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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Jan 7, 1911

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 A British Columbia Newspaper and Review, Published at Victoria, B.C.
EIGHTH    VEAR"'
HALL& WALKER
- Agents. 	
WELLINGTON COLLIERY
COMPANY'S GOAL
1232 Government 3t. Telephone 8J
THE W&EK, SATUKD^^
_____ ;*-•-*■■'; ■   , *   ■         _/t»V..     .^i-        w.
One Dqixab Fee Annum-
|THE BY-LAWS./
On the twelfth inst? k'niimber of By-'
laws have to be voted on by the property
owners of Victoria.   These By-laws have
been published in detail in the daily press
for some weeks past, and if the voters tire
not fully cognizant of them, it is their
own fault and some thousands of dollars
have been spent in vain.   Unquestionably,
, the most important is the Sooke Water
Scheme, if scheme it may be called.    The
By-law commits the .City to an initial ex-,
penditure not exceeding $1,500,000. Having carefully studied all the available data
and all the reports yet. made, Tbe Week
is of opinion that the total cost of carrying  out   this  scheme will.be  at.least
||.   $2,500,000.. It is in favour of securing the
Sooke water-shed and any other source of
supply which could be made subservient to
the ■■requirements of a large city, but it does'
not believe in. talcing "a leap in the dark,"
or in putting "the cart before the horse."
No fair-minded person would deny that,
before the property owners can vote intelligently in favour of the Sooke Scheme,
very much more information is /required;
that available is of the most: rudimentary
character.   To thoroughly investigate the
proposal it would be necessary to place a
first-class engineer on the ground for at
least six months, to give him a competent
.staff of surveyors and to allow him his own
time to complete his investigations and report on them.   This has never been done,
and yet the property owners are asked to
:* commit the City to an expenditure esti-
5,mated at $1,500,000 and sure to reach
- ,$2,500,000 on fragmentary reports and ex
■parte statements.   The other objection to
| the Sooke Scheme is that, even if a good
Il thing in itself, it would be far worse than
a white elephant with Y5 per. cent., of the
territory to be served left in,the hands of
a private corporation.   Victoria West, 'Es-
quiinAlt, Saanich and, in all probability,
Oak Bay will take their supply from the
Esquimalt Waterworks Company, and the
City will be confined to its own Municipal
\ boundaries.   Is this a business proposition,
or is it a subversion pf the wise apothegm,
"First things first."    The Lighting By-,
law is open to no objection; the same may
be said of the By-law providing for the extension of the Waterworks system;  both
are necessitated by the growth of the City.
The Telephone By-law was dealt with
fully in the last issue of The Week.   It is'
a reasonable proposition and Avould be a
bargain of which the City would undoubtedly get the best end.   It is to be hoped
that it will be passed by an overwhelming,
majority.   The last'By-law deals with the
Theatre question, and, much as The Week
•would like to see a first-class theatre in the
Cityj one commensurate with its requirements and development, it cannot* bring it-,
self to favour the proposal of Mr. Simon
Leiser.   There are many objections; one* is
that the location is extremely unsuitable;
being too far from the centre of the. City.  ■
If the people's money is to be used the
Theatre should be made convenient for the.
people.   Another objection is that the City
gets a very small consideration in $25,000
worth of stock for a very valuable piece-of ■
land.   It would be far better to sell the.
land, purchase a site elsewhere for half the
money and place the balance in the Municipal coffers.   A third and fatal objection
is that, with the management in the hands
of a number of directors as proposed,  it
would be impossible to achieve satisfactory
results. . A theatre, of all things,; must be  •
a "one-man" proposition.   For these reasons The Week advocates the setting aside
of this By-law, well assured that' better re-
suits will be obtained by private enterprise
,and that, when Victoria is prepared to
break into, public, OAvnerskip, it will not
start with "a theatre.
WHEAT MAD '. V.     ..
11''.'Mr!1 William ,AVhyfiii"!*',the": respected
second Vice-President of the O.P.R., in an
interview granted to the Winnipeg Press
on the 3rd iiist., said that the farmers of
the North-West were "Wheat-mad."   By
which he meant that they were so crazy to
make "quick money" by scratching the surface of the,ground and scattering wheat
that they entirely lost sight of the far
greater possibilities of liiixed farming.   To
usehis own expressive -words, "The agriculturist is, engaged, not in selling the products of the land, but the land itself.   He
is not tilling the soil, but exploiting it;
he is itaking all out and putting nothing
back.?':  He further pointed out that this
neglect to produce locally what the land
was able to produce and'what is so urgently needed by the people, led necessarily to
the importation of-many staple articles of
food and tended to raise the cost of living.
In 1910   Winnipeg   imported   from the
United States 10,000,000 eggs and the C.
P. R. purchases most of the chickens for
„ its "diners" in Chicago and its cream from
St; Paul.   This complaint of Mr. Whyte's
is in line with the stand which The Week
has taken on this question for some time
past.    Throughout AVestern Canada the
high cost of living is due in no small degree to the fact that so many of the necessaries of life are imported, "and it will -
never be brought down to a reasonable
basis until our own land is made to feed
our own people,    It is not necessary to
speculate.or to theorise as to what can profitable be grown in the North-West.,... It is
not many years since',the mere suggestion;
,,of growing1 anything but wheat would have
been scouted.   Tbat time has passed, and
since   1900  the   development  of  mixed
. farming in certain favourable sections of
the North-West Provinces has removed
any element of doubt' on the subject.   In
Southern Alberta, in the neighbourhood,
of Calgary and at almost any point on the-
Saskatchewan   between   Edmonton   and
Prince Albert, mixed farming can profit-*-
ably be indulged-, in and everything except
fruit, profitably produced. It was thought,
at .first, that extensive and costly irrigation
schemes would be necessary, but the more
recent development of scientific dry-farming has opened up a wide vista of possibilities.   After all, it must not be forgotten
that the whole of Western Canada is still
in the pioneer stage.   Less than ten per
cent, of its cultivable land is under the
plough.   The vast solitudes which twenty
or thirty years ago presented such a for-,
bidding aspect to the; world have been
peopled to this'extent; because of the simplicity and the facility of growing Avheat
crops. This, however, is but the first stage.
We are just beginning to enter upon the
■ second, -which means smaller holdings and
more* thorough cultivation.   Some day in
the far off future, so remote that1 the mind
fails to grasp it, the cultivation will become ."intense," and then there will be
abundance of cheap agricultural produce
for every home.   The most prosperous and
the  richest agricultural, country in the
world, France, arrived at* this third stage
long ago, and for more than a century has
presented an object lesson to the World.
England is just beginning, to follow suit.
and the cutting up of the large feudal
estates Avill mean a literal realization of
Mr. Chamberlain's policy of "three acres
and a cow" for every family.   It is yet a
long call to this happy state in Canada,
but it is the ultimate goal, and the only
solution  of  the   problem, "Iioav to  live
cheaply."  Mr. Whyte, than Avhom Canada
has no more sagacious ancl loyal adviser,
has rendered a public service in emphasizing the importance of local production and
the folly of paying import duties oil the"
staples of food. %_
I
ASCREf^OOSEjAN^l^fl
TW'Wsek has taken__a£peat.deal of*
trouble to lfostitote a serious cc
lodged at its offici^fiTvf
inst. Indeed, the;collljIniin_ iy so serious
that it is impossible to do justice' to all
parties concerned Avithout an enquiry being held, either by the Board of Directors
or the Provincial Government, and unless
such an enquiry is held promptly, the
Jubilee Hospital Avill rest under another
regrettable cloud of suspicion, arid public
confidence in the administration of its
affairs will be still further Aveakened. The
Week has no desire to prejudice the, case*
and Avill simply remark that neither the
Government nor the Board of Directors
seems to be aware of the amount of disaffection which exists in the mind of the
general public, nor of the extent to Avhich •
the friends of those Avho have once been
patients at tlle Jubilee invariably refuse
to go a second time ancl prefer to swell the
coffers of the St. Joseph's. The complaint
lodged is as follows ancl as it is in writing
it is perhaps best to publish it verbatim:
"extbaokdin'aky tkeAtment em a aveix
KNOAVN CITIZEN
"On Friday, December 30th,  a Avell
knoAvn citizen,  Mr.  Charles McKenzie,
who for the last four years has been subject to spasmodic asthma, was suddenly
stricken with an attack and several passers
by and friends carried him into a store on
Fort Street.   His sufferings and terrible
struggles to get breath made quite an impression on those around and one well-'
meaning individual brought him about a
spoonful of brandy.   His case looked so
serious that a hack Avas summoned and he
■Avas taken to the Hospital, accompanied by
one of the police officers.   On reaching the
Hospital the man,  who was in  a most
serious condition, was refused admission
and'Dr. Hasell told theinto take him back
to the Police Station for being drunk.
The gaoler, AA'ho kneAV the man McKenzie
and several of the police staff avIio had
knoAvn him for years realised that an aAV-
ful mistake had been made, as they AA'ere
in possession of the facts as to his suffering ancl temperate habits.    The sufferer
during one of his attacks had asked for a
friend of his to be advised of his trouble.
This Avas done, and Dr. Bapty, Avho was
acting for Dr. Hall, was phoned to and
asked what he thought of the matter, ancl
he ansAvered that Dr.. Hasell had smelt the
brandy and refused him admission on that
account.    The Hospital doctor was also
phoned to ancl on the same excuse being
offered for McKenzie's return to the Police Station, was assured by McKenzie's
friend that at no time during his sickness
ancl especially during the last four years
could such an imputation be cast on McKenzie.   A Colonist reporter ancl a number of the police staff are prepared to testify that McKenzie, Avhilst at the station
shoAA'ed absolutely no trace of drink.   Is
this Temperance run mad ?   Has it come
to this pass that, if to relieve sufferings
of* such a character a small dose of brandy
is given, persons are to be blacklisted at
our hospitals?   What are Ave coming to?
It is an awful reflection on that medical
management of our hospitals,  and will
Aveaken tlie support Avhich a willing and
generous public have accorded them for
years."
When interviewed on the subject Dr.
Hasell stated that McKenzie was at the
time of this occurrence an inmate of the
Hospital, being a sufferer from chronic
asthma. He said that he had obtained
permission from his assistant to go into
.town and that he had come back under the
influence of "drink." He stated further
that the same thing had occurred on five
previous occasions, ancl that this Avas the
sole Reason Avhy he had refused him ad-
m.issiqn.an, the first instance, but when he
Avas sent (town an hour later in the' patrol
Avagon, accompanied by a police officer, he
ias admitted. It is quite clear that a
jferious: mistake was made which, having
egard to McKenzie's condition, might
have resulted fatally. The whole incident
turns largely on the general character and
habits of McKenzie,:. and.on this point the
police aiid several private citizens who
kiiOAV hiin well, 'are A'ery positive, in repudiating the suggestion of intemperance.
The. matter should be probed Avithout delay
and; The Week appeals to the Board of
Directors not to ignore so serious a complaint, and, indeed, they cannot do so,, if
they Have the welfare of the Hospital; at
heart.
A SCREAMING FARCE
The third shoAV of the week, and it was
a "holy" shoAV, was staged ait;,the Victoria
Theatre last night.   The house was full,
the platform Avas empty;   A crowded audience Avas kept waiting nearly, .an ' hour
Whilst Mr. C. E. Redfern paced the wings,
and called in vain for spirits from the
vasty deep who Avould not come.   Finally,
goaded- to desperation, by the Kentish fire
Avhich indicated the impatience of the
public, he despatched a Colonist reporter
for the Colonist staff.   The proprietor and
editor responded, but still some scores of
empty chairs decorated the stage.    Mr.
Redfern, Avho meanwhile had taken, the
Chair, read a list of names of those Avho
Avere expected to entertain the audience,
but again the spirits refused to come, the
only  respondees being  ex-Mayor 'Lewis
Hall (a strong personal friend of the present Mayor), and a popular resident of
Oak Bay, Avho, in justice be it said, looked
like a fish out of water.   The Chairman
announced that the meeting was.for the
purpose of securing a strong candidate to
oppose Mr. Morley and that ah influential
citizens' committee had concluded that Mr.
Alec. SteAvart Avas the man. . He read a
letter  from that gentleman offering to
place himself in the hands of the ratepayers if Mr. Turner AA'ould liberate him from
a promise that he had given hiin not to
run.   He then called upon Mr. Morley's
life-long friend, Dr. Lewis Hall, to move
a resolution to that effect.   The resolution
Avas moved and seconded; on being put to
the vote a few voices whispered "Aye."
Nine-tenths of the audienpe yelled "No."*
The Chairman declared the resolution lost..
The gentleman from Oak Bay moved a
vote of thanks, ■ which should have been one
of condolence, to the Chair, and the meeting broke up.   Once more has the Colonist-
ensured the election of Mr. Morley by as
maladroit a piece of electioneering as any
very young child or very old Avoman could
have conceived.
ANOTHER COMICALITY
The Colonist of yesterday contained a   j
brief communication from Mr. J. H. Turner, our Agent-General in London, 'which,
coining from so important an individual,
Avas stoAved away in an obscure corner of
tlie' paper  with  the  equivocal   _. -ading
"Agent-General Informs."   Certainly the
Agent-General does "inform," for he "informs" the Colonist that in its issue of
December 4, 1910, it Avas stated that the
annual value of Britain's agricultural produce   in   years   of   prosperity   is   over
$1,000,000.   Mr.  Turner, whom no one
would suspect of being a huriiourist some-
Avhat laconically remarks that "it* is certainly over $1,000,00Q-J3ince it is over one
hundred million pounfl sterling, not taking   into   consideration   fruit,   floAvers,
horses,   sheep,   cattle,   pigs,  poultry   or
dairy."   It is a question Avhich is the more
comical, the   colossal   ignorance   of the.
Avriter in the Colonist, or the complacency
Avith Avhich the correction Avas inserted in
an obscure corner of the paper without
note, comment or explanation.   It looks as
if the political department of the Colonist
is' not the only one which requires a little
enlightenment on British affairs. THE WEEK, SATUKDAY, JI
EY 7, 1911
At The Street
Corner
Br Tne lounoer
It may safely be said tbat the
automobile owners and the chauffeurs
of Victoria are a law-abiding set of
people. It. is rare that any .'complaint
has to be made against them; in fact
I am inclined to think that in proportion to her size Victoria possesses
more motor-cars and has to prefer
fewer charges against them than any
other city in the world. The drivers
are not addicted to speeding to the
public danger; there is little or no
joy-riding, and, as a rule, great consideration is shown to persons driving horses. But every flock has its
black sheep, and though I am not
in a position to say who the offending chauffeur or driving owner may
have been, it is a fact that recently
an incident occurred on the New
Road, close to Victoria, whereby human life was endangered through a
display  of  reckless  insolence.
* *     »
The facts are as follows: A well-
known gentleman living on the outskirts of Victoria was driving along
the road in his buggy. Hearing the
"toot-toot" of a car coming up rapidly behind he pulled over to the extreme edge of his own side of the
road and waited for the car to pass
whilst lighting his pipe. As the
motor did so, the driver impudently
swerved to the left and passed so
close to the horse's head as almost
to touch it. Fortunately the animal
was well broken in to automobiles
and treated the insult with a calm
contempt. The impertinent driver
nearly suffered for his action as he
only just managed to clear the side
of the ditch. Would that he had
fallen in! I don't say that I should
like him to have been killed, but it
would have been more satisfactory if
he had been badly hurt and had broken up ' his car irreparably. The
owner of the horse and buggy was
unable to see the number, and the
noise of the car was too great for
any satisfaction to be obtained out of
using the strong language which rose
to his lips. He had to imitate the
example of the quadruped, but, seeing that the chauffeur turned round
with a grin on his face, he was enabled to signify his contempt in a
more expressive manner. By extending the thumb of his right hand to
his nose, stretching thc fingers out
at full length and applying the digits
of the left hand in similar fashion
to the little finger of the right, he
could at least allow the thoughtless
idiot in front the opportunity of realizing exactly what the sentiments
were which hc was leaving behind
him.
* *     *
I have at the time of writing a letter which was delivered to me by a
business man of Victoria this morning. It affords me an opportunity of
giving another concrete example of
the awful dangers to which we are
laying our wives and daughters open
by the system of non-segregation. It
would appear from my correspondent,
who is a man well-spoken of in town,
that a relative of his and the
daughter of a well-known family (for
obvious reasons 1 cannot give further
identification) were on their way
home from a concert, and, when in
the neighbourhood of the Provincial
Gaol, wcre molested by a brute fiend
who threw one of them down on the
sidewalk. Her companion screamed
for help which resulted in thc appearance of some men, who arc said
to have merely looked on and to
havc made no attempt to capture thc
beast, who made good his escape.
