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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Apr 29, 1911

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 "GET  THE  HA9IT"
and have your Clothes made
to  order at
[Jiutley's Tailor Shop
645 Johnson Street
Perfect Fit and Satisfaction
Guaranteed
The Week
fl British Columbia Newspaper and Review,
Published at Victoria, B. e.
HALL & WALKER
Agents
WELLIN6T0N COLLIERY
COMPANY'S COAL
1232 Government St.
Telephone 83
Woi_. IX, Wo
M
Eighth Yeab
THE WEEK, SATUKDAY, APRIL 29, 1911.
Eighth Yeae
One Dollab Peb Annum
JE LIBERTY OF THE SUBJECT
[rhe readers of The Week are requested
lake special note of the report whieh ap-
lirs in this issue of the proceedings be-
|e the Police Commisioners on Monday
when an enquiry was held into the
Itter of the arrest and incarceration of
Bronsen Singh.   The Week wishes at
outset to state that the Commissioners
Ide a thorough investigation as far as
material before the Court permitted;
It they extended every courtesy to the
Iresentatives of The Week, and that
|ler the circumstances their finding was
and equitable. But, this does not
Idly dispose of the question at issue
Teh is whether the police have the right
arrest and lock up a prospective witness
[the mere purpose of detaining him in
eity, especially when the witness does
[belong to the criminal classes and has
lean record.
The Object of the Week
I'he object whicii The Week had in view
■jiving publicity to this important case
not to convict George Kirk & Co., or
[stable Heather of improper ,conduct
to determine if possible what the
Its of a private citizen are in respect to
(st, and incidentally what view the Po-
ICommissioners and the Police Author-
Victoria take of those rights. That
Ition has been settled. The judgment
ic Mayor, in which his colleagues con-
led, was perfectly clear and The Week
Ives it is sound. He held that there
J justification for The Week taking the
Is it did in the interests of the personal
|clom of the citizen, and, whilst exoner-
■ the police constable because he had
in accordance Avith the police regula-
stated that in all cases where posit is better to lay a charge. That
|edes the whole case of The Week,
British Law
ian is known to belong to the criminal
les there may be cases where it would
[istifiable to adopt extreme measures to
lent him from leaving town when his
pnee was required in a matter of im-
Jtnce, and even then the arbitrary act
arresting and locking up a witness
Ild be very cautiously exercised; but in
lease of a man of good character,
list whom nothing is known, The
Ic still believes that neither British
Ihor British sense of justice would
lion such a proceeding. Constable'
Iher seemed to realise this, because his
Ice proceeded along entirely different
He said that he arrested Bronsen
because he suspected him of being
Iccomplice with Lehman in stealing
The Week is perfectly willing to ac-
[this statement, but in doing so would
out that the action of the constable
Jd have been more consistent with his
lice if he had seen that an information
laid, and a proper charge formulated.
[Mayor's remark would seem to indi-
Jthat this would have been the wiser
le to pursue, and in this connection it
jt a ltitle singular that although Mr.
on the first occasion and Mr. Hig-
his solicitor, on the second occasion
[ed Bronsen Singh's detention, they
ler proceeded to make a charge nor to
[he Hindu as a witness when the case
into court.
Lay a Charge
jithing more need be said on this phase
[ie question beyond emphasizing the
J that the principle for which The
Ic contended, viz. that the arrest of any
[should be followed by the laying of a
hr information, was confirmed by the
■nissioners. The Week acquits Con-
h Heather of any personal responsibil-
[i the matter; not because it thinks he
wisely, but because his action was
j'sed by his superior officers who
Ifore assumed the responsibility. The
|ion of bad language is a minor issue.
Constable Heather denied having said
"God damn you"; he admitted saying
"damn you". He also admitted that he
told Bronsen Singh that "if he knew and
would not say so he would not get any
sympathy or mercy from him," which,
taken in connection with the treatment of
the Hindu is not without some significance.
Sweating
The view which The Week took from
the beginning was that the object of locking up the man on two separate occasions,
several days intervening, was to "sweat"
him, and this thought must have occurred
to the mind of the Mayor because he asked
if that was not the idea which The Week
had. It certainly was and still is. But,
if Constable Heather's superior officers
consider that "sweating" is justifiable, the
constable certainly cannot be held responsible.
Attitude of Daily Press
Only one other thing remains to be said,
and that is that the attitude of the daily
preSs towards this whole matter must be
one of profound regret to any liberty-loving community. Both the Colonist and
the Times • suppressed the most material
evidence given in the case of Kirk & Company vs. Lehman when the matter was before the court. They held aloof, which
was their privilege, when The Week drew
attention to what appeared to be an improper, if not an illegal, arrest, and when
the case came before the Police Commissioners they not only suppressed every
item favourable to The' Week, but they
both misrepresented and garbled the evidence and the findings of the court.. The
Colonist came out with a scare head-line
"Charges Against Detective Fail," an 1
the Times varied the wording but admirably preserved the spirit in a head-line
wliieh read "Charge Is Found to Be
Groundless One." Both papers ignored
the fact that the statement published in
The Week was substantiated in every single particular, except as to the swearing.,
They also, of course, omitted to quote the
finding of the Commissioners, although it
was very brief, and completely exonerated
The Week from the charge of having exceeded the legitimate bounds of public
criticism. The result is an injustice to
The Week and to the public. The former
has incurred the expense of procuring a
verbatim report of the hearing from the
court stenographer so that there may be
no question as to what actually took place.
Neither of the daily papers apparently
considered it a matter of sufficient importance to warrant an accurate, still less
a detailed report; there was nothing in
question but the personal liberty of a Hindu ancl the opportunity to give a backhanded blow to The Week by suppressing
the truth.
Systematic Suppression
This is not the only case in which both
daily papers stand convicted of pursuing a
similar policy, but it is one of sufficient
importance to every citizen to justify tho
trouble and expense which The AVeek has
incurred; for whatever else may result
from the enquiry it is certain that more
care will be exercised in future in the arrest of prospective witnesses, even at the
request of influential tradesmen ancl their
solicitors, and that in any event more regard will be paid to the British custom of
laying an information as promptly as possible after tlie arrest has been made.
ROBBING JOHN BULL
The Week has had a good deal to say
lately about the policy of the daily press
in suppressing important news items, and
from the persistency with which this has
been done it is only reasonable to conclude
that the course has been adopted in pursuance of a settled policy. The view of The
Week is that the Press has no right to hold
back legitimate news, and that to do so is
an offence against public morals, as well
as being inimical to the public interest.
There may fairly be a difference of opinion as to what constitutes "news" in a technical newspaper sense. For instance, it
would be obviously improper to print
many of the rumours which are heard at
the street corner, although they might have
a substratum of truth; indeed, the first
duty of an editor is to test the accuracy of
his information by every reasonable means
at command. If the information conies
from a reliable source, and the public interest would be served by its publication,
a newspaper has no right to suppress it.
Both Victoria daily papers have refused to
give publicity to the facts which follow; as
to whether they were justified in their refusal the readers of The Week must judge
for themselves. Whether the object is to
shield the guilty parties must also be a
matter of conjecture, but there can hardly
be a question that on any rational definition the story is a news item of very great
importance, and its suppression is calculated to defeat the ends of justice. It
seems to be a matter of common knowledge, at any rate to persons living at
Esquimalt, that for many years the Imperial Government stores kept there for
naval purposes have been regularly and
systematically pilfered. Such goods as
indiarubber, paint, rope and oils being
the favourite plunder. It is believed that
this extensive and long-continued thieving
could only have been carried on by .collusion between the actual thieves and some
persons in tlie employ of the Government,
and having access to the stores. The annual sales of naval stores by auctioa, the
details of which can be obtained from the
auctioneers' books, account for but a very
moderate percentage of the stores not
actually consumed on the ships. A week
ago in consequence of information received the Customs officers of the Dominion Government seized a large quantity of
rubber at the works of the Victoria
Machinery Depot. This rubber is of a
peculiar make, furnished only to the Navy
and was unquestionably stolen from the
naval stores at Esquimalt by the parties
who sold it to Mr. Houston, the foreman
of the Victoria Machinery Company. The
interest of the Customs authorities is that
the rubber was a consignment of English
goods which had not paid duty. They
took tho property seized and deposited it
in the warehouse of the Customs Department, where it still remains. The naval
authorities have placed the matter in the
hands of the police who are no doubt investigating the theft. It would be wholly
improper at the present stage to make
any comment upon their work, but it 's
surely a matter of public interest to let
it be known that such an important end
extensive seizure has been made by the
officers of the Dominion Government. It
it inconceivable that wholesale robbery of
this kind should be condoned; any settlement "sub-rosa" would be compound] ".g a
felony which is decidedly not only illegal
but opposed to the public interest. For
this reason, The Week has no hesitation in
giving publicity to the facts, and expresses the hope that the vigilance of the
police will ensure the capture of the criminals.. There is no reason to suppose that
the principals of tho Victoria Machinery
Company were privy to the transaction,
but since a reference to their books shows
that the rubber in question was purchased
at a nominal price, they should certainly
not hesitate to .require a full explanation
from their foreman. At any rate these
are the facts and apart from the one instance of theft which is hereby demon-
started the story throws a very interesting
light. upon the* "easy mark" which that
popular and jovial old gentleman, John
Bull, becomes in the hands of unscrupu
lous servants far from home. Incidentally,
it also shows why the defence of the Empire is a costly undertaking for the British
tax-payer.
BRITISH NEWS
In the matter of the publication of British News the Colonist has constituted itself judge and jury and, having asked
whether it publishes all the news available,
winds up by saying that it does, and therefore that there is no room for improvement. In arriving at this conclusion the
Colonist entirely ignores the facts which
The Week has laboriously collected day
after day and published in several issues,
showing that all the competitors of the
Colonist are able to secure and to publish
a far greater quantity of British news. The
Week has repeatedly asked the question
why the Colonist cannot do as well as its
competitors, and especially why it is necessary to buy a Vancouver World on the
streets of Victoria in order to obtain a
modicum of British news. During the
present week the Colonist has printed exactly 32^2 inches of British news in five
issues; the Province has printed 150^
inches, and the World 13314, so that it-
will be seen that the proportion of the
Colonist news varies from one-fourth to
one-fifth of that of the other papers.
Amongst the important items published in
the Province and the World and entirely
ignored by the Colonist are the following:
South African Railway Disaster; Canadian Arch for the Coronation; a London
Despatch re new C. P. R. Steamers; Copyright Bill; Retirement of Dean Gregory;
British Fleet in Delagoa Bay; Lord Kitchener's Command; Plague in India; Canadian Visitors in London; Outline of Proposed Home Rule Bill; Arrest of the Manager of the Charing Cross Bank; Regulation of Trust Companies in Australia;
British Aerial Defence; The King and
Ireland; London Telegram re Attempted
Assassination of Kaiser. These are a few
items taken at hap-hazard, none of which
appear to lack interest, and all of whicii
were printed in the Vancouver papers.
Why does not the Colonist face the issue
and since it is so anxious to receive suggestions tell the public why it is only able
to gather one-fifth of the British news secured by its competitors.
SEX HYGIENE
The best editorial by long odds that has
ever been printed in the Victoria Times
appeared in the issue of Wednesday last
and dealt with the subject of sex hygiene.
The Week wishes to say in the most emphatic manner that it is in entire accord
with every word of that article. It has
the greater gratification in saying this because it has come iii for a good deal of
odium for expressing similar views time
after time, and it only hopes that the Victoria Times will be a "stand-patter" on
this very vital matter. The Week has always maintained that the idea of teaching
sex hygiene in public schools emanates
from erotic and diseased brains, and that
what parents do not teach their children
in this connection had better go untaught.
Indeed, it would go a stop further and say
that any parent has a legal right to object
to the teaching of such a subject to his
child. Such a course is bound to lead to
pruriency and immorality. This has been
the experience wherever it has been tried,
and human nature is the same all the
world over. The Week has ahvays believed that so-called moral reformers, who
inflict prurient and salacious lectures on
the public should be prohibited by the
police, and the men, however, well-meaning, who support such a movement should
be looked after by their friends. Surely
it is not unreasonable to express the hope THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 29, 1911.
In a recent issue of The Week I
made some remarks about the millen-
ium, saying that when that happy
period arrived there might be found
some ladies returning from "Pink
teas," who would be willing to relinquish their seats in street cars to
tired-out men. It would appear from
the following letter that the day
when such consideration on the part
of the fair sex may be expected is
very far distant, seeing that an act of
courteous thoughtfulness only aroused
the derision of the ladies (sic) who
witnessed it. The letter needs no
further comment; it speaks for itself,
and I only wish to add that the name
of the sender was attached and will
be furnished to any Doubting Thomas
who may feel that some unwarranted
aspersion is being cast upon the manners of some Victorian ladies.
Cowichan Station, April 25, 1911.
To the Editor Week:
Dear Sir:—I noticed the incident
mentioned by the Lounger about the
young lady and the tired man in the
street car: I can vouch for the following which happened on a Fort Street
car two weeks ago: A lady entered a
car at the corner of Fort and Douglas
Streets and as there were no vacant
seats she stood for some time until a
middle-aged man who was by his
dress evidently a plasterer or bricklayer, rose and said, "Take this seat,
lady!" but the lady said, "No, thank
you, you are more tired than I am;
you have been working hard all day."
The man said "Thank you, ma'am,"
2nd kept his seat. Then everyone on
the car that heard what passed stared
at the lady as if she had said something outre, and two ladies sniggered
and one said to the other, "Did you
hear that?" It seems from this that
politeness and consideration for others is very rare and uncommon in the
street cars of Victoria. If the Lounger likes to use this he may. I know
it to be true because the lady in question was my wife. I am,
Yours truly,
There is probably.no one who more
thoroughly enjoys a ride in an automobile than the writer of this column
and personally I have no bias against
the speed fiends, because I know that
I should be one if I had the chance.
I have only one "kick" against the
automobilist and that is when he is
noisy. It would seem impossible to
check joy-riding in the early hours of
the morning. When all the world is
still and when speed is practically
permissable owing to the absence of
any traffic, the only real objection
which people can have to these joy-
rides is the infernal row they make.
I want to know why it is necessary for
motorists of this description to confine themselves to the city limits when
indulging in this particular form of
amusement. Two men have complained to mc this week with regard
to the noise made by joy-riders just
before dawn. Beacon Hill Park was
the locale in one instance and of
course the long-suffering Rockland
Avenue was in the other. For goodness sake, joy-riders, do get out of
town if you want to make night hideous and the early morning worse. I
would never appear as a witness in
court on a question of speed, but I
would gladly give evidence in any
charge of this description.
*   *   *
There is only one society which
really fascinates me and which I
would support with financial, when
possible, and spiritual aid at all times,
and that is the Anti-Noise Society,
which is in active operation under
some name or other in various large
cities and which has up to date accomplished much in the way of eliminating useless noises. Already some
genius has invented a noiseless typewriter and a reference to the Financial Column of the current issue of
The Week will show that thc com-
[BptiBiuj punos v uo }ncl uaoq s«i|
uo|}uoaui s;i[} Suisfijjn s; ipujA-v Xuucl
basis. The inventor is a public benefactor and to my mind is worthy of
the Nobel prize.
* #   *
We in the West are rather prone
to boast that wa have no tenement
houses, no slums and none of the horrors which accompany such places, in
our cities. The other day I took a
stroll round Humboldt Street and up
Church Hill and round again by Victoria Crescent into Humboldt. I was
appalled by the conditions existing
there and sincerely trust that the
whole of the section comprised by the
streets named has been included in
the list of houses condemned during
the recent visit of inspection by the
City Engineer and the Building Inspector. The place is a fire-trap and
must surely be a breeding-place for
disease. Cabins, shacks and outbuildings are huddled up together in
one heterogeneous mass, and I can't
think how it is that I never noticed
this abuse before. I ought to have
been fulminating about it for the last
six years; but it is never too late to
mend and now that the city is making
such forward strides in every direction I hope that it will not be long before we see a complete demolition of
this and similar abominations.
* *   *
I do not ever remember seeing the
traffic blocked in Victoria; not really
blocked that is to say, but I saw
something very much like it last Tuesday on Broad Street, and I was so
struck with the incident that I made
a note of it at the time. I refer to
that part of Broad lying between
Johnson and Cormorant. Outside
John Meston's carriage works there
were seven horseless rigs awaiting attention, and two long timber carrying wagons. A couple of teams of
horses were being led to their morning's work. One big dray was going into Brackman-Ker's warehouse
whilst another was awaiting its turn.
Three automobiles were standing outside the Western Motor Co.'s store
and there was some kind of an obstruction in front of Messrs. Home's
establishment. This was all before
ten o'clock in the morning and it
must not be thought that I am regsi-
tering any kind of a complaint. Far
from it; I was delighted to see such
signs of prosperity, and though the
circumstances somewhat non-plussed
the driver of a rig who was passing
through, I couldn't help wishing that
all the streets of Victoria showed
such business activity so early in the
morning.
* *   *
For it was early in the morning—
for Victoria. Is there any other city
in the world of the same size and importance where such late hours prevail in the morning and such early
ones at night? I doubt it. True
things arc better than they used to
be. I seem to remember the time
when the average business man came
down about 10:30, glanced at his mail,
took a stroll round to see what was
doing and then went out to lunch. In
the afternoon he might be seen from
2 till about 4:30, but all business was
at an end by 5 o'clock. We do rather
better than that now, but still, there
is hardly that ceaseless rush of business which makes young men old and
has a deteriorating influence on the
hair. I can't say that I am particularly anxious to see Victoria develop
into a rush business town; it might
interfere, too much with my own comfort.
* *   *
It is also astonishing to see how
many men seem to have the time to
spend on the streets if there is anything to be seen. Take for instance
last Tuesday when the Fire-chief
made his spectacular dash down
Government Street after a new hat.
The side-walks were literally thronged
with    beholders   who   appeared   to
vouchsafe no apprehensions that their
various businesses might be going to
rack and ruin during their absence.
Of course, I was there in my official
capacity; when I "lounge" I am working, and that is one reason why I am
so fond of my job. But to come back
to the Fire-chief. I hear that he won
his hat and hope that he will get a
good one. I don't know what a "Pencil-curl" or a "Telescope" hat may be,
but I have seen them advertised and
feel sure that he would look very
saucy in one or the other. It was a
pity that the exact route to be adopted
by the various appliances was not
more clearly indicated as there resulted thc makings of a very pretty little
smash at the Belleville Street comer.
However, all's well that ends well, and
the people of Victoria are to be congratulated on having such an efficient
Chief and Brigade, and I think also
that the Chief should be congratulated
on having a chauffeur who doesn't
mind taking chances. The Police Patrol took part in the proceedings and
presented a very edifying spectacle
on its return, being escorted home by
two mounted constables.
I was immensely interested at a
little incident which occurred last Saturday morning on Bastion Street, and
only regret that I did not arrive on
the scenes in time to see the start.
Just as I got to the corner I saw a
small boy lying prostrate and howling
on the pavement outside the entrance
to the Acme Press, and standing over
him in an aggressive manner another
boy with a bicycle. To the latter
there quickly approached a gentleman
of elderly appearance who demanded
in no uncertain tones why he had
kicked the other when he was down,
following up the query with a sounding open-handed smack on his face.
The boy grunted out something about
what right had the boy got to knock
him off his bicycles. But that didn't
satisfy the gentleman who proceeded
to read him a homily on the British
axiom of not hitting a man when he
was down. To my sorrow the boy
was not suitably impressed and on
the gentleman's departure made use
of the language of the country whilst
conveying to an assembled audience
his opinion of the ancestry of his assailant.
*   *   *
Now I haven't the slightest doubt
but that the first boy thoroughly deserved to be knocked down; it is just
as likely as not that he had started
the trouble; even if- he hadn't there
was not much harm done. But when
it came to the tin-British practice of
kicking a prostrate foe it was time
for someone to interfere. The spirit
of fair-play cannot be too strongly
impressed on the minds of the youth
of thc country; if the Boy Scout
Movement did nothing else for the
boys of the country it would deserve
well of the community. I do not
think that the offender in this case
could be a member of any of the
troops which made so creditable a
showing at Beacon Hill last Saturday.
Tliere ought to be a lot of good work
done this summer by the Scouts, and
Victoria is lucky to have so many
men who are willing to devote themselves to thc work, and so many boys
who appreciate what is being done
for them. I only wish ttat the movement had started in the boyhood of
Cfri
<rb"^Z*_
Book Notes
Mrs. Campbell Praed's latest book,
"The Opal Fire," deals with the much
vexed question as to the right to put
a merciful end to the agony of one's
fellow creature when they are suffering from a painful and incurable
disease. The subject of euthanasia
has been dealt with in many forms,
but seldom has it been treated in
such a dramatic manner as in "The
Opal Fire," where the mother herself is confronted with the problem.
The scene of the story is laid in Australia and throughout the book a
powerful love drama is enacted, but
the main issue hinges on the correct
A Discussion of Gender
. We often wonder why they call a ship "she."
Perhaps it's because she wears a bow in front.
No, that can't be it, because the mere man wears his bow in
front.
Perhaps it's because she has a beau; but then all feminines
haven't got beaux.
Doubtless, it is because she is not ready for business unless
she is properly manned.
Or is it because it takes a good many yards to rig her out?
We believe we have heard old sailors speak about her going in
stays.
Yes, again, a ship it not always of the femal persuasion; how
can she be when she's a man-of-war?
Unless, indeed, she's a wo-man-of-war, i. e., a Suffragette.
We don't care to thus discuss gender.
In fact we hate to "cuss" anything, unless it's the foolish man I
who, when he orders a bottle of champagne at his hotel or club,]
forgets to specify G. H. Mumm & Co.'s Champagne.
Remember when YOU order "Extra Dry," say "Bring me the]
bottle with the pink capsule"; then you'll get the best and purest]
champagne possible to buy at any money.
Pither & Leiser
Wholesale Agents for Mumm's Champagne in B. C—Victoria,]
Vancouver, Nelson.
The name on the Label should be SCHMIDT'S, if you
want the best in genuine imported Clarets and Burgundies. They have been on this market for the past
fifteen years and stand for the Popular Choice.
For sale by all liquor dealers.
"RADIGER & JANION
1318 Wharf Street 'British Columbia Agents
HANA
The Best of All
No one would willingly buy an ind
Cerent painting when for practically \
same price a real masterpiece could I
secured. Neither would anyone, if hel
she knew it, buy a shoe of indifterl
style and ineipable of comfort when tl
could just as well own aHANAXT—a ll
masterpiece. f
It ia to you, who do not know it, L
art speaking*. HAXTAlf Shoes need al
ply an introduction—that'a aU.
atyles, all shapes.
H. B. Hammond Shoe
Broadwalk Seuffers for Children i
Sole Agents;
Hanan & Son, Wichert ft OardiJ
N. Y. N.Y.
Pemberton Building, 621 Fort Street
Miss S. F. Smith
A.T.C.M.
Takes PIANO PUPILS at
Her Studio
"SEA  VIEW"
104 DALLAS ROAD
VICTORIA, B. C.
Harmony and Theory a
a Specialty
answer to the above question. The
authoress would appear to shrink
from solving the problem and by introducing a "deus ex machina"
leaves her readers to follow out for
themselves the solution.
"The Opal Fire," by Mrs. Campbell Praed; Messrs. Cassell & Co.,
Ltd. $1.50. On sale at the Standard
Stationery Company's Store, Government Street.
Two other new books which have
just arrived at the same store are
"A Breath of Prairie," by Lillibridge.
Messrs! L. C. McClurg & Co. $1.50.
"The Victory," an Answer to "The
Calling of Dan Matthews," by Allan
Rutledge; Messrs. McClurg & Co.
$1.50.
CANCELLATION OF BESEI
Notice is hereby given that
serve established over certain lJ
the Cariboo and Lillooet Distri<|
tice of which  bearing date Jun
1908, was published in the Br
lumbla  Gazette  on  July  2nd,
cancelled in so far as the samel
to   the   following   surveyed   1:
Townships 52 and 54, Lillooet
viz.:—Sections 1, 2, 3, 10, 11, 12,|
15, Fractional Sections 16, 17,
18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, Fraction"
tion 26, Sections 26,  27, 28,   FrtJ
Section 29,  Sections  30,  31,  32,
Fractional   Sections   35   and   36,,
Township 52; and Sections 3, 10
tional Section 11, Section 13, Fra
Section  14,  Sections  24  and  26,1
Township  64,  and  that all  thej
mentioned lands  not already al
by pre-emption have been set aa
the   endowment   of  the  UniverJ
British Columbia.
ROBT. A. RBNWIll
Deputy   Minister  of  L|
Lands   Department,   Victoria,
April 10th, 1911.
apl 15
SWEDISH MASSAGE
MEDICAL GYMNASTIC]
VIBRATORY TREATMI
G. Bjornsfelt, S.
Phone 1856
8a 1 Fortl THE WEEK, SATUKDAY, APKIL 29, 1911.
The New Grand j
|y far the best turns which visit
i local vaudeville house are those I
[ch introduce equilibrists, acrobats
athletes, many of whom perform j
Is   which   cannot   be   excelled   in
I largest citites.    Under this cate-
must  be  placed  the  last  item
Ithis   week's   programme,   which
ininces the appearance of Joe Fen-
Is Awakening Athletes.   When the
men   are   discovered    on  the
le an involuntary murmur of ad-
ltion at their physique arises from
[audience which bursts into a vol-
|>f applause at each successive feat
[the rings.    Mr.  and  Mrs.  J.  R.
farm & Co. are back again with
ever-popular    one-act    comedy,
1:1 e Charles of Charleston," which
[been scoring a bigger  hit than
Violet  MacMillan's best char-
|-ization   is   that   of   the   spoiled
beauty   who   resents   her   boy
s   desertion.     Harry   Le   Clair
j on a farcical absurdity entitled
bpatra," but it is hard to know
j it  should  be  entitled  anything.
Infess  that Knox & Alvin  made
pugh, but in spite of that I con-
that   their   act   contains   much
I is vulgar.    There is nothing of
suggestive about it; it is merely
[ion.    For instance, the idea of
(ing a lady's nails on  the stage
Ices of the disgusting, and is cer-
• not the form of humor which
|ils to Victorians.
Romano's Theatre
Ifine western drama entitled "A
[ of Honour," was presented at
no's early this week, and in
base it was satisfactory to note
lthe hero remained faithful to
Indian spouse in spite of the
nation to return with the fair
Irner to his unexpected acquir-
prtunc. A marvellously clever
[depicted the wine-making in-
in northern Italy, thc rail-
t'ourney up the mountains being
[ularly beautiful in its scenic ef-
The Crystal Theatre
lis   not   often   that   the   Tlian-
|r Company produce comedy, but
they  do   it  is  certainly  good
"Haley's Comet" was one of
|tost amusing bits of fun  that
seen on the screen for many
day. The big piece during
It part of the week was a drama
h with the sacrifice of a mother
[r daughter's sake.
The Majestic Theatre
Kaien Company were to the
In Monday and Tuesday last at
Ihristie's house on Yates with
lerful Civil war drama entitled
llmothcr's War Story." This
lie of the best films ever shown
Itoria by this company. Good
ly was provided by "The Lover
lie Count," an Edison produc-
l-hich is calculated to give the
[tending to marry thc man of
loice a hint as to a new way
ling her unwilling parents.
Madame Sherry
lhe many lighter forms of en-
Iment which have occupied the
If the Victoria Theatre, I doubt
lone has furnished more amuse-
In- afforded more general satis-
than Madame Sherry. It is
5 criticism on several points,
the apparent irrepressible
Icy to American companies to
lte towards the salacious, and
Is a second legitimate ground of
lint would bc the inadequacy
j or two of thc leading charact-
Im a musical stand point. Hav*
■id that, there can be nothing
laise for one of the lightest,
1st and cleverest musical
les   which   Victoria   has   seen.
The fact that it played to capacity
on two nights is the best testimony
to its excellence.
When all is said and done, the attractive features of the play were emphasized by Miss Ann Tasker, the
most delightful ingenue, and our old
friend Oscar Figman, the irrepressible and unique comedian. Not that
the other parts were not well played,
and on the whole well sung. But
these two stood o-ut above all their
compeers.
Miss Tasker is as vivacious and
clever as she is dainty and beautiful;
she has a pure, sweet, fresh voice,
which she uses as if she enjoyed the
singing of every note. Her dancing
is in a class by itself and for sinuous,
poetical grace is hardly surpassed by
any of the ladies who have recently
attained such wide notoriety as Terp-
sichorean artistes. If I were to say
thet Miss Tasker sings with her hands
I might be charged with a misapplication of a paradox, but it is never-
"Philippe" was one of the cleverest
portraitures in the play and was sufficiently handled by Mr. William Cameron, who apart from his other attainments is easily one of the strongest men on thc stage, and as a weight-
lifter will yet make his mark. Of
course in a vaudeville show weight
ligting can hardly be considered out
of place, as long as due regard is
had to the centre of gravity and the
right balance for recovery. He would
be a captious critic who would say
that on this particular occasion Mr.
Cameron was not elevating.
The other members of the company, if not entitled to head-lines all
did well, and contributed to a success
which will ensure crowded houses
whenever Madame Sherry pays Victoria a second visit.
It is to be regretted that in the temporary adsence of Manager Denham,
the very salutary rule against the admission of late-comers during the progress of the play was not adhered to.
Dr. Henry Coward and Dr. Charles Harris
Conductors of the Musical Festival  of the Empire  Concerts to be
held in the Drill Hall May 17th, 18th, 19th
theless true, for whether singing, sitting or dancing her beautiful, artistic
hands arc eloquent. Altogether, one
can only express the hope that this
delightful young actress will not be
spoiled by success, for in these days
of resurrected prima donnas it ii,
something to catch one young and
fresh, and if Miss Tasker continues
as she has begun, she will not only
be a thing of beauty, but a joy for a
very long time.
I have seen Oscar Figman in many
parts, but in none that suited him better than that of "Theophilus Sherry,"
the millionaire connoisseur of Greek
art. He was sprightly, eccentric, incisive and intellectual and some of his
touches were simply inimitable. His
reading of the motto at the foot of
the stairs was a triumph of histrionic
art. All his songs were good, but
the gem was "Wc are Only Poor
Weak Mortals.", which was delivered
with exquisite drollery.
