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Week Jul 9, 1910

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Array IX S n STB 8 8 B 5 '8 8 S S 8 }____T__"
Just a Little Better
Terry's
Fountain
ALWAYS IN THE
IllJUUUUUUULAJUUAJUl
Week
A British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria,  B. 6.
flrre-sT-mr-rrrrwTWTwrteg
HALL & WALKER   \
Agents
WELLINGTON   COLLIERY
COMPANY'S COAL
1232 Government St. Telephone 83  ■
^CB»P«tOtPBOOo(.l_BomiLti?
Vol. VII.   No. 22
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 9, 1910
One Dollar Per Annum
|he companies' act
At the last session of the Provincial
legislature the House set its seal upon
lie work of Mr. Charles Wilson, ex-At-
Imiey-General, in consolidating the Com-
lanies' Act of 1897.   There was no dif-
31-ence of opinion as to the necessity for
lis consolidation.    After thirteen years
Ixperience, during which the business of
lhe Province had increased by leaps and
lounds, the old Act had out-lived its use-
lulness.    It needed bringing up to date,
probably needed  the  importation of
bme new clauses, and generally speaking,
I  needed to be lined up with English
[Jompany Law of to-day.   Not that it fol-
aws of necessity that the English law of
lommerce is in all respects applicable to a
lew and sparsely populated country like
lis, but in a general sense it may fairly
le said that the Britisli Columbia Gov-
Irnment is justified in following this pre-
ledent.   Everyone interested in trade and
lommerce knew of Mr. Wilson's appoint-
lient and its purpose; indeed, the Liberal
lress and notably the Victoria Times was
|ot slow to criticise the appointment.  All
lie more reason, therefore, that these self-
lonstituted critics should have kept close
|*ib on his work, and have called the attention of the House to any objectionable
llauses  which   he  may  have   imported.
IVhen the Consolidated Act was submitted
here were five members from Vancouver
|nd four from Victoria in their seats, yet
hey were not instructed to make any pro-
pst against the Act, whicli passed without
Ipposition, and was duly incorporated in
Iho Statutes of the Province.    With re-
Jpect to any alterations whicii may have
Jieen introduced, it is admitted that thc
Imrpose of these Avas to bring the Com-
lianies' Act of British Columbia in line
Ivith that of the other Provinces, and so
Tar aa The Week has boen able to learn
pom its strongest opponents, there is no
Special feature in the British Columbia
lAet which is not to be found in other
■provincial Acts.    Whether this is to be
■regarded as retaliation or protection mat-
Iters very little, and while it may fairly be
largued that because Ontario or Quebec
(adopt a certain line that is no reason why
IBritish Columbia should do the same, it
Imay also well be argued that the most
[thinly populated Province in the Dominium can hardly afford to be less stringent
lin its protective legislation than the more
Ipopulous" and   richer   Provinces.     The
]*Boarcl3 of Trade of Victoria and Vancou-
Ivejf have discovered all too late what they
I should have discovered when the matter
was before the House, viz., that there are
clauses in the new Act to which they
strongly object*.   The Vancouver Board of
Trade interviewed Mr. Bowser and the
Victoria Board of Tvsltlc interview^ Pre-
I mier McBride-, requesting that thi. Act be
not enforced.   Both requests wfere denied,
and the Act will be enforced, though pos-
I sibly hot exactly along the lines which
1 some of its opponents {ear.   Anyhow, it
must be admitted that it was an unbusi-
ness-like'proposition and would be a very
dangerous precedent for a Government to
consent to the general non-enforcement of
an Act, which had been passed unanimously, and which had provoked no criticism
at the time of its passing.   Even if it
contains objectionable conditions, it is obvious that the only constitutional course
is to Watch how it Avorks and to seek
amendment at the next session of Parliament    The principal objections urged,
and urged with considerable ability by
Mr. Shallcross, representing the Victoria
Board of Trade, are against the provisions
requiring all Incorporated Companies doing business in the Province to be regis-
I tered in the Province, and to pay a license
I fee  for   such   registration.    It  is -con
tended  that  such  a  fee  Avould run  to
$400.     The   other   main   objection   is
to requiring Incorporated Companies  doing business here to register their mortgages.    The latter is a technical question
which  involves no very great hardship
anyAvay, and is rather a matter of procedure than principle.   As to the former,
much could be said.    There are many
who think that the Companies Avho are
doing such a large and profitable business
in this Province may Avell contribute more
largely to its revenues: a contention which
it is difficult to gainsay.    On the other
hand, it is contended that it is the same
with taxes as Avith tariffs, they are ultimately paid by the consumer.   In the present case it may be pointed out that the
strongest objection comes from manufacturers' agents, and agents for outside produce  companies.    These  men  carry no
stock and Avork for a small commission;
probably on the average, not more than
five per cent.    Anything Avhich cripples
their business  Avould  throAV  it  into the
hands of the Avholesalers, and the latter
carrying large stocks and assuming the
burden of heavy financial arrangements,
require a much larger percentage of profit;
which is no doubt true, s.o that any dislocation of the present supply market will
sensibly increase the cost of living. There
is, hoAvever, a point not to be lost sight
of, it is that the importation of large quantities of cheap supplies may Avell check the
development of local industries, by subjecting them to severer competition than
they can stand.   Those avIio have set forth
the case for the Board of Trade claim
that the Act can be so interpreted as to
make it illegal for a book-seller to sell a
magazine, the property of an Incorporated Company, unless the latter is registered in the Province and has paid the
registration fees, because magazines carry
advertisements, and a consumer might cut
out an advertisement and send for some
article, and by so doing would constitute
the book-seller an agent of the Company.
This may be an extreme case, still, on the
authority of eminent legal advisers it has
been stated as a possibility.   Mr. Shallcross contends that the Act Avould prevent
a vessel of an unregistered Company from
purchasing supplies, indeed there is no
limit in this direction.    The whole subject is both legal and technical, but having
very carefully folloAved the argument of
the objectors, The Week is unable to believe that tho Act* could, be applied in the
manner suggested, and, in any event, it
would  have been better  policy for the
Boa I'd of Trade to have waited until it
was brought into operation in some specific
case.   If it was found susceptible of the
interpretation Avhich the Board of Trade
suggests, there is very little doubt but that
the   Government  would   consent  to   an
amendment, but at present it stands in
line with the Companies' Act of all other
provinces  and with  British commercial
law, and it is therefore unlikely tliat the
Government will consent to any such extreme proposal as that of non-enforcement.
TROP DE ZELE
It is not often that The Week disagrees with the action of the Rev. J. G.
Shearer, who, as the head of the Lord's
Day Alliance, and later of the Social ancl
Moral Reform Association of Canada, has
done splendid Avork for the cause of righteousness, but it cannot refrain from protesting against the tendency Avhich Dr
Shearer seems to share in common Avith
most reformers to adopt a policy of prohibition rather than to persevere Avith an
educational propaganda. In a very brilliant article hy Dr. Andrew AndreAv McPhail, recently reprinted in the columns
of The Week, it Avas pointed out how this
tendency is groAving, and how thereby the
influence of the churches is being Aveak-
ened; a proposition Avhich no reasonable
man can deny. The latest illustration
is in the movement accredited to Dr.
Shearer for prohibiting the exhibition of
the Moving Pictures of the Johnson-
Jeffries fight. Mr. Shearer may not approve of prize-fights, and therefore Avould
not Avish to see them; it is also probable
that he has no desire to witness their reproduction on the screen, but he should
remember that there are thousands Avho
love a prize-fight ancl avIio avouM thoroughly enjoy the pictures Avithout suffering any
sense of degradation. Why a broad-minded
Christian minister should Avish to curtail
the innocent enjoyment of some thousands
of people is beyond the comprehension of
The Week, and it is especially difficult to
understand this in the case of Dr. Shearer.
The Week has for years supported him
and his Avork, ancl hopes to do so in the
future, but Avould respectfully suggest that
by making such an extreme proposal as the
one above referred to, he is guilty of an
excess of zeal, AA'hich cannot but re-act on
his legitimate Avork ancl seriously cripple
his usefulness as a reformer.
BLUNDERS
The Victoria Times has had a relapse and after six months of tolerably
good behaviour it is once more breaking
out into one of its former unreasoning
ancl vicious attacks on the Attorney-General. In a recent editorial it spoke
unctuously of Mr. Bowser's blunders. One
would tliink that if any paper should
speak gently of blunders it Avould be the
Victoria Times. There are not a feAV active members of the Liberal party avIio
claim that the Times Avas the chief contributor to their defeat in the last Federal
election, and to their practical annihilation at the last Provincial election. Tliere
are not a feAV men in both political camps
Avho believe that the Times Avas an important contributor to Premier McBride's
popularity and success. The AVeek has
heard it hinted in Avell-informed quarters
that the Hon. William Templeman shares
these vieAvs, and that the cleansing of the
Augean stable is not intended to stop at
the commercial department. This may or
may not be true, but in any event, it is
impossible to read the Times' comment
on Mr. BoAvser's blunders Avithout recalling the incident of "the mote ancl the
beam,"
ISLAND DEVELOPMENT LEAGUE
The Island Development League has
just issued a beautiful booklet on the
southmost districts of Vancouver Island,
specially underlining Cohvood, Metchosin
and Sooke. The book is a credit to all
concerned, especially to Mr. Ernest McGaffey, the indefatigable secretary and to
Mrs. Madge Robertson Watt, who is responsible for tlie letter press. It furnishes
a large fund of information, ancl is easily
tho best thing of the kind Avhich has been
produced. In commenting on it The Week
Avishes to call attention to an important
fact which does not seem to have attracted
the attention of the Development League;
it is that in spite of all protests to tlie
contrary, and even in spite of a commina-
tory editorial in The Colonist, farming on
Vancouver Island does not pay at present. By this Tho Week does not mean
that no farm pays, but that the majority
do not, ancl that but for thc private incomes upon Avhich the farmers draw, they
would starve. It is all very avcII for the
Development League to paint one picture,
but they should in justice to the English
immigrants Avhom they would attract,
paint the other. It is all very Avell to induce people to come out here to live on
their incomes and play at farming for a
pastime.   There are many %vho do that at
home, ancl all too many Avho do it here,
and if that is Avhat Englishmen are to expect there is no reason why the Development League should not tel) them so; but
if they are expected tc come here and get
a living for themselves and theii families
off the land, The Week can prove that under   existing   conditions   of   population,
transportation, cost of labour ancl of other
necessaries of living, it cannot be done, except in a few very favourable instances.
This statement is based on observation and
on the experience of those Avho have tried
it, and The Week Avishes to register a protest against a presentation of the case,
which sets forth all the favourable conditions, but ignores the drawbacks.   If anyone thinks that this is an unfair statement
of the case, let him take a trip through
the very districts coA'ered by Mrs. Watt's
pamphlet, ancl notice the amount and character of the cultivation after more than
half a century of settlement.   Let him also
take note of the fruit crops Avhich are al-
loAved to rot because it will not pay to
gather them, and of the grass which remains uncut, year after year, because it
will not pay to make it into hay.    And,
after noting these things let him urge the
Development League to study the economic
side of the settlement question and publish
the facts.
A GOOD OMEN
The Week has often criticised the
school system of Canada and has laid special stress on the general lack of discipline
which prevails. It is with extreme pleasure
that it directs attention to a little incident
Avhich goes far to discount any feeling of
pessimism in this regard, ancl wliieh is
full of promise for the future. Mr.
Rogers, the well-known sugar magnate of
Vancouver, visited Victoria Regatta this
week in his beautiful yacht. It Avas
manned by his oavu boys, the only paid
labour on board being the engineer. The
bpys Avere Avell trained and disciplined.
Not a sentence Avas heard on the yacht except in naval terms. Everything Avas precise, prompt ancl professional. The boys
only Avent ashore on leave, and though
they Avere entertained most hospitably by
old friends, they insisted on leaving on the
very stroke of time, in order to be able to
report when their furlough expired.
Moreover everything Avas done with the
utmost zest, ancl duty was obviously a
pleasure. There can be no finer training
than this, and no better omen for the
Canada of thc future.
A SENSIBLE MAYOR
In Ered. Stork Prince Rupert has
found a sensible Mayor. Anyone Avho
knoAvs him knoAV that hc would easily defeat his opponent in the mayoral contest.
He had established a record in Pernio of
which any public man might Avell be
proud. Apart altogether from politics,
which should bc ignored in municipal matters, and in spite of the fact that Mr.
Stork is a life-long Liberal, it must be
admitted that he possesses all the necessary
qualifications for successful public service.
He is a man of high personal character;
of absolute honesty; he is broad-minded,
progressive, tactful and diplomatic. He
makes no enemies ancl many of his
warmest friends belong to the other camp.
