the former.    Be it noted in passing, that, except temporarily, through
the  grant  of the  Island,  the  Company, west of the "Rockies," had no
title to the soil, and, under the Act
of  1821, authorising the issue of an
exclusive Indian Trade Licence, such
licence could not be effective within
the limits of any colony that might
be established.   Thus the Home Government,  save  for the  old  Declaratory Act hereinbefore referred to, ancl
not  yet rendered practically  inoperative by a naval statutary definition
of the term  "representative government,"   had,    comparatively,    a  free
hand in starting the new colony on
the mainland.    The real man at the
helm was Lytton, the novelist, above
mentioned, Sir Edward  Bulwer Lytton, Secretary of State  for the  Colonies,   in   the   Derby   Tory  ministry
(parts of 1858-9), a ministry opposed
to   the  then  rapidly  growing policy
of    Colonial    separation.      Lytton's
whole  soul was in his  "secretariat,"
more than it ever had been even in
his chosen  field of literature.    Some
of Lytton's best writing, indeed, is in
his   official    despatches   which    few
read.    1 doubt, however, if he had it
in him to have become a great minister for the Colonies.   He never was
in a colony, and his books suggest to
me that his genius was not receptive
of the  sort of experience,  available,
to some extent, to Old Country residents, ancl helpful of, at any rate, an
imaginative  appreciation  of  Colonial
life.     The   self-depicturing,   in   Lytton's many books, shows that he did
not know, or sympathise, adequately,
with,  those grave,  earnest, practical
characteristics of the Home national
life which are reproduced,  specially,
owing to the circumstances of Colonial   life,   As  a   youth   in   London,
without expectation    that    I  should
ever visit North-west America, I had
an opportunity of admiring Lytton's
speech in introducing the British Columbia Colony Bill.   It was the speech
of one who took pride in his opportunity, an eloquent, clear exposition,
marred, in its effect on a hearer not
interested in thc subject, by the rather
ungraceful  gestures   of  the   speaker,
and by his rapid "gobbling" utterance, which Thackeray made fun of,
as some of my readers may remember. Ambitious, versatile, laborious,
virulent critic of Alfred Tennyson,
naturally shy, and a bit stand-offish
to those he did not know well, or
take to, Lytton was like a veritable
boy among a congenial few in the
gardens, or smoking room, at Knab-
worth, and always proud, very proud
of having founded British Columbia,
more so it seemed, than of his literary and dramatic success, through
which the public knew him. At a
later time, he was a semi-recluse, during the day, both to guests and neighbours, sharing in a little social or
business talk only after dinner. His
health and interest in life having
failed several years before his death
in January, 1873, I was unable to
get much help from him, when representing the Province in London, not
from any want of will on his part,
but as he was worn. An odd contrast was an older man, Admiral Sir
Thomas Maitland, commanding on
this station, 1860-1862, whom I knew
very well. He became eleventh Earl
of Lauderdale, in 1863. Hearing he
was in London, when I wanted some
help at the Colonial office, the Earl
answered my knock at his door,—
slippers, no coat, neckcloth awry, fry-
Save Money on
Your Xmas Gifts
Two Minatures  made  Free  with
every locket.    Full line of Watches,
Chains, Diamonds, etc.    Gold Nugget Jewelry a specialty.
H. Greensfelder, Jeweler
547 Johnson Street
Mrs. D. B. McLaren
Teacher of Singing and
Voice Production
Terms on Application   Phone X2308
P. 0. Box 44Q
F. KROEGER
ARTISTIC  UPHOLSTERY
" Windowphanie"
Ma.ies Stained Glass out of Plain Glass
Has Removed to 721 Courtney Street
Opposite Alexandra Club Telephone 1148
ing pan in hand—"what do 'e want!
laddie?" said he, "Oh, I mind ye weel!
come in, come in!" "Excuse my havl
ing a bite, then we'l talk of the olJ
place." I never knew a naval office|
who did not love this part*of the Pa
cific station, and the same may bl
said of the Royal Engineers. So dil
Lytton, as above hinted, though hi
had never seen it. There is a littll
pathos in the fact that, hardly a co|
onist of the colony he founded,
his own cherished life achievemenl
ever thinks of the statesman Lyttoil
though a few may read some of h|
books and dramas."
"What is the end of Fame? 'tis bil
to fill
A    certain    portion    of    uncertaj
paper?"
Postscript.—Please, reader, do nJ
confuse "our Lytton," with his sol
the literateur, "Owen Meredith," wll
was minister to Portugal, Vice-rcl
of India (1876-80), afterwards Arj
bassador at Paris, and whose baroil
inherited from his father, was aul
menteel to an earldom. The prese|
young holder of the title has son
political repute, but I do not kne
if he interests himself in Colon!
questions.
BOOK NOTES
Books   to   read   during   the |
Christmas Holidays:
At The Victoria Book & Sta-I
tionery Co., 1004 Government!
St., Victoria:—
"My Own Story," by the Ex-
Crown Princess of Saxony,!
$3.00.
"The Claw," by Cynthia Stock-1
ley.   $1.50.
"The Common Law," by Robert |
W. Chambers.   $1.50.
"The Case of Richard Meynell.'i
by  Mrs.   Humphrey  Ward.]
$1.50.
"The Glory of Clementina," byl
William J. Locke.   $1.50.
At The Standard Stationery Co.]
1220 Government Street, Vic-f
toria:—
"Adrian Savage," by Lucas Ma-|
let.   $1.50.
"The Apple of Happiness," byl
Ethel Turner.   $1.50.
"Earth," by Muriel Hine. $1.50.!
"The Money Moon," by Jeffrey!
Farnol.   $1.50.
"Mother Carey's Chickens," byl
Kate Douglas Wiggin. $1.50.1
A SENSIBLE  GIFT
A Pair of Daniel Green & Co's
Felt Footwear
for the Man,
Woman or
Child
H. B. Hammond Shoe Company|
Pemberton Building, 621 Fort Street, Victoria, B. C.
SMOKE
EL DORO
CIGARS
Mrs. S. Shelton
Ye Old Country Dry Goods
Store, 734 Yates St.
English Serge Dress Skirts, navy and
black.    Machine stitched bottoms.
$2.25 each.   Come and see.
Roy's   Art   Glass   Works   and   Store
915 Pandora St.,   Victoria, B. C.
Albert F. Roy
Over thirty years' experience ii
Art Glass
LEADED LIGHTS
Sole manufacturer of Steel-Cored Lead
for Churches, Schools, Public Buildings and private Dwellings. Plain and
Fancy Glass Sold. Sashes Glazed by
Contract.    Estimates   free.    Phone 594 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
CONDITIONS IN CANADA
The first review of general conditions in Canada during the year
[which is closing was given at the Bank of Montreal's annual meeting
[this week by its president, Mr. R. B. Angus. He reminded us that the
[country has enjoyed a period of great prosperity in almost every
[department of trade and commerce, and has undoubtedly added to its
[permanent and productive wealth. Although this has been more
[marked in British Columbia and the prairie provinces, Ontario, Quebec
[and the maritime provinces have not failed to participate.
Some interesting crop figures from a capable and well-informed
Isource were given by Mr. Angus. The estimate of the Western wheat
Icrop is given by that authority as about 180,000,000 bushels. While the
■quality this year, as a whole, is not all that could be desired, the average
•prices being paid for the lower grades are even better than the prices
■obtainable in many previous years for the higher grades, and conse-
Iquently the net cash returns will be the largest ever obtained from our
|North-West.
When considering the effect of the wheat crop in relation to its
[influence on the prosperity of our Dominion, the value of the other
|cereals produced in our North-West must not be overlooked.   If we
accept the present estimates of the various important grains, which are
as follows:—
Bushels
Wheat     180,000,000
Oats      200,000,000
Barley        35,000,000
Flax         7,000,000
[he cash value to the farmer, at the average prices prevailing today,
vould be approximately over $235,000,000, no inconsiderable sum,
lonsidering that this is exclusive of the farmers' receipts from various
lather sources, such as live stock, hay, root crops and dairy products.
While we are inclined to think that the wheat crop will be several
Inillion bushels less than 180,000,000, there is no doubt that the higher
Irices for the low grades will compensate for losses in the production
^f high grades.
Mr. Angus drew attention to the important factors creating active
Industrial conditions. British and foreign capital has been invested
freely in the Dominion, the stream of immigration continues, and railroad construction is proceeding apace. Ready-made farms, he says,
fannot be supplied fast enough to meet the wants of would-be settlers.
fe would prefer that Mr. Angus should not place emphasis upon the
Itatement that railway enterprise is being followed by large landholders and capitalists of Great Britain, who, from patriotic motives
In some instances, are making such investments. We are inclined to
lelieve that the primary reasons are that such investments are good
lusiness, and are made in one of the most attractive investment fields
|i the world.   Incidentally, patriotism may figure.
Dealing particularly with the industrial position, Mr. Angus stated
liat manufacturers have been fully occupied, and that new industries
If every description are being created in every part of the Dominion,
■he iron and hardware trade and groceries are decidedly good. A
Irge and profitable business in boots and shoes has been transacted
ptwithstanding the high price of leather. The dry goods trade was
■imewhat unsatisfactory, stocks being heavy and demand light in the
Iring, this being largely a legacy of the previous year. Improvement
J being made with much better prospects. Woolen and worsted manu-
licturers suffered from the competition of foreign imports, English
pods intended for the over-stocked American market being sold here.
1-77) ? Monetary Times.
WOULD HAVE CANADIAN ORES ADMITTED FREE
The Spokane Mining Men's Club, composed of operators in the
l>ur northwestern states, has started a campaign for such relations
ptween the United States ancl Canada as will permit the free entry
[to this country of Canadian lead ancl zinc, ores and products. These
mints are set out in a resolution addressed to the president of the
|nited States and members of Congress, adopted at the last meeting.
"The various attempts to improve the present unsatisfactory
[ndition of production and market have proved of no value to the
[oducer or consumer.
"The combined production of lead and zinc in Canada and the
Inited States is less than the consumption in both countries, as
Jithered from federal sources, and the margin of difference is grow-
|g wider, with no important new fields of either being discovered.
"The cost of production in Canada is greater than in the United
jates because of higher cost of machinery, supplies and transporta-
|in, with labour costs identical and fully unionized and equally efficient.
"A large number of Americans are operating in the lead and
[ic mines of Canada who have invested a large combined capital.
"The present tariff on lead and zinc ores and their products as
[tering the United States ports from Canada is of no advantage to
le United States nor ever will be, but rather serves to restrict trade
[lations."
H. H. Shallenberger,.chairman of the committee on resolutions,
lows these figures in a statement of lead and zinc production ancl
Residence  Phone F1693
Business Phone 1804
W.D'O.Rochfort
Architect
Plans and Specifications on
Application
Suite 407 Pemberton Block
<Cfce
Taylor Mill Co.
Limited
All kinds of Building Material
Lumber   .'   Sash   .'   Dooi
Telephone 554
North Government Street, Victoria
TELEPHONES
J48 AND 249
A. E. KENT
PHOPRIBTOl
Pacific Transfer
Co.
Trucking and Expressing
B-tiat* Chi.Ud and Furniturl
ftimtvtd t_ any parttf City
504 bf 506 FORT STREET
VICTORIA, B. C.
Give Your
Typist Good
Stationery
and She'll Give
You Better
Work
Baxter & Johnson Co.
Limit.i
721 Yates St. Phone 730
Royal Bank Chambers
Victoria, B..C.
Thomas Hooper
Jrchitect
522 Winch Building
Vancouver, B. C.
List Your  Properties with   Us
Stuart & Reeves
Members Victoria RealEstate Exchange
Cor. Fort& Douglas Sts.,   Victoria
Telephone 2612      P. O. Box 1519
Clover Hill
All Good High Lots-The
best buy in the City for a
Home.   Prices, $500 to $900
Terms: io per cent Cash and io per cent Quarterly
Green & Burdick Bros.
Phone 1518
Cor. Broughton & Langley St.
Half Acres
in the Fairfield Estate, suitable for
subdivision, $2100 to
Q
$2500
uarter Acres
in Alexandra
Park
$1050 to $1250
Pemberton & Son
CORNER FORT AND BROAD STREETS
We desire to announce that we have opened offices in Rooms
304 and 305 Bailey Building, Handling. Seattle, Wash., handling
Stocks, Bonds, Grain and Cotton, strictly on a Commission Basis,
in the various markets of the world. Mr. Carl L. Miller, who has
long been connected with important brokerage firms in the west,
will be in charge.
We are members of the Chicago Board of Trade. Our
Eastern correspondents are S. B. Chapin & Co.. and Logan &
Bryan, of Chicago and New York, members of all Exchanges.
Private leased wire connections enable quick dispatch in handling
all business intrusted to us for execution.
Having carried on a successful brokerage business in Victoria,
B.C., for the past io years, we refer you to any bank, firm or
individual of that city as to our standing and integrity.
Respectfully,
F. W. STEVENSON & CO.
Frank W.  Stevenson
Walter   H.   Murphey
Seattle, March 6, 1911.
Work Guaranteed Estimate!  Free
Phone F209
John P. Morris
General Contractor
Foundations, Floors, Walks, all
kinds of Plain and Ornamental
Cement Work
Phoenix Street,      Victoria W.
P. O. Box 417
Blue Printing
Maps
Draughting
Surveyors'  Instruments  and
Drawing  Office   Supplies
Electric Blue Print & Map
Company
1218 Langley Street, Victoria, B. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
consumption compiled from reports of the United States geological
survey and the mines branch, department of Mines of Canada, for
1910:
Lead
World—Production, 1,211,411 short tons; consumption, 1,196,482
short tons.
United States—Production, per cent of whole, 30.7; consumption,
per cent, of whole, 33 per cent.
Canada—Production, per cent, of whole, 1.36; consumption, per
cent, of whole, *172.
*Does not include imported manufactured products of lead to the
value of $308,479.
Zinc
World—Production, 883,419 short tons;   consumption, 882,573
short tons.
United  States—Production, 269,184 short tons;   per cent, of
whole, 30.5; consumption, 245,884 short tons; per cent, of whole, 28.
Canada—Production, *3,304 short tons; per cent, of whole, 0.36;
consumption, figures not given.
♦Exported to the United States.
Mr. Shallenberger says that while previous years show a slight
change it is evident that the difference in consumption over produc
tion of the two countries will be even more marked in the future.
LATHS  IN   CANADA  LAST  YEAR
LOSING NO TIME ON HUDSON BAY LINE
Hon. Frank Cochrane, minister of railways, is losing no time in
fulfilling the promise he made in the house that the Hudson Bay railway would be proceeded with at once and that it would be built as
soon as they could make certain the starting point was right. There
is a possibility that Prince Albert or the Pass will be made the starting
point for the foad. It is pointed out that Prince Albert is a greater
centre and feeder for the road and could be more easily reached by
both Saskatchewan and Alberta lines. This would not necessarily
mean the abandonment of the Pass line which would be made a branch
to tap the main route.
At a special conference will be discussed the respective merits of
Port Nelson and Fort Churchill as the terminals. There is a strong
feeling in Ottawa that Port Nelson will be finally chosen as it is
believed it has a far superior harbour. There will be no delay in the
work, no matter which route is chosen and arrangements will probably
be made for taking provisions into the Pass mission for use on the line
during the winter.
Despite the use of metal lath and patent methods of interior finish,
wooden lath production amounted to eight hundred and fifty-two
million pieces, worth one million, nine hundred and forty-three thousand dollars, in Canada during 1910. This information has been
obtained from statistics compiled by the Dominion Forestry Branch
which show that nearly thirty million more lath were produced in 1910
than in the year before, but that owing to a decrease in the price per
thousand, the total value of the industry was thirty-five thousand dollars less. Two-fifths of the total was cut in Ontario, which province
increased its 1909 production by fifty-seven million or nearly twenty
per cent. New Brunswick, the second province in importance, increased its proportion of the total from one-fifth to one-quarter, by
cutting sixty-two million more than last year. The production of laths
in Quebec ancl British Columbia during 1910 was considerably more
than in 1909, amounting with Ontario and New Brunswick to ninety-
four per cent, of the total. The remaining five provinces cut smaller
amounts, and with the exception of Alberta, each showed a decrease
from the amount produced in 1909. The average price of laths in 1910
was $2.28 per thousand, or 16 cents less than in 1909. The price varied
considerably between the different provinces, British Columbia laths
being $1.66 per thousand, while in Prince Edward Island the price was
$2.67.
SMOKE
EL DORO
CIGARS
Chas. Hayward
President
Reginald Hayward
Sec'y-Treas.
F. Caselton
Manager
Phones 2235,   2236,   2237, 2238,   2239
The B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
(Successors to Charles Hayward)
Funeral Directors and Embalmers
1016 Govt. St. Established 1867 Victoria, B. C.
ft UP flpTIl
THE BESTOrEYMTHING
IN THE HEART OF THECJlTY
135RoohsWithBath-505ampieRooh3
Just Arrived
A fine  line of Ladies' Silk
Waist  Patterns,  Fancy Silk
Scarfs, Shaws, etc., which
we have marked at
bargain prices.
So Kee & Co.
1029 Cook St.
Cor. Cook & Fort
Your Xmas
Pictures
Have them made
now in SEPIA at
the Skene Lowe
Studio Cor. Yates
and Douglas
Streets
ii
1.
Good Illumination
Means Efficiency
Scientific Management consists in cutting out waste — waste
time and waste effort. It isn't a scheme to make men work
harder: it is designed to make hard work easier. Scientific
illumination enables your operatives to produce more with less
effort. Waste time, inaccuracy, lost motion, nervous strain are
reduced in the shop, mill or factory that is lighted scientifically
By Electricity
Let us advise you.   Our services are free in looking
into your requirements
B. C. Electric Railway Co., Limited
P O. Box 1580 Light and Power Department Telephone 1609 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
m
=5)
Northern Anthracite Collieries
LIMITED
WILSON  ROBERTSON
COAL  FIELDS
GRAHAM    /SLAND
*«?$,
SnezrcH Map
SHOWING
Coal Licenses
IN
Bearskin Bay, Q.C.I.
^_t\-
ALFRED BAY COAL FIELDS
Capital - - $1,500,000
Divided into $1,500,000 Shares, $1.00 each
President   T. S. Gore, Capitalist
Vice-President  J. C. Keith
Directors A. Scot Innis, A. E. Hepburn, Christian F. J. Galloway
Solicitors  Burns & Walkem
Consulting Engineers A. E. Hepburn, Christian F. J. Galloway
Chartered Accountants  Kenah & Nesbit, Vancouver and London, Eng.
Secretary  F. H. Hepburn, 317 Winch Building
D. R. Young has contracted for purchase of
two blocks of shares of 100,000 each, and
are being sold by A. E. Kealy for purchaser
The entire proceeds of which are to be
used for development purposes only
Latest Information from Queen Charlotte by wireless is to the
effect that the diamond drill is already down over 500 feet
ajnd making fifteen feet each day, in coal formation,
and is expected to, cut through seam of coal at  any  hour
Stock Now Advanced to 25 cents per share and will surely advance
to 50 cents per share as soon as the COAL SEAM is cut by the drill
Get hi Now, Don't Wait unfit Too Late—Opportunity Only Knocks Once
APPLICATION FOR SHARES
H. J. HEAL, Victoria, Agent for Arnold E. Kealy, Vancouver, B. C.
I hereby request .you to obtain for me shares in the  NORTHERN  ANTHRACITE  COLLIERIES,   LIMITED,  of'par  value  of  $i.oo
each at the net price to me of 15c per share, and I now hand you the sum of $  being the first payment of five cents per share now applied
for; the balance I agree to pay as follows: Five cents on each share in thirty days from date hereof; five cents on each share in sixty days from date hereof;
being payment in full, and I hereby agree to accept the said shares or any less number of shares that may be allotted to me, and also pay for same; and I
hereby authorize you to obtain registration of me as the holder of the shares so obtained for me.
This application is made by me subject to  (50,000)  shares being subscribed for and purchased.
A. E. KEALY, Office: 506 Pacific Bldg., 744 Hastings SU W., Vancouver
H. J. HEAL, 125 Pemberton Block, Victoria, B. C
=0 f
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
J. C. LINDEN
G. H. ROLLAND
Everybody Knows Them
LINDEN & ROLLAND
BROKERS
Insurance, Loans, City Property a Specialty
We have very good values in City Property
Come and See Us
Phone 2870
738 Fort Street
Victoria, B. C.
New Premises for the B. C. Funeral Furnishing Company
\  hi mm 1 Dm I m-wtmmm
The above show tbe front exterior
and interior views of the Mortuary
Chapel, connected with the new lire-
proof building for the B. C. Funeral
Furnishing Co., uow in course of
■.construction, at the corner of Brought
ton aud Wilcox streets by Mr. Chas.
Hayward. The Company, having
outgrown their present accommodation at 1016 Government street, will
remove to the new premises as soon
as possible.   These commodious quar
ters will be elegantly fitted up, with
all modern accessories, including fireproof receptacles, large, well ventilated chapel with organ and lighted
by indirect illuminators. The ground
floor provides for waiting and recep
tion rooms, and business offices, while
the 2nd floor will be arranged for show
rooms, and the necessary accommodation for the night staff. The building,
costing about $30,000, will be devoted
exclusively   to   the   Company's   uses.
A  FRENCH   INTERPRETATION   Ol|
EVE
The   following   is   said   to   be   a   FrenI
man's   account   of   the   temptation   and
of   ]$ve :—
"Monsieur  Adam,   lie  walked  up,   he  s|
une   belle   demoiselle   aslip   in   ze
Voila   de   la   chance.    'Hon   jour,    Madsj
Tv.'   Madame   Iv   she   wake;    she   hole
fan   before   to   her   face.   Adam   put   up
eye-glass   to   admire   ze   tableau.     Zey   ml
one promenade,    Madame  Iv, she feel  11
gry,   she   sees   appel   on   ze   arbre,    Serij"
ze  promene  sur  1'arbre,   make  one  walk|
ze   tree.    'Monsieur   Serpent,'  says  Iv,
yon   not   have   ze   bonte   to   peek   me
appel,   j'oi   faime?'     'Certainment,   madaj
say   ze   serpent,    'charmc    de    vous
TIolo, mon ami, ar-r-reter vous,' say Ad|
'stop   que   sougez   vous   faire?     What
ness  is  zees—you  must  not peek  ze  apl
Ze   snake,   he   take   one   pinch   of   snuff,f
say:    'Ah I    Monsieur   Adam,   do   you
know   zere   is   nothing  prohebeet   for   ze|
dies?    Madame Iv, permeet me to offer
some  of this  fruit  defendu.*    Iv,   she in]
one   courtesey   ,ze   snake   hc   fill   her   wi
parasol   wiz   appel.     He   say,   'Kritis   si
Deus.    Monsieur Adam he will eat ze apl
he   will   become   like   one   Dieu,   know |
good   and   ze   evil;    but   you,   Madame 1
cannot  become more of a goddess  zan '
are   now.'   And   zis   finish   Madame   Iv."'
A  CONTINENTAL DISTINCTION!
In   Europe   a   woman   would   die   twJ
times   for  the  man   she   loves.    In   Amel
she   might   die   if   she   were   not   loved |
twenty   men   at   the   same   time.
AN   INVITATION
"Where are you going,  my pretty ma|
"Under the mistletoe, sir,"  she  said.
"May I go with you, my pretty maldl
"You   are   certainly   slow   if   you   doi|
she said.
MAKING GOOD
Many a woman falls in love simplyl
convince some man that she is not if
pable of it.
A   SURE  CLUE
A  woman's  face   is  invariably  a  maskj
her   fancy;   like   a   court   masker,   she
only   be   recognized   by   her   mouth.
A   SWEET   MISTAKE
Of    all   the   printer's   blunders   we
saw,   "entremet   sacre"   for   "cntrcmct  sm|
was   thc   most   damning.
WANTED—A   CAP
Some    newspapers    are    too    dull    to
worth   filing.
AN   INFERNAL  TASTE
The devil's favourite  lish is fried THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER.23, 1911
ft
Gossip from the Stalls
The Empress Theatre
For the week preceding Christmas
the management of the Empress
Theatre has been fortunate enough
'to secure an exceptionally strong
bill. Headed by Hal Stephens & Co.,
who put up a fine turn including
scenes from Shakespeare, Rip Van
Winkle and Faust, during the course
of which there is some really magnificent stage setting, the rest of the
performers are of more than average
pierit. Miss Lillian Seiger plays excellent selections on the cornet and
has been heartily applauded. Joe K.
Watson is an Hebraic monologist,
^^tnd one of the best. Luckie & Yoast
ire good singers and dancers whilst
the remaining turn contributed by
lobert & Robert leaves the audience
rendering which is the better actor
-Robert, the bull, or Robert, the
■nan.
The Crystal Theatre
Nothing finer in the line of West-
|'rn sports has ever been seen on a
Victoria screen than that showing the
|ound-up at Pendleton, Oregon, which
ras the "piece de resistance" at the
trystal early this week.   Three magnificent reels, each replete with interest and excitement, kept large audi-
[nces in a perpetual thrill, and many
•ere the  complimentary remarks to
|e heard.
Romano's Theatre
The well-known   "Imp"   Company
|rere  responsible    this  week    for  a
Jever film representing life on a submarine  with  a few thrilling  experiences worked in.   The marvellous attrition  to detail which is shown in
lictures  of  this  kind  is  worthy  of
l:mark and the audience is left won-
Isring how it is possible to portray
pnie of the scenes enacted.
The Majestic Theatre
J The  management  of  the   Majestic
live been able to procure, if possible,
li even better set of films this week
than usual. In consequence the pre-
holiday crowds have been thronging
the doors in greater numbers than
ever. It always seems that the Majestic is pre-eminently successful in
picturing Indian scenes; and these
have always been a great attraction
to Victoria picture-seekers.
A Dickens Recital
Lack of space in the last issue of
The Week compelled the omission
of all mention of an extremely clever
able recital which was given by Miss
Eugenie Fox in the hall of the Alexandra Club on Tuesday, Dec. 12th.
Miss Fox, who made the happy selection of Dickens' "Christmas Carol"
as the medium of her recital, showed
herself to be an elocutionist of a type
far too rare at the present day. In
addition to possessing a clear enunciation, Miss Fox has a wonderful
power of modulating her voice; so
developed is this power that at times
it would have been impossible to tell
in a darkened room whether it was
a man or a woman who was giving
the recitation. She delivers with fine
expression the words of her characters and has learnt well the most
difficult art of gesticulation. It is
probable that Miss Fox is the most
accomplished elocutionist who has
ever taken up her residence in the
city, and it is to be hoped that Victorians will have many more opportunities of hearing her voice. Assisting Miss Fox at the recital was
Miss Lilian Haggerty who sang two
songs in good style. The second of
the two, "Come Sweet Morning," was
greeted with demands for an encore,
to which she responded. Another
feature of the entertainment was the
playing of that talented young performer, Miss Muriel Hall, who has
lately returned to Victoria after a
successful season in Europe. Her
two musical sketches evoked loud applause,  and as  Miss  Hall  has  now
taken-jup her abode in this city, it is
certain that she also will be in great
request at forthcoming entertainments.
The Trial Scene from "Pickwick
Papers"
On Friday, December 15th, too late
for mention in the last issue of The
Week, a most enjoyable performance
was given by the members of the
Berean Bible Class in the A. O. U. W.
the celebrated pianist, will appear at
the Victoria Theatre on Wednesday,
January 3rd.
Vladimir de Pachmann, who was
last heard in New York four years
ago, played again in that city on Friday afternoon, October 20th, in Carnegie Hall, before an audience whicii
filled every seat in the huge auditorium. An audience enthusiastic
and appreciative listened tO him for
Fred Stone, who will appear at the Victoria Theatre on Thursday, December 28, in "The
Old Town."    Mr. Stone is shown with a Gigantic Trophy of the Chase
Hall. The famous trial scene from
"Pickwick Papers" had been chosen
for presentation and the players called
forth much well-earned applause. Mr.
E. Hardwick, who played the immortal Sergeant .Bux-fuz, gave an exceptionally meritorious rendering of
the character and the rest of the
performers showed that they possessed histrionic ability in no small
measure. A large audience departed
having spent a thoroughly enjoyable
evening.
De Pachman
Under the auspices of the Victoria
Ladies' Musical Club De Pachmann,
several hours. According to Mr.
Richard Aldrich, in the New York
Times, de Pachmann has in no way
changed his artistic ideals or his
technical methods since he was last
here. He still commands all his old
marvel of "touch," his old magic of
delicacy, filmy irridescent tone, of
sighing pianissimo, or purring rippling passages, of clear articulation
to transform the piano into a celestial instrument. It is ravishingly
pretty and it beguiles the senses of
the listener in a way that hardly any
other piano playing can do.
A Wonderful Discovery ...
Kinemacolor, the marvellous inven-i
tion which shows animated pictures!
in natural colours and which was seen!
locally some few weeks ago, is book-*
ed for a return engagement at the
Victoria Theatre for three nights,
conimencing Monday l)ec. 25th, with
matinee  every day.
The capacity houses which the
Kinemacolor pictures draw wherever
they are shown speaks volumes for
the admitted remarkable discovery of
colour photography. Everywhere
they have created a sensation. There
is no comparison between these wonderful pictures and the black and
white pictures whicli are shown elsewhere. The full colour value of all
objects photographed in motion down!
to the minutest change of shade is
shown in these pictures and their
great merits wcre recognized by the
authorities at the coronation in England, who appointed the Kinemacolor
Company official photographers and
were commanded to take one set of
pictures for the King.
On all sides these pictures have
been recognized as one of the greatest educational and instructive influences extant. In many instances
schoolmasters have taken their pupils
in a body to see this wonderful new
discovery. Parents, likewise, are recognizing the advantages to their
children by taking them to see these
pictures. Whereas much has been
said and written for and against the,
harmful influences which the usual
moving picture shows have on the
young, no such discussion can arise
so far as Kinemacolor pictures are
concerned. The company does not
believe in wasting time by taking manufactured and exaggerated
scenes, but confines itself by giving
life-like and real pictures of nature
and reality.
On the following visit an entire
new new series of pictures will be
shown including many views of the
Canadian West along the lines of the
C. P. R„ G. T. P., and C. N. R.
(Continued on Page 11)
Moose Bowling
Team
Victoria Lodge, No. 738
The accompanying cut shows the
leaders ancl prospective winners of
the Commercial Bowling League,
which is drawing to a close.
Two months ago the Victoria
Moose Lodge, No. 738, took a four-
year lease on the second floor of
the Richard Hall building at 1230
Government street, for its club and
lodge-rooms, but owing to the
rapid growth of the Order there
has been a committee appointed to
secure another location, which will
be fitted up on a much larger and
more up-to-date plan, having all the
requirements of a modern club.
It was intended to close the Charter
on the 18th inst as advertised, but
owing to the fact that several requests were sent in asking to extend
the time set for closing the
Charter it was finally voted to do
so. On account of the Christmas
holidays the next regular meeting
will be held on Wednesday evening, January 7th.
From left to right:—C. R. Johnston  (Manager), Harry Aaronson, Charlie  Brooks,  A.  E.  Ockerman,  C  R.   Graves,   H.   Brewster  (Capt.)
—Photo  by   l.amgim 10
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
ANNOUNCEMENT
Hotel Prince George
Opening!ImM, with the PRINCE
GEiORGIE CAFE in Connection
Newest Addition to ^Victoria's 'Travelling Accommodation. Built to meet the demand for
an jUp-to-date and Moderate Priced Hotel
THE PRINCE GEORGE
is one of the MOST COMPLETE AND THOROUGHLY
EQUIPPED HOTELS on the Coast, having 120 Guest Rooms,
Ladies' Drawing Room, Buffet, Writing and Billiard Rooms
and Barbers' Shop, Steam Heat, Hot and Cold Water, Private
Bath Rooms, Local & Long Distance Telephone in every Room
i
n ii
Special Accommodation for Commercial Men
European Plan   Rates: $1.00 and Up   Popular Prices in the Cafe
Hotel Prince George under Management and Proprietorship ot Mr. Jason Graham PECIAL SUPPLEMENT—CHRISTMAS NUMBER
Special 45c Luncheon Served Daily
11.30 a. m. till 2 p. m. Six Course
Special Chicken Dinner, Jjc, every
Sunday 11.30 a. m. till 9 p. m. at
The King George Grill
I  j6j Yates Street   :    :    White Cooks
The Week
A British Columbia Newspaper and Review,
Published at Victorin, B. e.
Hall & Walker
Agents
Wellington Colliery
Company's Coal
1232 Gov't St. Telephone 83
T
Vol. IX.   No. 51
Ninth Year
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
Ninth Year One Dollar Per Annum
Victoria—The City of Opportunities
The Expansion of Victoria-It Means Opportunities for All
ffik^W
LOOKING TOWARDS THE HARBOR FROM THE PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS
'Prosperity and expansion; better
lospects today thair ever before"
fhat sums up the commercial, finan-
1.1 and industrial history of Vic-
l'ia for the year now ending, and
several years past. It is a his-
|y that will bc recorded annually
a long time to come.
I?0 this eminently satisfactory con-
Jion of affairs several causes have
litributed, any one of whicii would
Ine be sufficient to have a marked
ect upon  the welfare  of the city,
all of which will continue to be
J operation in the future even more
lin in the past.   The general devel-
Iment taking place in the province
1 which Victoria is the capital and
liich comprises an almost virgin ter-
lory more than twice as large as all
lrmany,   a   development  which   in-
lides  the  opening  up  of  extensive
"las by the railway construction car-
Id on by three transcontinental or-
Ifiizations, has played its part.   So,
has the wider realization of the
Iractiveness of Victoria as a resi-
litial city.    But even more potent
iuences have been the development
|l  the  railway  construction  going
in the rich and  extensive island
jn which Victoria is situated; and
practical  realization of the adjutages of  the  harbor of Victoria
its relation to the trade and com-
of the mainland and of the
Icific.
Where Opportunity Abounds
Irhe casual visitor will have his
lention attracted by the amount of
Biding going on and by the in-
lased hotel accommodation which
Is, nevertheless, barely kept up to
Jiuirements. If he visits the indus-
lal establishments of the city he
111 find increased plants and facili-
|s running full blast. If he visits
wharves, the shipping and the
tlway terminals, he will find them
enlarged and yet taxed to their capacity to handle the volume of traffic offering. If he goes still further
afield he will find throughout the
Island hundreds of new industries
which mark but the beginning of the
utilization of vast and rich resources.
And where these conditions exist opportunity  abounds.
Figures that Mean Something
The bank clearings for last month
were the largest during the year, the
increased commercial activity more
than offsetting the normal tendency
to a lessening in the volume of hank
clearings at this season of the year.
For the eleven months of the present year there is an increase of 34
per cent, over last year and of 96 per
cent, over the preceding year. The
figures in detail are:
1911
1910
■ 909
Ian.   ..
.. $ 9,013,71 r.
$7,390,767
$4.-'35,476
Feb,   ..
.    9,9,078,881
(1,404,570
4.3 J 1,397
Mel-.    .
..    13,358,330
7,170,088
4,940,2(19
A pril    .
ii,(193,804
7,239,38.1
5,539,070
May    .
..    13,670,535
7,485,044
5,407,059
lune   .
..    11,3(11,784
0,189,761
6i,453,l75
July  ..
10,517,023
(',051,953
Aug.   .