Miss Cheridah Simpson scored
heavily as Catherine, the erstwhile
Madame Sherry. She had a difficult
port to play as a big, bouncing, rollicking Irishwoman who had married
an excitable Frenchman, but her fine
natural qualifications of voice and fig-
ttre enabled her to carry it through
with the greatest success, and she
was obviously a prime favourite with
tho audience.
It is a rule to which there should be
no exceptions and experience has demonstrated that it will impose no
hardship if rigidly enforced; but if
people once get the idea that the management is not really in earnest, it
will bc impossible to observe it.
Lew Dockstader
Lew Dockstader and his 20th Century Minstrels will be the attraction
at thc Victoria Theatre, Monday, May
1. Dockstader is undoubtedly th^
most up-to-date and progressive of
thc Minstrel managers and hc usually
has something new to offer his patrons and it is promised that for the
present season he has made no exception to this rule. The comedian claims
that his present show is Ministrclsy
with a plot and also makes thc statement that it. possesses quite as much
of a story as docs the average musical comedy. Hc has even gone so
far in making innovations as to do
away with the time worn semi-circle
for a first class part and presents his
company at thc rise of the curtain in
what is called "The Possum Hunt
Club Revue." This scene depicts thc
lawn of the Club House of a swell
club organization with thc members
seated at tables enjoying a summer
evening. Dockstader is invited to bc
present   and   makes   his   appearance
(Continued on Page 15)
rWJEJTIC
THEATRE
Yates Street, Just Below Qovernment
WHERE EVERYBODY GOES
If you are dull and get the blues,
And do not know the place to choose
Come to the Majestic on Yates Street
Bring the friends you are apt to meet
And if on pleasure you are bent,
You won't regret the Dime you spent.
WE CATER TO LADIES AND CHILDREN
CHANGE OF PROGRAMME
Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday
Interesting
Instructive
RCMAN©
THEATRE
GOVERNMENT STREET NEAR JOHNSON
THE ONLY THEATRE USING FILMS THAT ARE AB-
SOLUTELY NEW, NEVER HAVING BEEN SHOWN BEFORE. 	
Latest and best music by Romano Orchestra.
Open from  12 noon to  11 p.m.
Admission 10 cents; Children at Matinee, 5 cents.
flcLAUGHLlN BUICK
AUTOS
Prices from $875 to $4,250 F.O.B. Victoria
Model 21—The Smartest Car Round Town
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Don't be misled.   Get the Best.
Fore Door Touring Torpedo, 35 H. P., Selective Sliding Glass,
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with Bailey Treads on Tires
Let us show you THE car,
WESTERN MOTOR AND SUPPLY CO.
1410 BROAD ST.
(Limited.)
PHONE 695.
THE
Crystal Theatre
BROAD STREET
The Largest, Best Furnished and Most
Comfortable Picture Theatre
in the City
WATCH FOR CONSTANT IMPROVEMENTS IN APPOINTMENTS AND SERVICE.
Roses
We have a very
fine stock of all
LEADING VARIETIES,   including all the best novelties of last season.   Now
is the time to plant if you want to get best
results.
Catalogue Free
LAYRITZ NURSERIES
Carey Road, Victoria, Branch at Kelowna, B.C. THE WEEK, SATUKDAY, APEIL 29, 1911.
The Week
A  Provincial  Newspaper  and  Review,
published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published  at  1208  Government   St.,
Victoria, B.C.,   Canada
W. BLAKEMORE, Editor
Short
Stories
BY BOHEMIAN
Every literary critic knows that the
most difficult thing in the world to
write is a good short story. It is even
more difficult than a three-volume
novel. As a matter of fact, if one
scans the roll of successful novelists
who have produced really good work,
it will be found that their number far
exceeds the number of those who have
written really clever short stories.
There is a principle involved in this
which will be easily recognized, and
that is that the art of condensation
is infinitely more difficult than the art
of expansion. Every newspaper one
picks up furnishes an illustration of
the ease with which a skilled journalist can pad out half a dozen lines of
despatch into a column of more or
less acceptable reading matter, but
the instances are very few and far between where any type of literary man
can compress all the features of even
one brief incident into a column of
reading matter.
And there is the genius of short
story writing; to seize one incident
and tell all about it briefly, succintly,
interestingly and with illumination.
The first thing is to catch your incident, and this can only be done by
one who has the instinct. A thousand
people will stand at a street corner
and witness an exciting episode; they
will all go home and relate it to their
friends, but not one in the thousand
• will make it a picturesque, appealing
story, and not one in ten thousand,
even though he could relate it entertainingly, could run it into cold type
without the story losing its flavour.
In short the successful short story
writer is a genius of a peculiar bent
who is rarer than the rarest orchid
and infinitely rarer than the genus
novelist.
Thc trouble with the short story
writer, even where he has caught the
incident, is to round up the story and
make it full, complete and satisfying
without allowing it to become scrappy
and sketchy. There have been a few
such, but even these few have only
produced a limited number of really
good stories. Of them all, I only
know one who during the days of his
short story regime never produced a
bad one; I refer to Quiller-Couch, who
some twenty years ago wrote a series
of short stories which are easily the
best since Stevenson gave us his incomparable miniatures. Jack London
has written a few which will live amid
an ocean of trash and piffle. Bart
Kennedy promised well a few years
ago with his Spanish stories, but the
vein seems to have petered out. Aid-
rich and Frank Stockton did good
work in this line and occasionally
even in the wilderness of magazine
fiction one comes acrciss a gem, which
predicates the future-success and popularity of its author.
Before Owen Wister became a novelist, his short stores of Western life
had gained him a measure of fame,
and the same is true of Robert Barr
and of course of men like Cret Harte.
Of the very latest writers one hesitates to speak with definiteness because they are still in the making.
But I cannot close this brief dissertation without mentioning a short
story which I have just read in
Young's Magazine for April. It is
entitled "A Crystal Flask," and is by
Paul Rosenwey, a writer of whom I
have not heard before. The story will
not appeal to everybody, and a few
may misunderstand the moral which
is perhaps a reasonable criticism of
the story, but it is easily the best I
have read for a long time, and goes
a long way to satisfy all the requirements of a model short story. I think
I can give the plot without spoiling
the reading of the story, but I need
hardly say that the plot is only a very
small part of the story itself, which
is full of humour and philosophy, and
is written in a good style.
It tells of a young couple about to be
married, who received a present from
their rich uncle. As they were his
favourites, they expected a large fortune, instead of which they received
a crystal flask filled with water which
the eccentric uncle had taken from
a magic spring. The water had
peculiar properties; as long as the
young couple remained faithful to
each other the water would continue
to be clear as crystal, but at the first
departure from the paths of fidelity
it would become clouded. Surely a
pretty fancy, and one which occasioned considerable amusement to the
happy bride and bridegroom. The
flask was hidden away as a joke and
forgotten. Two years later the husband was called away on an important
mission to thc Orient. He could not
take his wife, and as he was only to
be absent a few months, they finally
became reconciled to the separation.
At the last moment the husband
thought of the crystal flask and determined to play a practical joke on
his wife. Breaking the seal he poured
away half its contents, filled up the
flask with ink, re-corked and restored
it to its hiding place. His absence
was prolonged. On his return a year
later he found everything entirely satisfactory and his greeting so pleas-
ureablc that again the flask was forgotten, but after the lapse of a few
days he thought of it and determined
that the supreme moment had come
to tease his wife. Imagine his consternation when on going to the
hiding-place and withdrawing the flask
he found the contents as clear as
crystal.   Verb. sap.
Literal
"What is your last name, my boy?"
asked the teacher of the new pupil, a
frightened looking youngster of some
half dozen years.
"Tommy,"
"Tommy what?"
"Tommy Tompkins."
"Then Tompkins Is your last name,"
turning to his record book.
"No, sir," came the reply with the
air of one accustomed to render literal-
ness to inquiring elders. "I don't think
so, sir. Tompkins was my name already
when I was born, and aunty says they
didn't give me the other for a whole
month  afterward."
Willing & Co.
Manufacturers    of    Ladies'    and
Children's Underwear. Suits made
to order.   All work guaranteed.
Retail dealers in High Grade
Silks aiid Cotton.
1412 Blanchard St., Victoria, B. C.
P. KROEGER
ARTISTIC   UPHOLSTERY
"Wlndowphanie"
Makes Stained Glass out of Plain
Glass
Has removed to
721  COURTNEY  ST.
Opposite  Alexandra  Club
Telephone 1148
'WiW.'
PUBLIC HIGHWAYS
Roy's Art Glass Works and Store
848 Yates St., Victoria, B. C,
Albert F. Roy
Over twenty years' experience in
Art Glass.
LEADED   LIGHTS
Sole    manufacturer    of    Steel-
Cored Lead for Churches, Schools,
Public     Buildings     and     private
Dwellings.  Plain and Fancy Glass
sold.
Sashes Glazed by Contract.
Estimates  free.
PHONE   594
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE notice that I, Mary D. Macnnughton, of Cumberland, B.C., occupation, Married Woman, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the north-east corner, about
20 chains distant, and in a southerly
direction from the south-east corner of
Lot 345, Range 3, Coast District, thence
west 40 chains; tiience south 40 chains;
thence east 80 chains to lake; thence
following the lake shore to point of commencement, and containing 320 acres,
more or less.
Dated January 3rd, 1911.
feb 25 MARY D. MACNAUGHTON.
Esquimalt District
To all whom it may concern:
It having been found that cer
parties have attempted to close or ]
tially close the undermentioned h
ways to public traffic,
Notice is hereby given that the w
of the following described highway
sixty-six feet throughout, namely:—
Old Esquimalt Road
Commencing at its junction with
western boundary of the City of
toria, thence running westerly to
Naval Dockyard and having a w
of thirty-three feet on each side
the centre  line of  the  said road.
New Esquimalt Road
Commencing at its junction wi
western boundary of the City of
toria, thence running westerly to itl
tersectlon with the Old Esquimalt I
in Suburban Lot 39, and having a w
of thirty-three feet on each side of
centre line of the said New Esqui:
Road.
Admiral's Road
Commencing at its connection
the Esquimalt Road in Suburban
39, * thenee running northerly to
Craigflower Road and haying a -V
of thirty-three feet on each side o
centre line of the said Admiral's I
THOMAS TAYLOR,
Minister of Public W
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C., 13th April, 1911.
apl22 m
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Mrs. Do
O'Farrell, of Dublin, Ireland, occur
Married Woman, intends to appl;
permission to purchase the followir
scribed lands:—Commencing at a
planted at the south end of Takia
on the Bella Coola and Ootsa Lake
and marked the N. E. Corner;
west 40 chains; thence south 40 6.
thence east 40 chains, more or 1<
lake; thence northerly along La
point of commencement and conti
160 acres more or less.
Dated January llth, 1911.
MRS. DOROTHY O'FARREL
feb 18 Per J. R. Morrison,
A Dingy Store Front Doesn't Improve Business 1
Putting on a good front applies just as strongly to the business house as it does to the business man.   You may be all right
inside, but if you don't look it nobody believes you are.   "The apparel oft proclaims the man."   It's the same with a building.
A gloomy exterior is a bad index to the store within.
Our
Osram Tungsten Lamps
Will Make Your Store
Stand Out Prominently
They supply unrivalled illumination at minimum cost and are
ideal for store and window lighting.
DID YOU EVER PAUSE TO THINK HOW MANY PEOPLE PASS YOUR STORE AT NIGHT? MANY OF THESE
FOLKS WOULD, NO DOUBT, SHOP AT YOUR STORE THE FOLLOWING DAY IF THEY SAW THE GOODS
PRICED  REASONABLY  IN  YOUR  WELL-LIGHTED   WINDOW.   LET US SHOW YOU HOW TO BUILD UP
BUSINESS BY MEANS OF GOOD ILLUMINATION.
CALL OR TELEPHONE 1609
B.e. Electric Railway eompany, Limited
eorner Port and tangley Streets
Victoria, B.e. THE WEEK, SATUEDAY, APEIL 29, 1911.
THE MOTHERLAND
Another Stage Romance
ss Grace Vernon Pinder, well
m at Daly's Theatre, who left
tage to open a milliner's shop, is
larry Captain Horace Webber,
\. The wedding will take place
loly Trinity, Sloane-square, on
I 29.
Triumph of British Boots
te President of ;the Board of
e states that the exports of
er boots and shoes from thc
_d Kingdom last year showed an
ase of nearly 250,000 dozen pairs,
more than £250,000 over the
_s  of  19J9.
Music Hall Sold
lollin's" Music Hall, Islington,
the Lansdowne Arms were sold
her by auction in London res' for   £10,000.
Lord Kitchener
is stated that a post will very
ly be provided for Lord Kit-
t having some connection with
irganization and preparation of
s for war. It has been sug-
d in this connection that the
shot and Southern Commands
d be amalgamated and made in-
le great training area for the
ipal troops in England of the
ditionary Force.
New Peer's Title
The London Gazette announces
that the title of Sir Edward Priaulx
Tennant will be Baron Glenconner of
Glen.
Will Dale
Will Dale, the famous huntsman
who for the last fifteen years has
hunted the Duke of Beaufort's
Hounds, will bring his long and notable career to a close at the end
of this month. There will thus disappear from active service in the
hunting Held one of the great outstanding ligures in the annals of thc
chase. He has been huntsman for
no fewer than thirty-eight years and
a hunt servant for fifty-one altogether.
New High Commissioner
; King has approved the ap-
nent of Major Sir Hamilton
Goold-Adams, G.C.M.G, C.B.,
Governor of the Orange River
y, to be High Commissioner for
is, in succession to Sir Charles
_ny King-Harman, K.C.M.G.
The King's Sea Elephant
The latest addition to the Zoological Gardens, Regent's i'ark, is a
specimen of the rare sea elephant
(Macrorhinus elephantinus) from the
Crozet Islands, in the Antarctic
Ocean.
It is a present to the King's African collection of animals by Dr. Louis
Peringuey, director of the South African Museum, Capetown, and deposited by his Majesty at the Zoological Gardens. It is a male and
quite a baby, about 6ft. long, for the
adult reaches from 15ft. to 20ft. in
length. It is only in the adult male
that the proboscis is seen. The sea
elephant is to be found in the Pavilion  pond.
Duke of Bedford's Coming Sale
The Duke of Bedford's estates in
Devonshire, comprising between 13,-
000 and 14,000 acres of agricultural
land and several hundred houses,
shops, and inns at Tavistock, a large
property at Flintstock, near Plymouth,    and    a    small    estate    near
Launceston, are to be disposed of by
auction shortly. In order that the
Duke of Bedford's old tenants may
have an opportunity to purchase their
present holdings, the Duke has arranged that they may obtain mortgages on easy terms.
The Gaiety Restaurant
The London County Council arc
about to take possession of the
Gaiety Restaurant in the Strand,
wliicn six years ago was built at a
cost of £100,000 on land belonging
to the Council.
The lease was granted by the Council for fifty years to the Gaiety Restaurant Company, Ltd., at a rental
of £5,894 3s. 6d. The company, ♦ne
Improvements Committee of the
Council reports, are in liquidation, and
the furniture and effects have been
sold.
Bank Amalgamation
Lloyds Bank announces that it has
arranged to unite with the banking
business of Messrs. Hill and Sons at
West Smithlield, Islington, Deptford,
Liverpool, Birkenhead, Romford, and
elsevvnere. The entire staff of Messrs.
Hill and Sons will be retained* in
the service of Lloyds Bank.
The Military Tournament
The Royal Naval and Military
Tournament, to be held at Olympia,
London, from May 18 to June 3, will
this  year  have  exceptional  features.
Over £1,000 is to be spent in
turning Olympia into the courtyard
of a mediaeval castle surrounded by
park lands.
The "Observer-
It is announced that the London
Sunday newspaper, the "Observer,"
has been acquired by Mr. W. W.
Astor. Mr. Garvin will continue in
the editorship of the paper.
Lord Wolverhampton's Will
The estate of the late Lord Wolverhampton (Sir Henry Fowler) is
valued at   £94,523.
As his wife predeceased him, each
of his children—the present Lord
Wolverhampton, the Hon. Ellen
Thorneycroft Felkin (Ellen Thorneycroft Fowler, the novelist), and the
Hon. Edith Henrietta Hamilton—receives one-third of the estate on trust
for life, with remainder to their respective issue.
Royal ".Geographical Society
Lord Curzon of Kedleston has consented to bc nominated as President
of the Royal Geographical Society,
in succession to Major Darwin, who
retires at the anniversary meeting on
May 22.
Diminishing a Town
One of the most curious census
incidents was at Cheltenham, the
population of which is just about
50,000, or enough to make it a county borough. If the census showed
50,000 and the change was made the
license duties in the town would
under the Budget at once jump up
some £1,000 a year.
Accordingly certain breweries paid
the expenses of employes, wives, and
children for a week-end holiday, so
that the town should be depleted of
a number of its usual inhabitants.
On the other hand Dover is eager
to become a county borough, and the
mayor there appealed to citizens to
stay at home to help to make up thc
50,000.
New Bishopric Proposal
The headmaster of Eton, speaking
in support of the proposal to form,
in consequence of the Bishop of Oxford being overworked, a separate
bishopric for Buckinghamshire, said
that the present state of things was
intolerable. A bishop had told him
that he received, on an average, 120
letters a day. It was stated that
£50,000 must be subscribed in order
to support a bishopric for Buckinghamshire.
Exit the Birch at Eton
The birch promises ere long to be
a thing of the past at Eton. It has
now been dispensed with iri the upper school—its place being taken by
an ordinary cane—and only a smal'
birch is retained for the punishment
of refractory juniors.
Archdeacon of London
It is officially announced that thc
Bishop of London has appointed the
Rev. E. E. Holmes, hon. canon of
Christ Church, Oxford, to be Archdeacon of London in succession to
Archdeacon Sinclair, whose resignation takes place on June 30 next.
A Melba Scholarship
Mme. Melba is founding a scholarship in connection with the Guildhall
School of Music, London, and will
visit the school at an early date in
order to address the students*
Pigeon Plague
Pigeon shooting on an organized
scale has taken place in several districts in South Wilts and portions of
Hampshire and Dorset. The South
Wilts Chamber of Agriculture was
one of the first bodies to move in
the matter, and their proposals were
taken up by many resident landowners and estate agents. Since the
beginning of February parties of
sportsmen have been out on Wednesday evenings, and, although the birds
are not easy to shoot, their number
has been considerably reduced.
Policemen's Dogs
Sir Edward Henry, Commissioner
of Police, has granted the police who
do night duty in the country districts within the metropolitan area
permission to take a dog with them.
We Qm Give You An
8*Piece Dinina*
Room Outfit
for $79
At seventy-nine dollars gives you an opportunity to buy a whole roomful
of dining-room furniture for less money than you ordinarily pay for a table
and half a dozen chairs alone. This suite consists of 8 pieces of furniture
of the Weiler Standard, in solid quarter cut golden oak, to gvie years of
service.   It includes a table, 6 chairs and sideboard.
YOU CAN GET THESE EIGHT PIECES $79.00
A CHIFFONIER AT $30
Your choice in mahogany
finish or golden oak. It has
a top 20 x 30 and British
bevel mirror 16 x 16, with 4
large and 2 small drawers.
This is a high grade Chiffonier and should prove to you
conclusively that Weiler prices
are the most reasonable in this
city*—$30.00.
JUST ARRIVED THE LATEST OPEN STOCK DINNER SET
Limoges, China, White and Gold, 107 Pieces, $40
We are in receipt of the latest open stock pattern in Limoges China with
Ahrenfeklt decoration. A pure white china in artistic designs with gold
edge, the open stock pattern is one which should appeal to the "Newly
Weds," as you can buy a few articles now and add to them when you can
better afford it, and in a very short time you have a complete set. And
remember, this is one of the best china dinner sets that money can buy.
It consists of 12 dinner plates, 12 tea plates, 12 bread-and-butter plates,
12 soup plates, 12 fruit saucers, 3 flat dishes, 2 covered vegetable dishes, 1
open vegetable dish, 1 open sauce boat and stand, 12 butter pads, 12 cups and
saucers, 1 bowl, 1 jug.
You can always replace a broken piece at any time.   175 pieces. .$65.00
These Are  Go-cart
Days.   Come Here and
See These "Whitney"
Ones.
Get a Bottle of "Glos-
sine" for Your Spring
Cleaning.   25c and 50c
Per Bottle. THE WEEK, SATUKDAY, APRIL 29, 1911.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Sophus Alfons
Echrophia Hansen, of Alameda, Cal.,
occupation Carpenter, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the southeast corner of
Lot 384, and marked S. A. E. H.'s S.
W. Cor.; thence east 40 chains; north
80 chains; west 40 chains; south 80
chains to point of commencement, containing  320  acres,  more or less.
Dated Jan.  3,  1911.
Sophui Alfons Echrophia Hansen,
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Thomas Ward
Kirkpatrick, of Dawson, Y.T., occupation
Miner, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—flommencing at a post planted
about 6 miles north from Capoos' on
the winter trail, and marked T. W. K.'s
N.W. cor.; thence south 80 chains;
east 80 chains; north 80 chains; west
80 chains to point of commencement,
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated  Jan.  3,   1911.
THOMAS WARD KIRKPATRICK.
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Clinton Greene Epperson, of Oakland, Cal., occupation
Book-keeper, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on Capoos' winter trail on the
east side of Salmon River, about 4
miles north from the crossing, and
marked C. G. E.'s N. E. cor.; thence
west 80 chains; south 80 chains; east
80 chains; north 80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Bated  Jan.   3,   1911.
CLINTON GREENE EPPERSON,
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that TJrsola Louderback,
of Alameda, Cal., occupation Widow, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about 3
miles in a northerly direction from the
Abuntlep crossing on the Salmon River,
on Bella Coola winter trail, and marked
J. L.'s S. W. Cor.; thence north 80
chains; east 80 chains; south 80 chains;
west 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated Jan. 2, 1911.
L'ltSOLA LOUDERBACK,
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Ida May Van Stan,
of Alameda, Cal., occupation Widow,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about 5
miles in a northerly direction from the
Abuntlep crossing on the Salmon River
on Bella Coola winter trail, thence east
80 chains; south 80 chains; west 80
chains; north 80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated  Jan.   2,   1911.
IDA MAY VAN STAN,
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Ira Russell Hutchinson, of San Francisco, Cal., occupation Mechanical Engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—^Commencing
at a post planted about four miles north
of Indian Capoos' on the east side of
Salmon River, on winter trail, and
marked I. R. H.'s N. E. Corner; thence
south SO chains; west 80 chains; north
80 chains; east 80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated Jan.  3,  1911. „„„
IRA   RUSSELL   HUTCHINSON,
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Herman Bernard
Nlelson, of Vancouver, occupation Photographer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a pest planted about 5 miles in a northerly direction from the Abuntlep crossing on the
Salmon River on Bella Coola trail, and
marked H. B. N.'s S. W. Cor.; thence
north 86 chains; east 80 chains; south
80 chains; west 80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated Jan. 2, 1911.
HERMAN BERNARD NIELSON.
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Charles Herbert
Barker, of Grass Valley ,Cal., occupation Broker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 3 miles in a northerly
direction from the Abuntlep Crossing
on Salmon River on Bella Coola trail,
and marked C. H. B.'s S. E. Cor.; thence
west 80 chains; north 80 chains; east
80 chains; south 80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated  Jan.   2,   1911.
CHARLES HERBERT BARKER,
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that David Chisholm
Hay, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Photographer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 3 miles in a northerly direction from the Abuntlep crossing on
the Salmon River on Bella Coola trail
and marked D. C. H.'s N. E. Cor.; thence
south 80 chains; west 80 chains; north
80 chains; east 80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated Jan.  2,   1911.
DAVID CHISHOLM HAY.
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Norman Vickery,
of Vancouver, occupation Engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of Lot 318, and marked N. V. N. E. Cor.; thence west 40
chains; south 80 chains; east 40 chains;
north 80 chains to point of commencement, containing    320    acres,    more or
Dated Jan. 2nd, 1911.
NORMAN VICKERY.
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that John Drysdale Tiller, of Vancouver, occupation Miner, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on Capoos' winter trail, about 9 miles northerly from the Abuntlep crossing and
marked J. D. T.'s S. E. Cor.; thence west
SO chains; north 80 chains; east 80
chains; south 80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated Dec. 30th, 1910.
JOHN DRYSDALE TILLER,
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that James Boker Clark
of- Vancouver, B.C., occupation Engineer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of Lot 317, and marked
J. B. C.'s S. E. Cor.; thence north 80
chains; west 80 chains; south 80 chains;
east 80 chains to point of commencement,   containing   640   acres,   more   or
Dated Dec.  30,  1910.
JAMES BOKER CLARK,
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Alexander George
Sutherland, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Miner, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 5 miles south of Alcatcha
on the Bella Coola winter trail, and
marked A. G. S.'s N. W. cor.; thence
east 80 chains; south 80 chains; west
80 chains; north 80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated Jan. 4th, 1911.
Alexander George Sutherland,
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Frank Kessler, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Logger,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about 2
miles north of the northeast corner of
Lot 317, and marked F. K.'s N. W.
cor; thence south 80 chains; east 80
chains; north 80 chains; west 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640  acres  more  or less.
Dated December 30th, 1910.
FRANK KESSLER.
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Beatrice Neilson, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Married
Woman, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 3 miles east of a point of Salmon River, about 14 miles in a northerly direction from the Abuntlep crossing, and marked B. N.'s S. W. Cor.;
thence north 80 chains, east 80 chains;
south 80 chains; west 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
Dated Jan. 3, 1911.
BEATRICE NIELSON.
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Dorcas James
Spencer, of Alameda, Cal., occupation
Widow, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about three miles in a northerly direction from the Abuntlep crossing on the
Salmon River on Bella Coola winter
trail, thence east 80 chains; south 80
chains; west 80 chains; north 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres,  more  or less.
Dated Jan. 2, 1911.
DORCAS JAMES  SPENCER.
mar 18
Norman McMillan, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Bertha Hansen, of
Alameda, Cal., occupation Married Woman, intends, to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 3 miles In a northerly direction
from the Abuntlep crossing on the
Salmon River on Bella Cooia winter
trail and marked B. H.'s S. W. Cor.;
thence north 80 chains; east 80 chains;
south 80 chains; west 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated  Jan.   2,   1911.
BERTHA HANSEN.
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that James Treve, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Plumber,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of Lot 387, and marked
J. T.'s S. E. cor.; thence north 80
chains; west 80 chains; south 80 chains;
east 80 chains to point of commencement,    containing    640   acres, more or
Dated Dec.  28th,  1910.
JAMES  TREVE.
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Charles Burton
Inch, of New Brunswick, occupation
Teacher, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the northeast coiner of Lot 387,
and marked C. B. l.'s S. W. Cor.; thence
north 80 chains; east 80 chains; south
80 chains; west 80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated Dec. 28th, 1910.
CHARLES   BURTON   INCH,
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Edward Earl Fry,
of Victoria, B.C.. occupation Lumberman, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner of Lot 387, and
marked E. E. F.'s N.W. cor.; thence
south 40 chains; east 80 chains; north
40 chains; west 80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 320 acres,
more or less.
Dated Dec.  28th,  1910.
EDWARD EARL FRY.
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE NOTICE that I, John P. Hicks,
of Victoria, B.C.. Clergyman, intend to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:*— Commencin;:
at a post planted at John G. Brown's
southwest corner post; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement; containing
640  acres,  more or less.
Dated November 24, 1910.
JOHN  P.  HICKS,
feb 11 A K. Stuart, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Charles Howells
Willis, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Salesman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on Capoos' winter road, at the northeast corner of Lot 384, and marked C.
H. W.'s S. E. corner; thence west 80
chains; north 80 chains; east 80 chains;
south SO chains to point of commencement,   containing   640   acres,   more or
Dated Jan. 3, 1911.
CHARLES HOWELLS WILLIS,
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice    that    Hugh Strahan
Jones,  of Vancouver, occupation Plumber, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:
—Commencing at a post planted about
two miles north of Capoos' on the winter trail,  and marked  H.  S.  T.'s  S.  E.
corner; thence north SO chains; west 80
chains; south 80 chains; east 80 chains
to  point  of  commencement,  containing
640  acres  more or  less.
Dated Jan. 3, 1911.
HUGH   STRAHAN   JONES,
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent.
OMlNUiUA L_l_   DISTRin
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Arthur Chris Thode
of San Francisco, occupation Electrician,
intends to apply for permission to purchase  the  following described  lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of Lot 318 and marked A. C. T.'s N. W. Cor.; thence south
80   chains;   east   80   chains;   north   80
chains; west 80 chains to point of commencement,  containing 640 acres,  more
or less.
Dated Jan. 2, 1911.
ARTHUR CHRIS  THODE.
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent.
CANCELLATION  OF  RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve existing by reason of the notice published in the British Columbia
Gazette of the 27th December, 1907,
over Lot 2351, Group 1, New Westminster District, situated within the
boundaries of Lot 1377, Group 1, New
Westminster District, held under Timber Lease by the British Columbia
Sulphite Fibre Company, Limited, will
be cancelled three months after date of
this notice in order that a sale of the
said Lot 2351, may be made to the
said   Company.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
9th February, 1911.
may 6
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE notice that Annie Johnston, of
Vancouver, B. C, occupation Married
Woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 1_ miles north-westerly from
■the head water* of Millbrook Cove;
thence north eighty chains; thence west
eighty chains or to shore line; thence
southerly along shore line about eighty
chains; thence east sixty chains more or
less to point of commencement, and
containing 480 acres more or less.
Dated January 28th. 1911.
ANNIE JOHNSTON,
mar 25 Frederick A. Smith, Agent.
"LAND REGISTRY ACT"
In  the  matter  of  an  Application  for
Duplicate   Certificates   of   Title   to
Lots 19 and 20 of Sub-lots 26 and 27,
Fernwood   Estate   (Map   257),   Victoria   City,   and   Lot   112   of   Sub-
lot 69, Fernwood Estate (Map 262),
Victoria City.
NOTICE  is hereby  given  that it  is
my intention at the expiration of one
month from the date of the first publication hereof to issue Duplicate Certificates of  Title to  said lands Issued
to Skene Lowe and Annie McKay Lowe
on the 8th and 19th days of May, 1891,
and 4th day of June,  1894, and numbered 11966a, 11824a and 18242a respectively.
Land Registry Oflice, Victoria, B. C,
the 20th day of March, 1911.