Hc has initiated his term of office in
Prince Bupert by introducing "high license," which is the only practical method
of conducting the drink traffic. It will
haA'e the effect of closing the "blind pigs,"
and of heading off Dr. Spencer's nostrum,
the Scott Act. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 9, 1910
1
At The Street
Corner K
By THE LOUNOBR
_
"The rule of the road is a paradox
quite;
If   you   go   to   the   right   you   are
wrong; if you go to the left you
are right."
. I well remember this little axiomatic paradox, or paradoxical axiom being installed into my ears when they
were but eight years old, or thereabouts; and I have never forgotten
it. Well would it have been for me
if I could have forgotten it on the
occasions when I visited Continental
countries in Europe, or when I set
foot on thc other side of the line
in this vast expanse of country.
However, for the most part I live in
British countries, and in them the
above maxim holds good; and not only
holds good, but is well observed. It
is rare indeed that drivers, whether
of flesh and blood or of iron and
steel evade the rule, and if they do,
and there is an accident—woe unto
them. But there are many people
who seem to be totally unaware that
there is an unwritten law governing
the sidewalks and the multitudinous
pedestrian traffic which they carry.
And this law reverses the former,
for on the sidewalk men and women,
and I would lay special emphasis on
the word "women," because they arc
the worst offenders, are supposed to
pass on the right. But do they? I
wot not. I remember that my estimable friend, Mr. Horace, somewhere
in "The Ars Poetica," makes reference to the same thing, but in the
brutal tone of the day he says that
the weakest have to go to the wall;
now-a-days we say: "Give the lady
the inside berth." But that only applies on uncrowded streets, and certainly has not any effect in the case
of Government Street on a holiday
or on Saturday night. Such little
acts of politeness, praiseworthy
though they be, are only a cause of
further confusion, and pedestrians
would do well to keep firmly fixed in
their minds the rule that, in passing, they are supposed to keep to the
right hand side.
*     *     *
I believe that it is a doctrine of the
Jesuits that it is right to do evil provided that good may result therefrom. It also appears to be the doctrine of the Victoria City Council.
On Monday, July 4th, when the city
was crowded with excursionists, there
was a lake in front of the City Hall.
It was not an ornamental lake; there
were no swans swimming on it; no
water-fowl brooded on its confines,
not even a seal was to be observed
lurking 'neath the pebbles. In fact,
some people might have been rude
enough to have called it a big puddle,
caused by the zealous attentions of
the water-cart man and the equally
zealous inattention of the authorities.
Anyhow, there it was, and I noticed
a lot of our visitors regarding it with
awe ancl amazement. They evidently
failed to reconcile its existence in a
prominent place, just outside the
building that makes Victoria the wonder and envy of thc world (sic), with
the beauties they had seen in other
parts of the city. I wondered also;
and my faith in our appointed guardians was on thc point of being shattered, when a dumb animal showed
me how near I was to placing blame
where no blame belonged. This lake,
or puddle, is provided by a kindly
and humane body of men as a bathing and drinking place for our humbler friends. A little dog, a mongrel,
but still a dog, came along, gave me
a plaintive look, as much as to say:
"Don't be angry with them, they are
doing it for my sake," ancl proceeded
to drink and then wallow in the luxurious accommodation provided for
him. It is a real pleasure to know
that our City Fathers have such kind
hearts, but I would point out that,
though T myself am a Protector of
the Poor, I do think that they need
not provide quite so many of these
artificial baths for our canine friends.
*     *     *
Dear reader, are you a very big
dog, or a very small horse, or arc
you just kn ordinary common or
garden human being? Much depends
on the correct solution of this problem. The person who designed the
two drinking fountains, one at each
end of the Causeway, seems to have
put you and me in a class not hitherto defined in the Natural History
books. For a clog they are too high;
for a horse they are not capacious
enough, and for a human being they
are low,—far too low. There are
four ways in whicii a man can drink
in comparative comfort; he can drink
standing up; hc can drink sitting
down; he can drink lying on his
back, and he can drink lying flat on
his "tummy"; but—he cannot drink
with any satisfaction to himself, when
he is bending clown. But that is what
we have to do if we are thirsty on
the Causeway. All credit to the
Council for establishing the foundations; they were badly needed; all
credit to them also for not having
provided those germ-breeding cups
which are such a disgrace in many
cities! But it would have cost such
a very little more to have built the
foundations a little higher so that
men of 5 ft. io}4 in. (my own height)
could occasionally get a little drink
during the heat and burden of the
day, without looking like asses and
without getting a crick in the back.
One would have thought that when
people advertised on a theatre curtain they would insist on correct spelling. Apparently, the business men
of Victoria are like Gallio of old,
"they care for none of these things."
I have noticed on two theatre curtains in Victoria bad spelling; one is
possibly a matter of opinion, though
I think my opinion is right. The
other is AWFUL; "their" is spelt
"there." What do you think of that?
If you want to know where this atrocity is perpetrated you had better go
the round of the shows and look for
it. My only hope is that the advertiser did not pay the company who
contracted for the curtain.
* *     *
What happened to the water-cart on
Monday after it had filled the lake
above mentioned? The main streets
were thronged with visitors and the
corner of Yates and Government was
one whirling mass of dust. During
the whole of the summer the water-
cart has been most assiduous in its
attentions, and I don't think that the
citizens have any just cause for complaint, but a la Victoria, just when
the influx of excursionists came, the
dust was  the one thing which they
could not possibly miss.
* *     *
I took another "lounge" out into
the country last week-end. How many
Victorians know the beauties of Nature which are lying right at their
doors? Prospect Lake is one of the
prettiest places that I have ever seen.
You can get there in all sorts of
ways. You may take a carriage and
drive; you may take an automobile
ancl scorch, or, you may do as the
Lounger did, take a car to the Gorge,
and then walk. Don't go there unless
you are prepared to appreciate scenery, rest and quietude. At Prospect
Lake there are to be found no saloons, no picnic grounds and no
"tourist attractions." But there is to
be found a spot of scenic beauty, unparalleled, in my humble estimation,
within thc same radius. Boating,
fishing and bathing can all be indulged in, and the happy party who
drives there with a luncheon basket,
prepared to spend the Sunday, de
pendent on its own resources for
all save the boat, will come back
all the better prepared for the next
week's work.
* *     *
Do you "batch"? If so, there have
doubtless been many times when you
felt too lazy to wash up the dishes,
ancl have left them till the morning
I had a "tip" given me the other
day, which I will gladly pass on to
other unfortunates. In such circum
stances turn the dishes over, and then
the rats can't get in.
if"*' /
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THE PIANO THAT ALWAYS RETAINS THE CHARM OF YOUTH
MONTELIUS PIANO HOUSE, LIMITED
SOLE B. C. REPRESENTATIVES
1104 GOVERNMENT STREET
-COR. FORT STREET
Development League
MEETING at
ALBERNI
DISTRICT
Train leaves E. & N. Station July
14th, 9 a.m. Round trip to Wellington $4.65. Free transportation from
Wellington to end of E. & N. Extension and return. All-day trip on
Alberni Canal to Barkley Sound and
back to Port Alberni on July 17; fare
for trip $2.50. Picnic at Sproat Lake
July 16th.
Members and friends cordialy invited. A splendid opportunity to
visit a famous district.
Tickets at C. P. R. Ticket Offices,
Government and Fort Street, and E.
& N. Railway Station.
Although Mr. D. R. Ker is enjoying
a continental trip in Europe, he cannot forget Victoria, at any rate he
cannot forget its dust; for I notice
that he writes a very interesting letter
to the Colonist, making a suggestion
for dust-laying. The suggestion is to
follow the example of County Kent
by sweeping all the dust off the roads,
then applying a thin coating of boiling tar and a sprinkling of sand. The
idea is excellent in Kent, where the
roads are really macadamized, but,
unfortunately, Victoria cannot boast
of one single piece of road made after
the recipe of macadam, and if the
city workmen had to sweep dust until
they came to a stone foundation, they
would have to sweep to the country
rock. Mr. Ker evidently overlooks
this trifling circumstance, which entirely alters the value of his suggestion; at least that is the humble
opinion of
cfa
^C4C^f\
King Edward Mines
LIMITED
NON-PERSONAL LIABILITY
PORTLAND CANAL,  B.C.
We are offering the balance
of the first issue of shares
in this Company at ioc per
share. For Prospectus and
full particulars apply to	
KING EDWARD MINES, Limited
Room 8, Mahon Building      P. O. Box 77a
Victoria, B.C.
The name on the Label should be SCHMIDT'S, if you
want the best in genuine imported Clarets and Burgundies. They have been on this market for the past
fifteen years and stand for the Popular Choice.
For sale by all liquor dealers.
"RADIGER & JANION
1318 Wharf Street 'British Columbia Agents.
S. L. Wilson
J. Kennedy
VICTORIA GARAGE
S. L. WILSON, Manager
REPAIRING OF ALL MAKES  OF  CARS A SPECIALTY
AUTOMOBILES STORED, CLEANED AND FOR
HIRE DAY AND NIGHT
943 FORT STREET (Opp. Skating Rink)
Telephone 2326 VICTORIA, B.C.
Shameful
Extract from a young lady's letter
from Venice: "Last night I lay in a
gondola in the Grand Canal, drinking
it all in, and life never seemed so full
before."
More Nearly Ezaet
"Don't hesitate to put your money I
on me," said the boastful prize-fighter. |
"I'll win in awalk."
"You mean," said the knowing friend,
"that you'll win in a talk, don't you?" THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 9, 1910
The Victoria Theatre
j The Empress Stock Company made
excellent start in Victoria with
lieir initial performance of "Trilby."
lliss Isabelle Fletcher in the title
pie scored a big success, her acting
the difficult death scene being spe-
|ally worthy of comment. As Sven-
ali, Frederick Wilson was distinctly
ood, showing to the best advantage
li the lobby scene. Mention should
|so be made of Messrs. Henderson
|id Southern who sustained the parts
"The Laird" and "Taffy" in a very
Ireditable manner. This is by far
lie best stock company that has visit-
Id Victoria within the ken of the
I riter. This was proved by their
Kxellent rendition of "Wildfire,"
Ihich will again be presented at a
latinee and evening performance to-
lay. This play fits the company like
glove, and I have no hesitation in
kying that in it the Empress Stock
tompany far excel the average com-
lany which visits Victoria on tour.
Ishley Popper in the difficult part of
■Main; Teddy MacNamara in New
fork street slang as a stable boy,
nd Miss Fletcher as Mrs. Barring-
Ian are specially worthy of praise,
|ttt, truth to tell, the parts were so
xcellently balanced that it seems in-
lidious to make distinctions. If the
Dinpany maintains next week the
ligh standard it has set itself this
reek, it may leave Victoria feeling
liat it has not worked in vain.
The New Grand
The Scott Brothers who are ap-
learing at the above theatre may
futhfully be said to be marvels.
I'heir equilibrist work is beyond all
ompare and their grand finale in the
I'heel is Avorth walking miles to see.
|'or people who like animal shows
knita Diaz has provided a troupe of
Ixccedingly clever monkeys, whose
lerformance delights the house. They
liay be said to be top liners in
lungleland Vaudeville. Of the other
lurns I would specially select J.
Francis O'Reilly, who is a long way
|ihead of the average monologist. The
loving Pictures show Roosevelt in
|\frica and are therefore specially interesting,
Pantages Theatre
The performance at Pantages opens
|with some wonderful card tricks by
■the conjurer "Mysterio." He is distinctly clever, and performed one
■trick which I had never seen before,
|with cards in a glass. The Lewis &
iLake Musical Comedy Company have
(presented another of their laughable
■absurdities with Irish and Hebraic
■comedians and daintily dressed chorus
Igirls. Asther, Meyar and Mack would
Idrive away the blues from the big-
tgest pessimist living and are making
[a great hit with their drolleries.
Romano Theatre
"Talking Pictures" are the great attraction at Romano's. This effect is
J produced by having a gramophone
[working in connection with the films,
I and the effect is very good.
The Majestic Theatre
Some very amusing pictures have
I been holding the curtain here. "My
1 Lord in Livery" was a great success
land the management promises an
I equally fine programme for the end
| of the week.
The Empress Theatre
Pictures sober and gay have been
I giving every satisfaction to the many
I patrons of the Empress Theatre. Al-
I though it is not on the direct line of
[travel for folk lounging up and down
I Government Street, this picture house
[has made itself very popular, and al-
[ways attracts large numbers of peo-
Ipie; which is as it should be, as the
[pictures shown are of the best.
MOMUS.
known American success, "The Lion
and the Mouse," written by the successful playwright, Charles Klein.