One hardly knows whether to censure thc more the brutalism of the
beast or the indifference of the men,
who took no steps to effect his capture. One fact I have not yet mentioned, and it is one of the most significant in the case. Both girls wcre
young, about fifteen and sixteen years
of age respectively.
*     *     *
Go on, reformers.    Talk in scathing accents about "legalized vice." If
you prefer the other kind, the more
fools you. Take no notice of the
example which has been afforded by
other cities! It is said that experience is the best teacher. You'll get
taught all right. Of course, the thing
doesn't worry me very much. I have
no sisters or daughters out here, but
I should have thought that those who
had, would have made a bigger stand
against the criminal folly which
makes such molestations, not only
possible but actually probable, and
which in time will be frequent. Not
long ago Victoria was one of thc
safest cities in the world for any
girl to walk about in without fear
of molestation; now—read the above.
And I believe that this is only an
isolated instance.
* 1|! *
There is only one thing to bc done
if the system of non-segregation is
to be continued, and that is to increase the Police Force. The men
are all right, but their numbers are
wholly inadequate to cope with the
new aspect of affairs. We need, under present conditions, a very large
number of plain-clothes men, who
would patrol the outlying districts.
Of course they would have to be
armed, but it would be even more
satisfactory if they were built after
the style of ex-pugilists, who could
let the brutes understand what decent
men thought of them before they
haled them off to justice. Such a
course of action is the only alternative to the re-opening of the "Red-
light" district.
* *     *
"Choose ye now. Which will ye
have? Legalized vice, or unlegalized
immorality? Will ye depend on the
presence of the guardian policeman
to protect your daughters when they
have to run out to post a letter, or
will ye return to the old system under which women-folk could Avalk
about without fear of the "pestilence
that vvalketh by night?" Choose, and
choose quickly ere it be too late.
At last there appears to be some
likelihood of Victoria obtaining her
much needed public convenience,
about which I have written many
times. I have said this before and
it would have appeared that this absolute necessity would have been
erected almost at the time; but it was
not. Now, however, the retiring
Council seem inclined to leave with
at least one useful accomplishment to
their credit. I notice that there appears to be some difference of opinion
as to whether it should be situate at
the corner of Government and Wharf
streets, or at the junction of new
View and Government. So long as
it is erected somewhere within a central area it does not seem to me
that it very much matters where.
* *     *
There arc two parables in the
Bible of which I am ahvays reminded
when I walk down across the Causeway at night. I made mention of
this last week, I know, but I intend
to go on making mention till something is done. I refer to the king
who thought he had enough men to
make war on his neighbour and then
thought better of it, and of thc man
who started to build a city and found
that he had not enough bricks to
complete the same. In the Old Country a man who starts to build a house
and is unable to finish it, owing to
lack of funds, leaves a building behind him, which is referred to as
"So-and-so's Folly." I can't help
thinking that the new lamps on the
Causeway might be designated as
"Victoria's Folly." It would appear
that she cannot afford to pay for thc
lighting of all of them. Why then,
in the name of all that is good and
beautiful, did she order so many?
Every second lamp is lit on the one
side; the vis-a-vis is unlightcd, and
vice-versa. I do not say that there
is not light enough to walk by;
there is. But the general effect is
so "cheap." It is equivalent to telling the stranger that we know that
we ought to have a certain number of
standards erected, and that we arc
ready to comply with our hospitable
duties to that extent, but that we
really cannot afford to light them all.
If this is really the fact, let the City
CHICKERING   GRAND   PIANO?
We are sole agents for this World's Famous Instrument
Montelius Piano House,
Limited
1104 GOVERNMENT STREET, VICTORIA, B. C.
ALL
RULINGS
We have Blank Books
of all sizes and rulings
— the largest stock
we've ever had.
Baxter & Johnson
Co., Ltd.
721 Yates St.       Phone 730
Satisfaction
We guarantee quality and satisfaction with every purchase of
Groceries.
Phone orders carefully attended to.
A.  POOL
623 Yates St. Phone 44I
Watson's Old Stand
BLUE PRINTS
Any Length in One Piece
Six Cents per foot
TIMBER AND LAND
MAPS
DRAUGHTING
Electric Blue Print &
Map Co.
1218 Langley St. - Victoria,'B.C.
Council publish abroad the exact state
of their misfortunes and appeal to
the public to subscribe enough money
to keep the credit of the City good,
at least on the outside. If they will
do this, a dollar is forthcoming from
the
C_ri
rioit^r.
Open until 10 p.m.
GIGANTIC
SALE
Our entire stock of Plain and
Fancy Silks is now on Sale
at greatly reduced prices
Oriental Importing Co.
610 CORMORANT STREET
-   OPP. E. & N. DEPOT
The name on the Label should be SCHMIDT'S, if you
want the best in genuine imported Clarets and Burgundies. They have been on this market for the past
fifteen years and stand for the Popular Choice.
For sale by all liquor dealers.
"RADIGER & JANION
(3It Wharf Street 'British Columbia Agents
GRACE and STRENGTH
Result from ROLLER SKATING.   No other form or exercise
is half so pleasant and beneficial.   Insure a good time by going to
Assembly Roller Skating Rink
FORT STREET
GRAND MASQUE CARNIVAL
Tuesday, November 15th.   Valuable Prizes Gn •
PHONE 2317.
L. C. POWELL '/
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 1,  1911
MUSIC
AND  THE   STAGE
New Grand Theatre
To my mind Lester & Kellet furnish one of the most amusing duologues I have heard for some time,
ln addition, the man sings a most
amusing medley    of popular    songs.
The Olio Trio are great banjoists,
whilst    an    excellent    song    entitled
"The King of the Mafia" rendered by
one of the troupe was a   great   suc-
Jt*  -ess.
"' Miss Margaret Frye is a dainty
comedienne and fairly brought down
the house both by her costumes and
her singing. "Gonga-Gee," which was
heard, I think, for the first time in
Victoria, elicited enthusiastic applause. The Chamberlains are truly
.marvels with the lassoo and are probably the most capable exponents of
thc art on the caudeville stage.
The Majestic
The big feature picture for the
week has been a representation of the
construction of the G. T. P. from
the driving of the first spike to the
completed track. The spectators
were then taken on to the front of
the engine ancl travelled by illusion
past some of the most interesting
places on the line. Included in the
same series were views from all quar-
L; trs of the famous falls of Niagara.
|,'. Crystal Theatre
The British Army manoeuvres of
1910 have been attracting large
crowds to Mr. Jamieson's theatre.
I They are very comprehensive and
show an enormous amount of detail,
nearly every branch of the service being. faithfully represented.
Romano's Theatre
Iii addition to thc usual first-class
lilms shown at the above theatre,
amongst which may be mentioned
"The Sioux's Reward," a thrilling
Western drama, and "Moonshine and
Love," an amusing story of illicit
whiskey and love, the management
have been enterprising enough to secure the services of Bolango, the boy
violinist, whose capable renditions
havc been greatly appreciated.
MOMUS
New Empress Theatre
THE    ONLY    HOUSE   IN   VICTORIA   THAT
CHANGES FEATURE FILMS DAILY
Up-to-date and
Well Ventilated
ENTIRELY RENOVATED AND UNDER NEW
MANAGEMENT
The best films that can be obtained are seen here daily.
A pleasant place to spend an hour.
PROF. WOLFENDEN'S ORCHESTRA
Victoria Theatre
It is universally admitted that Thc
Chocolate Soldier as presented at the
Victoria Theatre Tuesday last was
by far thc biggest success ever. presented in the local Opera House so
far as this style of play is concerned
and that it eclipsed 99 per cent, of
plays of any description which havc
been witnessed during the past few
years. The audience were more than
„ enthusiastic, they were vociferous.
The leading lady, Antoinette Kopetzky, was a most fascinating prima.
She was well supported by Margaret Crawford, a contralto of
more than usual excellence, ancl
by Hon Bergere. Amongst the men
Frank H. Belcher scored a big success as Captain Massakroff and was
more than amusing in the "Search"
song. The enunciation of Edmund
Mulcahey was admirable whilst the
vocalism of Harry Davies elicited
thunderous applause. The price de
resistance was "The Letter Song," in
which John R. Phillips ancl Antoinette Kopetzky scored the biggest hit
of the evening; in fact the Chocolate Soldier himself carried off a
large share of the honours. With costumes by Baruch and music by Oscar Strauss it only needed a first
rate company, such as that which
was gracing the boards in the Capital
City on January 4th, to ensure the
success whicii it undoubtedly attained. Not since "Olivette" was first
introduced to London audiences thirty-five years ago by Florence St.
John, Marius and Estley has so thoroughly satisfactory a genuine Opera
Bouffe been seen; its excellence is
not a little enhanced by George Barnard Shaw's brilliant epigrammatic
lines.
"The Inferior Sex"
On Thursday night Maxine Elliot
appeared in the Victoria Theatre in
a farce-comedy entitle^ "The Inferior Sex."    It is well described in
these words, except that perhaps the
former should be underlined; it is a
typical American farce, which might
easily become a boisterous burlesque
in less capable hands. It was redeemed by the superb acting of Frederick Kerr, whom I have not seen for
twenty years, * but who was at that
time one of the most capable actors
in George Alexander's company at
St. Jamec' Theatre. There is a polish ancl a finish about Frederick
Kerr's work, which is rarely seen
now-a-days on any stage. He is to
be classed with Charles Hawtry and
no higher praise could be given. Of
Miss Elliot it need only be said that
she has been a beautiful and graceful woman and that the play in question fitted her like a glove, or her
gown. She demonstrated once more
that light comedy affording her plenty of opportunities to smile, to laugh
and to tease is her metier. The
work of Mr. Clarence as "Bennett,
the Valet," was hardly inferior of that
of Frederick Kerr; it was inimitable
and could not possibly have been improved upon. The house Avas crowded and the audience evidently delighted, and what more could you
have? Clifford Denham is to be congratulated on having inaugurated his
term of management with two such
stellar attractions as "The Chocolate
Soldier" ancl Maxine Elliot. He has
certainly established a record in having two sold-out houses in one week.
New Grand Theatre
That Mabel McKinley is to be one
number on any vaudeville bill is usually enough said on behalf of that
particular bill. There is possibly no
more popular girl on the American
stage today than this charming relative of the martyred president. Her
singing has been one of the sweet features of vaudeville these several years
past and her personality one of its
richest assets. She will head the
Grand bill next week,
Hammond ancl Forrested have capitalized caricature and are making
money with it in vaudeville. One
would go far to find two more accomplished fun makers or a line of
fun more nearly unique. Little Miss
Hammond is quite "some dancer" and
is gifted also with a charming singing voice. There is absolutely nothing at all divine about Mr. Forrester
but he is at the top notch when it]
comes to comedy and eccentric dancing. Between the two of them they
are putting over as delightful a
vaudeville offering as comes this way.
Fred and Elsa Pendleton offer an
instrumental number, with something
in the Avay of vocalics added, that
appeals particularly to those who have
an appreciation of real music. They
are not mere musicians; they are
artists of the best European ancl
American training and their act is
counted one of vaudeville's musical
treats. Their program carries enough
of the classical to appeal strongly to
the musical "highbrow" and at thc
same time, enough of popular melody
to prove highly pleasing to just the
plain person who likes his music because it is music.
There are two of the Rosaires; one
a very pretty and graceful girl who
also is a remarkable equilibrist; the
other a well set up and graceful man
who is as clever a performer as is his
partner. The things they do on the
tight wire are the things that most
™£_\ RAND    wWioT
VAUDEVILLE \_.c_o_-s _
SULLIVAN __ CONSIDINE
WEEK JAN. gth, 1911
First  appearance  in  Victoria
MABEL McKINLEY
Niece of the Martyred Ex-President
of the United States.
In Vocal Selections.
HAMMOND    AND    FORRESTER
Classical and Eccentric Dancers
A Musical Feature
Fred— THE PENDLETONS —Elsa
Vocalists and Instrumentalists
THE ROSAIRES
Dancing Equilibrists in
"Up in The Air"
EMILY DODD
ancl   her   own   Company,   presenting
thc powerful tabloid drama
"The Awakening of Lucille"
THE GRANDISCOPE
other performers in that line never attempted.
Emily Dodd, who, with her company, is now appearing in "The
Awakening of Lucille," a tabloid
drama written expressly for her by
Ben C. Mason, is one of America's
best known emotional actresses. It is
to be said, however, that her reputation was established in the legitimate,
not in vaudeville, but this does not
mean that she is not repeating on the
variety stage the successes she made
in other lines. Miss Dodd's present vehicle is a tense little heart interest story, the tale of a girl ex-convict whose child has been taken from
her during hei '.. ;.trceration and given into the hands of a minister of the
gospel. The action of the playlet
hangs upon her efforts to regain her
little one and its inheritance, to accomplish which she is compelled to
fight, as her chief enemy, her own
brother.
Those readers of The Week who
arc lovers of thc feline race arc reminded of the Cat Show now in progress at the Broad Street Hall. This
is thc first annual show of the Victoria Cat Club and under the energetic secretaryship of Mrs. Kelly, a
fine collection of domestic favourites has been gathered. Additional
eclat is given to the exhibition by thc
fact that it was under thc patronage
of Mrs. T. W. Paterson.
Thc Sister Superior and Sisters in
charge of St, Joseph's Hospital wish
hereby to' return sincere thanks to
the Manager, Editor ancl Directors of
Thc Week for the copy of their appreciated paper sent regularly to the
institution, May a year of prosperity be the record for 19.lt for this
valuable periodical and those in
charge of it.
A Tamer.
Maud—Would you marry a widower?
Ethel—No,  I wouldn't      The    nun I
marry I'm going to tame myself.
M)U\K
THEATRE
Yates Street, Just Below Government
WHERE EVERYBODY GOES
If you are dull and get the blues,
And do not know the place to choose
Come to the Majestic on Yates Street
Bring the friends you are apt to meet
And if on pleasure you are bent,
You won't regret the Dime you spent.
WE CATER TO LADIES AND CHILDREN
CHANGE OF PROGRAMME
Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday
Interesting
Instructive
R0MHN©
THEATRE
GOVERNMENT STREET
NEAR JOHNSON
THE ONLY THEATRE USING FILMS THAT ARE ABSOLUTELY NEW, NEVER HAVING BEEN SHOWN BEFORE.
Latest and best music by Romano Orchestra.
Admission 10 cents; Children at Matinee, 5 cents.
If you wish to begin the New Year Right
be Sure and Buy a
ricLAUGHLIN BUICK
AUTO
They have pleased others and will please you.    Let us
demonstrate the New 1911  Models for you as Ave have
them ready for immediate delivery.
WESTERN MOTOR AND SUPPLY CO.
Broad Street
(Limited.)
R. P. CLARK, Manager
Phone 695
JAMIESON'S
Crystal Theatre
BROAD STREET
The Largest, Best Furnished and Most
Comfortable Picture Theatre
in the City
WATCH FOR CONSTANT IMPROVEMENTS IN APPOINTMENTS AND SERVICE.
VICTORIA, and
KELOWNA, B.C
Headquarters for choice nursery stock.
Apple, pear, cherry, plum and peach trees
and small fruits, also ornamental trees,
shrubs, roses, evergreens, etc. Largest and
best assorted stock in British Columbia.
Bulbs, highest quality, just in.
PRICE LIST AND CATALOGUE ON
APPLICATION THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 1, 1911
The Week
A   Provincial   Newspaper   and   Review,
published every .Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published  at   1208   Government   Si,
Victoria, B. C,   Canada        '!
AV. BLAKEMORE, Editor
THE YUKON
(By W. G. Win.terburn.)
Leaving Skagway, the train immediately begins to climb the mountains,
crawling up one side of a deep valley, where far below can be discerned the old White Pass Trail; at intervals wcre deserted log cabins,
which had been roadhouses and depots in' the days of the Klondyke
rush, broken bridges, where the trail
had.crossed the turbulent stream;
and here and there a post, or a cross
indicating the last resting place of
one who had fallen by the wayside.
Near the Summit is a spidery bridge,
crossing the gorge at an immense
altitude; the rails are narrow gauge;
and the train/ like a . gigantic centipede glides gingerly across.
About twenty miles from Skagway
we have climbed nearly 3,000 feet;
the frontier is soon reached and the
twin flagstaffs, one bearing the Stars
and Stripes and the other the British
Ensign, indicate that we are about
once more to enter British territory.