..    11,394,981
8,865,359
5,864,553
Sept.   .
9,652,304
7.984,304
5,8(14,553
Oct.  ..
..    11,537,733
8,750,129
6,873,809
Nov.    .
..    13,869,885
10,3S(M73
7,200,485
Tl. 11 ms. $123,176,573 $91,382,601 $62,595,786
Building Statistics
The building statistics tell the same
story. For November they were the
largest in the history of the city,
and for the eleven months they
showed an increase over former
years even more pronounced than that
of the bank clearings. The figures
for the three years are:
1911 1010 1909
Ian $   151,455   $   128,985   $    78,080
Feb  182,940 151,760 132,080
Mch  279,945 344,760 121,640
April     280,110 192,440 188,060
May    287,335 257,250 188,(120
June     250,800 227,600 90,120
July     335,375 297,290 372,120
Aug  429,960 212,814 141,040
Sept  406,295 199,686 140,935
Oct  563,125 '-'4,375 104,840
Nov  616,625 104,295 53,585
Tl.  11 mos...$3,783,965   $2,141,255   $1,601,120
Imports, Postal Revenue, Tramway
Passengers
Other statistics showing the condi
tions of business in the city are as
follows, taking the latest returns
available:
1911 1910
Imports for   12  mos. to
30tb   June     $6,506,787   $5,416,834
Exports for 12 mos. to
3otb June    ,132,228      1,325,298
Customs   collections   to
30th   June        3,669,779     2,048,064
Inland revenue to 30th
June            245,126        230,454
Post    Oflice    to    30th
June,  approx        120,000 90,000
1911 1910
Number    of    Tramway
passengers carried  ..    6,579,336     5,285,304
Other Indications
Three more Canadian banks have
recently opened branches in the city,
and the commercial agencies have
done likewise. Extensive new business blocks of reinforced concrete
have been built and are in building.
The contract recently let for thirty-
six miles of asphalt street paving is
said to be the largest award of the
sort made at one time in North America—or the world. The transportation companies report that the tourist travel has increased beyond expectations and the C. P. R, Empress
hotel has, in consequence, been twice
enlarged, one part hardly being completed before additional accommodation was found to be required. The
Grand Trunk Facilic is also planning
the erection of a similar hotel and
has placed steamships 011 the Victoria
route, while the C. P. R. fleet now
running into Victoria and with headquarters here numbers thirty steamships. Stil lanother C. P. R. steamship for the Victoria run is en route
ancl is of the same class as the Princess Victoria and the Princess Charlotte, two of the finest vessels on the
Pacific. Other additions to the fleet
have recently heen made. The C. P.
R. boats on the service between Vic
toria and the Mainland run with the
regularity and punctuality of railway
trains and are nowhere surpassed in
comfort and convenience. The purchase of the E. & N. railway by the
C. P. R. and Mr. McBride's contract
with the C. N. R, have linked the
Island and the City of Victoria with
the interests of these two great transportation systems. In beneficial rivalry they are extending their lines
throughout the Island and introducing its vast and rich resources to
the attention of a widespread connection of capitalists, investors, developers and colonizers.
During the present year work has
been carried on upon the C. N. P.
line from Victoria north-westward
for some thirty-live miles, and upon
C. P. R. lines in districts a little further north toward Cowichan Lake
and Crofton. In addition the latter
company has completed the very important extension of its line from Nanaimo to Alberni and has thus
brought a railway service to the west
coast, a region hitherto almost untouched.
Space permits but a brief reference
to the extent of the resources of the
districts reached by these new lines
alone. Apart from the immense marine wealth now made accessible and
apart from the agricultural lands to
be developed, there are billions of feet
of the finest timber, and extensive
deposits of iron and copper. The iron
is not only of excellent quality but
is found adjacent to limestone for
fluxing and convenient to both coal
and water power. Development is already under way, and with splendid
water power available, and situated
on one of the great shipping highways of the world, the prospect for
the iron industry is obvious.
To take one of the districts near
Victoria now being opened up, it may
be mentioned that it has been estimated that on the west coast between Victoria and Barclay Sound, a
distance of some 80 miles, there are
5^4,155 acres of timber land, and that
cruisers' reports upon 104,000 acres
of this estimate the standing timber
at 48,750 feet per acre. On 37,000
acres it runs 87,000 feet per acre
according to tlle same reports. Taking the average at 20,000 feet per
acre, the total for the district would
be some 12,000,000,000 feet. In the
same district there are also mineral
claims already taken up comprising
3,011 acres, arable land under crown
grant or pre-emption amounting to
74,000 acres, aud vacant crown land
amounting to 140,800 acres.
In this connection the increasing
demand for lumber may be illustrated
by the following figures, whicii show
the approximate cut of British Columbia mills for eight years'
1903   317.551,151 feet
'904   348,031,790 "
1905   47,1,713,986 "
1906   508,069,969 "
1907   846,000,000 "■
1908   658,000,000 "*
1909   775,000,000 "
1910    1,040,000,000   "*
Vancouver Island coal mines produced last year 1,616,030 tons, about
one-third of whicii was for export.
With the completion of the Panama
Canal and the great increase in shipping bound for ports on Puget Sound
and southward this output will show
a corresponding increase in addition
to the continual increase going on
under present conditions, and Victoria must be a chief coaling station
for this shipping.
In a paper read before the Canadian
Mining Institute last March, Mr. D.
B. Dowling estimated thc ocal areas
of Vancouver Island, Queen Charlotte
Islands and  the  northern  mainland THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
coast its containing 61,000,000 tons of
anthracite coal, 2,884,000,000 tons of
bituminous and 256,000,000 of lignite.
Fire brick, pottery and tile, lime
and Portland cement are products
of industries which find their raw
material here in abundance and which
are expanding and enlarging plants
or bringing new plants into existence.
Pulpwood exists in even greater
quantity than saw timber and bids
fair to give rise to a great paper
industry.
It should be noted that freight cars
from the mainland come through to
Victoria via car ferry ancl leave in
the same way, also that rates from
Victoria are the same as those from
the mainland ports of Vancouver and
New Westminster to points in the interior of the province. The city of
Victoria thus is in a position to share
in the business created by thc development of the mainland of the province,—an area of hundreds of thousands of square miles where the C.
N. P., the C. P. R. and the G. T. P.
are actively engaged in railway construction upon a large scale. This
railway construction is supplemented
by work of the Provincial Government upon bridges and highways
some four million dollars per annum
being devoted for this purpose from
the  provincial treasury.
Radial  Electric   Railways
To line agricultural areas in the
immediate vicinity of Victoria the B.
C. Electric; Railway company, a powerful financial institution whose lines
in this province have been most successful, has decided to extend a system of radial lines and is beginning
with a 24-mile run through the Saanich Peninsula. This will make profitable the cutting up of large farms
ancl the cultivation of the ground for
the purpose of supplying the market
of Victoria with products now imported from abroad in great quantities and at high prices, both for local
consumption and for supplying vessels.
Two revolutionary changes in conditions in Victoria have been mentioned; a third remains to be told.
The introduction of the C. P. R. and
the C. N. P. have revolutionized conditions relating to the development
of the Island. The equalization of
rates from Victoria to those from
Vancouver to interior points together
with the car ferry of the C. P. R.
and that to be constructed by the C.
P. R. have revolutionized conditions
relating to trade with the mainland
and have put the city in the same
position as a mainland port in this
respect. The completion of the
Panama Canal will make a revolutionary change in conditions relating to the commerce between the Atlantic seaboards and the Pacific
Coast.
Already Victoria has advantages
not possessed by any other port on
the North Pacific Coast of North
America. As compared with San
Francisco it has the advantage of
being close to coal mines of the best
quality, to unlimited timber, to iron
and other minerals. As compared
with any port north of San Francisco it has the advantage of being
the port of call for the greatest number of vessels, and of being easy and
safe of access all the year round,
lying as it does near the main ocean
and being practically free of fog
in winter as well as in summer.
Victoria is upon the route of all
the shipping bound for Vancouver
and New Westminster and in addition all the shipping bound for Seattle and Tacoma. Ships unloading
here avoid the further distance and
do not have to traverse a course interspersed with islands, swept by
changing tidal currents and frequently clouded with fog, as is the case
with vessels bound for Puget Sound
ports. Yet when they are unloaded
here their goods can be placed in cars
and shipped to the interior at the
same rates as from the mainland
ports.
With  the  completion  of the  Paul
ama Canal these advantages will b«
greatly   emphasized.      In   the    firs!
place the volume of sea-borne traffil
to Pacific coast ports will be greatli
increased.    In  the  second  place thi
Atlantic vessels are as a rule of mucl
greater draught than those at presenj
in use  upon the  Pacific.    For thes
deeper   draught   vessels   the   induce'
ment to stop at Victoria and to avoil
the channels to Puget Sound will bl
much    greater.      At    comparative!!
small   cost   the   outer   harbor  whicl
has a depth of one hundred or morl
feet  can  be  made  an  ideal  port  il
all   weathers   and  can   accommodatl
any quantity of shipping.   The Dom.
inion  Government  is  already  takin
preliminary  steps  with  that  end
view.     At   the   «ame   time   the   rJ
moval  of  the  Indians  from  the  r|
serve which they long occupied upo
the harbor will give unparalleled
cilities  for the  construction of r;
way  tracks   to   both   the  inner  an|
the outer harbor.
TheHinton Electric Company
Limited
A Victoria Enterprize which has' Made Good
Over twenty years of continuous
business activity is a record of whicii
any firm might well feel proud, and
when these years have been marked
with a steady increase in the volume
of business transacted, the territory
embraced in its field of operations
and a reputation whicii only quality
goods and quality work can produce,
those in charge of its affairs have
every reason to congratulate themselves and consider their efforts well
repaid. In the rough this is the record attained by The Hinton Electric Company, Limited. The company was established twenty-two
years ago and from the date of its
inception its progress has been steady
and substantial. Each year, in its
passing has brought the firm greater
business success ancl today in the
electrical circles of Western Canada
the firm holds a distinct position of
leadership, ancl may be classed with
the largest and most reputable concerns of its kind operating in the
Dominion. The firm deals at both
wholesale and retail in electrical machinery and supplies of every description, ancl in addition do an extensive contracting business. Through
the wholesale branch they distribute
electrical supplies throughout all of
British Columbia and the Northwest
provinces, having two salesmen on
the road who are at all times in
touch with the trade. As contractors they have installed some of the
largest electrical plants in Western
Canada, including many of the largest
of the modern office buildings erected in Vancouver and Victoria in recent years.' Their ability to fulfill
their contracts within the time limit
and the dependable quality of the
work executed, are two very essential
reasons why the firm has enjoyed
such an enviable success in this
branch of their business. The sales
department owes at least a part of
its success to its ability to supply
this section of the country with electrical fixtures ancl supplies of the
most up-to-date ancl modern type, at
prices competitive to those of eastern
houses. No longer is it necessary for
you to send cast for your electrical
wants, feeling that by so doing you
are getting better goods at cheaper
prices. Tbe Hinton Company has
made it possible for you ancl me to
get the best and latest on the market
'"*at'''eastern prices, ancl so patronize a
"local institution and keep our money
iit home. There is still another
branch of industry in which this firm
is rapidly gaining prominence, and
which promises to become one of the
'big1 manufacturing enterprises of the
'Wt'st.' We refer to their launch and
' motor-boat plant. Here they have installed modern machinery for boat
building purposes, and though the industry is practically in its infancy the
plant is kept running to its capacity.
They employ a large force of experienced mechanics in this department
and construct delivery tugs, launches
and motor-boats of different sizes up
to sixty feet. Undoubtedly the future  has much  in  store  for this  in
dustry. Referring back to electrical
devices, etc., the company is now arranging to place upon the local market the very latest thing in electrical
motor trucks.    They have for  some
immense parcels post trade with the
Old Country and in this respect as
in the Chinese brokerage there has
been a steady increase in business.
In general the progress made by Mr.
Howell has been 150 per cent, greater
during 1911 than it was in 1010 and
the forecast for 1912 offers every reason to believe it will continue to advance at the same rapid rate. Mr.
Howell has great faith in Victoria
and he is one of the host of boosters,
Standard Steam Laundry, Ltd|
One of Victoria's Most Progressive Business
Institutions
Iu making a review of Victoria's
substantial and progressive business
concerns, with a record for achieving
results in their given line of trade, or
vocation,  and  prominently  identified
time considered this step, but it is
only within recent months that the
battery as applied to trucks has been
perfected, and as soon as possible
thereafter the linn secured the agency
for this section. They will also carry
electric runabouts, broughams, etc.
Lack of space makes it impossible
for us to go into a more comprehensive review of this deserving enterprise, though columns could be
written regarding its history and
operations. It is enough to state
tliat it is one of British Columbia's
big progressive institutions and tbat
the management is capable of advancing the interests of the firm in
the future as they have in the past.
who are helping to place the city.in
the front rank of tlle industrial centers of the west. He is located at
1006 Government Street, Room 23,
Promis Block.
Business of Alfred M.
Howell Shows Remarkable Increase— Does Much
to Advertise Victoria
Though established less than two
years Mr. Howell has built up an extensive business as a customs broker,
forwarding and commission agent,
public stenographer and real estate
agent. The territory embraced in his
field of operations is international and
the magnitude of the business transacted is beyond thc appreciation of
those unacquainted with its substance and nature. Especially is he
active with the Chinese brokerage
department which is growing larger
year by year, having increased 200 per
cent in the first seven months following its  inception.    He also does  an
C. H. Tite & Co.
A Progressive Firm which has
acquired Prominence in
Business Circles
In speaking of the dependable business institutions of Victoria, whose
operations are extensive, and whose
ideas coincide with those who are in
favour of expansion, mention must
be made of the establishment of C. H.
Tite & Company, located at 620 Johnson street. This is one of the wideawake, aggressive business concerns
now operating in Victoria, ancl at the
same time it is one whose success
reflects with credit upon those who
have charge of its affairs. The firm of
Tite & Company is best known to our
readers as dealers in wall paper,
paints, painters supplies, etc., and as
painters, decorators, paper-hangers
and manufacturers of all kinds of
signs, window slips, etc. They also
make a specialty of interior theatrical decorations and in this respect as
in others they maintain a position
of leadership. Tbe management of
the firm is in the hands of men of
long experience and sound business
judgment. They have great faith in
Victoria and as the city grows the
firm is developed to take care of the
increased business.
with the growth and development of
the city, it is essential that mention
be made of the Standard Steam Laundry, Limited. This is the largest and
most up-to-date laundry in the city
and at the same time it is one of thc
most reliable, having attained an enviable reputation for prompt and satisfactory service. The Standard was
established in a modest way some six
years ago. From the very first clay
of its business career, the object of
tlle management has been to do the
best work possible, and increase the
efficiency and enlarge the capacity of
tlle plant as business warranted. The
result of this policy is exemplified
in the present modern plant, in which
over $20,000 has been expended during the past year in new equipment
and where 45 people are employed
preparing laundry that five wagons
are kept busy delivering. The Standard makes a specialty of quick delivery work, having adopted the latest
methods for handling ancl taking care
of the transcient trade. They also
specialize on hotel and family flat
work and in this respect as in others,
they hold a position of leadership,
being fully equipped to do their work
in a prompt and satisfactory manner.
The management of thc laundry is in
the hands of Mr. H. R. Savage, a
gentleman too well known to need
words of introduction, lt is enough*
to state that his experience, push and
energy have been important factors
in advancing the laundry to its 'present   state   of   perfecti 'i,   and   as   a
booster he  has  always  been  to  tH
fore where the interests of the cij
have been involved.   The Standard
located at 841 View street, phone 101I
Establishment
C. H. Smith
A Favorite Trading Place
That the old established business I
C.  H.  Smith was  entirely destroy!
by fire in November of 1910 is nl
decipherable at this time.   In fact tl
firm is transacting a larger volume I
business at the present writing thi
at any time since their inception, al
their stock is bigger and more up-f
date than it was before the great dl
aster which  wiped  out of existenl
for the  time  being,  several  of  V|
toria's   leading  business   institutio
Particularly  is  this  true  of  the
department,   where   the   display
water     colours,     fac-simile     watl
colours,   photo   gravetures,   carboil
platinotypes,    hand-coloured    gra\|
tures,  etc.,  call forth  expressions
admiration   from   the   patrons   al
visitors to the establishment.    Till
stock of kodaks, photographs, stippll
and art goods of various descripti|
is  also   extensive.    The   firm   is
cated in a two-story building at.
Fort Street, almost opposite their,
location.   Their display rooms wh|
occupy the lower or ground floor
tastefully arranged.   The upper sti|
is utilized by the picture framing .
developing and printing departmetl
and in these lines the firm occupie|
position of leadership.   Mr. Smith, 1
head of the firm, deserves great
for the  manner  on  which  the  li|
has recovered  from the loss of
year.    He  is  an  able business  m|
and a progressive booster where
interests of Victoria are involved.
J. L. Punderson
Company
The   firm   of   J.   L.   Punderson I
Company  has  only been  establislj
about three months, but in that sh
time   they   have   demonstrated   th|
ability as contractors and builders
are worthy of mention in any edit
depicting the building activity, grov
and   prosperity   of   Victoria.      1|
company   confines   itself   entirely
building ancl selling residences, btl
ness blocks, etc., for which  it ful
isbes  the  money.    Their plan  is I
sell on the instalment plan the buil
ing  they   erect,   and   being   satisff
with    small    profits    they   have
trouble in disposing of their prop|
ties, within  a  few days  of the
they are placed on the market.
J.    L.    Punderson,    an    experiencj
builder and contractor gives the bu
ness his personal attention.    The
fices of. the company are located
the corner of Fort and Qrt^dra streej THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
A Christmas Present that gives
pleasure all year round
Sectional Bookcases
in all Finishes
The Baxter, Johnson
Company
721 Yates Street Victoria
Rooms 1 & 2 Green Bldg.
Cor. Broad St. & Trounce Ave.
C. Elwood Watkins
Architect
Telephones: Office 2188, Res. L1398
Victoria, B. C.
Telephone No. 5
P. O. Drawer No. 674
W. Curtis Sampson
Chartered Accountant, Auditor,
Assignee, Liquidator,
Etc.
Tel. Address: 'Sampson," Victoria
1219 Langley St.
"The Paint and Varnish House
of Victdria"
The Staneland Co.
Limited
Paint Makers
Paint Makers.    Wholesale & Retail
Dealers in Painters'
Supplies
Sole Agents in B. C. for
Burrell's Warranted Genuine English White
Lead and Linseed Oil. Pratt & Lambert's
Varnishes. "Duresco" Washable Water Paint
The Staneland Co., Ltd.
Victoria        Prince Rupert
An Ideal English Gentleman's Country Home
FOR SALE—THE SURREY FARM—as a going concern stocked
with the finest Thoroughbred Stock; 140 acres of first class bottom
land mostly cleared and under cultivation; good Fruit and Garden,
roses and shrubs; 10-roomed modern bungalow with hot and cold
water and toilet; 5-room dwelling for help; new and up-to-date barn
and concrete cow stables; concrete creamery, ancl hog pen; thoroughbred Holstein cows and young stock; fine poultry runs stocked
with the finest Pit Game Fowl in the world, steel tested and proven;
thoroughbred Yorkshire pigs; water, piped from a living spring to
the house and buildings: a first class Trout Lake is part of the
property and this ranch is considered the finest Pheasant ranch in
B. C; fine team of young Clyde mares, waggons, seeder, plows and
all implements necessary for a first class place, also creamery utensils,
etc.; situate one mile from Tyee Siding on the E. & N. Railway.
Further particulars on application.
Price $25,000 on Terms
McPherson & Fullerton Bros.
Owners 618 Trounce Ave. Victoria
New Business
Enterprise/flr
Victoria
Mr. Albert H. Maynard, for fifty
years associated with the photographic supply business of the city,
enters the automobile field.
Immediately after the first of the
year a new business concern will
make its inception at 701 Pandora
Street, whose purpose will be to conduct an up-to-date automobile sales
agency and garage. At its head will
appear the name of Mr. Albert H.
Maynard, a gentleman for over half
a century identified with the business
life of Victoria, as an extensive
dealer in photographic supplies ancl
apparatus, and well known in business
circles throughout the province as a
gentleman of ability and progressive-
ness. The new firm will make a
strong bid for the automobile business of the city. They have already
had plans drawn for a modern garage and repair department and expect
to have the building erected and
ready for business early in the spring
of 1912. They will make a specialty
of the "Jackson Car," for which they
have secured the sole agency for
Vancouver Island. In selecting the
Jackson, Mr. Maynard delved deep
into the merits of the car, as compared with other cars now on the
market. He even went so far as to
send a special representative east for
the purpose of visiting the various
automobile factories and give the different cars a complete personal inspection. This resulted in the Jackson being selected as the car best
adapted, and most suitable, from the
standpoint of durability, to withstand
the wear and tear of constant travel
over the roads of this country. The
moderate price at which the car is
sold also commended it to Mr. Maynard. One car-load of the "Jackson
Cars" has been ordered, ancl will be
shipped to him at the earliest date
possible. A demonstrating car will
arrive in Victoria about the middle
of January. The success which has
attended Mr. Maynard during the
long time he has been in business
in this city, stamps him a gentleman
of sound ancl capable ability and insures the success of his new venture.
At the same time he will continue
his business of photographic supplies
ancl apparatus at 715 Pandora Street,
ancl here no doubt he will meet with
the same success in the future that
has been his in the past.
The Majestic
Theatre
One   of   Victoria's   Popular   Amusement Houses
Thc citizens of Victoria are proud
of the Majestic Theatre ancl the high
standard of excellence it maintains
as a moving picture house of the better
class. Located at 564 Yates street the
Majestic is splendidly equipped and
arranged for the comfort of the patrons, while the subjects illustrated
are representative of exquisite scenery, renowned events and epochs of
history and the world, the weird
charms of yesterday, the life-stirring
incidents of today, some culled from
the majestic beauty and grandure of
nature and some from the lighter
arena of fun, fancy ancl frolic, where
thc imagination loves to roam at random. It affords an entertainment
which deserves and we are pleased to
say receives the commendation of
the citizens of Victoria as is evidenced by the liberal patronage accorded it each afternoon and night
during the week. The films are
changed three times each week, so
there is always a new show at
the Majestic. For a pleasant evening's entertainment it offers one of
the best attractions in the city, as
those who are regular patrons will
admit.
Real Xmas
Gifts
In making holiday gifts to your family and friends
select something that will remind them of you
long after the festive season is past, something
that will delight and provide entertainment for
them always.   We would suggest
Player Pianos    -    $550 to $1000
Pianos   -   -   -   - $275 to $1000
Columbia Hornless Grapho-
phones - $30, $45, $65 to $250
Columbia Double-Disk Records by
the World's Best Artists
Fletcher Bros.
Victoria's Largest and Oldest
Music House
1231 Government St.
Victoria, B. C.
Gavin H. Burns
Phone 2624
W. Wallace Grime
Phone 2625
P. O. Box 684
Gavin H. Burns and
W. Wallace Grime
Brokers
Timber Lands, Coal Lands, Agricultural Lands, City Property,
Mines, Investments
Cor. of Government £# Fort Streets
{Over C. P. R. Ticket Office) Victoria THE WEEK, SATURDAY/DECEMBER 23,1911
BUILDING O U T L O O K
Remarkable Buildiftg Activities in 'Victoria
During"the Past Year  r ._
More building has been undertaken
in Victoria during the past twelve
months than in any previous two
years in the city's history. This fact
is self evident and is further borne
out by the value of the permits issued. This year's permits have
totalled well over $4,000,000. In
1910 the total was $2,141,255. During 1909 the value of permits issued
only reached $1,601,120.
Indeed it may be stated that the
past year has witnessed a remarkable
change in the general appearance of
the city. Hitherto with a few notable
exceptions, there were few structures
of any size. Now six-storey buildings are becoming common and the
business area is rapidly assuming a
more metropolitan aspect.
Buildings Completed During ign
Of the buildings which have beeii
completed during the year perhaps
the most important is the Sayward
block erected at a cost of $200,000.
The ground floor has provided premises for a number of stores, the
removal of which to that point has
had the general effect of diverting a
large amount of the Government
Street business to Douglas Street.
The remaining five storeys are occupied by offices and that accommodation for these is much in demand is
illustrated by the rapidity with whicii
this new block was filled.
Another structure completed this
year was the Westholme Hotel of
four storeys. The Prince George hotel on Douglas Street is now almost
finished. The block on Douglas
Street for Messrs. Marymont & Bradshaw, costing $150,000, is well under
way and will be ready by Spring. A
number of apartment houses have
been put up and it is a hopeful sign
that all these have been well filled.
The brightest outlook of all, however, is to be found in the activity
which has    characterised    the latter
months of the year. Chief in tllis
is the commencement of work on yet
another wing to the Empress Hotel
which when complete will have cost
$250,000. A new Union Club is being erected at a cost of $200,000 on
Humboldt and Gordon Streets. A
new block for the Union Bank of
Canada is about to be commenced
on Government and View and these
it is estimated will cost $180,000.
Messrs. Fullerton and Elliot are
building a six storey block on the
corner of Broad and View which is
now well under way and which it is
estimated will cost $100,000 when finished. Preparations are afoot for the
erection of a large block on the Belmont site, at the corner of Government and Humboldt Streets—and it
is stated that this structure will cost
$300,000. Other buildings of a smaller nature are either being erected
or have been projected for Fort
Street between Douglas and Cook,
and last and by no means least operations have been started on the additions to the Parliament Buildings,
additions which, when finally completed in the course of years, will
have cost the province upwards of
$2,500,000.
The Forecast for 1912 Very
Promising
The foregoing indicates what is in
hand; In addition it is probable that
the new year will see other projects
afoot whicii will mean much towards
the upbuilding of the city. The Hudson's Bay Company during the coming Spring will commence work on a
new departmental store on Douglas
Street on the site whicii they recently
acquired. This structure will cost
something in the neighbourhood of
half a million and will be equal to
anything in the same line this side
of Winnipeg. The Grand Trunk Pacific is expected to commence on
their hotel on the James Bay site pur
chased upwards of a year ago, Ru-
niouf,, and^ evidently substantial/rumour, has it that the Canadian Northern railroad will also erect a palatial hotel, but as yet the location of
this is unknown though. it, is generally assigned to some point in the
Esquimalt district in the immediate
vicinity of the proposed terminals of
the railway on the Island. A new
post office and a new court house are
also spoken of, and at least one of
these will eventuate in the near future. A large hotel is projected for
Government Street on the site of the
present Windsor saloon. Messrs.
Grant & Lineham will erect a store
and office block on Douglas street.
These are a few of the buildings
which are practically certain to be
under way before the new year is
half over, and the activity which has
marked the declining months of the
present year it is anticipated will be
continued in an increasing ratio.
In addition to structures in the
business area there has been immense
activity in residential districts. Never
before have so many residences gone
up and even still the supply is altogether inadequate to the demand.
New suburbs have been created, numerous areas thrown open by subdivision, and the civic authorities have
been unable to keep pace in the matter of providing the necessary facilities caused through building activity.
In the residential area immediately
adjacent to the city perhaps the most
interesting event has been the purchase of the Uplands Farm for $1,-
500,000 by a syndicate of French capitalists. This in the form of subdivision is now being broken up into
streets and it will undoubtedly eventually become one of the most attractive suburban areas within immediate
hail of the city.
Outside capital is flowing into the
city and is being invested in buildings which are bringing high returns.
There is not a vacant store and there
is hardly a vacant residence throughout the city. The situation here in
this respect is probably unequalled
on the continent.   The opening up of
View Street has led to building activity on that centre, and one of the
features of the year has been the
trend of* business towards Douglas
and away from Government Street.
There is every indication that this
movement will continue, and that
Douglas Street will soon be the central business artery of the city.
In building circles the outlook was
never better. The optimism is ■ well
based if the activity now evident is
any criterion of what the future has
in store.
Stewart Williams
Auctioneer, Valuator, Appraiser
Real Estate (st Commission
Broker
The above heading briefly describes
the business operations of Mr. Stewart Williams, though it fails to accredit him with the important part
he has taken in the development of
the city and community. For as a
progressive wide-a-wake citizen he
has been closely associated with all
movements advanced in the interest
of Vancouver Island, and incidentally he has built up an extensive business as an auctioneer, appraiser, real
estate and commission broker. He
has only been established for a little
over six years, but in that brief time
he has acquired an enviable reputation as a man of wide knowledge and
mature judgment in all matters pertaining to the business of auctioneer,
appraiser and valuator. His office ancl
salesrooms are located at 637 Fort
Street, and here Mr. Williams can be
found always ready for regular business or to answer an emergency call.
His charge for services rendered are
moderate and the returns are always
above the average, two facts which
have been largely instrumental in
gaining and retaining the confidence
reposed in him by his patrons and
friends.
Standard Stationery j
Company
One of the largest and most up-to-date
stationery concerns in the
Province
Located at 1220 Government Street,
the Standard Stationery Company represents a business institution whicii
stands pre-eminently at the head oi
the   book   and   stationery   establishments operating in the "City of Op
portunities. From its very incipiency
dating  back   over   a   period  of  fivi
years, this firm has trod the path o
progress;   at all times keeping pac
with  the rapid  growth  of  the  city
by enlarging their stock and caterinj
to the public with;the latest and mos
up-to-date  line  of  staple  and fane;
stationery on the market.   Especiall
does  this  apply  to  their  splendidl
assorted stock of books, fancy good:
toys, novelties, postcards, etc., whic
is   one  of  the  largest  in  the  Pre
vince, both in  quality and diversity
They  also  deal  extensively in  can
eras,  kodaks  and  photographic  sui
plies of most modern type.   The vet
satisfactory business which has bee
built   up   by   tiie   company   may   b
traced   to  the   dependable   method
employed in all their business trai
sactions,  the   non-competitive  prici
whicii allow the firm only a reasoi
able  profit,  ancl the  able manner
which the operations of the instit'
tion are governed by those who a
in direct charge of its affairs.   To s;
the least its    success    reflects wi
credit upon Messrs. J. E. Huxtabl
H. T. Knott and A. S. Huxtable, t
well known and popular members
the firm.   They have succeeded in d
veloping   a big    business enterpritl
while at the same time exerting the
efforts in aiding the growth of V:
toria.     Remember,   if   it   its   bool
fancy goods, toys, etc., the Standa
Stationery Company can satisfy yc
wants.
The British Columbia
Land and Investment
Agency, Limited
(A British Company)
Real Estate, Financial
and Insurance Agents
Estates Managed.    Fire Insurance: Phoenix of London
Your Country Home
Gordon Head
922 Government Street, Victoria
Head Office:
20 Essex Street, Strand, London
Eight Acres, situate only a few hundred yards from the waterfront and only
five miles from Victoria City Hall, with over a thousand fruit trees and
ten thousand strawberry plants, all in full bearing and in an excellent
condition of cultivation There is a large, extra well built 8-roomed house
(cost over three thousand to build), large stable and barn, packing houses,
Chinaman's house, chicken houses and runs, all in first class repair. The
Government driveway around Victoria City and environments passes immediately in front of the property. Surrounding properties are held as high
as $2,000 per acre without anything like the improvements on this house.
The land has a gentle slope to the roadway affording splendid drainage, and
commands a good view. With the improvements the fine condition of the
house and outbuildings, and the exceedingly low price, this is the suburban
homesite property par excellence near town. The road to Gordan Head is
excellent and one can motor to town in 20 to 25 minutes. It is well known
that the B. C. Electric Co. will be running cars out there before long, perhaps
next year, when the property we are now offering will be considered an
absolute gift at the figure.
Price $12,500.00.  Any Reasonable Terms
Pemberton & Son
Cor. Fort & Broad Sts.
Vietoria, B. C.
r THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
William Dunford & Son
Builder of Dunford Bungalows
There are many firms and many individuals whose names are best
known to the public by the product
they produce. If we speak of a safety razor, we think of the name Gillette, tea has made the name of Lipton famous and breakfast foods suggest the name of Post.   This is a con-
prospects of various cities in British
Columbia they selected Victoria as
their basin of operations. A fact
which bespeaks their admirable business sense. The firm entered an unknown field, bought land ancl erected
thereon modern bungalows, which
were   sold   on   the  installment  plan
A DUNFORD BUNGALOW
dition which exists in practically
every country where specializing in
business is carried on, and Victoria
is no exception, for here if we men-
;ion the word Bungalow the firm of
Wm. Dunford & Son immediately
:omes to mind. And, well it should,
for this firm is one of the oldest and
nost reputable home building con-
:erns operating in British Columbia.
[t is a matter of some four years
iince the firm made its inception, and
>ecame an important factor in the
milding activity of Victoria, as contactors and investment specialists.
These years have witnessed a won-
lerful change in the residential sec-
ion of the city, largely due to the
Activity of this firm, an activity made
possible by the remarkable demand
tor residences of the bungalow type
fnd design of construction. Wm.
Kunford & Son were formerly in the
lumber business in Winnipeg. They
lonceived the idea of devoting their
lttention and capital to home build-
lig purposes, and after carefully in-
lestigating    the    opportunities    and
at a small profit. They met with even
greater success than they anticipated
and while the business as carried on
at the present time is practically the
same as the time of their inception it
has developed beyond their fondest
expectation. They have practically
built up Chamberlain and Fell streets
and the Oak Bay district, and many
of the finest homes in the city are of
their creation. During the past year
they have averaged one bungalow
every nine days, and the firm states
that each one of these has been sold
before the date of its completion.
Certainly this is evidence of the wonderful growth of Victoria, ancl besides
it gives one a fair idea of the popularity and demand for the homes
erected by this firm. And the company deserves the success which has
attended their efforts. They endeavour to give their customers value received, by constructing their bungalows in the best and most modern
manner possible. With this end in
view Mr. Dunford, senior, makes annual trips to  California and various
sections of the United States to
gather new ideas for the design and
construction of Dunford Bungalows,
which are erected and sold complete
for sums from $3,500 to $4,500 each,
though there are homes in the city
designed ancl built by the firm at a
cost of over $8,000. They operate upon the basis of "Not how cheap, but
how good," they can erect a modern
residence ancl keep the price within
the reach of the man of moderate
circumstances. The firm also does
a general real estate business. This
department is handled in a most capable manner by Mr. F. R. Carlow.
Another feature of their business and
one whicii promises great success is
their ready to stock poultry ranches,
fully equipped with runs and the necessary buildings. The offices of the
firm are located in the Pemberton
building, Suite 231-2-3.
British Columbia Salvage
Company, Limited
The above is one of Victoria's most
important companies, the name alone
describing the laudable objects of the
concern. The Company are owners
of the steamers "Salvor," "Wm. Jo-
liffe," and "Maude," which are all
equipped with the momst modern
plants for salvage. They employ in
their work hydraulic jacks, blocks
and falls with a capacity from 5 to 20
tons, ancl all divers working for them
are men of the highest ability and experience, so that any work entrusted
to them is certain to be done thoroughly and carefully. The Company
are agents for Suter Hartmann and
Rathjens compositions, besides always
having in .stock a large supply of
naval stores, paints ancl anti-fouling
composition. The managing director
of the Company is Mr. H. F. Bullen.
Opportunity is knocking at your
door. If you doubt it investigate the
claims as set forth by the Real Estate firms whose advertisements appear in this Edition.