This will be recognized as one of
the biggest hits of recent years. The
plot treats of one of the vital problems of the day, the power of
money. The bill for July 18th, 19th
and 20th will be "The Girl of the
Golden West." This is a drama that
has won enormous success and ran
for nearly two years in New York
city, and has toured all over the country to record-breaking receipts. The
theme of this drama is laid in California in the early days and the powerful characters of "The Girl," "The
Gambler," and "The Road Agent" are
taken from life and presented in the
action of the play with so much fidelity to nature, that they seem to
live and breathe. This is the greatest
play ever written by the author, David
Belasco, who numbers many plays to
his credit. Crowded houses should be
the case for the balance of the engagement of this talented Company.
New Grand Next Week
The Great Albini will head the
Grand Theatre bill next week. Those
who have not seen Albini in magic
have an opportunity this coming week
to do some seeing and afterwards
many, many hours of thinking and
puzzling. Albini will give a new performance every night. For six days
he will offer six different acts, all of
the same magical nature. He will
probably open Monday with the illusions known as the disappearing
lady, the magic chair, the transparent trunk and the bridal chamber
and in between each of these will
give several sleight-of-hand tricks, his
complete show lasting over half an
hour. With Albini in the bill this
week and four other good acts, Mr.
Jamieson has the most expensive bill
Sullivan and Considine have allotted
Victoria in many months. One night
during the week Albini promises to
offer an exposure of the fake palmists ancl fortune tellers and show exactly how these fakes arrive at their
supposedly marvelous conclusions.
Chantecler
Jewelry
A new consignment just received — delightful conceptions
smart dressers will approve of—
BROOCHES
BEAUTY PINS
BELT PINS
HAT PINS
Etc., Etc.
Inspection cordially invited.
Come in any time whether you
desire to purchase or not.
W. H. WILKERSON
The Jeweler
915 Government Street
Tel 1606
JHEATRi
 i  LISSIE 8. MANACI
MONDAY, TUESDAY  and
WEDNESDAY
-THE-
Victoria Next Week
Only one more week of the engage-
Iment of the Empress Stock Company
lin celebrated plays at Victoria Thea-
Itre remains. On Monday, Tuesday
land Wednesday evenings, July 18th,
ligth, and 20th, will be given that well
UNDER CANVAS
The Boy Scouts in Camp
At the corner of Lampson and
Head Streets, over in Victoria West,
an edifying spectacle is to be observed by all who are sufficiently interested in the training of our boys to
go and witness it. The boy Scouts to
the number of over two hundred are
in camp where they are having the
time of their lives. It must not be
imagined, however, that this means
that they are merely having a glorified picnic, all play and no work. On
the contrary they are living under a
strict regime whereby they are learning the first principles of discipline
and obedience in addition to regular
instruction in musketry and scouting.
When the proposal for this camp
was first mooted it was distinctly laid
down that the boys had to do everything for themselves; no grants were
to be made; no subscriptions received
from outsiders, and no liberal tips
from the wealthier parents. The
camp was to be the result of individual self-denial, proved by weekly
savings, and the camp is to last as
long as the funds hold out, which will
probably be another week. Tents ancl
cook-stoves were "rustled" by the
youngsters themselves, who begged
or borrowed them from sympathetic
relatives and friends who had the
good sense to appreciate the incalculable benefits likely to accrue from a
fortnight's military discipline for the
boys. No help was given in pitching
the camp, yet, though the boys did
not march in till 3 o'clock on Saturday afternoon, the tents were all
pitched, the camp arranged and when
supper and bed-time came, everything
was in order. Not a bad record for
boys, the majority of whom are only
thirteen or fourteen!
The Scouts are divided into troops,
each under a scout-master, who is
some gentleman willing to devote his
time for the boys' good; each troop
is divided into so many patrols consisting of about eight members, each
patrol being under the command of a
boy, chosen for his superior qualities
in thc way of leadership. And the
scheme is working wonderfully well.
In spite of what has been said about
Empress Theatre
Stock Company
OF VANCOUVER
Presenting the Famous New York
Success
The Lion and the
Mouse
THURSDAY,    FRIDAY,   SATURDAY and SATURDAY MATINEE
The Greatest Western Romance Ever
Written
The Girl of the
Golden West
David Belassco's Greatest Play
Summer Prices—75c, 50c, 35c, 25c.
Doors open 8 p.m.  Curtain Rises 8.30.
YAKATHA TOMBOLA
Good Prizes
Where?   Why?
DOWN at the GORGE
JAPANESE ICE
CREAM PARLORS
'mwmmmimmm®Mmimm*
I
There's
Nothing half
So Sweet
In Life as
Love and
Dudleigh's
Mixture
iSf&s?   Richardson I
«  Cigar Store.     »»iv""» UOVM1  M
I Phone 346 p
S:K*K*K*:-:*K*M*:-:*K*K^*t-:*:-:*§
the Canadian boy and his dislike of
regulated authority, so far, there has
been no breach of discipline worth
mentioning. The patrols obey their
immediate superior, whilst the slightest nod from a scout-master is sufficient to prove to the interested visitor
M)U\K
THEATRE
Yates Street, Just Below Government
WHERE EVERYBODY GOES
If you are dull and get the blues,
And do not know the place to choose
Come to the Majestic on Yates Street
Bring the friends you are apt to meet
And if on pleasure you are bent,
You won't regret the Dime you spent.
WE CATER TO  LADIES AND  CHILDREN
CHANQE OF PROGRAMME
Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday
THE
New Grand
Week of July 11
The Incomparable
ALBINI
The World's Master of Magic
Art
ROSE and ELLIS
World's  Greatest  Barrel
Jumpers
GEORGE   DEVOY   AND
DAYTON SISTERS
In   Rollicking   Songs   and
Eccentric Dances
Guy Frances
RAWSON and CLARE
"Just Kids," in "Yesterday"
GEORGE B. ALEXANDER
"The High-Toned Hobo"
THOS. J. PRICE
NEW MOVING PICTURES
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
PANTAGES
THEATRE
Week of July 11
Second Production of
Lewis & Lake's
Musical Comedy
Company
SUMMER ENGAGEMENT
A Bundle of Refined
Mirth and Music
The $10,000 Beauty
Funny Comedians
Spectacular Singing and
Dancing Numbers
Special Features
Interesting
Instructive
ROMAN©
THEATRE
CHANGE OF PROGRAMME THREE TIMES A WEEK
COOLEST AND MOST POPULAR THEATRE IN THE CITY
ADMISSION-TEN CENTS
Open afternoons a to 5.30, evenings 7 to 11
(Continued on Page 8)
EMPRESS
THEATRE
GOVERNMENT ST., NORTH OF JOHNSON
GEO. A. LEVELLE, Mgr.
ONLY FIRST CLASS
Motion Pictures and Illustrated Songs
Matinee every day from a to 5 p.m.   Evenings from 7 to 11 p.m.
Admission
10 Cents THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 9,  1910
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
1208  Government St.,  Victoria, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE, Editor
Black and White
BY BOHEMIAM
I should not like to say how many
millions of people have followed with
avidity the daily records of the doings in Jeffries' and Johnson's camps
for several months past. Neither
should I like to make a guess at the
number of millions who swarmed
around bulletin boards as the result
of the fight was flashed to every part
of the world. But it was millions,
beyond a doubt.
Now a good many people, and not
a few newspapers have seized the
occasion to "point a moral and adorn
a tale." They have declared that
prize-fighting is debasing; that it is
deplorable to find so many people
taking an interest in it; that it lacks
a single redeeming feature and should
be denounced in unmeasured terms
as a public evil, inimical to the well-
being of the race.
I do not share these views, and
when I looked through the crowd
which surrounded the Colonist and
Times offices on Monday afternoon,
and noticed many of the most prominent and respectable citizens of
Victoria, including School Trustees,
Magistrates and Judges, as well as a
sprinkling of the fair sex, I was more
than ever confirmed in my view that
prize-fighting is like many other
things in this world, not bad in itself,
and only objectionable in connection
with extraneous matters which are
dragged in.
I have always advocated prizefighting, and do not mind confessing
that it has a peculiar fascination for
me. Apart from its special appeal to
the manly instincts of the race, it is
possible that my \intercst was increased by the fact that as a small
boy I made the acquaintance of the
bravest fighter that ever stepped into
a ring, Tom Sayers, the little middleweight, who, although he had a
broken arm, for more than three
hours fought the American giant, and
succeeded in making a draw of what
is after all the classic battle of the
prize ring. I also knew Goss, King
and Mace, and when I was reading
the bulletins on Monday, I wondered
how long Jeffries or Johnson would
have stayed in the ring with either
of these men, fighting to a finish with
bare knuckles.
Those were the palmy days of fisticuffs, when men fought for small
stakes, and went back to their ordinary job of work as soon as thc fight
was over. In those days there were
no Moving Pictures and the side bets
were put up by aristocratic patrons
of the ring who gave their proteges
a "bunch" if they won. The modern
prize-fighter is at best more of a
showman than a fighter. Still, we
havc got to take what wc can get,
and when all is said and done, it is
better to develop the courage and
nerve, to say nothing of the muscle,
necessary to enter thc prize ring and
fight to a knock-out, than for men to
lose personal courage, or to resort to
thc use of weapons for self-defence.
After all, prize-fighting is no superficial thing; it is not a fad of a moment or of a generation; it is woven
into the very fibres of our being, and
is as deep as our consciousness. The
instinct grew as the race developed;
it is, if you like, a survival of thc
brutal conflicts of the cave-men, but
it is still an exhibition of pluck and
courage, and when man ceases to like
fighting ancl to indulge in it, he will
have lost his pre-eminence.
Prize-fighting develops instincts
whicli tend, not only to the preservation of the race, but to protection,
to coolness, to resourcefulness. It
develops the love of fair play; for
what is more certain than that the
slightest attempt at a foul arouses the
fiercest hostility from any prize ring
audience in the world? Jack London
thinks that "the tiger and the ape"
are gradually being eliminated from
human nature. He illustrates this by
pointing out that men are less cruel;
that bare knuckles have given way to
padded gloves, and that even in warfare slaughter is economised. He
thinks this is an evidence that some
day "the tiger and the ape" will completely die out, and our sports will
consist of forensic, artistic and ethical battles between our chosen champions.
Again, I disagree. I believe that
the more the brutal instincts of our
race are eliminated, the less aggressive and vital shall we be. The less
able to compete or contest; the less
able to maintain our supremacy. I
believe that it is the judicious blending of the physical and the mental,
which has produced the Anglo-Saxon
type, excelling every other in virility
and in the conquering, domineering
power. The future of the world ia
for the race which longest perpetuates
these qualities, and the acme of civilization is so to develop the mental
and the moral side of man, that "the
tiger and the ape" are kept under control.
That these views are widely held
and that even the most civilized people everywhere respond to the appeal
of a prize-fight, has been well illustrated this week. None of the papers
whicii denounced the fight had elaborated any argument on what they
called "the debasing influences of the
ring," and they must have looked out
with amazement when they recognized among the crowds in the street
men of culture and of the highest
personal character, who are responsible for the we'1-being of the community.
There is little danger that the fight
at Reno will be the last. Such a prediction is as far from the truth as the
statement that Monday's fight was
one of the greatest in the annals of
the prize ring. As a matter of fact,
it did not deserve the name of
"fight." For the first time in thirty
years I did not have a dollar "up,"
because I knew that the white man
could not win, and I would not back
the nigger. It is now perfectly clear
that no one, least of all, Jeffries, expected that the white man would win.
While the fight was "on thc square,"
it is certain that Jeffries had not undergone any serious training. He refused to be weighed at any time, and
I have the best authority for saying
that he probably fought at 240 pounds,
which is 25 pounds above his proper
weight. My view is, ahd I think that
it will subsequently be confirmed, that
six years bar-keeping have converted
Jeffries into a whiskey barrel, with
soft muscles and hard veins; he could
not stand serious training, and the
secret was well kept for the sake of
the purse and the pictures. While
Johnson did all that was asked of
him, I doubt if he has any cause for
exultation, and now that the fight is
over it is certain that there are at
least two other men who could give
Johnson a harder "go" than he had
on Monday.
SABLE AND PURPLE
May, 1910
(William Watson)
I
I   sing  nnt  Deatli.    Death  la  too great
a thing
For me to dare to sin-?.
1   chant   the   human   goodness,   human
worth,
Whicii   are  not  lost,   but  sweeten   still
the Earth;
The  things  thnt  flee  not  with  the  up-
yielded breath,
But,    housed   In   sanctuary   of   simple
hearts.
Lives undethroned when Death
Comes to the chamber of n mighty King,
And   waves   abroad   the   silence   of  his
wing,
Then   shakes   his   raven   plumage,   and
departs.