Some little imagination is required to
realise that here, a thousand miles
from Victoria, we are still in our own
Province of British Columbia. About
twenty miles or so further on, we enter the great lone land of the Yukon.
The train is now on a plateau surrounded by snow-capped mountains;
not very grand, but bulky; a few
stunted pines and coarse grass is all
'hat grows.
Soon we come to Lake Bennett, the
headwaters of the great Yukon river,
which winds for over two thousand
miles, penetrating the Arctic Circle
before it debouches into the sea,
which is almost within sight at its
source.
Mile after mile we run alongside
the lake; as we advance, the country
becomes more open, but there is lit
tie vegetation, and no life except a
few ducks.
At Bennett, a steaming hot lunch is
obtainable at the station; there is a
picturesque church here, now partly
ruined; for there is no congregation,
the whole of the inhabitants of Bennett consisting of the railway officials. At this place, during the gold
stampede, prospectors built their
boats for the final lap of their long
journey, and it was then that the
church was needed.
The rest of thc passage was through
a sandy and inhospitable desert; a
scrubby plain in summer, a wild
snow-covered scene in autumn, when
the return trip was made.
The next station, Caribou, is quite
a ..fair-sized village; with two large
hotels and a store; steamers for Atlin and beyond, connect here with the
train.
White Horse is the terminus of thc
railroad, and is a long town stretched
along the left bank of thc Yukon,
here termed the Lewis river; it is a
thriving place of about 400 inhabit
ants; there art churches, hospital
and an immense barracks for thc
North West Mounted Police. Fine
soldierly looking fellows they are
with their scarlet uniforms, boots
and spurs. *,*
People here are honest; a stall of
picture postcards was left open a
night; apparently if a purchaser came
along hc would havc to , leave his
money on the table and select his
cards. Carpenters leave their tools
about their job when they "knock
off," and nobody bothers to lock
their doors.
The weather, August, was brilliantly, fine, quite hot at midday, with
sometimes sharp frosts at night; the
mosquitoes had just disappeared, but
their successors, the black flics, were
in full force; men wore gauze veils
to work in, for thc bite of the black
fly is as bad, or worse, than his long
snouted  predecessor.
The Whitehorse Rapids, about a
mile above the town, limits navigation up stream; these rapids, and
Miles Canyon further above, caused
many miners to come to grief in the
days of the Klondyke rush.
The river rolls swiftly by the town;
a majestic stream when in flood and
requiring powerful steamers to breast
it. Twenty-five miles further down it
expands into a beautiful lake; seen in
September, with the green and golden tints on the trees, snow crested
mountains in the distance, and thc
blue water of the lake in the foreground; Lake Labarge is an enchanting picture and must live long in the
memory bf all lovers of the beautiful. Below the lake run thirty
miles of rushing river, the current in
places worthy of the name of rapids.
Real rapids are swept through at the
Five Fingers Rocks, a remarkable
cluster of pinnacles jutting out of
the stream, forming natural gateways. The Rink Rapids, just below,
are shallow but strong.
Right through to Dawson, the scenery is sufficiently interesting to keep
the voyager on de^Jc' all daylight,
hours, and these are.mearly twenty-
four hours per'dieiai.'in early sum-.,
mer. There are logging camps, and
coal mines, and sometimes a cluster
of cabins inhabited by trappers or
Indians; and on the bars lonely gold
seekers patiently washing their pans.
The side streams of the Yukon are
not much known to the outside world.
We turn into the Hootalinqua, below the 30-mile rapids, and find ourselves on a lonely and picturesque
river; at one place passing crumbling
cliffs, 200 feet high, vertical and constantly sliding down into the water;
threshing up against the stream we
seem to be uncomfortably long in
getting past, on the return passage
we glided by in a few minutes.
We reach the Roaring Bull rapids,
and here we had a hard fight with
that well-named current; minute after
minute passed and we just stood still;
the engines groaned, the wheel revolved its hardest, steam roared off at the
safety valve, and t'he water roared below. Gazing steadily at a stump on
the shore, it at length appeared to
move slightly astern. Yes; it is a
few inches abaft. Fire up. We are
making it. Inch by inch, until presently the headway is plainly perceptible. We have conquered the Roaring Bull, the first steamer to do it,
and the Owner is dancing about the
deck with joy.
A few miles of fairly, placid water,
and Ave come to the Boswell Rapids.
These are of a different character;
deep and oily, with sil tit swirling eddies gliding quickly by. We tackle it
with confidence, but reckon without
our host; the black current is irresistible, and after urging our engines
for many minutes to their utmost capacity slight fall of pressure occurs,
and the boat begins to go backwards.
In vain she strives to regain her way;
the current has her in its grip and
backwards stilt she goes. Fighting is
futile; wc make for the shore, a hundred fathoms of line is paid out and
made fast to a tree the steam capstan
winds this in while the engines work
full ahead, and slowly we force our
way through the rushing waters.
This process of "lining" is laborious and of .frequent necessity; thirty miles per day is very good work,
but the return passage is swift and
thrilling, and sometimes dangerous.
Thc Hootalinqua is a beautiful river; the forest on cither bank does not
extend far, and beyond are wide
stretches of meadow land suitable
for cultivation.
The short summer of these regions
does not encourage a vast amount of
cereal and vegetable produce; but oats
are grown successfully, turnips thrive,
and other hardy vegetables are raised
in marketable quantities*.
The Yukon cannot be boosted as a
country suitable for settlers yet; what
produce is grown is the work of pioneers who make a living by cutting
wood, fishing, and trapping. The Indians are nearly,all nomads and do
no husbandry.
It will take thc .slow .growthv of
generations to populate the country;
as Well might farmers be induced to
quit the fertile plains of France and
settle in Siberia as it would be to get
cultivators to make that lone land
their home, and rely upon the earth
for their existence; it will only be
after a race is born to the soil that
permanent population will increase;
when there are native born, who like
the rest of mankind will cherish affection for the land of their birth.
The "call of the wild" and the music
of the riffles, are poetic; but do not
last long in the ears of those accustomed to milder conditions.
Arrived at Teslin Lake, a scene of
beauty opens before us; a wide expanse of shimmering sea with lofty
mountains in the distance. The country round about is unexplored and is
probably the finest hunting ground on
the continent for big bags can always
be assured. The village, or hamlet,
consists of a trading post with a few
resident white men, and some Indian
hunters' families; they are all happy
and thriving.
The Pelly River is another affluent
of the Yukon and a larger stream; the
confluence is at. Selkirk, quite a respectable sized village. The description of the ascent of the Hootalinqua
might suffice for the Pelly, except
that this river is still more lonely,
and more difficult to navigate. For
two hundred miles we saw no human
being; at nights the boat would be
tied up to the bank, lights lit to keep
bears off, and no time lost in seeking
the arms of Morpheus, for we were
always up and away again before
dawn.
Both bears and moose were numerous; we did not molest the former as
the pelts are no good at that season
and the flesh uneatable on account of
their fishy diet. The banks of the
rivers are strewn with dead salmon;
their mission in life accomplished, the
fish are exhausted after their long
struggle against torrent and shoal and
they may be seen in hundreds gasping
their lives out in a few inches of water. Bears come down to fatten on the
bodies, and especially towards evening
are extremely frequent.
We shot all the moose we needed
ancl lived upon moose meat for weeks;
those lordly animals are rather stupid,
and filled with curiosity at the
strange sight of a steamer would gaze
stolidly at it, patiently waiting to be
shot.
We had to line up the Squaw Rapids and nearly came to grief in a
whirlpool at Fishhook Bend; after
passing the mouth of the Macmillan
River the riffles became very shallow,
until finally Ave could get no further
and had to cache the cargo a dozen
miles from our objective, the Ross
River.
During the nine days since we left
the Yukon, the water had fallen two
or three feet, which made the return
journey very perilous. Sweeping
through Granite Canyon, we found it
full of projecting rocks, which had
been covered on the upward passage;
the ship struck one of them so violently as to cause the boiler to jump
up several inches, and seriously in
jured one bf the crew; the wheel was
jammed on to another, and there we
were stuck in the middle of a roaring
torrent and a snowstorm raging the
while. Ultimately a steel hawser was
got on shore and we hauled off. Then
came the thrilling moment when we
came to let go and once more trust to
the mad waters; like a trick cyclist
wheeling about amongst bottles, we
threaded through, due to the wonderful skill of the skipper and a great
deal of good luck.
Those Canadian rivermen are admirable in handling a boat. When fore*
ing against a rapid the helmsman
steers his craft up behind an eddy
then will shoot her across the stream,
maybe losing a little way in the pas
sage; up behind a rock or jutting
point; then chassez croisez through
the weakest part of the current; until
the battle is won and she reaches a
stretch of tolerably calm water.
Coming down stream requires still
greater skill; oftcr the channel is but
little wider than the boat's, length,
though the river is a quarter of a
mile in breadth. Full of sharp bends
and shoals, the boat is swiftly carried
on although perhaps with the engines
I know some girls who are strong on art, and they all have lofty
brows, and they paint mg scenes in the busy mart ahd pictures Of
pea-green cows; and I say "It's great! While the ages whirl.your
glory shall .'.never fade," but my sad heart yearns for the1 old-time
girl who bragged of
The Bread She Made
Robin Hood, an exceptionally good flour, sack $1.90
Lake 0' the Woods, the favorite of many, sack $1.90
Royal Household, a most excellent bread flour, per sack $1.90
Royal Standard, a flour that deserves its great popularity, sack $1.90
Moffet's Best, many consider this the best procurable, sack...$1.85
Snowflake, splendid pastry flour, sack  $1.85
"Dixi" Flour, positively unequalled for light, flaky pastry, sack $1.75
Calgary, a flour that pleases everyone, sack $1.75
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
Independent Grocers, 1317 Government Street
Tels. go, 51, 52. Liquor Dept. Tel. 1590
A Tale of Woe or
Wail of Toe
Ever hear the story of a man who was shaving and he
accidentally cut off his nose? In his excitement he
dropped the razor and decapitated one of his toes.
Hastily picking up the dismembered portions of his
anatoniy, he clasped them to the bleeding wounds and
bound them up tightly.
After the flesh had grown fast and healed up, he
removed the bandages and was filled with horror when
he found a well developed toe in lieu of a nasal organ
and vice versa. Now, whenever he gets a cold he has
to remove his shoe and stocking in order to blow his
nose.
Tales of woe are pretty frequent in this Avork-a-
day world, and there are many varieties.
But there's no tale of voe the morning after, if you
keep on the safe side and drink good wine.
Always order Mumm's "Extra Dry" because there
are no bad effects after this absolutely pure champagne.
Look for the rose colored capsule.
If the bottle does not bear this distinguishing
mark it is not the genuine "Extra Dry."
PITHER   &   LEISER
Sole B. C. Agents for Mumm's Champagne
VICTORIA VANCOUVER NEL&oN
FURNITURE PACKED BY EXPERTS
For shipment to any part of the world.
Good  Clean  Materials.      Satisfaction  Guaranteed.     Estimates Given.
Special Care taken witli Glass and China.
A  Special  feature of  our business  is  re-upholstering   and   restoring
Furniture of all descriptions.
E. S. STYLES
PHONE 3149
805 POBT STREET
running reversed; just as she appears
about to strike, her stem is shoved
into the bank; she turns on her own
centre, slips clown the riffle stern
first. When clear, "full speed ahead"
is the order, and she waltzes round
again and proceeds on her course
with her prow in the direction she
should go. Hairpin curves arc taken
which to the novice look like deliberate suicide, but it is the only way to
navigate such waters, and accidents
are comparatively infrequent*.
It was high time to return, or Ave
would have to face the prospect of
"mushing it" for hundreds of miles.
Far past the reach of telegraphs and
beyond civilization, we made haste
homeward. Wildfowl had long been
flying south in attenuated V shaped
file jthe aurora borealis filled the heavens -with its powerful mystic light;
and any moment might bring a frost
which would grip the little steamer
fast until spring.
Arrived, at Whitehorse, we found
everyone in high spirits as to prospects for 1911. Wages were good,
labor scarce. Business better than it
had been for a long time. The gold
mines in the Iditarod district promise
well; scores who had gone out for
the winter were returning next spring
and hundreds more are expected to
come in. Whitehorse, as a distributing centre, looks forward to great
prosperity  next  season.
Pianos Tuned to Order
Tuner—1 called to tune the piano.
Lady—But I didn't send for you.
Tuner—No,   but   the   man   next   door
did.
Utilizing- an Accompaniment
"I'll be kind 0' glad when Josh gits
home from school," said Farmer Corn-
tossel. "I have an idea he can be right
useful."
"Are you going to put htm to work?"
"Maybe, I've exhausted all the language I know on that team of mules.
But t haven't given up hope. I want
to'see whether Josh can startle 'em
some with his college yell."
, Help Us!
Some men were born for great things,
Some men were born for small;
AU  women were born for millionaires'
wives;
Good Lord, watch o'er us all!
But with all woman's resourcefulness
she has not yet figured out a way to
keep both hands in her muff and at the
same time to hold up her skirt.
Where to Bestow Them
"Oh, madame," said the French maid,
"leettle Fido weell no eat ze bon-bons."
"The dear, intelligent little doggie!"
exclaimed Mrs. Swellman. "There must
be something whong with those bonbons, Yvette; give them to the children."' THE AVEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 1, 1911
Dominion and Provincial News
War Eagie
The War Eagle mine at Rossland is
once nn <■_ in working order.
New Line
A line is to be built by the C. P .R.
from Cardston to Lethbridge.
C.  N. A.  Coal Dock Burned
The Canadian Northern Railway
Company's coal dock and contents
were destroyed by fire on Jan. 3rd.
Hydro-Electric Sites
Messrs. Mackenzie & Mann are behind a scheme to acquire hydro-electric sites north of Lac du Bennett, the
civic power site on Winnipeg river.
Nicola Valley
In the Nicola Valley, hogs are teu
cents a pound live weight, and lambs
.7 each; while cattle are 2J-4 to 4
cents a pound live weight.
s, Printers Will Meet
The Boundary and Kootenay Printers' Board of Trade will hold their
regular semi-annual meeting at Nelson! on Saturday, January 21st.
Social Evil in Lethbridge
Chief of Police Gillespie is asking
the.city council to appoint a commission of citizens to investigate thoroughly the whole matter of segregation and the social evil.
Chtaper Sleepers
Within a comparatively short time
it is certain that Canadians will be
able to occupy upper berths in sleeping cars at substantially lower rates
than are charged for lower ones, and
it is probable that tthere will be some
reduction in rates charged for lower
berths.
From May 1 to October 31, to leave
Kispiox every Monday at 8 a. m.; to
deliver the mail at Hazelton post office and convey return mail to Kispiox with all despatch.
From November 1 to April 30, to
carry mails as above every alternate
Monday.
Poultry Expert Appointed
Mr. John R. Terry, for the past five
and a half years assistant professor
of poultry at the Ontario Agricultural College, Guelph, is to take charge
of the poultry department affairs under the department of agriculture, entering upon his duties here with the
new year.
Harvest In Canada
A bulletin of the census office issued
recently gives the total area of the
field crops grown in Canada this year
as 32,711,062 acres and the value of
the crops as $507,185,500, compared
with 30,065,556 acres and a value of
$..32,992,100 last year. Wheat, oats
and barley had last year a total area
of 18,917,900 acres, with a value of
$289,144,000 and this year an area of
20,992,900 acres valued at $248,738,300.
The yield of wheat, oats and barley
this year in Manitoba, Saskatchewan
and Alb;rta is 277,021,000 bushels
compared with 364,279,000 bushels last
year.
Heavy Mails
Clerks at the Sherbrooke Post Office state that never in the history of
the* office has there been such a large
amount of mail through here. The
staff was increased, and even then
overtime was necessary to dispose of
the letters and parcels.
Strikes Ledge in Dundee Mine
The Dundee gold mine on Dundee
mountain in Ymir camp, has encountered the main vein with its long
cross-cut, at a distance in of about 500
feet. Where the ledge is cross-cut
15 feet of ore is shown thus far, the
hanging wall having not yet been
reched. The vein has a dip of about
85 degrees. The tunnel gives a
] depth of a good many hundred feet
under the upper workings, which con-
] sist principally of a shaft. The val
I ues at the point of contact have not
yet been determined, but it is sur*
mised that they are there. The new
compressor is now being employed
and the drill makes four feet a shift,
working two  shifts.