J. E. Smart & Company
Acquires Connections in London—Will bring
Large Amount of English Capital
into This Section of the
Country
The intrinsic value of an institution
or firm of any kind, is largely determined by the interest it takes and the
part it plays in the development and
prosperity of the community at large,
and especially the city in which it is
located. Fortunately Victoria possesses a great many business firms,
corporations ancl individuals, always
identified with such movements as
are from time to time advanced for
the purpose of portraying the great
advantage the city has to offer in the
way of investments and in all lines of
trade and industry, and among these
the firm of J. E. Smart & Company
occupies an enviable position. With
offices in the Pemberton Building,
Rooms 405-406, this company carries
on a general insurance ancl investment business. The insurance written by them includes fire, life, accident, sickness, liability, guarantee
bonds, burglary, plate glass, etc. As
investment brokers they confine themselves almost entirely to buying and
selling city property, and it is in this
respect that the company is so closely allied with the growth of Victoria.
They are judiciously investing foreign capital in city real estate, a fact
made possible owing to the valuable
connections made by Mr. Smart during his recent visit to London, where
he succeeded in convincing strong
financial interests that Victoria is indeed the "City of Opportunities." An
office was established at 837 Salisbury House, London, E. C, ancl almost immediately thereafter English
capital was placed at the disposal of
the firm for investment purposes with
Victoria as thc base of operations.
This money is being invested carefully ancl where prospects offer the1
best possible results. The firm also
manages estates, effect loans and collect interest ancl rents ancl carry on
a general realty business. They are
responsible and thoroughly reputable
in their business dealings and while
progressive they are conservative
where the interests of their clients
are involved.
The Occidental
Hotel
Offers    Excellent    Accommodations
There is nothing more essential to
the growth and expansion of any city
than ample hotel accommodation.
And certainly Victoria has a splendid
array of hotels from the grand and
magnificent to the middle class commercial establishments. Among her
many well equipped hotels is The
Occidental, which has served an important purpose in her development.
This hotel has an accommodation of
38 rooms, which are well heated, ventilated and furnished. The management caters to the working classes,
ancl consequently the rates are
moderate. However, this does not
mean that the comfort of the guest
has been overlooked, for iu fact the
hotel is convenient in every particular. Mr. Anderson, the proprietor, is
well known as a gentleman of genial
personality, always alive to the interests and wants of his guests. A bar
is operated in connection with The
Occidental, where choice wines,
liquors ancl cigars are dispensed by
courteous and obliging mixologists.
The location is the corner of Johnson  and  Wharf  streets.
Victoria is destined to be one of
the most important shipping and
manufacturing centres on the Western Coast of North America—a broad
assertion but a true prophecy.
Gillespie, Hart
& Todd, Limited
General Insurance and Real Estate Agents
REAL ESTATE DEPT.
Mortgages, Rents Collected, Estates
Managed and Real Estate
Investments
INSURANCE DEPT.
Fire, Marine, Automobile, Employers'
Liability, Accident, Sickness,
Elevator, Plate Glass
& Bonds
1115 Langley St.     Vietoria, B. C.
INVESTORS
We are the Fiscal Agents for British Investments, Limited, owners of 150 x 120 feet on
Cormorant Street, opposite the City Hall, Victoria, V. I. This property is improved with
buildings containing seven stores beside the
upper stories and these are leased on terms
up to 3 years, bringing in a total rental of
$12,816.00 per year. This sum is sufficient
to pay 6 p. c. dividends yearly on the investment and the increase in the value of the
property will amount to 10 p. c. to 15 p. c.
more annually. Inside business property in
a growing city like Victoria is surely one of
the best investments a person can make.
Write us for further particulars.
BEVAN, GORE & ELIOT, LTD.
Member Victoria Real Estate Exchange
222 Sayward Bldg. Telephone 2470 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
Excellent Opportunities for Investment in Real Estate
The firm upward tendency of real
estate values on Vancouver-Island is
but the natural consequence of conditions of a substantial and permanent nature. Though this upward
movement has been so marked as to
be extremely satisfactory to owners
and investors, and has in many instances yielded extraordinary profits,
yet values in Victoria are still lower
than in any other city on the Pacific
Coast of similar size or with similar
resources and prospects, and the same
comparison applies to the Island in
general. Furthermore, the industrial
and commercial development of this
"treasure house of the Pacific" is
proceeding upon an ever larger and
larger scale and will ensure a continual advance in the value of well
situated real property.
A few years ago neither the Canadian Pacific Railway nor the Canadian Northern was interested in a
mile of railway on the Island.    To
day they havc embarked upon construction which will include hundreds
of miles of main line and many branch
lines. A large amount of work has
already been completed and the rest
is being vigorously carried forward
Millions of acres of virgin territory,
rich in resources of all sorts, are being opened up. Almost magically,
as it were, they have been discovered to the world and made commercially accessible, while two great
transportation companies, with worldwide connections in the realm of capital and investment, have become interested in the utilization and development of these resources. Capital
is flowing into industrial enterprises
large and small, into colonization,
mining, fisheries and manufactures.
The Island is in the lusty infancy of
an era of industrial and commercial
expansion.
Expansion  will  continue along all
the new railway lines completed and
under construction. New towns and
many subsidiary industries will spring
as they have sprung up on the prairie
lines built primarily to develop the
single industry of agriculture. All
of this development contributes to the
business done in Victoria as well as
to the general business of the Island
and its towns as a whole.
Of comparatively recent date also
is the fuller realization and utilization of the advantages of Victoria
as the port best istuated on the North
Pacific Coast. Apart from the development in tlle Island, this alone would
be sufficient to ensure the continued
and extensive growth of the city.
So far as the trade of thc interior
of tiie continent is concerned, Victoria has the same advantages as a
mainland port, in that freight cars
run into Victoria from points such as
Montreal, Winnipeg and Calgary,
and from Victoria to such points;
while the freight rates between Vic
toria and points in the interior of
the province are the same as in the
case of mainland ports. In addition
Victoria has decided advantages possessed by no other port, and shippers, manufacturers and wholesale
houses can find in Victoria advantages to be found nowhere else.
All vessels for either Vancouver
and New Westminster or for Seattle
and Tacomam must first pass by Victoria which lies some scores of miles
nearer the open ocean and with clear
sailing thereto. It is therefore a port
of call for both streams of traffic
and not for one alone. In other
words more lines of vessels and more
individual ships call at Victoria than
at any other of these ports. The
advantage of this to the shipper, the
manufacturer, and the merchant is
obvious.
Victoria, again, lying so much
nearer the outer ocean, and with no
intervening islands or peninsulas,  is
Where is Coquitlam?
It is thc terminus or garage for
all steam trains coming to British
Columbia coast towns via C. P. R.
railways and the starting point for
the great electric system which is to
spin a web over the coastwise cities
of   B.  C.
Why is Coquitlam the place? This
is geographically answered, but cannot be told without the inevitable
"Because." Coquitlam is in the way of
everything that everyone wants to do
and like thc dollar bill you cannot
get around it without using it.
When the B. C. Electric invested
four or five millions of dollars in Coquitlam lake power plant The Burg
was on the spot.
When the Stave Lake plant drank
up a similar sum low Coquitlam
•caught the drops.
All you have to ask is the $10,000,-
000 already in Coquitlam to lie
idle and the dividend on these bonds
to go unpaid, while the workshop
stands idle? The answer is given by
thc C. P. R. who is to spend $7,000,-
000 more to start the wheels of the
industrial workshop. The answer is
echoed by the Dominion Government
who by the support of millions of
dallars, said: "Let there be light," at
Coquitlam. "Let there bc traffic on
our greatest river of fresh water for
ever."   Let the mainland ship, grain,
lumber, fish and fruit to Panama and
the world from this natural storehouse of power and plenty. Coquitlam Industrial Trackage Subdivision is as stubborn as its mother and
cannot be moved an inch. It is in
lot 384A bounded on the soutii by
the Government street to Vancouver,
by the live C. P. R. tracks laden with
cars, by the station and stores now
like bee hives, lt is bounded on the
east by the main street running to
the New Westminster waterworks
with a 24 in. and a 16 in. main now
laid, and by the power lines and wires
of the B. C. Electric. On the west by
the saw-mills and contains in itself
trackage for industrial sites.
And this is what we wish to call to
your personal attention. We believe
two years will place these lots at
unbelievable figures. One week more
will see them sold as far as we are
concerned, but this one week will be
your chance to make a fortune with
$60 to $loo payment on a $500 to
$1,000 lot, with $10 to $20 to pay
monthly and interest at 6 per cent.
Who can say it is beyond his means?
You can, but you wont. Go to 304
Pemberton Block at once. W. C.
Bond, sole agent for Coquitlam Industrial Trackage Subdivision, Part
Section 384A.
Gonzales Park, One of Nature's Beauty Spots
A Picturesque Residential Locality, Commanding the Finest View
in the World.    The Firm of C. C. Pemberton have
Much to offer Prospective Residents
"Victoria has been referred to as
the spot that lingers longest in the
memory of the tourist." Its delightful climate, which is unsurpassed,
never enervating, always invigorating, with an average daily sunshine
of seven hours for seven months in
the year, its rugged natural beauty,
beautiful drives and parks, excellent
educational facilities and religious advantages, combined with other attractions, too numerous to mention, long
ago made it a place never to be forgotten by visitors, or forsaken by
those who have once called it home.
As is only natural, with the growth
of Victoria, from the village of yesterday to the city of today the demand for residential property, eminently adapted for the selection of
homes where the high standard of
comfort and pleasure can be maintained has increased. Many of the
choicest sections such as Rockland
Avenue which heretofore has been
the chief residential section of this
city have been built up. There are
still a few remaining, and in the foreground of these is Gonzales Heights.
This is undoubtedly tiie most beautiful residential location in Victoria,
commanding as it does the finest
view in the world, within easy walking distance    of the    city's business
centre. It overlooks the beautiful
Straits of Juan de Fuca, called after
the celebrated Spanish explorer,
whose mythical story of discovery
of an ocean passage through the
North American Continent from the
Pacific to the Atlantic Ocean proves
to have foundation in the existence
of this Mediterranean of the Pacific.
Mount Baker, the Fugjiama of all,
on all local picture cards, and even
the towering crag of Mount Rainier
or Tacoma, 140 miles distant on Puget
Sound, the Olympian Range, Washington's National Park, and the
jagged peaks of the Cascade Range
extending to Vancouver City, and
never-ending vistas of Inland sunlit
seas surrounding the thousand isles
of the San Juan Archipelago.
To traverse Gonzales Heights Subdivision is to secure a picture, which
once painted upon the soul's canvas
can never be effaced. This choice
property is being placed upon the
market by the well-known firm of C.
C. Pemberton whose offices are located at 601 Sayward Block. In Gonzales Park they are offering to the
public a sub-division that has every
requirement as a residential section,
at prices within the reach of the man
of moderate means.
In the near future they expect to
easily and safely accessible, and ov
ing to its almost complete freedoij
from mthe fog can readily be an
proached at all seasons of the yeal
Reached from    the    ocean by tl|
Straits of Juan de Fuca, ten or tweij
ty  miles  wide  and   of  great   dept|
there are no shallow channels and
dangerous shoals   to   circumnavigalj
Vessels of the greatest draught ca
enter all but the inner harbor wi|
absolute  ease.    This  will  be  of
creased importance as the completii
of the Panama Canal brings in to
cific waters vessels of much greatj
draught than have hitherto been eg
ployed.
Other causes contributing to the :
creased population and busines
Victoria and the neighbouring p;
the Island might be mentioned,
growth of manufactures from lol
raw materials has been very markl
The capital of a vast and rich pi
vince, the growth of the business |
government means an increase in
number of civil servants here r\
dent. Railway construction in
neighbouring agricultural areas
the extension of radial electric
lines is resulting in the cutting I
of large farms into small holditj
whose occupants and cultivators
ready to hand one of the best tr|
kets in North America. Similar
division and occupancy by s
holders is going on in other parts]
the Island where like conditions
vail. For example in the vicinitj
Duncan, Ladysmith, Nanaimo, Sol
Colwood and Metchosin. It will!
cur also in still other districts
railway and tramway constructio|
extended.
The  chief  movement in real
perty in  the  past year has  beeil
such subdivisions, in other subdi|
ions  caused    by    the    expansion]
mining, manufacturing and lumber]
by the creation of new towns,
by the increased value of propertl
the central districts of this city|
of other old established towns.
spend considerable sums of
for various improvements, onl
which will be the extension arl
the eastern shore of Gonzales Hel
of one of the finest auto driva
Canada the famed "Beach Drivq
connect with Dallas Road.
The excellent location and de
bility of this property makes it
of the  "Real  Estate  Snaps"  ofl
year and  the public  should  nol
too slow in taking advantage o\
opportunity presented them.
Mr. Pemberton is also recordil
large number of sales of Hardyl
property    in    Northern    Vancc|
Island,  and  the  advertised  ter
of the C. P. R. extension to the
end of this Island.    To those |
may be unacquainted with C. C.
berton & Company a few wordsl
tive to the personality of the firnl
be of interest.   It is composed o|
C.   C.   Pemberton   and   Mr.
Blaikie, gentlemen well-known ir
toria as men of integrity and al|
progressive where the interests *
City  are  involved,  but  conserv
where the welfare of their clierl
concerned.    Their long residenJ
Victoria, and their association j
the business affairs of the city
fy them admirably for the po^
they  occupy in  the  business
of today.   They have in the past ,
liberally to advance the growtlij
prosperity of the city, and at the
sent  time  they  are  playing  anl
portant  part  in  residential   dev|
ment of the community.. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
THE STREAM OF GOLD Has Already Begun to Pour Into
COQUITLAM
The Gold of Capital which Employs Labor and Builds Cities
A large body of men are busy clearing land for the Canadian Pacific Railway terminals,
linemen are erecting telegraph poles to supplement those already in use. Gangs of
laborers are grading and ditching—the municipality has installed a gigantic rock-
crushing machine to crush rock for roads now under construction—a small town has
built  up around the tracks, consisting of rooming houses, restaurants and dwellings.
Coquitlam is in a State oi
Feverish Activity
The hundreds of men now at work on improvements in Coquitlam are uniting their
efforts with hundreds of thousands of dollars now being invested in Coquitlam in
paving the way to make Vancouver's great industrial sub-city fulfil the artist's vision
embodied in this sketch.
Transportation, Rail & Water, will
Make Coquitlam Great
Again we call your attention to this vital truth—at Coquitlam, and nowhere else in
the metropolitan district, are there to be found all the elements for the up-building of
a great industrial center. Coquitlam is a deep water port, fronting on the P'tt Rivef
at its junction with the Fraser River, and in conjunction with the railway terminals, the
river front will develop into a busy shipping district. The navigation advantages
supplemented by an immense car storage, proximity to the great world city of
Vancouver, cheap electric power furnished by two large electric power companies,
extensive industrial trackage systems, ancl level land must in the very nature of
things bring in hundreds and thousands of people whose source of employment will
be independent of the railroad company.
Buy Near the Terminals
We are the original and recognized townsite owners. We have "put Coquitlam on the
map." We sold the terminal property to the Railway Company. We own 85 per cent,
of the land in the general district immediately surrounding the terminals—the region
the public has come to know as the townsite. We emphasize this fact because the
municipality of Coquitlam is twenty-four times as large as the townsite and you may
buy a lot in "Coquitlam" and still be miles and miles away from the only district
which will be directly benefited by the great development taking place at Coquitlam.
Invest in a City with Its
Career Before It
The men who bought lots in Vancouver three or four years ago have no reason to
complain of the earning power of their money. Yet their profits, large though they
may seem to you, are likely to be paralleled many times in Coquitlam, during the next
few years. Opportunity entreats you to accept her favors. We cannot impress you
too strongly that this is a great—perhaps final—opportunity to invest in a coming
city whose destinies are guided by men of substance and judgment, when its expansion
is before it—not behind it. If possible, call at our office and have a personal talk
with us, but if not, send the coupon below for booklet, maps and full  particulars.
Shaughnessy, James' Park, St. Mary's Heights & First
Division Lots Now on Sale (Greenwood and
Pitt Centre Sold Out)
COQUITLAM IS NOW
PROGRESSING FAST
Work in All Directions—Ledger-wood Laying Track—Cotton Cleaning Land
—Municipal Rock-Crusher Nearly Ready
FASTER THAN VANCOUVER
Coquitlam's Population Increases 300 Per Cent, in a Month—Will be Bigger
Than Westminster in Three Years
(Coquitlam Star, Dec 8,  1911)
Exactly one month ago, Coquitlam's population was estimated at 300 residents. Today it exceeds 900, and by Christmas will
probably be well over the 1,000 mark. At
this rate of increase, which is faster than
Vancouver's in the period following the big
tire, the city will have a population of over
_»o,ooo within thirteen months. This is, of
course, rather too optimistic, but there is no
doubt that thc 20,000 mark will bc passed
before the dawn of 1914. Tbis seems inevitable, for by that time, upwards of seven
thousand workmen, for thc C. P. R. and other
industries, will be living here in company
with, at a moderate estimate, 3,000 commuters. To cater to the wants of this army, the
small number of 10,000 seems hardly enough,
especially when it is considered that in this
number are included the municipal employees.
For any one who doubts the stories of
Coquitlam's progress, the evidence of his own
eyes should be sufficient to convince him
that his doubts were unwarranted. Let him
take a stroll on some week day in December
along the railroad for two miles, up Shaughnessy street and School House Road, and
down Flynt road, and return in a month, and
take the same stroll again. Then he will note
lhe difference.
Far down the railroad track, about where
Broadway will be, Cotton's contractors, a
large body of men, are busy clearing thc
land to the north of tlie track, where Lh'-'
Dewdney trunk road must be removed to
make room for the eighteen tracks to be
built  on that  side of the main  line.
A quarter of a mile west of Cotton's men,
a gang of linemen are busy erecting telegraph posts to supplement those already in
use, and to help carry the commercial conversation that the increasing amount of business on the Pacilic coast makes necessary.
These will be finished within a week.
Towards the Junction another half-mile, two
hundred Chinamen and thirty or forty whites
are engaged in levelling tbe beds of the sidetracks that are, and the sidetracks that arc
lo be, with the aid of an improved ledger-
wood and a thousand or so tons of clay
gravel scooped from the Pitt river bed. A
small town bas built up around the tracks
where the ledgerwood gang is working, consisting of rooming houses, restaurants and individual shacks. Tliis work will be continued
for the most part throughout the winter.
Down the Flynt road, a couple of blocks
from tbe Nort road, another gang of thirty
or forty men are working against time to
complete the tracks and lay the rails to bring
the stone from the Coquitlam river to the
new rock-crushing machine, which the municipality has installed at big expense, to cms1!
the rock for the roads which the municipality
has installed at big expense, to crush the rock
for the roads which the municipality has under construction. When the tracks are laid,
which will probably be by eight days, rocu
will be brought from the river on Hat cars,
pulled by nudes to the machine, crushed and
stored in the immense bunkers that have already   been   built   ready   for   it.
School House road is another centre of
activity this week. A score nf workmen arc
re-making the road with coarse gravel.
Greater Part ot Programme will be Completed
by the End of 1912
Coquitlam "Star,"  December 8,  1911
In a short interview accorded a representative uf tlu* Star in Vancouver Monday,
Vice-President Bury of tlu- Canadian Pacific Railway, who is in the West on a flying trip,
made the following important  statement: ,   .        ,
"Work has begun at Coquitlam. I he companv means business there and intends to
carry out its share of the bargain with tlu* municipality to the letter. In all probability
the greater part of our programme there will be carried through before lhe finish of 191J.
Rapid work on the terminals is Imperative—and thc work and development  will  be rapid.
INFORMATION COUPON
Please   send   me   full   particulars   about   tbe   Industrial
Centre of Coquitlam. >
NAMK   	
ADDRESS   	
Coquitlam Terminal Co., Limited
Coquitlam Townsite Co., Limited
553 Granville St., Leigh-Spencer Building, Vancouver, B. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
Residential, Educational, Religious and
Climatic Advantages
From Atlantic to Pacific, Victoria
the Beautiful is known to all men
through its two foremost characteristics—it is "Victoria, the City of
Homes," and "Victoria, the City of
English Comfort."
The two descriptive titles arc aptly
associated, for no other population
centre in all Western America possesses so distinctive a charm as a
true "home city." Latterly the marked influx of population which has
necessitated the conversion of erstwhile farming areas into compact
squares of 'charming bungalows has
been in a large measure attributable
to the migration hitherwards of well-
to-do residents of the prairie provinces in search of an ideal place of
residence—ideal because combining iii
the fullest degree the essentials of
ilelightful climate, scenic attractive-'
■ncss, superior educational and social
facilities, and delightful environment.
.These same factors go far towards
Jiiaking this provincial Capital City
the favorite tourist resort of Western
Canada.
"Victoria is not a commercial city,"
more than one superficial observer
has said and written,, sensible primarily to the peculiar charm, of the
place in its restful hoine-loving con-*
jent. While this is but partially true
j—the industrial importance of the
pity being non-assertive—it is meant
in jsincerest compliment rather than
th disparagement.
(-Peculiarly Victoria is superlatively
dslightful by natural endowment as
k' place of residence or sojourn. And
With the realization of the various
projects now under way which attest supplementary civic enterprise—
the completion of the comprehensive
street paving programme, associated
with whicii are the provision of many
miles of cement walks, well lighted by
jjiglit, and the planting of hundreds
of shade trees along its extensive
boulevards; the assurance of a thoroughly adequate supply of the purest
water; the erection of such necessary
adjuncts of entertainment as are
found iu the new ice rink and a palatial modern theatre, etc., the natural
advantages of the city for residential
purposes will be made so complete
hy the enterprise of its people that
nothing will be found wanting in Victoria as a City of Homes.
Just what are the special requirements of the perfect place of residence?
Tt must be picturesquely situated.
What more lovely setting has any
town or city of Canada than Victoria,
enthroned at the gateway of the
western sea, overlooked by the eternally snow-covered and forest-clothed
mountains—the radial centre of a multitude of drives, each one of whicii
unfolds its own peculiar panorama
tempting the artist's eye and evoking
his most enthusiastic commendation?
It must possess the essential of an
equable and delightful climate. That
of Victoria—in common with all tlie
southern part of Vancouver Island—
is comparable with that of the south
of England, subject to extremes of
neither heat nor cold, with moderate
rainfall and flowers blooming almost
continually in the open air.
It must provide the best and most
modern facilities for education. Those
of this Capital City are renowned
throughout the Dominion, both in the
excellence of the public school sys-
te mand in the presence of numerous
private and higher schools, academies,
colleges, the graduates of whicii have
year by year attested the thoroughness of their instruction by going out
into the world to fill efficiently the
highest offices in industrial and professional life, public affairs and the
united services.
lt must be sport-loving. What
other town or city of the West is
So endowed by Nature as a centre of
delightful activity in either land or
aquatic pastimes, or what other possesses in its near environment so happy a hunting ground for the nature
lover who wisely elects to while away
his hours of beneficial leisure with
mr! nr trim afi_e_ld_?
It must boast social advantages.
These, as the political Capital and the
centre of naval and military activities
in the West Victoria possesses in
very marked degree.
These be essentials in the abstract.
More than these has Victoria, in its
stately gardens, its charming public
works, its bathing beaches almost
without number, its handsome public
buildings, its characteristic ciyic hospitality and unstudied good comradeship.
Had Victoria been set down, with
its own peculiar characteristics and
charm of individuality, in some western  state, it had been long ere this
famous throughout the continent—the
mecca of a multitude of Summer sojourners and the most popular place
of residence throughout the length of
the Pacific Slope. Modesty has ever
been its bane—the modesty that
shrinks from self-advertisement. Now
that the American public has. through
its own initiative largely, learned to
appreciate the charm of tllis Canadian city at the Pacific's edge, its
growth in residential population of
the better class is certain to advance
vvith rapid strides, the rank and file
of tiie tourist army constituting themselves voluntarily and right gladly its
most efficient champions.
A. P. Blyth, Optometrist and Optician
645 Fort Street
This concern is one of the most
progressive and up-to-date establishments in the optical line. Mr. Blyth
has made practically a life study of
optics, having commenced his career
in.the Old Country^ and been in pracr
tice for over a quarter of a century.
His painstaking, reassuring manner
and: ability in handling. his patients,
combined with' his manifest enthusiasm in the work, have brought his
name to the front in the .optical profession. During the past few years,
in keeping with the growth of Victoria, his. business has greatly increased and constant additions have
been made to his plant and facilities.
In the testing room are all the latest
sight-testing instruments, and no expense has been spared in making this
in every way efficient. One feels, after going through the hands of Mr.
Blyth, that nothing has been overlooked and that the best that science
can do has been done in disclosing,
measuring and correcting the defects
of the eye. In the rear of the premises is the factory in which all prescriptions are made up. Here is undoubtedly one of the finest manufacturing plants on the coast, in which
every form of spectacle lens is ground
and finished by automatic machinery
—Spherical, Cylindrical, Prismatic,
Toric, and Kryptok lenses in every
possible combination.
Mr. Blyth makes a specialty of the
Krygtok bifocal .which is now being made for the first time in Victoria. Those who require two pairs
of glasses—for distance and near—
and who find changing from one to
the other troublesome, should try a
pair of these lenses, which combine
neatness with the convenience of having the two sights ground on one
lens for constant wear. They are
unlike the old-time double lens which
"shews the joining," for in the new
lens the added reading glass cannot
be detected on the face, removing
one of the strongest objections to the
use of this ideal and convenient form
of lens. Those who have a bent for
scientific mechanics would find an inspection of this plant a source of
great interest. Victoria is to be congratulated in having such an establishment in its midst, and a gentleman so well up in a profession that
is so necessary and productive of so
much good to all classes of the community.
E. S. STILES
Has Established an Extensive Trade--His Establishment
Popular with those Desiring Something
Antique
Mr. Stiles, has been established in
business in Victoria for four years
past, and in that short time he has
built up a most lucrative trade, whicii
is constantly increasing. While .his
is in part attributable to his ability
as a business man of the modern
school, his dependable and complete
stock, priced and sold at figures
which defy competition have been the
means of attracting a large patronage
to his establishment, located at 11oo
Fort Street. Mr. Stiles is recognized
as an authority an antique furnishings of every description, and in this
line of business in Europe and Canada he has collected an extensive and
varied assortmemnt uf antiques including furniture, china, brass work
and old prints. These form a part
of his stock, and one piece especially
interesting is a Welch dresser which
dates back to the year 1600. There
are many other pieces which attract
the attention of those possessing
knowledge of or interested in antiques. He also carries some very
handsome reproductions of Sheraton's
work in mahogany satin wood inlay.
Another feature of the business as
carried on by Mr. Stiles is the reproduction of furniture representing that
manufactured at any given period. In
this work he is eminently successful.
He also does upholstering, packing,
removing, leather work, autcioneer-
ing valuating, etc., and recently he
purchased and placed in operation
one of the most powerful vacuum
! cleaners in the city. With this machine he is enabled to give prompt
and satisfactory service in all kinds
of sanitary cleaning, at the least possible financial expense to his patrons,
not to mention the wear anrl tpot* m-*.-
on tiie articles renovated. Personally Mr. Stiles is an effable gentleman
of keen and sound business sense. He
has been a resident of Victoria for
five years past, ancl during that time
he has been intimately connected with
all projects advanced in the interest
of the city.
The Atlantic Hotel
Located at the corner of Johnson
and Broad Streets, in the very business centre of the city, the Atlantic
Hotel offers excellent accommodations to those who from a part of
our transcient population. The Atlantic has forty-two tastefully and
comfortably furnished rooms with
every accessory of baths, etc. The
sitting and reading rooms are excellently arranged and amply commodious. A cafe is operated in connection with the hotel in which one may
secure meals prepared by experienced
chefs and unrivalled for quality and
variety. There is also a bar where
the purest of the best brands of
wines, liquors and cigars are procurable. The rates at the Atlantic are
most reasonable and since Mr. David
Murry entered the hotel as proprietor
and manager its patronage and popularity has been greatly increased,
whicii iu itself bespeaks Mr. Murry's
affability and capability as a hotel and
business man.
TO   PLEASE   EVERYBODY
"And what arc you going to be when
you grow up?"
"Well, after I've been a judge for a while
to  please   mother,   an'   an   admiral   to   please
7 p. c. Guaranteed
on First Mortgages
Rents Collected, Apartments for Rent
Insurance in all its Branches.   We
have a choice listing of business and
residential properties, homes
and acreage.
Timber and wild lands for sale both
oh Vancouver Id. and the mainland.
MONK & MONTEITH, LTD.
Members Victoria Real Estate
Exchange
639 Fort St. Phone 1402
Telephone 2967
Res. Phone 2026
1205 Langley Street
Victoria
Beckett, Major &
Company, Ltd.
Real Estate
Financial and Insurance Agents.
Estates Managed, Rents Collected,
Money to Loan. Lots, Farms,
Acreage, Residences, Islands and
Waterfrontage for Sale.
Mr. F. C. Beckett
Managing Director
Mr. R. J. S. Bateman
Secretary- Treasurer
Established 1858
A. W. Bridgman
Real Estate, Financial
and Insurance
Agent
AGENCIES:
Commercial Union Assurance Co., Ltd.
of London, England
Commercial Union Fire Insurance Co.
of New York
Canada Accident Insurance Co.
Imperial Underwriters' Corporation
Northern Counties  Investment Trust
of Bradford, England
1007 Government St.   Victoria, B. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
For A ll Investments
in B. C. Real Estate, especially
Victoria £# Vancouver
Island
See or Write
Herbert Cuthbert £f
Company
Specialist in City £&f Suburban Real Estate
Members Victoria Real Estate Exchange
Expert Townsite and Subdivision
Auctioneers. Twenty Years
Experience
635 Fort Street
Victoria, B. C.
GORDON
BURDICK
Real Estate and Insurance
Specialist in Oak Bay Property
620 BROUGHTON ST.
PEMBERTON BLOCK
We Are
Selling Agents for Fraser Lake
The Official Townsite of the G. T. P.
Read This Letter
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC
This is to certify that Fraser Lake is the Official Townsite of the
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, situated on Lots 2011 and 617, Coast
District 5, British Columbia, and the Western Lands, Limited, Victoria
and Vancouver, B. C, are the authorized selling agents for same.
It is the intention of the Railway Company to erect a fine station
on this Townsite commensurate to the district it will serve, which will be
erected as soon as the line is completed through this district.
The Company looks upon Fraser Lake as probably one of the very
best Townsites on its line in the Province of British Columbia.
Five per cent, of the gross sales of the Townsite is set aside to be
handed over to the first Board of Trade when duly constituted and when
same has a membership of twenty-five residents in Fraser Lake, this
fund to be used for the development of the Town, advertising resources
of the district, etc.
The Grand Trunk Pacific Railway deny any connection whatever with
Fort Fraser, as the grade makes it impossible to place a station at that
point.
G. U. RYLEY
Land Commissioner
Winnipeg, Dec. 3th. 1911
WESTERN LANDS, LIMITED
1201 Broad Street, cor. Viet), Victoria 410-411 Winch Building, Vancouver
Capital City Realty
Company
A Reputable Firm Doing an
Extensive Trade
The name of the Capital City Realty
Company is familiar to the citizens of
Victoria and throughout the Island as
that of a firm whose operations in
real estate have been wide and extensive. Since its incipiency the firm
has held an enviable position among
the more reputable real estate firms
of the city, and has been instrumental
in increasing the demand for desirable property throughout the community. The Capital City Realty
Company was established about three
years ago for the purpose of transacting a general real estate business.
The members of the firm are F. G.
McQueen and E. J. Bright, both
young men, natives of Canada, progressive in their business policy and
optimistic as to the great future development of Victoria. Their transactions include city and suburban
property, farm lands, fruit ranches
and timber and minerals in Vancouver Island, and to anyone desiring to
make judicious investments we take
pleasure in referring them to the register of the Capital City Realty
Company. This register is kept thoroughly up-to-date, in all matters pertaining to the present worth and future possibilities of the various listed
properties. The office of the Capital
City Realty Company is located at
618 Yates Street, and here the visitor
is accorded a hearty welcome.
The Crystal Theatre
One of the Most Up-to-date Moving
Picture Houses in British
Columbia
The people of today, especially
those comprising the population of
the North American Continent are a
fun-loving, amusement-seeking people, ever ready to lay aside'the business worries and cares incident to
their every-day work-a-day life and
devote themselves to the entertainment and recreation afforded by high
class amusement houses of diversified
character. So, we have a reason
for the great popularity of the first
class moving picture house, combining as it does all the features of
dramatic act, from the most serious
to the frivolous laughter-creating
scenes and acts which pleases youth,
makes younger the old and obliterates
the cares ancl worry of business. It
is also an educational institution of
no small moment, depicting as it does
views of the various cities and countries of the world and the customs
of the people, events and epochs of
history, incidents and happenings of
the day, scientific progress, etc.
Under the capable management
of Capt. J. R. Rice, the Crystal, located on Douglas just below Yates
street, has attained a leading position
in this field of amusement, being one
of the largest ancl most up-to-date
moving picture theatres in the province. It has a seating capacity of
over 600. The isles are wide, the
seats are arranged for convenience
and comfort, and the ventilation is
perfect. Tliere are six emergency
exits allowing ample protection in
case of fire, ancl in many other ways
lhe management has shown a deep
consideration for the welfare of the
patrons. The show at the Crystal
cannot be excelled, including as it
does the licenced pictures ancl productions of such noted companies as
the Vitagraph, Lubin, Edison, Ka-
lem, Biograph, Selig, Mclies, Essaney,
Pathe ancl Eclipse. A special programme is offered on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays ancl Fridays. On
Wednesday nights the amateurs of
the city arc given an opportunity to
make goocl, at the same time adding
to the entertainment of the house.
Excellent music is furnished by one
of the best orchestras in the west, recently secured by Capt. Rice from
New York city. All said, the Crystal is popular. Popular because of
thc meritorious show it produces.
Popular because gf the courteous
treatment extended to all patrons;
because of its excellent accommodations, ventilation, etc., and last but
not least because of its excellent location.
The
City Brokerage
Real Estate, Timber, Fire
Insurance
HOMES OUR SPECIALTY
We Photograph Our
Houses
A. T. ABBEY
1319 'Douglas Street, Victoria, B. C.
Residence Phone Y 2403
Phone 815
Notice of Removal
ARTHUR H. HARMAN
Real Estate Agent, has removed his office to 1207
Latlgley  St.,    opposite Court House
As I am remaking my List I shall be glad of confirmation of any listings already made and
also of new ones
Member of the Real Estate Exchange
R. H. Swinerton J. Musgrave
P. 0. Box 502
Swinerton & Musgrave
Real Estate, Financial and
Insurance Agents
Money to Loan
On Mortgage at Current Rates
Agents for Connecticut  Fire Insurance   Company of Hartford, Conn.
FOR SALE
Lots, Houses, Farms and Central Business Property
1206 Government Street
Victoria, B. C. 10
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
Victoria as a Wholesale Centre
It is safe to say that Victoria's
wholesale trade during the past' year
has increased by anywhere from forty
to sixty per cent. This has been
principally through the expansion of
the business done by firms which have
existed for many years past.
A notable feature of tlie growth of
this branch of the commercial life of
the community is the rapidly expanding trade between Island points. Nanaimo, Ladysmith, Alberni, Duncan
and Chemainus are centres which
each month are increasing in population and Victoria's importance as a
distributing point is growing proportionately. All the large wholesale
firms report continuous prosperity.