II
Honor the happy dead with sober praise,
Who living would have scorned the fulsome phrase,
Meet for the languorous Orient's jewelled ear.
This was the English King, that loved
the English ways:
A man not too remote, or too august,
For other  mortal  children  of  the dust
To know and to draw near.
Born witli a nature that demanded joy,
JULY
And those who in July are born,
No  trouble  should  their  brow
adorn,
If they this gleaming gem have
worn—
The Ruby
Redfern & Sons
1009 Government Street
VICTORIA, B.C.
He took full draughts of life,  nor did
the vintage cloy;
But when she passed from vision, who
so long
Had sat aloft—alone—
On   the   steep   heights   of  an   Imperial
throne,
Then rose he large and  strong,
Then   spake   his   voice   with   new   and
grander tone,
Then, called to rule the State
Which he had only served,
He saw clear Duty plain, nor from that
highway  swerved,
And,  unappalled  by  his  majestic  fate,
Pretended   not   to   greatness,   yet   was
great.
Ill
Sea-lover, and sea-rover, throned henceforth
Amid the paths and passes of the sea;
You that have sailed, out of our stormy
North,
And have not sailed in vain,
To all the golden shores where now You
reign,
Through every ocean gate whereof You
keep  the key:
O may  your power and  your dominion
stand
Fixt  on  what  things  soever  make  life
fair,
And on  what things  soever make men
grand,
In royal robe of ordered  liberty
So   shall   your   praise   be   blown   from
strand to  strand.
Your Father lies among the Kings his
kin,
Pillowed   on   yonder   couch   of   silence,
where
No wandering echo of the world's loud
blare
Profanes the awesome air.
The age that bore us is entombed there!
With You the younger time is eager to
begin.
Let nations see, beneath your prospering
hand,
An  Empire  mighty  in  arms,  its  fleets
and hosts
Keeping far   vigil round your   hundred
coasts—
An Empire mighty in arms, but therewithal
Nourished in mind, with noble thoughts
made rich,
And   panoplied   in   knowledge,   lacking
which
The   proudest   fortress   is   but   feebly
manned
And   ever   trembles   to   its   thunderous
fall.
And now to You—to Her who at your
side
Henceforward  shall  divide
The ull but dreadful glory of a crown—
Be honor and felicity and renown!
And may the inscrutable years.
That  claim  from  every  man  their  toll
of tears,
Weave  for  your  brows a  wreath  that
shall not fade—
A ehaplet and a crown divinely made
Out of your people's love, your people's
trust;
For wanting these all else were but as
dust
In that great balance wherein Kings are
weighed.
Something Dropped
"Now, children," said the teacher,
"you have been making too much noise.
Let us see if we can't all be quiet.
Just see how still you can be—so still
you can hear a pio drop."
The teacher waited expectantly. The
pupils responded ln a body. After several moments of profound silence, in
which not a sound was heard from
pencil, book, or paper, the boy in the
back  seat  called  out:
"Let  her  drop,  teacher!"
DANGER!
DO YOU KNOW that there are more fatal diseases contracted
from the dust you sweep off your floors and carpets, than
from any other source?
AND YET at the cost of a few cents a week, by using our sweeping compound, Dustless Waxine, you need run no such risk.
WAXINE collects all dirt and dust as you sweep it across your
rooms and saves you the necessity of dusting,
WAXINE contains a disinfectant that is sure destruction to germs
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WAXINE also contains an expensive essence that will drive away
fleas and other pests.
WAXINE will keep an oiled floor, or oilcloth, always bright and
glossy, and carpets sweet and clean.
WAXINE leaves a refreshing odor in your rooms.
WAXINE is cheaper than anything else of its kind on the market.
WAXINE is used by many of the principal stores, offices, banks,
theatres and private houses of Victoria and Vancouver.
WAXINE is manufactured in Victoria by Victoria people, who
spend their money in Victoria.
Prices:
25-lb box, $1.00; 50-lb box, $2.00; 100-lb box, $3.75; 250-lb box, $7.50
AMBERINE FLOOR OIL—Our Floor Oil will stand the test as
against any other make, in fact it is the best floor oil made.
Use it.   Per gallon  $1.00
ACME METAL POLISH—Our Metal Polish, which is unequalled,
should be used by everybody.
IMPERIAL WAXINE CO.
PHONE 1968
1602 DOUGLAS STREET
Amateurs' printing and developing done at shortest
notice.
A. H. MAYNARD, 715 Pandora St.
FURNITURE PACKING BY EXPERTS
For shipment to any part of the world.
Qood Clean Materials.       Satisfaction Guaranteed.      Estimates Given.
Special Care taken with Glass and China.
A Special feature of our business   is   re-upholstering   and   restoring
Furniture of all descriptions
STYLES & SHARP
PHONE 2149
805 POBT STREET
McLaughlin Buick
Runabout Cars
A more serviceable and artistically designed Runabout Car has
never before been produced. The McLaughlin Buick 20 h.p. Runabout is the height of perfection, and the last word in motor car
construction, made from the highest possible grade of materials.
They give satisfactory service where others fail. Better let
us show you one priced at
$1,400
WESTERN MOTOR AND SUPPLY CO.
New Premises, 1410 Broad Street
Telephone 695        - - R. P. CLARK, Manager
Headquarters for choice nursery stock,
Apple, pear, cherry, plum and peach trees
and small fruits, also ornamental trees
shrubs, roses, evergreens, etc. Largest ane
best assorted stock in British Columbia.
Ten per cent, cash discount on all order:
above $10.00.
PRICE LIST AND CATALOGUE ON
APPLICATION.
P. Leonard James, A. R. A. I. C.
Architect
1006 GOVERNMENT STREET
Phone No. 269
The Taylor Mill Co
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Qovernment St., Victorii THE WEEK, SATTJKDAY, JULY 9, 1910
Dominion and Provincial News
The Hon.  Edward Blake, recently
:ported to be ill, has left Toronto
ir his summer home at Murray Bay,
good health.
Ashcroft is glutted with freight for
ariboo points. It is being moved
: the rate of 30 tons a day which is
10 slow for the people of Fort
eorge.
The   Prince   Rupert   Council   were
nanimous in agreeing that any per-
in in the city, who becomes ill and
without means, should be looked
Ifter by the city.
j It is generally conceded that the
loundary has now an alert and active
liuad of provincial police who have
een giving a good account of them-
Jdves in rounding up any criminals
liat may venture within the territory.
' Fort George seems to be the Meeta for all sorts of celebrities. Prof.
If. Schenk, recently arrived in Kam-
liops, is the head of a party of Germans who will undertake the trip
lorth on foot.
Marriott & Fellowes, one of the
lest known real estate firms of Van-
louver, has established a canvas office
It Port Mann, evidently with the intention of being first on the spot
|dien the next movement in real
tetate takes place across the river.
not be open till 10 a.m. on that day
in future. This action by the Department of the Interior is a compromise
with the Lord's Day Alliance, who
wished to close the baths entirely on
Sunday. This new rule is certain to
produce much crowding and inconvenience; but it may also hasten the
construction of the new baths and
buildings.
A new feature that will be appreciated by the travelling public, is
about to be introduced on the Eastern
lines of the C. P. R. A recent circular provides that all passenger trains
shall be equipped with an emergency
medical outfit, in charge of the conductor. The conductors and crews
will be instructed in "first aid" to thc
injured, and will be given standing
according to qualification. In case
of accident many lives are lost
through lack of prompt medical attendance. It is understood that the
service will be extended to all parts
of the line.
J Recently Vancouver had a cleaning
lp day, and about 400 wagon loads
If   dirt   were   scraped  together   and
arted out of the city.   As there was
ome soil mixed in with the refuse,
| is  difficult to tell how  much  the
ass will be to the real estate agents.
Henderson's city directory for the
lurrent year gives as Vancouver's
population on a conservative basis
jio,o68. This is exclusive of Orientals
Istimated at 10,000 additional. Comparing the directory estimates this
Ihows that the population of Vancouver has more than doubled in
lour years.
Mrs. Bruce Heathcote, of Berkeley,
"al., whose  husband  is  manager  of
lthe Canadian Bank of Commerce at
San Francisco and five years ago was
■manager of the branch at Nelson, has
larrived in Nelson with her daughter
■Grace, and is visiting her sister, Mrs
|W. J. Goepel.
The police commissioners have deluded in favor of a uniformed police
|force for Prince Rupert. As soon as
I arrangements can be made with some
(local firm for the proper making of
lthe suits, each policeman is to be
(manned as though he were just im-
I ported from a Paris outfitter.
C. W. Young, chief of police, Nelson, has received a letter from the
chief of police of Detroit, thanking
him for his assistance in bringing
to justice John Wooton, the forger.
Wooton passed a forged check for
over $2,000 on the Imperial Bank of
Canada last October, and Chief Young
sent a circular with his description
to the police of all the principal
cities. Later Wooton tried to pass
on a Detroit bank a forged check on
a Nelson bank, and the Detroit bank
wired to the Nelson bank for confirmation. Chief Young at once notified the Detroit chief that this was the
Wooton wanted in Nelson, and he
was arrested.
The publishers of the Racing Record, a local publication, issued during the race meets at the Woodbine
track, were fined $100 and costs or
ten days in jail by Magistrate Kings-
ford, of Toronto, for violating the
Miller law by publishing odds on the
races. Mr. T. C. Robinette, K.C,
counsel for the defendant company,
applied for a stated case, but the application was refused. "Then I will
go to the Court of Appeals," proceeded Mr. Robinette, "as I am quite
sure the publication of the paper cannot be interfered with." The magistrate agreed to defer the payment of
the fine until October, when the
Court of Appeals will hold its first
sitting after the summer vacation.
Mr. A. W. Vowell, superintendent
I of Indian affairs in the province, will
leave shortly on a trip to Europe
I and will visit his old home in Tip-
perary after an absence of 30 years.
Judge Vowell has been in the civil
service in British Columbia longer
than any other man, having a record
of 40 years. He will be on a year's
leave of absence, and when he returns
will give up his governmental duties.
J. J. Warren, President of the Mid-
I way-Vernon Railway Co., says that
Penticton will be the principal divisional point on the Kettle Valley
railway. A wharf will be built, 900
feet long, at a cost of $50,000. The
Penticton pay-roll will probably
, amount to $60,000.
The first salmon to be caught in
! the Kootenay river this season was
I landed at  Granite last Saturday by
R. D. Graves, who was trolling from
I the shore.    The fish put up a great
fight, and tipped the scale at tyn,
' pounds,  its length being 29 inches.
Mr. Graves also landed a trout that
I measured exactly 20 inches.
It was a surprise to many would-
I be early bathers at Banff last Sunday
to find that the Cave and Basin would
Mr. D. D. Mann, despite the news
of this new and great discovery, still
inclines to the opinion that the Upper
Salmon River, toward which he is
building his Portland Canal short
line railway, as rapidly as men and
material can produce results, will
prove the stupendous surprise of
years to mining men. He has now
between thirty-five and forty claims
under bond in this section, and is
snapping up all other offers for sale.
In one case the showing of ore body
seemed as immense as that of the
great Treadwell, while retaining the
high values peculiar to the ores of
this and the Portland camp. It is
the intention of Mackenzie & Mann
to complete the Portland Canal short
line by September, if at all possible,
crossing the mountains at the headwaters of Bear River by a new pass,
at an altitude of but 2,600 feet, traversing the Naas Valley and the auriferous Omineca, and connecting with
the Canadian Northern main line west
of Yellowhead Pass, thus making
Stewart also a transcontinental terminus.
LAND REGISTRY ACT
In the matter of an application for a
Duplicate certificate of Title to Lot
41,  Victoria West.
NOTICE is hereby given that it is
my intention at the expiration of one
month from the date of the first publication hereof to issue a Duplicate Certificate of Title to said land Issued to
Charles Pollock on the Sth day of May,
ISO!), and numbered 4311.
Land Registry Offlce, Victoria, B.C.,
the 30th day of June, 1910.
J. P. McLEOD,
jy 9 Deputy Registrar General
QOVERNMENT
AUCTION
SALE
OF
QUESNEL
TOWN LOTS
Notice is hereby given that all vacant
lots in the
Townsite of Quesnel
will be offered for sale at Quesnel by
PUBLIC AUCTION
ON
Monday, Aug. 1
Over one hundred lots will be offered at this sale, the terms of sale
being 25 per cent, cash and the balance in three equal annual instalments with interest at the rate of 6
per cent, per annum.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., June 27, iqio.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Cadboro Bay School
Sealed Tenders, superscribed "Tender
for School-house," will be received by
the Honourable the Minister of Public
Works up to noon of Monday, the 18th
July, 1910, for the erection and completion of a two-room frame school-
house at Cadboro Bay, Saanich Electoral District.