New C. P. R. Hotel
C. W. Sharpe, of Winnipeg, has secured the contract for the new Canadian Pacific hotel at Balfour, near
Nelson, B. C. Thc structure will be
three storeys high, 205 feet by 105
feet, with a foundation of cement and
s'tone. It is expected to be open for
thc tourist season of 1911.
New Canadian Coins
The Finance Department is awaiting the approval of King George V.
of his effigy to be used on Canadian
gold coins. As soon as this is done
and the dies are forwarded, the coinage of gold will begin at the Ottawa
branch of the royal mint. This will
probably be next month.
Reduce Freight Tariff
All railways in Western Canada
are ordered by the railway commission to reduce their freight tariffs so
as not to discriminate against Regina
and Moose Jaw in favor of Winnipeg.
Owing to the great scarcity of potatoes in Manitoba railways have given
cheap rates on this commodity when
shipped into the province.
Finest Iron Ore
The iron ore made at Port Arthur
by the Atikokan Iron company is the
best in the world, is the effect of 1
communication received by Manager
J. Dix Fracer from the Rogers Brown
company, selling agents, who in the
United States handle fifty different
brands from thirteen states and are
the largest dcilers in iron ore in the
world.
Kispiox Mail
Instructions have been received
from the postal authorities giving effect to the establishment of a post
office at Kispiox. Hugh Taylor has
ben appointed postmaster, and also
has the mail contract. Following is
the schedule proposed by the officials:
Hotel Licenses Increased
The City Council of the City of
Chilliwack has increased the license fee
in that city from $400 to $800 per annum. The current license term ends
January 15, and in order to make the
amendment to the by-law providing
for the increase effective on that date
it was necessary that the present
council should take action before its
term of office closes on January 12.
This increase will not be a surprise to
the hotelmen as it has been expected
for some time. The question of increasing the number of licenses in the
city will be left for the new council to
decide. A city by-law, now in force,
limits the number of licenses to two
until such time as the population of
the city passes 2,000; but there has
been considerable agitation for an
amendment providing for the granting of at least one additional license
at once.
COAST   RANGE   III   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that I, Percy E.
Brown, of Toronto, Ont., occupation
Commercial Traveller, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about seven miles
distant in a southerly direction from
Salmon River two miles southeast of
Bella Coola-Alcatcho summer trail,
thence south 40 chains; thence west 40
chains: thence north 40 chains; thence
east 40 chains to commencement, containing 160 acres.
Dated October 8th  ,1910.
nov 26 PERCY E. BROWN.
LICENCE    TO    AN    EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANY
Companies  Act
July lst,  1910
CANADA:
Province of British Columbia.
No.   31.7A   (1910)
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that "The
Hemlock (B. C.) Mines, Limited," is
authorized and licensed to carry on
business within the Province of British
Columbia, and to carry out or effect all
or any of the objects of the Company
to which the legislative authority of
the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head offlce of the Company Is
situate at 6 Old Pewry In the City of
London,  England.
The head ofllce of the Company in
this Province is situate at 1112 Langley Street, A'ictoria, and Charles Du
bois Mason, Barrister and Solicitor,
whose address Is Victoria aforesaid, is
the attorney for the Company.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is eighty thousand pounds, di
vided into twenty thousand shares.
Given   under   my   hand   and   Seal   of
Ofllce  at  Victoria,  Province  of  British
Columbia,  this  first  day  of  December,
one thousand nine hundred and ten.
D.  WHITESlDn,
Registrar of Joint-Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has  been  established  and  licensed are:
To acquire mines, mining rights and
metalliferous land in British Columbia
or in any part of the Continent of
America and' elsewhere, and any interest therein, and to enter into the
contract mentioned in Article 2 of the
Company's Articles of Association registered  herewith.
To search for, crush, win, get, quarry,
smelt, calcine, reduce, amalgamate,
dress, refine, and prepare for market,
and to buy, sell, export and deal in
gold, ore and other metalliferous and
mineral substances of all kinds; to
acquire 0 rerect and maintain and use
smelting or other works, and mining,
milling and other machinery of all-
kinds, and to carry on business as
miners, smelters, refiners, and metallurgists in all branches;
To search for, examine and inspect
mines and ground supposed to contain
gold ore or other metals or minerals
and to search for and obtain information in regard to mines, mining districts and localities, and to purchase,
take on lease, or otherwise acquire for
any estate or interest, any such mines
or ground, and any lands, waters, water
rights, mines, mining rights, minerals,
ores, buildings machinery, plant, stock-
in-trade, utensils and real and personal property of any kind, the acquisition of which the Company may
think conducive directly or indirectly
to any of its objects.
To construct, erect, maintain and improve and to aid In and to subscribe
towards the construction, erection,
maintenance and improvement of railways, tramways, roads, wells, watercourses, aqueducts, waterways, reservoirs, shafts, wheels, poles, buildings,
machinery and other works, undertakings, and appliances which may seem
necessary or convenient for any of the
purposes of the Company.
To promote, make, provide, acquire,
take on lease, grant running powers
over, work, use and dispose of railways, tramways, and other roads, ways
and means of access to any part or
parts of the property of the Company,
and to contribute towards the expense
of promoting, making, providing, -acquiring, working and using the same.
To lay out land for building purposes,
and to build on, improve, let on building leases, advance money to persons
building, or otherwise develop the same
in such manner as may seem expedient
to advance the Company's interests.
To apply for, purchase or otherwise
acquire, any patents, brevets d'invention, concessions, and the like, conferring an exclusive or non-exclusive or
limited rights to use, or any secret or
other information as to any invention,
which may seem capable of being used
for any of the purposes of the Company,
or the acquisition of wliieh may seem
calculated, directly or indirectly to
benefit this Company, and to use, exercise, develop, grant licenses in respect
of or otherwise turn to account the property, rights and information so acquired"
To purchase or otherwise acquire and
undertake all or any part of the business, property, and liabilities of any
person or company carrying on .any
business which this Company is authorized to carry on or possessed of property suitable for the purposes of the
Company;
To enter into any arrangement with
any Government or authorities, supreme,
municipal, local or otherwise, and to
obtain from any such Government or
authority all rights, concessions, and
privileges that may seem conducive to
the Company's objects or any of them;
To procure the Company to be incorporated, registered, domiciled, or otherwise recognized in British Columbia,
France or elsewhere abroad;
To enter into partnership or into any
arrangement for sharing profits, union
of interests, joint adventure, reciprocal concessions, or co-operation with
any person or company carrying on or
engaged in or about to carry on or engage in any business or transaction
which this Company Is authorized to
carry on or engage in, or any other
business or transaction capable of being
conducted so as directly or Indirectly io
benefit this Company, and to take or
otherwise acquire and hold shares or
stock in or securities of, and to subsidize, or otherwise assist any such
company and to sell, hold, re-issue, with
or without guarantee, or otherwise deal
with  any  such   shares   or   securities.
To sell the undertaking of the Company or any part thereof, for such
consideration as the Company may think
fit and in particular for shares (fully
or partly paid) debentures or securities
of any other Company having objects
altogether, or In part, similar to those
of   this   Company.
To promote any Company or companies for the purpose of acquiring all
or any property, rights and liabilities
of this Company, or for any other purpose which may seem directly or indirectly calculated to benefit this Company;
To invest and deal with the moneys
of the Company not immediately required, upon such securities and in
such manner as may from time to time
be determined;
To lend money to such persons and
on such terms as may seem expedient,
and in particular to customers of and
persons having dealings with the Company, and to guarantee the performance of contracts by members of or
persons having dealings with the Company;
To raise or borrow, or secure the
payment of money in, such manner and
on such terms as may seem expedient
and in particular by the issue of debentures, debenture stock, whether perpetual or otherwise, and charged or not
charged upon the whole or any part
of the property of the Company, both
present and future, Including its uncalled capital;
To draw, accept, endorse, discount,
execute, and issue bills of exchange,
promissory notes, debentures, bills of
lading, and other negotiable or transferable  Instruments  or  securities.
To remunerate any party for services
rendered, or to be rendered, in placing
or assisting to place any shares in the
Company's capital, or any debentures,
debenture stock, or other securities of
the Company, or in or about the formation or promotion of tbe Company or
the conduct of its business;
To pay all preliminary costs, charges,
stamp duties, and other expenses in
connection with the promotion, formation  and  registration  of  tlie  Company;
To do all or any of the above things
In any part of the world, and either as
principals, agents, trustees, contractors
or otherwise, and either alone or in conjunction with others, and either by or
through agents, sub-contractor:), trustees or otherwise;
To  do  all   such  other   things  ns  arc
incidental   or  conducive   to   the  attaln-
mehi  of the above objects,
dec 31
LICENCE    TO    AN    EXTRA-PROVIN-
CIAL   COMPANY
Companies Act.
(July lst, 1910.)
CANADA:
Province of British Columbia.
No. 250A (1910)
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that "Winnipeg
Casket Company" is authorized and licensed to carry on business within the
Province of British Columbia, and to
carry out or effect all or any of the
objects of the Company to which the
legislative authority of the Legislature
of British Columbia extends,
The head offloe of the Company ls
situate at Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
The head office of the Company in
this Province, is situate at the Law
Office of Clarence Wilton Bradshaw, Victoria, and Clarence Wilton Bradshaw,
Barrister-at-law, whose address is Victoria aforesaid, is the attorney for the
Company.
The amount of the capital of the Company is one hundred and fifty thousand
dollars, divided into fifteen hundred
shares.
Given under my hand and Seal of
Offlce at Victoria, Province of British
Columbia, this twenty-eighth day of November, one thousand nine hundred and
ten.
D.   WHITESIDE,
Registrar of Joint-Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has been established and licensed are:—
Manufacturing, purchasing, selling,
dealing in both as principals and agents
for others, burial caskets and cases,
robes and linings, casket hardware,
hearses and ambulances and undertakers'
supplies of all kinds, and packing boxes,
cases and crates of all kinds, and lumber, mouldings, sashes and doors and
woodenware of all kinds, and also to engage in any and all kinds of businesses
and enterprises in any way allied to any
of the aforesaid industries or in whieh
the Company may desire to engage, and
for such purposes to own, acquire and
operate such plants and machinery as
may be required therefor; to engage in
any business, transaction or enterprise,
and to do and perform any and all act or
acts which may be incidental or conducive to the interest of the Company;
to own and acquire by purchase, lease
or otherwise and by exchange or for cash
or partly for cash and partly for credit
or otherwise or for stock in the Company, any real or personal property; to
purchase and sell and generally deal in
lands and personal property, subject to
the provisions of "The Manitoba Joint
Stock Companies Act," to acquire, own
and hold shares in the capital stock of
other corporation and to use its funds
in the purchase of such stock and to exchange its stock for that of some other
company, and to lend its moneys on
mortgages of real or personal property,
or upon stock, bonds, or debentures; to
hold and acquire by purchase, grant,
lease, exchange or otherwise for cash
or partly for cash and partly for credit
or otherwise or for stock in the Company, any lands, timber, timber lands,
lumber and lumber mills, machinery,
boats of all kinds, railways and tramways for the purpose ancl on the property of the Company only, and to operate such mills, tramways, railways and
other enterprises that may be considered
necessary or in the interests of the Com*
pany, but as to railways and tramways
only on the property of the Company;
also with power to buy or acquire by
amalgamation or otherwise the property
of any other company and to let or sublet any property whether real or personal or franchise owned by tlie Com
pany, and to sell, mortgage, hypothecate
or otherwise dispose of all real or personal property of the Company and its
business or undertaking or any part
thereof and for such consideration as
the company may think fit.
dec 3
RUPERT   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Henry E. B. Foster, of Vancouver, occupation Broker,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Section ten (10)
Township twenty-four (24), Rupert Dis*
trict; thence south forty (40) chains;
thence east eighty (80) chains; thence
north forty (40) chains; thence west
eighty (80) chains to the point of com
mencement.
Dated 24th October,  1910.
HENRY E. B. FOSTER,
nov 26 Reginald Jaeger, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert
TAKE notice that F. M. Kelly, of Victoria, B.C., occupation Prospector, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north shore of Nlmpkish Lake, east of
small creek entering lake near outlet,
and marked "F. M. K.'s S.E. corner";
thence nortli 40 chains; tiience west 40
chains; thence south to lake shore about
50 chains; thence following lake shore,
about 40 chains to point of commencement, and containing 160 acres more or
less.
Dated October 17, 1910.
dec 3 F. M. KELLY.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert
TAKE NOTICE that John Blackstock
Hawley, of Fort Worth, Texas, occupation Civil Engineer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the northwest corner of Lot
45, Rupert District, and marked "J. B.
H.'s N.E. Corner," thence south 80
chains; thence west to shore of Lake
Amutz, about 20 chains; thence in northerly direction following shore line of
Lake Amutz, Amutz River, and Lake
Nlmpkish to point 40 chains south of
mouth of Kla-anch River; thence east
40 chains to point of commencement, and
containing 4S0 acres more or less.
Dated  October  22,   1910.
dec 3     JOHN BLACKSTOCK HAWLEY.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert
TAKE notice that John AV. AVray, of
Fort Worth, Texas, occupation Farmer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
northeast side of Island situated In
mouth of Kla-anch River, Rupert District, and inarked "J. W. AV.'s N.E.
Corner"; tiience following shore line
west, soutli, east and north to line of
Lot 17; thence north to point of commencement, and eontnlulng 160 acres
more or less.
Dated  October  22,   1910.
dec 3 JOHN W. WRAY.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands,
the Hon. the Chief Commissioner of
for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum under the following described
submarine areas adjacent to the West
Coast of Saturna Island, Cowichan District, British Columbia:—Commencing at
a post planted at the southwest corner
of Section No. 8; thence 80 chains west;
thence 80 chains north; thence 80 chains
east; thence 80 chains south to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Located this twelfth day of October,
A.D.  1910.
C.   BURNETT,
dec 10 Gerald F. Payne, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
the Hon. the Chief Commissioner of
for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum under the following described
submarine areas adjacent to the Southwest Coast of Saturna Island, Cowichan
District, British Columbia:—Commencing at a post planted on the Southwest
corner of Section 3; thence 80 chains
south; thence 80 chains east; thence 80
chains north; thence SO chains west to
point of commencement, containing 640
acres, more or less.
Located this twelfth day of October,
A.D.  1910.
ARTHUR PITTS,
dec 10 Gerald F. Payne, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
the Hon. the Chief Commissioner of
for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum under the following described
submarine areas adjacent to the AVest
Coast of Saturna Island, Cowichan District, British Columbia:—Commencing at
a post planted at the northwest corner
of Section 5; thence SO chains west;
thence 80 chains south; thence 80 chains
east; thence SO chains north to the point
of commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
Located this twelfth day of October,
A.D.   1910.
Mrs. Alice Sandys Trewartha-Jamei.
dec 10 Gerald F. Payne, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
the Hon. the Chief Commissioner of
for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum under the following described
submarine areas adjacent to tbe southwest coast of Saturna Island, Cowichan
District, British Columbia:*— Commencing at a post planted at the southwest
corner of Section No. 2; thence SO chains
south; thence SO chains east; thence SO
chains north; thence SO chains west to
point of commencement, containing 640
acres more or less.
Located  tllis twelfth day of October,
A.D.   1910.
dec. 10 GERALD F. PAYNE.
SATURNA ISLAND, B.C.
Island District
NOTICE is hereby give nthat thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum
under the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner of Section S, Saturna Islam*.,
and marked S. E. corner of G. F. Payne's
coal claim; thence north SO chains;
thence west SO chains; thence south SO
chains; thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, with exception of any
lands therein contained granted prior to
1899.
Located December 23rd, 1910.
dec 31 G, F. PAYNE.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
the Hon. the Chief Commissioner of
for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum under the following described
submarine areas adjacent to the southwest coast of Saturna Island, Cowichan
District, British Columbia:—Commencing at a post planted about 20 chains
north of the southeast corner of Section 5; thence 80 chains south; thence
80 chains west; thence 80 chains north;
thence 80 chains east to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less.
Located this twelfth day of October,
A.D.  1910.
MAURICE B. CANE,
dec 10 Gerald F. Payne, Agent.
COAST , RANGE III, LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE notice that William Wingfield
Colley. of Harpenden, England, occupation Clergyman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-west corner of Lot
318. Range HI, Coast District, on Salmon
River, 12 miles north of Abuntlet Lake;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 40 chains to .point of commencement.
Dated November 29th, 1910.
WILLIAM WINGFIELD COLLEY,
dec 3 E. P. Colley, Agent.