S.  Y.  WOOTTON,
mar 25 Registrar-General.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE notice that Harry Murdock
Speddlng of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Bookkeeper, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the head waters on the
north shore of Millbrook Cove, thence
north twenty chains; thence west eighty
chains; thence south eighty chains or
to shore line, thence meandering easterly and northerly to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres
more or less.
Dated January 24th,  1911.
HARRY   MURDOCK   SPEDDING.
mar 26 Frederick A. Smith, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Francis Richard
Robbins of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Gardener, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains north of Uhlgako River
and about 30 miles west of Cluscus Lake
on the Cluscus and Alcacho trail and
marked the N. W. corner; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains to point of commencement.
Dated January 9th, 1911.
FRANCIS   RICHARD   ROBBINS.
feb 18 Per J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Jane Robbins, of
Victoria, B.C., occupation Married Woman, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
near shore at north end of Small Lake
about 3 miles north of Lot 387, Salmon
River Country, and marked the S. W.
corner, thence north 40 chains; thence
east 40 chains; thence south 40 chains
to lake; thence west 40 chains along
the lake to point of commencement.
Dat;d January 7th, 1911.
JANE ROBBINS.
feb 18 Per J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Jean Muir, of New
Westminster, B.C., occupation Student,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted four
miles East and four miles North from
the North East corner of D. L. 417
(and marked North East corner); thence
South 80 chains; thence West 80 chains;
thence North 80 chains; thence East 80
chains to point of commencement and
containing 640 aeres, more or less.
Dated Jan.  16th,  1911.
JEAN  MUIR,
mar 18 Per James Scott, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that John Conlan, of
Revelstoke, B.C., occupation Laborer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described Iands:—
Commencing at a post planted four
miles East and four miles North from
the North East corner of D. L. 417 (and
marked North West corner); thence
South 80 chains; thence East 80 chains;
thence North 80 chains; thence West
80 chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated Jan.  16th,  1911.
JOHN CONLAN,
mar 18 Per James Scott, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Alexander McKenzie, of Sacremento, Cal., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
six miles East and four miles North
from the North East corner of D. L.
417 (and marked North East corner);
thence South 80 chains; thence West 80
chains; thence North 80 chains; thence
East 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated Jan. 16th, 1911.
ALEXANDER" McKENZIE,
mar 18 Per James Scott, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that J. Davis McNeil,
of Rock Bay, B.C., occupation Lumbermen, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
six miles East and four miles North
from the North-East corner of D. L.
417 (and marked North West corner);
thence South 80 chains; thence East 80
chains; thence North 80 chains; thence
West SO chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated Jan.  16 th,  1911.
J. DAVIS McNEIL,
maris Per James Scott, Agent.
LAND REGISTRY ACT
In the matter of an Application!
Duplicate Certificate of Title [
3 of E. half of Section XVII.l
ley Farm (Map 268), Victorid
NOTICE  is  hereby  given  that|
my  intention at  the expiration
month  from the date of the flrsl
lication hereof to issue a Duplicate
tificate of Title to said Land, iss|
George  E.  Munro  on  the  16th
February,   1891,   and   numbered
Land   Registry  Office,   Victoria!
the 25th day of February, 1911.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
mar 4 Registrar-General ofl
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICI
District of Coast, Range 3 [
TAKE   notice  that  David   SteJ
Vancouver,   B.C.,   occupation   Clen
tends  to apply  for  permission  tl
chase  the  following described  lar
Commencing   at   a   post    plantq
miles  East  and  six  miles  North
the North East corner of D. L. 41|
marked  North    East    corner);
South 80 chains; thence West 80 *
thence North 80 chains; thence
chains  to  point of commencemeil
containing 640 acres, more or lea
Dated Jan.  17th,  1911.
DAVID   STEELE,
maris Per James Scott,
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICI
District of Coast, Range 3f
TAKE notice that William Stef
Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Keeper, intends to apply for peril
to purchase the following del
lands:—Commencing at a post ll
six miles East and Six miles r
frqm the North East corner ofl
417 (and marked North West cl
thence South 80 chains; thence l|
chains; thence north 80 chatns;
West SO chains to point of cornl
ment and containing 640 acres, n|
Dated Jan. 17th, 1911.
WILLIAM   STEELE,
mar 18 Per James Scott,
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that James P. McMur-
phy, of New Westminster, B.C., occupation, Steam Fitter, intends to a pply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted six miles East and four
miles North from the North East corner of D. L. 417 (and marked South
West corner); thence North 80 chains;
thence East 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence West 80 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Jan.  16th,  1911.
JAMES P. McMURPHY,
rnanilS Per James Scott, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Thomas A. Hayes,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Hardware Salesman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted six miles East and four
miles North from the Nortli East corner of D. L. 417 (and marked. South
-East corner); thence North 80 chains;
thence West 80 chains; thence South 80
chains; thence East SO chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres,  more or less.
Dated Jan.  16th,  1911.
THOMAS A. HAYES,
mar 18 Per James Scott, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Charles Boardman,
of Collingwood East, B.C., occupation
Hardware Merchant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted four miles East and four
miles North from the North East corner of D. L. 417 (and marked South
West corner); thence North 80 chatns;
thence East 80 chains; thence South 80
chains; thence West 80 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres,   more  or   less.
Dated Jan.  16th,  1911.
CHARLES BOARDMAN,
mar 18 Per James Scott, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that John M. Morrison,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Fisherman, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
four miles East and four miles North
from the North East corner of D. L.
417 (and marked South East corner);
thence North 80 chains; thence West
SO chains; thence South 80 chains;
thence East 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated Jan.  16th,  1911.
JOHN M. MORRISON,
mar 18 Per James Scott, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that George Gardner, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Retired
Dealer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
four miles East and six miles North
from the North East corner of D. L.
417 (and marked North East corner);
thence South 80 chains; thence West 80
chains; thence North 80 chains; thence
East SO chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or
Dated Jan.  17th, 1911.
GEORGE GARDNER,
maris Per James Scott, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that James Thompson,
of North Arm, occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted four
miles East and six miles north from
th eNorth East corner of D. L. 417
(and marked North West corner);
thence South 80 chains; thence East
SO chains; thence North 80 chains;
thence West 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated  Jan.   17th,   1911.
JAMES  THOMPSON,
mar 18 Per James Scott, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRIC
District of Coast, Range 3|
TAKE    notice   that    William I
(Junior), of Vancouver, B.C., occ-1
Hotel  Clerk,  intends  to apply  fj
mission to purchase the followf
scribed  lands:—Commencing  at
planted   six  miles   east   and   si*
north   from   the   north-east   cor|
D.   L.   417    (and   marked   South'
corner); thence north 80 chains;'
east 80 ehains; thence South SO j
thence west 80 chains to point
mencement,   and   containing   640|
more or less.
Dated Jan. 17th, 1911.
WILLIAM STEELE (JUNl
mar 18 Per James Scott,!
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICJ
District of Coast, Range I
TAKE   notice   that   Thomas   _,
Innes,   of  New  Westminster,   B|
cupation   Real   Estate   Dealer,
to apply for permission to purch
following   described   lands:—Col
ing  at  a  post  planted   six  milf
and  six  miles  North  from  the!
East eorner of D.  L.  417  (and 1
South   East   corner;    thence   nt
chains;   thence west  80  chains;]
south SO chains; thence East 8(f
to point of commencement and
ing 640 acres,  more or less.
Dated   Jan.   17th,   1911.
THOMAS A. McINNES,
mar IS Per James Scott,!
VICTORIA LAND DISTRiq
District of Coast, Range
TAKE   notice   that   John   R.
of  New  Westminster,   B.C.,   occL
Manufacturers Agent,  intends  tl
for permission to purchase thel
ing described lands:—Commencil
post  planted  four, miles  East
mlles North from the North El
ner  of  D.   L.   417   (and  marked
West corner);  thence  north  801
thence East 80 chains; thence _
chains; thence West 80 chains
of   commencement   and   contaln|
acres, more or less.
Dated   Jan.   17th,   1911.
JOHN R. KNIGHT,
mar 18 Per James Scottl
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRll
District of Coast, Range i
TAKE notice that Frederick t
Kelly, of Vancouver, B.C., ocq
Upholsterer, Intends to apply
mission to purchase the follov
scribed lands:-*-.Commencing atl
planted four miles East and sf
North from the North East cd
D. L. 417 (and marked South El
ner); thence north 80 chains-f
west 80 chains; thence south 80|
thence East 80 chains to point I
mencement and containing 64|
more  or  less.
Dated Jan. 17th, 1911.
FREDERICK CHARLES KE
mar 18 Per James Seotrt
VICTORIA LAND DISTRll
District of Coast, Range J
TAKE notice that Arthur Robl
wood, of Victoria, B.C., occupatl
Estate Agent, intends to apply f
mission to lease the following!
ed lands:—Commencing at a poA
ed at the south-west corner ofl
Coast, Range III, thence in _.
easterly direction and followlJ
water mark to the northwest cl
Lot 12; thence due west to lol
mark; thence in a south-westl
rection following the low water I
a point due west of point of coil
ment; thence due east to point I
mencement, containing ten (101
more or less.
Dated February 28th, 1911.
ARTHUR  ROBERT   SHERV
maris Angus K. Stuartl
VICTORIA LAND DISTRll
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice that Robert Drl
Kimsquit, B.C., occupation Salni
ner, intends to apply for permil
lease the following described
Commencing at a post planted
north-west corner of Lot 1_L
Range III, thence southwestel
following the high water marlf
southwest corner of Lot 14;l
due west to low water mark; tl
a north-easterly direction follow
low water mark to a point duel
point of commencement; thence I
to point of commencement, col
twenty  (20)  acres, more or lesl
Dated February 28th,  1911.
ROBERT DRANEY,
mar 18 Angus K. Stuartl
OMINECA LAND DISTRIQ
District of Coast, Range \
TAKE notice that Elizabeth!
ley, of Vancouver, occupation
Woman, intends to apply for pel
to purchase the following dr
lands:—Commencing at a post L
about one mile west of the sol
corner of Lot 3S5; and markedf
S. E. Cor, thence west 80 chainl
80 chains; east 80 chains; sf
chains to point of commencemef
taining  640 acres,  more  or lesa
Dated December 2Sth,  1910.   7
mar  18      ELIZABETH  THORB THE WEEK, SATUKDAY, APEIL 29, 1911.
IlAT AUSTRALIA THINKS
{•jf With   Arguments   in   John
juart Thomson's New Book,
"The Chinese."
Winnipeg Telegram, April 1).
Australian papers are saying:
lerning the reception by the edi-
E Great Britain of 'The Chinese,'
'artford, U.S.A., "Courant" says:
Chinese,' by John Stuart Thorn's favourably received by the
i  press as it was in  America.
only goes to show the merit
book of travel and its sincer-
|'t is one of the straws indicative
ernational political currents.'
.  Thomson, as  The  Brooklyn
points  out,  argues  for  some
ISs in Far Eastern policies, and
the drawing closer of Britain,
olonies,   America,   and   China,
the Atlantic ocean to the care
Itain's and Canada's fleets, and
icific waters to the patrol of
:a's and Australia's fleets, with
nama Canal as a bond between
b. This would leave Japan and
ny—for he recommends the
of the Anglo-Saxon alliance—
!:ndid isolation' respectively on
o oceans, and lay the German
;host, until a partially disarmed
ly should find it well to join
d-fraternit.y of these five Tettt-
itions in protecting China from
and Russia by a probably all-
nt moral and educational
C"
Thomson,   who  is   Canadian-
|nd educated, is also the author
other books, "Estabelle," and
|.y's   Song,"  published  by  W.
Richmond   Street,   Toronto,
lonth's issue of Windsor Maga-
l-ondon,  has  his  sonnet, "The
and Pall Mall Magazine of
Ii in November   last   had   his
lustrated  poem,   "Autumn   in
He frequently contributes
i:r British magazines, such as
->rs Journal of Edinburgh. The
Mercury of Pietermaritzburg,
Africa, (Dec. 19, 1910), says:
homson's work, 'The Chinese,'
t with international success."
3. Williams & Co.'s going-out-
less sale of Clothing, Hats and
lings, which has been such a
success, ends tonight with the
f business as they are under
t to turn their store over May
iheir successors, J. N. Harvey,
t is understood that the store
: closed on Monday for the
of stock.
Varied Programme
lomen of an Indiana town recent-
plzed a literary club, and for a
|/erything was lovely.
," asked the husband of one of
nbers,   upon   her   return   home
e of the meetings,  "what was
c under discussion by the club
rnoon?"
couldn't remember at first. Fln-
vever, she exclaimed:
1-es, I recollect! We discussed
-zen-looklng woman that's Just
n across the street and Long-
-Phlladelphla Record.
Sorry He Spoke
ictor—This here transfer explr-
jur ago, lady.
,dy (digging in her purse, snap-
-No wonder—with not a single
ir   open   in   the    whole    car!—
A Woman's Way
Idvanced   to  the   paying  teller's
and,   handing ln a   check   for
liars, stated that It was a birth-
sent from her husband and ask-
ayment. The teller informed her
i must first endorse it.
n't know what you mean," sho
iltatlngly.
,  you  see,"  he  explained,  "you
J.ite your name on the back, so
en we return the check to your
he   will  know  we   have   paid
I money."
|s that all?" she said, relieved.
One minute elapses,
the     "endorsement":     "Many
Idear.    I've got the money. Your
\lif-, Evelyn."
IP I HAD ECZEMA
trash  it  away  with  that  mild,
Ig liquid,  D.  D.  D.    Relieves
Is  of  skin  trouble,  cleansing
he impurities and clearing up
nplexion as nothing else can.
If  I  had  any kind  of  skin
I'D USE D. D. D.
the  D.  D.  D.  Laboratories,
IV.V., 49 Colbomc St., Toronto,
:y will send you a trial bottle
r  sale  by  all   Druggists.)
IN THE SPRING THE YOUNG MAN'S FANCY LIGHTLY
TURNS TO THOUGHTS OF
BOCK   BEER
It might turn to things worse, for good Bock Beer is a genuine
Spring Tonic.   We have a fine stock just now, as we have of Ales,
Beers,  Porters, Wines,  Liquors,  Liqueurs,  Mineral  Waters, etc.
Best brands priced right.
VICTORIA PHOENIX BOCK BEER, QTS. DOZEN, $1.50;
PINTS 75c.
SILVER SPRING ROCK, QUARTS, DOZEN $1.75.
H. 0. Kirkham & Co., Ltd.
Grocery Store Butcher Shop Liquor Store
Tels. 178, 179. Tel. 2678 Tel. 2677
E. A.  STILES
Upholsterer, Cabinet Maker and French Polisher
FURNITURE PACKED BY EXPERTS
1109 FORT STREET
'PHONE 2149
Important Sale of Modern
Household Furniture
By Waring & Gillow of London, England
MESSRS. STEWART WILLIAMS & CO.
duly instructed by G.  R. Dunn, Esq., who is leaving for Europe,
will sell by Public Auction
TUESDAY, MAY 9th
AT TWO O'CLOCK SHARP
at his House on the East Saanich Road, opposite French's Menagerie,
io minutes' walk from the Douglas St. Car Line, the whole of his
valuable and nearly new Household Furniture, Pictures, Glassware,
etc., the major portion of it by Waring & Gillow of London, England,
after designs by the well known craftsman, Sheraton, including:—
Solid English Oak Extension Table, 8-ft; 6 solid Oak Dining Chairs,
upholstered in leather; handsome Oak Sideboard, carved with British
Plate Glass Mirror; 2 solid Oak Carving Chairs, upholstered in
leather; solid Oak Overmantel with British Plate Glass Mirror;
very fine solid Oak Bookcase and Writing Desk combined; Velvet
Table Cover; 2 pairs Lace Curtains and Poles; several Sporting
Prints; "The Return from Calvary," by Schmaltz; "Baby" Grand
Piano by Richard Lipp & Son of Stuttgart, in inlaid satin wood case,
after Sheraton, Music Stool to match; very old Sheraton China
Cabinet in splendid order; Settee, upholstered in pink silk brocade;
Satinwood Sette, upholstered in Eau de Nil silk brocade; Satin-
wood Arm Chair, upholstered in Eau de Nil silk brocade; Satinwood
Arm Chair, upholstered in pink silk brocade; High-backed Mahogany Chair; Inlaid Satinwood Lady's Writing Table after Sheraton;
Inlaid Satinwood Work Table after Sheraton; Inlaid Satinwood
Round Table after Sheraton; very handsome British Plate Glass
Mirror; very heavy Brass Coal Scuttle after Sheraton; Inlaid Clock
by Camerer, Kuss & Co., London, after Sheraton; 2 very fine Water
Colours by H. C. Fox; "Spring," coloured engraving after Alma
Tadema; 2 Artist's Proofs, signed Alma Tadema; Embroidered White
Satin Table Centre; Wilton Carpet, 15x10; Turkish Rug, 9x12;
very handsome pair of Sevres Vases, mounted in brass; several old
Dresden Plates; very handsome Bedroom Suite, Mahogany inlaid
with Satinwood, etc., comprising large Wardrobe 6ft. by 8ft. with 2
Dress Cupboards with B. P. Glass Mirrors, Drawers and Hat Cupboards, handsome Dressing Table with mirror; Marble-topped Wash-
stand, very handsome Bedstead, Pedestal Cabinet, Overmantle, 2
Chairs, Towel Horse and Mattresses( the whole is a copy of Sheraton work); handsome Double Toilet Sets; Upholstered Mahogany
Chairs; Wilton Carpet; large English Carved Oak Cupboard; Inlaid
Mahogany Bedroom Suite, comprising Wardrobe, Dressing Table,
Washstand, Pedestal Cabinet, 2 Chairs; long Turkish Runner;
Axminster Stair Carpet; Stair Rods and Pads; Dinner Service; English Cut Glass Tableware, comprising one dozen each Ports, Sherries,
Clarets, Champagne, Tumblers, Finger Bowls, also Decanters and
Water Bottles to match; very fine old English Cut Glass Jug and
Goblets; handsome solid silver mounted Toilet Set, comprising 2
Hair Brushes, Mirror, Clothes and Hat Brushes.
' Cards Given to View the Goods
THE AUCTIONEER - - STEWART WILLIAMS
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Mary Dennis
Ohrly, of London, England, occupation
Spinster, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 2 mlles nortli of Lot 387, Salmon
River country, and at south end of Small
Lake and marked the N. W. corner;
thence south SO chains; thence east 40
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 40 chains to point of commencement.
Dated January Oth, 1911.
MARY DENNIS OHRLY.
feb 18 Per J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Helena Frank, of
Victoria, B.C., occupation Spinster, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted near Salmon River, about 2 miles S. W. of the
S. W. corner of Lot 385, thence south 80
chains; thence west 40 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 40 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated January 12th,  1911.
HELENA B'RANK.
feb 18 Per J. R. Morrison, Agent.
"For Tea You Can't Beat Upton's"
Give it a Thorough T«st.
Try it Alongside the Rest;
You Will Agree That the Best
LIPTON'STEA
SOLD ONLY IN AIRTIGHT PACKAGES.
Sold Only in Airtight Packages
A fence of this kind only 16
to 2Cc. per running foot.
•L.-lpped ia rolls. Anyone
can put it on the posts without special tools. We were
the originators of this fence.
Have sold hundreds of miles
for enclosing parks, lawns,
gardens, cemeteries, churches,
station grounds, etc., etc.
Supplied in any lengths de-
, sired, and painted either
white or green. Also "Page'.'
Farm Fences and Gates, Netting, Baskets, Mats, Fence
Tools, etc. Ask for our 1911
' catalog, the most complete
";fence catalog ever published.
MESSRS. E. G. PRIOR & COMPANY
Victoria and Vancouver, B.O.
50SP
Musical Festival
OF THE EMPIRE
Patron
HIS MAJESTY THE KING
President
HIS EXCELLENCY EARL GREY, PC, G.C.M.G., G.C.V.O.
Direction
DR. CHARLES HARRISS
DRILL HALL
VICTORIA
With the Kind Permission of the Officers in Command.
WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY Evenings at 8,30
FRIDAY MATINEE at 8.30 o'clock
MAY 17, 18, 19
THE
Sheffield Choir
OF ENGLAND
TWO   HUNDRED  VOICES
Conductor—Dr. Henry Coward
Soloists
Miss Jennie Taggart Miss Gertrude Lonsdale
Lady Norah Noel
Miss Maud Willby Miss Alice Heeley
Mr. Robert Charlesworth        Mr. Wilfrid Virgo
Mr. Robert Chignell Mr. Henry Turnpenney
Solo-Organist and Chorus Accompanist
Mr. Edward Hodgson, Mus. Bac, F.R.C.O.
PRICES, MAT.: SCHOOL CHILDREN 25c, ADULTS $1.00
MAT. PROGRAM 90 MINUTES.
PRICES, EVENING: $1.00, $1.50, $2.00.    TICKETS ON
SALE AT HICKS AND LOVICKS WEDNESDAY, MAY
10, AT 10 A. M.   MAIL ORDERS NOW ACCEPTED.
The Difference
"Can any little boy," asked the new
teacher, "tell me the difference between
a lake and an ocean?"
"I can," replied Edward, whose version had been learned from experience,
"Lakes are much pleasanter to swallow
when you fall In."—Philadelphia Inquirer.
The Difference
When a duck lays nn egg, she just
waddles oft as if nothing had happened. When a hen lays an egg, an exchange says, there's a hell of a noiso.
The hen advertises. Hence the demand
for hen's eggs Instead of duck's. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 29, 1911.
*
.'
!
'
Dominion and Provincial News
Arctic Victims
After one of the most heroic struggles chronicled in Arctic expedition
every man of the Royal Northwest
mounted police party, comprising
Captain F. J. Fitzgerald and Constables Carter, Kinney and Taylor,
has perished on the banks of the
Peel river not far south of Fort McPherson.
Wireless on Lake Boats
Arrangements have been recently
completed in Port Arthur between
Mr. Jas. Playfair, principal owner of
the Northern Navigation company,
and Mr. S. Guy Ashley, local manager for the Marconi Wireless Telegraph company, for thc installation
of thc wireless equipment on all boats
of the Northern Navigation company. This work will be started at
the earliest possible date, and it is expected that the boats will be fully
equipped shortly after the commencement of the season, being the first
Canadian boats on the Great Lakes
with wireless. They will thus be in
constant touch with Port Arthur.
Wells Fargo in Rupert
The Wells Fargo Express Company, the oldest concern of the kind
on the continent, is opening an office
in Prince Rupert. They are taking
over the entire business of the Alaska
Pacific Express, thus giving Prince
Rupert the only express company operating exclusively in the States. J.
H. Rogers is the agent.
Rifle Club
The members of the Prince Rupert
Rifle Association are organized for
the season and expect to have a
largely increased membership this
year. The association is regularly
the Dominion act and holds regular
organized under the provisions of
practices. The range across the harbor is a good one, affording excellent opportunity for training.
Some Census Details
Rates of pay for census commissioners and enumerators have been
announced. The rates for commissioners vary from $75 in cities, to $1,-
800 in the Yukon. The highest in
British Columbia is for Comox-Atlin.
Nine hundred enumerators are paid
by scale, five cents each for living
person, ten cents for deaths; farms
twenty-five cents; mines, fifty cents,
etc. The expense allowance in British Columbia is $12 per hundred
names.
Gone to Rest
Major General Frederick Wilson,
one of Canada's most distinguished
and experienced soldiers, died recently at Montreal after a long illness. He was 59 years old and had
served in thc Soudan, where he won
the Egyptian war medal with clasps
and the Khedive's star, and also in
the Northwest rebellion in 1885-86.
A New Department Store
On April 20, the contract was let
to A. A. Goodwin of Saskatoon for
thc construction of % new departmental store building on thc west side
of the city, the price being $158,000,
exclusive of the structural steel work,
which has been awarded separately
at a cost of $30,000, making a total of
$188,000. The new building will be
125 by 125 feet, six stories in height,
and one-third of the'floor space is to
be used for white wear and overall
manufacturing. Who will occupy the
building could notjjjfe learned, but
various rumors cofflgct certain Regina, Winnipeg arflHaa'gary parties
with the new busiiTlS| venture.
Track ImpSSement
The Canadian Pacfflt has completed
arrangements to spend two hundred
thousand dollars on improvements to
its track in and adjacent to Fort William. Work will be commenced at
once and it is proposed to have the
contemplated improvements completed in time to handle this year's crop
The yards at West Fort William are
to be enlarged and the line double
tracked between Fort William and
Port Arthur. Three hundred men
will bc engaged as soon as possible in
ballasting tracks in Fort William.
Hookworm in Canada
Health Officer Whitlaw says that
there is danger of the negro immigrants from the southern states bringing the hookworm into Canada. This
disease was brought into the southern states by the negroes from Africa
and some time ago J. D. Rockefeller
gave $1,000,000 to combat it, It
grows to alarming proportions in
humid climates, and while Dr. Whitlaw says the cold northern country
will prevent its spreading to any serious degree, the danger nevertheless
exists with the coming of the negro.
Hon. Frank Oliver, Minister of Interior, will have his attention called
to the matter.
The New Parish of Cariboo
The vicar and parishioners of St.
John the Divine, Kennington, England, are about to form a new parish—"which shall never lose its connection with its mother at home"—
to be called St. John the Divine, Cariboo, in the diocese of New Westminster, B.C.
Canon A.  G. Deedes, with six assistants, were due to leave  England
yesterday.    They will be met by the
Archdeacon of Yale at Lytton, B. C, j
whence   they   will   proceed   on   their
trek Northwards, visiting and minis-
tering to thc people as they go.  They
expect  to  reach  Quesnel  before  the!
•end of June, and  they will at once !
proceed to erect a permanent place of
abode.    As sooii  _$' possible Canon '
Deedes will return with a full report
of the needs of the new parish and of
the  business prospects  for any who'
wish to go out and settle in the new
country.
Mission Sawmill Running
A sawmill is now in operation at
the St. Eugene Mission, turning out
15,000 feet per diem. The bulk of
this product is at present being turned to local uses. Extensive irrigation operations are under way, which
will add 100 acres to the Mission farm.
Want Curfew Bell
A movement with the object of
having a curfew bell in Ottawa which
would call all children under the age
of 16 from the streets to their homes
before 9 o'clock in the evening, is being started by the Ottawa Women's
Reform society.
forty voted against reciprocity, three
not voting.
Denies  Stories
Mr. R. H. Hall, fur sales commissioner of the Hudson's Bay Co., gives
an emphatic denial to stories sent
out this week that Indians are starving in Northern Kecwatin and around
Hudson's Bay, are attacking Hudson's
Bay Company posts and that aid had
been asked from the Northwest
Mounted Police. All the stories, he
says, emanated from a fertile imagination. No such skirmishes as related have ever occurred.
Want Line Built
The- Lethbridge board of trade is
sending a petition to C. P. R. authorities urging thc company to build the
cast end of thc Lethbridge-Weyburn
line this summer. Two hundred land
owners have signed ancl a map accompanying the petition shows the
exact location of each petitioner. The
map shows that at least 75 miles is
to bc built to se.ve a country already
settled along the proposed route.
Other information will accompany the
petition showing the urgent necessity
for the construction of the line.
Houston Memorial
The funds raised for the John Houston memorial may be used towards
the improvement of the city park at
Nelson. In such case the park would
be renamed "Houston Park."
The Coalmont Mines
The new coal mines at Coalmont,
in the __..nilkameen are estimated to
contain 120,000,000 tons of high grade
coal suitable for domestic purposes,
for steaming, for coke and for black
smithing. There are six seams and
an average thickness of 50 feet of
coal. It is expected that shipment
will begin by next September.
Superintendent Appointed
The Dominion Government has appointed Mr. E. J. Pearce, a grain
bt\yer, as superintendent of the new
experimental farm to be established
at Fort Simpson, Mackenzie River,
fringing the Arctic, this spring.
A Convincing Vote
By a vote of 1435 to 131 the graduates of Queen's University have
placed themselves on record in favor
of separation from the Presbyterian
Church.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve of a parcel of land situated or
Graham Island, notice of which appeared in the British Columbia Gazette
of the 25th of February, 1909, being
dated 23rd February, 1909, is cancelled
to permit of the lands being acquired
by pre-emption only and for no other
purpose.
ROBT.   A.   RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria,  B.C., April  6th,  1911.
july 8
New Churches for Winnipeg
The most striking feature of the
vestry meetings recently held in Winnipeg was the enthusiasm of vestrymen for new buildings. Christ church
and All Saints both contemplate $50,-
000 edifices to replace the old buildings which are showing unmistake-
able signs of age.
Hope Lures Prospectors
The lure of gold continues to draw
men towards Hope and Steamboat
Mountain. Every day prospectors,
miners and promoters flock in and
out of the little town of Hope. Many
go on up the trail towards Steamboat
and come back with claims staked
sometimes in the snow ancl sometimes on more solid foundations. But
at present the men with claims are
not talking much; they think they
have a good thing and are not giving
anything away—until they know what
it is worth.
Another  Condemnation
W. H. Sharp, M.P, for Lisgar, lately addressed a meeting of his constituents at Plum Coulee, Man., on
the reciprocity pact, which hc strongly condemned, claiming that it would
not add a cent to the price of farm
products and would open the door for
American trusts to prey on Canadian
resources. He ended by stating he
would not vote for the pact, but if
the Conservatives in Lisgar wanted
he would not vote against it. After
the meeting a private meeting of Mr.
• ancl his supporters was held
to enable him to hear their views on
thc matter, and on a vote being taken
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE notice that James Walsh of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Storekeeper,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about 60
chains north-east from Millbrook Cove;
thence east eighty chains; thence south
twenty ehains more or less to shore
line; thence south-westerly along shore
line about eighty chains; thence north
eighty chains more or less to point of
commencement, and containing 480 acres
more or less.
Dated   January  24th,   1911.
JAMES   WALSH,
mar 25 Frederick A. Smith, Agent.
NOTICE
In  the  Estate  of Alexander  McDonald
Black Fraser the elder, deceased.
All persons having claims against the
above named deceased,  are  required to
send  particulars   thereof,   duly  verified,
to the undersigned on or before the 14th
day   of   April,   1911,   after   which   date
the executors will proceed to distribute
the  assets  of  the deceased  among  the
persons entitled thereto,  having  regard
only to the claims of which they shall
then have notice.