Plans, specifications, contract, and
forms of tender may be seen on and
after the Oth day of July, 1910, at the
Public Works Department, Victoria,
B. C.
Each proposal must be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank of
Canada, made payable to the Honourable the Minister of Public Works, in
a sum of $300, which shall be forfeited
if the party tendering decline to enter
into contract when called upon to do so,
or If he fail to complete the work contracted for. The cheques or certificates
of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers
will be returned to them upon the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the forms supplied, signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed in the envelopes
furnished.
Tlie lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
P. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., 5th July, 1910.
jy9
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Caroline B.
Barnes, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Stenographer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 135 chains north of the
northeast corner of Lot 347 on the west
bank of the Chilco River (being about
50 chains north of the N. E. corner of
R. B. Webster's application to purchase); thence west 60 chains; thence
south to the north boundary of R. B.
Webster's application to purchase, being
50 chains more or less; thence east 35
cnains more or less to the river; thence
following the river bank northerly to
point of commencement and containing
200 acres more or less.
Dated June 4th. 1910.
je 25 CAROLINE B. BARNES.
"LAND   REGISTRY  ACT"
In the matter of an application for a
Duplicate Certificate of Title to
Subdivisions Nos. 3, 53 and 64 of
Section XXV (Richmond Estate)
Victoria District.
NOTICE is hereby given that it is
my intention at the expiration of one
month from the date of the first publication hereof, to issue a Duplicate
Certificate of Title to above land issued
to Robert Paterson Rithet on the 23rd
day of August, 1882, and numbered
4016A.
Land  Registry  Offlce,  Victoria,   B.C.,
the 9th day of June, 1910.
J.  P.  McLEOD,
je 11 Deputy Registrar-General
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Duncan
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Merchant,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner of Lot 336, thence 40
chains north; thence 40 chains east;
thence 40 chains south to the north
boundary of Lot 336; thence west along
the said north boundary of Lot 330
40 chains to point of commencement and
containing 160 acres more or less.
Dated May 30th,  1910.
je26 CHARLES   DUNCAN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Gonzales,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Fisherman, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 80 chains south of the southeast corner of Lot 331; thence 80 chains
north to the south-east corner of Lot
331; thence west 80 chains along the
south boundary of Lot 331; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated  June  lst,  1910.
je 25 JOSEPH GONZALES.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Gustav Bram-
well Ehrenborg, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Architect, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the south-west corner
of Lot 333; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, more or less, to
the north-east corner of Lot 333; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
along the north boundary of Lot 334
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, and being Lot 333.
Dated  June  lst,  1910.
GUSTAV BRAMWELL EHRENBORG.
je25
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Frank McGinn,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of Lot 342; thence
80 chains, more or less to the northwest corner of Lot 342; thence south
65.76 chains more or less to the shore
of Eagle Lake; thence following the
said shore to the south-east corner of
Lot 342; thence north 37.92 chains to
the point of commeneement containing
412 acres, more or less, and being Lot
342
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je25 FRANK McGINN.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
waters of Shoo-wah-tlans and Wood-
worth Lakes, in Range 5, Coast District,
and the waters of all streams flowing
into said lakes, and all streams flowing
therefrom, are reserved, subject to the
rights of existing records only, for the
use of the Crown.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands
Lands Department,
Victoria, B.C., April 29th, 1910.
apr 30
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Burroug
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Burroughs Webster, of Vancouver, B.C.,
occupation Accountant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the west bank of the
Chilco River, about SO chains north of
the northeast corner of 4347; thence
west 40 chains; thence south to the
north boundary of Lot 347 (being 80
chains more or less); thence east along
the north boundary of L. 347 to the
river bank, being 35 chains more or
less; thence following the said river
bank northerly 80 chains more or less
to point of commencement and containing 300 acres more or less.
Dated  June  4th,  1910.
ROBERT BURROUGHS WEBSTER
je 25
^_%\*^i
PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS
Heating Office Annex
Sealed Tenders, superscribed tenders
for "Heating Office Annex, Parliament
Buildings," will be received hy the Hon.
the Minister of Public Wnrks up to
noon of Thursday, the 21st July, for
tlie Installing of a heating system In
the offlce annex building, situated in
the grounds of the Parliament Buildings,  Victoria.
Drawing, specifications, contract form,
and form of tender may be seen on and
after Wednesday, the Oth lnst., at the
office of the Department of Public
Works.  Parliament   Buildings,  Victoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank
of Canada, made payable to the Hon.
the Minister of Public Works, in a sum
of $300, which shall be forfeited if the
party tendering decline to enter Into
contract when called upon to do so, or
when he falls to complete the work
contracted  for.
The cheques or certificates of deposit
of unsuccessful tenderers will he returned to them upon the execution of
the   contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the form supplied, signed
hy tlie actual signature of the tenderer,
and enclosed in the envelope furnished.
The lowest or any tender  not necessarily accepted.
jy9
F. C. GAMBLE.
Public Works Engineer
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., 6th July, 1910.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Katie Gibson, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Stenographer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west bank of the Chilco River,
about 56 chains north of where the said
river flows out of Chilco Lake, and being at the north-east corner of R, H
W. Edmond's application to purchase;
thenee west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 cliains more or
less to river bank; thence following
the west shore of the river southerly to
point of commencement and containing
640 acres more or less.
Dated June 3rd, 1910.
je 26 KATIE GIBSON,
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that Eva Gunn, wife
of John William Gunn, of Suthwyn,
occupation farmer intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land:
Commencing     at     a     post    planted
about 5 chains from the north bank of
Salmon River and beside the south-east
corner   post   of   lot   392   as   surveyed,
thence south SO chains;  thence west 80
chains;  thence north  80 chains; thence
east  80 chains  to this  post, containing
640 acres and being lot 393 as surveyed,
which land was located by me on the
llth day of June, 1910.
Dated June 25th, 1910.
EVA GUNN.
jy 2 William Forrest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that John McBeth,
of Parkdale, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described land:—Commencing
at a post planted about 60 chains from
the north bank of the Salmon River
and beside the north-west corner post of
lot 395, as surveyed, thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains,
containing 640 acres and being lot 395,
as surveyed, which land was located by
me on the 14th day of June, 1910.
Dated June 25th,  1910.
JOHN  McBETH.
Jy 2 William Forrest, Agent.
COAST RANGE III
TAKE NOTICE that Lewis Hind, of
Victoria, B.C., occupation Mining Engineer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands—Commencing at a post planted at
a point about twenty (20) chains distant
in an easterly direction from the outlet of the Salmon River into Dean
Channel, thence north forty (40) chains,
thence west twenty (20) chains; thence
following the south bank of the Salmon River and shore of Dean Channel
to point of commencement, and containing eighty (80) acres, more or less.
Dated 3rd May, 1910.
my 7 LEWIS HIND.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that John William
Gunn, of Suthwyn, occupation Farmer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about 5
chains from the north bank of the Salmon River and beside the south-east
corner post of lot 392 as surveyed;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
cliains; thence south 80 chains; thenee
east 80 chains, containing 640 acres, and
being lot 392, as surveyed, which land
was located by me on the 14th day of
June, 1910.
Dated  June   25th.   1910.
JOHN WILLIAM GUNN.
Jy 2 William Forrest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that David M. Robinson, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
School Superintendent, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the north-west corner
of Lot 340; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 65.76 chains, more or less, to the
shore of Eagle Lake; thence following
the said shore to the south-west corner
of Lot 340; thence north 84.60 chains,
more or less, to the point of commencement, and containing 607 acres, more
or less, and being Lot  340.
Dated June 2nd,  1910.
je 25 DAVID M. ROBINSON.
BRITISH     COLUMBIA.     t.     ALASKA
BAILWAY COMPANY
Hotice to Stockholderi
The  first  general  meeting of  stockholders will be held at the office of the
Company, 614 Fort Street, Victoria, British Columbia, on July  20th,  1910,  at  2
p.m.,   to   elect   a   permanent   Board   of
Directors  to  consider   the  acts  of  the
provisional  Board,   and   transact  sucn
other  business  as   may   properly  come
before the meeting.
Dated, Victoria, B.C., June 10th, 1910.
HAROLD B. ROBERTSON,
je 18 Spcre'ary.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that George Henry
Lawrence Hobson, of Vancouver, B.C.,
occupation Insurance Agent, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted at the south-east corner of Lot 313; thence north 40.04
chains; tiience west SO chains; thence
south 40.04 chains to the north-west
corner of Lot 314; thence east SO chains
to point of commencement and containing 320 acres, more or less, and being
Lot 3*13.
Dated June  2nd,  1910.
je 25      George Henry Lawrence Hobion.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that John Anquetel
Norman, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Gentleman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west bank of Chilco River about
15 chains north of where the Chilco
River flows out of Chilco Lake; thence
west 20 chains; thence south to the low
water mark on the shore of Chilco Lake
being 40 chains (more or less); thence
following the sinuosities of the shore
northerly to point of commencement and
containing 40 acres more or less.
Dated June Srd, 1910.
je 25 JOHN ANQUETEL NORMAN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Alfred Gonzales,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Fisherman, Intends to apply for permission
to purchnse the following described
lands:—Commencing nt a post planted
about 80 chains south of the southeast corner of Lot 331; thence 80 chains
west; thence 80 chains south; thence 80
chains east; thence 80 chains north to
point of commencement and containing
640 acres more or less.
Dated  June lst.  1910.
Je 25 ALFRED  GONZALES. THE AVEEK,  SATURDAY, JULY 9,  1910
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the Reserve existing on Crown Lands in the
vicinity of Babine Lake, situate in
Range 5, Coast District, notice of which
was published in the British Columbia
Gazette, dated December 17th, 1908, is
cancelled in so far as said Reserve relates to lots numbered 1519, 1518, 1517,
1516, 1515, 1510, 1507, 1506 1606A, 1503,
1501, 1502, 1512, 1511, 1505, 1504, 1513,
1514, 1509, 1508, 1530, 1527, 1528, 1529,
1531, 1532, 1533, 1534, 1535, 1537, 1539,
1536, 1538, 1540, 1541, 1544, 1543, 1545,
1646, 1542, 1547, 1548, 1549, 1550, 1520,
1521, 1522, 1523, 1524, 1525, 1526 and
1551.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands
Lands Department,
Victorin, B.C., June 16th, 1910.
je25
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that (Mrs.) Sarah
Catherine Coles, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Married Woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lnnds:—Commencing at
a post planted at the south-east corner
of Lot 345 on the shore of Eagle Lake;
thence north 44.23 chains; thence west
SO chains; thence south 99.57 chains,
more or less, to the north shore of Eagle
Lake; thence following the said shore in
an easterly direction to point of commencement, and containing 568 acres,
more or less, and being Lot 345.
Dated June 2nd,  1910.
(MRS.) SARAH CATHERINE COLES
je 26
CANCELLATION OK RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the Reserve existing on Crown Lands in the
vicinity of Babine Lake, and situate in
Cassiar District, notice of which bearing
date June 30th, 1908, was published in
the British Columbia Gazette, dated July
2nd, 1908, is cancelled.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands
Lands Department,
Victoria, B.C., June 16th, 1910.
je26
HXNEBAX. ACT
Form F
Certlflcate of Improvement!
NOTICE
"Jacob"  Mineral   Claim,  situate  in  the
Victoria Mining Division of Renfrew
District.     Where   located—Bugaboo
TAKE NOTICE that I, C. R. Carter,
acting agent for John Bentley, Free
Miner's Certlflcate No. 45076B, L. N. Anderson, Free Miner's Certificate No.
44913B; Carl Stromgren, Executor, and
H. M. Shore, Executrix of the estate of
Sidney Shore, deceased, Free Miner's
Certificate No. 40864B, Wm. Harrison,
Free Miner's Certificate No. 41007B,
John H. Smith, Free Miner's Certificate
No. 40823B, E. J. Smith, Free Miner's
Certificate No. 45083B, Elizabeth Berryman, Free Miner's Certificate No. 45060B
and Oliver Snaith, Free Miner's Certificate No. 44938B., intend, sixty days from
the date hereof, to apply to the Mining
Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a
Crown Grant of the above claim.
And further take notice that action,
under section 37, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated this Sixteenth day of June, A.D.
1910.
je 25 C. R. CARTER.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Reginald Foulkes
Cottrell of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the south-east corner of Lot 336;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains, more
or less, to the south-west corner of Lot
336; thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 606 aeres
of land, more or lens, and being Lot 336.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je    REGINALD FOULKES COTTRELL
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that John Atkinson,
of St. Marks, occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 5 chains
north of the Salmon River and about
38 ehains south from the north-west
corner post of lot 396 as surveyed ot>
the west boundary line of said lot 396;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chatns; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; whieh land was located
by me on the 14th day of June, 1910,
containing 640 acres.