NOTICE ls hereby given that thirty
days after date 1 intend to apply to
the Hon. the Chief Commissioner of
for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum under the following described
submarine areas adjacent to the southwest coast of Saturna Island, Cowichan
District, Britisli Columbia:*—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast
corner of Section No. 4; thence 80
chains south; thence 80 chains west;
thence 80 chains north; thence 80 chains
east to point of commencement, containing 610 acres more or less.
Located this twelfth day of October,
A.D.  1910.
C. T. CROSS,
dec 10 Gerald F. Payne, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date 1 Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
the Hon. Chief Comnilssloner of Lands
for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum under the following described
submarine areas adjacent to the southwest of Saturna Island, Cowichan
District, British Columbia:—Commencing at a post planted about 20 chains
north nf the southwest corner of Section No. 1, thence 80 chains south;
thence SO chains east; thence 80 chains
nortli; thence 80 chains west to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
Located this twelfth day of October,
A.D.  1910.
ELIZABETH CLARA PAYNE,
dec 10 Gerald F. Payne,  Agent. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 1, 1911
PRIVATE BILLS
H OTICE
The time limited by the Rules of the
House for the presentation of Petitions
for Private Bills will expire on the 22nd
day of January, 1910.
Private bills must be presented to the
House on or before the 2nd day of
February, 1910.
Reports of Standing or Select Committees upon Private Bills will not be
received after the 9th day of February,
1910.
If the rules are suspended to allow a
petition to be received or a bill presented,  double  fees  are  payable.
Dated this 25th day of October, 1910.
THORNTON FELL,
nov 5 Clerk Legislative Assembly.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve existing by reason of the notice
published in the B. C. Gazette of the
27th of December, 1907, over lands situated on Cortez Island, formerly covered by Timber Licences Nos. 27196 and
35420 is cancelled, and that the said
lands will be open to location at midnight on March 16th, 1911.
ROBERT  A  RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands
Lands   Department,
Victoria,  B.  C.
dec lu
VICTORIA ASSESSMENT  DISTRICT
Revision 1911.
Assessment Rolls.
NOTICE is hereby given that a Court
of Revision ancl Appeal, under the provisions of the "Assessment Act, 1903,"
for A'ictoria City, North Victoria, South
Victoria, and the Islands adjacent thereto of the above district, ancl for "Taxation of Corporations" will be held at
the Assessor's Ofllce, Parliament' Buildings, on Thursday, the 12th day of
January, 1911, at 10 o'clock in the forenoon.
For the Esquimalt Division of the
above district will be held at Price's
Hotel, Parsons Bridge, on Friday, the
13th day of January, 1 911, at 11 o'clock
in the forenoon.
THOS. S. FUTCHER,
Judge of the Court of Revision
and Appeal,
dec. 31
CANCELLATION  OF  RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve existing by  reason  of  the notice
published in  the  B.  C.   Gazette  of the
27th of December, 1907, over lands situate on Texada Island, New Westminster
District,   formerly   covered   by   Timber
Licence No. 13449, is cancelled, and that
the said lands will be open for location
under  the  provisions  of  the  Land Act
at midnight on the 22nd of March, 1911.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy   Commissioner  of  Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C.
CANCELLATION OF RESEDVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve existing by reason of the notice
published in the B. C. Gazette of the
27th of December, 1907, over lands situated on KIngeome Inlet formerly covered by Timber Licence No. 44995 Is
cancelled, and that the said lands will
be open for location under the provisions of the Land Act at midnight on
March   Kith,   1911.
ROBERT   A  RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of  Lands.
Lands  Dejartment,
A'ictoria,  li.  C.
dec 10
CANCELLATION OF RESERVES
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserves existing on Crown lands In
Range 5, Coast District and in Cariboo
District situated In the vicinity of Stuart River, notices of which, dated Decemher 17th, 190S, and February 15th,
1910, were published In the British Columbia Gazette in the Issues of December 17th, 1UOS, and February 17th, 1910,
are cancelled In so far as the said reserves relate to Lots numbered 231)1,
2390a, 2971, 2971a, 2395, 2970, 2969,
2969a, 2951a, 2S36, 2S10, 2S35, 2S20, 2788,
2rsDa, 2789, 2790, 27S7, 2787a, 2791a,
2792a, 2952, and 2828a, Range li, Coast
District.
R. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Department of Lands,
A'ictoria, B. C, Jan. Srd, 1911.
,1an 7
CANCELLATION OF RESERVES
NOTICE Is hereby given that the reserves existing on Crown lands In
Range 5 .Coast District and In Cariboo
District situated In the vicinity of Babine Lake, notices of which, dated Decemher 17th, 1908, and May Bth, 1910,
were published In the British Columbia
Gazette In the Issues of December 17th,
1908. and May Sth. 1910. arc cancelled In
■■•o far as the said reserves relate to
I nts numbered 656, 657, 658, 659, 660,
661, 662, 663. 661. 665. 660, 657, 668,
669, 670, 673, 67*1, 675, 676, 1873, 671,
672.  677,   678,  679,  680,   1S70,  1871,  and
R.  A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Department  of  Lands,
Victoria, 13. C, Jan. Srd, 1911.
.1tin 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph McNiell,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Carpenter,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted one mile
north of the north-east corner of the
Indian Reserve which is situated about
flve miles east and two miles north of
Kluscus Lake on the north lide of the
Blackwater River; thence south 40
chains; thence east to the Lake, about
40 chains; thence following the Banks
of the Lake in a northeasterly direction
about 50 chains; thence north 10 chains,
west SO chains to the point of commencement containing 250 acres more or
Dated November 12, 1910,
JOSEPH  McNIELL.
dec 10 J. E. M. Rogers, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Cecil W. Stan-
cliffe, of A'ancouver, B.C., occupation
Mechanical Engineer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about dVi) one ancl a
quarter miles north-west of the northeast corner of the Indian Reserve which
is situated -about flve miles east and
two miles north of Kluscus Lake on
the north side of the Blackwater River;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east SO chains; thence
north SO chains to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less.
Dated November 12, 1910.
CECIL AV. STANCLIFFE.
dec 10 J. E. M. Rogers, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAK ENOTICE that William Haggie
of Sunderland, England, occupation
manufacturer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about (1*14) one and a quarter
miles north-west of the north-east corner of the Indian Reserve, which is
situated about flve miles east and two
miles north of Kluscus Lake on the
north side of the Blackwater River;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east SO chains; thence
south 80 chains to the. point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated November 12,  1910.
WILLIAM   HAGGIE,
dec 10 J. E. M. Rogers, Agent.
A'ICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Sidney John
Breckton, of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Police Constable, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
clescribed lands:—Commencing at a post
planted two miles north of the northeast corner of the Indian Reserve, which
is situated about five miles east and
two miles north of Kluscus Lake, on
the north side of the Blackwater River;
thence west SO chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south -80 chains to the point of commeneement containing 640 acres, more
or  less.
Dated November 11, 1910.
SIDNEY   JOHN   BRECKTON.
dec 10 J. E. M. Rogers, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Mathew Kerr
Love, of Victoria, B.C., occupation Gas
Stoker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
two miles north of the north-east corner of the Indian Reserve, which is situated about flve miles east and two
miles north of Kluscus Lake on the
north side of the Blackwater River;
thence south SO chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north SO chains; thence
east SO chains to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more
oi*  less
Dated   November   12,   1910.
MATHEW KERR LOVE,
dec 10 J. E. M. Rogers, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that John T. Denne-
hy, of Victoria, B.C., occupation, Engineer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the Northeast corner of the Indian
Reserve about live miles east and two
miles north of Kluscus Lake on the
north side of the Blackwater River;
thence north SO chains; thence west SO
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east SO chains to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated November 12,  1910.
JOHN  T.  DENNEHY.
dec 10 J. E. M. Rogers, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Harold Charles
Engelson, of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Contractor, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:*—Commencing at a post
planted (114) one ancl a quarter miles
northeast of the northeast corner of
the Indian Reserve, which is situated
about live miles east ancl two miles
north of Kluscus Lake on the north
side of the Blackwater River, thence
north SO chains; thence west SO chains;
tiience so.ith SO chains; thence east SO
chains to the point of commencement,
containing 6*10 acres .nore or less.
Dated November 11,  1910.
HAROLD CHARLES ENGELSON.
dec 10 J.  E. M. Rogers, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick Bond
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Telegraphist, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:
■—Commencing at a post planted (IVi)
one and a quarter miles north-east of
the northeast corner of the Indian
Reserve, which ls situated about five
miles east ancl two miles north of Kluscus Lake on the north side of the Block-
water River; thence north 80 chains;
Ihence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to the
point of commencement, containing 640
acres more or less.
Dated   November  11,   1910.
FREDERICK  BOND,
dec 10 J. E. M. Rogers, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Richard Porte,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Waiter,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following lands:—Commencing at a post planted t-./o and a quarter
miles northeast of the northeast corner
of the Indian Reserve which Is situated
aijout five miles east and two miles
north of Kluscus Lake, on the north
side of the Blackwater River; thence
north SO chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south SO chains; thence east 80
chains to the point of commencement,
containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated  November 11,  1910.
RICHARD PORTE,
dec 10 J. E. M. Rogers, Agent.
LAND   REGISTRY   ACT
In  the matter of an Application for a
Duplicate   Certificate   of   Title   to
Lots  1,  2,  3,  4  and  5,  Block  2,  of
part  of  Section  29,  Map  987,  Victoria City...
NOTICE   is   hereby  given  that  it  is
my  intention  at  the  expiration  of one
month from  the date of the first publication   hereof   to   issue   a   Duplicate
Certificate of Title to said lands issued
to   David   Cowper   Frame   on   the   19th
day of May, 1910, and numbered 23089c.
Land Registry Office,  Victoria, B. C,
the 5th day of December, 1910.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
dec 10 Registrar-General of Titles.
COAST, RANGE III,  LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that I, F. G. McKay,
of Toronto, Ont., occupation, Wholesaler, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
three-quarters mile east of Salmon
River, crossing on the Bella Coola-Alcatcho summer trail, on North side of
Salmon River; thence east 40 chain,
south 40 chains, west forty chains,
north 40 chains to commencement, containing 160 acres.
Dated  October  15,  1910.
nov 26 F.  G.  McKAY.
COAST   RANGE   III   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that I, M. Narghang,
of Toronto, Ont, occupation Farmer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands.—
Commencing at a post planted six iniles
south of Salmon River on the Bella
Coola-Alcatcho summer trail, thence
south 40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence west 40
chains to point of commencement, containing 160  acres.
Dated  October  7th,  1910.
nov 26 M. NARGHANG.
COAST   RANGE   III   LAND   DISTRICT
District  of  Coast
TAKE NOTICE that I, H. Jolley, of
Toronto, Ont., occupation Cashier, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted six miles
south of Salmon River, about three
miles southeast of Bella Coola and
Alcatcho summer trail, thence south 20
chains; east SO chains; north 20 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres.
Dated October Sth,  1910.
nov.26 H. JOLLEY.
COAST   RANGE  III   LAND  DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that I, Charles G.
Norris, of Toronto, Ont., occupation
Business Manager, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted five miles and in a westerly
direction from Salmon River crossing on
the Bella Coola-Alcatcho summer trail
(downstream) half a mile from south
bank of Salmon River; thence north
SO chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east SO chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
Dated  October  12th,  1910.
nov.26 CHARLES   G.   NORRIS.
COAST   RANGE   III   LAND  DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that I, Alfred Thorpe
of Toronto, Ont. occupation Conductor,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the- following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted eight
miles south of Salmon River on the
Bella Coola-Alcatcho summer trail
thence north 40 ehains; thence west
10 chains; thence south 40 chains,
thence east 40 chains to point of com-
commencement,  containing  160  acres.
Dated October 7th,  1910.
nov 26 ALFRED THORPE.
COAST   RANGE   III   LAND  DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that L. W. Hanson, of
Toronto, Ont., occupation Commercial
Traveller, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
flve and a half miles in a southerly direction from Salmon River on Bella
Coola-Alcatcho summer trail; thence
north 40 chains; west 40 chains; south
40 chains; east 40 chains to commencement, containing 160 acres.
Dated October 7 th,  1910.
nov 26 L.  W.  HANSON.
COAST   RANGE   III   LAND  DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that I, Oliver W.
Adams, of Toronto, Ont., occupation
Business Manager, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted six miles south of Salmon
River and about one mile southeast of
Bella Coola-Alcatcho summer trail;
thence enst 80 chains; thence south 20
chains; thence west SO chains; thence
north 20 chains to point of commencement,  containing  160 acres.
Dated October Sth,  1910.
nov 26 OLIVER AV. ADAMS.
COAST   RANGE   III   LAND  DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that I, Herbert Ber-
gey, of Toronto, Ont., occupation Farmer, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
binds:—Commencing at a post planted
about one-half mile distant and in an
easterly direction from Long Lake on
the Bella Coola-Alcatcho summer trall.
thence west 40 chains; thenee south 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 40 chains to commencement, containing 160  acres.
Dated October Oth.  1910.
nov 26 HERBERT  BERGEY.
COAsT   RANGE  III   LAND  DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that I, Fred. G. Mara,
of Toronto, Ont., occupation Special
Agent Insurance, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
nlnnted three miles in a southerly direction from Salmon River ancl about
one m"e southeast of the Bella Coola-
Alcatcho summer trail, thence south 40
chnins, west 40 chains; nor'h 40 chains
nnd east 40 chains to commencement,
enntnlnlng 160 acre--*.
Dnted  October  13th.   1°10.
nov 26 FRED G.  MARA.
COAST   RANGE  HI   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTTCE that I .Ernest Edwards, of Toronto, Ont.. occupation Conductor, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a pnst planted
nbout five miles dlstnnt and In a southerly direction from Salmon River, ancl
Bella Cooln-Alcatcho summer trail;
tnence east 40 chains; south 40 chains;
west -10 chains; north 40 chains to commencement, containing 160 acres.
nm^d October 11th, 1910.
nov 26 ERNEST EDWARDS.
COAST   RANGE   III   LAND  DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that I,W. G. Marston,
of Toronto, Ont., occupation Salesman,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted one and
a half miles distant and in an easterly
direction from Salmon River, crossing
on the Bella Coola-Alcatcho summer
trail, on the north bank of Salmon
River, thence north 40 chains; east 40
chains; south 40 chains to river bank;
thence following river bank in a westerly direction to commencement, containing 160 acres.
Dated October 16th, 1910.
nov 26 W.   G.   MARSTON.
COAST   RANGE   III   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that I, Alexander M.
Kennedy, of Toronto, Ont., occupation
Business Manager, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about one mile distant and in
an easterly direction from Coal Creek
on the Bella Coola-Alcatcho summer
trail, thence west SO chains; thence
south 20 chains; thence east SO chains;
thence north 20 chains to point.of commencement, containing 160 acres.
Dated October 5,  1910.
nov 26        ALEXANDER M. KENNEDY.
COAST   RANGE   III   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that I, Herbert S.
Moore, of Toronto, Ont., occupation,
Commercial Traveller, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about half a mile distant
and in an easterly direction from Salmon River, crossing on the Bella Coola-
Alcatcho summer trail and on north
bank of Salmon River, thenoe west 40
chains, north 40 chains; east forty
chains; south 40 chains to commencement,  containing 160 acres.
Dated October 14th, 1911).
nov.26 HERBERT   S.  MOORE.
COAST   RANGE   III   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Milton Bergey,
of Toronto, Ont., occupation Business
Manager, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted three miles south of Salmon River
crossing on Bella Coola-Alcatcho summer trail, thence south 80 chains;
thence west SO chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated  October  13th,   1910.
nov 26 MILTON   BERGEY.
COAST   RANGE   III   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that I, F. Woolnough,
of Toronto, Ont., occupation, Manufacturer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about four mlles distant in a southerly
direction from Salmon River, about two
miles south east of Bella Coola-Alcatcho summer trail, thence south 20
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 20 chains; thence west 80 chains
to commencement, containing 160 acres.
Dated  October  13,   1910.
nov 26 F.   WOOLNOUGH.
COAST   RANGE   III   LAND  DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that H. C. Powell, of
Toronto, Ont., occupation, Electrical Engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase following described
lands:—Commencing at a post plantecl
about four and one-half miles distant
and in a southerly direction from Salmon River on Bella Coola-Alcatcho summer trail, thence north 40 chains; west
40 chains; south 40 chains; east 40
chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres.
Dated October llth.  1910.
nov 26 H.   C.   POWELL.