Dated this 13th day of March, 1911.
GEO. A. MORPHY,
118 Langley  St., Victoria,  B.C.,
Solicitor for the Executors,
mar 18
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Clyde H. Dickenson
of New Westminster, B.C., occupation
Waiter, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
three mlles east from the northeast
corner of D. L. 414 (and marked northeast corner); thence south 80 chains;
thence west SO chains; thence north SO
chains; thence east SO chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Jan. 10th, 1911.
maris Per James Scott, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Frederick R. Waly,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Mill Setter, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted three
miles east from the north-east corner
of D. L. 414 (and marked north-west
corner); thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north SO chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 aores,
more or less.
Dated Jan. 10th, 1911.
FREDERICK R. WALY,
mar 18 Per James Scott, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Charles Chester
Grand of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Broker, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
five miles east from the north-east corner of D. L. 414 (and marked north-east
corner); thence south 80 chains; thence
west SO chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated Jan.  10th,  1911.
CHARLES CHESTER GRAND,
mar 18 Per James Scott, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that George H. Hut
of Ashcroft, B.C., occupation Ra
intends to apply for permission vt>
chase the following described Ian
Commencing at a post planted fourj
East from the north-east corner of
417 (and marked North West coi
thence south 80 chains; thence Ea
chains; thence north 80 chains; t
west 80 chains to point of comn
ment, and containing 640 acres,
or less
Dated Jan. llth, 1911.
GEORGE H. HUTCHINS.
mar 18 Per James Scott,
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Frank Ellio
Ashcroft, B.C., occupation Builde
tends to apply for permission to
chase the following described lat
Commencing at a post planted six
east from the north-east corner of
417 (and marked north-east co
thence south 80 chains; thence wi
chains; thence north 80 chains; t
east 80 chains to point of comn
ment, and containing 640 acres, mi
less.
Dated Jan.  12th,  1911.
FRANK ELLIOTT,
maris Per James Scott,
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT!
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Frank Well
Ashcroft, B.C., occupation Dentiif
tends to apply for permission td
chase the following described Ial
Commencing at a post planted six!
east from the north-east corner o|
417 (marked North West Corner); \
south 80 chains; thence east 80 o
thence north 80 chains; thence wl
chains to point of commencemenl
containing 640 acres, more or lessl
Dated Jan. 12th, 1911.
FRANK WELSH.
maris Per James Scott,
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Edward Hewitt, of
New Westminster, B.C., occupation Can-
neryman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
five miles east from the north-east corner of D. L. 414 tand marked northwest corner); thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north SO
chains; thence west SO chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
aeres, more or less.
Dated Jan. 10th, 1911.
EDWARD HEWITT,
mar 18 Per James Scott, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Edward Teather, of
New Westminster, B. C, occupation
Painter, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
five miles east from the north-east corner of D. L. 414 (and marked southwest corner); thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
EDWARD TEATHER,
Dated Jan.  10th,  1911.
mar 18 Per James Scott, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Constance Teather
of New Westminster, B.C., occupation
Married Woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted five miles east from the northeast corner of D. L. 414 (and marked
South-East corner); thence north SO
chains; thence west 80 chatns; thence
south SO chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated Jan. 10th, 1911.
CONSTANCE TEATHER.
mar 18 Per James Scott, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE notice that Ethel Beatrice
Walsh, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Married Woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described Iands:—Commencing at a post
planted about sixty chains north-east
from Millbrook Cove; thence east eighty
chains; thence north eighty chains;
thence west eighty chains; thence south
eighty chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated January 24th, 1911.
ETHEL BEATRICE WALSH,
mar 25 Frederick A. Smith, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE notice that Robert George
Scarlett of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Retired, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
20 chains north from the head waters
of Millbrook Cove; thence west eighty
chains; thence north eighty chains;
thence east eighty chains; thence south
eighty chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated January 25th, 1911.
ROBERT   G  EORGE   SCARLETT,
mar 26 Frederick A. Smith, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Clarence E. Peele,
of New Westminster, B.C., occupation
Printer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
three miles east from the north-east
corner of D. L. 414 (and marked Southwest corner): thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Jan. 10th, 1911.
CLARENCE E.  PEELE,
maris Per James Scott, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that James Blair, of
New Westminster, B.C., occupation Ironworker, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
three miles East from the North-East
corner of D. L. 414 (and marked South-
East corner); thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 ehains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres more or less.
Dated Jan. 10th, 1911.
JAMES BLAIR,
maris Per James Scott, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that James G. Stewart,
of Ashcroft, B.C., occupation Carpenter,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted four
miles from the North-East corner of
D. L. 417 (and marked North East corner); thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence East SO chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated Jan. llth, 1911.
JAMES G. STEWART,
mar 18 Per James Scott, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICI
District of Coast, Range* 3 [
TAKE notice that Peter Prefd
of Ashcroft, B.C., occupation Fret
Intends to apply for permissil
purchase the following described I
—Commencing at a post plant!
miles east from the North EaJ
ner of D. L. 417 (and marked]
West corner); thence north 80
thence east SO chains; thence so
chains; thence west SO chains td
of commencement, and containiil
acres, more or less.
Dated Jan. 12th, 1911.
PETER PREFONTAINE,
maris Per James Scott,
VICTORIA LAND DISTRIC
District of Coast, Range 3|
TAKE   notice   that   Charles
Grand,   of  Vancouver,   B.C.,   occl
Broker, intends to apply for perl
to   purchase    the   following    def
lands:—Commencing at  a  post
six   miles   east   from   the   Nortl
corner of D. L. 417  (and markeij
East  Corner);  thence  north  SO
thence west 80 chains; thence sil
chains   ;thence east  SO  chains  t|
of  commencement,   and  containi|
acres,  more or less.
Dated   Jan.  12 th,   1911.
CHARLES EDWARD GRAI)
maris Per James Scott,!
VICTORIA LAND DISTRKJ
District of Coast, Rnnge
TAKE notice that Eugene Rd
of New Westminster, B.C., occ«
an Accountant, intends to apj
permission to purchase the fof
described lands:—Commencing I
post planted four miles East fil
North East corner of D. L. 4l|
marked South West corner);J
north SO chains; thence east 80 I
thence south 80 chains; thence
chains to point of commencemej
containing  640  acres,  more or
Dated  Jan. llth,  1911.
EUGENE ROUSSEAU,
mar 18 Per James Scott J
VICTORIA LAND DISTRI(|
District of Coast, Range i
TAKE notice that Joseph  S.
of   New  Westminster,   B.C.,   oc<|
Hotel  Clerk,  intends  to  apply
mission  to  purchase  the  follov
scribed   lands:—Commencing  utl
planted four miles East from thi
East corner of D. L.  417   (andj
South   East  Corner);   thence
chains;  thence West  80  chainsl
South 80 chains; thence East 81
to   point   of  commencement,   al
taining 640 acres, more or lessl
Dated  Jan.  llth,  1911.
JOSEPH S.  BARNES,
mar 18 Per James Scot!
VICTORIA LAND DISTRll
District of Coast, Range f
TAKE notice that Melvin K.J
son, of New Westminster, B.C
pation Canneryman, intends tl
for permission to purchase theT
ing described lands:—Commenc!
post planted two miles North a
miles East from the North El
ner of D. L. 417 (and markei
East corner); thence south 801
thence west 80 chains; thenci
SO chains; thence East 80 cl]
point of commencement, and
ing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated Jan. 13th, 1911.
MELVIN  K.   DICKENSON
mar 18 Per James Scot!
VICTORIA LAND DISTRI]
District of Coast, Range j
TAKE NOTICE that W.
Covel, of Vancouver, B.C., oc|
Confectioner, intends to applyJ
mission to purchase the folloi
scribed lands:—Commencing atl
planted two miles North and fof
East from the North East cl
D. L. 417 (and marked Norl
corner); thence South 80 chaina
East SO chains; thence North 8f
thence West 80 chains to pointl
mencement and containing 64|
more   or  less.
Dated   Jan.   13th,   1911.
W.  ANDERSON  COVELl
mar 18 Per James Scotf
OMINECA LAND DISTRll
District of Coast, Rangul
TAKE notice that Albert GalJ
Vancouver,   B.C.,   occupation
intends to apply for permission
chase   the  following  described
Commencing at  a  post  plante-1
southeast corner of Lot 385, anq
A.   G.'s  N.  W.    Cor.;    thence
chains; south 80 chains; west _i
north  80 chains to point of co|
ment,   containing   640   acres,
Dated Dec. 29th.  1910.
ALBERT GALLIENS
mar 18 Norman McMillan! THE WEEK, SATUKDAY, APEIL 29,1911.
lis
vS.     '^____\*ff^__T-___\_m__to___ ^^^^^^___u^_z>_'2i_tl&S*i
BUILDING PERMITS
* ""■
(April 19 to April 26.)
,ril 19-
W. H. Kettle—Quadra—Dwelling  $ 1,800
A. E. Sargison—Menzies—Garage        100
ril 20—
Trustees Chinese Mission—Fisguard—Mission  10,000
Jas. Leigh & Sons—Garbally—Dwelling      3,000
ril 21—
W. G. Cooper—Cook St.—Dwelling  3,500
James White—Cedar Hill—Stable   100
Mrs. E. M. Brett—Sylvia—Dwelling  1,859
Smith & Champion—Douglas—Storage  10,000
ril 24—
D. B. Holden—Fort St.—Alterations  6,000
Donald Cameron—Denman—Dwelling  1,900
Thos. Brambley—Edmonton—Dwelling  1,200
A. L. C. Westend Co.—Yates St.—Store  500
|il 25—
Frank Rhode—Alpha St.—Dwelling  1,800
I Galland Bros.—Oliphant—Dwelling  2,500
E. J. Dabie—Montreal—Dwelling   2,300
j E. J. Prior Co.—Government—Warehouse  2,740
I J. Moggy—Vancouver St.—Dwelling  2,500
I A. Mallett—Fairfield—Auto Shed       150
S. Lewthwaite—Fairfield—Auto Shed       170
II 26-
IJ. W. Cassin—Fifth—Stable       175
|W. McMillan—Howard St.—Dwelling     1,000
 L
APRIL'S BUILDING RECORD
|With a week yet to go, the value of buildings for which permits
been issued by the buildings inspector aggregates $253,675
pared with $192,440 for the whole of April a year ago. There
, number of buildings upon which work has commenced, but the
l__!fs have not yet been applied for. These will bring the aggre-
I values for the month to well over $300,000. The record for any
tous month was made in July, 1909, when permits for buildings
j.d at $371,000 were issued, the chief item being the Pemberton
TEN YEARS* LEASE ON STELLY BLOCK
[W. Bick has secured a ten years' lease of the Stelly block, bet-
piown as the Clarence hotel, Yates and Douglas street,
irithin a few days will arrange for remodelling the whole block
^n up-to-date hotel, basement grill, stores and other new fea-
^he block was recently sold by George Stelly to the Odd Fel-
from whom the present tenant has taken the lease. Friday
laturday of this week the furnishings of the Clarence hotel por-
J)f the building are to be sold by auction by Maynard & Son,
[hat will leave the new lessee with the building ready for relation.
The new lessee of the prominent corner says that the scarcity
Ire space is very apparent in Victoria, and that since first plan-
lalterations in the Stelly block he has been approached twice
ior all available.
|le will modernize the hotel portion of the structure and intro-
basement restaurant and grill, baths and other conveniences.
Iiotel has for some years been conducted by Harry Harris, who
[ring, and will shortly take a trip to England. The hotel has
len 50 and 60 rooms and bar room, the fixtures and furnishings
lich all go to auction. The sale commences Friday and will
Lie till Monday, when the bar fixtures are to be sold.
JICH TUNGSTEN MINE HAS CHANGED HANDS
lontrolling interest in the richest tungsten mine in the world,
\d at Scheelite, near Moose River, Guysboro County, has been
jy A. A. Hayward to a syndicate, composed of prominent
lians.   The price is about $300,000.   Mr. Hayward retains
|;erest, which is under option to a syndicate and under second
to a French syndicate.
Don't Lose This Chance
ELEVEN LARGE LOTS ON COOK STREET—Just outside the i^-mile circle,
FOUR CORNER LOTS—City water laid on.    Ten minutes from the car.
$4,700
Adjoining lots selling for $800 each.
J. E. SMART & CO.,     405-6 Pemberton Block
LOCAL   AGENTS   CALIFORNIA    INSURANCE CO.
VIEW ST. 2 lots 30x120 ft.
each, close to Quadra St.
Price for each $5,000.00
OAK BAY, OLIVER ST. One
double corner 25 per cent, below market value. Price
 $1,500.00
ESQUIMALT. Some good
buys in this district, including
one water front lot, 30x130 ft.
for    $825
Easy Terms given on the above
Fegan & Co.
'Phone 1500 P. O. Box 848
Mahon Bldg., Government St.
VICTORIA, B. C.
ftnp Horn
SEATTU
Chas. Pemy, mo ft.
THEBESTOrmmiilNG
in the rajurr or thecitt
135RD0MSWJTHaWH-50SAMPLER00MS
Office Roll-Top
& Flat-Top Desks
Our stock offers you a
more varied selection and
range of prices than has ever
been shown in Victoria before.
Baxter & Johnson
Co., Ltd.
Complete Office Outfitters
i2i Yates St.       Phone 730
Crown Grant
and License Timber
Northern B. C. Wild Lands
In acreage or in Large Tracts.
For particulars apply to
ERNEST BRAMMER
Tel. 2095
Office:   103   Pemberton   Block
3-SPEeiftLS-3
HERALD STREET, close to Government, 120x120; revenue
producing.   Price $36,000
RICHARDSON STREET, large grassy lot, 70x125, facing
south.   Price $1,500
POULTRY RANCH, 3 acres within 3 mile circle; new 6-room
bungalow; H. & C. water laid on, chicken houses, etc.
Price  $5,000
GILLESPIE & HART
Phone 2040
Fire, Accident, Automobile and Employers' Liability
Insurance.
1115 LANGLEY STREET      ....      VICTORIA, B.C.
IMPROVED SUBURBAN ACREAGE
PROSPECT  ORCHARD, THOMAS' CROSSING, OVERLOOKING BAZAN BAY, SAANICH
10 ACRES, about 2-3 orchard, six year trees, Italian prunes, King apples, Bartlett pears and plums. Balance meadow now being
ploughed $6,000
26 ACRES, 2 houses and extensive outbuildings; about seven acres orchard and small fruits, 3 acres bush; balance in hay and meadow.
Fine soil, good location and view $12,500
8.25 ACRES all cleared, fall wheat now up $3,300
8.24 ACRES all cleared, fall wheat now up; on two roads, house and
usual outbuildings  $4,500
FIFTY ACRES, being W/2 Section 15, Range 2; cottage 4 rooms, outbuildings, strawberry vines, orchard, 40 trees, 5 years old; well.
Price, per acre  $200
THIRTY ACRES WATERFRONT, S/2 Section 13, Range 6-Tim-
bered, red soil, nice short, no rock.   Price per acre $300
Telephone Qjfl    &     %QQQ§ ^S^
620 FORT STREET, VICTORIA, B. C.
FRUIT  FARMS
WILKINSON ROAD, 6)/. acres all cleared and fenced, 3% miles from
the City; just off* Burnside Road. This property overlooks Portage Inlet at the head of the Gorge.   Price per acre $600
CORDOVA BAY, 10^ acres fine level land, suitable for fruit growing; beautiful view of the sea. Splendid situation for a home.
Only 6 miles from Victoria; close to the best BATHING BEACH
in B. C.   Price $3,150.   Terms.
NORTH SAANICH, 10 acres all cleared and plowed, also one 7-acre
block, at $360 per acre; about a third cash, balance 1 and 2 years.
This property is situated on the MAIN CROSS ROAD between
Sidney and Union Bay, and is well adapted to fruit growing and
truck gardening, owing to the fertility of the soil and climactic
conditions. The B. C. Electric Ry. have contracted for right of
way through land adjoining this.
Bagshawe & Co.
REAL ESTATE AND GENERAL BROKERS
Telephone 3371
Rooms 10 and 11 Green Block 1216 Broad Street. 10
THE WEEK, SATUKDAY, APEIL 29, mi.
ENGLAND HOLDS MOST OF OUR RAILROAD STOCKS
Grand Trunk shares are held by 54,000 persons, against 52,900
a year ago.
Mr. CM. Hays asserts that from 75 to 90 per cent, of the shareholders are residents of Great Britain, while no less than 98 per cent.
;of the securities of the Canadian Northern Railway are held in the
(United Kingdom.
Of Canadian Pacific's 24,000 shareholders, only about 2,500 reside in Canada.
DIRECTORS OF THE NOISELESS TYPEWRITER CO.
At the annual meeting of the Noiseless Typewriter Co., held at
Middletown, Conn., on April uth, the following directors were
elected: Hon. W. Caryl Ely, Buffalo; Col. Jeffrey H. Burland,
Montreal; Charles W. Colby, Montreal; Barron G. Collier, New
York; Hon. Rolland S. Duell, New York; W. H. Brouse, Toronto;
James H. McGraw, New York; Joseph F. Rankine, New York.
The enterprise is said to be in a thriving condition, and is fast
assuming an active commercial position in the typewriter industry.
Looking at the list of directors, it will be seen that the same
interests who are connected with the Wm. A. Rogers, F. N. Burt
and Carter-Crume companies are also largely interested in the
Noiseless Typewriter Company. The Canadian Fairbanks Company, well known throughout Canada as manufacturers of the Fairbanks-Morse engines and Fairbanks scales, have been appointed
general agents of the Noiseless Typewriter Co.
HUDSON BAY DIVIDEND TO BE RAISED
The recent sensational announcement of the result of the Hudson's Bay Company's land sales for the year ended March 31st last,
coupled with the subsequent news that it had been decided to raise
the price of the company's land by from $2 to $3 per acre all round,
have revived speculative interest in the shares.
Last year, it will be remembered, the company paid in dividends £4 per £10 share, giving at the present quotation a yield
of just $y2 per cent.
It would not be surprising if the distribution were this year
raised to £5 10s, or even £6 per share, and with the hopeful outlook of the company generally, the shares do not look over-valued
even after their recent advance. >
SALMON PACKERS' OUTLOOK
According to advices received from various coast cities, a labor
famine threatens the Alaska salmon canners during the coming season. Agents of the packers have been scouring the Japanese and
Chinese quarters of the various coast cities, with but little success,
; and in their desperation have attempted to import a number of Filipino laborers from the Hawaiian Islands.
Whether this labor scarcity will influence the British Columbia
packers is not known at present, and it is thought by those interested in the industry that enough Orientals can be secured in this
port, Victoria and other Canadian cities and towns to handle the
season's catch.
At Port Townsend the agents of the packers have been exceedingly active in their attempts to induce the Chinese and Japanese to
go North for the summer, but so far few of the Orientals have decided to leave the city. In Seattle, according to advices, a number
of workers have been secured, but not enough to handle the catch.
The attempt of the packers to import Filipinos from the Hawaiian Island sugar plantations has brought down on the master of the
steamer Senator, the hand of the law, and caused the skipper to
clear from Honolulu in a great hurry. Stringent laws have been
passed by the legislators of the island providing for punishment for
those who solicit laborers to leave the islands.
It is not known at present whether the scarcity of labor will affect the market to any great extent, and the more conservative of
the packers are of the opinion that enough men can be securd to
handle the catch.
DIRECTORS OF BANK OF ENGLAND ARE ELECTED
At the General Court held at the Bank of England, Mr. Alfred
Clayton Cole, of 64 Portland Place, W., was elected governor, and
Mr. Walter Cunliffe, of Messrs. Cunliffe Brothers, White Lion
Court, Cornhill, was elected deputy-governor for the year ensuing.
The following directors were appointed: C. C. Arbuthnot, H.
Cosmo Bonsor, H. Brooke, W. M. Campbell, B. Cokayne, J. S. Gil-
Hot, C. H. Goschen, E. C. Grenfell, Sir E. A. Hambro, L. H. Hanbury, G. W. Henderson, W. D. Hoare, F. H. Jackson, R. E. Johnston, C. Lubbock, S. H. Morley, R. L. Newman, M. C. Norman, Sir
A. Prevost, Lord Revelstoke, A. G. Sandsman, H. A. Trotter, V. C.
Vickers, and A. F. Wallace.
Mr. Alfred Clayton Cole, the new Governor, was born in London 57 years ago, and is Lieutenant for the City of London. In 1907
he married a daughter of Col. Arthur Williams, of Canada, who was
the widow of Herbert Chamberlain.
FRUIT FARMS
Gordon Head
554 acres, tiled, drained,
well fenced; 5-room house,
barns, chicken house, 700
fruit trees, ^ acre strawberries and small fruits.
South Saanich
52 acres, 20 under high state
of cultivation; 9 room
house (strictly modern),
1,700 fruit trees, 2,300
strawberry plants; horses,
barns and outbuildings.
These   are   two   beautiful
properties.
For further particulars
Apply
ARTHUR COLES
Fire, Marine, Accident and
Employers Liability
Insurance
Real Estate and Financial
Agents
1205 Broad Street
Next to Colonist Office
P.O. Box 167
Tel. 65
W.D'O.
Rochfort
ARCHITECT
Suite 407 Pemberton Block
Plans and Specifications on
Application
Business Phone 1804
Residence Phone F1693
"Dintford"
Bungalows
Our Bungalows are Homes
not Houses
WE DESIGN
AS WELL AS BUILD
We build on your own terms
I Will Buy
Subject to confirmation
15,000
AMALGAMATED
DEVELOPMENT
@ 10c per share.
R. 0. Maclachlan
BOARD OF TRADE
BUILDING
Phone 2106
Mortgages For Sale*
We have on hand a number of first
class first mortgages on choice Residential Properties in the cities of
Victoria and Vancouver in sums ranging from 1,000 to 4,000, at rates varying from 7 to 8 per cent, interest, payable quarterly, that we can let
investors have.
Pemberton & Son
Pemberton Block
Victoria, B.C.
We desire to announce that we have opened offices in Rooms
304 and 305 Bailey Building, Handling, Seattle, Wash., handling
Stocks, Bonds, Grain and Cotton, strictly on a Commission basis,
in the various markets of the world. Mr. Carl L. Miller, who has
long been connected with important brokerage firms in the west,
will be in charge.
We are members of the Chicago Board of Trade. Our
Eastern correspondents are S. B. Chapin & Co., and Logan &
Bryan, of Chicago and New York, members of all Exchanges.
Private leased wire, connections enable quick dispatch in handling
all business intrusted to us for execution.
Having carried on a successful brokerage business in Victoria,;
B.C., for the past 10 years, we refer you to any bank, firm or
individual of that city as to our standing and integrity.
Respectfully,
F. W. STEVENSON & CO.
Frank W. Stevenson
Walter H. Murphey
Seattle, March 6, 1911.
P.O. Box 618 '' Phone 2443
i       J
Alvo von Alvensleben, Ltd.j
636 View Street
FINANCIAL AGENTS,      REAL ESTATE,      TIMBEI
Members Victoria Stock Brokers' Association, and
Vancouver Stock Exchange
Stocks Bought and Sold on Commission
HEAD OFFICE:   VANCOUVER, B.C.
Branch Offices:   North Vancouver and Victoria, B.C.
Foreign Offices:
London, Berlin, Paris, St. Petersburg and Vienna.
CADBORO BAY
Property in this District is turning over rapidly.
Come in and let us show you over our list.
We can sell you waterfront lots or acreage improved or unimproved.
l\. V. Winch & Co., Ltd.
Financial, Insurance and Estate Agents.
TEMPLE BUILDING FORT STREET \&
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 29, 1911.
11
STEAMBOAT MOUNTAIN
Mr. F. J. Crossland, who ••ecently arrived in Vancouver from
leamboat Mountain, when interviewed by the News-Advertiser,
[d some very interesting information to give concerning the recent
rid discoveries there. From the amount of work done at present
showings Certainly warrant the growing conception of the im-
Irtance of the camp and several new strikes have been made dur-
\l the past month, in each case showing more or less visible signs
[free gold in the quartz porphyry.
He called attention to the false impression that many people
|d concerning the difficulties to be encountered in travelling over
trail. The conditions of travel are really excellent, and he has
|t recently travelled from Steamboat to Hope in one day. It is
possible at present, however, to do any prospecting on account of
f>w slides, and the great quantity of snow in the mountains and
|se conditions will likely continue for another month.
There is considerable building activity in the Skagit Valley, two
[eig being in the course of erection, and with between five and
[hundred strangers in Hope accomodation is at a premium.
Mr. Crossland is a miner of some experience.   He has been in
Ddesia, West Africa and South America, and can speak with
Ihority.   He feels confident that with proper handling and econ-
|cal mining this camp will prove a great success.   While he has
|1 no high grade ore in sight, what he has seen shows uniform
•ies of great width, and with transportation and other conditions
favorable should prove a good paying proposition.
j From the present condition of the pack trail they should be able
■lake animals over it in a week's time. He says that there is only
j route in, and that is the Hope trail. The talk of trails and wag-
roads from Chilliwack should not be entertained for a moment.
JIG DIVIDENDS ARE PAID BY MINING CONCERNS
[With the first quarter of 1911 it is apparent, from reports made
ie Mining World by American mines and works, that the year,
bite the present unsatisfactory condition of the metal markets,
[prove of unusual profit to holders of certain stocks.
|With 96 mines and works contributing, the disbursements for
juarter ending March 31 total $21,849,031.
iThat the declarations of American mines and metal works are
pf a sporadic nature is.evidenced by the fact that the total declaims of these 96 companies, since incorporation, reaches the stu-
lous total of $651,261,221, a mighty strong endorsement of the
[tableness of mining when conducted as other successful busies are conducted.
■On the combined issued capitalization of these companies—
1,548,289—this is a return equivalent to 107 per cent.
SHIPMENTS TO BE INCREASED
lit is the intention of the Consolidated Mining & Smelting com-
of Canada, Limited, to increase their shipments of ore to the
smelter to 900 tons or 950 tons a day.
Uthough it may not be necessary to provide a new train, it
Imean at least three trips daily, as the ore trains are limited to
|/e cars, averaging about thirty tons each.
tosslanders will be dehghted with this news, which, with other
Is, points to increased prosperity in the camp. It was intimated
|me quarters that heavier steel was to be laid up in the mine,
-/e are officially informed that this is not contemplated.
A. J, NESBITT CONFIRMS THE CEREAL DEAL
Ir. A J. Nesbtit, managing director of the Investment Trust
lately confirmed the report that he had concluded arrangements
lie consolidation of the International Milling Co., Limited, of
Vtchewan and Minnesota, tnd the Canadian Cereal & Mining
■^any.
Ir. Nesbitt stated that a holding company would be formed
I known as the International Milling Co. of Canada, with an
prized capital of $3,500,000 of 7 per cent, cumulative preferred
and $2,500,000 of common, of which tliere will now be issued
lie acquisition of the shares of the International and Canadian
II & Milling companies $2,500,000 preferred and $1,500,000
lion.
?here will also be an authorized bond issue of $2,000,000, of
$1,500,000 will be outstanding.   Of this latter amount $1,-
will be held in escrow to retire the present outstanding
of the International Milling Co., Ltd., and the Canadian Celt Milling Co., Ltd., the latter having arranged to retire $125,000
this year.
The details of the agreement are contained in a circular to be
jirded to the shareholders of the Cereal Co., signed by Messrs.
[Flavelle, G. E. Goldie and A. J. Nesbitt.  The circular says:
lie International Milling Co. has four mills in Minnesota and
I, U. S., and one mill in Moose Jaw, Sask., having a combined
|daily capacity of 6,000 barrels of flour and 600 barrels of rolled
and oatmeal."
MITCHELL INNES
ESQUIMALT—New sub-division on waterfront and less than one minute's
walk from car line.   Twenty-nine lots to select from.   Ideal position for home
sites.   Magnificent view.   Prices and terms to suit all purchasers.   Fullest
particulars may be had from the above-named at their offices.
P. O. BOX 1514
Offices 3 & 4 Greea Bk., 1216 Broad St.
TEL. No. 86a
DOUGLAS  STREET
One of the finest business sites on this thoroughfare, over 130 feet frontage on prominent corner.   Price $31,000
FINE CORNER, 70x110, overlooking that
open space at the Fountain. Good site
for store.    Price $11,000
CORNER, 100x100, good location for business. Price $40,000; $12,000 cash, balance
in one and two years.
DOUGLAS STREET, south of Bay Street,
54x135.   Price $20,000
80x125, near Bay Street.   Price $40,000
120x120, Semi-business property. Price
 $6,300
60 x 126, Semi-business property. Price
• $3,150
Douglas Street is to be paved and is to
have cluster lights, work on which will start
at an early date.
The Next Move will be on Douglas Street.    BUY NOW!
Good Terms Can Be Arranged on Any of
the Above
MARRIOTT & FELLOWS
619 Trounce Ave.
Telephone 645
NOTICE is hereby given that under
and pursuant to the. Revised Statutes
of Canada, 1906, Chapter 116, Frederick William Pretty will apply to the
Governor-General ln Council for approval of the plan and site for the
erection of a Wooden Wharf ln front
of his Lot, 1286, in the city of Victoria.
A plan of the said proposed wharf
and a description by metes and bounds
of the proposed site of same have been
deposited with the Minister of Public
Works at Ottawa, and duplicates thereof hove been deposited In the office of
the Registrar of Deeds for the said
City of Victoria, the same being the
Land Registry Office at Victoria, aforesaid.
Dated at Victoria, B. C, the 27th
day of April, 1911.
A.   S.   INNES,
Solicitor for Frederick William Pretty,
Applicant,
apl 29 may 27
LAND   REGISTRY  ACT
In the matter of an Application for a
Duplicate   Certificate   of   Title   to
Lot   24,   Block   F,   Fairfield   Farm
Estate  (Map 340)  Victoria City.
NOTICE  is  hereby  given  that it  is
my  intention at  the  expiration of one
month from the date of the first publication   hereof   to   issue   a   Duplicate
Certificate of Title to said land, issued
to  Seraph    Blackwell     and     Laura  A.
Blackwell on the 7th day of September,
1910, and numbered  23923C.
Land   Registry  Office,   Victoria,  B.C.,
the 25th day of April, 1911. ,
S. Y. WOOTTON,
apl 29 Registrar-General of Titles.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Cowichan.