Dated June 25th, 1910.
JOHN  ATKINSON,
jy 2 William Forrest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Richards
Brown, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Accountant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 5 chains south of the confluence
of Lingfield Creek and the Chilco River
on the west bank of the Chilco River,
being about one and one-half miles north
of the N. E. corner of W. R. Blind's
application to purchase; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains more or less to the west
shore of the Chilco River; thence follow the said shore southerly to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
Dated June 3rd, 1910.
je25      CHARLES RICHARDS BROWN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that John Simons, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Accountant,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner of Lot 343; thence N. 80
chains; thence W. 80 chains; thence S.
80 chains to the N. W. corner of Lot
343; thence E. along the north boundary of Lot 343 eighty chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated May 30th, 1910.
je 25 JOHN SIMONS.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that Tena Blanchard,
wife of Charles Haliburton Blanchard,
of Lydiatt, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 70 chains north
of the Salmon River and beside the
north-west corner post of lot 391, as
surveyod; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 40 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains, and being lot
391 as surveyed, which land was located
by me on the 14th day of June, 1910,
and contains 320 acres.
Dated  June   25th,   1910.
TENA BLANCHARD.
jy 2 William Forrest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that William R. Blind,
of Vancouver, B.C., Real Estate Agent,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of the Chilco River about 135
chains north from where the said river
flows out of Chilco Lake (being at or
near the N. E. corner of Katie Gibson's
application to purchase; thence 80 chains
west; thence 80 chains north; thence 80
chains east more or less to river bank;
thence following the west shore of river
southerly to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated June 3rd, 1910.
je  25 WILLIAM  R.  BLIND.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Gibson, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner of Lot 337 and the
south-east corner of Lot 334; thence
80 chains west along the south boundary of Lot 334; thence south 60 chains;
thence east to the shore of Eagle Lake;
thence following the shore of Eagle
Lake in a northerly and easterly direction to the south-west corner of Lot
337; thence .north 45.49 chains, more or
less, to point of commencement, and
containing 400 acres, more or less.
Dated June 2nd,  1910.
je 25 JOSEPH   GIBSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that David Blair of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Architect,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of Lot 328; thence west
40 chains to the north-west corner of
Lot 328; thence south 40 chains to tne
south-west corner of Lot 328; thence
west 40 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 480 acres,
more or less.
Dated May 31st, 1910.
je 26 DAVID BLAIR.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Stanley Street,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner of Lot 332; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to the north-west corner of Lot 332,
(being the north-east corner of Lot
217); thence south along the east boundary of Lot 217 eighty chains to the
south-west corner of Lot 332; thence
east 80 chains, more or less, to point
of commencement, (excepting any part
of Lot 332 that may not be at present
Crown lands), and containing 600 acres,
more or less, and being Lot 332.
Dated June lst, 1910.
je 25 STANLEY STREET.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Edward Arthur
Morris,, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Tobacconist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-west corner of Lot
335; thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 chains more or less along the west
boundary of Lot 336 to the north-east
boundary of Lot 335; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 520
acres of land more or less and being
Lot 335.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je 25      EDWARD ARTHUR MORRIS.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Mary Gibson, ot
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Stenographer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 80 chains south of the south-east
corner of Lot 331; thence 80 chains east;
thence 80 chains east; thence 80 chains
south; thence 80 chatns west; thence 80
chains north to point of commencement,
und containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated June lst, 1910.
je 25 MARY GIBSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Fred Gibson, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing nt a post planted at the
N. W. corner of Lot 332, thence 40
cbnlns west to the north-west corner of
Lot 217; thence 40 chains south; thence
40 chains west; thence 80 chains north;
thence 80 chains east to point of commencement and containing 480 acres,
more or less.
Dated Jue lst,  1910.
je FRED GIBSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Maurice Gintz-
burger, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Real Estate Agent, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the north-east corner of Lot
331, thence 80 chains east; thence 80
chains south; thence 80 chains west to
the south-east corner of Lot 331; thence
80 chains north along the east boundary
of said Lot 331 to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or
Dated June lst, 1910.
je 25 MAURICE  GINTZBURGER.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that John Charles
Thurston Crofts of Vancouver, occupation Cvlll Engineer, Intends to apply
fnr permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post nlanted at the south-west corner of
Lot 339: thence east 80 chnins; thence
north 80 chnins; thence west 80 chains;
thence south SO chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, being Lot 339.
Dated June 2nd. 1910.
je 25     John Charlei Thuriton Crofti.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that James Ross, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation, Accountant,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—■
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of the Chilco River, about 2
miles northerly from the confluence of
Lingfleld Creek with the Chilco River
and about one mile northerly from the
N.E. corner of Chas. R. Brown's application to purchase; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains more or
less to the north boundary of Chas. R.
Brown's application to purchase; thence
east 80 chains more or less along the
north boundary of Brown's application
to purchase to the Chilco River; thence
following the west bank of the Chilco
River northerly to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres more or
Dated June 4th, 1910.
je 25 JAMES ROSS.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that George William
Hobson, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Insurance Agent, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the south-east corner of Lot 334,
thence north 19.53 chains to the southeast corner of Lot 343; thence east along
the south boundary of Lot 343 eighty
chains to the east boundary of Lot 341;
thence south along the eastern boundaries of Lots 341 and 342 to the shore
of Eagle Lake; thence following the said
shore northerly and easterly to point
of commencement, and containing 396
acres, and being Lot 344.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je25        GEORGE WILLIAM HOBSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Jonathan Rogers,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Contractor, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner of Lot 347; thence
east 61.40 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 90.91 chains to the
bank of Chilco River; thence following
the river bank southerly to point of
commencement and containing 588 acres,
more or less, and being Lot 347.
Dated June 2nd,  1910.
je 25 JONATHAN   ROGERS.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that George William
Coles, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the south-east corner of Lot 346;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east SO chains to point of commencement, and containing 492 acres of land
and being Lot 346.
Dated June  2nd,  1910.
je25        GEORGE WILLIAM COLES.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT    '
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Cecil Croker
Fox, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Architect, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the south-east corner of Lot 334;
thence north 80 chains; thenee west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains, more or
less, to the south-west corner of Lot
334; thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640 acres
and being Lot 334.
Dated  June  2nd,  1910.
je 25 CECIL   CROKER   FOX.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Harlow
W. Edmond, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation, Gentleman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the west bank of the Chilco
River about 65 chains north of where
the said river flows out of Chilco Lake;
thence west 20 chains; thence south 40
chains more or less to the north boundary of John A. Norman's application
to purchase; thence following the said
north boundary in an easterly direction
to low water of the river a distance of
10 chains more or less; thence following the west shore of the river northerly to point of commencement and containing 40 acres more or less.
Dated June 3rd, 1910.
je5      ROBERT HARLOW W. EDMOND
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that William Ralph
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Merchant,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of Lot 348; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 49.61
chains to the shore of Eagle Lake;
thence following the said shore northerly to the south boundary of Lot 346;
thence following the said boundary east
53.16 chains to point of commencement
and containing 468 acres and being Lot
348.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je25 WILLIAM RALPH.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that George Phillip
Carr, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Postman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the intersection of the N. W.
corner of L. 330 and the east boundary
of Charles Skinner's pre-emption (Lot
329); thence north 40 chains more or
less to the north-east corner of said
pre-emption; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 80 chatns to the
north-east corner of L. 330; thence
west 80 chains more or less along the>
north boundary of said Lot 330 to point
of commencement and containing 480
acres more or less.
Dated May 31st, 1910.
je 25 GGEORGE PHILIP CARR.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that John David
Breese, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Insurance Agent, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-west corner of Lot
330 on the shore of Cochin Lake; thence
east along the north boundary of Lot
331, 53.88 chains; thence north 80
chains to the north-east corner of Lot
330; thence west to the east boundary
of Charles Skinner's pre-emption (Lot
No. 329); thence south along the said
boundary 27.01 chains to the shore of
Cochin Lake; thence following the said
shore southerly and easterly to point of
commencement and containing 559 acres
and being Lot 330.
Dated May 31st, 1910.
je 25 JOHN  DAVID BREESE.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Joseph
Sharp, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 80 chains south of the southeast
corner of Lot 331 and adjoining Mary
Gibson's, Joseph Gonzales' and Alfred
Gonzales' locations; thence 80 chains
north to t'he southeast corner of Lot
331; thence 80 chains east; thence 80
chains south', thence 80 chains west to
point of commencement, and containing
640  acres  more or less.
Dated June lst, 1910.
je 25 HENRY   JOSEPH   SHARP.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that Alexander Good,
of St. James, occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
one chain west of the trail which runs
along the east bank of the Salmon
River, known as the Ootsa Lake Trail
from Anaham Lake, said post being
about 15 chains north-west from an
oblong lake (partly meadow) on the
east side of the said trail and said post
being nearly equidistant between lots
surveyed respectively as Lots 387 and
388 and said post being William Setter's
north-west corner post and William
Brown's south-west corner post, which
land was located June 13th, 1910, ar.d
contains 640 acres.
Dated  June   25th,   1910.
ALEXANDER GOOD.
jy 2 William Forrest. Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick Hems-
ley Shanks, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Secretary, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the northeast corner of Lot
345; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 40 chains
to the north-west corner of Lot 345;
thence along the north boundary of Lot
345 eighty ehains to point of commencement, and containing 320 acres, more
or  less.
Dated  May   30th,   1910.
je 25 FREDERICK HEMSLEY SHANKS
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur W. Jarvis
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Bank
Manager, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following describea
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the north-west corner of Lot 337;
thence east 80 chains', thence south 78.38
chains along the north boundary of Lot
338 to the shore of Eagle Lake; thence
following the said shore in a westerly
direction to the south-west corner of
Lot 337; thence north 45.49 chains to
the point of commencement, and containing 462  acres and being Lot 337.
Dated June  2nd,  1910.
je25 ARTHUR   W.   JARVIS.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that Annie McBeth,
wife of John McBeth, of Parkdale, occupation Farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 65 chains north of the
Salmon River, and beside the northeast corner of lot 396 as surveyed;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains, containing 640 acres,
and being lot 396 as surveyed, which
land was located by me on the 14th
day of June, 1910.
Dated  June   25th,   1910.
ANNIE McBETH.
jy2 William Forrest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Hillman
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Florist,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner of Lot 331 on the
shore of Cochin Lake; thence east 53.8S
chains along the north boundary of
Lot 331 and the south boundary of Lot
330 to the north-east corner of Lot 331;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 53.91 chains, more
or less, to the shore of Cochin Lake;
thence following the shore of Cochin
Lake In a north-easterly direction to
point of commencement and containing
582.8 acres, and being Lot 331.
Dated May 31st,  1910.
je25 CHARLES  HILLMAN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Alexander Mo-
gee, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Gentleman, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west bank of the Chilco River
about two and one-half miles north of
the north-east corner of Lot 347; thence
west 60 chains; thence south 80 chains,
thence east to the river, being 35 chains
more or less; thence following the said
river in a northerly direction to point
of commencement and containing 300
acres more or less.
Dated June 4th, 1910.
je25 ALEXANDER  MOGEE.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that William Brown,
of Headlngly, occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands: Commencing at a post planted about nne
chain west of the trail whioh runs along
the east bank of the Salmon River,
known as the Ootsa Lake trail, from
Anaham Lake, said post being about 15
chains north-west from an oblong lake
(partly meadow) on the east side of
the satd trail and said post being nearly equidistant between lots surveyed
respectively as lots 387 and 388, and
said post being William Setter's northwest corner post and Alexander Good's
south-east corner post which land was
located June 13th, 1910, and contains
640 acres.
Dated  June   25th,  1910.
WILLIAM BROWN,
jy 2 WIUiam Forrest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that George Munro,
of Winnipeg, occupation Banker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands: Commencing at a post planted about flve
chains north of the Salmon River and
beside the south-east corner post of Lot
392 as surveyed, thence north along
the east boundary line of Lot 392 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains to said post,
containing 320 acres, which land was
located by me June 14th, 1910.
Dated June 25th, 1910.
GEORGE MUNRO.
jy 2 William Forrest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Frances Dunlc
of Vancouver, occupation Stepographe
intends to apply for permission to pu
chase the following described lands:-
Commencing at a post planted at tl
southeast corner of Lot 330; thence
chains east; thence 80 chains nort
thence 80 chains west to the northea
corner of Lot 330; thence 80 chaii
south along the east boundary of sa
Lot 330 to point of commencement ai
containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated   June   lst,   1910.