COAST   RANGE   III   LAND  DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that I, Frank Osborne,
of Toronto, Ont, occupation, Printer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
four miles distant and in a northerly
direction from Salmon River, crossing
on the Bella Coola and Alcatcho summer trail, thence 80 chains west;
thence 20 chains south; thence Su
chains east; thence 20 chains north to
point of commencement, containing 160
8.cres
Dated   October   7.   1910.
nov 26 FRANK OSBORNE.
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days
after date, I intend tn make application
to the Hon. the Chief Commissioner of
Lands for a licence to prospect for coal
and petroleum under the foreshore and
under the water ancl on the lands in
ancl opposite Malcolm Island, Rupert
District, clescribed as follows: Commencing at a post planted at the point
whore the north boundary line of Section 15. Malcolm Island, Rupert District Intersects the shore-line, thence
north SO chains, thence east SO chains,
thence south SO chains, thence west 80
chnins  to  thc  nlnce  of commencement
Dated  this 2 1th dav of October,  1910.
TT.  G.  S. HI6TSTERMAN,
dec  10 John White, Agent.
NOTICB
NOTICE Is hereby given that 30 days
after date. I Intend to apply to the
Hon. the Chief Commissioner of Lands
for a licence to prospect for coal and
petroleum miner the foreshore and under the water and on the lands in and
opposite Malcolm Island. Rupert District, described as follows: Commencing at a post planted at the south east
corner of Section 15, Malcolm Island,
Rupert District, thence south SO chains,
thence west 80 chains, thence north Su
chains, thence east SO chains, to t'-e
place of commencement, containing 610
acres  more or  less.
Dated this 24th dnv of October, 1910.
S.  H.  REYNOLDS,
dec  10  . John   White,   Agent.
LICENCE    TO    AN    EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANY
Companies  Act
July lst, 1910
CANADA:
Province of British Columbia.
No.   345A   (1910)
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that "Charles
M. Home, Limited," is authorized and
licensed to carry on business within
the Province of British Columbia, and
to carry out or effect all or any of the
objects of the Company to which the
legislative authority of the L.gislature
of British  Columbia extends.
The head offlce of the Company is
situate at the City of Toronto, Province of Ontario.
The   head   office   of  the   Company   in,
this Province is situate at the City of
Victoria,   and  A.   E.   Forbes,   Secretary,
whose address is Victoria aforesaid,  is
the attorney for the Company.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is fifty thousand dollars divided into flve hundred shares.
Given under my hand and Seal of
Victoria, Province of British Columbia, thi stwenty-eighth day of December, one thousand nine hundred and
ten.
Registrar of Joint-Stock Companies.
D.   WHITESIDE,
The objects for which this Company
has  been  established  ancl  licensed  are:
To acquire ancl take over as a going
concern the wholesale business In the
said city of Toronto belonging to one
Charles M. Home and all or any of
his assets and liabilities in connection
with said business;
To buy, sell, Import ancl export goods,
wares and merchandise of every name
and  nature;
To manufacture goods, wares artel
merchandise ancl sell the manufactured
products;
To carry on and conduct a general
wholesale, domestic and foreign dry
goods business, on commissioH or otherwise;
To carry on any other business or
businesses which may seem to the Company capable of being conveniently carried on in connection with the above
or which may be calculated directly or
indirectly to enhance the value of or
render profitable any of the Company's
property or rights or conducive to any
of the Company's objects;
To adopt such means of making known
the products of the Company as may
seem expedient, and in particular by advertising In the press, by circulars, by
purchase and exhibition of works, of
art or interest, by publication of books
and periodicals, ancl by granting prizes,
rewards and donations;
To purchase or otherwise acquire,
hold, sell, assign, transfer, pledge or
otherwise dispose of any shares of
stock, bonds, debentures, or other obligations or evidences of indebtedness of
any other corporation now or hereafter
to be formed having objects or powers
similar to the objects or powers of this
Company or similar to some one or
more of them and while the holder
thereof to exercise all the rights ancl
privileges of ownership, including the
right to vote thereon ancl to distribute
said shares, bonds, debentures, obliga-.
tions and evidences of Indebtedness or
any other assets of the Company in
specie, upon a division of profits or" distributions of capital among the shareholders;
To apply the money of the Company
in promoting any other corporation or
corporations for the purpose of acquiring all or any of the property or liabilities of this Company or to promote
any other corporation or corporations
for any other purpose which may seem
in the opinion of the directors directly
or indirectly calculated to benefit this
Company;
To sell, exchange, lease, mortgage or
otherwise any property of the company for such consideration as may be
thought fit and in particular to accept
payment wholly or In part by a ground
rent or rents or In shares or obligations
of any other corporation;
To enter into partnership or into any
arrangement for sharing profits, union
of Interests, co-partnership, joint adventure, concession or otherwise or to
amalgamate with any person, firm or
corporation carrying on or about to
carry on any business capable of being conducted so as to benefit the company ancl to advance money and guarantee the contracts of any such person,   firm   or  corporation,   and
To sell, lease or otherwise dispose
of in whole or In part the property,
assets or undertaking of the Company
for such consideration as may be
agreed ancl in particular for share's, debentures or securities of any company
purchasing the same to distribute
among the shareholders of this Company in kind any property of the Company, and In particular any shares, debentures or securities of other companies belonging to this Company or of
which this Company may have the
power of disposing,
dec 3
LAND REGISTRY ACT
In  the matter of an Application for a
Duplicate   Certificate   of   Title    to
Sections 45 and 46, Sooke District:
NOTICE   is   hereby   given  that  it   is
my  intention  at  the  expiration  of one
month from the date of the first publication hereof to issue a Duplicate Certlflcate   of   Title   to   said   lands   issued
to Daniel Sanderson on the llth day of
June, 190S, and numbered 17518C.
Land  Registry Offlce, Victoria, B. C„
the 16th day of December, 1910.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar-General  of  Titles.
NOTICE
NOTICE Is hereby given tint 30 days
nfter date. T intend to apply to the
Hon. the Chief Commissioner of Lands
for a licence to prospect for coal and
petroleum under the foreshore and under the water and on the lands In and
opposite Malcolm Island. Rupert District described ns follows; Commencing nt a post planted nt. the south east
corner of Section 15, Malcolm Island,
Rupert District, thence south SO chains,
Hinnce enst 80 chains, thence north "
chnins, thence west SO ehnlns to th"
place of commencement, containing 610
ncres.  more or less.
Dnted this 24th day of October, 1"11.
PACIFIC   co\«T   COAL   M^NES,   LTD.
(Non-Persorni tiiflW'ttv.
dec 10 John   White,   Agent.
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 clays
after date, I intend to make application to the Hon. the Chief Commissioner of Lands for a licence to prospect
for coal and petroleum under the foreshore and under the water and on the
lands in and opposite Malcolm Island,
Rupert District, described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
point where the north boundary line
of Section 15, Malcolm Island, Rupert
District, Intersects the shore-line,
thence south 80 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence north SO chains, thence
east SO chains to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or  less.
Dated this 24th day of October, 1910.
W. E.  CATHELS,
dec  10 John   White,   Agent.
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 clays
after date. I Intend to apply to the
Hon. the Chief Commissioner of Lands
for a, licence to prospect for coal and
petroleum under the foreshore and under the wnter and on the lands In and
opposite Rupert District, described as
follows: Commencing at a post planted
on the North west corner of Section 28,
Townshln 2, Rupert District, thence
North 61.51 chains, thence East 80
chains, thence Snuth SO chains, thence
Westerly following the shore-line at
h'gh wnter mark to the place of commencement.
Dated this 2 it'-, dny nf October, 1910.
J.  M. SAVAGE.
John   White,  Agent. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 1, 1911
The Horns of New Ideas
and Honest Values
We have always new ideas in Dining-room Furniture. We are always receiving new
goods and these new goods give us new id eas and our ideas are usually good ones. By
giving us a call and looking over our furni ture you can get ideas for yourself. The furniture arranged on our two large furniture floors give you suggestions. Our values are
always honest ones; we can't help it because we keep the very best quality of everything
at reasonable prices. You will only req uire to place an order with us for the first time to
be convinced that what we say is true.
Solid Quarter Cut Golden Oak Buffet*, 2 small
drawers and 1 large drawer, 2 cupboards and
* oval shaped mirror  $40.00
Solid Quarter Cut Golden Oak Buffet, top 19x46,
glass 11x36, 2 small drawers, 1 large drawer,
2 clipboards  .$45.00
Solid Quarter Cut Golden Oak Buffet, 3 small
drawers, 2 cupboards, 1 large drawer. .$50.00
Solid Quarter Cut Golden Oak Buffet, top 22x50,
glass 14x42, 2 small drawers, 1 large drawer
and 2 cupboards   .$60.00
Solid Quarter Cut Early English Oak Buffet,
top 19x43, glass 12x40. Exceptionally good
value $38.00
Solid Golden   Oak Finish,   all   square.    Prices,,
$18.00, $16.00 and  $12.00
Solid Quarter Cut Oak, square.    Prices, $60.00,
$50.00, $40.00, $38.00 and  $35.00
Surfaced Oak, Early English Finish Buffet,
Price  $30.00
Surfaced Oak, Early English Finish Buffet, top
22x44, g'**ass 18x36 $25.00 '
Solid Quarter Cut, Early English Buffet, 3; small
drawers, 1 large drawer, 2 cupboards . .$48.00
Solid Quarter Cut, Early English Oak Buffet, top
22x54, glass 14x40 -.'.'■ .' $60.00
Solid Quarter Cut, Early English Oak Buffet, 2
small and 1 large drawer, 3 cupboards, $55.00
Surfaced Golden Oak Buffet.. .$28.00 and $25.00
Elm Sideboards. Prices $16.00 and .$15.00
Surfaced Oak Sideboards.  Prices $22.50 and $17
Golden Ash Sideboards, glass 18x30, top 21x48.
Price $25.00
Extension Tables
Solid Quarter Cut Golden Oak, round. Prices
$60.00, $50.00, $45.00, $38.00, $35.00 and $30.00
Solid Quarter Cut Early English Oak, square.
Prices $30, $32 and  $35.00
Ash, Early English*Finish, round $27.50
Sideboards, solid quarter cut golden oak, mirror
16x28, top 19x48  $40.00
Buffet, solid quarter.cut oak, Avax finish, top 22x
56, glass 18x40 $80.00
..  This is a beautiful sideboard.
Solid Quarter Cut, Early English Oak Buffet, top
24x48, glass 18x40  $50.00
Solid Quarter Cut Golden Oak Combination
Buffet and China Cabinet, 5 small drawers, 2
large cupboards, china cabinet in centre, Avith
mirror on either side  $85.00
Solid Quarter Cut Early English Oak, 2 small
drawers, 3 large drawers, 2 cupboards, and
2 colored glass cabinets on either side.for
china $90,00
Solid Quarter Cut Early English Oak—
8 feet   $47.00
10 feet   $50.00
Surface Oak, $18.00, $16.00 and $15.00
Govern m't
Street
Victoria,
B. C.
WANTED IN 1911
Prominent  Citizens  IntervieAved:—Hon.  W.  Templeman—Mayor
Morley—Dr. Ernest Hall—W. Oliphant—J. N. Muir—Miss
Ruth Cameron—Simon Leiser—Philip Chalk—
E. M. Johnson—George Jeeves
Inspired, no doubt, by an article
which appeared under the above caption in the Colonist of Sunday last,
the Editor of The Week sent for me
on Monday and instructed me to
make a personal canvass of some of
the most prominent citizens of Victoria Avith a view to learning exactly
what they wanted for 1911. I was
specially ordered to include all
classes of society and to make my
selections with a view to obtaining
opinions from the representative
members of the various cliques and
sets in the City. I started out on
my assignment in some trepidation,
as most of the persons whom I had
put on my list were personally unknown to me, but I was agreeably
surprised by the courteous, nay enthusiastic reception which was everywhere accorded me. All the personages to whom I addressed myself
appeared not only willing, but
anxious, to give the public a chance
of knowing how best they could
please those speaking to them through
my medium. . There was a delightful Christmassy flavour about their
answers, which reminded me of nothing so much as the way in which
tiny tots address Santa Claus, Avhen
they are allowed to choose their own
presents.
MAYOR MORLEY
I naturally directed my footsteps
first .to the office of the Chief Magistrate, who received me with a charming bonhomie. "My wants for 1911,''
said he, in answer to my polite
query. "Well, now, that's a big question; we all want something, some
more, some less. Personally, I think
that I may say that my own wants
are very limited.    I have been much
blessed during the past few years,
and I could almost say with perfect
truth that I want nothing. Stay,
though," he continued, and I noticed
that his lips came together with a
click of determination, whilst a
thoughtful furrow contracted his massive forehead. "I find that there are
one or two things that I want. First
of all I want the Mayoralty for 1911,
and," with an increased look of determination, "I am going to get it."
I shall step in as I did before."
Here the potentate fell into a reverie
and I could catch only a few muttered sentences. "Every time my band
is stronger, and I'll rid the City of
these, pesty Aldermen, who dare dispute my will. In time these fools of
citizens shall have their government
by Commissioners, but I shall be one
and I shall take good care that I have
the choosing of the other two. Yes,"
he said, "breaking out into a louder
strain, "I Avant to be IT and the only
IT; then the citizens shall have their
desires, provided that these coincide
with my views."
With these words of strong determination on his lips and with this
calm and confident spirit manifest in
his attitude, the Mayor gave me a
cheery farewell, and I proceeded on
my way to
DR. ERNEST HALL
The genial doctor received me in
his consulting room and .after enquiring as to my business'remarked
without the slightest hesitation that
he wanted the New Grand Theatre,
adding that he wanted it 'full'." As
soon as he had said this I knew that
the reports that I had heard were'
the maHcious slanderings of jealousy
and that Dr. Hall was in reality brim
full of the milk of human kindness
and good-fellowship. "I should like
to see the theatre full every afternoon
in the week," he went on to say, "instead of only on the first day. I
should like to see a by-law passed
which would compel a 'full-house'
throughout the seven days." Whilst
saying this he absently toyed with the
poker, and then, gazing at me with
those strong, clear eyes Avhich seem
to read the innermost thoughts, he
added, "Why should not the public
at large have the privilege of hearing me speak? Why.should my words
be wasted on those who merely come
in that they may sit down to rest,
because there is nothing else to do?
It is some slight alleviation of the
annoyance I experience that an excellent weekly paper publishes my
speeches verbatim, but written matter
is not thc same thing as spoken
words." At this point the doctor rose,
and taking mc by the hand uttered
in impressive tones, "You may tell
the readers of your publication that
my ambition for 1911 is that I may
be recognized as thc foremost orator
of British Columbia."
I left his house more moved than
I could havc imagined possible, and
it was with a start that I ran into
the very man upon whom I Avas next
intending to call, and with him was
another gentleman on my list. These
two, walking arm in arm and discussing some matter in loud tones were
no less important members of our
society than
MESSRS. W. OLIPHANT AND
J. N. MUIR
There was no need for me to speak
first. They literally threw themselves
upon mc. "Wc know what you are
doing," they cried simultaneously, "so
you needn't bother about asking any
questions. Tell thc people of Victoria," shouted Mr. Muir, "that I want
the Superintendent of Education put
in his place, or out of it, I don't
care which. What is thc use of my
perpetually referring to his carelessness in the columns of the Victoria
Times, when nobody ever takes notice
of what I, say?" "Ancl you can say
for me," broke in Mr. Oliphant, "that
my sentiments with regard to Mr.
Justice, Gregory and the City Solicitor
have been exactly expressed by Mr.
Muir's words. I want proper sewerage and I want the right to talk as
much as I like, and as loudly as I
like, and to be allowed to say what
I like. Whose business is it if some
of my statements are not entirely in
line Avith the facts? By fair means
or foul I'll get sewers to improve my
property, and that's what I want for
1911." So saying the two gentlemen,
j who had worked themselves up into
I a high state of indignation, marched
away, leaving me to cogitate on the
high public spirit which had so far
been evidenced by the men upon
whom I had called.
Feeling that my nerves had undergone somewhat of a strain by the
abruptness of this last fortuitous interview, I determined to soothe them
by calling upon a lady whose name
T had inserted on my list, the more
so as it was tea-time, and I like a
cup of tea, I therefore hastened my
steps to thc house of
MISS RUTH CAMERON
I found Miss Cameron in her boudoir, a fitting abode for the talented
authoress whose "Evening Chit-chat"
is such an enjoyable feature of thc
Victoria Times. Clad in a gown of
some "soft clinging material," she
looked the picture of grace, and it is
evident that she is not one of those
who practise not what they preach.