TAKE notice that we, James Hunter,
Joseph Hunter, Thomas Hunter and
William Hunter, of Thetis Island, occupation Farmers, intend to apply for
permission to lease the following described land, viz.:—the following foreshore:—Commencing at a post planted
on the shore line at high water mark
at a point on the northern boundary
of Lot 27, Thetis Island, about 25
chains south-easterly from the Northwest corner of said lot; thence northerly to low water mark, a distance of
about one chain; thence easterly, northerly and southerly following low water
mark about 90 chains to a projection
of the north boundary of Lot 22, on
the said Island; thence westerly about
one chain to high water mark; thence
northerly, southerly and westerly following high water mark about 90 chains
to the point of commencement, containing 9 acres, more or less.
Dated April  24th,   1911.
JAMES HUNTER,
JOSEPH   HUNTER,
THOMAS HUNTER,
WILLIAM HUNTER,
apl 29
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
" '        _ District of Cassiar
TAKE-notice  that  I,   R.   Greenwood,
of   Victoria,   B.C.,  capitalist,   Intend   to
apply   to   the   Chief   Commissioner   of
Lands   for   a   license   to   prospect   for
coal   and   petroleum   on   the  following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the left bank of the Skeena
River about eight miles up stream from
the  Indian  Village  of  Kispiox,  thence
north SO chains, thence west 80 chains;
thence south  80 chains,  thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
March lst, 1911.
RICARDO GREENWOOD,
apl   29 Robt. MacDonald, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Cassiar
TAKE NOTICE that I, R. Greenwood,
of Victoria, B.C., capitalist, intend to
apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands for a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the right bank of the Skeena
River about eight miles up stream from
the Indian Village of Klsplox, thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
80  chains  to  point  of  commencement.
March lst, 1911.
RICARDO GREENWOOD,
apl   29 Robt. MacDonald, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Cassiar
TAKE notice that I, A. W. McVittie,
of Victoria, B.C., Surveyor, Intend to
apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum on the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the right bank of the
Skeena River about eight miles up
stream from the Indian Village of Kispiox, thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north SO chains,
thence east SO chains to point of commencement.
March  lst,  1911.
ARCHIBALD  W.   McVITTIE.
apl  29 Robt. MacDonald, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Cassiar
TAKE notice that I, A W. McVittie,
of Victoria, B.C., surveyor, intend to
apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands for a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the right bank of the Skeena
River about ten miles up stream from
the Indian Village of Kispiox, thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chi' s; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
March 2nd, 1911.
ARCHIBALD W. McVITTIE.
apl  29 Robt. MacDonald, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Cassiar
TAKE notice that I, A. W. McVittie,
of Victoria, B.C., surveyor, Intend to
apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands for a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the right bank of the Skeena
River about ten miles up stream from
the Indian Village of Kispiox, thence
south SO chains; thence east SO chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to the point of commencement.
March 2nd. 1911.
ARCHIBALD W. McVITTIE.
apl  29 Robt. MacDonald, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of -Cassiar
TAKE notice that I, R. Greenwood,
of Victoria. B.C., capitalist. Intend to
apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands for a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the right bank of the Skeena
River about eleven miles up stream
from the Indian Village of Kispiox,
thence south 80 chains, thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement.
March 2nd, 1911.
RICARDO GREENWOOD,
apl   29 Robt. MacDonald, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
• District of Cassiar
TAKE notice that I, R. Greenwood,
of Victoria, B.C., Capitalist, Intend to
apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum on the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the right bank of the
Skeena River about twelve miles up
stream from the Indian Village of KIs-
p< Ix, thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement.
March 2nd, 1911.
RICARDO GREENWOOD,
apl  29 Robt. MacDonald, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE NOTICE that William Gibson
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Merchant, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
two mlles North and six miles East
from the North East corner of D. L.
417 (and marked North East corner);
thence South 80 chains; thence West
80 chains; thence North 80 chains;
thence East 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or iess.
Dated  Jan.  14th,  1911.
WILLIAM GIBSON,
maris Per James Scott, Agent,
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Arthur Davis, of
New Westminster, B.C., occupation
Clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:— ommencing at a post planted
two miles north and six miles East
from the North East corner of D. L.
417 (and marked North West Corner);
thence South 80 chains; thence East 80
chains; thence North 80 chains; thence
West 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or
Dated Jan. 14th, 1911.
ARTHUR DAVIS,
mar 18 Per James Scott, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Sam Rognos, of
Vancouver, occupation Lumberman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about S
miles south of the southeast corner of
Lot 386, and marked S. R.'s N.W. Cor.;
thence, east 80 chains; south 80 chains;
west 80 chains; north 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated  Dec.   29th,   1910.
SAM   ROGNOS.
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent,- 12
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 29, 1911.
_\
:
.■
The capacity of the two companies when consolidated will be
900 barrels of flour and 3,000 barrels of rolled oats per day.
The net profits of the combined companies for the year ending
August 31st, 1910, were about $430,000. The officials of both companies estimate that the profits of the consolidated company
should, in an average year, be from $350,000 to $400,000, which
would leave from 6 to 9 per cent, on the common stock.
FEW FAILURES IN CANADA IN THREE MONTHS
Commercial suspensions in the Dominion of Canada during the
first quarter of 1911 make a notably satisfactory comparison with
those of the corresponding period in recent preceding years, numbering only 367, against 426 last year, and 425 in 1909, while the
amount of defaulted liabilities aggregated only $2,876,705 against
$4,021,584 and $4,814,627, respectively.
•Each of the three divisions into which the statement is divided
shows marked improvement, and though the number in manufacturing is exactly the same as last year, it compares with 100 two
years ago, a decrease of 20.
As regards the amount of liabilities, however, in this class, the
exhibit is much more favorable, the total, $774,445, showing a
marked decrease as compared with the $1,747,225 of last year, or
the $1,077,991 of 1909.
On the other hand, in the Trading division the conditions are
almost entirely reversed, improvement being more pronounced in
number than in the amount involved, 281 suspensions, with defaulted indebtedness of $2,083,260, comparing with 339 last year for
$2,238,423, and 313 for $2,839,493 in 1909.
Failure record figures and every other kind of figures go
to show that business is much better in Canada than it is in the
States. With a lower tariff, the Americans would now be swamping
our markets with their surplus goods.
MILL CONSTRUCTION AT PORT MANN
The construction of a merchant bar tube mill, the first unit of
the big steel works to be established at Port Mann, will be undertaken within three months. With its completion work on blast furnaces and mills capable of turning out 1,000 tons of steel rails and
structural steel daily will follow. The first unit will utilize scrap
iron and other old material and will cost $700,000. C. P. Taft,
brother of the American president, is financially interested in the
scheme.
RECORD BANK CLEARINGS
The Vancouver clearing house returns for the week ending
April 13 broke the record, amounting to $11,069,941, which is over
half a million dollars above the previous record. The clearings have
often topped the ten million mark and up to this week the record
was $10,400,000. .For the corresponding week of last year the clearings were $8,018,878, and for the corresponding week of 1909 the figures were $3,797,233.
SILK MERGER
It is stated on good authority that a merger of Montreal and
outside silk mills has been formed, to be known as the Belding, Paul
and Corticelli Silk Company. The total issue is probably about $1,-
600,000.
A CHANGE OF CONTROL
Control of the Nugget Gold Mine on Sheep Creek, West Kootenay, has been purchased by J. T. Hillis and Dr. A. R. Baker and
associates of Vancouver. It is the intention of the new management
to install a plant capable of handling 100 tons of ore per day. This
will consist of a modern stamp mill and cyanide plant.
WILL LOWER SEWERS
In order to permit of adequate drainage for cellars of buildings
on Johnson, Yates and Fort streets, between Vancouver and Cook
streets, the city will undertake the work of lowering the present
level of the sewers now serving that section. The present sewer is
laid at from seven to nine feet below the street level, but this is not
deep enough to permit of proper drainage to buidings, which it is
confidently expected will be erected within the next few years. As
permanent pavements are to be constructed on these streets, the
work of lowering the existing sewers will be undertaken at once, so
that it will not be necessary to later carry out this work after the
pavements have been laid. The cost of the work is estimated at
$1,000, and will be charged to sewer maintenance.
Office Phone 1092 Res. Phone 1372
ARE YOU INTERESTED IN  NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA LANDS?
I have control of the following blocks:
20,000 acres  Babine Lake (Babine)
30,000 acres Fulton River (Fulton)
40,000 acres Kitwancool (Kitwancool)
90,000 acres Nation Lakes (Nation)
80,000 acres  Omineca
40,000 acres Peace River
12,500 acres Cariboo
80,000 acres Naas and Tributary Valleys
Robert Wm. Clark room I mahon block
Ton Oan Keep Potted oa all Dfrelop-
menti In th* Pence Birei, the Cariboo
Mid
Fort George
Country, Beading ont
F_U_E monthly
I. G. Bulletin of
Information
which gives all the news Impartially,
clipped from the leading dallies, weeklies and magazines; articles bearing on
British Columbia, covering Farm Lands,
Fruit, Lumbering, Mining, Fishing, New
Railways; also synopsis of Land, Lumber, Mining, Immigration and othel laws.
WX ABB JOXVT OWHEBB AHD
BOLB AOEKTS OP TBI!
POBT OBOBOX TOWNSITE
at tbe junction of 1100 miles of navigable waterways, the strategic point for
the building of the second largest city of
British Columbia, having more varied
and important natural advantages than
Spokane.
Seven railroads building and projected.
One hundred million dollars (estimated) will be spent in next flve years in
railroad building radiating from Fort
Qeorge.
Millions of agricultural acres waiting
for farmers.
Coal, timber lands, water power and
rich gold mining country all tributary
to Fort George.
Write us today. We don't ask you to
buy; just get posted—then do what you
think is wise.
NatuN Resources
Securities Co., Ltd.
693 Bower Bldg., Tanoonver, B.O.
643 POBT ST..      -    •     TIOTOBIA, B.O.
Thomas Hooper
Architect
Royal Bank Chambers,
Victoria, B. C.
522 Winch Building,
Vancouver, B. C.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Cassiar
TAKE notice that I, R. Greenwood,
of Victoria, B.C., Capitalist, intend to
apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands for a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the right bank of the Skeena
River about ten miles up stream from
the Indian Village of Kispiox, thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
March  2nd,  1911.
RICARDO   GREENWOOD,
apl   29 Robt. MacDonald, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Cassiar
TAKE notice that I, A. W. McVittie,
of Victoria, B.C., surveyor, intend to
apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands for a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the left bank of the Skeena
River about nine miles up stream from
the Indian Village of Klsplox, thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
March 2nd, 1911.
ARCHIBALD W. McVITTIE.
apl   29 Robt. MacDonald, Agent.
Bevan, Gore & Eliot
LIMITED
STOCK AND BOND BROKERS
Members Vancouver, Victoria and Spokane
Stock Exchanges
All active stocks bought and sold on commission
All active stocks carried on margin
All active stocks sold for "FUTURE DELIVERY"
If you want to invest in mining or industrial stocks
see us about it
•-   ■» I**
Agreements of sale purchased.
Money to loan.
Vancouver Island Agents for
"The British Empire Agency, Ltd."
11 Haymarket, London, England.
1122 GOVERNMENT STREET
Phones 2470 and 2471
VICTORIA, B.C.
Coutts-way and Vancouver Street .,'
MODERN AND LUXURIOUS APARTMENT HOUSE
In favorite residential district within one minute of Fort Street I
car and eight minutes' walk of Post Office and Theatre.
Heated throughout with Hot Water; Electric Light, Hot ahd Cold j
Water and all Up-to-date Conveniences
OPENS MARCH 1ST
Suites may now be rented at moderate rates.
Domestic help for all tenants can be obtained on the premises on
economic terms.
For full particulars apply
THE MANAGER,
A. Williams & Co.
LIMITED
704 YATES STREET
PHONE 1386
HARDY BAY TOWNSITE, containing 410 unsold lots, together!
with 500 acres adjoining same; lots in the townsite have soldi
from $100, $150 and $200 pe'r lot.   Hardy Bay and QuatsinoJ
Sound are certain to become great industrial and shipping centres in the near future.   For quick sale, price $70,000; terms,
$15,000; balance three years; interest 5 per cent.
YATES STREET—Between Vancouver and Cook street—6-room I
Bungalow; pantry, bath, scullery; excellent basement; electric!
light, gas, lawn. Price $20,000; terms one-third cash, balance*!
1 and 2 years; interest 7 per cent.
R—Cottage, 4 lots, 60x120 each; city water, electric light, telephone]
can be had.   Bargain.   Only $2,600|
LOTS—240x60 each, cleared; best of soil, fine location. $550 each;]
very easy terms.
WHARF STREET—Valuable business block, near the G. T. P.]
wharf  .$17,0001
Blue Printing
Maps
Draughting
Surveyors' Instruments and
Drawing Office
Supplies
ELECTRIC BLUE PRINT
MAP CO.
1218 LANGLEY STREET
VICTORIA, B.C.
The Taylor Mill
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Vid THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 29, 1911.
13
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Rupert, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE  that Alex.  McCarter,
lof Victoria, B.C., contractor, intends to
■apply  for  permission  to  purchase  the
Ifollowing   described   lands:—Commencing at a post planted south-east eorner
l_f  Section  26,   Township  21,   Range   1,
Ttupert District; thence 80 chains west;
Lhence 80 cliains north; thence 80 chains
|;ast; thenee 80 chains south to the point
Df   commencement   and   containing   640
licres,  more or less.
Dated March llth,  1911.
ALEX. McCARTER.
[ipl 8 D.  Wilkinson,  Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that George Arthur
feenjamin Hall, of Victoria, B.C., phy-
Iiician, Intends to apply for permission
lo purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
M the north-east corner of Section 16,
l.'ownship 21, Range 1, Rupert District,
Ihence 80 chains west; thence 80 chains
louth; thence 80 chains east; thence 80
lhains north to the point of commenee-
Inent and containing 640 acres, more or
less.
Dated March  14th,  1011.
J GEORGE ARTHUR BENJAMIN HALL.
|.pl 8 John Dalby, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert,  Range 1.
TAKE   NOTICE   that   Lawrence   Mc-
J'arter, of Victoria, B.C., contractor, in-
l.ncls  to apply for permission  to  pur-
Ihase  the  following  described  lands:—
lommencing  at  a  post   planted   south-
list   corner   of   Section   22,   Township
ll, Range 1, Rupert District; thenee 80
lhains   west;   thenee   SO   chains   north;
lience 80 chains easlfc thence 80 chains
liuth to the point of commencement and
Iontaining 640 acres, more or less.
. Dated March  14 th,  1911.
LAWRENCE  McCARTER.
til 8 D.  Wilkinson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT -,-■>.
District of Rupert, Range 1.
I TAKE NOTICE that AVilliam McCarter
I' Victoria, B.C., contractor, intends to
liply for permission to purchase the
allowing described lands:*—Commencing
a post planted south-east corner of
Action 27, Township 21, Range 1, Ru-
l.rt District; thence 80 chains west;
lence 80 chains north; thenee SO'chains
1st; thence 80 chains south to the
liint of commencement and containing
10 acres, more or less.
IDated March 14th, 1911.
WILLIAM McCARTER.
[)1 8 D.  Wilkinson,  Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert,  Range 1.
ITAKE NOTICE that Henry Gage Dal-
I,  of Victoria,  B.C.,  clerk,  intends  to
Iply  for  permission  to  purchase  the
flowing described lands:—Commencing
J a post planted  south-east  corner of
Iction   20,   Township   8,   Range   1,   Ru-
Irt   District;   thence   80   chains   west;
lance 80 chains north; thence 80 chains
1st;   thence   80   chains   south   to   the
lint of commeneement and containing
|)   acres,   more  or   less.
Dated  March 15th,  1911.
HENRY GAGE DALBY.
|1 8 D.  Wilkinson,  Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert,  Range 1.
|PAKE NOTICE that Charles Banfield,
Victoria,   B.C.,   printer,   intends   to
Dly   for  permission   to  purchase   the
llowing described lands:—Commencing
1 a post planted  south-east corner of
htion 28, Township 21, Range 1,  Ru-
l-t   District;   thence   80- chains   west;
lnce 80 chains north; thence SO chains
It;   thence   80   chains   south   to   the
lnt of commencement and containing
I  acres,  more or less.
|)ated March 15th,  1911.
CHARLES BANFIELD.
John Dalby, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert,  Range 1.
JAKE   NOTICE    that   Robert   Swan
llby,  of Victoria,  B.C.,  Clerk,  intends
■apply for permission to purchase the
llowing described lands:—Commencing
la post planted  north-east  corner of
Ition 21, Township 21, Range 1, Ru-
It   District;   thence   80   chains   west;
lnce 80 chains south; thence 80 chains
It;   thence   80   ehains   north   to   the
lnt of commencement and containing
I  acres,   more  or  less.
|)ated March 15th,  1911.
ROBERT SWAN DALBY.
John Dalby, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert,  Range 1.
IAKE NOTICE that Mina F. Schabbel,
■Victoria,  B.C.,  Intends  to  apply  for
Inisslon   to   purchase   the   following
Bribed lands:—Commencing at a post
Iited north-east corner of Section 16,
l-nship 21, Range 1, Rupert District;
lice 80 chains west; thence 80 ehains
T.h; thence 80 chains east; thence 80
Ins north to the point of commence-
•t,   and  containing  6,40   acres,   more
Jess,
lated  March   14th,   1911.
MINA   F.   SCHABBEL.
D. Wilkinson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Range 1.
IAKE NOTICE that Susan M. Mc-
lden, of Victoria, B.C., Intends to ap-
I for permission to purchase the
lowing described lands:—Commenc-
I at a post planted north-east corner
■Section 18, Township 8, Range 1,
■ert District; thence SO chains west;
|ice 80 chains south; thence 80 chains
thence 80 chains north to point
■commencment, and containing 640
Is, more or less,
lated March  14th,  1911.
SUSAN M.  McFADDEN.
John Dalby, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert,  Range 1.
|*\.KE  NOTICE  that  Robert  McFad-
of Victoria,  B.C., butcher,  Intends
Ipply for permission to purchase the
|>wing described lands:—Commencing
post planted  south-east corner of
■lon  19,  Township  8,  Range  1,  Ru-
1   District;   thence   west   80   ehains;
Ice   north   80   chains;   thence   east
[mains;   thence   south   80   chains   to
J point   of  commencement,   and   con-
ling  640 acres,  more or less.
Iited  March   14th,   1911.
ROBERT   McFADDEN.
John Dalby, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert,  Range 1.
\KE  NOTICE  that  Francis  Walter
of Victoria, B.C., physician, intends
Ipply for permission to purchase the
jwlng described lands:—Commencing
post planted south-west corner of
|lon  30,  Township  8,  Range  1,   Ru-
Distrlct;   thence   SO   chains  north;
Ice 80 chains east; thence 80 chains
lh;   thence   80   chains   west   to   the
It of commencement and containing
lacres, more or less.
Iited  March 14th,  1911.
I    FRANCIS WALTER HALL.
|S D. Wilkinson, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District   of  Coast,   Range  3
TAKE notice th,at Henry Morehouse
Leonard, of Victoria, occupation Estate
Agent, intends to apply for a license to
prospect for coal and petroleum on the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about one-half
mile south of the East branch of Coal
Creek and about four miles south of
Long Lake Creek (Tai-a-Reazi Creek)
in the watershed of the Salmon River,
thence north eighty chains; thence east
eighty chains; thence south eighty
chains; thence west eighty chains and
containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated  February   13th,   1911.
HENRY MOREHOUSE LEONARD,
apl 1 Frank Hallett, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District   of  Coast,   Range  3
TAKE notice that Frank Hallett of
Kimsquit, B.C., occupation Prospector,
intends to apply for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum on the following described lands:—Commencing at
a post planted about a mile and a half
north of the East branch of Coal Creek
and about two -and a half miles south
of Long Lake (Tanyabunket Lake) ln
the watershed of the Salmon River;
thence north eighty chains; thence west
eighty chains; thence south eighty
chains; thence east eighty chains and
containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated February 15, 1911.
apl 1 FRANK HALLETT.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE notice that Axel Anderson, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Miner, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about 2_
miles north from the head waters of
Millbrook Cove; thence north eighty
chains; thence east eighty chains; thence
south eighty chains; thence west eighty
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated  January  26th,   1911.
mar 25 Frederick A. Smith, Agent.
AXEL ANDERSON,
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE notice that James Graham
Blaikie, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
Retired, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 1_ miles north-westerly from
the head waters of Millbrook Cove,
thence south eighty chains; thence west
about sixty chains to shore line; thence
northerly about eighty chains along
shore line; thenee east sixty chains
more or less to point of commencement, and containing 480 acres, more or
Dated January 28th,  1911.
JAMES GRAHAM BLAIKIE.
mar 25 Frederick A. Smith, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Alexander Farrel
Brady, of Grass Valley, Cal., occupation
Hardware Merchant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about one mile north of
Alcatcho Indian Reserve, on the Bella
Coola trail, and marked A. F. B.'s N.
W. Cor.; thence east 80 chains; south
SO chains; west 80 chains; north 80
chains to point of commencement, containing 640  acres,  more or less.
Dated Jan. 4, 1911.
ALEXANDER  FARREL BRADY,
maris Norman  McMillan, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Rang-3 3
TAKE notice that Annie Dunbar Upton, of Grass Valley, Cal., occupation
widow, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile north of the Alcatcho
Indian Reserve on the Bella Coola
trail, and marked A. D. U.'s N. E. Cor.;
thence west 80 chains; south 80 chains;
east 80 chains; north 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more  or less.
Dated  Jan.  4th,  1911.
ANNIE DUNBAR UPTON,
mar IS Norman McMillan, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District  of  Coast,   Range  3
TAKE notice that Henry John Sanders
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Broker, intends to apply for a license to prospect
for coal and petroleum on the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about one mlles south of
Coal Creek and about three miles south
of Long Lake Creek (Tai-a-Reazi
Creek) in the watershed of the Salmon
River, thence north eighty chains;
thence east eighty chains; thence south
eighty chains; hetnee west eighty
chains, and containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated   February   llth,   1911.
HENRY JOHN SANDERS,
apl 1 Frank Hallett, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Sooke.
TAKE notice that sixty days after
date, I, Albert Edward Todd, of Victoria, intend to apply for a lease of
the whole of Sooke Spit, at the entrance to Sooke Harbour, for the purpose of removing sand and gravel
therefrom.
Dated 20th March, 1911.
mar 25 ALBERT EDWARD TODD.
OMINECA-LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that James Henry Cory,
of Sausalita, Cal., occupation Insurance
Agent,  intends to apply for permission
to purchase    the    following    described
lands:—Commencing at  a post  planted
about  2   miles  north  of  the  northeast
corner  of  Lot  317,  and  marked   J.   H.
C.'s  S. E.  Cor.; thence west 80 chains;
north  80  chains;  east 80 chains;  south
80   chains   to   point  of  commencement,
containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated  Dec.   30,  1910.
JAMES HENRY CORY,
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District   of  Coast,   Range   3
TAKE notice that Lorenzo Alexander
of Victoria, occupation Broker, intends
to apply for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum on the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about one mile and a half north
of the East branch of Coal Creek and
about two and a half miles South of
Long Lake (Tanyabunket Lake) in the
watershed of the Salmon River; thence
south eighty chains; thence east eighty
chains; thence north eighty chains,
thence west eighty chains and containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated February 13th,  1911.
LORENZO ALEXANDER,
apl 1 Frank Hallett, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District  of  Coast,   Range   3
TAKE notice that Cecil Woods, of
Victoria, B.C., occupation Rancher, intends to apply for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum on the following described lands:—Commencing
at si post planted about one mile south
of Coal Creek and about three miles
south of Long Lake Creek (Tai-a-Reazi
Creek) ln the watershed of the Salmon
River; thence east eighty chains; thence
south eighty chains; thence west eighty
chains; thence north eighty chains and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated February llth, 1911.
CECIL WOODS,
apl 1 Frank Hallett, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District   of  Coast,   Range   3
TAKE notice that Philip Oldham, of
Victoria, occupation Broker, intends to
apply for a license to prospect for eoal
and petroleum on the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about one-half mile south of the
East branch of Coal Creek and about
four miles South of Long Lake Creek
(Tai-a-Reazi Creek) in the watershed of
the Salmon River; thence west eighty
chains; thence north eighty chains;
thence east eighty chains; thence south
eighty chains and containing 640 acres
more or less.
Dated February  13th,  1911.
PHILIP OLDHAM,
apl 1 Frank Hallett, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District  of  Coast,   Range   3
TAKE notice that Percy Byng Hall of
Victoria, B.C., occupation Broker, Intends
to apply for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum on the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about one mlle south of Coal
Creek and about three miles south of
Long Lake Creek (Tai-a-Reazl Creek)
in the watershed of the Salmon River:
—thence west eighty chains; thence-
north eighty chains; thence east eighty
chains; thence south eighty chains and
containing 640  acres  more or less.
Dated  February  llth,   1911.
PERCY BYNG HALL.
apl 1 Frank Hallett, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District  of  Coast,  Range  3
TAKE notice that Arthur R. Sherwood, of Victoria, occupation Estate
Agent, intends to apply for a license to
prospect for coal and petroleum on
the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about a
mile and a half north of the East
branch of Coal Creek and about two
and a half miles Soutn of Long Lake
(Tanyabunket Lake) in the watershed
of the Salmon River; thence west
eighty chains, thence south eighty
chains; thence east eighty chains; thence
north eighty chains and containing 640
acres  more or  less.
Dated February 13th, 1911.
ARTHUR  R.  SHERWOOD,
apl 1 Frank Hallett, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE notice that Minnie Blaikie, of
Vancouver, B. C, occupation Married
Woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 2 miles north-east from Millbrook Cove; thence east eighty chains;
thence north eighty chains; thence west
eighty chains; thence south eighty
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres more or less,
Dated January 30th, 1911.
MINNIE BLAIKIE.
mar 25 Frederick A. Smith, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE notice that Eva Scarlett, O'"
Vancouver, B.C_, occupation acc6untant,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:
—Commencing at a _.ost planted at the
head waters on the north shore of Millbrook Cove, thence north twenty chains;
thence east eighty chains; thenee south
eighty chains or to shore line; thence
north-westerly along shore line to point
of commencement, and containing 480
acres more or less.
Dated January  24th,  1911.
EVA   SCARLETT
mar 25 Frederick A. Smith, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAI-.D   DISTRICT
District   of  Coast,   Range  3
TAKE notice that Maurice Cane, of
Victoria, B.C., occupation Mining Engineer, intends to apply for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum on
the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about one
mile south of Coal Creek and about
three miles south of Long Lake (Tai-
a-Reazi Creek) in the watershed of the
Salmon River; thence south eighty
cnains; thence west eighty chains;
chains; thence north eighty chains;
thence east eighty chains; and containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated February llth,  1911.
MAURICE CANE,
apl 1 Frank Hallett, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District   of  Coast,   Range  3
TAKE notice that William Marchant,
of Victoria, occupation Inspector of
Customs, intends to apply for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum on
the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about a mile
and a half north of the east branch of
Coal Creek and about two and a half
miles south of Long Lake (Tanyabunket Lake) in the watershed of the
Salmon River; thence north eighty
chains; thence east eighty chains; thenee
south eighty chains; thence west eighty
chains and containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated February 13th,  1911.
WILLIAM MARCHANT.
apl 1 Frank Hallett, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Felix Polrier, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Carpenter,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of Lot 385, and marked F. P.'s S. E. Corner; thence west 80
chains, north 80 chains, east SO chains,
south 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated Dec.   26,  1910.
FELIX POIRIER,
maris Norman McMillan, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Olivier Carriere, of
Alberni, B.C., occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Cemmencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of Lot 385, and marked O. C.'s N. W. Corner; thence east
80 chains; south 80 chains; west 80
chains; north 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated Dec.  26,  1910.
OLIVIER CARRIERE,
maris Norman McMillan, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Metchosin
TAKE   notice  that  I,   Allan  S.  Ashwell,  Agent  for  the  West Coast  Fishing   Co.,Ld.,    of   Victoria,    occupation
Real   Estate   Agent,   intends   to   apply
to lease the following described lands:
—Commencing, at a post planted at a
point one (1) chain south of the southeast corner of section 74; thence southerly seven (7)  chains; then westerly at
an  angle  pf  93   degrees  a  distance  of
16.35  chains;  thence at an angle of 87
degrees north seven  (7)  chains; thence
easterly at an angle of 93 degrees a distance  of  16.35  chains   to  the  point  of
commencement.
Dated 21st March,  1911.
Weit Coaat Fishing Company, Limited.
mar 25 A.   S.   Ashwell,  Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that John Provo, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Miner, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about 2
miles north of the northeast corner of
Lot 317, and marked J. P.'s N. E. Cor.;
thence south 80 chains, west 80 chains,
north 80 chains, east 80 ehains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or  less.
Dated Dec.  30th,  1910.
JOHN PROVO,
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that William Battson,
of New Westminster, B.C., occupation
Plumber, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted two miles North and Six miles East
from the North East corner of D. L.
417 (and marked South West corner);
thence North 80 chains; thence East 80
chains; thence South 80 chains; thence
West SO chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated Jan.  14th,  1911.
WILLIAM BATTSON,
maris Per James Seott, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Mary Jane Muir,
of New Westminster, B.C., occupation
Married Woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted two miles North and four miles
East from the North East corner of D.
L. 417 (and marked South East Corner);
thence North SO chains; thence West 80
chains; thence South SO chains; thenca
East SO chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more
or  less.
Dated Jan. 13th, 1911.
MARY JANE MUIR,
mar 18 Per James Scott, Agent.
£__\  aB
mM
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that James Robertson
of New Westminster, B.C., occupation
Plumber, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted two miles North and six miles East
from the North East corner of D. L.
417 (and marked South East corner);
thence North SO ehains; thence West 80
chains; thence South 80 chains; thence
East SO chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated   Jan.   14th,   1911.
JAMES  ROBERTSON,
maris Per James Scott, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Marie E. Douglas,
of New Westminster, B.C., occupation
Student, intends to apply ■ for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted two miles North and four miles
East from the North West corner of
D. L. 417 (and marked South West
Corner), thence North 80 chains; thence
East SO chains; thence South 80 chains;
thence West 80 chains to point of commeneement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated January 13th, 1911.