The increase in the trade done by
Messrs. R. P. Rithet & Company is
probably half as great again as it
was at the beginning of 1911. Messrs.
Wilson Bros, report an excellent
year. This firm has been expanding
in every direction and enjoys a very
large share of the provisioning of the
Island centres as well as catering to
the needs of the city. Messrs. Simon
Leiser & Company, as well as having
largely increased their business within the last twelve months, are very
hopeful for the future as with the
rapidly increasing population and the
growth of the new communities they
anticipate a record year's business in
1912. Messrs. Turner, Beeton & Co.
have shared in the general growth,
and this firm, more perhaps than any
other, enjoys a large share of the
trade with mainland centres which it
is interesting to note is also of a
continually expanding character.
One of the features of the year in
the wholesale life of the city has been
the absorption of the business of
Messrs. Pither & Leiser,- wine merchants, by British capital. It is stated,
although the details are not yet
known, that the amount involved was
$1,500,000 and that those who now
control the well-known house will
consistently expand the business
throughout the province, both by
opening up new branches and establishing agencies in points which have
not hitherto been reached.
Another feature of the year has
been the removal of the headquarters
of the general wholesale department
of thc Hudson's Bay Company in
British Columbia to Vancouver. The
company stil lretains here a liquor
licence but hereafter the entire -wholesale department will be carried on
from Vancouver and the great company's interests in this city will be
centralised on a departmental. store,
the erection of which will commence
during the coming Spring.
An old established wholesale firm
which has changed hands during the
year has been that of Messrs. P. McQuade & Sons, which, though still
running under the old name, is now
in thc control of Messrs. Camsusa
& Christie, the former of whom has
long been identified with the management. Messrs. E. B. Marvin &
Co. continue to increase their facilities and have been able to keep pace
with the growth of shipping coming
to the port.
Another wholesale firm whieh is doing a rapidly increasing business is
the Y. Griffin Company, representative of tiie Swift interests in this
city, lt is stated that in the near
future this company will rapidly expand here by building wharf warehouses and installing a packing plant
and other cold storage facilities.
Among the minor wholesale firms
conditions are also good and thc trade
of all previous years has been easily
eclipsed, the various companies more
than holding their own in the general era of expansion. Generally
speaking the outlook for Victoria as
a wholesale centre could not be
brighter even if judged alone from
the experience of the past twelve
months. The growth in this branch
of the city's life has been little short
of phenomenal. Active railroad construction and the consequently large
number of men employed havc served
to give a further fillip to the demand
for supplies. Another reason of the
growing demand is the large amount
of civic improvement work which has
been undertaken. The future has
much larger works in store and it is
safe to prophesy that before another
year has passed away there will be
many more thousands of men engaged in the upbuilding not only of
Victoria but of the southern half of
the Island. The consequence will be
an ever growing demand for supplies and necessarily the wholesale
houses must continue to expand.
Some years ago Victoria was only
looked upon as a residential city, but
this belief has been largely expelled
with the growth of business interests
and the broadening of the commercial outlook. In measuring the future
the lessons drawn from the immediate past are of the highest moment
and in this regard the progress of
Victoria as a wholesale centre commands the earnest attention of all
who have faith in their city. It may
be said that the prospects in this
branch of the business life of the
city could not be brighter and
through this development the citizens
as a whole must benefit.
Turner, Beeton & Co. Limited
A Growing Local Industry that is a Strong Factor
in the Industrial Life of British
Columbia
Since its birth in 1863, the firm of
Turner, Beeton & Company has developed into one of the big industries
of Western Canada, and during its
career of nearly a half century the
aim of the management has been to
cater to the trade with quality goods,
guarantee satisfaction and insure
prompt and satisfactory deliveries of
orders, be they large or small. The
firm was first established by the Hon.
J. H. Turner, ex-premier of British
Columbia and now Agent-General for
the Province in London, England Tt
was incorporated in 1902 as a limited
company, having for its local directors G. A. Kirk and Henry B. Thomson, M.P.P, for Victoria. At that
time the firm did a general wholesale
dry goods business, imported merchandise and made a specialty of work-
ingmen's apparel and outfitting.
Shortly after the firm was incorporated it was decided to enter the field
as manufacturers of shirts and overalls, and as a result of this decision
the "Big Horn" shirt and overall factory was established. The plant was
equipped with modern machinery, a
union scale of hours and wages was
adopted and the firm began an aggressive campaign for the shirt and overall trade of British Columbia and
surrounding territory. The results attained have gone beyond the most
sanguine expectations of the directors, and so great has become the demand for the "Big Horn" product
that the capacity of the plant has been
increased from time to time until it
now has an average output of 2,000
dozen per month. The company has
on its payroll over 100 hands and the
wages  of  the   girls  working in  the
E. G. Prior & Co.
Limited, Liability
One of Victoria's Oldest and Largest
Wholesale   and   Retail   Establishments
For more than half a century E. G.
Prior & Company have been identified
with the business affairs of British
Columbia, and today theirs is easily
one of the largest wholesale houses
operating in Western Canada, in fact
it is a house with an international
reputation, having offices in London,
Eng., and New York City, U.S.A..
also branches in several cities in various sections of Canada. The company are wholesale importers of bar
and plate iron and steel of all kinds,
rails, pipe, fittings, nails, wire rope,
pumps, gasoline engines and general
shelf and heavy borders. They are
also exclusive agents for Massey-
Harris farm machinery, Meyers Bros,
pumps and many other makes of machinery and implements. The quantity of orders both wholesale and retail handled by the company is very
large yet the end of each succeeding
year finds a handsome increase in the
total volume of business transacted.
This is largely due to the dependable quality of their immense stock
and the prompt attention given to
each order, bc it large or small. During the many years of its career the
company has evidenced a great interest in Victoria, and has been closely identified with the city's development. The officers of the company
are Hon. E. G. Prior, president; G.
E Matthews, vice-president; G. F.
W. B, Wynne, managing director, and
C. P. W. Schwengers, secretary.
factory exceeds $35,000 a year. The
firm is pushing the "Big Horn"
brand and as the demand for the output increases the plant will be enlarged, new equipment will be added
and more people will be employed,
and as the people of Victoria are interested in the success of any industry of merit, it will be to their own
advantage to patronize a home product of quality, produced by a home
industry whose progressiveness and
dependability has never been questioned. The following are some of
the lines manufactured at the "Big
Horn" factory: — Overalls, denim
pants, jackets, jumpers, shirts of all
kinds, waiters', carpenters' and cooks'
aprons, Mackinaw coats and pants,
duck and canvas lined coats, etc.
These garments represent the highest
quality, cut and workmanship. Mr.
Thos. W. Walker is superintendent of
the factory and under his able direction the output maintains the same
high standard of excellence, equal if
not superior to any on the market,
at a cost no greater than that quoted
by competitive companies, which if
patronized take the money received
for their goods out of circulation in
British Columbia. The wholesale
business of the firm has also developed into large proportions. Turner,
Beeton & Company, Ltd., have their
office and warehouse on Wharf street
and the factory is at Bastion Square.
The London agents are H. C. Beeton Company.
Telephone 1092
Robert Wm. Clark
Real Estate, Timber, Farms
Coal Lands, Loans
Insurance
Mahon Blk., Gov't St.
Victoria
The Union Steamship Co.
Ltd., of B. C.
Operating Steamers covering the whole of the B. C. Coast
S.S.  Camosun—Every Wednesday for  Prince  Rupert and  Stewart
direct.
S.S. Cowichan, S.S. Cheslakee, S.S. Cassiar, S.S. Comox—Daily for
all Logging Camps.
The Boscowitz Steamship
Co., Ltd.
S.S. Venture—Sailing weekly for  all  Northern  Cannery  Points.
S.S. Vadso—Every Thursday from Evans, Coleman & Evans' Pier D.
JOHN BARNSLEY
AGENT
Phone  1925
534 Yates  Street
WHEN YOU HAVE AN OPPORTUNITY
to get in on the ground floor in the business section of a new city you
should grasp it. That is the way the Big Money is made. We offer
you the opportunity at
HAZELTON, B. C.
(Regd. as South Hazelton)
We have large property interests in Hazelton surrounding the Grand Trunk Pacific Station grounds, and
will be glad to furnish full particulars of the resources tributary to the future city to all who may enquire.
WHY   SHOULD   YOU   INVEST   IN   HAZELTON?
Because Hazelton will be a city—not a mere town.   It has the geographical and strategic location of the
ULTIMATE MANUFACTURING AND MINING CENTRE OF THE LAST WEST
Even now—
HAZELTON is the centre of a mining area that includes not only gold and the precious metals, but the
baser ones also.
HAZELTON is the only city in Canada whicii has anthracite coal equal in extent and quality to that
of Pennsylvania.
HAZELTON is the first city east from Prince Rupert with a fine, dry and healthy climate.
HAZELTON has a large fruit and agricultural area directly tributary, apple  orchards  now in  bearing.
HAZELTON is the head of navigation by river steamers from the Pacific Ocean.
HAZELTON is the point from which is projeced a railroad to Alaska, and from whicii will radiate
branch lines to various mining districts.
HAZELTON has the favored locations for sites for factories, smelters, saw mills, and it has the raw
materials at its doors.
HAZELTON already has an established trade; it has been the chief outfitting point, with roads and
trails to the interior; and the merchants of the old townsite—on an Indian reserve—are now
getting ready to move in a body to the  NEW G. T. P. TOWNSITE.
■■_
Natural Resources Security Company, Ltd.
Joint Owners and Sole Agents Fort George Townsite
606-615 Bower Building 543 Granville Street
Vancouver, B. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
11
The Silver Spring Brewery Ltd.
A Big Industry that is Forging to the Front, Will Enlarge Lager Beer Plant in 1912
Victoria is the home of a great
many laudable business enterprises
deserving of mention in any edition
or publication the purpose of whicii
is to give a review of industrial conditions in. the city, or of Vancouver
Island. ' Prominent among these is
the Silver Spring Brewery, Limited.
This is one of the largest up-to-date
brewing establishments operating in
British Columbia, and its output is
recognized as the very acme of perfection. The company operates two
separate plants, both of which are
equipped with all the most modern
machinery and appliances necessary
for the manufacture of their product.
One of these plants was first put in
operation about ten years ago. This
is confined exclusively to the manufacture of their celebrated English
Ales and Stout. The lager beer plant
was established two years ago, and
has been enlarged from time to time
as the output has been increased. A
1,400-barrel storage room was erected
at this plant during 1911, and the
company states it will increase its
storage capacity and add another
story to the fermenting room in the
early part of 1912.   The head brewers
at the two plants are Mr.. Geo. S.
Douglas and Mr. F. Tate, both gentlemen who have had many years of
practical experience in the manufacture of malt liquors and possessed of
a thorough knowledge of all the in
tricate details of the brewer's art.
Under their direct supervision the
justly famous Silver Spring lager beer,
Silver Spring stout and Tate's English
ale are produced. These products
were each awarded a gold medal as
first prize at the 1910 Agriculture,
Industrial ancl Mining exhibition.
Scrupulous cleanliness and perfect
sanitation predominates in the plants
where they are manufactured, conditions which are essential to the successful production of pure wholesome
beer and exist in all breweries of the
first class. The two plants have a
daily output of 100 barrels each of
lager, ale and stout, and this is distributed in all parts of Canada and
the Western section of the United
States. All orders, be they large or
small, receive prompt attention, and
in every case satisfaction is guaranteed. Mr. Harry Maynard is the
managing director of the company
ancl to his untiring energy and affable
personality much of the success of
the company can be attributed. Mr.
L. Cumberbatch is secretary. It is
such institutions as the Silver Spring
Brewery that are directly responsible
for the enviable position which Victoria now occupies in industrial circles, and they should bc encouraged
in every way possible by those who
have the interests of the citv at heart.
tF
GOOD ADVICE
"If you work for a man, in heaven's name work for him. If he pays you wages that supply you your bread and butter, work for him, speak well of him, think well of him,
stand by him, and stand by the institution he represents. If put to the pinch, art ounce of loyalty is worth a pound of cleverness. If you must vilify, condemn him and
eternally disparage him, why, resign your position; and when you are outside, DAMN to your heart's content. But, I pray you, so long as you are part of an institution, do
not condemn it: not that you will injure the institution—not that—but when you disparage the concern of which you are a part, you disparage yourself."—Elbert Hubbard.
Cieiuauy uiapaiagc iiiiju, wny, icaigu jruui   puaiiiuii,   anu  wncii y_u cue uui»uc, uniui.   iu yuui  ucaiia luiil-cui.     xjui, i. yiay /uu, ~\i lung a_ yuu die _>_l. Ul ail lusuiuuuil, uo
not condemn it: not that you will injure the institution—not that—but when you disparage the concern of which you are a part, you disparage yourself."—Elbert Hubbard.
MORAL: If you live in a country, patronize the industries of that country and build it up
SHIRTS M OVERALLS
The product of white labour for white
people.    Quality, cut and workmanship
unexcelled.    For sale at all the leading
stores.    Union made
TURNER, BEETON 8 COMPANY, Ltd.
Wholesale Merchants and Manufacturers
Victoria, British Columbia 12
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
The Shipping Development of Victoria
Two reasons for which the port of
Victoria and the citizens generally
have special cause for congratulation
as an outcome of the past year are
the unusually large increase in the
amount of tonnage handled and thc
great growth in the actual freight
landed at local wharves. In 1906
the amount of cargo landed here was
38,316 tons. This year the total is
well over 80,000 tons, or an increase
of more than 100 per cent. Five
years ago the number of vessels entering ancl clearing here did not greatly exceed 500. The figures for the
present year reaches all but 1,000.
The total tonnage represented by
these is in excess of 1,250,000 tons.
These figures speak eloquently of
the progress which the port is making, and it must be remembered that
all this increase has been brought
about by what might be termed "natural development," for the cargo
handling facilities are very little better than they were a year ago.   *
.Practically all the companies running vessels to Victoria are increasing
the size of their fleets ancl placing
better boats in service. In the growth
of trade in the Puget Sound district
Victoria can claim more than a proportionate share, judged from the
standpoint of population, and there
is little doubt that this is clue to the
natural advantages whicii she possesses.
In the transpacific tradae the vessels of the Holt line, the Nippon
Yusen Kaisha, the Osaka Shoshen
Kaisha, the Weir line, the Canadian
Pacific, and the Canadian-Australian
are monthly bringing increased cargoes for unloading here. The actual
figures of the growth of trade between British Columbia and Australia and the Orient are not available
but from them there is little doubt
that it would be possible to show
that the past year has witnessed a
wonderful development, in whicii this
port has played a very important part.
A development of the year has
been the fact that a large amount of
the European freight for local consignees is now being handled via the
Tehuantepec railway and brought to
this port by the vessels of the Canadian Mexican line. This factor has
served to reduce the number of vessels making the trip via the Horn.
The consequent quickening up of
transportation facilities, has naturally
increased the demand ancl has played
no insignificant part in the era of development.
Coastwise traffic has also shown a
remarkable growth. The Canadian
Pacilic Coast S.S. Company continues
to lead in this branch, but at the
same time the Grand Trunk Pacific
Company is rapidly increasing its
facilities and is monthly securing a
larger share of the trade. Smaller
companies are amalgamating with a
view to strengthening their position,
ancl the factor of the last few years
has been the introduction of a class
of competit'on which is doing much
to promote development ane' to better the type of vessels used between
British Columbia ports.
In catering to the needs of ocean
bound steamers practically nothing
has been done locally during the past
year. The outer wharves where such
vessels load and unload remain almost as they were, any improvements
which have been made not being
such as to increase the berthing accommodation. Within the harbor
there has been a measure of development. The Grand Trunk Pacific
wharves, with the headquarters of the
steamship branch of that company on
this coast are now being fully utilised.
The C. P. R. Coast S.S. Company
has made extensive additions to the
Belleville Street clocks, and the ever-
increasing fleet of that company has
more adequate berthing facilities. In
Esquimalt, beyond the repairing of a
number of vessels, the work upon
which calls for no special comment,
there has been little activity. No new
coastwise boats have been built, nor
has any construction work of moment been undertaken either at the
Victoria Machinery Depot or at Tur-
pels Wals. In spite of the lack of
construction work the amount of
minor repairing which was undertaken has meant continuous activity
at the shipbuilding and repairing
plants both in Victoria and Esquimalt.
An interesting feature of the year
in the history of the port has been
international agreement whicii brotigh
the passing of pelagic sealing.
The international agreement which
brought about this has just come into
effect, and through it different interests in Victoria, notably the Victoria
Sealing Company will benefit by a
cash quid pro quo of probably $500,-
000, a portion of which at least it is
safe t osay will be invested in further shipping enterprises which will
lead still further to the growth of the
port.
And what of the coming year. The
announcement of the greatest importance as far as the development of the
port is concerned is the practical certainty that the Dominion Government
will construct a breakwater off the
entrance to the harbor. This undertaking will cost anywhere from $2,-
000,000 to $3,000,000 and when complete   will   provide   adequate   accom
modation for all tiie ocean borne traffic for which the port can hope for
many years to come. Further harbor
improvements are also on the tapis.
During the Spring construction work
will commence on a large drydock at
Esquimalt, an undertaking subsidized
by the Dominion Government and
one whicli will bring a large amount
of repair work to this point. The
clock will be 1,000 feet in length by
100 feet in breadth with 34 feet of
water on the sill. A ship repairing
plant will be installed in connection
with it. Branch rails will connect
with the shops, and travelling cranes
will be employed. All motive power
will be generated by electricity and
the cost of the entire undertaking
will be approximately $2,900,000.
Still dealing with Esquimalt it may
be stated that the B. C. Marine Railway Company has secured from the
C. P. R. the contract for the construction of a coastwise steamer to be
built at a cost of $250,000. The construction of this will be commenced
early in the year and when completed
the vessel will be engaged on the.
West Coast route.
There are other projects which
point to great development during
the next twelve months. It is almost certain that the Canadian Northern Railway will provide a fleet of
coasting vessels and that there headquarters will be at this port. The
growth of traffic will mean the addition of two or more ships to the
swell the tonnage of the C. P. R.
The Grand Trunk Pacific can also
be looked to to make additions, while
the recently amalgamated Union S.S.
Company and the Boscowitz S.S.
Company is stated to have a new
vessel under construction in the Old
Country.
Extensions to the ocean lines are
also in prospect. The new Empresses
for the C. P. R. may not arrive during the coming year but they will be
here early in 1913. The Nippon Yusen Kaisha will put two new and
larger vessels on the route, replacing two of the older boats. It is anticipated that the Osaka Shoshen
Kaisha will make at least equal improvements , in its service, while the
Holt line has under construction a
couple of great freight carriers which
will eventually be used on the Pacific.
Other European companies have had
their representatives on the coast for
months past looking into the possibilities of trade with a view to the
opening of the Panama Cam.1. Whatever measure of trade development
may be expected from these must in
a large degree be shard in by Victoria owing to her commanding commercial position.
Looked at from atl standpoints,
there is every reason for anticipating
progress such as has not been dreamt
of in the past. The Dominion Government has been brought to a realization of the needs of the port and
its growing importance. The citizens
generally are taking a more lively interest in the commercial future of
the city. There are indications that
a large shipbuilding plant is an
eventuality for which there can be
reasonable hope. The lumber trade,
the coal industry, the fisheries are all
being developed more rapidly—all of
which means the necessity of more
tonnage utilising this port. The needs
of the community are also growing,
ancl perhaps the most hopeful factor
of all is that shipping interests are
thoroughly alive to what the opening
of the Panama Canal will mean to
the  future  of  Victoria.
R P. Rithet & Company
_™w
Importers & Wholesale Dealers in
Groceries, Wines and Liquors, Cigars, Tobaccos
etc., Salt, Wire Rope, Fire Brick, Fire
Clay and Cement
Agents Pacifie Coast Steamship Company, Asaka Shosen Eaisha,
The Bank Line, Limited, etc. Shipping and Insurance Agents.
All classes of Insurance Written, including Fire, Marine, Life, Liability
Accident and Bonding
Wharf Street
Victoria, British Columbia THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
13
The Beer That Made Milwaukee Jealous
The Purity and
Quality of Our
output is in
advance of competition
Its
High Standard
of Excellence is
always maintained
A product of
pure Malt and
Hops, Modern
Equipment &
Competent
Brewers
Its
Popularity is the
Reason of Our
Success
Victoria Phoenix Brewing Company, Ltd.
Worswick Paving Company
Limited
Contractors for Asphalt Pavements
Telephone 2386
Hollywood P. O., Victoria, B. C.
Mount Tolmie Sand & Gravel
Company
Sand, Gravel, Rock, Etc.
Pit Telephone L1851
Office Telephone 2386 14
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
The great growth of Victoria's Telephone System
makes necessary a larger and more convenient
exchange. Our new home nearing completion will
be one of the finest and most up-to-date telephone exchanges in the West.
Like many of the inventions that have entered into the life of modern nations from time to time, to serve humanity, by aiding development—the telephone would
seem to have reached a solution of its powers and capabilities just when the business necessities,—ripe for a simple, convenient means of communication,—had
become a necessary factor in the business and social life of the nation, particularly to the hurry-burry nations of the western hemisphere.
The growth of the telephone service for a time somewhat slow—as if feeling its way, half doubting—has of late years amply met and satisfied the
expectations of its most sanguine early advocates, ancl has come to largely occupy the place of many former methods of communication, by errand boy, vehicle,
mail, etc., at the same time being infinitely quicker and less costly.
The phenomenal telephone growth of recent years and particularly of the past year, has rendered it most difficult, at times, and in places, to secure within
a reasonable time, the necessary Plant equipment with which to extend the service to the required limits. Especially does this apply to communities where there
has been such a remarkable development as that experienced in British Columbia during the past decade.
Sometime since, in anticipation
of the growth of Victoria and
the consequent need of extending
exchange facilities, the B. C.
Telephone Co. secured a lot and
commenced the erection of a
suitable "Central Exchange
Building" in this City. This
building is now nearing completion, as shown by the photograph
reproduced on this page.
It will be equipped with ample
switching apparatus of the most
modern type, and contain all the
necessary adjuncts of an up-to-
date Telephone Exchange Home,
for which it is designed, as well
as being a structure worthy of
our growing Capital City. Contemporaneous with this work is
that of placing the wires underground in the business section,
and beyond it—as at present defined—in some directions.
To illustrate the comparatively recent ancl rapid increase in
orders for Telephone Service, it
will only be necessary to quote
from the Company's carefully
compiled and published statistics
from January to August of this
year, where we find the following high percentage records for
service installations.
Quarter—
January to March  7.5%
January to June 17.4%
January to September. .25.5%
It is hardly necessary to state
that every effort has been made
by the Company to meet the demands of this enormous expansion of the system, by urging the
supply factories to make prompt
delivery of orders already
lodged, and supplementing these
requests with additional orders,
only to find the factories overtaxed and orders 'thereby temporarily delayed.
In all parts of British Columbia, where the B. C. Telephone
Co. is operating, come reports
of extensions, of lines completed,
and new work undertaken. The
Company is a British Columbian
Corporation from start to finish
and is not an inconsiderable factor in the development of B. C.
It now serves thirty-three cities
and towns in the province. It
laces many of these communities together with Toll lines,
links the Mainland and Vancouver Island by submarine cable,
and, as has already been noted
in the press, have a further cable
service of three circuits in view
to be laid between Vancouver
and Nanaimo in the near future,
to provide ample service between
the Island and the Mainland. It
is institutions of this character
that form the backbone of a
city's progress and prosperity,
and they should be fostered ancl
encouraged as much as possible
by those who have the interests
of the community at heart.
To its Patrons, present and prospective, the
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY
Extends a Cordial Christmas Greeting THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
15
Office Sf Showroom
512 Fort Street
Opposite B. C. Electric Railway
Victoria, B.C.
Jas M. Mellis
Manager
Wm. N. O'Neil & Co.
High Grade Building Materials
550 Seymour
Street
Vancouver
B. C.
TILE DEPARTMENT
"INTERIOR   FINISH"
DEPARTMENT
MISCELLANEOUS
We execute everything in Floor and
Wall Tile Work, Faience Tile Exteriors and Interiors.
"Rusts" Vitreous Mosaics executed to
special design.
Floors,  Walls  and Panels.
Roofing Tiles in all designs.
GLASS DEPARTMENT
Plate and Window Glass
Plate Mirrors—Plain and Bevel Edge
Lead and Copper Glazed Stained Glass
Windows
Wired Plate Glass
"i;asy Set" Metal Frames and Corners
'.or Plate Glass Setting
Hardwood Interior Finish—Quarter-cut
White and Red Oak, Birch and Mahogany.
Hardwood Flooring—Quarter-cut White
and Red Oak, Birch, Beech and
Maple.
Parquetry Flooring.
"Korelock" Hardwood Veneered Doors,
Interior      and      Exterior      Column
Capitals.
"Kchls" Lock Joint Columns.
Art  Panels for  Decoration.
Varnishes,  Stains  and  Ripolin  Enamel.
"Parker's" Metal Comer Bead
"Rutty" Metal Wall Plugs
"Bulldog" and "Miami" Wall Ties
"Diamond" Expansion Bolts
"Universal" Safety Treads
Chicago "Cube" Concrete Mixers
"Roenius"  Coal  Chutes
"Majestic" Coal Chutes
Tapestrolia Burlaps
"Emmonite" Roofing
"Lonabond" Roofing
"Rex" Building Paper
"Marquetry" Wood Panels
STRUCTURAL   DEPARTMENT
Structural Steel and Ornamental Iron
Pressed Bricks and Terra Cotta
"Duplex" Post Caps and Bases
"Duplex" Joists and Wall Hangers
Herringbone Metal Lath
Steel Studding and Furring
Reinforcing  Fabric and  Rods
Fire Escapes, Spiral Stairs
American 3-Way Sidewalk Lights
Safes and Vault Doors
MANTELS, GRATES, TILES, FIREPLACE FURNISHINGS
In this department is to be found
everything necessary to equip a fireplace
in the most artistic and satisfactory manner. Designs furnished for special work
and executed by us.
MOORE & PAULINE
The New Name of an Old Established
Firm
The   remarkable   development    of
the  automobile  industry  daring  the
past decade stands unparalleled in the
(history of the world.   Crude and un-
•eliable ten years ago, the machine of
|tliat  period  has  been  replaced with
:he wonderful creation of today, beau-
fiful   in   design   and   finish,   reliable,
•asy to operate, and purchaseable at
figure much lower than those of
Hornier days.   With the growth of the
ndustry came the necessity  for  eatable salesmen, and proper garage facilities.   And it is in this respect that
(ve  mention  the  name  of  Moore  &
,'auline,   whose   garage    and    sales-
•ooms are    located    at    iots    Yates
Itreet.   As the heading of this article
mplies  this  is  a  new  firm,    hough
heads an establishment which has
|cen in operation for over two years,
'he business   was    incepted by Mr.
iarry Moore, in 1909, and under his
linpetent   management   enjoyed    a
ost  gratifying   success.    Mr.   Pau-
le, who is a native of Victoria, and
is formemrly associated with  the
firm of Pauline & Company, wholesale dry goods, entered the business as a partner of Mr. Moore during the present month of December.
Both gentlemen are able business
men,, whose ability and integrity have
never been questioned. That the firm
will be one of the active business institutions and successful in the future is unquestioned. Moore & Pauline handle the world-famous E. M.
F. "30" and Flanders "20." By their
efforts a large number of cars were
placed in this section during the year
just drawing to a close, and the firm
has placed orders for 75 cars for the
forthcoming season. They also deal
in automobile sundries, oil and gasoline. Their garage is strictly modern,
and the service maintained in this department is of the standard adopted
hy them in all their dealings. We re-
fer our readers to the display advertisement of the firm, whicii appears
on this page, for such further information as they may desire.
Preservation of Dialects
At a meeting of the Yorkshire Dialect Society in Sheffield Dr. Craigie,
of Oxford, called for greater efforts
to be made for the preservation of
dialects in England. He suggested
that the Yorkshire Dialect Society
should endeavour to place within the
reach of every Yorkshireman all that
was best in the dialect literature of
the county. There should also be
oublished a concise but comprehensive dictionary of the Yorkshire dialect at a reasonable price. Many
dialects had in all probability a long
life still before them.
Fastest Liner to Canada
The Allan Line has placed an order
for one of two new liners for the
Liverpool and Canadian mail service
with Messrs. Beardmore and Co.,
Glasgow. The liner will be 15,000
tons, and will be the fastest vessel on
the Canadian route. The second has
been placed with the Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Company.
New Copyright Law
The House of Lords have read a
second time after a brief debate the
Copyright Bill, which has already
passed the Commons, and provides
for international and imperial copyright.
RADIGER & JANION, Ltd.
A Well Known Business Enterprize that has
Become a Prominent Factor in the
City's Development as a Distributing Centre
The firm of Radiger & Janion,
Limited, was established in Victoria
in 1901, so that the present year
marks the first decade of its activity
in the business circles of the city.
From the date of its inception, the
firm has been one of the most aggressive and progressive operating in
this section of the country, with the
natural result that today it is recognized as one of the big and most substantial institutions identified with
the wholesale jobbing business of the
"City of Opportunities," as well as in
Vancouver, where they are also established, and where they do an extensive business, both in the city and
throughout the Province. The firm
has gained an enviable reputation for
the quality and purity of their goods
and the dependable manner in which
all orders are executed. They are
agents for Buchanan's Red Seal and
Black and White Scotch Whiskies,
Les Fils de F. Schmidt, Bordeau
Clarets and Still and Sparkling Burgundies; A. Magnier & Co.'s Cognac
and   Brandies,   Cumberland   Packing
Company of Sidney, Australia, manufacturers of the finest grade of
canned meats on the market, J.
S. Cotterall __ Co., producers of the
celebrated New Zealand honey and
J. H. Wethey, Limited, of St. Catherine, Ont., manufacturers of mince
meats, etc. The firm also carries on
an extensive business in California
green and dried fruits. They are located at 531 Yates street where every
department of the business is conducted along the most modern lines, and
the ability and progressiveness of the
management is evidenced in the fact
that the firm has kept pace with the
remarkable development which has
taken place in the cities of Victoria
and Vancouver during recent years,
and is as before stated one of the
substantial, meritorious business concerns of British Columbia.
Success never conies to those who
wait. You have to go out and hunt
for it. Some are better hunters than
others.
MOORE & PAULINE
1012 Yates St., Victoria.   Agentsifor the Studebaker Corporation's Famous E-M-F and Flanders Cars
iqi2 FLANDERS "20" TOURING CAR
The first and only car to reach Hazelton, B. C, thus winning the
Challoner & Mitchell Troyhy
IQ12 E-M-F "30" TOURING CAR
Self-Starting Device fitted to any car if required.   Auto Supplies and Repair Work a Specialty.
We have a limited number of cars in stock for Christmas Presents 16
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
Prosperous Conditions in the
Retail District
Whatever else may be said about
Victoria, no one will question that, as
a shopping town, it holds a premier
position.    While  it  cannot  compare
with other large cities in the number
of stores, it can challenge comparison
with any of them in the variety and
quality of goods displayed.    This is
a circumstance which at first is apt
to puzzle the visitor, but it is easily
explained.   It is due to the enterprise
of the store-keepers and to the exacting demands of the Victoria people.   Victoria is peopled with English
stock, and English people are of all
the .most  determined to  have  good
quality and full value for their money.
This explains why so many of the
Victoria stores carry English goods.
It is a case of quality and durability
every time.   There was a time when
smartness was sacrificed  to  quality,
but this is no longer the case.   English manufacturers are now adapting
themselves to Canadian requirements,
and are incorporating the smart, chic
appearance of American and French
goods with the durability of those of
English  make.    The result is  altogether satisfactory from  the  standpoint of the shopper.    Besides being
characterized by a high average of
standard of excellence, Victoria can
boast of a few large stores which cannot   be   surpassed   anywhere.     It   is
only necessary   to   mention    Weiler
Bros., Challoner & Mitchell, Fitzpatrick & O'Connell, Fletcher Bros, and
Spencer's to prove the case.   Perhaps,
however, especially at Christmas time,
it is permissible to mention one other,
which, though small in comparison,
and confined strictly to one line of
goods, is without a peer in the wide
world.   Of course the reference is to
Rogers' candy store.    Mr. Rogers is
a unique  personality.    He will  probably object to the use of the term
"Candy."    Because,   what  he  prides
himself on is his chocolate.    This is
shipped in thousands of packages to
every part of the known world, and
if it were possible to send it by aeroplane to Mars, it would be certain to
go there.    Mr.  Rogers is the  only
tradesman, known to the writer, who
sells out his stock every week  and
locks his doors for two or three days
while he replenishes it from his own
factory.
In their way, Weiler Bros, are just
as celebrated for furniture, Challoner
& Mitchell for jewellery, Fitzpatrick
& O'Connell for clothing and Fletcher
Bros, for music, as Rogers for chocolate. Because these linns have been
singled out, it must not be supposed
that any disrespect is intended to
scores of others, who have made a
name for themselves, lt is only because they are pioneer firms, who
have grown up with the city of Victoria and have become household
words.
There are new-comers who are rapidly making a name for themselves,
including such well-known firms as
Gordons, Ltd., P. Bums & Co., 11.
O. Kirkham, Ltd., and many othet ;*,.
Thanks to thc enterprise of the
pioneer firms the new-comers have to
live up to the excellent standard already established, and their gorgeous
stocks this Christmas evidence their
intention to do so.
But the retail shopping, hire everything else in Victoria, is on the m.ive,
and this is true in more senses than
one. It is not only expanding, in
every direction, but new centres of
activity are being established. Only
three or four years ago Government
Street was the only first-class shopping street. Today its supremacy is
being successfully challenged by
Yates and Douglas. In fact, it is
not at all unlikely that within
ten years or less, Government
street, between the Post-office and
Yates, will cease to be a shopping street, and will become a street
of offices and financial institutions on
the same lines as St. James' street,
Montreal. This will give a character
to Victoria which it has not before
possessed, and is at once the strongest
evidence of its development on
modern lines, and its promise for the
future.
There is one feature of Victoria
retail shopping which must be referred to in conclusion. It is the
large number of small stores belonging to Old Country tradesmen, who
conduct their business on Old Country lines and transport one in recollection from a busy Twentieth Century Canadian city to an old-time
English town. Some of these stores
have been in the same hands for
nearly half a century and have attained that respectability and confidence which always comes to old-
timers who have stayed in the business. Altogether it will be gathered
that Victoria is an interesting as well
as a unique shopping town, one where
variety can be found and money well
spent.
Hutchison Bros. &
Company, Ltd.
A Progressive Concern Which Continues to Grow
Victoria Truck and
Dray Company
Limited
One of Victoria's Oldest Successful
Business Concerns
With a business career extending
over a period of thirty years the Victoria Truck & Dray Cbmpany, Limited, represents one of the oldest and
most successful concerns now operating in the "City of Opportunities."
Wm. Croft, Cap. Irwin, R. P. Rithet
and Wm. Ladner established the business in 1880, at that time placing in
operation one truck, which was capable of taking care of a large percentage of the drayage business then
carried on in the village of Victoria.