"Do sit down and have some tea,"
were her first words, before you tell
me what business you have come
about. It is such a pleasure to have
some intelligent person to talk to,
one who converse on higher things
and not merely about thc nonsensical
doings of their neighbours. I often
feel that the modern generation is
so sadly wasting its time by not taking a greater interest in thc things
that matter. "Do you know," she
said, when I had put down my cup
and stated my business, "I think you
may say that my great 'want' for
1911 is to see the Art of Conversation revived, that, and the proper culture of the skin and figure. If only
more of my readers would be guided
by me, both the appearance and the
intellect of our Victoria girls would
be so much improved. But I find
that those of us who endeavour to
bring about these useful reforms are
styled either blue-stockings or beauty-
fakers. Must you really be going?
I have so much enjoyed your conversation," she continued, as I rose to
make my adieux, and it was with such
words ringing in my ears that I found
myself on the door-step, inwardly
thinking that after all interviewing
some people was not such extraordinarily hard work.
I did not expect to have much
difficulty with my next subject because I knew what his answer would
be before I put my question, nor was
I disappointed. I was betaking myself to the counting-house of
MR. SIMON LEISER
"I am glad you have called," hc
remarked, after the felicitations of the
season had been uttered, "I wanted
one of you newspaper men to drop
in so that I might havc an independent opinion as to the likelihood of
the theatre by-law being passed this
year. My friends bring me good
tidings, whilst my enemies do the reverse, but you fellows arc supposed
to' have your finger on the public
pulse." Here . Mr. Leiser regarded
me with a wistful expression in his
eyes, and I hadn't the heart to give
him my candid opinion, which is that
thc people of Victoria haven't the
sense to know what they do want;
I refer to the "hoi polloi," of course,
and not to any of the great ones
whom I was canvassing. "Mr. Leiser,"
I said, "permit me to doubt the 'entire accuracy of your remark. How
can you know what your enemies
think, you, who have no enemies?"
"Then you really think it will pass,"
hc said eagerly, his anxiety obviously
(Continued on Page 10) THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 1, 1911
No Dark Spots With Osram
Tungstens
With this system of store lighting you get the light that brings business
—the most brilliant light of all. Dark spots have no place in a modern
business house. Poor light means poor business. Your store may
appear light enough for YOU because you have become used to it, but
what do your customers think of it?
MAKE YOUR STORE A STAR AND CUSTOMERS WILL FLOCK TO YOU
For everybody appreciates a good light.  Good lighting speaks prosperity
and prosperity begets prosperity.   It costs very little more to have a
brilliant up-to-date system of lighting.
OUR REPRESENTATIVE WILL CALL IF YOU PHONE I6O9
6. e. Electric Railway eo., Ltd
Demonstration Rooms, Corner Port and Langley Streets
Telephone 1609
Mrs. Roger Wilby leaves town
shortly for California where she will
spend  the rest of the winter.
* *   *
Mr. W. A. Allan, from Duncan, is
in town and is registered at the King
Edward hotel.
* *   *
Mr. Jack Meredith has returned
from an extended visit to the Old
Country.
* *   *
Miss K. Stevenson, from Shawnigan Lake, is in town on a short
visit.
* *   *
Miss E. Heanagc from Thetis
Island, was in town during the week.
* *   *
Miss R. Anderson has returned
from Chemainus where sh elias been
spending thc holidays with friends.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Roller, Concrete, Wash., are visitors in the city.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. N. H. Armstrong,
Shawnigan Lake, are in town and are
stopping at thc Empress Hotel.
* »   *
Mr. J. E. Gilmore, from Prince Rupert, was a visitor in thc city this
week.
* *   *
Mrs. E. E. Blackwood, Linden
Avenue, was one of this week's hostesses.
Mr. and Mrs. Lugrin have returned
from a visit to Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Jones have
returned from a most enjoyable holiday spent in Seattle.
* *   *
Mrs. Bennett, Vancouver, is the
guest  of her  sister,  Mrs.  Wulffsuhn
of Esquimalt.
* *   *
Mr. W. A. Dockrill from Chemainus, has been a guest at the Empress
Hotel.
* *   *
Mrs. Walter Langley has issued invitations for the marriage of her
daughter, Miss Marguerite Langley
to Mr. Charles Gore, which will be
celebrated on January 18th, at hal.
past two at Christ Church cathedral.
* *   *
Mrs. Herbert Carmichael was hostess last week of a small bridge party
at the Alexandra Club. Amongst
some of her guests were Mrs. E, E.
Blackwood, Mrs. Fagan, Mrs. Arthur
Coles, Mrs. Pierce, Mrs. Bodwell and
Mrs. Ross.
* *   *
Amongst some of those who attended the football match on Monday
to witness the final match between
the Victoria and Berkeley teams were
Mr. and Mrs. George Gillespie, Miss
Pooley, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Pooley,
Miss Eberts, Dr. Taylor, Mrs. A.
Gillespie, Mrs. H. Gillespie, Mr. and
Mrs. Scott and  Miss Scott, Mr. and
Mrs. George Johnston, Miss Mason,
Miss Newcombe, Misses Monteith,
Miss Irving, Miss Page, Mr. and G.
P. Goddard, Misses Heyland, Mrs. C.
M. Roberts, Miss Johnston, Messrs.
B. Irving, J. Arbuckle, R. Wilmot,
Barton, T. W. Buss, J. Bridgman, C.
Gamble, H. Davis, Bromley, 0. Villiers, G. K. McLean, C. Pitts, Mr. and
Mrs. G. Gaudin, VV. B. Monteith, F.
Rome and Miss Rome.
Miss Brownie Bodwell, Rockland
Avenue, entertained a number of her
young friends recently at a very
charming dinner party. The table
decorations were pink and white carnations with asparagus fern. Those
present were Miss T. Scott, Miss
Gladys Peters, Miss D. James, Miss
Mabel Eberts and thc Messrs. Robert
Scott, Berkeley Monteith, John Rogers, R. Crawford and T. Ambery.
*   *   *
A very pretty wedding was celebrated at Pender Island on December 28th, when Miss Nellie Pender
Grimmer was united in marriage to
Mr. Cyril Charles Gordon Hamilton,
of Somerset, Eng. The ceremony was
performed by thc Rev. Canon Pad-
don, in the drawing-room of the
bride's parents, which was beautifully
decorated for the occasion. The
bride, who was given away by her
father, entered thc room to the
strains of the wedding march. She
was gowned in white silk trimmed
with silk embroidered Swiss net and
carried a bridal bouquet of white
chrysanthemums and asparagus fern.
Her sister, Miss Olive Grimmer,,
acted as bridesmaid and was daintily gowned in blue mull. The groom
was supported by Mr. H. Baker, The
groom's gift to the bride was a handsome hair ornament and to the bridesmaid a gold bangle. A sumptuous
wedding breakfast was afterwards
served at whicii .about a hundred
guests were present. A great many
handsome and costly presents were
received, the bride and groom being
well known throughout Victoria and
Vancouver. The bride travelled in a
smart blue gown with hat to match.
The honeymoon is being spent in Victoria, Vancouver and New Westminster. On their return they will take
up their residence on Pender Island.
*   *   *
The James Bay Athletic Association held a most successful and enjoyable dance last week at the Woman's Building at the exhibition
grounds in honor of the visiting rugby
players from Berkeley, Cal. The
committee consisted of the following
gentlemen, Messrs. J. P. Sweeney,
V K. Gray, J. A. Raymur, S. J.
Shanks, W. Newcombe, L. Sweeney,
H. A. Leigh and on the reception
committee were Messrs. G. J. Jay,
J. C. Miller, J. H. Gillespie, W. C.
Moresby, Charles Wilson and H. Dallas Helmcken. The floor was perfect
and Miss Thain's orchestra played a
delightful selection of dance music.
The ball room was gaily decorated
with the colors of the University, the
Victoria Rugby Club and the J. B. A.
A. Among the invited guests were
Miss Allen, Miss Brydon, Miss B.
Brydon, Misses Barnard, Misses
Brycc, Miss T. Belleatt, Miss B.
Briggs, Miss M. Briggs, Miss Anderson, Misses Bone, Miss V. Beckwith,
Misses Bagshawe, Miss A. E, Cameron, ' Misses Dalby, Misses Black-
wod, Miss E. Abery, Miss M. Burrows, Miss V. Adams, Misses Blake,
Misses Archibald, Miss B. Andrews,
Misses   Brooker,  Miss  H.  Anderson,
Miss M. Anderson, Misses Andrew,
Miss Carson, Miss M. Camsousa,
Miss Carne', Miss R. Cane, Misses
Clay, Miss Fletcher, Miss M. Cameron, Miss M. Clarke, Miss E. Cullin,
Miss L. Cousins, Miss D. Catterall,
Misses Burke, Miss F. Clarke, Miss
Cameron, Misses Erskine, Miss E.
Etheridge, Miss Gladys Rutter, Miss
D. Forrester, Miss C. Fisher, Misses
Fawcett, Miss F. Finlayson, Miss R.
Devlin, Miss Fleming, Miss M. Fraser, Miss Ewer, Miss M. George,
Misses Gray, Miss P. Gillespie, Miss
Griffiths, Miss Gargin, Miss Greaves,
Miss A. Gillis, Misses Goodwin, Miss
V. Georgeson, Miss B. Gaudin, Miss
N. Gray, Miss B. Gidley, Mrs. Hamilton, Miss B. Goodfellow, Miss J.
Hawkins, Misses Heyland, Misses
Miller, Miss A. Moss, Misses Gardiner, Miss M. Hickey, Miss C.
Helmcken, Miss L. Holden, Miss
Holden, Misses Hiscocks, Misses
Hirst, Mrs. Bcrcsford-Hogg, Miss
Howard, Miss F. Handlcy, Miss B.
Heaney, Miss N. Head, Miss E.
Heater, Misses Hall, Miss Hodgson,
Miss Home, Misses Henderson,
Misses Maloney, Miss G. McDougall,
Mrs. J. Hastings, Miss C. Johnson,
Miss Jay, Miss H. Jeffries, Miss
Kirk, Misses Jennings, Miss N. Jones,
Miss L. Johnson, Miss F. Kettle,
Miss G. Leary, Miss E. LeBlanc,
Misses Lugrin, Miss Locke, Miss B.
Leeming, Misses McB. Smith, Miss
L. Maynard, Miss McCarter, Miss I.
Moore, Miss J. McDonald, Miss J.
McKay, Miss D. McTavish, Miss
Lowe, Miss M. Lovell, Misses Luscombe, Misses Morry, Miss E. Lawrence, Miss McGurk, Miss M. Mints,
Misses N. Neil, Miss Newcombe,
Miss F. O'Brien, Miss N. Nicholles,
Miss I. Nason, Miss E. Nichols,
Miss E. Wales, Miss M. Tait, Misses
O'Sullivan, Miss A. Nolte, Miss K.
O'Keefe, Misses Newbigging, Miss
H. Shakespeare, Misses Smith, Miss
M. Tribe, Miss N. Rankin, Miss L.
Fekir, Miss B. Raymond, Miss F.
Shore, Mrs. Skinner, Miss F. Piercy,
Miss M. Regan, Miss Ethel, Miss
Wcldon, Miss A. \yattallet, Miss Ada
L THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 1911
Schwengers, Miss H. Simpspn, Mrs.!
G. Simpson, Miss Tillman, Miss E.
Sewell, Miss M. Pengeth, Miss E.
Stevens, Misses Sargison, Miss A.
Patterson, Misses Palmer, Miss E.
Rendell, Miss Peters, Misses Renouf,
Miss J. Sears, Miss E. Sparrow, Miss
Ulin, Miss G White, Misses Wallace,
Misses Vincent, Misses Wilkerson,
Mr. and Mrs. P. Austin, and the
Messrs. C. R. Bagshawe, Brown, H.
Austin, T. Bain, W. Barton, T. Ard,
H. Bamford, K. Bywell, T. Archibald,
E. Brightman, W. Blake, C. W. Anderson, R. Brooker, F. Brown, D.
Frame, T. Anderson, S. Behnsen, G.
Chungranes, H. Dalby, C. Cousin, J.
Cambie, F. C. Davie. E. Dewdney, B.
Dorman, Duce, P. Foote, G. F. Duf-
lield, A. Futcher, E. Dempster, F.
Dinsdale, A. Carss, F. Cameron, R.
Fitzpatrick, Etheridge, V. Fawcett,
J. Ewans, R. W. Fleming, J. Finlaison, R. C. Flitton, T. Elworthy, C.
Hogg, R. Hiscocks, Mr. and Mrs. H.
Gillespie, Mr. and Mrs. J. Leeming,
Mr. and Mrs. A. Newcombe, Mr. and
Mrs. W. N. Winsby and many others.
TOPICAL TRIFLES—X
(By Onlooker)
The death of Mrs. Baker Eddy has
been publicly noted to such an extent as to show that the good lady
was no mere cypher on this mortal
earth during her long and energetic
life. She is recognized as being the
founder of the cult of Christian
Science, and the creed was propagated with considerable rapidity. It
is said to have found many followers among women,, which at first
seems somewhat astonishing for it is
generally supposed that one of women's weaknesses is the delight they
take in being coddled by the doctor
on the slightest provocation of a pain
in the little finger. Or it may be
another case of the extremes to which
women undoubtedly are apt to rush.
Mrs. Eddy certainly worked hard
enough in thc cause of Christian
Science to give the new creed a good
start, and she lived to a good old
age herself, though she was not so
successful with her- three husbands,
all of whom predeceased her.
The anarchists in London have succeeded in stirring up a rumpus that
rivals the suffragettes. Unfortunately they did more damage and worked
more woe by causing the death of
four gallant policemen, the fracas
ending up in dire disaster for themselves as their death came in a decidedly unpleasant form. You wouldn't
catch the women making such a mess
of things. We hear that Mr. Churchill
got mixed up in the fray and came
out quite a hero. After this he probably won't think much of a flick
in the face with a dog whip.
The local dailies are having a little
fun by suggesting that the knightly
honours in store for Canadians at
the forthcoming coronation of His
Majesty King George will stimulate
interest in the approaching mayoralty contest. I would like to suggest a title for Fire Chief Davis who
risks his life every time he responds
to a call from Box 14, even if it
is only a false alarm. It must be
very annoying to start off to a fire
at thc rate of sixty miles an hour and
then to get hopelessly stuck in the
mud about twenty-five yards from the
scene of action. However, there is
an awful lot of talk just now about
good roads and the "Glidden Tour,"
but thc Glidden outfit will find
themselves "slidden" if they come
touring round some streets in a certain city of British  Columbia,
A Victoria daily paper complains
that the idea is generally current to
the effect that when newspapers
agree with each other on a public
question their motives are doubtful.
It explains that such an idea is positively heneous, but admits that personal friends and party associations
are sometimes blinding. Truly, some
people have an ingenious Avay of putting things. It was told last week
that its ideas were jejune and its
theories impossible, but some people
positively won't take a hint. Some
newspapers also have a mean way of
refusing to publish thc communications of correspondents whose ideas
differ frorii its own. Perhaps this is
a compliment to the disappointed
ones who would like to air their side
of the story occasionally.
There is a cat show in Victoria
this week. It ought to be a great
success.
CURE THAT COUGH
Very unwise to let a cough
run on, because frequent coughing increases irritation in the
bronchial passages.
BOWES'  BRONCHIAL
BALSAM
cures coughs and colds. A fine
remedy for young or old; unrivalled in all throat and lung
troubles.   50c bottle, here only.
Gyrus H. Bowes
1228 Government St.
Tels. 425 and 450
SWEDISH MASSAGE
MEDICAL GYMNASTICS
VIBRATORY TREATMENT
Q. Bjornfelt, S.M.
Phone 1856
821 Fort St.
LIMITED   LICENSE   TO   AN   EXTRA-
PROVINCIAL   COMPANY   UNDER
SECTION   158   "COMPANIES  ACT"
CANADA:
Province of British Columbia.
No.   212A  (1910)
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that "Chippewa  Farm   Land  Company"   is   licensed
and empowered to acquire, hold, and alienate land, and to loan and Invest its
moneys in land and other securities in
the Province of   British    Columbia    in
manner and to the extent permitted by
the  charter  and    regulations    of    the
Company.
The head offlce of the Company is
situate at the City of Chippewa Falls,
County of Chippewa, State of Wisconsin, U. S. A.