Je25 FRANCES  DUNLOP.,
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Colin C. McLe
nan, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation H
tel Clerk, intends to apply for permi
sion to purchase the following d
scribed lands:—Commencing at a po
planted at the south-east corner of L
341; thence north 80 chains, more
less, to the north-east corner of L
341; thence west 80 chains; then
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chain
to point of commencement, and contai
ing 640 acres, more or less and beii
Lot 341.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je25 COLIN  C.  McLENNAN,
COAST LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1
TAKE NOTICE that I, William Ne
son Draper, agent for T. J. Sulliva
of Cloverdale, occupation Manufacture
intends to apply for permission to pu
chase the following described land:-
Commencing at a post planted one cha
from the shore of a small cove abo
one mile easterly from Boulder Poit
Knight's Inlet; thence easterly (6
sixty chains; thence northerly (2
twenty ehains; thence westerly (6
sixty chains; thence southerly (2
twenty chains to point of commenc
ment.
Dated 3rd May, 1910.
T. J. SULLIVAN,
my 14 By W. N. Draper.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three  (3)
TAKE NOTICE  that William  Sett,
of St. Andrews, occupation Farmer, i
tends  to apply  for  permission  to pu
chase the following described lands: Con
mencing  at  a  post  planted  about  oi
chain   west   of   the   Trail   whieh   rui
along the east bank of the Salmon Riv
known  as  the Ootsa Lake Trail,  fro
Anaham Lake, said post being about
chains north-west from an oblong Ial
(partly meadow) on the east side of tl
said  trail,  and  said  post  being  near
equidistant   between   lots   surveyed
Nos.  387 and 388,  which land was
cated by me on the 13 th day of Jui
1910, containing 640 acres.
Dated June 25th, 1910.
WILLIAM SETTER.
Jy2 William Forrest, Age
RENFREW LAND DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Roderick M
Donald, of Port Renfrew, occupatic
Farmer, intends to apply for permissic
to purchase the following describi
lands:—Commencing at a post plant
20 to 25 chains north of N.W. corn
of lot 204; thence north 80 chain
thence west 10 chains; thence sou
about 16 chains; thence west 40 chain
thence south 40 chains; thence west
chains; thence north 40 chains; then
west 10 chains; thence south 60 chain
thence east 40 chains; thence soui
about 10 chains; thenee east 40 chaii
to point of commencement.
Dated April 9, 1910.
ROBERT ELLIOTT,
my 14        Agent for Roderick McDonal
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Halybut
ton Blanchard, of Lydiatt, oceupatio
Farmer, intends to apply for permis
sion to purchase the following descril
ed lands:—Commencing at a post plan
ed about 70 chains north of the Salmo
River and beside the north-west corne
post of lot 391 as surveyed, thenc
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
thence north 80 chains; thence east 8
chains, containing 640 acres, which Ian
was located by me on the 14th day o
June, 1910.
Dated   June  25th,   1910.
Charlei Halyburton Blanchard.
jy 2 William Forrest, Agent
COAST RANGE III
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Fellowi
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Gentleman
intends to apply for permission to pur
chase the following described lands :-
Commencing at a post planted at i
point about twenty (20) chains dis
tant in an easterly direction from thi
outlet of the Salmon River into Deai
Channel, thence north twenty (20
ch'ains; thence east twenty (20) chains
thence south twenty (20) ohalns; thenci
following the shore of Dean Channel ti
point of commencement, and containini
forty (40) acres more or less.
Dated 3rd May, 1910.
my 7 ARTHUR FELLOWS.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that (Mrs.) Eleano
Mary Crofts, of Vancouver, B.C., occu
pation Married Woman, intends to ap
ply for permission to purchase the fol
lowing described lands:—Commencing a
a post planted at the north-east corne
of Lot 338; thence west 80 chains
thence south 78.38 chains to the shor
of Eagle Lake; thence following the sah
shore to the south-east corner of Lo
338; thence north 84.60 chains to poln
of commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less, and being Lot 338.
Dated  June  2nd,  1910.
(MRS.) ELEANOR MARY CROFT!
je 25
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that (Mrs.) Catherin
Blair, of Vancouver, B.C., oceupatio
Married Woman, intends to apply fo
permission to purchase the followin;
described lands:—Commencing at a pos
planted at the north-west corner o
Charles Skinner's pre-emption (Lot 329)
thence east 80 chains; thence north 4
chains', thence west 80 chains; thenc
south 40 chains to point of commence
ment and containing 320 acres, more o
Dated May 31st, 1910.
je25        (MRS.) CATHERINE BLAIR.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast. Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Minnie Living
stone of Vancouver, B.C., oceupatio
Spinster, intends to apply for permis
sion to purchase the following describe
lands:—Commencing at a post plante
at the north-east corner of Lot 348
thence west 61.40 chains; thence sout
SO chains; thence east to the banks o
Chilco River, being 85 chains, more o
less; thence northerly to point of com
mencement and containing 640 acrei
more or less, and being Lot 349.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je 25 MINNIE  LIVINGSTONE. THE AVEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 9, 1910
While the Berries Are Ripe
You'll Find Use for Such Pieces as These—See Them
They are berry sets today—a little later you can use tliem as preserve sets or salad sets. Cjuite a convenient bunch of china in the matter of
practical uses, besides being a wonderfully good show-thing for the sideboard or china. closet. We have a big line of the newest designs, and now is the
season of the luscious and numerous berry family, so come in and get a set. You can't kick on the score of price, for these prices start from the bottom
of the scale. We have 13-piece berry sets from $1.50. Of course there are others that cost more, and then, too, we can make up very smart sets from
our splendid stock of French and Saxe china.
You'll Not Find a Better Choice of Salad Sets
You'll have to visit some other town if you wish to see a better display of salad sets than this store offers. Not only is the choice of patterns interesting, but also the range of prices. Now is the "season" of salad sets, though they are useable at all times. So get YOUR set today. We are showing
some in our Government Street window—glance at these and then come inside and learn some more about them—13 and 14-piece sets priced from
$14.00 to $5.00.
Big Choice of Salad Bowls
Salad Bowls in a wonderful variety of decorations and at many prices may be found in this china store of ours. .From the dainty pieces in French,
Italian or Saxe china to the more common kinds selling at little prices, you'll find a satisfying choice. Come in and go through this stock and get acquainted
with the best display of salad bowls in the city.    We are always pleased to see you here.
See ©ur Fruit Canning Accessories
We suppose you intend to put up some fruit this year as usual. You'll require something in fruit canning accessories, and we offer you the advantages of choosing from these excellent stocks of ours. Berries are ripe and ready now, and other fruits will soon be pouring in. You have got* to "take
time by the forelock" when it comes to fruit-canning—so be prepared. Lay in a supply of the needfuls now. Get new rubbers, new rings or new jars
—don't risk disappointment by using the old ones once too often.    Come in and see our offerings.
fl Word or Two on Dinnerware Patterns
We mean, of course, open-stock patterns—the kind you can get ma tellings for at any time without trouble or delay. On demand, in fact.
There are many manufacturers and many patterns—hundreds of them. To select from this vast array, the best in quality and the choicest in
ornamentations, and secure control of them for this vicinity, has been our hobby. That's why we sell so many dinner services—we get the cream of the
world's productions.    If you need a new service, come in and see our splendid display of "open-stocks"—more than 15 patterns.
FURNISHERS OF
CHURCHES
SCHOOLS
BOATS
SINCE 1862
AT VICTORIA, B.O.
Complete Home Furnishers
Victoria, B.C.
FURNISHERS OF
HOMES
HOTELS
CLUBS
SINCE 1862
AT VIOTORIA, B.O.
SOCIETY
■Mr. W. C. Ward is visiting in Kam-
nps.
*   *   •■
Scott
|Mr. W. E. Scott is visiting at
liwichan.
laptain Hunter has left on an ex-
|ided visit to the East.
|Mrs. Thos.  Hooper has left town
an extended visit to the East.
* *   *
■Hon. Mr. Justice Gregory has gone
1 New Brunswick on a pleasure trip.
■Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Taylor have
■turned from a visit to the Main-
lid.
* *   *
IMr. John Arbuckle was a guest at
likeside Hotel, Cowichan Lake, last
leek.
* *   *
■Miss Martin from Prince Rupert
[ spending her holidays with friends
Victoria.
* *   *
■Mrs. Dunsmuir has issued invita-
Tins for a small dance to be held on
lly 22nd.
I #    #    *
|Dr. Baker, who has been visiting
1 town for a few days, has returned
I his home in Vancouver.
* *   *
IMrs. W. C. Berkeley has moved in-
1 camp at Kanaka Ranch, where she
|ll spend the summer months.
* *   *
|vlr. Hyland-Barnes, of the Domin-
li Bank, left last Sunday for Win-
l_cg, where he will spend his holi-
|ys.
(Hon.   T.   W.   Paterson   and   Mrs.
l.terson   left   during   the   week  for
Incouver,*where they will spend a
days.
* *   *
Ir. and Mrs. Bernard Heisterman
Mr.  John  Arbuckle have  taken
their    residence    at    Mr. David
|r's cottage at Finnerty Beach.
Messrs. R. G. Monteith, Wm. Newcombe and Dr. Newcombe have returned from a most enjoyable trip
to the Queen Charlotte Islands.
* *   *
Hon. Mr. Justice Irving and Mr.
Bruce Irving left last Thursday for
the Old Country where they will join
Mrs. Irving and Miss Irving, who
have been travelling on the Continent.
Some of the Victorians who attended the Vancouver Club ball
were: Captain and Mrs. A. D. Macdonald, Capt. Gillan, Lieuts. E. Gore
Langton, R. Neville, J. Fraser, Misses
Eberts, Miss Troup, Mrs. Langley,
and Miss Langley, the Misses Dunsmuir, and many others.
Ht      *     *
An engagement which has been announced recently is that of Miss
Florence Helen Leslie Heyland, second daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Pow-
ley Heyland, to Mr. Bertie Gerard
Anneslcy Townshend, eldest son of
the late Lieut.-Col. Gerard Paul
Townshend and Mrs. Townshend of
Hoe Benham, Berkshire, Eng.
* *   *
Mrs. Stewart Williams, Carberry
Gardens, was hostess last Monday afternoon of a very smart tea. The
house was very prettily decorated
with sweet peas and carnations, and
the tea table was carried out in pale
pink sweet peas. Mrs. Williams received her guests in a very handsome
gown of gray silk. Among thc many
guests who were invited, some of
those present were: Mrs. C. M.
Roberts, Mrs. Griffiths, Mrs. Robertson, Lady and Miss Crease, Mrs. Walker, Mrs. Dewar, Miss Davie, Mrs.
Devlin, Mrs. Wilby, Mrs. King, Mrs.
Langton, Mrs. Cleland, Mrs. Bullen,
Mrs. Crosse, Miss Crosse, Mrs. Raymur, and Miss King.
* *   *
The marriage of Miss Anita Antoinette Heyland, eldest daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Rowley Hevland, to
Mr. David George William McCurdy,
eldest son of Mr. A. W. McCurdy,
was celebrated on Saturday, July 2nd
at 2.30 at Christ Church Cathedral.
Thc service was conducted by thc
Ven. Archdeacon Scriven, assisted by
the Rev. Mr. Barton. The bride, who
looked very charming and sweet, wore
a beautiful gown of soft ivory French
crepe with panels of silk net trimmed
with lace. She wore a very pretty
Brussels net veil arranged over a
tiara of old filigree silver and orange
blossoms. A necklace of filigree was
also worn to match the tiara, both
of these being the gift of her grandmother, Mrs. Macnaughton Jones.
The bride, who carried a large bouquet of lilies of the valley entered
thc church on the arm of her father,
followed by six bridesmaids who were
very prettily gowned in dresses of
white chiffon over white satin slips,
trimmed with bands of white satin
and wearing large picture hats of
white lace with sprays of white forget-me-nots. They were: Miss Blackwood, Miss Francis Drake, Miss
Helmcken, Miss A. King, Miss Beatrice Heyland, and Miss Constance
Heyland. Miss Helen Heyland was
maid of honor, while Master Sholto
Watt made a very charming little
page. The bridegroom was supported by Mr. Brycc Fleck as best man.
After the ceremony a large reception
was held at the residence of the
bride's grandmother, Mrs. Macnaughton Jones. Among the many guests
who were present some of those were:
Major and Mrs. Audain. Miss Troup,
Miss Rome, Mr. and Mrs. Arbuthnot, and Miss Arbuthnot. Mr. Angus.
Mr. John Arbuckle, Mrs. W. C.
Berkeley, Mr. Cecil Berkeley, Mrs.
Browne. Mr. H. Barnes. Mrs. Rome,
Mrs. Blaiklock. Mrs. Bodwell. Mrs.