With the city the company grew, new
equipment was added, the scope of
business was enlarged, and the present time finds it doing the largest
light and heavy trucking, general
teaming, contracting, moving safes,
machinery, boilers, furniture, etc., in
the city and maintaining the only
storage warehouses on the E. & N.
tracks. The firm also does an extensive distributing and forwarding
business, making a specialty in this
respect of car-load lots. Some two
years ago Mr. D. Mackenzie assumed
control of the firm and under his able
direction as general manager it has
become recognized as one of the most
reliable and capable business concerns operating in the city. It also
occupies an enviable position in the
front rank of the dependable establishments of Victoria, boosting and
promoting to the best of their ability
the prosperity of the community. The
office of the firm is located at 1315
Wharf Street and the stables at 749
Broughton street.
The big business institutions giving
employment to a large number of
people and owing to the nature and
magnitude of their operations attracting the money of outside interests in
exchange for their production and
labour, from the backbone of a city's
growth and prosperity. They are the
substantial element of the community
in which they exist and in times of
financial distress they keep the
"wheels of progress" grinding on.
Listed among such concerns is Hutchison Bros. & Company, Limited.
For many years this has been recognized as one of Victoria's big industries, and for that matter it is one of
the largest and most up-to-date institution of its particular kind in the
Province of British Columbia. .The
company of today was incorporated
about five years ago, succeeding at
that time the firm of Hutchison
Brothers. The business as it is now
carried on includes electrical and
mechanical engineering, iron and
brass founders and the installation of
electrical plants of every description.
Many of the largest lighting plants in
this section of the country have been
installed by this firm. Their plant,
located on Esquimalt Road is modern
in every respect. To successfully
handle their extensive high class work
this is essential. The firm employs
experienced and capable draughtsman,
have their own pattern shop and
draughting plant and all accessories
which can contribute to the perfection and distinct individuality of their
work. Owing to the promptitude with
which all contracts are carried out
and the efficiency of their workmen
and the superiority of their work
when completed, the volume of business transacted is constantly on the
increase. The progressive ability and
sound integrity of the officers of company has had much to do with the
development of the firm and the
standing which it enjoys in commercial circles. Mr. R. Hutchison, is
electrical superintendent, Mr. J. H.
MacEachern, secretary-treasurer, Mr.
D. Dixon, mechanical superintendent,
and Mr. D. C. Hutchison, general
manager.
Business Telephone 32       5      Office Telephone 76
Lawrence Goodacre
& Sons
Butchers and Packers
Contractors by Appointment to His Majesty's
Royal Navy and the Dominion
Government
Queen's Market
Cor. Gov't & Johnson Streets, Victoria, B. C.
YES!
We are still making those
Delicious Ice Cream
Bricks
ROYAL DAIRY
1110 Douglas Street, Victoria, B. C.
Phone 188
The greatest timber belt in Canada
as yet practically untouched is that
bounded by the shores of Vancouver
Island.
Why Not Treat Yourself to a
Christmas Present
A Suit or Overcoat from
this Store will prove a
lasting satisfaction. You
have choice of a wide
variety of winter garments that represent
more than the usual
amount of Style and
Quality and at very
moderate prices
$15 to $30
"You'll like our Clothes"—^.
Fitzpatrick &'O'Connell
Hatters Sf Clothiers
811-813 Government Street
Oit'ilt' f"> Offitt THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
17
Union Bank of Canada
■'."•.  . Established 1865   -•
Capital paid up      -      -    ' -'   ' -'     -"'-      -       $4,675,000''
Reserve, undivided profits        -.       -        -        -        3,325,000
Total Assets, July 31, 1911     -    -    -    -    -    -       53,000,000
British Columbia Branches
Victoria, Vancouver (five offices), Prince Rupert, Hazelton,
Enderby, Vernon and Nanaimo.
SAVINGS BANK DEPARTMENT AT ALE BRANCHES
INTEREST ALLOWED ON DEPOSITS
A branch of the Bank has been established at ji Threadneedle
Street, London, Eng., where Letters of Credit, and Drafts payable at all important points in Caijada, ancl the United States,
can be purchased, and Money Transfers by cable or by letter may
be arranged.   Clients of the Bank, when in London, are invited
to  visit  the  branch.   Information   will  be' furnished  on  all
Canadian business matters.        '           *
A. E. Christie    -    Manager Victoria Branch
Pioneer Coff ee & Spice Mills,Ltd.
Manufacturers and Distributors of the British Columbia
Breakfast Favorite
"CROWN COFFEE"
Sold by Alt Grocers
Pembroke Street      -     -      Victoria, British Columbia
BRICK & TILE
The Victoria Brick & Tile Co., Ltd.
Established 1886
The building activities of Victoria now demand
the entire output of our plant
Office and Yard, Douglas St.                                  J. P. Elford, Manager, Res. Phone 665
Phone 2298                                                            |W. J. Smith, Secretary
653 Yates Street
Tighe & Wheeler's
High Class Lunch Counter
and Cafe
We Serve the Best Goods
at Moderate Prices
653 Yates Street           Victoria, B. C.
British Columbia Pottery Co.,Ld.
Victoria, B. C.
Manufacturers of Vitrified Salt Glazed
Sewer Pipes
Sanitary Fittings, Agricultural Drain  Tile,  Cement,   Flower   Pots,  Terra
Cotta, Chimney Pipe and Flue Lining, Chimney Tops, Fire Brick, Fire
Clay.    All kinds of Fire Clay  Goods, Assayers' Furnaces, etc..
made to order.
Factory, Victoria West       City Office, corner Broad and Pandora Sts.
Phone 1592                      P. 0. Box 395               Res. Phone 2541
JOHN WILSON
Architect
221 Pemberton Block                                                 Victoria, B. C
Brick    Brick
Baker Brick & Tile Co.
Manufacturers of Brick and
Drain Tile
Office & Works: Cor. Douglas
Street and Tolmie Ave., Victoria
Tile                              Tile
G. F. Waites        E. Knapton
Waites & Knapton
For Fine Mechanical
Repairs
Keys and Key Fitting in all its Branches.
!                Full stock of Yale Latches for house or
office.     Safe Combinations Re-Set.     Surveyors' Tapes, Instruments, etc., accurately
1                repaired.    Camera repairs.
610 Pandora Street, Near Government
1                                    Telephone 2439 18
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
SIMON LEISER&
COMPANY, Ltd.
Wholesale Grocers : Victoria, fi C
Sole Agents for
Apollinaris Mineral Water, Pacific
Cereal Association of San Francisco
(Carnation Wheat Flakes), James
Robertson & Company's—of Dundee,
Scotland—Celebrated Jams, Jellies
and Marmalades, Soogalla and Mara-
villa Brands Ceylon Teas, Upton's
Celebrated Teas and Coffees
Victoria Chemical
Company, Limited
Manufacturers of Chemical
Fertilizers and Tree Sprays
OUR SPECIALTIES: Chemical Fertilizers, Brands "A," "B," "C" and"D"
Muriate of Potash, Sulphate of Potash
Nitrate of Soda, Thomas Phosphate
(Basic Slag), Arsenate of Lead
"Black Leaf 40," Lime Sulphur Spray
Write for Our CATALOGUE and PRICE LIST
Consult with those who have tried our Products
Vietoria, British Colombia
EVANS, COLEMAN
& EVANS, LIMITED
Builders' Supplies
Contractors' Supplies
Cannery Supplies
Calcutta Bags and Hessian
Cast Iron and Steel Pipe
Iron and Steel Products
Mining and Mill Supplies
Mantels, Tiles and Grates
Steel Rails, Switches & Frogs
Smithing Coal and Coke
Steel Wire Ropes
EVANS, COLEMAN & EVANS, LTD.
Phones 272,1690
613 PANDORA AVENUE, VICTORIA, B. C.
P. Burns & Co., Ltd.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
MEAT, POULTRY AND FISH
Quantities, large or small, may be secured
trom any of the following Markets:-
Island Market, cor. Douglas and Johnson
Phones 155 and 154
Pacific Market, cor. Gov't and Courtney
Phones 73 and 72
Alberta Market, cor. Cook & North Park
Phone 1824
West End Market, Skinner Street and
Craigflower Road Phone r 2518
Oak Bay Market, Oak Bay Avenue and
Amphion Street
Also SYDNEY, B. C.
" WE HAVE CHOICE GOODS AND WE GIVE THE SERVICE"
P. Burns & Company, Ltd. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1011
23
THOMAS PLIMLEY
Automobiles W Bicycles
To get an idea of the development of the motor industry it is only
necessary to visit the commodious
establishment of Mr. Thomas Plimley, 730 Yates street, where elaborate
preparations have been made for the
selling and caring for the various
types of automobiles, motor deliveries, trucks, etc.
Mr. Plimley is local representative
of several well known manufacturers,
among them being the Daimler Co.
of England, builders of the Daimler
R. C. H. Light Runabout and other
lines. The Gramm Motor Co. of
Walkerville, Canada, who are the
producers of the Gramm Motor
Trucks in various sizes, and last but
not least, the sturdy little Metz
Runabout marketed by tbe Metz
Motor Co. of Waltham, Mass.
There is a well equipped repair
shop, a power pump for pumping auto
tires, automatic gasoline measurers
and storage tanks, a powerful elevator for raising automobiles to the up-
THOMAS PLIMLEY--OFFICE AND SALESROOMS
Silent Knight; the Russell Motor Co.
of Toronto, who market the well
known Russell automobile in both
the Silent Knight and ordinary value
models, ancl the Willys Overland Co.
of Toledo, with ten or a dozen
models of runabouts, touring cars,
limousines, etc. The well known R.
C. Hupp Motor Co. of Detroit, who
market the Hupp-Yeats Electric, the
per floors, lathes, drills, brazers, etc.
Mr. Plimley also conducts an extensive business at 730 Yates street,
adjoining the automobile department
at the rear, and handles such popular
mounts as the Massey Harris, Singer,
Enfield, Humber, Kirmer, Couer De
Lion, Minstrel Rae, etc. There is also
a modern repair shop in connection
with   the   Cycle   Department  and   in
the store at 730 Yates street, a well
selected stock of automobile and
bicycle sundries.
In view of the great advances made
in electric cars, we desire to mention
a few of the many new and striking
features that are evident in the Hupp-
Yeats Electric. The body is much
lower than the ordinary electric, and
the running board is practically on a
level with the floor of the car, and
also with the height of the average
curb. The advantage of this will be
apparent instantly. The occupants of
the Hupp-Yeats need not climb up
and down to enter and leave the car,
they literally step in and out, on a
level with the sidewalk. The frame
is pressed steel in channel section—
identical with the frames of most exclusive gasoline cars. Throughout,
the chassis is equipped with the finest
imported ball bearings, which assure
easy running and a consequent saving of current and tire wear—to
which the lighter weight of the car
also contributes. Many parts and
much friction are eliminated, and an
additional saving of current effected,
through the "direct drive." There
are no chains or reduction gears on
the Hupp-Yeats. Power is transmitted to the rear axle from the
motor through a si.igle set of bevel
gears.
Notwithstanding tne fact that the
Hupp-Yeats weighs 400 pounds less
than the next lightest electric, its
chassis is so strongly built that it
is capable of the same work that is
expected of gasoline cars, though it
is doubtful if it will ever be called
upon for such duties. The batteries
are carried over the front axle, the
motor being attached to the rear axle
gear housing and immediately forward of the axle itself. Thus the
weight is evenly distributed and perfect balance maintained.
A cordial invitation is extended to
all interested persons to call at Mr.
Plimley's Garage, 727 Johnson street,
and inspect the various cars sold.
Canadian Northern Pacific makes Rapid
Progress in the Construction of
its Line During 1911
The building of the Canadian Northern Pacific Railway marks an epoch
in the history of Western Canadian
development. The driving of the final
spike in its new line and the beginning
of transcontinental operations with
Victoria as its western terminal, will
mean more to British Columbia, especially that section known as Vancouver Island, than can possibly be
estimated even by the most optimistic. It will open up a country of untold timber, mineral and agricultural
wealth, heretofore inaccessible and
barren insofar as concerns thc value
of its production. It will mean the
building of new cities and new industries will spring into being, because
of the improved facilities it offers
for transportation, with the result that
thousands of men and women will
find steady and lucrative employment, so multiplying the population of
the Province and increasing greatly
the sum total of its prosperity.
During the year now drawing to its
close the Canadian Northern Pacific
has made rapid headway in the construction of the new line from Victoria to Alberni, a distance of 146
miles. Thirty-one miles of roadbed
has been graded east of Parsons
Bridge to a point just south of Sooke
Lake and all of the bridging in this
section will be finished by the middle
of February, 1912. It is expected that
the entire line will be completed
within the next eighteen months. In
operation it will make one of the most
beautiful scenic routes in the world,
at the same time entering a wonderful fishery, timber, mineral and agricultural districts, as yet practically
untouched, but which is destined to
be a district of vast resources, offering as it does so many advantages to
settlers, etc. From time to time as
the country develops spurs and feeders will  be run  rrom  the main  line
to outlying districts, tapping their
wonderful resources and enhancing
their value and progress.
It is impossible to foresee the great
benefits Victoria will derive with the
advent of this new road. Certain it is
that the city will reap bountifully
from the great increase in its transportation facilities instilling as it
will new life into every line of trade
and industry and like the multitudes
who are working for the good of the
city, we extend greetings to the company, its management and employees
and in closing let us say Victoria impatiently awaits the arrival of the
new line of Canadian Northern
Pacific.
The Queen's Hotel
Loggers'  and  Miners'  Headquarters
Victoria is fortunate itr possessing
a large number of good hotels, capable of taking care of their guests
in the best possible manner. Several
of these cater to a certain class of
people, and are recognized as the
headquarters of this class. Such a
hotel is the Queen's, located at the
corner of Johnson and Store streets.
This is known as the Victoria headquarters for loggers and miners, and
it is safe to say that it secures practically all of the men identified with
the timber and mining business, in
the capacity of employee, who from
time to time visit the "City of Opportunities." The rates are reasonable and the accommodations are the
best in the city for the money. Mr.
F. L Smith is the proprietor, and being an affable host he is very popular
with his guests. A lirst class bar
and cafe are operated in connection
•vith the hotel.
THE
Westholme Lumber Co., Ltd.
General Contractors and Builders
Cor. Douglas & Broughton Sts.
Victoria, British Columbia
Xlrtl
Uli
m
•*•*.
sirr*.
. *\ *•-> __* * ">; v*'' iM/_*'«'$*>>__,   i_
Asylum for Insane at Coquitlam under course of Construction
*-'V*,3L<
A Few of Our Contracts
Asylum for the Insane Coquitlam St. Margaret's School
Alexandra Club Building      ---------      Victoria Victor A. G. Eliot Building
Government Wharf (Reinforced Concrete)     -    -     - -   -    -     Prince Rupert q   t   Woolley's Residence
Ross Bav Sea Wall (Reinforced Concrete) Victoria ,,     -,.   .  .".   T1.      . ,   „   .,
...      . Mrs. Lhzabeth Hiscock s Residence
Westholme Hotel -----       \ ictoria ,   ,* - -  ,
V,     , -,_.      t> m •*• \, _, ;„„ rransmission Line       -
Brackman-Ker  Building .-.--. Nanaimo
Portland Canal Short Line Railway Stewart Clearing Right-of-Way E. & N. Railway
Victoria
Victoria
Somenos
 Victoria
Todd Inlet
McBride's Junction to Union THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
Pacific Coast Construction Company, Ltd.
Is Now one of the Largest Construction
Companies Operating in British Columbia
;       .**
The value to a community of concerns like the Pacific Coast Construction Company, Limited, can only be
estimated. Their importance as factors in the development of the city
in which they are located and the territory embraced in their field of operations, is of a quality and quantity
second to no other line of industry;
for they are the ones in a literal
sense actually responsible for the improvements made and wholely responsible for the dependability of such
improvements. The Pacific Coast
Construction Company, long ago demonstrated its. ability to carry on ancl
properly execute contracts of every
description, where the word construction is employed. Since their inception some two and one-half years
ago this firm has been identified with
a large number of important contracts, which, now completed, stand
monuments to their ability and success. Passing over these we will refer in this brief sketch only to their
more recent contracts, on one of
which the work is nearing completion, referring of course to the Dallas Road sea wall, probably one of
the heaviest pieces of engineering ever
successfully executed in the Province
of British Columbia. The contract
for the erection of this wall was let
and work commenced in the Spring
of the present year, and as this issue
of The Week goes to press the company hands the completed work over
to the City of Victoria, a work which
in years to come will stand a substantial monument to the Pacific Coast
Construction Company, Limited. This
wall is constructed of re-inforced concrete, is 2,000 feet long and four and
one-half feet wide at its base, which
is six to eight feet below sea level.
It tapers to a width of about three
and one-half feet at the top, and aside
from being one of the largest, it is
the only wall of its kind on the
North American Continent. It cost
the city in the neighbourhood of
$150,000 and gave employment to a
force of 150 men, who were on the
job night and day throughout the
time of its construction, ln addition to the original contract, covering only the sea wall, the company
was recently awarded a new contract
to construct steps and landings, lead-
DALLAS ROAD SEA WALL
ing to the public convenience. It is
this work which is just completed.
Another large contract was awarded
to the company in March of this
year, when, in the face of strong competition, the Dominion Government
selected them as contractors and engineers for the construction of the
Marine Depot at Digby Island,
Prince Rupert, where, at the cost of
$200,000, they are erecting the finest
Marine and Fisheries Station in Canada, including one of the largest,
scientifically constructed concrete
wharves on the Pacific coast. The
contract also calls for the erection
of four handsome residences for the
use of the Marine Staff, a large buoy
shed, power house, carbide shed, concrete chimney, lighting plant and a
complete water and sewerage system,
including storage dam. This huge
undertaking is being carried on in the
same dependable manner that has
been the chief characteristic of the
work done by the Pacific Coast Construction Company in the successful
execution of the contracts they have
been identified with in the past, and
when   completed,   it   will    mark    an
epoch in the history of Canadian progress. In adidtion to being contractors and engineers, the company is
also identified with the industrial expansion of Vancouver Island and
British Columbia as manufacturers of
Patent Ferro-Concrete Piles and Patent Ligno-Concrete buildings. The
former product is acknowledged to be
the most durable and satisfactory pile
on the market. It has been used by
the company in the construction of
several wharves and in connection
with other work where long and
heavy service has been essential. It
is now being used in the construction
of the wharf at Digby Island, spoken
of in a previous paragraph. The
buildings referred to are a more recent venture, but already they are in
great demand for residence purposes,
the Ligno-Concrete blocks, from
which they are constructed being
non-conducive, and therefore a protection against heat, cold or dampness and absolutely fireproof. The
cost of constructing a residence or
business block out of this'material
is another feature which  commends
it to the public, as is also the fact
that the company furnishes the necessary designs and sketches, thereby
doing away with the expense incurred
when an architect is employed. The
material is particularly adapted for
bungalows, though of course it is
suitable for a building or residence
of any design of architecture. At the
present time the company has contracts in hand for more than twenty
residences to be erected in Victoria
in the early spring, all of which will
be constructed of Ligno-Concrete.
Lack of space makes it impossible to
give a more comprehensive review of
this well known concern. It is
enough to add that the management
is in the hands of gentlemen thoroughly conversant with all the intricate details of the contracting and
engineering business, progressive in
their business policy and deserving the
success which has crowned their efforts. They have their head office,
wharf ancl warehouses at the foot of
Yates street, and maintain an office
for the Ligno-Concrete department
at Room 10, Board of Trade Building.
F. J. O'REILLY, British  Columbia Land Surveyor
C. T. CROSS, Accountant; Members  Victoria Real
Estate Exchange
CROSS & CO.
General Agents, Real Estate
Mines and Timber
622 Fort Street, Victoria, B. C.
Phone 556 Branch Office: Silverton, B. C.
Pacific Coast
Coal Mines
Limited
High Grade Bituminous Coal
for Bunkering, Industrial
and Domestic
Purposes
Mines: South Wellington
General Office: Victoria,B.C. THE' WEEK, SATURDAY,' DECEMBER '23, 1911
25
Great Timber #«</ Mineral Wealth of Vancouver Island
One of the strongest guarantees of
the ultimate greatness of Vancouver
Island as a contributor of essentials
toward the world's support and as a
centre consequently of population
and industrial activity is found in
the abundant endowment which this
Island possesses in both timber and
mineral wealth, both excellently di-
versifi :d ancl well distributed. The
timber needs no advertisement. It
is known by timbermen the wide
world over for its size, its strength,
and—when one comes to enquire as
to its location—its exceptionally
heavy scaling to acreage, the average
stand of Douglas fir on this Island
being probably the heaviest to be
found anywhere. As to the minerals
—every prospector who has attempted the herculean task of penetrating
the Island wilderness is fully convinced that minerals are there, in
abundance and of commercial worth.
The insuperable obstacle in the way
of their development heretofore has
been that bane of all colonizing progress—the lack of economical transportation facilities. With the extensions now in hand of the Canadian
Pacific (Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway) system on the Island, ancl the
construction of the westernmost section of the Canadian Northern Pacific through to the western coast, this
obstacle disappears to a large extent,
and one may look with confidence
to a rapid and substantial development of both lumbering and mining
interests during the next few years,
a development attended naturally and
necessarily by no inconsiderable influx of population ancl the establishment of various related industries.
To speak of the virgin timber wealth
alone which here awaits exploitation,
it has been estimated by an expert
railroad man of many years' experience that there are still standing in
Vancouver Island forests sufficient
commercial timber to provide backhaul for three transcontinental systems for a century to come.
Is this sufficient to indicate the
magnitude of our heritage in this one
essential?
Vancouver Island's coal, too', needs
no introduction on this Pacific Coast.
most important forward movement in
relation to the utilization of the
Island coal measures recorded during all the brief history of the Island.
This is accounted for largely by the
circumstance that, having acquired by
purchase the famous Dunsmuir properties, a strong company headed by
Sir   William   Mackenzie  is   now'en-
the suggestion of any lowering of
wages or impairment of efficiency in
equipment. Indeed the contrary is in
each case the actuality. Besides the
extensive forward programme of the
Canadian Colliers, Ltd., the new mines
of the Pacific Coast Coal Co., which
have their shipping base at the new
port  of  Boat  Harbor,  are  now  im-
It represents the higher standard of
quality in comparison with the product of all Coast mines; it is of fine
coking possibility; and it is found in
exhaustible quantity, conveniently
placed for shipment by water, the
most economical transport agency.
The past year has seen probably the
gaged in the reorganization of existent and the opening of new mines,
all to be worked in future upon ultramodern system, so that the output
will be very appreciably increased
while simultaneously the average tonnage cost of production will be considerably reduced.   And this without
portant contributors to thc Island's
total of coal production; and at the
present time a half a dozen other
companies are actively preparing to
open new mines and work them, assuring an increased volume of production and possibly lower cost to the
provincial consumer.    Of these  new
mines some are on the Eastern Island
Coast, in the direct path of earlier
coal measures; others on the western
seaboard as far to the North as
Quatsino, at which port surface out-
croppings have long been known to
exist and have even supplied fuel
coal for passing steam craft; and yet
others on Tumbo, Saturna and nearly related islands of the Gulf of
Georgia, these lying in the recognized
coal bearing zone on which the Nanaimo and Comox mines are founded. The wide distribution of coal
areas of fixed commercial worth
throughout the Island is thus accentuated. During the year now
passing it is estimated that the coal
production of the Island has exceeded by quite twenty per cent, the
next highest production total in history; while for 1912 an even greater
advance is confidently predicted.
As to metalliferous mines, the situation is so bound up with that of
railway construction as to make any
comprehensive development policy
with regard to mines auxiliary to
and a necessary part of railway policy. The construction of the roads
already assured or substantially guaranteed in the development plans of
two transcontinental systems must
result in an unprecedented activity
in prospecting and development of
already located claims, the value of
which has long been approximately
understood, although development has
been set back by the past impossibility either of getting in supplies or
getting out the mined ore. This major handicap must disappear with the
advent of railways, and incidentally
the promotion of the development of
the mines will be fostered in every
possible way by the railway companies, which cannot aflford to ignore
so paramount a feature in the creation   of   traffic  necessary  to  make
P
\ME make a special-
^^ ty of show eases,
bank, store, hotel and
office fixtures, art grills
and mirrors, hardwood
finish of every description, veneer doors and
windows, wall panelling, etc. Our new factory is one of the most
up-to-date on the Coast
Give us a trial—We
guarantee satisfaction
and furnish estimates
upon application
Woo&workers
Timite6
R. McKINNEY, Manager
Manufacturers of Doors, Windows
Rough and Dressed Lumber
Lath, Shingles
Etc.
Factory and Office:
2843 DOUGLAS ST.    VICTORIA, B. C.
Telephone 1396
All Kinds of Building Material in both Hard and
Soft Woods 26
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
WE ARE
The largest dealers in lumber, and carry the most complete stock of finished
products on the Island.    Our facilities for handling your order are the best
IF YOU
Have been disappointed in the manner in which your last order was handled
it was because the other fellow got your business. Come to us direct with
your next order and we will guarantee   to   deliver   what   you   want,
when you want it.
t
Canadian Puget Sound Lumber Co.
Limited
Manufacturers of Lumber,Logs,Lath,Shingles,Box Shooks,Sash,Doors&interior Finish
Corner Store and Discovery Streets, Victoria, British Columbia
Telephone 25
their respective ventures profitable.
The gross value of mineral products
mined from Vancouver Island during
the closing year is approximately estimated at something very close to
$9,000,000, a marked increase being
recorded, as 1910 produced a total of
but $7,635,890, an advance from
$6,280,631 in 1909 and $5,233,397 in
the previous year.
To exclude from consideration both
coal and its by-products, the Island
is known to contain extensive deposits of gold and copper bearing
quartz; large fields of iron ore, both
hematite and magnetic; silver and
lead in common combination, together
with a considerable number of the
rarer metals the existence of which
is too frequently non-apparent to the
casual prospector whose tests are for
the more familiar in mineral wealth.
Iron especially is certain to become
in time one of the great supporting
factors of Island industry, the ore existing in sufficient quantity in the
several fields to justify the establishment and operation of immense smelters and blast furnaces, rolling mills,
etc., its utilization being economically possible through the near presence
also of limestone and other fluxes,
coal ancl coke—indeed all the essentials of modern manufacture.
Any attempt to compute even most
approximately the timber wealth of
Vancouver Island produces results almost staggering in their magnitude.
Prefatorily it may be said that although there are at present contained
in crown-granted lands and lands
held for timber under lease or license
on the Island no less than 1,900,000
acres, even this does not represent
the complete total of timber-bearing
land. It is a recognized fact that
specially fine stands of Douglas fir
cut as high as 200,000 feet to the
acre, while 50,000 feet may be said
to represent a very safe average, and
$8.00 per M. may be taken as a fair
value of logs delivered at the mill,
from which it will be seen that—since
the cut timber to date represents but
a  microscopic  and  insignificant  fac
tor of the total,—Vancouver Island
at present possesses in its standing timber a capitalization in this
one resource of something like
$750,000,000.00!
Last year's production, according
to official figures, may be set down
roughly at 202,277,783 feet in logs
alone, to say nothing of the output
in poles, mining props, shingle bolts,
corwood, etc., the Island cut representing about thirty per cent, of the
provincial total, and the timber industry returning to the Government
in 1910 (the last year for which complete returns are as yet available) no
less than $2,056,644.31 in revenue under royalty, lease and license charges.
Up to the present time the attention of millmen in the exploitation
of Vancouver Island's timber wealth
has been almost wholly devoted to
the lordly Douglas fir. Besides this
noble tree, the Island has also immense resources in spruce of gigantic
proportions ancl very considerable
worth as commercial timber, hemlock of equally noble size, white cedar closely resembling the famous
southern cypress in its everlasting
quality, red cedar, and a great variety of less important woods.
The development of the timber resource is as yet in its infancy. This
industry, too, must obtain the greatest possible impetus through the
opening up of the Island by railway
construction, and not only may British Columbians look for the creation
of many important towns and cities
through the operations of loggers and
millmen, but incidentally through the
inevitable establishment of pulp
manufacturing plants and paper mills,
car shops, ancl a score ancl more of
other related industries which will
find their raw materials convenient
to the hand in the developing mines
ancl timber areas.
The day of Vancouver Island's
greatness resultant upon the utilization of its virgin areas and its mines
would seem to be near at hand.
A New Industry which is Making Rapid Progress
The Canada Mosaic Tile Co. plan big Improvements
Necessary to Supply the Trade with
Argilla Tile
Victoria is fast becoming an industrial centre. New and important
firms are springing into life and
joining in the forward march of progress. A fact which foretells the
great development and prosperity in
store for the city and Island during
the next decade. In the subject of
this sketch we have one of Victoria's youngest industrial enterprises, though it has already proclaimed itself one of the most aggressive and progressive in the "City of
Opportunities." The month of March,
1911, marked the birth of The Canada Mosaic Tile Company, Limited.
It was given life by Messrs. Geo.
Ager and R.'W. Marsh, who until they
were assured of the ultimate success
of their undertaking gave no voice to
the merit of their product, which at
present consists of Argilla flooring
tiles, but which will eventually include the manufacture of all the byproducts of concrete. This is essentially a home industry; all of output with the exception of the colouring, being made from Vancouver
Island products. The cement comes
from the beds of the Vancouver
Portland Cement Company, which after most exhaustive ancl thorough
tests made in competition with cement from .all parts of the world
proved to be the most satisfactory,
and the fine washed sand used in mixing the concrete is secured from the
Producers' Rock & Gravel Company
of Victoria. The colouring is the
only foreign substance employed ancl
that is imported from France and
Germany. Although the product of
the Canada Mosaic Tile Company is
new in this country, its superiority
over other tiles placed upon the market, was so clearly demonstrated that
from the day of its inception the
company has met with flattering suc
cess, orders pouring in from all parts
of the Province, including Grand
Forks, Kaslo, Vernon, Revelstoke,
Kamloops and Vancouver. In a local
way the stamp of approval has been
set upon the name of Argilla tiles as
is evidenced by its use in the construction of such buildings as the El-
Hot-McPherson-Fullerton block, the
new wing of the Parliament buildings
and the new Union Bank building in
Government Street. Probably the
most beautiful tiled floor in British
Columbia is that at the Grotto Saloon
on Douglas street, and the tiling used
bears the name of Argilla and was
manufactured by The Canada Mosaic
Tile Company, Limited. The process
under which the output of this company is manufactured is a German invention, and the company has secured
the sole right for Canada ancl the
United States for the use of the machine with which the tiles are manufactured. Branch factories will be
put into operation throughout the
Dominion and in the States as well,
ancl it will be interesting indeed t'o
watch the development of an industry, born on the Pacific Coast, as it
wends its way eastward to the Atlantic. Usually our western industries are the offsprings of eastern
parentage. The Canada Mosaic Tile
Company was incorporated November
2nd of this year, having for its board
of directors Beaumont Boggs, president; Geo. A. Fraser, Dr. A. E. McMicking, R. W. Marsh and Geo.
Ager, a most capable board and a
strong one. Mr. March, who will
act as superintendent of manufacture for the company, has had some
eight years or more experience along
this line of manufacturing, having
studied the different processes of
manufacturing tile in Europe ancl introduced the business in China, which
is now grown into large proportions
there. The company has purchased
a site on the E. & N. R. R. with 400
feet of trackage, and their architect
is now preparing plans for a large
and up-to-date plant which when completed will have a capacity of 1,000
feet of tile per day. To make these
improvements the company will place
a limited amount of their stock upon
the market for public subscription,
and in view of the success they have
already attained it should prove to
be a very valuable investment. At
any rate it is worthy of further investigation, and for this purpose the
public is cordially invited to call at
the offices of the company at 1318
Wharf Street, or address them, care
P. O.  Box  1171.
The British Columbia
Marine Railways Company, Limited
One of our biggest industries—Large
Payroll Adds Greatly to the Sum
Total of Our Prosperity—Brings
Outside Capital Into Circulation
in the City
The mighty commerce of the Pacific will demand Pacific Coast shipyards, and the British Columbia
Marine Railways Company, Limited,
have already laid the foundations of
a vast shipbuilding enterprise that
will not only add to our wealth, but
contribute to our commercial prestige and influence. They construct
steel and wooden vessels, and dock,
paint and repair them. The company's marine railways and plant at
Esquimalt have facilities for docking
up to 3,500 tons gross; for vessels of
larger tonnage they have arrangements for docking them at the Dominion Government drydock at Esquimalt, the company's yards at Victoria and Vancouver being slightlj
smaller than that at Esquimalt. Thej
employ from 300 to 600 hands. Thc
president of the company is Mr. W
F. Bullen, and the managing directoi
is Mr. H. F. Bullen.
We Manufacture all Grades of Fir, Spruce, Cedar & Hemlock Lumber
Our Stock is Large and we can fill all orders promptly.   Good Dry Kilns and Best Machinery enable us to turn out finest Finishing Lumber
Cameron Lumber Co.
Limited
VICTORIA, B. C.
Lath, Mouldings, Flooring and Ceiling, Drop and Bevelled Siding, Casing
and Base, Door and Window Jam, Stepping, Gutter,
—PlfcL" Band Sawing, Trimmings, Etc.
We [Make ■Telephone, ^Telegraph   and   Power  Cross-Arms THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23. 1911
27
The Shawnigan Lake Lumber Company
Limited
Our New Plant at Shawnigan Lake is one of the Best Equipped and Most
Modern in Western Canada—Enabling us to fill all orders promptly and
guarantee satisfactory delivery.        Address all Communications P. 0. Box 298
Code Used: American Lumberman Telecode
Yard and Office, Corner Government and Discovery Streets    Victoria, B. C.
Mills, Shawnigan Lake, B. C.
SHINGLES
The demand for our Shingles keeps our plant running
day and night.   We manufacture a genuine
No. 1 Shingle.   Try us.
Victoria Shingle Mills, Limited
Phone 2545
424 David Street
Victoria
LUMBER
Sash, Doors, Mantels, Tiles, Grates, Interior and Exterior
Trim.   All kinds of Joinery and Millwork.
Shipments local & foreign
James Leigh & Son
Phone 397
Mill, Office & Yard: Foot of Turner
and Pleasant Sts.
Victoria, B. C
Bulman Lumber
Company
Limited
Prominently Identified with the
Building Activities of
Victoria
This is an industry particularly interested in the growth and prosperity of Victoria and vicinity, ancl one
which is closely identified with the
building activity of the community.
Incorporated some four years ago it
is one of the substantial and growing
concerns of this section of the country. As manufacturers of lumber,
lathe, shingles, doors and other constructive articles the company has
built up an extensice trade whicii is
constantly on the increase. In fact
at the present time the plant is running to its capacity to keep up with
the demand. The mill of the Bulman
Lumber Company, located at Spring
[sland, is equipped with machinery of
the most modern construction, and
here the product of the company is
prepared for the market. Thc offices,
yard and wharf, are located at 618
Montreal street. The company owns
large timber tracts which possess
some of the finest growths in the
province. The timber is splendidly
diversified and excellently located, as.
regards accessibility for logging pur***"
poses. Mr. W. Bulman is the managing director of the company's affairs. He is not only a most capable
business man but is an enthusiastic
booster for a greater Victoria and
the general progress of Vancouver
[sland.