MARIE E. DOUGLAS,
maris Per James Scott, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE notice that Thomas Gordon
Johnston, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Broker, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 2_ miles north-easterly from thei
head waters of Millbrook Cove; thence
east eighty ehains; thence south eighty
chains; thence west eighty ehains;
thence north eighty chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640 acres
more or less.
Dated January 27th,  1911.
THOMAS  GORDON JOHNSTON,
mar 25 Frederick A. Smith, Agent.
NOTICE  TO  CONTRACTORS
North Cowichan School
Sealed Tenders, superscribed "Tender
for Nortli Cowichan School," will be received by the Honourable the Minister
of Public Works up to noon of Monday,
the lst day of May, 1911, for the erection and completion of a two-room
frame school building at North Cowichan, near Duncan, B. C, in the
Cowichan  Electoral  District.
Plans, specifications, contract, and
forms of tender may be seen on and
after the 7th day of April, 1911, at the
offices of the Government Agent, Duncan, and the Department of Public-
Works,   Victoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank of
Canada, made payable to the Honourable the Minister of Public Works, for
ti.e sum of $250 which shall be forfeited
if the party tendering decline to enter
Into contract when called upon to do
so, or if he fail to complete the work
contracted for. The cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them upon
the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the forms supplied, signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed in the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C., 3rd April, 1911.
apl 29
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range .-.
TAKE notice that George Sharp, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Laborer,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about 3
miles south of the southeast corner of
Lot 3S6, and marked G. S.'s S. W.
Cor.; thence north 80 chains; east 80
chains; south 80 cliains; west 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 29th, 1910.
GEORGE SHARP,
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Edward Beaubien,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Hotel-
keeper, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 2 miles north of the northeast
corner of Lot 317, and marked E. B.'s
S. W. Cor.; thence east 80 chains;
north 80 chains; west 80 chains; south
80 chains to point of commencement,
containing 640 aeres, more or less.
Dated Dec.  30th,  1910.
EDWARD BEAUBIEN,
maris Norman McMillan,  Agent.
WATER NOTICE
NOTICE Is hereby given that an application will be made under Part V
of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a
licence In the Coast Division of Victoria District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant is Robert Draney,
Kimsqult, Dean Channel, Salmon Can-
ner.
(b) The name of the lake, stream or
source is a small creek leading about
one mlle N. E. of the Kimsquit Cannery.
(0) The point of diversion is about
three-quarters of a mile up the Creek
from its mouth at Dean Channel.
(d) The quantity of water applied
for is  two  cubic feet.
(e) The character of the proposed
works is a diversion of the water applied for into a flume or pipe to the
Salmon Cannery at Kimsquit.
(f) The premises on which the water
Is to be used is the Salmon Cannery
at Kimsquit, Dean Channel.
(g) The purposes for which the water
Is to be used are General Cannery
Purposes.
(j) The area of Crown land intended
to be occupied by the proposed works
Is  about  200  square  feet.
(k) This notice was posted on the
28th day of February, 1911, and application will be made to the Commissioner on the 30th day of April, 1911.
(1) There are no riparian proprietors
or licensees who or whose lands are
likely to be affected by the proposed
works, either above or below the outlet.
ROBERT DRANEY,
apl 1 Kimsqult,  B.C.
NOTICE
Tenders will be received by the undersigned up to the 22nd day of April,
1911, at 5 p.m., for the purchase of
Block 27, Subdivision of Lot No. 541,
Group one, New Westminster District,
situated in the City of Vancouver, and
being the site of the old Provincial
Court House. Each tender must be enclosed In a registered letter and must
be addressed to the undersigned, and
plainly marked "Tender for old Vancouver Court House Site," and must be
accompanied by an accepted cheque for
ten per cent, of the first payment of
the purchase money. Payment for the
property will be accepted ln Instalments of one-quarter of the purchase
money. The first of such instalments
to be paid within thirty days after
the acceptance of the tender, and the
other three annually thereafter, with
interest at the rate of 6 per cent, per
annum. In the event of the person
whose tender is accepted falling to complete the first instalment within thirty
days of the notice of such acceptance
the sale to him will be cancelled and
his ten per cent, deposit forfeited. The
cheques of unsuccessful tenderers will
be leturned. The highest or any tender
will not necessarily be accepted. No
commissions of any kind will be allowed.
WILLIAM   R.   ROSS,
Minister of Lands.
Department of  Lands,
A'ictoria, B.C., March 7th, 1911.
mar 11
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Edward Thornley,
of Vancouver, occupation Commercial
Traveller, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the Bella Coola winter trail,
about 12 miles southwest of the Salmon
River crossing, and marked E. T.'s S.
W. Cor.; thence east SO chains; north
80 chains; west SO chains; south 80
chains to point of commeneement, containing  640 acres,   more  or less.
Dated Dec.  27th,  1910.
EDWARD   THORNLEY.
mar 18 Norman  McMillan, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert,  Rnnge 1.
TAKE NOTICE that William Angus
Gleason, of Victoria, B.C., builder, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post plnnted southeast corner of Seotlon 23, Township 21,
Range 1, Rupert District; thonce 80
chnins wost; thence SO ohalns north;
thonce SO chains east; thenco 80 chains
south to the point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or loss,
Dated  March  llth,   1911.
WILLIAM  ANGUS  GLEASON.
apl 8 John Dalby, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert,  Range  1.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Mould,
of Victoria, B.C., butcher, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted north-enst corner of
Seotlon 14, Township 21, Range 1, Rupert District; thenoe 80 chains west;
thence SO chains north; thence SO chains
east; thonce SO chains south to the
point of commencement and containing
640 acres, more or less.
Dated  March  14th,  1911.
THOMAS  MOULD,
apl  8 John  Dalby,  Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Willlnm Henry
Boycott, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Bricklayer, Intends to applv for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about ono mlle south of the southeast corner of Lot 3S5, and marked W.
H. B.'s N. E. Cor.; thenoe south 80
chains; west SO chains; north SO chains;
east SO chains to point of commencement, containing 640 nores, more or less.
Dated Dec. 29th,  1910.
WILLIAM HENRY BOYCOTT.
mar 18 Norman  McMillan, Agent. 14
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 29, 1911.
CORRESPONDENCE
The Week accepts no responsibility
for the views expressed by its correspondents. Communications will be
inserted whether signed by the real
name of the writer or a nom de
plume, but the writer's name and address must be given to the Editor as
an evidence of bona fides. In no case
will it be divulged without consent.
HINDU GRATITUDE
Victoria, B. C, April 26, 1911.
To the Editor of The Week
Dear Sir:—Allow me to thank you
most sincerely for what you kindly
did for me in my case. I hope you
will kindly continue to stand up for
those who are undefended and who
on account of various reasons cannot
represent their cause properly.
I am glad that a gentleman of your
calibre and integrity took up my case
and I do hope you will give more
publicity to these facts in your valuable columns. Please accept this letter as a sign of gratitude and if I can
be of any use whatever to your kind
self, please let me know. Thanking
you, I remain,
Yours  respectfully,
X. BROHMSEN,
(His Mark.)
Witness:  Smund  Singh.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
MR. J. B. PERRY'S ACHIEVEMENT
No better endorsement of the wisdom shown by the Provincial Government in building the Mill Bay road
as a joint in thc main trunk system of
Vancouver Island can possibly be
shown than the remarkable performance of Mr. B. J. Perry on Wednesday last, when in his 30-horsepower
4-cylinder Packard motor, driven by
Louis Morris, he made the trip from
Victoria to Duncan's in one hour and
thirty-six minutes. The Packard
machine made the return journey in
one hour and thirty-five minutes,
about twenty-five minutes less than
the schedule time of the E. & N. service, and good hill climber as this
type of machine has proved itself to
be, it would be utterly impossible to
make this trip, which covers one of
the finest scenic panoramas in the
world, had not the new Mill Bay road
been constructed so as to avoid any
except average grades.
Yours truly,
PRACTICAL.
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve existing by reason of the notice
published in the British Columbia
Gazette of the 27th December, 1907, over
lands on Graham Island, formerly covered by Timber Licenses Nos. 37065,
37056 and 37057, which expired on the
6th day of November, 1909, and the
lands embraced within Timber License
No. 37059, which expired on the 25th
day of January, 1909, is cancelled, and
that the said lands will be open for preemption only under the provisions of
Section 7 of the "Land Act" after midnight on June 16th, 1911.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands
Lands Department,
Victoria, B.C.,
9th March, 1911.
june10
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve existing by reason of a notice
published in the British Columbia
Gazette of the 27th day of December,
1907, over lands situated on the East
side of Texada Island, lying to the
south of Lot No. 26, formerly covered
by Timber Licence No. 134,50, which expired on the 7th day of May, 1908, is
cancelled, and that the said lands will
be open for location under the provisions of the "Land Act" after midnight
on June 16th, 1911.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands
Lands Department,
Victoria, B.C.,
9th March, 1911.
may 6
NOTICE
A Word to the Wise
The Arnprior, Ont., Local Option
Committee, in a statement published
in the newspapers of that town a fortnight ago, issued the following warning to license-holders, which is not
without point even to those in "the
trade" in this far western province.
It has in it very much that is in the
nature of the "word to the wise:"
"It now remains for the license
holders to decide upon their future
course. Had the license law been
properly observed in all probability
there would have been no contest.
And it may be well to remind them
that, though Local Option is out of
the way for three years, the matter of
reduction of licenses is always to the
fore. We have been given to understand that amongst the license holders are some who observe the law.
If they wish to avoid trouble it is
for them to sec that the others also
observe it. They can save the situation if they choose to do so—for, to
give them thc credit to which they are
entitled—on election day drunkenness
was but little in evidence on the
streets up to the closing of the polls.
If they are satisfied to live within the
law the matter will probably rest
where it now does. But if, on the
other hand, the law is to be violated,
more particularly if there is to be a
continuance of the selling of liquor
to drunken men and to minors, a
new movement will be started. That
movement will be the reduction of
licenses."
Just as Good ai Ever
An old physician was noted for his
brusque manner and old-fashioned
methods. A lady called him in to treat
her baby, who was slightly ailing. The
doctor prescribed castor oil.
"But, doctor," protested the young
mother, "caster oil Is such an old-fashioned remedy."
"Madam," replied the doctor, "babies
are old-fashioned things."—Judge's Library.
PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that,
under the authority contained in section
131 of the "Land Act," a regulation has
been approved by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council fixing the minimum sale
price of first- and second-class lands at
$10 and $5 per acre, respectively.
This regulation further provides that
the prices fixed therein shall apply to
all lands with respect to which the application to purchase is given favourable consideration after this date, notwithstanding the date of such application or any delay that may have occurred in the consideration of the same.
Further notice is hereby given that
all persons who have pending applications to purchase lands under the provisions of sections 34 or 36 of the
"Land Act" and who are not willing to
complete such purchases under the
prices fixed by the aforesaid regulation
shall be at liberty to withdraw such
applications and receive refund of the
moneys deposited on account of such applications.
WILLIAM R. ROSS,
Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., April  3rd,  1911,
june 3
CANCELLATION OF BESERVE
Notice is hereby given that the re*
serve established over certain lands in
the Cariboo and Lillooet Districts, notice of which bearing date June 30th,
1908, was published in the British Co*
lumbla Gazette on July 2nd, 1908, is
cancelled in so far as the same relates
to the following surveyed lands in
Township 48 and 50, Lillooet District,
namely, Fractional Sections 2, 3, Section 4, Fractional Section 6, Fractional
E. % of Section 6, Fractional Section 7,
Sections 8, 9, 10, Fractional Sections
11,  12,  13;   Sections  14,  15,  16,  17,  18,
19, 20, 21, 22, 23, Fractional W. y_ of
Section 24, Fractional W. % of Section
25, Fractional Section 26, Sections 27,
28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, Fractional Section 35 and Fractional West % of Section 36, all in Township 48; Fractional
Sections 2, 3, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12, Sections 13,
14, Fractional Sections 15, 16, 17, 18, 19,
20, 21, Sections 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28,
29 and Fractional Sections 30, 31, 32, 33,
34, 36 and 36, all in Township 60, to
permit of the said lands being located
by pre-emption  entry  only.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy   Minister  of  Lands.,
Lands   Department,   Victoria,    B.   C,
April  7th,  1911.
apl 15 July 15
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Renfrew ,
TAKE notice that W. Dawson McGregor, of Victoria, occupation Mining Engineer, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the corner of Lot 526, Renfrew District, thence south about 70 chains to
the N. W. corner of Clavore Indian Reserve; thence East 60 chains; thence N.
to shore of Nitinat Lake; thence following shore of Lake Westerly to point
of commencement, containing 250 acres
more or less.
Dated  Feb.   18,   1911.
mar 18 W. DAWSON McGREGOR.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range III
TAKE notice that Lewis Hind of Victoria, B.C., occupation Mining Engineer,
intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted at or near
the mouth of the Salmon River at its
outlet Into Dean Channel; thence southeasterly and following.the high water
mark to the south-east corner of Arthur Fellow's application to purchase;
thence due west to low water mark;
thence in a north-westerly direction following the low water mark to a point
due west of point of commencement;
thence due east to point of commencement, containing twenty (20) acres,
more or less.
Dated February 28th, 1911.
LEWIS HIND,,
mar IS Angus K. Stuart, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE notice that Norman J. Paxton
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Logger,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about \_
miles north from the head waters of
Millbrook Cove , thence north eighty
chains; thence west eighty chains;
thence south eighty chains; thence
east eighty chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated January 26th, 1911.
NORMAN J.   PAXTON.
mar 25 Frederick A. Smith, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE notice that Eunice Bowen, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation, Accountant, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:
—Commencing at a post planted 3%
miles north and one mile east from
the head waters of Millbrook Cove;
thence east eighty chains; thence north
eighty chains; thence west eighty
chains; thence south eighty chains to
point of commencement, and containing
640 acres more or less.
Dated  January 30th,  1911.
EUNICE BOWEN.
mar 25 Frederick A. Smith, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE notice that Carl Jansen, of
Vancouver, B.C ..occupation Baker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile westerly from the head waters
of Millbrook Cove; thence west eighty
chains or to shore line; thence southerly about eighty chains along shore
line; thence easterly about sixty chains
along shore line; thence north about
eighty chains, more or less, to point
of commencement, and containing 480
acres  more  or  iess.
Dated January 28th, 1911.    ■
CARL JANSEN.
mar 26 Frederick A.  Smith, Agent.
_■.■•.
TRUST COMPANIES
Every Company receiving deposits of
money or carrying on business in the
Province of British Columbia as a Trust
Company, as defined in the "Trust Companies Regulation Act, 1911," is requested to furnish particulars as to the corporate name of the company, and the
name and address of its managing director to the Inspector of Trust Companies, Victoria, in order to receive a
supply of forms to be used in making
the return as provided in section 4 of
said Act.
W. U. RUNNALLS.
Inspector of Trust Companies,
apl 16 may 13
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert,  Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Erick Ulin, ofl
Victoria, B.C., manager of Taylor Mill,)
intends to apply for permission to pur-1
chase the following described lands:—I
Commencing at a post planted north-f
east corner of Section 13, Township 21,1
Range 1, Rupert District; thence Sua
chains west; thence 80 chains northa
thence 80 chains east; thence SO chainsl
south to the point of commencement,!
and containing 640 acres, more or iessT
Dated March  14th,  1911.
ERICK ULIN.
apl 8 John Dalby, AgentJI
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that George Williair.
Hall, of Victoria, B.C., physician, in-l
tends to apply for permission to pur*
chase the following described lands.—I
Commencing at a post planted south-I
east corner of Section 24, Township 2ll
Range 1, Rupert District; thence Sil
chains west; thence 80 chains northl
thence 80 chains east; thence SO chain!
south to the point of commencement
and containing 640 acres, more or lessl
Dated March  14th,  1911. "
GEORGE WILLIAM HALL. ,
aPl 8 John Dalby, Agentl
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Arthur Fellows of
Victoria, B.C., occupation Ship-owner,
intends to apply for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum on the following described lands:—Commencing at
a post planted about one-half mile
south of the East branch of Coal Creek
and about four miles south of Long
Lake (Tal-a-Reazi) Creek, a tributary
of the Salmon . River, therice south
eighty chains; thence west 'eighty
chains; thence north eighty chains;
thence east eighty chains and containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated February 13th, 1911.
ARTHUR FELLOWS,
apl 15 Frank Hallett, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Albert Edward
Christie, ot Victoria, B.C., occupation
Banker, intenas to apply for a license
to prospect) for coal and petroleum on
the following described lands:—Commencing at> a post planted? about ohte-
half mile south of the East branch of
Coal Creek and about four miles south
ot Long Lake (Tai-a-Reaziv Creek, a
tributary of the Salmon River; thence
East eighty chains; thence south eighty
chains; tiience west eighty chains;
thence north eighty chains and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated February 13th, 1911.
ALBERT EDWARD CHRISTIE,
apl 15 Frank Hallett, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert,  Range  1.
TAKE NOTICE that John Dean, ol
Victoria, B.C., farmer, intends to appl!
for permission to purchase the follow!
ing described lands:—Commencing at f
post planted south-east corner of Sed
tion-25, Township 21, Range 1, Ruped
District; thence 80 chains north; thenci
80 chains west; thence 80 chains soutli
thence 80 chains east to the point (f
commencement, and containing 640 acrel
more or less, (,
Dated March 14th, 1911.
JOHN DEAN,
apl 8 *   D.  Wilkinson, Agenl
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Sayward
TAKE NOTICE that Harold W. Hut
ter, of Hazelmere, occupation Millmal
intends to apply for permission to pui
chase the following described lands:-!
Commencing at a post planted at tl
southwest corner of Lot 501, Saywal
District, Province of British Columbil
thence north 26 chains; thence west
chains; south 26 chains; thence east
chains to point of commencing.
Dated February 10th, 1911.
mar 4 HAROLD WARE HUNTER.!
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Maude Harris, ,
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Sales Lad
intends to apply for permission to p{(
chase the following described lands}
Commencing at a post planted aboutL
miles north of Alcatcho Indian Resell
on Bella Coola trail, and marked M. if
S.W. cor.; thence north 80 chains; el
80 chains; south 80 chains; west f
chains to point of commencement, ccj
taining 640 acres more or less.
Dated   Jan.   4,   1911.
MAUDE HARRIS,
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agd
RESERVE
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE notice that Thomas Clyde
Paxton, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Logger, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 1% miles north from
head waters of Millbrook Cove; thence
north eighty chains; thence east eighty
chains; thence south eighty chains;
thence west eighty chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640 acres
more or less.
Dated January 26th, 1911.
THOMAS C. PAXTON.
mar 25 Frederick A. Smith, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that all vacant Crown lands not already under
reserve, situated within the boundaries
of the Land Recording Districts of
Cariboo and Lillooet, and the Kamloops Division of Yale Land Recording i
District, are reserved from any alienation under the "Land Act" except by
pre-emption.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Vietoria, B.C., April 3rd, 1911.
may 6
CANCELLATION  OF  RESERVE
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE notice that Donald McGregor,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Grocer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about 2%
miles northerly from the head waters
of Millbrook Cove; thence north eighty
chains; thence west about five chains
to shore line; thence south-westerly
along shore line about eighty chains;
thence south about twenty chains;
thenae east eighty chains to point of
commencement and containing 320 acres
more or less.
Dated January 26th, 1911.
donald McGregor.
mar 25 Frederick A. Smith, Agent.
NOTICE Is hereby given that the reserve existing by reason of the notice
published in the British Columbia Gazette of the 27th of December, 1907,
over Lot 1899, Group 1, Kootenay District, being the survey of Timber Licence No. 32654, is cancelled in so far
as it relates to that portion of the
said Lot, lying south of the line of
the Crow's Nest Southern Railway
Company's rights of way, containing
approximately 13.67 acres, in order that
a sale of the said land may be affected to the Adolph Lumber Company.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. 0„
3rd February, 1911.
may 6
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE notice that Lydia Speddlng, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Married
Woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a ,io.-it plnnted
20 chains north from the head waters
of Millbrook Cove, thence east eighty
chains; thence north eighty chains;
thence west eighty chains; tnence south
eighty chains to point of (•ommencement, and containing f>40 acres, more
or less.
Dated January 26th,  1911.
LYDIA SPEDDING.
mar 26 Frederick A.  Smith, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Helen Elizabeth
Hunter, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Clerk, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 3 mlles south of the southeast
corner of Lot 385, and marked H. E.
H.s N.E. Cor.; thence south 80 chains;
west 80 chains; north 80 chains; east
80 chains to point of commencement,
containing 640 acres,  more or less.
Dated Dec.  29th,  1910.
HELEN   ELIZABETH   HUNTER,
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that John Lynn Davidson, of Victoria, occupation Broker, intends to apply for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum on the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about half a mile
south-w.est of the south branch of Coal
Creek and about six miies south of
Long Lake (Tai-a-Reazi Creek, a tributary of the Salmon River; thence north
eighty chains; thence west eighty
chains; thence south eighty chains;
tnence east eighty chains and containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated February 13th, 1911.
L. DAVIDSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Cowichan
TAKE, NOTICE   that   Gilbert   Jar,
'Mouat,   Jane   Mouat   and   William I
Mouat, of Ganges, B.C., occupation Bu
ness   Proprietors*   intend   to  apply I
permission   ttf purchase   the   followl
described lands, viz.:—a small island!
Jlanges Harbour, adjoining section
sange four, East Salt Spring Island, .
tant about 130 yards southerly from _
Government wharf.    Commencing al
Tost planted on the shore line at I
most   northerly   point   of   said   islar
>hence foil-Swing the shore line eastd
and  southerly   a   distance   of   200   i
more or less to the most easterly pd
of the said island; thence southerly
westerly following the shore line a
tance of  200  feet  more  or less  to ,
most southerly point of the said islai
thence northerly and westerly follov'
the  shore  line  a  distance  of  200   <■
more or less to the most southerly pi
of the said islahd; thence northerly
westerly following the shore line a
tance of 200 feet more or less to .
most westerly point of the said isld
thence northerly and easterly a dista
of 200 feet more or less to the poinl
commencement,   said   island   contaiJ
one-half acre, more or less.
Dated January 28th, 1911.
G. J. MOUAT,
JANE MOUAT,
WILLIAM MANSON MOUAl
mar 4
apl 15 Frank Hallett, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Charley Arthur
Rae, of Victoria, occupation Agent, intends to apply for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum on the
following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about one mile southwest of the South Fork of Coal Creek
and about five miles south of Long
Lake (Tal-a-Reazi) Creek, a tributary of
the Salmon River, thence north eighty
chains, thence west eighty chains;
thence south eighty chains; thence east
eighty chains and containing 640 acres
more or less.
Dated February 14th, 1911.
CHARLEY ARTHUR RAE.
apl 15 Frank Hallett, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that May Brady Prod-
ger, of Grass Valley, Cal., occupation
Married Woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands: — Commencing at a
post planted about 5 miles south from
Catcho Lake on the Bella Coola winter
trail, and marked M. B. P.'s N. E. Cor;
thence west SO chains; south 40 chains;
east 80 chains; north 40 chains to point
of commencement, containing 320 acres,
more or less.
Dated  Jan.   4,  1911.
MAY BRADY PRODGER.
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
Notice is hereby given that the reserve existing by reason of the notice
published In the British Columbia
Gazette of the 27th December, 1907,
over lands situated on one of the
Islands ln the Pearce Group of Islands,
Rupert District, formerly covered by
Timber Licence No. 27806, is cancelled
and that the said lands will be open
to location by pre-emption only, after
midnight on July 13th, 1911.
ROBT. A.  RENWICK,
Deputy  Minister  of  Lands.,
Lands   Department,   Victoria,    B.   C,
April 10th, 1911.
apl 15 july 15
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3    ,
TAKE notice that Walter • Scott 1
Lellan, of Vancouver, occupation Ml
intends to apply for permission to I
chase the following described lancl
Commencing at a post planted at!
northwest corner of Lot 387, and ir
ed W. S. McL.'s N. E. Cor.; thence ,
80 chains; south 40 chains; easl
Chains; north 40 chains to poinl
commencement, containing 320
more or less.
Dated  Dec.  28th,  1910.
WALTER  SCOTT  McLELLAX
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Al
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT '
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that John Cyr, of i
couver, occupation Lumberman, lna
to apply for permission to purchas-J
following described lands:—Comnf
lng at a post planted at the nortM
corner of Lot 385, and marked J.I
N. W. Cor.; thence east 80 chi
south 80 chains; west 80 chains; {
SO chains to point of commence!
containing 640 acres, more or lessl
Dated Dec.  29th,  1910.
JOHN  CYR.
maris Norman McMillan, Al
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT I
District of Coast, Range 3   1
TAKE notice that Margaret Elizil
Lloyd, of Vancouver, B.C., occupl
Sales Clerk, intends to apply fori
mission to purchase the following
scribed lands:—Commencing at a I
planted about 3 miles south oi
southeast corner of Lot 385, and il
ed M. E. L.'s S.E. Cor.; thence wei
chains; north 80 chains; east 80 clf
south 80 chains to point of comm
ment, containing 640 acres more or
Dated Dec.  29th,  1910.
MARGARET ELIZABETH LLC
mar 18 Norman McMillan,
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT!
District of Coast, Range Three
TAKE NOTICE that I, Henry
ton Hanington,  of Victoria, B.C.,
pation  Barrister,  intends  to  appli
permission to purchase the followirl
scribed  lands:—Commencing at al
planted at the south-east corner ol
Thirteen  (13),  Kimsqult Dean Chit
thence   east  forty   (40)   chains,   tl
south twenty (20) chains, more orf
to the north bank of.the Salmon
thence following the north bank
Salmon   River  in  a  westerly   dirl
forty (40) chains, more or less, tl
north  to point of commencement!
containing eighty   (80)   acres  mol
ss.
Dated January 27th, 1911.
HENRY CARLETON HANINGTl
mar 11 Frank Hallett,
■ ■>,.,,., . .__.
-.V...* —i."   ■__*-':!_*. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 29, 1911.
15
IMUSIC AND THE STAGE1
(Continued from Page 3)
jshortly after the rise of the curtain
and becomes the butt of the jokes of
the dandy colored folk, and is induced finally by the president of the
club to drink a certain beverage called Dream Water under the promise
that if he does so all his dreams will
pome true. The curtain goes down
this act as the comedian drifts off
Into slumberland amid the singing of
popular songs by the other members
If the company. The second part of
[he show instead of consisting of time
Ivorn vaudeville is a continuation of
lhe first part and the whole is fin-
Illy brought to a conclusion in a logi-
lal manner. Of course, many of the
features of a minstrel show are refined and Dockstader will have many
lew jokes to tell and has several
Jilking songs to offer his patrons.
k will be remembered that in.all of
lie Dockstader entertainments, the
Jjmedian strives to take advantage of
lie latest inventions. At one time
then it was a novelty he made his
litrance in an automobile, then it was
li airship, and now he has one of
fe latest types of aeroplanes in which
sails over the heads of the aud-
Ince and from which he delivers his
|onologue. During the progress of
show, several travesties are in-
aduced, one of them being on the
|mic opera, "Pinafore."
The Allen Players
iMany Victoria theatre-goers will
lnember the excellent stock com-
Iny  which  paid  a  protracted  visit
portray "Katisha," and has successfully played that part many times in
England. "Yum Yum," by Miss Ruth
Cordingly, "Pitti Sing," by Miss Luvia
Ford and "Peep Bo" by Miss May
Chester, the trio of Three Little
Maids. Mr. Gavin Davis will sing
the tenor role "Nanki Poo." Mr.
George Taschereau the baritone
"Pooh Bah." George Chaffery the
bass "Pish Tush," and Carl Kenning
the titl erole, "The Mikado."
Alick Lauder
When Alick Lauder, the famous
comedian and his company come to
Vicoria on May 8th, there is no question but that they will be greeted by
one of the largest audiences that ever
assembled in the city. Alick Lauder
is not working on the fame of his
world-renowned brother, Harry, for
in the Old Country, the people are
quite as enthusiastic over the young
brother as they are over Harry. Alick
has been singing in all the principle
music halls in Europe, and has met
with ovations in each and every appearance. The only disadvantage
Alick has compared with Harry, is
the fact that the latter has the reputation. When this celebrated
comedian comes to Victoria, he will
no doubt be given a right royal welcome by his fellow countrymen, as
well as the people of all nationalities.
The Lily
"The Lily," David Belasco's dramatic sensation of last season, will
be the attraction at the Victoria
Theatre soon, from Mr. Belasco's own
theatre, New York, with Nance
O'Neil, Charles Cartwright and the
famous Belasco company.
A  Big  Advertisement  for  Canadian
Towns
Not in the hiscory of art is there
any record of the realization of such
a magnificent conception as the Musical Festival of Empire which is about
to be carried out by the famous Sheffield Choir. To get together an organization of 200 of the picked singers of Great Britain, and to take them
on a six months' tour of the Empire
to give their brethren beyond the
seas an opportunity of hearing absolutely the best choral singing that
the Empire can produce, is an undertaking that is Imperialistic in the
truest sense of that term. In cementing the bonds of Empire, as well as
in fostering the growth in new communities of one of the noblest of the
fine arts, it is ar. enterprise that is
bound to have far-reaching results.
But there is another side to this
enterprise which must not be overlooked. This great choir of 200 individuals, composed of men and
women of the highest social, business
and professional rank, will form the
greatest deputation that England has
ever sent around her Empire, and it
goes without saying that the members will not only give keen enjoyment to those fortunate enough to
attend their performances, but will
themselves be spying out the land and
its opportunities for themselves and
for hosts of relatives and friends at
home.
They will have much to tell about
the places they visit when they get
home, and many who are thinking of
going abroad for tours or for permanent settlement, will seek their advice.
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i
THE "THREE LITTLE MAIDS"
|ss Luvia Ford, Miss Ruth Cordingly and Miss May Chester, appearing in "The. Mikado" to be presented at
The Victoria Theatre, Saturday, May 6th, by The Vancouver Amateur Operatic Society.
I last year and won many tributes
Iheir good all-round acting. It
[therefore be good news to pat-
lto learn that the Allen Company
[eturning to Victoria towards the
lof May to fulfil a five or six
|s' engagement. It is understood
|an even better and bigger com-
than the last one may be ex-
I'-d.