The head offlce of the Company in this
Province is situate at 514 Fort Street,
Victoria, and Harold B. Robertson,
whose address is Victoria aforesaid, is
the attorney for the Company.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is One Hundred Thousand
Dollars, divided into One Thousand
shares of One Hundred Dollars each.
Given under my hand and seal of office at Victoria, Province of British Columbia, tllis fourth day of November,
One Thousand Nine Tundred and Ten.
D. WHITESIDE,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies,
jan 7
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Katherine
Sprague, of Vancouver, B.C. occupation
Married Woman, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about seven miles westerly from
Takush Harbour on the south shore
of Smith's Sound, thence south 80
chains; thence west SO chains; thence
north to shore line along shore line
to point of commencement, and containing 420 acres more or less.
Dated November 29th, 1910.
KATHERINE  SPRAGUE.
jan 7 Frederick A.  Smith, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Alvin J. Eng-
vick, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Broker, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles south of Takush Harbour on the east bank of Takush River,
thence north eighty (SO) chains; thence
west eighty (SO) chains; thence south
eighty (80) chains; thence east eighty
(80) chains to point of commencement,
and  containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated  November 9th.  1910.
ALVIN J. ENGVICK.
jan 7 Frederick A. Smith, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Marie L. Eng-
vick, of Vancouver, I B.C., occupation
Married Woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about two miles south of Takush Harbour, on the east bank of the
Takush River, thence south 40 chains,
thence east 80 chains; thence north 40
ehains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 320
acres, more or less.
Dated  November Oth,  1910.
MARIE L. ENGVICK.
jan 7 Frederick A. Smith, Agent.
Worswick Paving Company
LIMITED
CONTRACTS FOR ASPHALT PAVEMENTS
CEMENT SIDEWALKS, CURBS,
GUTTERS, ETC.
Refer to the Cities of:—Calgary, Alberta; Modesto, California; Merced,
California; Hollister, California; Fresno, California; Visalia, California;
Hanford, California; Bakersfieid, California.
GUARANTEE:—TEN YEARS.
Fifteen per cent, of cost price left with City to cover cost of repairs
on Asphalt Pavements. I j      ,
For fuller   information -apply   to—
214 Pemberton Block
' !|!    j!    ;i   !: PHONE 2323 .,
WORKS-CORNER LINDEN AVENUE     AND     MAY     STREETS.
Phone 2386.
The Taylor
Limited.
Co.
A11 kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St.. Victoria
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Dorothea Sie-
werd, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Nurse, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles south of Takush Harbour on the east bank of the Takush
River, thence south 80 chains; thence
west SO chains; thence north 80 cliains;
thence east SO chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated November 9th, 1910.
DOROTHEA SIEWARD.
jan 7 Frederick A. Smith, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Amlnda Eng-
vick, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Dressmaker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about three miles south of Takush Harbour; thence south 80 chains;
thence west SO chains; thence north SO
chains; thence east 80 chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
Dated November 9th, 1910.
AMINDA ENGVICK.
jan 7 Frederick A. Smith, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Amanda Jones of
Victoria, B.C., occupation Dressmaker,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted three
miles south of Takush Harbour; thence
south SO chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement and
containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated November 9th, 1910.
AMANDA JONES,
jan 7 Frederick A. Smith, Agent.
Do You Need a
Good Watch?
WE ARE AGENTS FOR THE HOWARD
AMERICA'S BEST
Prices From
$40.00 to $170.00
REDFERN & SONS
Established 1862
1009 GOVERNMENT STREET     -     VICTORIA, B.C.
Oldest Diamond and Jewellery House in Western Canada
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas M. Mc-
.'.ullffe, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
steward, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about three miles south-west from the
mouth of the Takush River, thence
north SO chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement and
containing 640 acres of land, more or
less.
Dated November 9th, 1910.
THOMAS M. McAULIFFE.
jan 7 Frederick A.  Smith. Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Nancy Morgan,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation housekeeper, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about two mlles south-west of Takush
Harbour, thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east SO chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated November 9th, 1910.
NANCY MORGAN,
jan 7 Frederick A. Smith, Agent.
Bevan, Gore & Eliot
LIMITED
STOCK AND BOND BROKERS
VIEW STREET—Full sized lot, next to comer of Vancouver
street, with house bringing rent of $30.00 per month; $4,000
cash.   An excellent purchase at  $15,000
VIEW STREET—30x120 feet between Quadra and Vancouver
streets, next to Pacilic Sheet Metal Works. A substantial
advance may be looked for directly View street improvements
commence.   Good terms.   Price  $4,700
HUMBOLDT STREET—Lot bringing in revenue of $84 per
month.    Any terms.    Price   $12,000
STEWART—One-quarter acre fronting on Fifth and Sixth streets,
ancl adjoining the Northern Hotel. Will either sell, or trade.
Now is the time to buy in Stewart.
1122 GOVERNMENT STREET
Phones 2470 and 2471
VICTORIA, B.C. 10
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 1, 1911
WANTED IN 1912
(Continued from Page .7)
modified, "now what can I do for
you?" "Nothing, thank-you, sir," I
replied, "I already have your answer.
Your great 'want' for 1911 is a
theatre, and if you have more than
one 'want' it is for two theatres."
"Right, my boy, right," he rejoined,
"bless you for being able to see so
clearly, what it is that is so dear to
my heart."
From Mr. Leiser's office it is but
a step to any of the saloons which
line the water-front, and ' thither I
bent my steps, as I Avas desirous of
interrogating a well-known public
man, whose business leads him to this
quarter of the town, where he has to
spend thc greater part of the day.
My visit was to
MR. PHILIP CHALK
He was sitting at a table pondering
the great things of life when I approached him. "Mr. Chalk," I said,
"what is your great 'want'?"
"Thanks," he' said, looking up, "I'll
the 'drink,' it's the paying for it, and
cured the desired refreshment, I explained to him the real object of my
call. "My great 'want'," he quickly
rejoined, "is to see a by-law passed
which will insist on the erection; of
free saloons, where the poor working-men, when he wants something to
cheer him up, can get it without the
necessity of feeling that his wife and
children are suffering. What's the
good of all this preaching about
'drink" ruining the home. It's not
thc 'drink' it's the paying for it, and
if folks want to see the poor man's
home bright and comfortable, let
them give the poor man his booze
for nothing. That's my 'want,' and
by the same token, if so be as you
have the price, I might take another
little shot, just to brace me up a
bit."
But I had reached the door and
from the look of him the bar-tender
was not imbued with the free-drink
germ. But two more names remained
andand I determined to tackle their
owners Avithout delay. If I hurried I
should be able to find in his office
MR. E. M. JOHNSON
Mr. Johnson received me with
great cordiality, which was, however,
somewhat less effusive when he discovered that I was a mere newspaper man and that I had not come
to buy real estate. "I don't know
what you fellows are thinking about,"
he began, somewhat peevishly. "Here
am I continually fighting the City,
and I never see a word of commendation in the newspapers. In
fact, I have more than once had an
idea that the brief paragraphs that
sometimes appear are purposely
written in such a manner that foolish people might think that there was
something humorous in my attitude.
However, I'll tell you that my great
'want' for 1911 is to have that extra
'two-bits' taken off my assessment.
When that is done, maybe, I shall
be able to think of a few other
things which might come in handy."
I departed wondering greatly what
the next answer Avould be, for I had
as my last name that of a representative of thc pessimistic class, and it
is a well-known fact that the pessimist takes a gloomy pleasure when
his prognostications of woe are fulfilled. It was in this state of mind
that I arrived at the residence of
MR. GEORGE JEEVES
As soon as I entered the door I
felt the mantle of pessimism wrap
itself round me. On propounding my
question Mr. IJeeves answered abruptly, "that Victoria will go to the
dogs, and, if she continues to travel
down-hill as fast as she is doing
at present, I haven't the slightest
doubt but that my "want" will bc
satisfied. That is my first and last
'want' for 1911."
I had already interviewed the esteemed gentleman whose name appears next. Having heard that hc
was about to go East I had managed
to see him before his departure, so I
was obliged to return to the office
without the pleasure of again calling
on ■■■-- - •>••*' * -
THE HON WM. TEMPLEMAN
The Minister for the Interior had
received me with an easy gracious-
ness which had done much to relieve
me of my embarrassment at intruding upon the time of so distinguished
a Victorian, who from the first has
brought his influence at Ottawa to
bear upon the Federal House, whenever an opportunity of benefiting the
city which he represents, has occurred. "I am afraid that I can give
you only two minutes," he had said,
"as I am busy packing." Honourable
Minister of the Interior," I had replied, "1 have only one question to
ask you. What is your 'want' for
1911?" "The nomination for Victoria
and the ability to sell out the Victoria Daily Times at my own price;
also another chance of selecting a
new site for a Drill Hall." With
these words, so characteristic of a
capable man who knows his own
mind and has no time to waste, he
had dismissed me.
Pondering deeply on the various
answers I had received I left ■ the
office, determined to allow myself
time before criticising them in the
aggregate, and now after due thought
and much deliberation I have only
this to say, -that -Victoria—i's indeed
to be congratulated when she possesses in her midst, such a combination of notables, all of; whom think
nothing of self, but all of her.
A Total Abstainer
Excited Individual—Is this where
they  swear  people?
Commissioner for Oaths—Yes, sir;
what can I do for you?
Excited Individual—I want to taice an
oath never to put down another carpet.—Tit-Bits.
Taking Him Sown
Jack (fond of putting on a little)—
I dined at my friend's, the Duchess de
Podboro's last week, and—would you
believe it?—we had no fish.
Nellie—Ah, well, I suppose they all
ate it upstairs.—Tit-Btts.
Better!
"Could you tell me where I can get a
drink at this time of night?"
"No, sir!" says the officer rebukingly.
The belated individual goes on his
way, but at the next corner he has a
new idea, so he returns to the faithful
officer and inquires confidentially:
"Could you tell me where we can get
a driiik at this time of-night?"
A Question of Relative Merit
A little boy of eight years, attending
school away from home, wrote a letter
to his sister, from, which the following
extract is taken:
"AVe had a spelling match in school
today, and I spelled all the boys down
and won the meddle."
A Perfect Fellow
Jones— Who is the really perfect
man, I should like to know.
Brown—The man your wife was going
to marry if she hadn't married you.
On Unknown Territory
"Say, whose feet 'er you steppin' on?"
growled the man in the crowded car.
"Really, I don't know," replied the
person addressed, "but I am willing to
oblige even a stranger."
Thereupon he stepped off.
His Extra Bath.
"That summer resort proprietor is a
sharp one, isn't he?"
"I should say so. I fell off the dock
and he charged me for an extra bath."
-Mamma,    can   I have
dear;  you  may take a
Small Phyllis-
some raisins?"
Mamma—Yes,    	
handful.
Smal] Phyllis—Won't you please 'give
them to me, mamma? Your hand is so
much  larger  than  mine.
VICTOEIA   LAND   DISTRICT,
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Margaret Mc-
AulifEe, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Married Woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:*—Commencing at a post
planted about three miles south-west
from the mouth of the Takush River;
thence south SO chains; thence west SO
chains; thence north SO chains; thence
east SO chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or
less.
Dated November 9th, 1910.
MARGARET McAULIPFE.
jan 7 Frederick A. Smith, Agent.
A'ICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2   ;
TAKE NOTICE that Walter S. Mc-
Lellan, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Cruiser, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about three and a half miles south of
the mouth of the Takush River, thence
south 40 cjhains; thence east SO chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence west 80
chains to the point of commencement
and containing 320 acres more or less.
Dated November 10th, 1910.
,  WALTER S. McLELLAN.
jan 7 Frederick A.  Smith, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that AVilliam Ernest
Darry, of A'ancouver, B.C., occupation
Broker, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about three miles south-west of Takush Harbour; thence south SO chains;
thence east SO chains; thence north SO
chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
Dated November 25th, 1910.
AVILLIAM   ERNEST   BARRY,
jan 7 Frederick A.  Smith, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Gerald G. Mc-
Geer, of A'ancouver, B.C., occupation
Student-at-Law, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about one and a half miies
westerly from Takush Harbour, thence
north SO chains; thence west SO chains;
thence south SO chains; thence east SO
chains to point of commencement and
containing 040 acres more or less.
Dated November 25th, 1910.
GERALD A. McGEER.
jan 7 Frederick A.  Smith, Agent.
A'ICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Lawrence G.
I.edwell, of A'ancouver, B.C., occupation
Fireman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about one and a half miies westerly
from Takush Harbour; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north SO chains; thence east SO chains
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated November 25th, 1910.
LAWRENCE G. LEDWELL.
jan  7   ■ Frederick A.  Smith, Agent.
A'ICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Ellen Ledwell,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Married
Woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about three miles south-west of Takush Harbour, thence west SO chains;
thence south SO chains; thence east 80
chains; therice north SO chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated November 26th, 1910.
ELLEN LEDWELL.
jan 7 Frederick A. Smith, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that John Anthony
Fahey, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about four miles south-west from Takush Harbour, thence north SO ehains;
thence west SO chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated November  26th,  1*910.*   ■■■'■■
JOHN ANTHONY FAHEY.
___^____\\_\\     Frederick A.  Smith, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Roy Broderick,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Fireman,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following clescribed lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
four miles south-west from Takush Harbour; thence south. 80. chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north SO chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated November 28th, 1910.*
ROY BRODERICK.
jan 7 Frederick A. Smith, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that James Nathaniel
Boult, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about sfk miles south-west from Takush Harbour; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres  more or less.
Dated November 2Sth, 1910.
JAMES NATHANIEL BOULT.
jan 7 Frederick A. Smith, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Cowan,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
seven miles south-westerly from Takush Harbour; thence north 80 chains;
thence west SO chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east SO chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated November 29th, 1910.
ARTHUR COAVAN.
jan 7 Frederick A.  Smith, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Harry J. Morrison, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Capitalist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about seven miles south-west from Takush Harbour; thence south SO chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north SO
chains; thence east SO chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
Dated November 29th, 1910.
HARRY J. MORRISON,
jan 7 Frederick A.  Smith, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that William Brothers, occupation Tradesman, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about five miles
westerly from Takush Harbour on .the
south shore of Smith's Sound; thence
south SO chains; thence east SO chains;
thence north SO chains; thence west
SO chains to point of commencement
ancl  containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated November 29th, 1910.
WILLIAM BROTHERS.
Jan 7 Frederick A  Smith, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Walpole,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Fireman,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
five miles westerly from Takush Harbour on the south shore of Smith's
Sound, thence south SO chains; thence
west SO chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement ancl containing ,640 acres,
more or less.
Dated November 29th,  1910.
HARRY, WALPOLE.
Jan 7 Frederick A.  Smith, Agent.
Visit The Big Pure Food
Market
Remember, it's Avhat you save that makes you rich, and
if you're alive, to your oavii interests you'll find you save
money by trading here. Other people do. Why not you?
We've got the goods. We've got the service. We'll save you
money.    Try us Avith your next order.
H. O. Kirkham & Co., Ltd.
741, 743 and 745 Fort Street Cars Stop at the Door
Grocery Store Telephone 178
Liquor Store Telephone 2677 Butcher Shop Telephone 2678
E. G. WARNER
R. S. IRWIN
Warner & Irwin
RENTS COLLECTED ESTATES MANAGED
Upper Pandora Avenue
New 10-roomed House, modern in every respect, standing
on two lots, fine situation. Price $10,000. Terms, one-third
cash;   balance can remain on mortgage at 7 per cent.
SHOAL BAY LOTS FOR SALE •
EASY TERMS
Oak Bay District
New 6-roomed House House, standing on two lots.
Price $5,000.   Terms easy.
Room 9, Finch Block, Yates St.
P. O. Box 821
Phone 2661
VICTORIA, B.C.
We Are Importers of
AMERICAN FOOTWEAR
For The Entire Family
ALL STYLES    ALL SIZES
ALL LEATHERS
SOLE AGENTS
Hanan & Son, N.Y., Wichert & Gardiner, N.Y.
Broadwalk Skuffers for the Children
H. B. Hammond Shoe Co.
Pemberton Building, 621 Fort Street
Established 1885.
Telephone 1386
A. Williams & Co.
REAL ESTATE AND.FINANCIAL AGENTS, AND
CONVEYANCERS
FOR SALE
Good Business and Residential
Properties and Farms, Mortgages, Negotiated, Rents
Collected
704 Yates St.    Victoria, B.C.

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