Mount Royal:
Milling&Man-
ufacturing
Company
Throughout the entire Dominion
the Mount Royal Milling and Manufacturing Company has blazed a trail
and won for itself distinction as producers of rice products of the highest
quality. With the knowledge of the
merit of the company's output came
a continued increa e in the demand
for them, and some five years ago
they realized the necessity of establishing a branch mill at Victoria. This
mill fully equipped with the most
modern machinery, supplies not only
Victoria and Vancouver Island, but
all of British Columbia and the
Northwest Provinces as far east as
Winnipeg. Their "Rice Meal" for
cattle feed, and "Chit Rice" for poultry and chicken feed are both said
to be unequalled for the purposes for
whicii they arc produced. The company imports all its raw material direct from the rice fields of China and
Japan, and the rice for table or domestic use, being the product of specially selected material, is unrivalled
for purity and flavour, lt i:, the rice!
purchased by those who desire the
best, lhe Victoria mill is managed
by Mr. J. McLorie, a gentleman who
has unfounded faith in the great future in store-for Victoria and an able
and progressive business man.
THE WRONG NUMBER
Speedy    (telephoning   from    farmhouse   to
garage):    "I   guess  you  will   have   to   come
and get me.    I've turned  turtle."
Voice:    "This is a garage;  you want  the
acquarium."
J. J. Lemon, President        A. Gonnason, Vice President        F. Nickells, Sec.-Treas.
Lemon, Gonnason Co.
Limited
_■'•   CAPITAL PLANING MILLS
Manufacturers of Lumber, Sash, Doors
Mouldings, Etc.
!
Office & Mills, Orchard Street     Vidoria, B. C.
P. O. Box 363       Telephone 77
The Very Best COAL on the Island
comes from the
South Wellington Mines
We are the Sole Agents and guarantee
2000 lbs. to the ton.
The Victoria Fuel Co., Ltd.
622 Trounce Avenue
Phone 1377 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
Canadian Mineral
Rubber Company
Sfe^PaSn^Contractors
Head Office: Toronto, Ontario    Victoria Office: Lumber Exchange Buildin
*'   IM..^^^^B_______\ THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
11
Limestone Beds
That British Columbia holds valuable limestone beds is the statement
if Mr. Alexander Faulds, a well-
cnown Vancouver mining engineer,
vho has returned to that city after
laving made a close inspection of the
erritory located along the line of
he Grand Trunk Pacific between the
ownsites of Shames and Amsbury.
n his report on the inspection trip,
Ar. Faulds states that in his opinion
he deposits contain millions of tons
tf cement of the highest grade. According to assays made of samples
hese deposits of crystallized lime-
itone are perfect for the manufac-
ure of cement.
Music Hath No Charms
The proposal to populate the woods
)f British Columbia with song birds
pf Britain,   whose harmlessness was
egarded as beyond all question, has
|_een    practically    abandoned.     The
'irospect  of hearing the  rising  note
f the lark or the twittering of the
[obin, in some field in the Fraser valley must be surrendered as a result
f a conference between the deputy
Ijiinister of agriculture and Mr. Bry-
n  Williams,    the    provincial  game
varden, following on the protests of
he fruit-growers of the province, who
eared  damage to  their  fruit.    The
trictly   commercial   has   triumphed
iver the sentimental view.
C. P. R. to "Get Busy" in B. C.
The C.  P. R. says Superintendent
||3ury will do more railway construction in 1912 than in any previous year
In B. C.   When the C. P. R. see other
ailroads butting in as the C. N. R.,
|tc,   are  doing,  they  get  busy  too,
Ind there is no doubt but they must
Jjittend to B. C. from now out.   Con-
Ittruction on the   prairies   has been
taking their attention iu the past but
now they must find ways and means
for prairie traffic to get to the coast
and interior of B. C.
Good for Edmonton
The Hudson's Bay Company has decided to sub-divide and offer for sale
its entire holdings in the City of Edmonton. The property is situated in
the centre of the city, and has remained undeveloped while the city
has grown in every direction around.
The company is offering to the city,
for park purposes, the property on
which the golf links are at present
situated, valued at about $300,000.
Leaves for England
Hon. J. D. Hazen, minister of marine and the naval service, will leave
for England immediately after
Christmas. It is understood that he
goes to consult with the British admiralty and to obtain counsel as to
the form which Canada's contribution to the imperial navy should take.
New Parliament Buildings
Following the announcement of the
sale of the site of Fort Osborne barracks to the Manitoba government,
$200,000 tenders will bc called for new
parliament buildings. All British
architects may compete, and wide
latitude will be allowed as to the
total cost.
All Agog
Kamloops is agog with excitement
following the discovery of placer
gold at the Tilton ranch on Rosehill,
a few miles from the city. Parties
have been busy locating claims, and
with the advent of spring work will
be actively undertaken to prospect
the whole district.
A  Deer  Exchange
Several shipments of deer have
been made from Porcher Island to
the islands of the Queen Charlotte
group by instruction of the government, whicii pays the hunters who secure  suitable  live  deer.
GOSSIP FROM THE STALLS
(Continued from Page 9)
The Old Town
It's always a safe wager that a
Dillingham production will contain
beauty galore. Where all the pretty
girls come from is a mystery to everyone, but Mr. Charles Dillingham himself. Whether it is due to his system of promotion, his engaging personality, or to the extreme extravagance of his productions where a girl
has the opportunity probably for the
first time to wear the most expensive
of gowns and millinery; but that matters not, for there is always beauty
in a  Dillingham production.
Two new stage beauties will be introduced during the engagement here
when the Misses Helen Falconer and
Edna Bates appear with Montgomery
and Stone in "The Old Town." These
two beautiful girls are said to be so
marvelously alike in form, feature and
colouring and expression that to
those who do not know them intimately arc astonished to be told they
are not twins, as it is only their
closest intimates who can distinguish
them apart, Such a phenomena is
rarely known—two girls of different
families, and one almost the counterpart of the other.
Owing to the absence of a member
of The Week staff a 'prentice hand
was turned loose on the dramatic
column last week with disastrous results. It is commonly supposed that
♦anyone from the office boy down can
write dramatic criticism, but it does
not always work out that way, and
hereafter whenever it is necessary to
entrust a department to one of the
subordinates it will be the editorial
and not the dramatic page in which
he will figure.—Ed. Week.
VintageChampagnes
Moet & Chandon, Dry Imperial, 1898 - Qts.
Moet&Chandon,DryImperial,1900-Pts.& Qts.
Moet & Chandon, Dry Imperial, 1906  - Qts.
Can Be Obtained from
Turner, Beeton & Co., Ld.
Wholesale Liquor Merchants
or any Retail Liquor Store
1232 WHARF STREET, VICTORIA
PHONE 116
For Prizes
20% Discount off our splendid selection of Books,
Bibles, Prayer and Hymn Books, etc., for
Prizes.    Best stock in the city
at our two stores
1004 Government St., late Waitt's Music Store
1216 Douglas Street, opposite
Sayward Blk.
Victoria Book & Stationery
Company, Limited 12
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
I
Rules for Limerick Competitors
i. Tn order to win a Limerick Prize it is only necessary to cut
out Coupon below, and to add a line to the verse which accompanies
the Coupon. This last line must rhyme with the first two lines, but
neither of the last two words terminating the first two lines may be
used.
2. All who desire to compete for the prizes offered by "The
Week" for Limericks must enclose the Coupon below, together with
P. O. for 50c (no stamps, and forward same not later than January
6th, addressed Limerick Editor, The Week, Victoria, B.C. All letters
sent after that date will be disqualified.
3. Competitors may submit two or more Limericks if desired—
but each attempt must be accompanied by separate coupon, and
additional entrance fee. Competitors sending more than one Limerick
may enclose one money order or cheque for the full amount covering
the number of their coupons. The Editor undertakes that every
Limerick shall receive careful consideration, but he will not hold himself responsible for coupons lost or mislaid.
4. The decision of the Editor on all matters relating to this
competition must be accepted as final, and acceptance of this rule is
an express condition of entry.
5. The result 'of each competition will be duly announced in the
next issue of "The Week," following the closing date for entries.
The names of the prize-winners, together with their addresses, will
be published with the winning lines,
6. The total amount of the money received will be distributed
amongst the winners who will be graded in order of merit, less 10
per cent, for various objects of general public interest, and. 10 per
cent, for expenses. The 10 per cent, this month will be paid to the
Public Library for the purpose of adding new books to the Library.
(We should be happy to receive any suggestions as regards the books
most in request by readers). Next month the amount set aside for
public purposes will be given to the Jubilee Hospital.
"THE WEEK" LIMERICK COMPETITION
Coupon No. 4
We hail Father Christmas today,
Who has always a glorious way,
Of distributing toys,
To good little  boys
Name  	
Address 	
No. of M. Order	
LIMERICK  COMPETITION
Forty Dollars in Prizes
In order to stimulate interest in
the Limerick Competitions which
have been running in The Week during the past month, the Editor of
The Week is offering three prizes
which will be awarded in order—1, 2,
3—to the best last line sent in to complete the following Limerick. The
prizes will be of value respectively:
$20.00, $15.00 and $5.00. These prizes
will be awarded irrespective of the
number of entries, but a P. 0. for
50 cents must accompany each
coupon.
PRIZE AWARD
As the number of competitors for
the second Limerick has been only
slightly in excess of that for the first,
it has again been decided to divide
the prize money between two competitors, the first ancl second, whose
Limericks are published below. There
were twenty entries, yielding $10.00,
which has been divided as follows:—
50 per cent, to the winner; 30 per
cent, to the second, 10 per cent, to be
set aside until it increases for the
Library ancl 10 per cent, for expenses.
First Prize—Mr. James Rye, Quarantine  Station, William Head.
They say there's a man in the moon,
Who at Aeroplanes winks, crying "Soon
'"If they're out for a race
"They may pass me in space,
"So please semi my 'Week' hy halloon."
Second Prize—Mr. Frank Sehl,
2411 Work Street, Victoria.
They say  there's a man in  thc moon,
Who at Aeroplanes winks, crying "Soon
"If they're out for a race
"They may pass me in space,
"On a course from Merlin to Rangoon."
A cheque for $5.00 has been forwarded to Mr. Rye and another for
$3.00 to Mr. Sehl.
LAMENTATIONS OF NEBUCHADNEZZAR
For seven  long years I ate unwonted grass,
With  the  wild  oxen and the savage ass;
And said, while eating this peculiar food,
"It may be wholesome, hut it is not good."
A bridegroom, on returning thanks, blundered through a speech, and, hardly knowing
what he was saying, brought blushes to the
cheeks of the bride by trusting "that in future
her  troubles would  bc little ones."
A Good
Tip
BUY   your   MILK,   CREAM,
EGGS and BUTTER at
The Island
Creamery
Ass'n
All Dairy Products
Cowichan Eggs and Creamery
Butter, Fresh Jersey Cream
and Milk Bottled
735 Fort St. Phone 2466
Watson A. Clark, Mgr.
N. W. F. Rant, Sec'y.
All Orders Promptly Delivered
THE PAVEMENT
They  took  a   little  gravel
And they  took a little tar;
With   other   such   ingredients
Imported   from   afar.
They   hammered   it   and  rolled   it,
And when  they went away,
They  said   they   had   a  pavement
That would last for. many a day.
But they came with picks and smote it,
To   lay   a   water   main:
And then they called the workmen
To  put  it  back  again.
To   run   a   railway   cable
They   took   it   up   once   more
And then they put it back again
Just   where    it   was   before.
They  took  it   up   for  conduit,
To run  thc   telephone,
And  then  they  put it back  again
As   hard   as   any   stone.
They took it up for wires
To   feed   th'   electric   light,
And  then  they  put  it  back again
Which  was  just,  and  only  right.
Oh!   the   Pavement,   full   of  furrows,
There   are   patches   everywhere.
You'd  like  to   ride  upon  it
But it's  seldom  that you  dare.
It's   a   very   handsome   Pavement,
A   credit   to  the   town.
They are always digging of it  up
Or putting of it down.
SUSPICIOUS.  .
Several years ago, when the Methodist
church in Willoughby was being torn down
to malce place for the present beautiful edifice, Mayor Wilson had occasion to hire a
man for a few days.
He sought Pat O'Erjen—a well known
citizen—to do the job.
"I can't do ut "at all—at all!" decalred
Patrick.
"Oh, try it for a day or two," urged the
mayor. "Get off any way you can to help
me."
"Begohs, I can't do it. I'm havin' th'
toime of me loife. I'm tearin' down a Protestant church, an' bein' paid f'r it."
There are few more beautiful or touching
sights than a litlle child saying its prayers.
We were the other evening witness of a
cherub of four at its devotions. Fervently
thc little child at the knee of its mother said,
"God bless mamma and papa, and" (for this
we were unprepared)  "the old  Obadiah  and
the  young "    It was not  allowed   to  go
beyond "young," but was hurried off to bed.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
"WATER  ACT,   1909."
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that the Wellington Colliery Company, Limited, holder of
Water Licences Nos. 1919 and 1920, granted
by the Water Commissioner for the Victoria
Water District, for the diversion of 1,000
cubic feet per second of water from the
Puntledge River, a tributary of Courtenay
River, has submitted to the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council a map or plan of the
works by which it intends to divert the said
water and conduct it to the place where it
shall be used for generating electric power as
described in the said  Licences.
That the undertaking of the said Wellington Colliery Company, Limited, as set out
in the( said plans' is hereby approved, and
the said Company is hereby authorized to
construct and ^execute the following works in
accordance with the plans and specifications
submitted and filed in the office of the Chief
Water Commissioner at Victoria, viz.:—
A. An impounding dam near the outlet of
Comox Lake.
B. Lowering  the  bed   of   Puntledge   River
and the hereinafter described diversion
dam to an increased depth of five feet
or less.
C. A   diversion   dam   on   Puntledge   River
about 2,800 feet below the impounding
dam above described.
D. The works  necessary  for  tho  transmis
sion of the power generated under the
above Licences on and in the vicinity
of lands belonging to the said Company.
That the Company may exercise its powers
within the Comox and Nelson Land Districts.
That no capital be required beyond that
already subscribed and paid up.
■ That the works shall be begun on or
before the first day of May next, and shall
be completed and in actual operation on or
before the 31st December,   1913.
With the proviso that during the construction of thc said works any engineer
appointed by the Minister of Lands for that
purpose shall have free access to all parts
of the works for the purpose of inspecting
the same and of ascertaining tnat the construction thereof is in accordance with the
plans and specifications herein referred to,
and that the cost of such inspection shall bc
paid by the Company.
Dated this 27th day of November.  1911.
A. CAMPBELL REDDIE,
Deputy Clerk of the Executive Council.
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
established by notice bearing date June 30th,
1908, and published in the British Columbia
Gazette on July 2nd, 1908, over certain lands
in the Districts of Cariboo and Lillooet in
the vicinity of the 52nd parallel of North
latitude, is cancelled in so far as the same
relates to the lands surveyed as Sections 12,
■ 3* 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 34, 35, and 36, Township 46, Lillooet District; Sections 4, 5, 6, 7,
8, and 9, Township 52, Liilooet District; Sections 1, 2, 4, 9, 12, 15, 16, 17, 18, 23, 26,
35, and 36, Township 54, Lillooet Districtc;
Sections 28, 20, 30, 31, 32, and 33, Township
84, Lillooet District; Sections 25, 26, 27, 28,
29, 30. 3>, 32, 33., 34, 35. and 36, Township
86, Lillooet District; Sections 34, 35 and 36,
Township 88, Lillooet District; Sections 1, 2,
3, 4, 9, 10, 11, 15, and 16, Township 47, Cariboo District; Sections 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
15, 16, 17, 18, 21 and 22, Township 49, Cariboo District; and Sections 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6,
7, 8, 0, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19.
20 and si, Township 51, Cariboo District, and
Sections 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13,
14, 15, 16, 1*7, 18, 18 and 20, Township 53
Cariboo District.
R. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C.
uth October, 1911.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
oct. 14
jan. 13
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range III
TAKE notice that Albert Edward Christie
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Banker, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—-Commencing at a
post planted at the north-west corner of Lot
140, Dean Channel, thence east twenty chains;
thence north ten chains more or less to the
south bank of the Salmon River; thence following the south bank of the Salmon River
in a south-westerly direction twenty chains
more or less, thence south to point of commencement, and containing ten acres more
or less.
Dated October 21st,   1911.
ALBERT EDWARD CHRISTIE.
A. K.  Stuart, Agent,
nov. 25 jan. 20
COAST LAND DISTRICT
Range I
TAKE notice that Archibald Dunbar Taylor, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Barrister,
intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted on the east shore of Cardero Channel and about thirty chains north
of Henry Point; thence east 45 chains; thence
north 30 chains to the south-west corner of
Lot 91; thence north 40 chains along the line
of Limit 91 and thence west 4s chains more
or less to the shore of Cardero Channel;
thence south _ along the shore of Cardero
Channel to point of commencement.
Dated November 17th, 1911.
ARCHIBALD DUNBAR TAYLOR.
Geo. Y. Hibberd, Agent.
dec. 2 jan. 27
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Renfrew
TAKE notice that I, D. J. O'Brien, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation cruiser, intend to
apply for permission to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted at thc
north-west corner and marked D. J. O'B.
N.W. Cor., located about 20 chains west
and 6 chains south of the south-east corner
of Lot 650, Renfrew District, and also about
one and three-fourths miles south and two
and a quarter miles west of mile post 43 on
the boundary line of the E* & N. R. R.
grant; tbence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains to point of commencement.
Located December 9th,   1911.
D. J.  O'BRIEN,
dec. 23 jan. 20
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Renfrew
TAKE notice that I, J. M. Linton, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation cruiser, intend to
apply for permission to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner and marked J. M. L.
N. E. Cor., located about 20 chains west
and fi chains south of the south-east corner
of Lot 650, Renfrew District, and also about
one and three-fourths miles south and two
and a quarter miles west of mile post 43 on
the boundary line of the E. & N. R.R. grant;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains to point of commencement.
Located  December oth,   1911.
J. M. LINTON,
dec. 23 Jan. 20
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days after
date I intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands foi* a Licence to prospect
for Coal and Petroleum under _ the following
described submarine areas adjacent to the
south-west coast of Saturna Island, Cowichan
District, British Columbia:—Commencing at
a post placed at the south-east corner of
Section No. .4 on Saturna Island, Cowichan
District, British Columbia; thence 60 chains
south; thence 80 chains west; thence 80
chains to the> sea beach at high water mark;
thence following the sea beach at high water
mark in an easterly direction to point of
commencement.
Dated September 18th, 1911.
Locator, T. D. ROBERTS.
Agent, G.  F. Payne,
nov. 25 dec. 23
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserves
established over vacant Crown Lands in
Ranges a and 5, Coast District, by notice
bearing dates respectively of December 17th,
1908, May 5th, 1910, and May, 25th, 1910,
which were published in the British Columbia
Gazette in the issues of December 17th, 1908,
May 12th, 1910, and May 26th, 1910, are cancelled in so far as the same relates to the
lands surveyed as Lots 387, 388, 532, 533, 534,
535, 53*5, 537, 538, 539, 540, 541, mi, 1112,
1113, 1114, 11 IS, 1116, 1117, 1118,
1119, 1120, 1121, and 1122, all in Range 4,
Coast District; and Lots 4028, 4029, 4030,
4031, 3022A, 3030, 3031A, 3043, 3044, 5594A,
4933, and 4934, all in Range 5, Coast District.
R. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C.
uth October, 1911.
oct. 14 Jan. 13
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that an application will be made to the Legislative Assembly
of the Province of British Columbia at its
next session for an Act granting to The Victoria Harbour Railway Company an extension
of time within which to commence and continuously and effectually proceed with the
construction of its railway, and also an extension of time within which tot spend fifteen
per cent, of its authorised capital upon the
construction  of  its  railway.
Dated at Victoria, B. C, this 4th day of
December,  1911.
ROBERTSON & HEISTERMAN,
Solicitors for the Applicants.
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 daya
after date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence to prospect for Coal and Petroleum under the following described submarine areas adjacent to
the South-west Coast of Saturna Island, Cowichan District, British Columbia:—Commencing at a post placed about the south-west
corner of the north-west quarters of Section
5, Saturna Island, Cowichan District, British j
Columbia; thence 80 chains south; thence
80 cnains east; thence 50 chains north, more
or less to the sea beach at high water mark;
thence following the sea beach at high water
mark in a westerly direction to the point 1
of commencement.
Dated September 18th, 1911.
Locator, W. FLINDELL.
Agent, G. F.  Payne,
nov. 25 dec. 23 |
VICTORIA  LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE  notice   that   I,   Rebekah   Crane, .of I
Vancouver, B.C., occupation House Wife, in-1
tends   to  apply   for   permission  to  purchase I
the  following  described  lands:—Commencing I
at  a post planted  about 20 chains west  oil
the north-west corner of the north-west quar-P
ter  of Section  22,  Township  8,  Range  111,1
Bella   Coola   Valley,   and   containing   sixty|
acres, more or less.
Dated  September  20,   1911.
MRS. REBEKAH CRANE,
nov. 4 dec. 3q
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days after
date I intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands tor a Licence to prospect
for Coal and Petroleum under the following
described submarine areas adjacent to the
south-west Coast of Saturna Island, Cowichan District, British Columbia:—Commencing at a post placed at the south-west corner
of Section No. 2, Saturna Island, Cowichan
District, British Columbia; thence 62 chajns
south; thence 80 chains east; thence 80 chains
north, to the sea beach at high water mark;
thence following the sea beach at high water
mark in a westerly direction to the point of
commencement.
Dated  September   18th,   ion.
Locator, E. R. CARTWRIGHT.
Agent, G. F. Payne,
nov. 25 dec. 23
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Renfrew
TAKE notice that I, H. L. Bunnell, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Cruiser, intend
to apply for permission to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the
south-west corner and marked H. L. B. S.W.
Cor., located about 20 chains west and 6
chains south of the south-cast corner of Lot
650, Renfrew District, and also about one
and three-fourths miles south and two and
a quarter miles west of mile post 43 on the
boundary line of tbe E. & N. R.R. grant;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80 cnains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains  to  point   of  commencement.
Located  December 9th.   1911.
II.  I,.  BUNNELL,
dec. 23 jan. 20
Young lady would like place as
lady help on ranch or farm, well
domesticated, musical, age 22;
also similar place for lady
fiiend. Write Miss C. Jessop,
White Hart Hotel, Margate,
Kent, England.
NOTICE
PRIVATE BILLS
. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitions for Private Bills must be presented to
the Legislative Assembly not later than Monday, the 22nd day of January,  1912.
Private Bills must be presented and introduced to the House not later than the ist
day of February,  1912.
Private Bills must be reported to the House
by the Committee considering same not later
than the 8th day of February, 1912.
Dated this 8th day of December,   1911.
THORNTON FELL,
Clerk Legislative Assembly.
dec. 9 feb. 3
RENFREW LAND DISTRICT
District of Jordan River 1
TAKE notice that I, Netta B. Moore,' ofi
Victoria, occupation Married Woman, intends!
to apply for permission to purchase the fol-l
lowing described lands:—Commencing at al
post planted sixty chains distant in a westerly I
direction from the north-east corner of Lot •},!
Renfrew District, being Netta B. Moore, S. E.I
Corner; thence north 40 chains; thence wcstl
34 chains; thence soutli 18.6 chains; thencel
east 10 chains; thence south 21.4 chains;!
thence east 24 chains to place of commence-f
ment, and containing one hundred and fourteen and six-tenths acres, more or less.
Dated November 28th, ign.
NETTA B. MOORE.
By William W. Steinmctz, AgentJ
dec. 3 teb* ■'
"LAND REGISTRY ACT"
In the matter of an  application for  a fresli
Certificate of Title to Lots 1769 and 179J
and parts of Lots 1768 and 1800, Victoril
City, British Columbia. I
NOTICE is hereby given of my intentiol
at the expiration of one calendar month frorl
the first publication  hereof to issue a fresl
Certificate of Title in lieu of the Certificatl
of Title issued to William Brooke Naylor ol
the 17th of July,  1890 and numbered  ioi8oJT
which has been destroyed. 1
Dated  at   Land   Registry   Office,  Victoria
B.C.,  this   ist day of  December, A.D.   191!
S. Y. WOOTTON 1
Registrar-General of Titles.
dec. 9 ian.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Malahat
TAKE NOTICE that I, Frederick Ado!
phus Futcher, of Victoria, B.C., oceupatio!
Merchant, intends to apply fpr permission tl
purchase the following described lands :-F
Commencing at a post planted at high watd
mark on the north bank of Arbutus Creek a
its mouth, Saanich Arm, on Lot 120, Malahal
District; thence east ten chains; thence nortl
to low water mark; thence following lo*
water mark in a westerly and northerly direc]
tion to a point due east of the north-easl
corner of Lot 120, Malahat District; thenci
west to high water mark; thence in a south!
erly direction following high water mark tl
point of commencement. ■
Dated November 2nd, ion.
FREDERICK ADOLPHUS FUTCHER,
Per William Meyerstein, Agent.
nov. 11 Jan.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Renfrew
TAKE notice that I, R. Carmichael Bamford, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation, dentist,
intend to apply for permission to prospect
for coal and petroleum on tlle following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the south-east corner and marked R.
C. B. S.E. Cor., located about 20 cliains
west ancl 6 chains south of the south-east
corner of Lot 650, Renfrew District, and
also about one and three-fourths miles south
and two and a quarter miles west of mile
post 43 on the boundary line of the E. &
N. R.R. grant; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Located December 9th,  1911.
R. CARMICHAEL BAMFORD,
Per D. J. O'Brien, Agent,
dec. 23 Jan. 20
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Malahat
TAKE notice that we, R. V. Winch & Col
Limited, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Corf
mission Agents, intend to apply for permil
sion to purchase the following describe^
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
high water mark at the north-east corner
Lot 95, Malahat District; thence east tl
low water mark; thence southerly and fof
lowing low water mark to a point due eas
of the south-east corner of Lot 118, Malahal
District; thence west to high water mark!
thence northerly and following high watef
mark to the point of commencement, con]
taining ten acres more or less.
Dated October 26th,   1911.
R. V. WINCH I!: CO., LIMITED.
By William Meyerstein, Agent,
nov. 4 dec, 3I
VICTORIA  LAND DISTRICT
District of Sooke
TAKE notice that Thomas J.  Cartwrighl
of East Sooke,  occupation Surveyor, intend]
to apply for permission to purchase the fol
lowing   described   lands:—Commencing   at  f
post planted at the south-east corner of Sed
tion   no,  bounded  as  follows:—Commencing
at   this   post;   thence   south   twenty   chainsl
thence   west   eighty   chains;   thence   nortf
twenty chains;  thence  east eighty chains.
Dated October 30th,  1911.
THOMAS J. CARTWRIGHT.
nov. 4 dec. 31
' THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911 13
At the Sip of the At the Sign ot the
Songhee Songhee
THE SONGHEES
Westholme
Hotel
GRILL
Where Everybody
Smiles
NOTHING BUT THE BEST
Hear Miss Thurston, Mrs. Nina
Martin Thatcher and Miss Harris
in their very latest Vocal Selections. Music every evening from
6.30 to 8.30 & from 10.30 to 12.30
Hotel Westholme
THE SONGHEES GRILL
At the Sign of the At the Sign of the
Songhee Songhee 14
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
Drury Lane Pantomime
Drury Lane Theatre betrayed the
first symptom of pantomime fever
during the last week of Novemtfer,
when in the saloon seventy young
people with good, well trained voices
commenced the chorus rehearsals of
"Hpp o' My Thumb." Seated in
rows, of chairs, in front of Mr.
James Glover, they sang of "moonlight,.", "shady walks,"- and .'.'summer
seas,!' that put the window view of
greasy, foggy London hopelessly out
of tune. And they sang.with such
wholehearted vigour that* the three,
pantomime authors-*--Mr. George' R.
Sims, Mr. Dix, and Mr. Arthur Col-
lins-*—conferring in another room, had
to close all intervening doors.
Drury Lane has sternly made up
its mind that it will have no bird
actors this Christmas. In former
years pigeons, chickens, turkeys, and
geese have contributed to pantomime
gaiety. But never again. The mortality among the bird actors was so
serious that no insurance company
would accept their lives. The fowls,
it is said, had a fatal habit of finding their way into the kitchen.
Edible actors of all sorts are now
absolutely barred.
Another time-honoured pantomime
friend to be excluded at Drury Lane
this season is the pun. Mr. George
R. Sims said on Tuesday that its day
is nearly over. "We put in a few
to see how they would look, but we
have since taken most of them out
and presented them to the Museum of
Theatrical Antiquities. This is 'my
first pantomime," said Mr. Sims, "but
hot my first attempt to rhyme. Why.
we will even give you blank verse if
we feel like it.    Where the story is
poetic we will be poetic. Our panto-
• trfifofef will (§•$ dramatic, musical, and
romantic, and the story will be so
clear that a child can go home and
tell it to its mother."
Great Shipowner
The death was announced at Liverpool on Tuesday, November 28, of
Mr. Alfred Holt, late head of the firm
of Alfred Holt and Co., ship-owners.
Mr. Holt, who was eighty-three years
of-age, ha<l long,'retired ftom'business, but almost every day he visited
'the offices, of the firm, and he was
there as' recently as Monday. 'The
firm of Alfred Holt and Co. owns
about seventy steamers in commission
or building, with a total, tonnage of
about half a millidh.
The jirst vessel'.acquired" was in
1852. It was a small steamer 130 ft.
long, and had been trading on the
coast of Africa. A new funnel was
necessary, and one was put aboard.
As there was a large quantity of blue
paint'in the ship part of it was used
to paint the' funnel. Such was the
or'gin of the Blue Funnel Line, all
the subsequent steamers having their
funnels painted blue.
TfaliiiraHy^ "aTe"'ToFeslfa'aoWd''''tSy*"'a'
well-founded report that rraval ex-*-
perts have under consideration the establishment of a great oil fuel depot
at Port Edgar, situated on the Firth
of Forth, about a mile to the west of
South Queens-ferry.
Lord George Sanger Dead
Lord George Sanger, who had been
living on his own small estate, Park
Farm, East Finchley, London, for
some years past, having retired from
the circus business, was attacked on
Tuesday, Nov. 28, by a man named
Cooper with a hatchet while sitting
in his'-r.oom.'.and died some- hours
later from his-injuries, jj
Country Mill Revival
Owing to the standard bread movement many old country mills, whose
stones had for years done nothing
but grind grist, or had even lain idle
altogether, have come back to activity, grinding the wheat of the surrounding countryside into standard
flour. The reason is that many ardent supporters of the movement believe that the ideal standard flour is
stone ground. ,    ■-..
ll.'ilHi    n'JI..     HlH.i.l.ii.K.'l...    J.J_!_.l_J«l_U.LHJillL-Ul___.I.JIJ—<V-.-!-..^,..__l~..-.«-^_.
SMOKE
EL DORO
f^Hlf
CIGARS
.   Airman's Chase! of a Heron
Mr. Mbbrhouse, the Huntingdon
airman, had an exciting chase lately
after a heron. While* flying back from
Cambridge, where he had lunched, he
saw the bird and went in* pursuit.
For a long time the airman chased the
heron round and about the aerodrome, dodging over treetops and
swooping to. the ground in the pursuit.
Wild Cattle in Wales
The herd of wild cattle belonging
to Sir Charles Assheton-Smith, of
Vaynol, near Bangor, has so greatly
increased that a number of them are
being killed. Sir Charles has also, a
number of' buffaloes dinhis estate.* •
Grand Christmas Drawing
$600.00 will be given away in 45 prizes. , A coupon
will be given with every 50c purchaser Do not forget that we are giving 30 per cent, off on all goods.
J. M. Nagano & Co.
Japanese Fancy Goods.Store *..       1117 Douglas.&. 1501 Gov't Sts.
cently sold at Steven's Auction Room,
London, for 75gs., being bought by
Mr. Alfred Dunhill. it
■.. Oil" Fuel in the Navy
Important developments in conenc-
tion with the use of oil fuel by the
New Lambeth Bridge
A Bill to enable the London County Council to demolish the existing
Lambeth Bridge across the Thames
and tc construct a new bridge and
approaches will be submitted to Parliament next year.
Sir Walter Raleigh's Pipe    :.
What is bel.ieved to be the,original
wooden pipe presented by the Indians to Sir Walter Raleigh, was re-
Greek at Oxford
The Convocation of Oxford University has rejected, by 505 votes to 360,
the statute permitting candidates for
honours in mathematics and natural
science to offer in responsions an al-"
tentative for either Latin or Greek.
Old Liner's Fate
The Anchor Line steamer Furnes-
sia, the pride of Barrow shipbuilders
in 1880, has returned to Barrow to be
broken up. She was purchased for
this purpose: at -a cost of £j2,ooo.
Discovery of *•* Roman Well
In ?n "pld and narrow street in
Reading, called Union-street, a corporation workman was repairing the
flagstones,   when   the   ground   gave  I
way, and he narrowly escaped fall- I
ing into a large cavity, which proved  I
*0* be   a   'Roman   flint   well partly
choked  up with  soil.
' ".What is love?" asked the romantic maiden. '
"Love,"   replies   the   cynic,   "is   a   souffle, i
composed of original sin, flavoured with pass- ,
ion, sweetened with a sprinkling of affection, !
and   heated   in   the   oven   of  desire.     When
consumed quite hot from the oven.it is de-
licious,   but   if  cold  it   is   insipid  and   indi- I
gestible." 1
The    same    Russian    Princess    one    took]
refuge from a storm in a cowshed at milking-
time, and, regarding the abdominal lacteal appendages of the creatures with a curious eye, |
inquired what they were all for.
"There is three for the milk, your Ryle'l
fghness, and one for the cream," replied thel
dairymaid.
A Baltimore belle, just from Vassar Col-j
lege, when told by the waiter that' they had!
no gooseberries, exclaimed, "What has hap-J
pened to the goose?"
"CAMPBELL'S" CHRISTMAS EXPOSITION
A Woman instinctively delights in accessories which enhance her beauty and lend an air of youth and grace to her appearance.   It is really impossible
to select more useful and practical gifts of adornment than those shown exclusively by  "Campbells."   As  a  brief mention we  submit  the following:
HANDKERCHIEFS
\sL
For the quick service of all customers we have arranged a special Handkerchief Booth
awaiting your inspection    Here's a brief list of
Children's Handerchiefs, in the prettiest of fancy boxes, three to
six in a box.   Price, per box, 50c, 35c and 25c
Ladies' and Children's Handkerchiefs, in fancy wicker baskets,
half-dozen to thc box.    Each box, $2,75 down to 40c
Ladies' Lawn and Linen Handkerchiefs, lace edged, 40c to.....ioc
Ladies' Real Lace Edged Handkerchiefs, in Armenian, Honiton
and Brussels point lace. J$ach from $15.00 to as low as....75c
Ladies' Embroidered Linen Handkerchiefs, many of which are
hand-embroidered.    Each $1.50 to  25c
Plain  Linen  Handkerchiefs,  excellent quality,   l/\,   l/2,   -J4   hem.
Kacli 35c, 25c, 20c and ioc
Exquisite Display of New Bags
Specially Priced
The New Auto Leather Bags in black, silver or gold mounting, with the new long
cords and tassels.
Handsome Gold Tapestry Bags with long cords of self-colour and satin-lined.
Fancy Tapestry Bags in light floral pattern, edged with gold ami long gold cords
and tassels,
Suede Bags—a very popular line—in almost any shade you ask for, and silk-lined.
These,  of course, have the new long cords and tassels.