Vancouver Amateur Operatic
Society
: big amateur musical event of
(season will be the appearance of
I Vancouver    Amateur    Operatic
Ity at the Victoria Theatre Sat-
]', May 6th, when the most suc-
|il of Gilbert & Sullivan's operas,
Mikado," will be presented.    It
nitted by the musical world to
oattern on whicii all comic opera
le modelled.    Certain it is "The
|io" has never been excelled  in
for  although   twenty  yearsi
ne by since its inception, it is
I attracting more attention  than
|ither musical offering before the
The revival at the New York
|o Theatre has had a most suc-
run of several months.    The
f  principals  include  some   of
est talent in Vancouver.   Alfred
[ing,  who  has   charge   of   the
will also be seen in the role of
|Co."   Madame Ada Bennett will
"The Lily" is a play in four acts
adapated from the French of Pierre
Wolff and Gaston Leroux, by Mr.
Belasco, and is said to be a gem of
dramatic literature that will endure
for many years as it is a play of ideas
as well as drama. The scenic embellishments are pronounced to be
upon the same scale of stability and
effectiveness that characterizes all of
Mr. Belasco's presentations.
Albert Chevalier
Albert Chevalier will open his first
tour of Western Canada at the Walker Theatre, Winnipeg, on May 22nd.
Chevalier needs no introduction to the
public. His name and character
creations are household words. Who
does not know and love the "Future
Mrs. 'Awkins," "My Old Dutch," "The
Little Nipper," and scores of others
too numerous to mention. Foremost
among English-speaking character
actors, incomparable as a delineator
of coster and cockney types, Chevalier occupies a position peculiarly and
positively his own and without parallel on the stage. Chevalier's con-!
cert repertoire will embrace a number
of new impersonations and will, ofl
course, include the old favourites
which Jiis art has made world famous.
Chevalier's Canadian tour is limited
to four weeks owing to his European
engagements.
Further, it is certain that their letters
home detailing their experiences will
be largely published in the daily press
of the country, for Great Britain is
keenly interested in this great Empire
tour. All these considerations make
it important that when the choir visits
Victoria in May the members should
be enabled to get a good impression
nf thc place, of the prosoeritv of its
inhabitants, and of the desirability of
Victoria as a place in which to live.
To those communities who rise to
their opportunities the visit of the
Sheffield Choir is going'to mean the
biggest advertisement it has ever received.
ONE NIGHT—MONDAY, MAY lst
ONE NIGHT
Lew Dockstader
The World's most famous Burnt-Cork
Comedian
AND HIS 20TH CENTURY
MINSTRELS
A great company of singers, dancers
and comedians.
Watch for the big Street Parade at {
5 p. m. on "Minstrel Day."
Prices:—25c, 50c ,75c, $1.00 and $1.50.
Robinson & Andrews
Ladies' Wash Suits
Stylish Suits of white or sky Indian Head, coat with blue collar trimmed with braid.   Skirts made in neat, plain styles.
Special Value, $5.00
We are also showing a large range of Wash Dresses and Skirts
which, at our cash prices, save you money.
Extraordinary Price For
New Window Draperies
500 Yards of Window Drapery, Muslin, stylish patterns and
colorings, in floral and scroll designs, 36m. wide.
SPECIAL PRICE, 8y2c A YARD
Robinson & Andrews
The Cash Dry Goods Store.
642-644 Yates Street. Phones 656-657.
SPRING
ILLS
April often finds the best of
us "run down", listless and out
of sorts from the effects of
heavy foods during the winter.
If you are experiencing the
usual Spring Fever
Bowes'
Blood
Purifier
will relieve you and put you
squarely on your feet. It will
cleanse your bad blood, correct
your appetite, banish your headache and improve your general
appearance. $1 bottle; sold
here only.
Cyrus H. Bowes
Chemist
1228 Government Street
Tels. 425 and 450.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice tliat Charles George
Phlnney, of Vancouver, occupation
Shipper, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 5 miles in a northerly direction from tlie Abuntlep crossing on
Salmon River, on Bella Coola winter
trail, and marked C. G. P.'s N. W. Cor.;
thence east SO chains; south SO chains;
west SO chains; north SO chains to
point of commencement, containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated  Jan.   2,   Jilll.
CHARLES GEORGE PHINNEY.
mar 18 Norman  McMillan, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE   notice   that   Olive  Altchlnson,
of Vancouver,    B.C..    occupation    Sales
Clerk,  Intends  to  apply  for  permission
to    purchase   the   following    describe.'
lands:—Commencing at  a  post planted
about 2 miles north of Alcatcho Indian
Reserve, on Bella Coola trail, and marked C. A.'s  S.  E.  Cor.;  thence north  80
i chains; west 80 chains; south 80 chains;
[ east  80  chains  to  point  of  commence-
| ment,  containing    040    acres,    more or
less.
Dated Jan.  4 th,  1911.
OLIVE AITCHINSON.
mar 1S Norman McMillan. Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Albert William
Aim, of San Francisco, Cal., occupation
Plumber, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing nt a post planted at the northeast corner of Lot 318,
and marked A. W. A.'s N. W. cor.;
thence east 40 chains; south 80 chains;
west 40 chains; north SO chains to point
of commencement, containing 320 acres
more or less.
Dated  Jan.   2,   1911.
ALBERT WILLIAM ALM.
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent. 16
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 29, 1911.
THE LIBERTY OF THE SUBJECT
Enquiry by the Board of Police Commissioners into the arrest and detention of ont
Bronsen Singh, at the Police Lock-up on 21st March, 1911.   Held in the
City Police Court on Monday, 24th April, 1911, at 3 p.m.
Present: His Worship, the Mayor,
Chairman; Aid. Fullerton and A. G.
Sargison, Esq., Commissioners. Mr.
Harrison was also present.
Sanda Singh was duly sworn as Interpreter.
BRONSEN SINGH, having been
duly sworn, through his interpreter,
was examined by Mr. Harrison, and
testified as follows:
Q.    What is his name?
A.    Bronsen Singh.
Q.   Where does he work?
A.    He is not working now.
Q.    Where  does  he live?
A. He lives in Chinatown, in one
of these streets.
Q. Does he recollect March last
about the 21st?
A. He was put in prison on March
21st.
Q. Ask him how that came about
when he was put in prison?
A. He was working for Messrs.
Kirk.
Q.    In what capacity?
A. Putting sacks on wagons, filling sacks and putting them on the
wagon.
Q. Who did he work with, Lehman?
A.   Yes.
Q. And Lehman was charged then
with theft?
A.   He does not know.
Q. He was charged with the offence of stealing coal?
A.    Hc does not know.
Q. Did he come in court on the
22nd or 23rd March?
A. The day before the 22nd he
was locked up and came to this court
twice and no one asked about him,
and he went away.
Q. Who was charged in this court,
a man named Lehman?
A. Yes; he was charged with theft
—that is what he understood.
Q.   Theft of coal?
A.   Yes.
Q. On the same wagon as he
drove?
A. Sometimes he was with him
and other times with another man.
Q. What time of day was he taken
in charge, and where did the officer
meet him?
A. He was arrested about 12 o'clock
noon.
Q. Where did he take .vitness in
charge?
A. He brought him to the police
station.
Q.   Where did he find witness?
A. He was working at Messrs.
Kirk's office.
Q. And how long was hc in the
police station?
A. He was kept till 5 o'clock, and
they let him out.
Q. What police officer took him
in charge?
A. That man (pointing to Detective  Heather.
Q. Do you know the English language?    Can you speak it?
A. He says he does not speak
much English.
Q. He was in thc police office from
12 to 5?
A.   Yes.
Q. What happened in thc police
office?
A. They asked him some questions,
but he did not understand.
Q.    Who asked him the questions?
A. There was another gentleman
present  with  him.
Q. And hc did not understand the
questions and  hc could not  answer?
A. Yes; hc did not understand and
so he could not answer.
Q. How did he come to lay this
complaint about his arrest and detention in the police office?
A. Hc says he was ignorant and
he asked some of his friends and
they said that he was put under false
arrest.
Q. Did the man Lehman tell him
to lay this?
A.    Yes; he also told him.
Q. Mr. Lehman is pretty hot at
Mr. Kirk, is he not?
A.    Yes; they had a case.
Q. And what did Mt. Lehman say
to this man when he told him to lay
the charge?
A. He says you better put it in the
newspaper, and he went with Lehman
and put it in the newspaper.
Q. Has he suffered any damage
from being in the police office?
Al Hc says that after being put
in court the other fellows are not
treating him with the same respect
as they used to do. He has lost
caste with them.
Q. He was not charged with any
crime, was he?
A. There was no wrong with him,
he was innocent.
Q.   And he was not tried?
A. He does not know whether he
was tried or not.
Q. And he was only there for
the purpose of being questioned as
to what he knew about Lehman?
A. He says that they asked him
sundry questions, but he did not know
what they were.
Q. Ask him if he knows Mr. Blakemore?
A.    Yes; he knows him.
Q.   Did he ever go to his office?
A. He says he went to his office
on  that day about newspaper.
Q. Who went with him to Mr.
Blakemore's office?
A. He was locked up again another
night at half past eight and another
Hindu was witness.
Q. Who was with him when he
went to Mr.  Blakemore's office?
A. There was another white man
with him.
Q.    What  was his name?
A. He was known by the name
of Gus.
Q.   Where does he live?
A. He does not know where he
lives.
Q*
man?
A.
Q. When he was brought in there
where was he put—when he was
brought into the police station?
A.    Put in the lock-up.
Q. He says he was arrested again?
When was that?
A.   Sometime last month.
Q. How long after he had been
let go at 5 o'clock?
A. About four days after the first
arrest.
Q. What time of day was he taken
in then?
A. About half past eight in the
evening.
Q.   Where was he taken in charge?
A. He was sleeping in bed when
hc was taken.
Q.   And who else was in the room?
A. Another Hindu that lives with
him.
Q. What is thc name of the other
Hindu?
A.    Indar Singh.
Q.   Where is he now?
A.   With thc B. C. Electric Co.
Q.    Hc is working there now?
A.    Yes.
Q. When hc went to Mr. Blakemore's office who acted as interpreter?
A. That other Hindu; he understands a little English.
Q.   What Hindu is that?
A.    Indar Singh.
Q. Who went to Mr. Blakemore's
office? This man—Indar Singh—Mr.
Lehman, and thc witness? And who
else?
A.   Yes.
Q. And Indar Singh acted as interpreter?
And  his other  name  is  Leh-
Ycs.
A. Yes; he knew a little English
and he expressed it.
Q. Does he know as much English  as  the witness  does?
A.   A little more.
A. And the witness does not know
enough English to speak it?
A. He knows very, very little English.
Q. Did he read over this statement
before he put his name at the bottom?
A. He says he was told to sign it
and how could he make it out.
Q.   Who told you to sign that?
A. The newspaper man told him
to sign it.
Q. Which man? This man (pointing to Mr. Blakemore)?
A.   Yes.
Q. And was that all read over to
him? Read over and explained to
him?
A. He says he did not know anything at all.
Q. The second time you were taken
in charge, when were you let out?
Q. The next morning about ten
o'clock he was let out.
Q. And did the Police Officer
(Heather) use any bad language to
him?
A. That night when he was arrested he used bad language and the
other Hindu asked him not to use
bad language.
Q.    Who said that?
A. The other Hindu asked the
policeman not to use bad language.
Q. Was young Mr. Kirk with this
officer when these words were spoken
he has referred to?
A. Yes. This gentleman (Mr.
Kirk) went to his house first and
then he brought a policeman.
Q. And the time that the lauguage
was used, was young Kirk there?
A.    Yes.
Q.    What was that language?
A. "God damn you," and some
other language. The other Hindu
told him that.
Q. And he only knows what the
other Hindu told him?
A. He understands "God damn"
perfectly well.
Q. Did he understand anything
else?
A. He says that since coming to
this country he has learned so much
in this western civilization.
Q. Did hc understand anything
else?
A.
thing
Q*
They have not qicked up any-
else—that is all.
Did hc hear any more language
besides that?
A. He may have been abusing him,
but he does not know.
Q. And your feelings were not hurt
if you did not know what is was?
A.    This policeman was very hot. j
Q. Did the other Hindu tell you
to say that?
A.    He could see the way hc talk-1
ed that this man was in a temper.
Q.    Did the other Hindu tell him 1
to give this language "God damn?"  |
A.   The other Hindu told him that |
hc had no right to use bad language;
if he wanted him he could take him
to thc lock-up.
Q. And when he went to The
Week office did thc other Hindu tell
him what thc language was?
A.    Hc went himself to tbe newspaper office and he took that  other I
Hindu  to  explain  the things  to  the
paper.
Q. Where is thc other Hindu working now?
A.   Hc works on the car.
Tn thc railroad tracks on thc
street?
A. Hc works on the car; he docs
not know whereabouts.
Q. Did you get any money from
Mr. Lehman?
A.    Nothing.
Q.    Has he got any promise?
A.    Nothing of the kind from him.
Q. Did Lehman take you in and
gin you up good afterwards? You
know what I mean?
A. No; he did not take him anywhere.
POONAH SINGH ( having been
duly eworn through the interpreter,
was examined by Mr. Harrison, and
testified as follows:
Q.    What is your full name?
A.    Poonah Singh.
Q.   Where do you live?
A.    Bridge Street.
Q.   What do you do for a living?
A.    Work in coal office.
Q.    Mr. Kirk's coal office?
A.   Yes.
Q. And the last Hindu, he worked
there, too?
A.   Yes; he used to work there.
Q. And the man Lehman used to
work there, too?
A.   Yes.
Q. Does he know whether or not
Lehman and the last Hindu were out
on the coal wagon together?
A.   Yes; they used to.
Q. Does he know of his own
knowledge whether Lehman has offered him  (Bronsen  Singh)   money?
A.   He does not know at all.
Q. Does he recollect having a talk
with the police at the time Lehman
was being tried?
A.   He does not recollect.
Q. Did he have a talk with this
officer here (Mr. Heather)?
A. Yes; he told him of a certain
place.
Q.   What did he tell Mr. Heather?
A. This policeman he asked him
where this Lehman had thrown away
some coal, and he showed him that
place.
Q. And did hc say that he thought
that this man—Bronsen—was getting
money from Lehman?
A. He does not know anything at
all; he does not recollect.
Q. He does not recollect whether
he told the officer—Mr. Heather—
tiiat Lehman was giving Bronsen
money?
A. He says that sometimes there
was a talk that Lehman used to take
him (Bronsen Singh) to the gin shop
and stand him some drinks.
Q. And he would be on some of
thc wagons from which coal was alleged to be stolen?
A.   Yes.
VICTOR HEATHER, having been
duly sworn, was examined by Mr.
Harrison, and testified as follows:
Q.   What is your full name?
A.    Victor Heather.
Q. You are a detective of the Victoria City Police Force?
A.    Yes.
Q. Do you recollect March 24th
last?
A.    1 do.
Q. Did you have occasion to take
Bronsen Singh in charge?
A.   Yes.
Q. When, and under what circumstances?
A. Mr. Kirk had reported to us
that a driver that was then employed
by him was stealing coal from him.
Stealing it in this way, that hc would
take for instance a half ton or a ton
of coal out to an order and he would
tell the people to whom the order
was directed that he was one or two
sacks short, but he would leave it
at another time, and he would sell
these one or two sacks, and some time
after make it up. I interviewed a
woman, and she told me that Lehman
had delivered half a ton of coal and
after putting it in her coal bin, he
asked her if she would buy another
sack, and he said that thc driver always  got  the  last  sack.    She  gave
evidence to that effect. Afterwards
interviewed the driver who was sa
to be continually with Lehman, ar
1 asked him if he had been with hi
when he left any extra sacks of co
over what he was to deliver. i
would not say a word.
Q. Where did that conversati(
take place?
A.   At Kirk's factory.
Q.    What happened then?
A. Taking into consideration tl
he would not talk ahd Mr. Kirk tc
me that he could speak good Engli:
it was only reasonable to suppose tl
he was an accomplice.
Q.   What happened then?
A. I brought him to the lock--
and had him in the office for over
hour and asked him questions, ;
he simply would not talk—he wo
just shake his head and say
savey." We made an endeavor to
Mr. Moore, the interpreter, but co
not get him.
Q.   What happened then?
A.    I  told  Sergeant of Detecti
O'Leary we could not get an in
preter, and he advised to let him
that we could pick him up agaii]
we wanted him.   He was let go a
five o'clock.
Q.   What happened after that?
A. He was brought in on a sei
occasion. Thc night he was bro
in Mr. Higgins telephoned to mi
my house, and he said that he
received information that this H
was going away.
Q. What did you do inconseque
A. I came down and met Mr.
and he told me where this Hindu
to   be   found.    I   met   Mr.   Kirkj
Government    Street,   and   we
down  to where the  Hindu was
before I brought hi,a up I mad'
remark to Mr. Kirk, "I will givej
man another chance and see if h
talk English."   He was under a Clj
man's store on Cormorant Street.'
was  sitting  in  his  bed  and  anq
Hindu was in bed.   1 told him tli
wanted to talk to him and I told;
that I did not want him to say
he knew anything about Lehm;
he did not, but if he did know t
so, and if he knew and would nol
so I told him that he would no
any sympathy or mercy from me
other Hindu came and butted iij
I told him not to interfere.
Q.    Who was present?
A.    Mr. Kirk, junior.
Q.   What was the reason tha|
took him in charge?
A.    I had every reason to bj
that he was an  accomplice  of
man's and  that he knew whcrl
wood was sold.
To Mr. Sargison:
Q.    It was proved that Lehm;
sell a sack of coal and collected
A.   Yes.
MR.    HARRISON'S    exami:
continued:
Q.   Where did you take thc m
A.   The lock-up.
Q.   What time was that?
A. Between ten and eleven,
him in then and tried then to
interpreter and could not get on
not being able to get one, I re;
to Mr. O'Leary, and he said th
Higgins had been ringing him tj
he said we better keep him t
court next morning.
Q.   Did you ever have any c
sation with the other Hindu?
A.    Poonah Singh?
Yes.
Yes; at Kirk's factory,
What was that conversati
I cannot recollect it wol
Q-
A.
Q*
'   A.
word.
Q*
A.
What was the substance!
I tried to get from him ifl
sen Singh
anything aboul
(Continued  on  Page  17.) j THE WEEK, SATUKDAY, APEIL 29, 1911.
17
rHE LIBERTY OF THE SUBJECT
an and knew where he left coal,
|d he said he was sure he knew, and
said that Bronsen could talk good
liglish if he wanted to.
|Q. Did he say anything about
pney passing?
I asked him and he said he did
|t know of his own knowledge, but
must have given hirn some or he
[mid some said something.
In consequence of the message
leived from Mr. Higgins and in con-
Iiuence of the conversation you had
Ith the second Hindu as to the re-
lionship between Bronsen Singh and
Ihman—was   it   in   consequence  of
lit that you took him in charge?
IV   Yes, and the way he appeared
me.    I absolutely deny using bad
jiguage.   I did tell the other Hindu
[keep his damned mouth shut.
IR. BLAKEMORE asked the pri-
pge to ask the witness some ques-
|ns.    The   commissioners   granted
|ve.
To Mr. Blakemore:
|3.   Was it entirely because he be-
Ted that this man was an accom-
fce that he locked him up?
|A.   Yes.
At any time did Mr. Kirk lay
|information against Bronsen Singh,
I stealing?
No.
I}.   And you locked him up on your
responsibility?
Yes.   Mr. Kirk said that if Leh-
In was stealing coal Bronsen must
[iw something about it, and he said
can use your own judgment.
Mr.  Kirk laid an information
linst Lehman?
Yes.
And in spite of that you, on
|r own suspicions would lock Bron-
Singh up twice?
Yes.
IIR.  SARGISON:   No doubt Mr.
Rther would have a much stronger
Ipicion than Mr. Kirk would have.
fR. BLAKEMORE: My only rea-
for taking an interest in the case
hat it occurs to me that the liberty
Jthe subject was endangered—that
Ian should be locked up twice when
, case was before the court,
/itness: The day before his second
|<st, Mr. Higgins telephoned to me
he  (the  Hindu)  was  going to
te the town.
|o the Mayor:
How long before the trial took
|e was this last arrest made?
On the evening of the day pre-
is to trial.
The man was not molested affile trial?
No.
|r. Harrison:  I have Mr. Higgins
and the two Kirks; but it seems
pss to go further.
Mr,    Blakemore:     Mr.    Harrison
lis to throw doubt as to the man-
pn which the statement was made.
_s read and re-read before the
Jment was  signed.     Mr.   Gould
vs that perfectly well.
Ir, Heather (to Mr. Blakemore):
Did  the  other  Hindu  under-
[d English?
Yes, quite good, I think. I did
find that this man (Bronsen
lh) could understand any.
JEONARD McLEOD GOULD,
|ng been duly sworn, was exam-
as follows:
the Mayor:
What is your position in Mr.
|:emore's office?
Secretary to the company.
And under what circumstances
you make out this statement that
tfore the court?
The opening paragraph was
[lted by Mr. Blakemore; the fol-
|ng statment by questions.
How about the remaining part?
Each   separate   sentence    the
ttion was asked thc Hindu.
Who asked thc questions?
Mr.   islakcmore,  through   the
I'preter, then thc interpreter would
it  to  Mr.  Blakemore and  Mr.
Icmore would' give it to me.
Then Mr. Blakemore worked
J up with the assistance of the in -
|retcr? Mr. Blakemore succeeded
the assistance of the interpreter
letting this?
A. I would not say that. Mr.
Blakemore acted in the same manner
as a lawyer would in- court, just the
same way as Mr. Harrison has been
doing now.
Q. Neither of these Hindus volunteered this information to Mr.
Blakemore?
A. To begin with, Mr. Blakemore
asked Indar Singh what he could say
about this matter.
Q. What did the Hindu say in reply?
A. Indar Singh replied that this
man Bronsen Singh can not talk English and I can talk a little, he was
locked by the police and if you will
ask questions by me he will answer
them.
Q.   Did the Hindu ask questions?
A. I believe Indar Singh turned
round and asked him what he had to
say and he said what he had to say.
There were no leading questions asked.
Q. Did Mr. Blakemore on the
strength of something he had heard
ask either of these Hindus whether
such statements were right, or were
the statements made voluntarily?
A.   They were made voluntarily.
To Mr. Harrison:
Q.    Was  Lehman present?
A.   Yes.
Q.   And did he make any remarks?
A.   Well, yes, he did.
Q. Did he suggest any of these
answers? Did he give any of the
answers to the Hindus?
A. Nothing of what Lehman said
was put down in the written statement.
y.   What did Lehman say?
A.   He kept on butting in.
Mr. Higgins requested permission
to ask the witness some questions.
Permission granted.
By Mr. Higgins:
Q. Mr. Blakemore put questions
and the interpreter is supposed to
interpret the questions to Bronsen
Singh?
A.   Yes.
Q. And you put down what the
interpreter told you?
A. Mr. Blakemore would ask the
interpreter and the interpreter would
ask Bronsen Singh and it would come
back.
Q. But you do not know whether
he got it right or not?
A. Of course, I do not know
whether he interpreted rightly.
Q. Did you have any Hindu that
understood Hindu language checking
up the interpreter?
A.   No.
Q. Do you know who sent this man
to your office originally?
A.   Yes; Lehman.
Q. Did any one connected with
the Fairview Greenhouse?
A.   I think Mr. Bridgman.
Q. Did you have a talk with Mr.
Mr. Bridgman?
A. I think Mr. Bridgman had a
talk about it.
Q. And you know there is some
trouble between thc greenhouse people and Mr. Kirk?
A.   Yes; I heard about it.
A. W. KIRK, junior, having been
duly sworn, was examined by Mr.
Harrison, and testified as follows:
Q.   What is your occupation?
A.   Working for Kirk & Co.
Q.   Coal and wood dealers?
A.   Coal dealers.
Q. You had Mr. Lehman in your
employ?
A.   Yes.
Q. And you charged him with
theft of some sacks of coal?
A.   Yes.
Q.   Do you know Mr. Heather?
A.   Yes.
Q. Do you recollect going with
him to certain premises and finding
this Hindu, Bronsen Singh, there?
A.   Yes.
Q.   What took place?
A. I was told he was going to
Vancouver and I thought we better
retain him, and I telephoned M4.
Heather and wc went to a Chinaman's
house and found him and he would
not speak.
Q. How long have you employed
him?
A.   Six months or more.
Q. Have you had occasion to speak
English to him?
A.   Often.
Q.   Could he speak English?
A. Often the driver could not get
off the wagon and he would come in
and I would explain to him where
the coal was going.
Q. What conversation was there
between Heather and Bronsen Singh
A. Heather asked him if he knew
about stealing coal and he would say
"no savey, no savey," and look to the
floor.
Q. Can you say anything about
bad language?
A. He did not use any bad lang
uage. The only thing he told the
other Hindu to mind his own damned
business.
Q. And you swear that he did not
use that language, "God damn you,"
to Bronsen Eingh?
A.   Yes.
Q. And you heard Bronsen Singh
say it was used?
A. It was not used, it is not true,
if I was there.
Q. Did you hear that term, "God
damn you," used?
A.   No, I did not.
WILLIAM BLAKEMORE, having been duly sworn, was examined
and testified as follows:
By the Mayor:
G. Tell the court under what circumstances you took this matter up?
A. Mr. Lehman came to my office
complaining of the treatment he had
received from Kirk & Co., and claimed he was the subject of malicious
persecution, and he said that a Hindu
had been locked up twice to give evidence against him and he said if I
would take the trouble he was willing
to bring him to my office. I said I
would, and on a night I fixed he came
with Bronsen Singh and Indar Singh
—the latter as interpreter.
Q.   Was Mr. Lehman present?
A.   Yes, all the time.
Q. Did he suggest anything as to
the statement?
A. He said very little. He said
sometimes I would rather that you
took the particulars. He butted in
once or twice, as Mr. Gould says. I
tried to get the story first of all from
Bronsen, but his English was so lame
that I could not get a consecutive
story. I had not seen the Hindus
before nor have I seen them since. I
made no suggestions what I did was
sort of cross-examine to bring the
story out. I had not heard their
story before. The way I proceeded
was this: When I found that Bronsen
Singh could not tell his story, I talked
with the interpreter and he would
get the answer of the man, and the
answer was put down, as Mr. Gould
says, and that is the whole story. It
was read and re-read and it was signed thc best way we could get it signed.
Q. Were your sympathies in favour
of Lehman?
A. No, not to Lehman; I did not
know anything about him, but they
were with the Hindu. I did not think
it was the right thing.
Q. Did hc claim to you that he had
been locked up on a charge?
A. No, he said that he had been
locked up and no charge made against
him.
Q. He did not explain that he was
wanted as a witness? You took the
view that he was being sweated?
A.   And take it yet.
To Mr. Sargison:
Q.   Did you see the police?
A.   Yes.
To the Mayor:
Q.    Was hc actually arrested?
A. When a man is taken from his
bed and locked up in the cells, it is
an arrest.
Q. Do you consider that an arrest?
A. I do not know; it is a matter
of law.
THE CHIEF: It is the law that a
man can bc arrested of thc court is
closed and it is not necessary to lay
an information till within 24 hours,
and if thc prosecutor fails to appear
the man is discharged.
Mr. Blakemore: This was done
twice, and he was not called in court.
The Mayor: It is liable to cause injustice to a free citizen, but no worse
than any business man.
Mr. Blakemore: They need not
have locked him in the cells.
Mr. Harrison: They had no other
place to put him.
Mr. Sargison: I think you have
served your purpose, Mr. Blakemore.
The Chief: I may say that the man
was not treated as a prisoner. He was
provided with a bed.
The Mayor: As good probably as
he had before.
Mr. Harrison: The law is quite
clear that a police officer can arrest
any one if he thinks a crime has been
committed. Here he had the circumstance that Mr. Higgins, Mr. Kirk's
solicitor, told him that he was informed that the Hindu was leaving town.
We have to hold men in cases like
that.
THE MAYOR: The Commissioners are of opinion that while it may
have appeared to Mr. Blakemore that
there was some justification in his
looking after the interests of free citizens, on the other hand the officers
must be commended for being active
and bringing to task any who are under suspicion or against whom a
charge is laid. The fact that there
has been short delivery of coal
made the police more active. In
all cases, where possible, it is better to lay a charge; but if we were
to stultify the detective department
we would be to blame. I presume
that Mr. Blakemore took up the matter because he thought that the man
should be protected, and could not
protect himself. That is commendable. I must say that from what we
know of the police officers and from
what I know of Mr. Heather, I think
he would be the last man that I would
accuse of exceeding his duty, and I
think there is no reflection on him.
I think that Mr. Blakemore should
WEEK—TEN
be quite sat;-fied that this matter has
been thoroughly probed and that the
matter has been satisfactorily settled.
Do you think that you have got
out of it all that is necessary, Mr.
Blakemore?
Mr. Blakemore: Yes, I think so.
I do not think there is any reflection
on Mr. Heather, he was simply carrying out the orders of his superiors.
Mr. Harrison: I hope that Mr.
Blakemore will make a retraction in
his paper and state that Mr. Heather
is exonerated.
The Mayor: I think Mr. Blakemore will do that.
The Board then adjourned.
HIGH CLASS FURNITURE
There are sales and sales, but it is
not often that Victoria has an opportunity of attending an auction sale
where high class are furniture of a
recherche character can be obtained.
Mr. Stewart Williams, who seems to
havc a monopoly of sales of this class,
will shortly offer the finest collection
of Sheraton furniture which has been
seen in Victoria for many years. A
catalogue will bc found in the current
issue of the Week and a special line
of cuts is being prepared for the next
issue. These cuts are made from actual photographs made by a local artist; they show individual pieces of
furniture and also the interior of
rooms with the furniture arranged en
suite. It is certain that to see the
pictures will mean to want the furniture and if tlie readers of thc Week
can spare a few dollars from their extensive investments in real estate they
will make no mistake in keeping them
for this sale, whicii will bc in every
sense a classy one.
world-famous tamer of wild animals,
to whom the Duke of Bedford last
month presented the medal of the
Zoological Society in recognition both
to his notable servcices to zoology
and to thc society, whicii has frequently received valuable advice from
him, besides many presents of animals for the gardens.