Velvet Bags in black only, lined with moire silk, small extra purse inside.   These
also have the long cords and tassels.
Hand and Pocket Purses, also Card Cases, a full range of these are always carried
by "Campbell's," in shades of alligator, suede and seal.
Feather Boas—Simply Lovely
Marabouts, in black, white, grey, sky, pink, mauve, brown and natural shades,
full length and having from five strands.   Priced, up, from  $3-75
The New Short Ostrich Feather Boas, willow feathers, finished with long velvet
ribbon ends and tassels in shades of blue, grey, black and white, up from..$7.50
Glorious Display of Boas and Wraps, in ostrich feather and crepe de chene, with
feather   trimmings—the   very   newest   ideas   for   street   and   evening  wear.
Muffs to match every shade and every gown.   Priced, up from $15.00
Spangled Scarfs, in helio, sky, green, pink, white, navy and royal blue.   From
$3.25 down to as low as , 90c
Angus Campbell & Co.
1008 and 1010 Gov't Street,  Victoria, B. C.
,   Talking about handkerchiefs, we certainly have a lovely lot
just a few handkerchiefs:
Plain Sheer Linen Handkerchiefs, very dainty , with </t in. hem
stitch, 35c, 25c and   20c
Sheer Lawn Handkerchiefs, with Amriswyl embroidery,  dainty
sprays in corners.    Each 35c and   25c
Hemstitched   Lawn  and   Linen   Handkerchiefs,   all   round   embroidery.   From $1.50 to as low as  25c
Colored  Edge Handkerchiefs, in  thc newest and prettiest patterns, priced from 50c down to  ioc
Bc sure and scc our very special display of Lace Edged Handkerchiefs at the modest little prices of 25c, i2j^c and ioc
Silk Blouses
Messaline Silk Blouses, with the new let-in sleeves, navy blue
trimmed with green, grey trimmed with cerise, black trimmed
with King's blue.   "Campbells" very special price $5.75
Tailored Silk Blouses, man-tailored, in black and white stripes,
navy and white stripes, patch pockets and soft double collars.
"Campbells" value   $4,90
Messaline Silk Blouses, with the new let-in sleeves, cream yokes
with small side frill attached. "Campbells" value, each $7.75
Messaline Silk Blouses, in navy and Copenhagen blue, cream net
yokes, and $4 length kimona sleeves, also showing the new
net puff at bottom of sleeves. "Campbells" value $6.25
We Sell Glove Scrips to any Desired Amount
Angus Campbell & Co.
1008 and 1010 Gov't Street, Victoria, B. C: THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
15
A Plain Proposition
AH Good Things
Come To An
End
For the past few weeks McCandless Bros. & Cathcart have been making a money-saving
opportunity for you to save money on high grade footwear. If you have not yet availed
yourself of the time to lay in needed supplies, it is time you should do so now, or repent
later. Why linger longer debating the question? Why not benefit yourself from the
money standpoint as well as add to your comfort and happiness in doing the right thing
at the right time—that is just now? During the remainder of this sale we will offer
wonderful bargains. Why not seize the present moment, why not lay in a supply of
high grade boots and shoes while the deep-cut prices cut an important figure in your
outlay? Let us show you. We will gladly do so, buy or not, as you may choose. We
have just what you want at most remarkably low prices. To ignore, to overl ok this
splendid proposition is unwise to say the least. Let us urge in your interest that you
take advantage of our sacrifice of profit and part of the cost while the opportunity is here
The Stock is being cleaned up at rapid pace
and the end is drawing near. Come now
and Save as you have never Saved before
Greatest and Most Daring Attack on Prices
and Values
A perfect landslide of gigantic bargains. Thousands of dollars worth
of the highest-grade boots ancl shoes the world can produce are thrown
at the mercy of the public. We must dispose of the balance of this
stock even if we do not realize fifty cents on the dollar for the same.
The orders given our sales people are sell! sell! and sell we must, there
is no alternative. There are no chicken-hearted, or half way measures
employed during this closing out sale. The greatest distribution of
spick and span merchandise ever heard of in all the great west.
We Must Say Goodbye For Ever
to every pair of boots and shoes in this big establishment of ours.
Some boots at cost, some boots at way below cost, antl the prices
on some lines cut less than half. We are doing this in order
to get out of business as quick as possible. As we have told you
before, we care nothing for cost or value, all we want is to get
rid of the goods. Of course there are many lines which are being-
sacrificed at a great loss to us. We are after the shoe business
and   are   surely    getting   it.     COME,    GET   YOUR    SHARE
McCandless Bros.
& Cathcart
555 Johnson Street, Victoria, B. C. 16
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
Correspondence
NAVAL SCOUTS
Koksilah, B. C,
Dec.: 18th,  igii.
To the Editor of The Week,
Victoria, B.C.
Dear Sir,—When you wrote 1 had
already done those things whereof
you wrote. Let my witness be the
letter I now enclose from Capt. MacDonald from whom (as from his
Chief, Admiral Kingsmill) I have received the warmest encouragement.
I suppose that I might have been
quicker about this business; the boys
asked me to do it for them some
months ago, but 1 am wedded to old
ways and wanted to do it through
the proper authorities, decently and
in order. Now I think the little boys
in blue should start fair and I hope
that Col. Hall will spread his protecting wing over them and understand that the Navy League, which
I have the honour to represent, is
seeking to help and not to lead in
anything connected with the Scouts.
It is unnecessary to thank you for
your letter. Whatever is done in the
interests of the Empire is sure of the
support of The Week. We know that.
Yours faithfully,
CLIVE PHILLIPS WOLLEY,
President The Navy League.
H. M. C. S. Niobe,
Dec. 14th, 1911.
Dear Phillips Wolley:
I have spoken to Admiral Kings-
mill about the subject of our conversation yesterday, and he will get the
Minister of Marine to initial a Memo.,
which will give your Naval Scouts
the official countenance of the Canadian Navy.
I also saw Capt. Hose of the "Rainbow" today, and he will give you
every assistance.
Yours sincerely,
W. MacDONALD.
ONE NATIVE SON
(Extracts from Victor A. Levy's
letter, London, Nov. 29th.)
Received the Colonist the other day
containing news of the Hibben fire,
and your cold weather. What interested me most, was the news about
tlie new Theatre for Victoria, and
the Ladies' Society concert. Miss
Pope can surely feel proud of such a
criticism and she certainly deserved
it. She is a good student and worked
real hard in Leipsic. I only knew her
there by sight, never spoke with her,
but still I used to hear what a hard
worker she was from friends of hers.
But just wait Dad, just give me
time and I will show the folks out
West what a Native Son can do,
something entirely new in the violin
line. My work is going splendid,
never better; gymnastics for acquiring strength, dancing for precision
and rythm, and the Ostrovsky method
for a brilliant technique. Music I
have already in me. Now it is only
time I want. As you say, "Rome was
not built in a day," but no matter
what stage of efficiency I attain I
want to make teaching my main line.
This method creates such a wonderful
field to work in. There is not only
a chance of making a big name, but
also the satisfaction of knowing you
are helping to bring your profession
to a higher standard of perfection.
Of course you know that I am now
a shareholder in the Ostrovsky Institute; the College itself will open
its doors on the first day of the new
year. We have secured fine apartments in the swellest part of London.
We have the whole floor of a building on Conduit, six doors from Regent, the best street in London. The
suite was previously used as show
rooms for Parisian dresses and cloaks.
We bought the carpets and all the
swell fittings for £80.   We are now
commencing to advertise and inquiries
are pouring in from all sides. We
even got one from Philadelphia.
What will people say when they find
out that Zimbalist (the great violinist,
now causing such a furore in America) is on our teaching staff. This
is one of our trump cards whicii we
will play when the opportunity is
ripe. This Ostrovsky method is certainly a grand thing and will revolutionise the Musical World, especially in violin and piano playing.
MISS AGNES DEANS CAMERON
It was a crowded house that assembled at the Alexandra Club last
Monday to listen to Miss Agnes
Deans* Cameron speak of her experi
ences in the Old Country during th'i
past two years, during which time*
she has been doing so much to bring
the advantages of British Columbia
before the people in England, But
not only was the audience which met
a large one; it was representative of
Victoria. Premier McBride took the
chair and introduced the lecturer, who
began her discourse with a few remarks about the national characteristics of the English in their own
country and of the first impression
which the stranger receives of London.
After this preliminary Miss Cameron went on to. tell of the wonderful
hold which Canada has obtained on
the people of England. Everywhere,
even in the veriest village, it would
seem that the call of the Dominion
has been heard. One of the characteristics which it would appear
strikes the new arrival most strongly
is the spirit of Imperialism which
pervades the people throughout the
length and breadth of the British
Isles. "To learn the full significance
of Imperialism," said Miss Cameron,
"it is necessary for a Canadian to go
to England."
For two hours and a half the lecturer entertained her audience, who
sat keenly listening, with never a
thought of fatigue, what time she led
them  by means of pictures  on the
screen through the journey of her
travels, with many a quip and crank
to heighten the charm of her story
Her fund of anecdote seemed inexhaustible, and when at length Miss
Cameron ceased ancl the Very Rev,
Dean Doull moved the vote of thanks,
the audience rose feeling that it could
have listened for twice the length of
time and  still been ready for  more
Moore & Johnston
Enthusiastic Concerning Port Alberni
A member of the above firm, on
being interviewed on the subject of
Alberni, said:
"Port Alberni promises to become
a big city. The call for lots there.is
increasing and most of our subdivision have been sold; though we hope
to secure some additional holdings
at the advanced prices. The demand
for Victoria realty has been active in
James Bay district; and we experience a big demand for working men's
homes. Builders have failed in the
past to anticipate this demand, with
the result that the supply hardly
meets the demand for such residences.
"But Port Alberni keeps us busy
all the time. One noticeable feature
proposition as well as others in that
growing town. He doesn't need to
be told that it has a magnificent canal
with 72 feet of water at the wharves;
a water supply from adjacent lakes
with enough potential energy to rur
electric light plants, and factories galore; that the town is beautifully situated, and well sheltered. These
things and many more, we find our
clients well posted on, which is a
splendid indication that the educational work conducted by the Press
and those interested financially, is
being good results.
"It is a matter of common interest
to know that the attention being paid
to the young city is not confined even
to Western Canada; as we have had
a number of inquiries addressed to
this office from the Western States."
UNDER A NEW NAME
The old Russ House on Johnsoi
Street has long been a familiar figure
to Victorians. There will be genera
interest felt in the fact that the ok
House has undergone extensivi
changes and is now opened unde:
the new name of "The Panama Ho
tel." The new proprietors, Mr
Maurice J. Condon and Mr. Freder
ick T. Clark, have spared no expens
to make the renovated hostelry ai
attractive establishment ancl cordiall;
invite inspection.
PUZZLE
PUZZLE
PUZZLE
—My! What a worry Christmas
is when you don't know what
to buy. The best way to
smooth out the wrinkles of perplexity is to come to this store,
where is displayed the broadest
ancl richest collection of useful
ancl practical gifts to be found
in the city.
FOR LADIES
Toilet Sets, Manicure Sets, Perfume Atomizers, Fountain Pens,
Ebony Hand Mirrors, Cloth
Brushes, Perfumes in Fancy
Boxes, etc.
FOR GENTLEMEN
Safety Razors, Pocket Cutlery,
Cigar Cases, Bill Cases, Military
Hair Brushes, Razor Strops,
Shaving Mirrors, Shaving Sets,
Etc.
Full Range of Prices to Suit
All Pockets
Cyrus H. Bowes
Chemist
1228 Government Street
Tels. 425 and 450
THE WHITE GARAGE
W. J. TAYLOR, Mgr.
Exclusive Agents for White Commercial and Touring Cars.   General
Engineers 8 Machinists
Phone 2908
1218 Wharf Street
Victoria, B. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
17
At Christmas, Play and make Good Cheer,
For Christmas Comes but Once
a Year
Yes! and Xmas is almost here. Make this Xmas
of 1911 one to be remembered. Surprise your
family and guests with a host of good things, and
do not forget the most important of all—to have a
supply of "Good Cheer" in the shape of Mumm's
Extra Dry or Mumm's Selected Brut Champagne
to offer. The sale of these popular Champagnes,
far exceed any other brand on the market, for the
one reason, they are the finest quality procurable.
Remember to order a case at once, from your dealer
PITHER & LEISER
Wholesale Agents for B. C.
Victoria Vancouver
Nelson
JAMES BUCHANAN & CO., by Royal Appointment
Purveyors to H. M. King George the V and the Royal Household.
Distillers of the popular
"Black & White" Scotch Whisky
Unsurpassed in Purity, Age and Flavor
All Dealers
Are You All Ready for
Christmas Day
Your enjoyment of the festive season will depend to some measure on your larder.
When thinking of GOOD THINGS TO EAT, think of our PURE FOOD MARKET
—it is THE place to go for your XMAS DELICACIES. It will please you to
come and see the FANCY TABLE IMPORTATIONS we are displaying, and the
visit WILL PAY YOU
For the Week End
We have  a choice  supply  of  fine  Plump  Young  Chickens,  Turkeys,  Prime  Beef,
Pork ancl Young Mutton;   Sausages of all kinds, also Fresh Oysters.
Cluster Raisins, Mixed Nuts, Crystallized Fruits, Splendid Red King Apples, Finest
Jap.   Oranges,   Marzipan,   Fancy   Boxes  Chocolates,   Dates,   Figs,   Plum   Puddings,
Plum Cakes, Cranberry Sauce, Mince Pies, Mince Tarts, Shortbread, Etc.
Wines  and   Liquors
ASK FOR CATALOGUE
H. 0. Kirkham & Co., Ltd.
741, 743, 745 Fort Street
Grocery Store Butcher Shop Liquor Store
Tels. 178, 179 Tel. 2678 Tel. 2677
i^8*»
Holly
Trees
4000 well cultivated, repeatedly transplanted Trees
to choose from, large and small, some varigated
leaved, many full of fine, red berries.
Plant Hollies for Ornament _ Profit
Layrit% Nurseries
Carey Road Victoria, B. C.
C. H. SMITH & CO.
Kodaks from $2     Framed Pictures from 50c
Calendars       Photo Albums
Mottos      Pictures Framed; bring them early
Other Things too
PHONE 2309    :    611 FORT ST.
Character by Handwriting
The Editor of The Week wishes
to call special attention to this Department, which is conducted by an
English gentleman, a 'Varsity man of
high attainments. Character reading
from hand-writing is a scientific
study, entirely devoid of charlatanism
and is possibly the most reliable index of all, because hand-writing records the development of character,
and its index is not confined to natural traits. It is an interesting
study, not merely in enabling us to
see ourselves as others see us, but
may be turned to important account
in submitting the hand-writing of persons with whom we have business relations. Indeed, viewed in this aspect,
it is only a reasonable precaution to
learn all that the chirographist can
tell us. Before deciding to institute
this Department the Editor of The
Week imposed the severest tests, submitting the hand-writing of well-
known persons entirely unknown to
the gentleman conducting this Department, who is a stranger to Victoria and a recent arrival. He is prepared to guarantee absolute accuracy
and hopes that the readers of The
Week will avail themselves of what
is a genuine privilege.
RULES
i. All persons wishing to consult
"Tau" must enclose a specimen of
hand-writing, consisting of about four
lines, written on unruled paper. It
may be signed with their own name
or not, but there must be an initial
or nom-de-plume to identify the
answer, which will appear in the next
issue of The Week.
2. Each specimen of hand-writing
must be accompanied by a P. O. for
50 cents. Stamps will not • be accepted, and the outside of the envelope should be indited "Hand-writing." Absolute privacy is guaranteed.
REPLIES
Weakling.—You are more fond of indoor
amusements than outdoor sports. You are
decidedly artistic, original and imaginative.
Tact, unselfishness and thought for others
arc well marked. Slightly opinionated and
egotistic, more cautious than impulsive. Good
moral sense, candid and open. A bright,
cheerful companion, but apt to make too
much of small things; you should take a
wider view of life. Fond of children and
sympathetic. Temper is very good indeed,
roused only by injury. Self control is fair.
Should be a good speaker with a clear head.
Not  a  complex   character.
M. B. H.—You have a complex character
with exceptional will power. Imagination is
good and there is strong artistic feeling.
An intuitive sense of the right thing, and
how and when to do it. Fond of society,
partial to popularity, you like to lead, you
should be able to do so. Energy abundant
and very ambitious. Candid and downright
yet capable of diplomatic evasion. Strong
passions yet strong self control. Inclined to
egotism and selfishness, yet a staunch friend
if a bad enemy. Very affectionate, fond of
children. Good clear business head, methodical,  neat and  precise;  not over scrupulous.
C. D.—Musical feeling is indicated in your
writing, fond of social life, fond of literature.
Fairly good at mathematics. Temper is
equable, passions moderate and well controlled. On thc whole, neat, tidy and methodical. . Originality poor, and will power is
weak, you lack ambition and you worry usually about trifles. Inclined to be selfish. Fairly candid and tactful, inclined at times to
jealousy. Imagination poor but you have a
good  sense  of  humour.
A. C. (Vancouver)—Please write me a short
note of half a dozen lines and send it to The
vVeek Office, without fee.
Jack K.— Decided artistic talent, you shnuld
be able to play or sing well. You dress
well and you are methodical and tidy. Somewhat pessimistic and lacking in ambition.
You have energy and should use it more.
Your temper is unreliable and you are not
always consistent or truthful. Will power is
not strong, you seek thc approbation and
praise of other people too much. You arc
fond of outdoor sports and recreations. You
have a good business head.
Teenie.—A pleasing, bright, open character,
fond of nature and open air life, yet thoroughly domesticated. Knergy, humour and
common sense are all in good proportion.
Ambition is poor. Quite artistic in tastes
and dress. Affectionate and unselfish. Willpower is moderate, temper smooth. Apt to
have fits of lassitude and depression. Slightly
unscrupulous and inclined to be carelessness
in matters that concern others. Jealousy is
well marked. Your moral and religious feeling is high.
Shirley.—A good sound character, not
averse to popularity but does not run after
it. Artistic and refined in tastes with a
highly strung sensitive disposition. Tactful
and thoughtful for others. Good business
head, with good will power and ambitious.
Conscientious and methodical. A certain
timidity is indicated which may cause thc
writer to hesitate at critical moments; let
him follow the guidance of his head rather
than that of liis heart which is weak.
If It's Signs
It's Manser
If It's Showcards
It's Manser
Phone 2887      1408 Broad St.
Watch this Space for Our
1912 Announcement
Western Motor & Supply Co., Ltd.
1410 Broad Street       Telephone 695       Victoria, B. C.
SMOKE
EL DORO
CIGARS
f «*'« »HljtW0 law % UttA of
(Etjristmas Jmj
Thomas J. Lipton
What you want, the way you want it
Afternoon Tea, Dainty Luncheons,
Special Teas for parties by arrangement.    Do not forget—We  always
keep on hand guaranteed
New Laid Eggs.
The TEA KETTLE   1119 douglas st.
MISS M.  WOOLDRIDGE, Proprietress Opposite the Victoria Theatre
Loose Covers and Hoat
Cushions
Leather Work nnd Special Designs
Made-to-order
E. S. STILES
AUCTIONEER (if VALUATOR
UPHOLSTERING, PACKING
■Sf REMOVING
French Polishing
1109 Fort Street       Phone 2149
H. C. R.—A refined, sympathetic and truly
artistic nature. Candid and truthful, energetic but too cautious to be very enthusiastic. Inconsistent at times and apt to
yield to sudden impulses. A bright and
cheerful companion ancl capable of deep affection. Inclined to be too severe and somewhat lacking in tact. Strongly attracted
to thc opposite sex. Shrewd and intelligent)
should be good at business. Not much reserve. Originality and imagination arc both
indicated.
Cutey.—You gave me very little to work
on but I will do my best. You arc artistic
and have good taste. Straightforward and
consistent, you are not very sensitive, but
have a good sense of humour. Inclined to
judge others somewhat harshly and apt to
he jealous.    Neat, precise and tidy, you have
good common sense, and you should be fairly
good at figures, You like travelling and going about, dancing, rowing and other sports.
You arc rather easily led but you arc not
impulsive. You are affectionate and a good
friend.
Nick.—Originality, order and method arc
all indicated. Careful with money but not
mean. Musical sense is marked but not much
ability. A painstaking character, more plodding than brilliant but with lots of energy.
Capable of very deep affection for one or two
people, otherwise somewhat standoffish and
reserved. A better thinker than talker. Should
be a fair business man but, both ambition
and will power are a bit weak. Not very
sanguine and inclined to criticise too freely.
Should   be a good  shot and pool  player. 16
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
Correspondence
NAVAL SCOUTS
■ Koksilah, B. _.,
Dec.; 18th,  iy11.
To the Editor of The Week,
Victoria,  B.C.
Dear Sir,—When you wrote 1 had
already done those things whereof
you wrote. Let my witness be the
letter I now enclose from Capt. MacDonald from whorii (as from his
Chief, Admiral Kingsmill) 1 have received the warmest encouragement.
I suppose that I might have been
<|uicker about this business; the boys
asked me to do it for them some
months ago, but 1 am wedded to old
ways and wanted to do it through
the proper authorities, decently and
in order. Now I think the little boys
in blue should start fair and I hope
that Col. Hall will'spread his protecting wing over them and understand that the Navy League, which
I have the honour to represent, is
seeking to help and not to lead in
anything connected with the Scouts.
It is unnecessary to thank you for
your letter. Whatever is done in the
interests of the Empire is sure of the
support of The Week. We know that.
Yours faithfully,
CLIVE PHILLIPS WOLLEY,
President The Navy League.
H. M. C. S. Niobe,
Dec. 14th, 1911.
Dear Phillips Wolley:
I have spoken to Admiral Kings-
mill about the subject of our conversation yesterday, and he will get the
Minister of Marine to initial a Memo.,
which will give your Naval Scouts
the official countenance of the Canadian Navy.
I also saw Capt. Hose of the "Rainbow" today, and he will give you
every assistance.
Yours sincerely,
W. MacDONALD.
ONE NATIVE SON
(Extracts from Victor A. Levy's
letter, London, Nov. 29th.)
Received the Colonist the other day
containing news of the Hibben fire,
and your cold weather. What interested me most, was the news about
the new Theatre for Victoria, and
the Ladies' Society concert. Miss
Pope can surely feel proud of such a
criticism and she certainly deserved
it. She is a good student ancl worked
real hard in Leipsic. I only knew her
there by sight, never spoke with her,
but still I used to hear what a hard
worker she was from friends of hers.
But just wait Dad, just give me
time and I will show the folks out
West what a Native Son can do,
something entirely new in the violin
line. My work is going splendid,
never better; gymnastics for acquiring strength, dancing for precision
and rythm, and the Ostrovsky method
for a brilliant technique. Music I
have already in me. Now it is only
time I want. As you say, "Rome was
not built in a day," but no matter
what stage of efficiency I attain I
want to make teaching my main line.
This method.creates such a wonderful
field to work in. There is not only
a chance of making a big name, but
also the satisfaction of knowing you
are helping to bring your profession
to a higher standard of perfection..
Of course you know that I am now
a shareholder in the Ostrovsky Institute; the College itself will open
its doors on the first day of the new
year. We have secured fine apartments in the swellest part of London.
We have the whole floor of a building on Conduit, six doors from Regent, the best street in London. The
suite was previously used as show
rooms for Parisian dresses and cloaks.
We bought the carpets and all the
swell fittings for  £80.   We are now
commencing to advertise and inquiries
are pouring in from all sides. We
even got one from Philadelphia.
What will people say when they find
out that Zimbalist (the great violinist,
now causing such a furore in America) is on our teaching staff. This
is one of our trump cards which we
will ' play when the opportunity is
ripe.: This Ostrovsky method is certainly a grand thing and will revolutionise the Musical World, especially in violin and piano playing.
MISS AGNES DEANS CAMERON
It was a crowded house that assembled at the Alexandra Club last
Monday to listen to Miss Agnes
Deans* Cameron speak of her experiences in the Old Country during th<_
past two years, during which time
she has been doing so much to bring
the advantages of British Columbia
before the people in England, But
not only was the audience which met
a large one; it was representative of
Victoria. Premier McBride took thc
chair and introduced the lecturer, who
began her discourse with a few remarks about the national characteristics of the English in their own
country and of the first impression
which the stranger receives of London.
After this preliminary Miss Cameron went on to. tell of the wonderful
hold which Canada has obtained on
the people of England. Everywhere,
even in the veriest village, it would
seem that the call of the Dominion
has been heard. One of the characteristics which it would appear
strikes the new arrival most strongly
is the spirit of Imperialism which
pervades the people throughout the
length and breadth of the British
Isles. "To learn the full significance
of Imperialism," said Miss Cameron,
"it is necessary for a Canadian to go
to England."
For two hours and a half the lecturer entertained her audience, who
sat keenly listening, with never a
thought of fatigue, what time she led
them  by  means  of  pictures  on  the
screen through the journey of her
travels, with many a quip and crank
to heighten the charm of her story.
Her fund of anecdote seemed inexhaustible, and when at length Miss
Cameron ceased and the Very Rev.
Dean Doull moved the vote of thanks,
the audience rose feeling that it cpuld
have listened for twice the length of
time and  still been ready for more.
Moore & Johnston
Enthusiastic Concerning Port Alberni
A member of the above firm, on
being interviewed on the subject of
Alberni, said;
"Port Alberni promises to become
a big city. The call for lots there.is
increasing and most of our subdivision have been sold; though we hope
to secure some additional holdings
at the advanced prices. The demand
for Victoria realty has been active in
James Bay district; and we experience a big demand for working men's
homes. Builders have failed in the
past to anticipate this demand, with
the result that the supply hardly
meets the demand for such residences.
"But Port Alberni keeps us busy
all the time. One noticeable feature
proposition as well as others in that
growing town. He doesn't need to
be told that it has a magnificent canal
with 72 feet of water at the wharves;
a water supply from adjacent lakes
with enough potential energy to rur
electric light plants, and factories galore; that the town is beautifully situated, and well sheltered. These
things and many more, we find our
clients well posted on, which is a
splendid indication that the educational work conducted by the Press
and those interested financially, is
being good results.
"It is a matter of common interest
to know that the attention being paid
to the young city is not confined even
to Western Canada; as we have had
a number of inquiries addressed to
this office from the Western States."
UNDER A NEW NAME
The old Russ House on Johnson
Street has long been a familiar figure
to Victorians. There will be general
interest felt in the fact that the old
House has undergone extensive
changes and is now opened under
the new name of "The Panama Hotel." The new proprietors, Mr.
Maurice J. Condon and Mr. Frederick T. Clark, have spared no expense
to make the renovated hostelry an
attractive establishment and cordially
invite inspection.
PUZZLE
PUZZLE
PUZZLE
—My! What a worry Christmas
is when you don't know what
to buy. The best way to
smooth out the wrinkles of perplexity is to come to this store,
where is displayed the broadest
and richest collection of useful
and practical gifts to be found
in the city.
FOR LADIES
Toilet Sets, Manicure Sets, Perfume Atomizers, Fountain Pens,
Ebony Hand Mirrors, Cloth
Brushes, Perfumes in Fancy
Boxes, etc.
FOR GENTLEMEN
Safety Razors, Pocket Cutlery,
Cigar Cases, Bill Cases, Military
Hair Brushes, Razor Strops,
Shaving Mirrors, Shaving Sets,
Etc.
Full  Range of  Prices to  Suit
All Pockets
Cyrus H. Bowes
Chemist
1228 Government Street
Tels. 425 and 450
THE WHITE GARAGE
W. J. TAYLOR, Mgr.
Exclusive Agents for White Commercial and Touring Cars.   General
Engineers £f Machinists
Phone 2908
1218 Wharf Street
Victoria, B. G. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
17
At Christmas, Play and make Good Cheer,
For Christmas Comes but Once
a Year
Yes! and Xmas is almost here. Make this Xmas
of 1911 one to be remembered. Surprise your
family ancl guests with a host of good things, and
do not forget the most important of all—to have a
supply of "Good Cheer" in the shape of Mumm's
Extra Dry or Mumm's Selected Brut Champagne
to offer. The sale of these popular Champagnes,
far exceed any other brand on the market, for the
one reason, they are the finest quality procurable.
Remember to order a case at once, from your dealer
PITHER & LEISER
Wholesale Agents for B. C.
Victoria Vancouver
Nelson
JAMES BUCHANAN & CO., by Royal Appointment
Purveyors to H. M. King George the V and the Royal Household.
Distillers of the popular
"Black & White" Scotch Whisky
Unsurpassed in Purity, Age and Flavor
All Dealers
Are You All Ready for
Christmas Day
Your enjoyment of the festive season will depend to some measure on your larder.
When thinking of GOOD THINGS TO EAT, think of our PURE FOOD MARKET
—it is THE place to go for your XMAS DELICACIES. It will please you to
come and see the FANCY TABLE IMPORTATIONS we are displaying, and the
visit WILL PAY YOU
For the Week End
We  havc  a choice supply  of fine  Plump  Young  Chickens,  Turkeys,  Prime  Beef,
Pork and Young Mutton;   Sausages of all kinds, also Fresh Oysters.
Cluster Raisins, Mixed Nuts, Crystallized Fruits, Splendid Red King Apples, Finest
Jap.   Oranges,   Marzipan,   Fancy   Boxes  Chocolates,   Dates,   Figs,   Plum   Puddings,
Plum Cakes, Cranberry Sauce, Mince Pies, Mince Tarts, Shortbread, Etc.
Wines  and   Liquors
ASK FOR CATALOGUE
H. 0. Kirkham & Co., Ltd.
741, 743, 745 Fort Street
Grocery Store Butcher Shop Liquor Store
Tels. 178, 179 Tel. 2678 Tel. 2677
*$*
Holly
Trees
4000 well cultivated, repeatedly transplanted Trees
to choose from, large and small, some varigated
leaved, many full of fine, red berries.
Plant Hollies for Ornament & Profit
Layritz Nurseries
Carey Road Victoria, B. C.
C. H. SMITH & CO.
Kodaks from $2     Framed Pictures from 50c
Calendars       Photo Albums
Mottos      Pictures Framed; bring them early
Other Things too
PHONE 2309    :   611 FORT ST.
Character by Handwriting
The Editor of The Week wishes
to call special attention to this Department, which is conducted by an
English gentleman, a 'Varsity man of
high attainments. Character reading
from hand-writing is a scientific
study, entirely devoid of charlatanism
and is possibly the most reliable index of all, because hand-writing records the development of character,
and its index is not confined to natural traits. It is an interesting
study, not merely in enabling us to
see ourselves as others see us, but
may be turned to important account
in submitting the hand-writing of persons with whom we have business relations. Indeed, viewed in this aspect,
it is only a reasonable precaution to
learn all that the chirographist can
tell us. Before deciding to institute
this Department the Editor of The
Week imposed the severest tests, submitting the hand-writing of well-
known persons entirely unknown to
the gentleman conducting this Department, who is a stranger to Victoria and a recent arrival. He is prepared to guarantee absolute accuracy
and hopes that the readers of The
Week will avail themselves of what
is a genuine privilege.
RULES
i. All persons wishing to consult
"Tau" must enclose a specimen of
hand-writing, consisting of about four
lines, written on unruled paper. It
may be signed with their own name
or not, but there must be an initial
or nom-de-plume to identify the
answer, which will appear in the next
issue of The Week.
2. Each specimen of hand-writing
must be accompanied by a P. O. for
50 cents. Stamps will not be accepted, and the outside of the envelope should be indited "Hand-writing." Absolute privacy is guaranteed.
REPLIES
Weakling.—You are more fond of indoor
amusements than outdoor sports. You arc
decidedly artistic, original and imaginative.
Tact, unselfishness and thought for others
are well marked. Slightly opinionated and
egotistic, more cautious than impulsive. Good
moral sense, candid and open. A bright,
cheerful companion, but apt to make too
much of small things; you should take a
wider view of life. Fond of children and
sympathetic. Temper is very good indeed,
roused only by injury. Self control is fair.
Should be a good speaker with a clear head.
Not   a   complex   character.
M. B. H.—You have a complex character
with exceptional will power. Imagination is
good and there is strong artistic feeling.
An intuitive sense of the right thing, and
how and when to do it. Fond of society,
partial to popularity, you like to lead, you
should be able to do so. Energy abundant
and very ambitious. Candid and downright
yet capable of diplomatic evasion. Strong
passions yet strong self control. Inclined to
egotism and selfishness, yet a staunch friend
if a bad enemy. Very affectionate, fond of
children. Good clear business head, methodical, neat and precise; not over scrupulous.
C. D,—Musical feeling is indicated in your
writing, fond of social life, fond of literature.
Fairly good at mathematics. Temper is
equable, passions moderate and well controlled. On thc whole, neat, tidy and methodical. . Originality poor, and will power is
weak, you lack ambition and you worry usually about trifles. Inclined to be selfish. Fairly candid and tactful, inclined at times to
jealousy. Imagination poor but you have a
good  sense  of  humour.
A. C. (Vancouver)—Please write me a short
note of half a dozen lines and send it to The
\Veek Oflice, without fee.
jack K.— Decided artistic talent, you should
be able to play or sing well. You dress
well and you arc methodical and tidy. Somewhat pessimistic and lacking in ambition.
You have energy and should use it more.
Your temper is unreliable and you arc not
always consistent or truthful. Will power is
not strong, you seek the approbation and
praise of other people too much. You are
fond of outdoor sports and recreations. You
havc a good business bead.
Teenie.—A pleasing, bright, open character,
fond of nature and open air life, yet thoroughly domesticated. Energy, humour and
common sense are all in good proportion.
Ambition is poor. Quite artistic iu tastes
and dress. Affectionate and unselfish. Willpower is moderate, temper smooth. Apt to
have fits of lassitude and depression. Slightly
unscrupulous and inclined to he carelessness
in matters that concern others. Jealousy is
well marked. Your moral and religious feeling is high.
Shirley.—A good sound character, not
averse to popularity but does not run after
it. Artistic and refined in tastes with a
highly strung sensitive disposition. Tactful
and thoughtful for others. Good business
head, with good will power aud ambitious.
Conscientious and methodical. A certain
timidity is indicated which may cause thc
writer to hesitate at critical moments; let
him follow the guidance of his head rather
than that of his heart which is weak.
If It's Signs
It's Manser
If Ifs Showcards
It's Manser
Phone 2887      1408 Broad St.
Watch this Space for Our
1912 Announcement
Western Motor & Supply Co., Ltd.
1410 Broad Street       Telephone 695       Victoria, B. C.
SMOKE
EL DORO
CIGARS
If m'n Hialjtitg fmi%lteBtflf
OH|rt0tma0 Jog
Thomas J. Lipton
What you want, the way you want it
Afternoon Tea, Dainty Luncheons,
Special Teas for parties by arrangement.    Do not forget—We  always
keep on hand guaranteed
New Laid Eggs.
The TEA KETTLE   m? douglas st.
MISS M. WOOLDRIDGE, Proprietress Opposite the Victoria Theatre
Loose Covers and lioat
Cushions
Leather Work and Special Designs
Made-to-order
E. S. STILES
AUCTIONEER dt VALUATOR
UPHOLSTERING, PACKING
_ REMOVING
French Polishing
1109 Fort Street       Phone 2149
H. C. R.—A refined, sympathetic and truly
artistic nature. Candid and truthful, energetic but too cautious to be very enthusiastic. Inconsistent at times and apt to
yield to sudden impulses. A bright and
cheerful companion and capable of deep affection. Inclined to be too severe and somewhat lacking in tact. Strongly attracted
to the opposite sex. Shrewd and intelligent,
should bc good at business. Not much reserve. Originality and imagination arc both
indicated.