It is to the kindly nature which
shines out of his eyes that Herr Hag-
enbeck owes the success which has
marked his life. "It is nothing but
kindness that makes animals really
tame," he said on Wednesday. "All
the terrible accidents that used to occur so frequently to trainers and
tamers were due to the fact that the
animals had been cowed and not won
by kindness.
Herr Hagenbeck owns an enor-i
mous private park at Stillengen, £
suburb of Hamburg, where the animals of the world live in surroundings as much like their native haunts
as the art and skill of man can contrive.
Some Prize Howlers
The feminine of 'fox' is 'foxhen.'
John Burns was the name of one of
the claimants to the throne of Scotland
in the reign of Edwnrd I.
Panama is a town of Colombo, where
they are trying to make an isthmus.
The three highest mountains In Scotland are Ben Nevis, Ben Lomond, and
Ben  Jonson.
Tennyson wrote a poem called Grave's
Energy.
The Rump Parliament consisted entirely of Cromwell's stalactites,
The plural of 'spouse' ls 'spice.'
Queen Elizabeth rode a white horse
from Kenilworth through Coventry with
nothing on, and Raleigh offered her his
cloak.
King John was surnamed Blackland
because he died of the Black Death.
'Those melodious bursts that fill the
spacious days of great Elizabeth' refers
to the songs that Queen Elizabeth used
to write in her spaf-e time.
Wolsey saved his life by dying on the
way from York to London.
An interjection is a sudden explosion
of the mind.
Monsoons are fertile gorges between
the Himalayas.
When the English first landed in Australia, the only four-footed animal in
the country was a rat.
Westminster Abbey Coronation Day
(An   anonymous   contribution   to   The
Week).
When thoughts of George and Empire
Shall fill our hearts with pride,
And loyal songs through Britain's Empire ring;
The Best of all our Greatness
Arc standing side by side
To give their homage to our Noble King.
When in that stately Abbey
Are gathered round the Throne,
All those who constitute Great Britain's
Best;
Our pride will be the stronger
To  think that  Dick—our own,
Is he, who stands to represent the West,
Our hearts are In Westminster
Yet New Westminster's son;
The  man  who's  Faced  the Fight and
Stood tho Test,
Is nlso deep enshrined
In hearts of every one
Of us, who know and love him In the
West.
PUBLIC  SERVICE ACT
FAMOUS ANIMAL TAMER
English Honour For Herr Carl '
Hagenbeck
It would hc difficult to imagine a
milder or more benevolent-looking
man thai) Herr Carl Hagenbeck, the
The qualifying examinations for
Third-class Clerks, Junior Clerks, and
Stenographers will be held at the following places, commencing on Monday
the 3rd July next:—Armstrong, Chilliwack, Cumberland, Golden, Grand Forks,
Kamloops, Kaslo, Kelowna, Ladysmith,
Nanaimo, Nelson, New Westminster,
North Vancouver, Peachland, Revelstoke, Rossland, Salmon Arm, Summer-
land,  Vancouver, Vernon,  and Victoria.
Candidates must be British subjects
between tho age of 21 and 30, If for
Third-clasS Clerks; nnd between 10 nnd
21. if for Junior Clerks or Stenographers.
Applications will not be accepted if
received later thnn tho 15th June next.
Further Information, together with
application forms, may bo obtained
from  tho  undersigned.
P. WALKER,
Registrar, Public Service.
Victorin.  B.C.,  27th April,  1911.
apl 29 june 10 18
THE WEEK, SATUEDAY, APEIL 29, 1911.
Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Young have
left on a visit to Portland, Ore.
Miss Wilson, Dnndas, Ont., is the
guest of Mrs. Stamford, Fort Street.
The Misses Hagen, from Saanich,
were visitors in the city during the
week.
Mrs. Pegram, Vancouver, is visiting Mrs. Holmes, Dallas Road, for a
few days. .
Mr. and Mrs. Rooke, from London,
England, are recent visitors to Victoria.
* *   *
The Friday Bridge Cluh met last
week at the residence of Mrs. Flumerfelt, Pemberton Road.
The Misses M. Jones and Johnson,
Vancouver, were guests in Victoria,
for a few days this week.
* *   *
Mrs. George McCurdy, from Vancouver, is the guest of her mother,
Mrs. Heyland.
* *   *
Mrs. Walter Thomas, who has been
visiting in the city for the past month,
left on Monday last for her home in
Field, B.C.
* *   *
Mrs. A. W. Bridgeman and family,
and Mr. E. H. Thornton, left during
the week on an extended visit to the
Old Country.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hunter, who
have been spending a few weeks at
the Oak Bay Hotel, returned during
the week to their home in Spokane.
* *   *
A quiet wedding took place last
week at the home of Mr. and Mrs. J.
A. Coates, when their daughter, Miss
Bessie Marion Coates, was united in
marriage to Mr. Victor Le Roy Smith,
of Long Beach, Cal.
* *   *
Last Friday evening, the Dancing
Club held one of its charming dances
in the Broad Street Hall, which was
prettily decorated with greenery and
flowers for the occasion. Miss Thain's
orchestra played for the evening.
Some of those present were: The
Misses Day, Miss MacDowall, Miss
Daisy MacDowall, Misses Lawson,
Miss Cross, Miss Holden, Miss
Dumbleton, Miss Little, Miss Gilles-
* pie, Miss Gibson, Miss Paula Irving,
Miss Combe, Miss Pooley, Miss
Helmcken, Miss Blackwood, Miss
Blackwood, Miss Veva Blackwood,
Miss McKay, Miss Spalding, Miss
Bridgman, Mr. and Mrs. Brotlierton,
Messrs, Arbuckle, Cambie, Payne,
Twigg, Dr. Hunter, D. Martin,
Dugald Gillespie, A. Pitts, Cane,
Bruce Irving, Robert Wilmot, H. C.
Barnes, Spalding, and many others.
* *   *
On Friday afternoon of last week,
Mrs. Henry Croft and Mrs. J. S. H.
Matson,   were   hostesses   at   "Mount
Adelaide,"  of  a   very   charming   at
home,  given  in  honor  of  Mrs.   McBride, who left this week, accompanied by Premier McBride, on a visit to
England, where they will attend the
coronation.    The   house   was   most
beautifully decorated for the occasion,
the   hall   being   artistically   adorned
with daffodils and greenery, while the
drawing room was daintily decorated
with   quantities   of  pale  pink  carnations,  begonias  and ferns.    The  decorations in the library consisted of
calla lilies, wild lilies and point set-
tias.     Thc   decorations   for   the   tea
tables were very artistic, being carried   out  in   arches   of  dainty  plum
blossoms,   and   masses   of  daffodils.
Miss Thain's orchestra played during
the   afternoon.     Mrs.   McBride   was
gowned in white satin with a hand
some over dress of gold and black
embroidery, and wore a picture hat
with white willow plumes and touches
of the palest pink. Among the many
guests present were: Mrs. McBride,
Mrs. Spratt, Mrs. Griffith, Mrs. W. S.
Gore, Mrs. A. S. Gore, Mrs. C. M.
Roberts, Mrs. Rome, Mrs. Blaiklock,
Mrs. R. R. Jones, Mrs. Thomas Tye,
Mrs. Arthur Jones, Mrs. Engelhard,
Mrs. Luxton. Mrs. McMicking, Mrs.
Beauchamp Tye, Mrs. A. Coles, Miss
Ada Saunders, Mrs. Grainger, Mrs.
Bennett, Mrs. Bodwell, Mrs. Trewartha James, Mrs. Harry Pooley,
Mrs. C. E. Pooley, Miss Pooley, Mrs.
S. Johnson, Mrs. Beresford Hogg,
Mrs. Flerbert Carmichael, Mrs. H. B.
Good, Mrs. Lugrin and the Misses
Lugrin, Miss Scott, Mrs. W. Monteith,
and the Misses Monteith, Miss J.
Devereaux, Mrs. Blackwood and Miss
Blackwood, Mrs. Peters, Mrs. Freeman, Mrs. Stewart, Mrs. Carewe Gibson, Miss Rome, Mrs. P. Lampman,
Mrs. E. G. Prior, Mrs. Harry Helmcken, Mrs. Roy Troup, Mrs. Captain
Troup, Mrs. Wulffsohn, Mrs. George
Matthews, Mrs. Gaudin, Miss Gaudin,
and others. Mrs. Croft received in
a handsome black gown with gold
trimmings, and Mrs. Matson was becomingly gowned in moonlight blue
with oriental embroidery.
* *   *
The marriage of Miss Florence
Helen Leslie Heyland, second daughter of Mrs. Rowley Heyland, of this
city, and Mr. Gerard Annesley Town-
send, bf the upper country, was celebrated last Wednesday afternoon at
Christ Church Cathedral. The Rev.
Wm. Barton officiated at the ceremony. The bride looked charming
in her wedding gown of white satin
with lace trimmings. She wore thc
. conventional bridal veil and a coronet
of orange blossoms, and carried a
shower bouquet. The bride's sister,
Miss Beatrice Heyland, made a very
pretty bridesmaid. She wore a dainty
dress of pink satin with an overdress
of dew drop net, and a tttscan straw
hat with trimmings of pink ribbon
and flowers.
The bride's mother was gowned in
gray silk and hat to match. Mrs.
McNaughton Jones, grandmother to
the bride, wore a handsome black
lace dress, and Miss McNaughton
Jones was tastefully gowned in green.
The bride was given away by her
brother, Mr. Jack Heyland, and the
bridegroom was supported by his
brother. The church was very prettily decorated with white lilies, daffodils and greenery. After the ceremony, the party drove to the home of
the bride, where a small reception was
held, only intimate friends and relatives being present. Among those
present were: Mrs. Tuck, Mrs. J. D.
Helmcken and Miss Helmcken, Mrs.
and Miss King, Mrs. Puree, Mrs.
Hunter, Mrs. Carmichael, Mrs. Audain, Mrs. Keith Wilson, Miss Wolfenden, Miss Jennie Lawson, Mrs. R.
Jones, Mr. Hopgood, Messrs, Bar-
Angus, Rev. Wm. Barton, Miss Wark,
and others.
Mrs. George McCurdy )Vancouver)
sister of thc bride, wore a handsome
dress of black and white organdie,
and a white lace hat. Mr. and Mrs.
Townshend left via thc C. P. R. for
England, where the honeymoon will
be spent. The bride wore a smart
travelling suit of tan color, with embroidered collar and cuffs, and a handsome set of mole skin furs and a
black hat with tan trimmings.
* *   *
Mr.  and   Mrs.  W.   E.  Rispin,   of
Chatham, Out., announce the engagement of their daughter, Miss Helen i
Claire   Rispin,   and  Mr.   John  Forin |
Templeton,    of   Victoria,    B.C.    Mr.
Templeton   is   spending   a   fortnight |
with his in-law's-elect in Chatham.
For Our Dumb Friends
The managers and promoters of the
Victoria Cat Club have done much
both to improve the breed of cats in
the city and also to emaliorate the
lot of those unfortunate felines who
from thoughtlessness or neglect arc
outcasts on the streets. It is in order
to raise funds for the providing of
a home where intending holiday-
makers can leave their pets in comfort during their absence and where
the ownerless cats may receive proper care, that a dance has been arranged to take place at the A. O. U.
W. Hall next Thursday night, May
4th. The management of this dance
has been left in the capable hands of
Mrs. Walter McMicking, Mrs. Kelly,
and Mrs. Barton, and these ladies
give every assurance that the dance
will be first-class in all respects. The
tickets, which include admission and
refreshments, are on sale at $1.50 for
lady and gentleman, with 50c added
for every additional lady. All those
who take an interest in the welfare of
our dumb   friends   are   requested   to
avail themselves of this opportunity
for exercising a little charity by attending a dance whicli they cannot
fail to enjoy.
There's  Hair
Charles E. Bigelow, the comedian, is
bald, except from a rim of hair a few
inches above his collar line.
"I'm in an awful hurry," he said one
day to the Lambs Club barber, "can you
cut my hair with my collar on?"'
"Sure," replied the barber, "I can
cut it with your hat on."
THEQ RAM D T   wMiree
VAU DE VILLE l_£!^_£ „
SULLIVAN __ CONSIDINE
WEEK MAY 1ST.
PATRICE
In thc political playlet
"The Lobbyist"
Supported by her own Company.
MLLE. ANI HILL
The foremost exponent of women's
athletics.
MULLER AND MULLER
In latest Broadway song hits.
CARITA DAY
Singer and Dancer.
CHARLES D. WEBBER
With a highly trained troup of Hats.
THE GRANDISCOPE
Cruet
Standi!
Small   Silver   Plated   Se|
holding 3 pieces
Each $5.00 to $2.50
Very useful for the bre:J
fast table.
Redfern & Son
Oldest Diamond and Jew
ry House in Western Cans
Established  1862
1009   GOVERNMENT   Sr|
Victoria, B.C.
THE BROADWAY |
852 Yates St.
SMOKERS'  SUPPLII
Candy,  Stationery and T\
Requisites
CORSETS
are made for every type of figure — the tall, the short, the
slender, the moderately plump and the large—modelling each,
easily yet firmly, to the fashionable lines of the newest styles.
Get the model suited to your figure and a perfect fit is assured.
Ask lor "C/C a la Grace" at the best stores.   Write for new
style book to Crompton Corset Company Limited, Toronto.
204 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APEIL 29,1911.
nds of jet will evidently be in
:o judge by the first showing
new   spring  frocks.    White,
irise, black, and amethyst are
the  different kinds  used  for
xdles,  for  flat   bodice   pieces
under the arm, and as orna-
kiffened with crinoline. Women
kike the return of jet for some
J and many who should never
|piece of it plaster themselves
ack jet the moment it makes
Iodic  bow.    White jet is  ex-
attractive,   and   goes   well
|ie   black   marquisette   gowns
fe  will  evidently  wear  from
J:il October.   And, by the way,
no end to the use of beads
[kinds  of   gowns,   hats,   and
The  rubber   ones  are  not
the loops or ends of other trimmings.
In one model seen recently—it was
made by a famous Paris milliner—
black velvet quills faced with black
and white checked silk trim a black
tagal model that is lined with green
tagal. Tagal is more used among
smart millinery than any other one
material, though the rough straws are
having a craze in walking hats. This
extreme in coarse and fine is no more
abrupt than the size of the hats, which
range from little turbans hooding the
head well to immense dress models.
* * *
Bags for use with dress costumes
are fanciful in the extreme. The long
cord survives and a host of novelties
have crept in. An odd one seen with
a  taupe  colored   afternoon   costume
;<*35*>!>-£y
1/ /
Inuch as they were last sum-
lough they are quite attract-
]far less perishable than the
crystal ones which  crush
very quickly. Wooden beads
ved h?avy and they are used
*   *   *
llonial turban, with its severe
I, is in line with the smartest
Ihats. All the hats of tailor
le the simplest kind of trim-
lelvet or straw cockades are
[ foremost. One of the new-
|des in French millinery by
is black and white striped
lied in cockades and other
Is. And when this is not em-
plack and white striped or
Isilk often makes a finish to
last week was diamond shaped with
the upper point cut off and banded
with taupe velvet. In the centre of
each side there was a diamond shaped
piece of antique embroidery. The
handle was of braided ribbons in the
colors of the needlework and they
were broken irregularly with ribbon
roses. Another bag of similar shapes
was made of beautifully beaded and
embroidered satin with big ornaments
in bead work at each corner.
Cerise alone is the touch of color
to be put on black hats, on blue
gowns, on white serge suits, and it is
to be widely used for separate blouses.
It is thc one tone of red that fewest
women can wear, and yet it is the
tone that has been chosen by the designers to outrank all others.   Right
here, hefore I forget it, it would be
well to tell you how amazingly fashionable these cerise satin blouses will
be. Last Autumn they were brought
out in Paris by two or three of the
famous tailors in combination with
coat suits of black camel's hair and
dark blue serge. Very few Americans
adopted the idea. They considered
it a shocking combination; this was
because they were drilled into the
idea of the one-color scheme from
neck to heel and the violent contrast
of the cerise blouse against the blue
skirt was not according to their acquired taste. This Spring the combination has been again brought out,
and it promises to be more popular.
The Winter has taught us much about,
the use of violent colors, and we are
not so shocked at the mere combination of cerise with something dark.
There is an extremely good dark blue
serge model that carries a blouse of
cerise satin that may be followed by
a number of persons. The skirt is
conveniently narrow, with a swinging box plait below the knees. The
coat is the square, short, sacklike garment that we will wear the next six
months, if not longer. It is single-
breasted, fastened with bleu bone buttons, has small sleeves without cuffs,
fastened with link buttons at wrist,
and has a turn over collar of ecru
filet lace. The bodice is cut on the
kimono pattern, with small, tight
sleeves that reach to the elbow, and a
V-shaped opening in front. The edges
are finished with a bias binding of
the material, and the guimpe is of
ecru dotted point d'esprit.
* *   *
The little Chantilly jacket lined
with colored chiffon is again a possibility. Girls who are handy with the
needle can turn out any number of
such little garments in bolero, fichu
or scarf style, which will do much for
simple costumes, once summer is here.
For the printed foulards, plain silk
coats of whimsical shape are going
to be. worn and also little garments
of chiffon or lace made solely for
effect and without a thought of
warmth. Shoppers cannot do better
than watch these little garments, as
they will continue to be opened up in
their department from now until summer calls a halt of the season. It is
the trimming counters which have the
choicest displays among the garnishments which they always keep.
* *   *
A few freakish developments and
any number of suggestions for making the new fashions practical in the
spring and summer's wardrobe are
what most women got out of the
formal openings of Paris fashions this
year. One of the freaks appeared in
the afternoon or evening gowns, the
skirts of which were fully five inches
from the floor, while trains dragged
on behind them. The trains were are
adjustable kind, of course, and were
narrow and square. Novelties were
as thick as the foliage of the parks
will soon be. The hat with an adjustable crown was one of the wonders.
The crown, usually of flowers, could
be removed and be replaced with one
to suit the costume by a hand's turn.
Parasols with their trimmings inside
were another surprise. Some of this
order had petal arrangements that
opened up with the shade into something like flowers with bows and ends.
Odd veils were traced with floral vines
in graduated chenille clots. Some of
the lingerie collars had burnous hood
effects instead of the sailor shapes.
The newest ostrich plume is long,
uncurled and wired to stand out at
any angle wanted of it. Next in
novelty to it is the camel's back
plume with a double curvature of its
stem that reminds one of the traditional hump.
The cuts used on this page are
furnished by Messrs. Finch & Finch,
Ladies' Outfitters, Yates Street, Victoria.
"My husband has gone motor-car mad.
We were driving yesterday. He hadn't
spoken to me for three hours, although
I was sitting by his side. We came to
a bit of the road where two cross roads
met, and a flock of sheep was coming
out of one of them. My husband
stretched out his hand and pinched me
so cruelly that I screamed aloud.
'Thanks,' he said, without even looking
at me. 'I didn't want to hurt you, but
my hooter ls out of order.'"
»'*'0-.f. I......     ,_
»* *- HlttiaiMH-r (q, Hf
The Trend of Fashion
With an exceptionally important crowded season ahead, it behooves
the woman who is anticipating many dinners, dances and out-of-door
fetes to make an early selection of their Dresses and Millinery. Knowing that an unusual demand for
GOWNS FOR ALL OCCASIONS
Would be evidenced, we have made exceptional purchescs, and hold
an unequalled and varied assortment of all that is new in the World
of Dress.
A SPECIAL LEADER LINE (as sketch on Woman's Page) of superbly Tailored Suits, built of sturdy serges and fine worsteds,
some   plainly   tailored;   some,   however   becomingly   trimmed.
Price    .* $25.00
Unique collection of all wool FRENCH DELAINE DRESSES represented by illustration on Woman's Page, in plain colors; also effective stripes with floral design trimming, possessing an air of distinction and exclusiveness.   Price $27.50 and $30.00
Several very handsome LINEN CRASH GOWNS, with heavy crochet lace trimming and insertion, which are at once elegant and
attractive.    Price  $35.00
Finch & Finch
LADIES' OUTFITTERS
7I7-719 Yates Street
JUST ABOVE DOUGLAS STREET
Appetizing Temptations
Heinz* Apple Butter,, per large crock  65c
Chinos in Syrup, glass  $1.00
Young Stem Ginger, glass jar  60c
Macedoines-des-Fruits, glass jar   60c
Cresca Gapon, whole bird in jelly, tin  $2.50
Cresca Poulet, whole fowl in jelly  $2.00
Norwegian Ptarmigan, tin  60c
Ripe Olives, glass jar, $1.00, 85c, 50c and  20c
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
Independent Grocers, 1317 Government Street
Tels. 50, 51, 52 Liquor Dept. Tel. 1590
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Steve Wukeh, of
Prince Rupert, occupation Railroader,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about one
mile west of the southwest corner of
Lot 385, and marked S. W.'s N. E. cor.;
thence south 80 chains; west 80 chains;
north 80 chains; east 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more  or less.
Dated December 28, 1910.
STEVE WUKEH.
mar 18 Norman McMillan, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE notice that Elizabeth Blshoff,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Housekeeper, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 2-t-i miles north-easterly from
the head waters of Millbrook Cove;
thence east eighty chains; thence north
eighty chains; thence west eighty
chains; thence south eighty chains to
point of commencement and containing
640 acres,  more or less.
Dated January  27th,  1911.
ELIZABETH BISHOFF.
mar 26 Frederick A. Smith, Agent 20
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 29, 1911.
EDITORIAL
(Continued from Page 1)
L
that Victoria has heard the last of the
!New Grand Theatre Sunday Afternoon
Lectures on Sex Hygiene and kindred subjects. After all, they are but a thin cloak
for the publication of details of the seamy
side of life with which the vast majority
of people have little or no acquaintance.
word, and he goes to the Coronation with
the full confidence of British Columbians
of every party and creed in his ability to
represent them "well and fitly" on a supremo historic occasion. This is as it
should be, for however diverse our political interests the National and Imperial
interests of all British Columbians are
identical.
with room for flowers, fruit, kitchen-garden and chicken-run. The call for "the
Simple Life" is no idle cry. People are
yearning for it more and more, and within
a year the hinterland of Victoria will be
open and accessible to thousands who are
only too eager to put it to the test.
LOYAL AND PATRIOTIC
The magnificent meeting held in the
Victoria Theatre on Friday night sounded
a note of loyalty to the British Throne
whicli will re-echo in every part of the
Empire. The address to His Majesty the
King is probably one of the briefest whicli
he will receive, but it is expressive in the
highest degree of the true loyal feeling of
the people of Britisli Columbia. The
graceful reference to his illustrious Con-
Bort in its concluding sentence will find a
response in every heart. The address to
Premier McBride is unique in many respects. The admirable example he set on
the occasion of the visit of Sir Wilfrid
Laurier has been followed in the present,
instance, when the leaders of both local
political organizations joined hands in
moving the address. There is hope for a
country whicli, in spite of grotesque cartoons, can bury all political differences,
and rise to the requirements of a great
occasion. The Hon. Eichard McBride is
a far bigger man as Premier of Britisli
Columbia than as leader of a Conservative
Government; he has shown himself big
enough to be a Canadian first and a politician second. But above all he is a British Imperialist in the best sense of the
THE B. C. E. R. IN SAANICH
The Week has frequently commented on
the vast importance of the extension of
the B. C. E. R. in the Saanich Peninsula,
and therefore views with special gratification the commencing of operations for
clearing the right of way. The first camp
was established near the Burnside Eoad
on Monday last; the work of clearing was
begun the next day and will continue without cessation until the right of way has
been established from Victoria to Deep
Cove. It is expected that this preliminary work of clearing will occupy about six
months, and that another six or eight will
suffice to grade and lay track, so that some
time during the summer of 1912 there will
be a regular car service throughout the
district, traversed. Many things must result from this, the most important of
which undoubtedly is increased cultivation
of land. But in addition the Saanich
Peninsula is destined to become an ideal
place for country homes, and the extensive
business transacted in lots during the last
two months indicate how highly Victorians
appreciate the opportunity offered to establish a home amid the most delightful
scenery, and under the most favourable
conditions. It is to be hoped that all lots
well out in the country will be large
enough to admit of a real country home
ON A JOURNEY
Mr. A. J. Brace has gone on a journey.
Before going he forgot to leave the apology
which the daily and weekly press concurred in demanding. The Eev. T. E.
Holling has not been heard from, so the
surmise of The Week is correct, that
neither of these gentlemen would realise
their obligation to the public. Mr. E. T.
Elliott wrote a remarkable letter to The
Vietoria Times on Saturday last, in which,
despite his admitted legal acumen, he
failed to touch the point at issue, which
was WHY HE, AS SOLICITOE FOE
ME. BEACE, PUT EOEWAED AN
AFFIDAVIT DEALING WITH AN
INCIDENT WHICH OCCURRED
THREE WEEKS AFTER THE PUBLICATION OF ME. BEACE'S STATEMENT TO THE CITIZEN. Even the
lay mind is able to grasp the fact that what
happened at the Henderson house on the
last week in January, or the first in February, could not have formed the basis of
a statement which Mr. Brace made in the
columns of The Citizen on the twelfth of
January. If Mr. Elliott had confined his
attention to this point, and explained it
satisfactorily, his letter would have been
much more effective. As it is the public is
still without an explanation of a circumstance which is damnatory, and which
places Mr. Brace in a worse position than
lie was before, that of having made an
attempt to bolster up an untenable position with a fraudulent representation.
THE SHEFFIELD CHOIR
It is to be hoped that the Sheffield C
will receive at least as hearty a welc
in Victoria as it has been accorded
where. The Choir is easily one or
finest singing aggregations in the w
and has been acclaimed as an "Emp
Choir. Its claims are based not onlj
its musical excellence but on the fact
it is a patriotic organization, promo
the interests of the Empire, and arou
an Imperial sentiment pretty much in
same way as the Coldstream Guards
ten years ago. Other cities have giver
organization an official welcome, and
tended to them some substantial civic
pitality. A movement of this kind w
be popular in Victoria, and would Ix
dorsed by all who love the Songs of
Empire—and who does not.
FAIR PLAY
A week ago Mr. J. A. AikmanJ
Crown   Prosecutor  in  the  case   ag
Faulkner, stated   in   court   that   a
named Harry Morton had offered $£
to the guardian of the girl to drop
case.    Mr. Aikman has since st
court that his information was unrell
and that his client had made a mid
It is only fair to Mr. Morton thatl
retraction should receive as wide publ
as the original statement.    It is eql
fair to suggest that greater care si]
be exercised, even .by barristers, in ra
ing so serious a charge unless it cij
substantiated.
To-day is tlie  Last  day
OF B. WILLIAMS & CO.'S Going-Out-of-Business
Sale of Clothing, Hats and Furnishings
We are under Contract to hand our Store over at the close of business to-night to our Successor, J. N. Harvey, Ltd.
This means that this Sale ends to-night at 11 o'clock.
Read This List of Last=Day Prices.
Act To-Day
MEN'S SUITS
After the brisk selling of the past week
we find that many lines of Men's Suits have
been sold down until there are only one or
two of a line left. These we have grouped
together and will sell while they last at
the following prices:
$10 to $12 Suits for $4.95
$12.50 to $15.00 Suits for $7.95
$18 to $22.50 Suits for $11.45
$23 to $25. Suits for  $13.50
Men's 1911 Spring Suits
Regular $15.00.   Sale price $11.45
Regular $18.00.   Sale price $13.95
Regular $20.00.   Sale price $16.45
Regular $22.00.   Sale price $17.95
Regular $25.00.   Sale price $19.85
Regular $28.00.   Sale price $23.95
Regular $30.00.   Sale price $25.50
Regular $35.00.   Sale price $29.45
Men's Fancy Vests at Half Regular
Prices
MEN'S PANTS
Reg. $2.00.   Sale price $1.45
Reg. $2.50 to $3.00. Sale price $1.95
Reg- $3-5° to $3.75.   Sale price $2.65
Reg. $4.00 to $4.50.   Sale price $3.45
Reg. $5.00 to $5.50.   Sale price $3.95
Reg. $6.00 to $6.50.   Sale price $4.95
Reg. $7.00 to $8.00.   Sale price $5.65
SOCKS
Very Special This Week
A large variety of the very newest
shades and patterns in Men's Fancy Half
Hose.
Regular 50c and 75c Sox, 3 pairs for.. .$1.00
Regular 35c Sox, 3 pairs for 75c
Regular 35c Black Cashmere Sox, 5 pairs
for $1.00
Reg. 15c pr.  Sale price, 5 prs. for 50c
Reg. 20c pr.  Sale price, 4 prs. for 50c
Reg. 25c pr.  Sale price, 3 prs. for....50c
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
Are
OVERCOAT DAYS
All our garments marked at a fraction
of their regular prices.
Note what you save:
Reg. $12.00 to $15.00.   Sale price $9.85
Reg. 18.00 to $30.00. Sale price $13-95
Reg. $22.50.   Sale price  $15-95
Reg. $25.00.   Sale price  $17-95
Reg. $30.00 to $35.00.   Sale price $23.45
Some are shower-proofed. Many have
convertible collars.
In Victoria at this season of the year,
an Overcoat is a necessity in the evenings.
Especially when motoring or driving. Then
for traveling or week-end it is indispensable.   Better buy now.
VERY SPECIAL FOR MONDAY
This Spring's regular $18.00 Shower Proof
Coats.   Sale price $13-95
These Coats are the new shades of grey
and olive. They are quarter lined and just
the thing for traveling and motoring.
UNDERWEAR
Reg. 50c Garments.   Sale price 35c
Reg. 65c French Balbriggan, for 45c
Reg. 75c Garments.   Sale price 55c
Reg. $1.00 Garments.   Sale price 65c
Reg. $1.25 to $1.50 Garments, for 95c
TIES
Reg. 15c.   Sale price, 3 for 25c
Reg. 25c.   Sale price, 3 for 50c
Reg. 50c,   Sale price, 3 for $1.00
Reg. 75c to $1.00.   Sale price, 2 for $1.00
HATS ALMOST GIVEN AWAY
A lot of odds and ends in regular $2.00 to
$3.50 Hats.   Price to clear 95c
Regular $2.50 to $3.00 this Spring's Soft
and Stiff Hats.   Price this week.. .$1.95
614 YATES
STREET
VICTORIA
B.C.
STORE  OPEN TO-NIGHT TILL 11 O'CLOCK
B. Williams &
614   YATES
STREET
VICTORIA
B.C.
t
______

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