Cutey.—You gave me very little to work
on but I will do my best. You are artistic
and have good taste. Straightforward and
consistent, you are not very sensitive, but
have a good sense of humour. Inclined to
judge others somewhat harshly and apt to
he jealous.    Neat, precise and tidy, you have
good eommon sense, and you should hc fairly
good at figures. You like travelling and going about, dancing, rowing and other sports.
You are rather easily led but you are not
impulsive. You are affectionate and a good
friend.
Nick.-—Originality, order and method arc
all indicated. Careful with money but not
mean. Musical sense is marked but not much
ability. A painstaking character, more plodding than brilliant but with lots of energy.
Capable of very deep affection for one or two
people, otherwise somewhat standoffish and
reserved. A better thinker than talker. Should
be a fair business man but, both ambition
and will power are a bit weak. Not very
sanguine and inclined to criticise too freely.
Should  be  a good  shot and pool  player. 18
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
Society
The Misses Stewart from Vancouver are  visiting friends  in  the  city.
* *   *
Mrs. Hinton entertained her many
friends during the week at a most
successful and enjoyable dance.
* *   *
Dr. ancl Mrs. Verrinder and children left on Sunday last for the
South, where they will spend the remainder of the Winter months.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Barton and children,
Esquimalt Road, returned last Tuesday evening from a six months' visit
to the Old Country.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Morse, London, England, are recent arrivals in
town and are staying at the Empres
Hotel.
* *   *
Mrs. Rattenbury was the hostess at
a smart luncheon on Friday of last
week in honour of Mrs. R. Gibson,
of York Place, who has since left
town with her family to winter in
Southern California. Covers were
laid for ten, the table being artistically arranged in a colour scheme of
mauve and pink, while the favours
were bunches of Neapolitan violets
in tiny baskets.
* *   *
On December 14th, Mrs. E. G.
Prior was hostess of a most enjoyable tea and bridge. Among the
guests were: Mesdames Blackwood,
Butchart, McCallum, Bullen, Brett,
Freeman, W. S. Gore, Griffiths, J.
E. Griffiths, Gaudin, Heisterman,
Cookson, Little, Loewen, Nealson,
Peters, Pooley, Stuart Robertson,
Raymur, Rithet, Spratt, Savage, C.
Todd, Tye, Pemberton, Gillespie,
Hannington, Johnson, McPhillips and
others. The first prize was won by
Mrs. Brett and the second by Mrs.
James Gaudin.
The engagement is announced of
Miss Laura Rose of Guelph, Ont
to Mr. W. E. Stephens, also of
Guelph, Ontario. The marriage has
been arranged from the 30th inst.
Miss Rose is well known to the Ca
nadian public as an institute lecturer
and writer of home and agricultural
subjects, one of her most popular
works, "Farm Dairying," being now
in its second edition. She made a
tour of the Province about a year
ago and lectured before Women's Institutes, so her name is familiar to
man. Mr. Stephens is the secretary
of the "Ayrshire Breeders" Association of Canada and the "Montreal
Milk Shippers" Association.
*   *   #
A very successful entertainment
was given by Mrs. Brenton Boulton,
A.R.C.M., at her home on Linden
Avenue, on Saturday afternoon last,
when her pupils provided the different
items on the programme. Both
teacher and pupils deserve the greatest praise for their accomplishments.
A delightful tea was afterwards
served to the guests, in which Mrs.
Boulton was assisted by Mrs. W. A.
Jameson and others. The programme
was as follows: "Through Field and
Forest" (Vogel), Miss Edna Lawrence and Mrs. Boulton; solo, "In
Rank and File" (Lange), Miss Agnes
Kingham; duet, "The Postillion,"
(Klein Michel), Miss Edith Mathews
and Mrs. Boulton; solo, "Lilly,"
(Schmoll), Miss Margaret Heather-
bell; solo, "Brook in the Forest,"
(Wenzel), Miss Victoria Wylde; trio,
"Hunter's Song" (Lyres), Misses R.
Robertson, Miller and Moore; solo,
"Warrior's Song" (Heller), Miss Dorothy Kingham; duo, two pianos,
"Rondo" (Gurlitt), Misses Ethel
Johns and Lena Miller;   duet, "Span
ish Dance" (Moskowski), Misses
Ferguson and Johns; duo, two
pianos, "Pas des Cymbales" (Chaminade), Miss Kingham and Mrs. Boulton; quartette, "Poet and Peasant"
(Suppe), Misses Hanna, O'Meara, L.
Robertson and McDonald.
* *   *
Mrs. William Langley entertained
on Monday last at a most enjoyable
tea given at the Alexandra Club. The
table was daintily decorated with
pink carnations and asparagus fern.
Among those who attended were:
Mrs. Pemberton, Mr. and Mrs. J.
Pemberton, Mr. and Mrs. Longhurst,
Mr. and Mrs. Cornwall, Mr. and Mrs.
E. Martin, Mrs. Gresley, Mrs. Archer Martin, Mrs. Alexis Martin, Mrs.
P. de Noe Walker, Mrs. Ambery,
Mrs. Ross, Mrs. A. W. Jones, Mrs.
Harry Pooley, Mrs. C. M. Roberts,
Mrs. A. W. Harvey, Mrs. Herbert
Carmichael, Mrs. Howell, Mrs. McGregor, Mrs. Combe, Mrs. Rome,
Mrs. Blaiklock, Mrs. Atkins, Mrs.
Klinton, Mrs. Wm. Holmes, Mrs.
Kitto, Mrs. King, Mrs. E. M. Johnson, Mrs. Dumbleton, Mrs. McCallum, Mrs. Hasell, Mrs. Langton, the
Misses Angus, Mrs. Angus, Miss
Drake, Miss McKay, Miss Bowron,
Miss Johnson, Miss Newcombe, Miss
Tilton, Miss Combe, Miss Payne,
Miss Mara, and the Messrs. O'Farell,
Irvine, Colley, Bridgman, Langley
and others.
* *   *
A very pretty wedding took place
Monday night at the residence of
Capt. and Mrs. Sears, 934 Hillside
Avenue, when Mrs. Sears' brother,
Mr. J. R. Phillips, was united in marriage to Miss S. E. Rive, daughter
of Mr. John Philip Rive of Thorn-
dale, St. Aubius, Jersey, Eng., by the
Rev. Mr. Holling. The bride, who
was given away by Capt. Sears, looked charming in her travelling suit of
Alice blue with hat to match, carrying a bouquet of white carnations
and lillies-of-the-valley. The bridesmaid, Miss Viva Babbington, wore a
pretty suit of brown with green velvet hat, trimmed with pink roses,
and carried a bouquet of pink carnations. Mr. S. Phillips supported the
groom. The groom's mother, Mrs.
Phillips, of View Street, wore black
silk, trimmed with lace. Mrs. Sears
wore a princess gown of black satin.
The decorations were in keeping with
the season, holly being used extensively in the drawing-room. The
dining-room and table was decorated
with white chrysanthemums and
ferns. Miss Bryant kindly assisted
the hostess in looking after the
guests. The presents were numerous
and costly, among them being a Morris chair, given by the Victoria Gun
Club. The wedding was a quiet one,
only immediate friends and relatives
being present. After supper Mr. and
Mrs. Phillips left for Southern California, via Vancouver, on their honeymoon trip.
*   *   *
Mr. A. D. Muskett, "Collegiate
School," was host on Thursday, December 13th, of a most enjoyable
dance given for the boys of the
school. Mr. Muskett was assisted in
receiving his guests by his sister-in-
law, Mrs. H. J. Muskett. During the
earlier part of the evening prizes
were distributed to the successful
boys of the school and several very
impressive speeches were made.
Among those present were: Mr. and,
Mrs. Bowker, Mrs. Beaumont Boggs,
Mrs. Wm. Rochfort, Mrs. Diespecker,
Miss Blackwood, Miss Veva Blackwood, Dr. and Mrs. Verrinder, Mrs.
Innes, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Robertson and children, Mr. and Mrs. Martin, Mr. and Mrs. Ross, Miss Page,
Miss Hilda Page, Miss Newcombe,
Misses Monteith, Miss Gillespie, Miss
Brenda Dumbleton, Miss Shela Dumbleton, Misses Lorna and Eileen
Dumbleton, the Misses Foulkes, Miss
Tommy Scott, Miss Tommy Monteith, Miss Dora Lauder, Miss Grace
Simpson, Miss Dorothy Moore, Miss
Madge Innes, Miss Baby Innes, the
Misses Macdonell, Miss Heyland,
Miss Charlotte Betterson, Miss Iris
Unsworth, Miss Vida McMillan, the
Misses Bagshawe, Miss Rotchfort,
the Misses Carey, Miss Phyllis Slater, Miss Eva Ross, Miss Mary
Boggs, Miss Barnard, Miss Rome,
Miss Ingram, the Misses Foulkes,
Miss Holden, Miss Miller, and the
Messrs. Talbot, Simpson, Smith, Geiger, Rochfort, Payne, Trewartha
James, Fred. Rome, Pitts, K. Walsh,
Mason, P. Ogden, Joe Chires, Macdonell, Nicholson, Buery, Messrs.
Barton,  Picken,  Ingram,  C.  Brown,
A. Holden, S. Gillespie, H. Boggs,
H. Ross, R. Matthews, Milligan, Gul-
land, C. Lowenberg, R. Lauder,
Yates, Bob Scott, Wheatley, Bruce
Robertson, Charley Baxter, J. Bridgman, W. B. Monteith, Cyril Spencer
and others. The house was gaily
adorned with Christmas decorations,
holly, ivy and red carnations.
Much interest has naturally been
taken in the first marriage celebrated
in the Roman Catholic Church of
Holy Cross, Creston, B.C. The ceremony took place on the 29th of November, the Rev. Father Beck of
Cranbrook, B.C., officiating at the
ceremony. The contracting parties
were Miss Margaret Moore, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Moore, of Victoria, and Mr. Edward Opie of Wasa,
B. C.  The ground covered with snow
and the trees loaded with the same
made  a  fit    setting    for  the  bridal
party and guests who arrived in cutters at the church, the merry jingle I
of sleigh bells adding to the pictur- I
esque effect.    Mrs. James Crompton !
presided most ably at the organ during   the   service,   which   was   fully I
choral.   The bride entered the church
leaning on the arm  of  her brother, I
Mr. C. Moore, and was dressed in a|
handsome  ivory  satin  with tunic of I
cream marquisette trimmed with sil-1
ver and wore a veil of soft tulle held|
in place by a coionet of orange blossoms.   She carried a bouquet of whitel
carnations and white chrysanthemums!
with   long  trails  of  asparagus   fern,f
the gift of the bridegroom.   The sister   of   the   bridegroom,   Mtss   Alicel
Opie,   was   daintily  gowned   in  palel
pink and wore a picture hat in thel
same   shade,  her  bouquet  of  carna-r
tions carrying out the colour scheme.1
Miss Vivian Moore, niece of the bridej
wore  a  most effective  costume and
undertook the dainty duty of flowed
girl.    Messrs. J. Atherton and James)
Crompton acted as ushers.   After the
ceremony a wedding breakfast was^
partaken of at the residence of Mrsl
Gensmer and later in the day a ret
ception was held at "The Willows,!
the home of Mr. Moore, which wal
tastefully    decorated.    Many    handl
some gifts testified to the popularity
of the young couple who left durinj
the evening for their honeymoon ;
the Coast.    The bride travelled in
smait    costume    of    braided    whitl
serge and white beaver hat trimme|
with   a   willow  plume   and  knot
panne velvet, with it she wore a se*
of handsome mink furs.
Always Think before You Buy
But don't think too long.   This is the last day to choose
the gift.   Come early.
Send Your Wife
Home
A Dining
Table
We Have Them
in a
Great Variety
from $7.50
Useful Xmas Gifts in Brass Novelties
The pieces we offer in Brass are the very newest.   See these on our first floor.   You must see them
to appreciate their grandeur.   Come today.   You'll find a piece here to suit.   Here are a few articles
and prices—the very latest:
SOLID BRASS INKWELLS, at $4.50, $3.00, $2.50, $2.00, $1.50  $1.25
SOLTD BRASS PAPER CLIPS at $1.25 and   $1.00
SOLID BRASS EXPANDING BOOK LOCKS, large variety designs, from $3.50
SOLID  BRASS TIE  RACKS—The  very  newest style $2.00
SOLID BRASS PIPE RACKS—Holders for six pipes, $2.50 and  $2.00
SOLID BRASS STATIONERY HOLDERS, $3.50, $300 and  $2.00
SOLID BRASS HANGING HALL MIRRORS-Unequalled in design  $4.50
SOLID BRASS LARGE STAND MIRRORS, $7.50 and  $6.00
SOLID  BRASS   SINGLE  PHOTO   FRAMES,  $1.50 and   $1.25
SOLID BRASS DOUBLE PHOTO FRAMES $2.00
SOLID BRASS THERMOMETERS  $1.75
SOLID BRASS MATCH BOX HOLDERS $1.00
il
Libbey" Cut Glass
No matter whom you have in mind you can surely make no happier choice for Christmas than Libbey
Cut Class or Libbey Engraved Crystal. These are admittedly the world's most exquisite productions
of their peculiar kind, and they further possess a real and practical use and value which completes
the requisites most desirable in a Yuletide remembrance. The Glassware Department section is
displaying a wonderful assortment of the newest "Libbey productions.
Give a
Burrowe's
Folding
Card Table
Only $4.50
Other Card
Tables
in Many Styles
Third Floor
Special Counters laden with Christmas Gifts at 10c, 15c, 25c 35c, 50c & $1.00 Come in now
U^&XUiVWZi
VICTORIA'S
Popular
rjrni5her5
^iVWiU&V-^
Everybody is
Welcome
Come Now THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
19
Once again Christmas is upon us
and once again I sit mc down in my
loungeresqtie chair to compose a few
words which will be acceptable to my
readers as an offering of good fellowship. Naturally I trust that you will
all have a good time this Christmas.
I sometimes think that it is somewhat
trite to reiterate the speech, "A Merry Xmas," because he would be a
Scrooke indeed who could find it in
his heart to wish any person a bad
time at this season of the year.
Doubtless there are occasions when
we think that we have the right to
wish ill to some one or other. On
the whole, however, I am a firm believer in my fellow man. I can't bring
myself to think that there is anyone
who would seriously go out of his
way to hurt me, so I am content to
look on everyone as possessed of the
spirit of charity. Still, it is the custom at Christmas to go out of our
way more than at any other season
lof the year to make an expression of
[kindly feeling, and therefore, good
[readers, take with you a Lounger's
Iblessing and may you all partake of
■good cheer and may none of you suf-
|fer evil consequences.
There is one fascination about
Christmas which never palls. May I
■lever grow too old and crusty to lose
the delight of wandering through the
[streets and looking at the different
pop windows. Here in Victoria our
Stores make a goodly showing and do
Inuch to heighten the festive spirit
vhich is abroad. Who could wander
last   our   good  friends,  the  Hinton
Electric Company, and not smile with
honest joy at the exquisitely absurd
decoration whicii is the centrepiece
of their warmth-giving advertisement?
See the revolving legs as they strive
to bring their grotesque owners
owners nearer to the sought-for
prize! Consider Weiler's and be envious, though indeed envy is out of
court at Christmas time. What a fascinating display of "Christmas Suggestions" which take the form of silver-ware arrayed in most attractive
guise! Some stores there are whose
Christmas joy finds expression in
more sober apparel. One such is the
Victoria Book & Stationery Co.'s emporium, where costly volumes bound
in rich vellum display their beauties
to the hungry eyes of enthusiasts.
Observe the illustrations in that wondrous tome! Surely it is our old
friend "Grimm's Fairy Tales" appearing in a new shape with pictures by
an artist hand. And next to him lies
"Lorna Doone" with views of Devon
that make the pulse beat faster. And
all around lie Christmas cards spread
in rich profusion. Truly a gallant
show, my masters, and one to fill the
heart of any lover of books and pictures with delight. What would Sir
Walter Raleigh say if he could see
our "Uncle Dudleigh's" window. Pipes
quaint and glorious, boasting their
graceful bowls before the eyes of all
lovers of the fragrant weed, are displayed in the Army & Navy Cigar
store. What a wealth of resting-
places for the rich cigar or for his
dainty sister the gentle cigarette!
Pass on, my    friend,    lest lingering
there with Raleigh's eyes, thy head
meet Raleigh's fate. And next a
wealth of fancy goods! The Standard Stationery Company, amidst a
pile of books has found a place for
all those dainty knick-knacks which
stand so gracefully on dainty tables.
Dost thou, as Iago of old, possess a
purse which holds but trash, or dost
thou wish to buy one fitting to thy
store? Gaze here and choose, wallet
or purse, hand-bag or satchel. All
around they lie and with them too a
host of Christmas cards.
*   *   *
I save till last the finest show of
all. Could good Charles Dickens, to
whom we owe so much of this, our
Christmas spirit, with prophet's eyes
have seen up Fort Street to where
the store of H. O. Kirkham stands,
methinks his "Fat Boy" would have
been endowed with twice his girth.
"Tiny Tim" would have waited longer
for his sire as that ill-fated clerk
rubbed and rubbed again his cold,
blue nose against those shining panes.
See him as Dickens would have pictured him, lingering at this near window. How his eyes bulge at the
wealth of raisins spread like a carpet
ou the sill! Those fruits make his
mouth water as they lie all crystallised in their dainty boxes. Never
before has poor Bob Cratchit seen a
hot-house flower, but there they
bloom, and clustering round the panes
are ivy, fir and holly. Reluctantly
he turns away when once again that
nose is flattened 'gainst the second
pane. Here massed amid dwart
palms, proud lilies and fair chrysanthemums are cakes ancl fruit the like
of which he never saw before. And
over all there hang ivy, fir, and holly.
Poor Bob, bethink ye now of Tiny
Tim, who's waiting thee at home. So
once again he heaves a sigh and
starts his weary way. And once again
he stops. At home there waits the
drinking by the Cratchit family a
weak and scanty store of punch and
Bob just has to look at window Number   Three.    Here's   drinking   for   a
lord, thinks he and scans the graceful bottles as they stand in serried
piles and here again he sees the ivy,
fir and holly. A gallant show, well-
lighted by strange flames which
Cratchit never heard of. And so we
leave him as he passes and we awaken
from imagination's fairy  dream.
*   *   *
As I was going down the street
the other day a man I know remarked
that he hoped that on Christinas
morning we might have a fall of
snow "Just to make it look like
Christmas," he said. I reasoned with
him and pointed out how foolish he
was to wish for such a thing. I
argued with him that we were suffering quite enough as it is with the
streets, though I won't be nasty and
say anything now about them, but he
persisted. He allowed the force of
my argument and like most people
when they are convinced against their
will, he went off saying "Still, I should
like to see a little snow." It made
me feel quite angry. But after he
had gone and I had pondered the
matter over in my own mind, I had
to agree that there was a lot in what
he said. Christmas never does seem
quite the same thing when you wake
up in the morning and see the rain
pouring down, or the sun shining
through a balmy atmosphere. I
rather imagine that we should like a
little frost and just the tiniest scattering of snow to greet in the morning. But it is so hard to get things
in the right quantities. One finds
that when making mincemeat, so on
the whole I suppose that it would be
just as well for us all to hope for
a fine day, but a mild one.
*   *   *
What crowds there have been in the
Post-office lately! When one considers the thousands of people who
make a point of sending their Christmas mail away weeks ahead of the
time, in order to save the pressure
which falls on the officials, it is wonderful what an amount of mail has
to  be  dealt  with.    For  my  part,   I
wonder how the employees can continue to work in the atmosphere
which prevails there. Hot, is no
word for it. I have always contended that in Canada it is too over-
poweringly hot in hotels, offices and
post-offices. The other day I had
occasion to go to an office situated
in one of our big modern buildings.
It was comfortably warm in the lobby; it was oppressively so in the
elevator, but it was over-poweringly
so in the office itself. Beads of perspiration stood out on my brow and
1 gasped with amazement when I saw
a man putting his coat on before going out. I suppose that the reason
one sees so many men wearing an
overcoat in winter-time, just because
it is winter-time, is that they have to
do so because after a certain date the
furnaces have to be heated whether
they arc needed or no, and their oc-
ccupants are liable to catch cold when
going into the fresh, outer air. I
know that so far this winter I have
not felt the need of a fire in the office
more than a dozen times, and only
then with a breath of air coming
through the window. However, perhaps other people are not so full-
blooded as the
(&l
<rit*^Z<r.
XMAS SOCCER
Victoria's Professional Soccer Club
is putting up the game that draws
the patronage of the public and on
Saturday, 23rd December, also on
Monday, Xmas day, it has a team
with it expects to gain a decisive victory over the Nanaimo United in the
Island League championship match,
and also over the Cumberland in the
B. C. League. Both games will be
worth seeing and it is expected a
large number will turn out Saturday.
Game starts at 2 p.m. sharp. Xmas
day game starts at 11 a.m. sharp. Admission 25c.    Play rain or shine.
Our First Appearance in "The Week"
affords us the opportunity of extending our Heartiest Christmas Greetings to the people of Victoria
Dress Goods
Of Course You Have Heard of
House Furnishings
Millinery
Staples
Ready to Wear
"Gordons"
Fancy Ooods
Garments
Who in Victoria has not?   On the streets, in the cars ancl in their homes one
OUR TERMS ARE
HOURS OF BUSI
can hear the ladies of Victoria talking of the beautiful new store on Yates
CASH—ALWAYS
NESS
Street.   Invariably the remarks   indicate   the   pleasure   and   satisfaction that
This means greatest pos
are from 8.30 to 5.30
follow, naturally, "shopping" at Gordons.
sible value for every cent
when the best trained
you spend and more
staff in Victoria is at
If by any chance you have not yet visited the store we specially invite
satisfaction all
your service.
you now.
The variety of our high grade stocks, the remarkably low figures at whicli
round.
Hosiery
they are inarked, the spaciousness and excellent arrangement of the various
Boots and Shoes
Underclothing
departments, the experience and courtesy of our staff ancl, above all, our
Toys
determination to thoroughly satisfy you will all combine to make you a satisfied
Furs
and constant visitor at
Notions&Smallwares
The New Yates
Street Department
Store
The New Yates
Street Department
Store 20
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1911
"SOTTO VOCE"
TheWeek'sRumours
& Humours, By the Hornet
That one of our fattest inspectors
on the Police force is evidently the
guardian of Steele's saloon.
* *   *
That  when    he retires    from the
Force  he  will  probably  assume  the
management of the Victoria Hotel.
* *   *
That drinks are served every Sunday in the dining-room of a well-
known hotel on Johnson Street at a
charge of 20 cents each.
* *   *
That things are pretty rotten in
connection with the running of some
of the hotels and saloons in town,
ancl the condition of affairs would not
be tolerated even in Buckville, Texas,
or Carson,  Nevada.
* *   *
That an ounce of help is still worth
a ton of pity; this applies to helping
the Public Library out with a few dollars or a few books.
* *   #
That an excellent example has been
set by Mr. Shakespeare and others,
for which the Commissioners and the
public are thankful.
* *   *
Tlat it may be all right for the
police to ask loiterers to "move on,"
but the request should be made with
civility.
* *   *
That a policeman is a public servant, not an autocrat or a czar.
* *   *
That politeness is still a short suit
with some members of the Police
Force, especially the new recruits.
* *   *
That the Post-office staff is more
over-worked than ever this Christmas, but is working with a good-will
and few grouches.
* *   *
That the Hon. Robert Rogers cannot too quickly decide to pay that increase of $20.00 a month to post-
office employees in the West. It is
badly wanted in Victoria.
* *   *
That the Post-master is doing the
best possible with the limited space
and limited staff at his disposal.
* *   *
That among the many things which
Victoria has out-grown the Post-
office easily ranks first.
* *   *
That if in the multitude of councillors there is wisdom Mr. Louis Coste
will be a second Solomon.
* *   *
That he is said to have decided to
endorse the suggestion of The Week
to abandon the Inner Harbour Railway over the Causeway and in front
of thc Parliament Buildings in favour of a Bascule bridge from the
Reserve to Laurel Point.
* *   *
That the ultimate scheme will certainly reflect much of the life work,
and many of thc ideas, of the veteran Secretary of the Inner Harbour
Board, Mr. T. C. Sorby.
* *   *
That no man can be an expert in
all subjects, not even Mayor Morley
or the Vice-President of the Board
of Trade.
* *   *
That Nature has determined that
freight trains from the railway terminus to the Outer Wharf shall
cross by means of a bridge.
* *   *
That the battle of the townsites
still continues, and no one knows
whether it is New Hazelton, South
Hazelton or just Hazelton.
* *   *
That Bob Kelly thinks he knows,
and Maybee he does.
* *   *
That when the Jay is away the mice
will play.
* *   *
That if the hours are shortened, and
the license fees raised, the inspector
will have a softer snap than ever—
if possible.
That the signatories of the petition 1 That the mover of the last toast
presented to the City Council will go asked "What should we do without
down to  history as the "Noble  Six the press?"   To which a popular So-
Hundred."
* *   *
That Dr. G. A. B. Hall is a good
Health Officer and the man who persisted in tearing down a scarlet fever
notice is an enemy to the public interest.
* *   *
That Dr. Gray is proving himself
to be "a man of parts," which is not
quite the same thing as a "jack-of-
all-trades."
* *   *
That a modern application of the
old proverb about a cobbler sticking
to his last might well be "Do one
thing and do it well."
* *   *
That there is an ancient and honourable precedent for paragraphing
every sentence    of   a    sermon—The
Book of Proverbs.
* *   *
That every sentence in every sermon is not a proverb, or even an epigram.
* *   *
That it is possible to weaken the
strength of a chain by multiplying the
links.
*-*•*   *   #
That a Vancouver Weekly is greatly perturbed at the success which Dr.
Young is making of the University
project.
* *   *
That there is only one person who
would be satisfactory to the paper in
question as President, and he is
wedded to the newspaper business.
That a certain county in Ontario is
said to have produced many geniuses,
but they are proverbially erratic.
That it is about time the long-promised Liberal Morning Daily with its
15,000 paid subscribers (mostly in
Ontario) made its debut.
* *   *
That the City Editor of the Victoria Times is an easy mark for
"crushed tragedians."
* *   *
That nothing succeeds like success,
unless it be personal advertising.
That the V. A. D. C. has covered
itself with glory—at last.
* *   *
That there seems to be not a little
difficulty in distributing the halos.
* *   *
That some people seem to have received an aloe—or a lemon.
* *   *
That the performance of "A Pantomime Rehearsal" was above criticism as an amateur production.
* *   *
That Victoria is still a world-
beater for native talent; the imported
does not stack up nearly as well.
* *   *
That the supper at the Empress after    Saturday    night's    performance
would   have  been  more  popular  if
handled by the Committee.
* *   *
That some people will never learn
the meaning of "butter-in."
* *   *
That  if  they  lose  a  few  feathers
they have no one but themselves to
blame.
* *   *
That when the wine is in the fit
is off.
* *   *
That in their excitement one or two
members of the supper party narrowly missed making it an "undress" rehearsal.
* *   *
That it was a happy thought to
toast "those who were not in the
cast, but should have been."
* *   *
That a logical sequel would have
been, "those who were in the cast,
but should not have been."
*   *   *
That all's well that tends well.
ciety lady    feelingly   replied with a
sigh "What indeed?"
That it is bad enough to be quarantined, but worse to be quarantined
for six months without pay.
* *   *
That if there had not been a change
of Government, the Quarantine Station men would by this time be after
William's Head.
* *   *
That even if he is now out of politics the Hon. William might jog the
memory   of   his   old   Departmental
friends.
* *   *
That as Assistant Medical Inspector at the Quarantine Station, Dr.
Douglas Hunter is the right man in
the right place.
* *   *
That after many days the C. P. R.
are providing asphalt walks and drives
to  the  Empress  Hotel.
* *   *
That the Empress ball on New
Year's night will be the social event
of the season, and Manager Jackson
is going to surpass all his previous
efforts.
That Mayor Mosley's missionary
tour among the heathen of the outlying municipalities has not been even
a qualified success.
* *   *
That the number of converts is out
of all proportion to the expenditure
of time, money and energy.
* *   *
That it is still true that in vain does
the fowler spread his snare in sight
of the birds.
* *   *
That according to W. H. Price, the
Mayor was not a success even as a
pea-nut roaster.
That the Secretary of the Conservative Association may be small of
stature, but his vocabulary does not
contain the word "fear."
* *   *
That he may be a politician, but
whenever he hands in his checks
many a poor man in Victoria will
lose his best friend.
* *   *
That it is a little cheap for misguided friends to pass the hat round
every time a brave man does his duty.
That Mr. Anscombe neither looked for nor would accept dollars for
doing what his conscience prompted
him to do.
* *   *
That all brave deeds are done on
impulse, and not on calculation.
* *   *
That as far as the evidence goes,
the blue-coated giant who allowed the
runaway team to pass him is not to
be listed with the brave.
* *   *
That   the   boy   at   Central Park,
Vancouver, who refused to hold up
his hands and was shot through the
wrist when defending the bank, makes
the six-foot of Victoria constabulary
look like thirty cents.
* *   *
That the people who wait on Government Street for the Esquimalt car
make a public convenience of Aaronson's doorway.
* *   *
That this is rather rough on a respectable tradesman.
* *   •»
That if the Westholme  Company
complete the Sooke Scheme for less
than $1,200,000 the water will be
cheap enough for flushing purposes
even if it is not fit to drink.
* *   *
That the City Engineer must have
walked by faith and not by sight when
allotting the contract for repairing
Smith's Hill Reservoir.
mere
Mrs.
her
That the successful tenderer's record in the early stages of constructing the Dallas Road Sea-wall is not
calculated to inspire confidence.
* *   *
That some people call it "Suffragist" and some "Suffragette," but after listening to Mrs. Pankhurst nearly three  hours  some people haven't
got the gist of it gette.
* *   *
That the lady in question is a great
talker and easily one too many for
those unfortunate auditors who undertook to ask questions.
* *   *
That a well-known ecclesiastical
barrister came off second best in an
encounter of wits with the redoubtable lady champion, which left a palpable crease in his choler.
* *   *
That answering questions is Mrs.
Pankhurst's "meat," to say nothing
of her  "long suit." '
That no one would object to her
eloquent appeal in the cause of humanity, except that it had "nothing
to do with the case."
* *   *
That in a lengthy and disjointed
address the speaker demonstrated the
inherent weakness of her sex—inconsistency.
That she did this with the motto
of the Suffragettes staring her in the
face from the upper boxes, "Deeds
not Words."
* *   *
That the versatile speaker excused
the Suffragettes for throwing stones
because of the physiological weakness which prevents a woman thrower
from hitting the mark.
That  on  the  same ground
man" is    prepared   to    excuse
Pankhurst's address.
■*•     *     He
That she admitted that
daughter only plucked up courage to
ask Sir Edward Grey a question when
another Suffragette "held her hand."
* *   *
That if every Suffragette had someone  to   hold  her  hand  there  would
soon be no Suffragettes.
* *   *
That if anything has provided sensational news for the English Press
it is the Suffragette movement.
* *   *
That when Mrs. Pankhurst appealed to the traditional platform of the
Liberal Party she forgot to quote
"Peace, Retrenchment and Reform."
* *   *
That many a "mere man" knows to
his sorrow that when woman's suffrage came in at the door, Peace flew
out at the window.
* *   *
That many a woman has married
a man to reform him, only to find
that after all she is still the weaker
vessel.
That Mrs. Pankhurst is not the first
woman to discover that so-called
Liberal principles are very good in
theory and very poor in practice.
* *   *
That the platform, which consisted exclusively of Liberals, tried hard
to look pleased while Mrs Pankhurst was denouncing the Liberal
Party and the Liberal leaders.
•'   *   *
That if the New Woman gets her
way it will be more necessary than
ever to sing "God Save the King"—
and the Country.
* *   *
That Mrs. Pankhurst's citation of
Madame Curie as an example of
"self-restraint" was rather unfortunate on the day when the courts condemned her as co-respondent in the
Langevin divorce case.
* *   *
That quite possibly Mrs. Pankhurst
was not aware of this little "inconsistency" in her own statement.
* *   *
That her advocacy of freer divorce
laws would probably obviate such an
unpleasant "contretemps" in the future.
* *   *
That some people would have peace
at any price, and others know that
the price is a set of furs.
That when woman appeals to force
she is only exasperating and ridiculous.
That man takes up his sceptre when
he strikes, but woman abdicates her
throne.
* *   *
That an ancient dictator built a
city on seven hills. His modern imitator would built one on seven civic
centres.
* *   *
That President Taft is still wrestling with the Trust problem, but he ,
is apt to get thrown.
* *   *
That Rudyard Kipling can hardly ]
be expected to survive the condemnation of the Colonist.
* *   *
That he may yet come to the conclusion that the female of the species j
is not always the deadlier of its kind.
* *   *
That the hardest knock the G. T.l
P. has yet received is to be told byl
the Railway Commission that theirl
officials "deserve to be in the peni-|
tentiary."
* *   *
That the court ruled them to havd
been guilty of "a deliberate attemtll
to deprive an individual of his rights.'!
* *   *
That without    endorsing   this ex-l
treme judgment the Government ol
British Columbia has always held th{
G. T. P. at arm's length.
* #   *
That Mr. Hays' plausible schemel
for acquiring terminal sites and drivl
ing a  coach and four   through thf
Alien Immigration   Act   never con
mended  themselves  to   British   Co|
umbians.
* *   *
That it must be particularly painfij
to be so harshly dealt with "in th
house of one's friends."
* *   *
That the  hysterics  of the  Liberl
Press on the Navy Question are onl
intended to cover confusion, and n|
to indicate any real feeling.
* *   *
That  if    Mr.    Borden    drops  tH
Laurier naval   policy   and makes
prompt cash contribution to the Irl
perial authorities, he will do exactl
what his Party would most appro-j
of.
* *   *
That if he decides on this courl
neither Mr, Bourassa nor the Queb|
Nationalists will stay his hand.
* *   *
That in the American judicial sj
tem   now-a-days   many   jurors
called but few are chosen.
* *   *
That it is quite possible that
Edward Grey knows as much abi
the German war scare as Mr. J. |
Norton Griffiths, although the lo
Press accorded him less than half I
space.
* *   *
That unless the Colonist is entirl
mistaken  we are on  the  eve  off
great day.   Why not have reserj
the reflection for next Sunday's
tion?
* *   *
That the missile which struck
Lloyd George's face would not hi
hurt him so seriously if it had b|
"Morocco bound."
* *   *
■ That if it is true that "love is e|
nal," it is probably true that "it
never die."   Vide Poem in Sundl
Colonist, reprinted   from   a contl
porary.
* *   *
That when the band played
Save the King" at the Empress Hi
a few nights ago, the only persf
who did not stand were—who do
think?—the Mayor   of   Victoria
his party.
* *   *
That one of the wisest wishes
could be indulged in this Christ|
season would be that the scales
fall from our eyes.
* *   *
That thc finest  charity we  cd
all  dispense at this time would|
tender sympathy.
A     Christmas
'greeting
greeting    witli

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