R. Beaven, Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Bullen, Mr. D. Bullen, Mr. and Mrs. F
S. Barnard, Mr. and Mrs. Beaumont
Boggs, Mr. and Mrs. Blackwood.
Misses Blackwood, Mr. and Mrs.
Brotherton. Rev. and Mrs. Barton,
Mr. and Mrs. Brett, Mr. and Mrs.
Jack Bryden, Mr. Bromley, Mr. and
Mrs. E. E. Billinghurst, Mr. and Mrs.
W. Barton, Messrs. Barton, Mr. T.
W. Buss, Lady Crease and Miss
Crease, Mr. ancl Mrs. T. Cornwall,
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Courtney, Mrs.
Charles. Mr. and Mrs. Henry Croft,
Mrs. Combe and Miss Combe, Mr.
and Mrs. H. Carmichael, Mr. and
Mrs. St. Clair. Mr. and Mrs. A. Coles,
Mrs. Cross and Miss Cross, Mr. J.
Cambie, Capt. Crawford. Mr. and Mrs.
Crottv. Mrs. Love, Mr. and Mrs. Dundas. Mr. and Mrs. R. S. Day, Miss
Dupont. Hon. J. Dunsmuir, and Mrs.
Dunsmuir, the Misses Dunsmuir. Mrs.
Devereaux. Misses Devereaux. Mr.
and   Mrs.   Devlin,   Hon.   D.   M.   and
Mrs. Eberts, Misses Eberts, Mr. H.
Eberts, Col. Gregory, Dr. and Mrs.
Holden, Mr. and Mrs. L. Hinds, Dr.
and Mrs. J. D. Helmcken, Miss
Helmcken, Maj. and Mrs. Hibben,
Mr. and Mrs. Napier Hibben, Mr.
Hopgood, Mr. Holmes, Mrs. Heisterman, Dr. and Mrs. Hannington,
Miss Hannington, Mr. and Mrs. R.
R. Jones, Mrs. E. M. Johnson, Miss
Johnson, Mrs. Kent, Miss Keast, Mrs.
Little and Miss Little, Mrs. Lawson
and thc Misses Lawson, Hon. R. and
Mrs. McBride, Mr. and Mrs. C. H.
Lugrin ancl the Misses Lugrin, Mrs.
McTavish, Mr. and Mrs. Alexis Martin, Judge and Mrs. Martin, Mr. D.
Martin, Mr. and Mrs. Muskett, Capt.
and Mrs. Nares, Misses Newcombe,
Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Pooley, Dr. and
Mrs. Powell, Mr. S. Powell, Mr. Newton, Mr. Payne, Mr. C. Pemberton,
Mr. Craddock, Mr. and Mrs. A. Robertson, Mr. and Mrs. Ritchie, Mrs.
Stevenson and thc Misses Miason,
Mrs. Raymur, Mr. K. Raymur, Mr.
Spalding, Mr. Scott, Mrs. Tuck, Mrs.
J. II. Todd, Mrs. Tye, Mr. and Mrs.
Beauchamp Tye, Miss S. Wark, Mr.
and Mrs. Roger Wilby, Capt. and
Mrs. James Gaudin, and the Misses
Gaudin, Mr. Robert Wilmot, Mrs.
Wooton, Mr. S. Pitts, and the Misses
Pitts, Mrs. Nash and Miss Nash, Mrs.
J. Irving ancl the Misses Irving, Mr.
Colburn, Capt. Gillain, Mr. and Mrs,
Phillips, Dr. and Mrs. Fagan, Mr.
Tillard, Capt. Jones and ollicers and
many others.
Mr. and Mrs. D. G. McCurdy are
spending their honeymoon in Southern California. The bride's travelling
costume was a gown of old rose faced
cloth, and she wore a large grey
picture hat. A great _ many very
handsome and costly gifts were received by the young couple. After
lhe reception a small dance was held
in the evening, at whicii a large number of young people were present.
BY THE SEA
The
Fowl Bay Tea Roon)s and
Bath Houses
NOW OPEN
This is the prettiest sandy bay
in Victoria
TAKE  COOK   STREET  CAR
REMEMBER
We   are   the   only   firm  that
can please in
ARTISTIC DECORATING,
PAINTING,
PAPER-HANGING or
SIGN WORK
C. H. Tite & Co.
Phone 2050   - 620 Johnston St.
Unknown to Fame
Maggie—You're not everybody, Lizzie
Clancy!
Lizzie—Well, Maggie de Almonds, I
never saw your name blown In nny
bottle.
He Wai Easy
Sire—"Whnt becomes of nil the money
you  get from me?"
Son—"I give It up,  dnd."
A story is told of a certain nobleinnn
In Europe who hnd nn eccentric humor,
nnd nlso had sufficient money to Indulge
It. Ile had n villa thnt wns his pnr-
tlcular joy, nnd one evening, when he
wns entertaining n party of friends
there, a young mnn Indulged too freely.
When the unfortunate fell asleep in the
billiard room, two smiling nttendnnts
nppenred and carried him to bed. The
next morning the other guests were
awakened by tlie host in person, nnd
conducted to a peephole through which
they saw the young mnn lying nsleep
on a white plastered floor. The eeilliiK
wns carpeted and the various articles
of bedroom furniture were securely fastened to it nnd hanging downward. The
young mnn nwoke nnd with n cry of
terror grasped a chandelier that came
up through the plastered floor. "They
all do it," cried the host with a laugh,
"every mnn of them grabs thnt chnn-
dellcr lest he should fall up to the
ceiling." THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 9, 1910
THE HOT POINT
ELECTRIC IRON
Will satisfy anyone. It entirely satisfies the most critical of laundrymen because it is constructed to meet
the exact requirements of laundry service.* It has many commendable features that other electric irons
do not possess. Its great popularity here is proven in fact that several thousand Victorian families are
using this Iron.
We Would Like to Leave One at Your
Home on Free Trial for Ten Days
Telephone, call or Avrite us if you Avould like us to do this and Ave will make prompt delivery. Price
complete is only $5.00 and the Iron and equipment is fully guaranteed to be as Ave say or money refunded,
MAKES A DAINTY GIFT
The UTILITY ELECTRIC OUTFIT HOT POINT ELECTRIC IRON does three things and does them well: IRONS, BOILS ancl CURLS.
Attaches to any electric light socket, heats laundry iron, boils a pint of Avater very quickly ancl heats curling tongs to curl the hair. Unrivalled
for a lady's use at home or Avhen travelling.    See it here in handsome travelling bag.
B. C ELECTRIC RAILWAY CO. Limited
Cor. Fort and Langley Sts., Victoria, B.C.
Telephone 1609
YACHTING NOTES
The International Regatta of the
North Pacific Coast is over. This is
the first year since 1904 that the International yacht races have taken
place in Victoria, but with auspicious
weather and an interesting programme, the affair proved a great
success in every respect. The sheltered harbor was a great boon to the
visitors living aboard their boats, and
the officers of the Victoria Yacht
Club were tireless in their efforts to
provide for the comfort and convenience of their guests.
On Monday, the opening day of the
Regatta, there was a strong breeze
from the southwest, and the first
event of the day was the race for
cruisers. In Class A, the "Gazeeka,"
of Vancouver, finished first, with the
"Acquila" of Seattle second.
Class B was also won by a Vancouver boat, the "Eileen," while the
"Dorothy" of Victoria was a good
second. Thc other races for cruisers
were contested by the visitors with
no home entries.
The most interesting race of the
day was undoubtedly thc 29-ft. class,
which brought out those old rivals,
Captain Dean and Captain Ted
Geary. Captain Geary's handling of
the "Winona" excited much admiration, but thc craft was not so speedy
as the "Alexandra," which crossed thc
finishing line first.
There were several races for power
boats on Tuesday, thc chief attraction
being thc speed boat race, which
brought out four entries, three of
Avhich were local boats. The "Theco,"
owned by John Hinton, of Victoria,
was an easy victor. She has beautiful lines and was very much admired.
The "Marie II" of Victoria took second place, while the "Priscilla" of
Vancouver overhauled the "H. B." and
took third place toward the end of
the race.   Thc "Priscilla" showed her
self to be a speedy craft, but owing
to a mishap on the trip down her
engine was running imperfectly and
she could not make her best time.
There were several very delightful
social functions in connection with the
Regatta, and especially the garden
party given by Mr. John Arbuthnot
which was largely attended and much
appreciated.
Perhaps the most important event
—which has not been taken notice
of in the daily papers as we go to
press—was the distribution of prizes
at the Driard Hotel on Wednesday
evening, July 6th. The drawing-room
was filled with the yachtsmen and
their lady friends. Commodore Cuppage, in a few well chosen words,
told the assembly that in undertaking
the detail of this Regatta, he had departed considerably from the ideas of
previous ones. He pointed out that
up till now thc International Association had not made enough of its
functions, and had not desired but
rather avoided the co-operation of
the ladies. The yachtsmen, both visiting and local, have come to the conclusion that to make a success of this
royal sport it is necessary to interest
the ladies. As a result of this decision it is rumoured that next year
will see motor boats and sailing
yachts captained by ladies and competing for the beautiful prizes offered by the Association.
During the presentation of prizes
which were graciously distributed by
Mrs. Cuppage, speeches were made
by Commodore MacNeill, of the
Vancouver Yacht Club, Captain
Deane of Vancouver, and Captain Abbott of Bellingham. These gentlemen
spoke in very flattering terms of the
hospitality they had received, and the
pleasure of their visit to Victoria, and
I they declared that undoubtedly Victoria was the best place for the Re
gatta. With three cheers for Commodore Cuppage and six cheers for
Mrs. Cuppage, the yachtsmen adjourned for the International meeting.
At this meeting a motion was
brought forward by Commodore MacNeill of the R. V. Y. C, seconded
by Commodore Abbott of the Bellingham Yacht Club, that in view of
the many advantages of Victoria for
a Regatta and International yacht
meeting, the next two yearly meetings should be held in this city. This
motion was unanimously carried.
It is doubtful if Victoria has ever
received a greater compliment, and
it goes without saying that Commodore Cuppage and the officers of the
Victoria Yacht Club deserve a great
deal of credit for the way in which
they have, in spite of many obstacles,
made a record success of the largest
and best attended Rcga.ta ever held
on the North Pacific Coast, and paved
the way for making Victoria the
"Cowes of Canada."
British Columbia Horse
"B" Squadron completed the annual training at its local headquarters, Vernon, after a very successful
camp in every respect. A school of
instruction was conducted for the
N.C.O's. and subalterns by Serg.-Maj.
Sparks of Strathcona Horse Regiment
of Winnipeg, under Major C. C. Bennett, D.S.A., of Victoria, resulting in
certificates of qualification being issued to four officers and sixteen
N.C.O's. The inspection took place
July 1st at 11 a.m. by Major Bennett,
who expressed himself as very highly
pleased with the efficiency the Squadron had attained to and complimented Major Bott, the 0. C. of the Squadron, very highly on having such excellent material to work with, both
men and horses proving very apt.
CORRESPONDENCE
Dust! I
Victoria, July 5, 1910.
The Editor of The Week.
Sir,—My wife is furious over her
dust baths and as a little joke at her
expense I made the drawing sent you
separately. If it is any use you are
welcome. We come from a town in
England where some sort of dust preventative is used very successfully.
The rain has laid our dust for the
present but a day or two will stir it
up again. The present Council and
Engineer, I understand, have done excellent work in this connection in
the central parts of the town. The
outer districts cannot be paved all at
once but some dust preventative
might be used.
Yours, etc.,
R. V. G. MONTMORENCY.
Only a Hope
He—"Farewell, my darling, I hope
you will remain true to me."
She (through her tears)—"I hope so
too."
Foul Bay
Victoria, B.C., 4th July, 1910.
The Editor of The Week.
Sir,—I think the Lounger has been
misinformed as to the correct spelling of Foul Bay, the proper way is
with a "ti" not a "av". The place has
clearly been named by a sailor, as the
bay is very foul from a nautical point
of view, the entrance being almost
blocked by rocks and kelp beds, which
extend into the bay itself and present an effectual barrier against anything larger than a dinghy. The word
"foul" is used in this case in the same
sense as when a fouled anchor or
propeller is spoken of. Some persons living in the vicinity of the Bay
appear to object to the name as properly spelled and are spelling it fowl.
Presumably they do not know the
reason the name was given, or possibly they do not desire that those
who have never seen the place may
acquire a wrong impression of it from
thc name. The fact that a few ducks
and divers haunt the place in the
winter hardly justifies the name fowl,
and as the correct name is clearly
open   to   misconstruction,   it   would
seem that a new name might |
perly be bestowed upon what is
of the most charming spots in
vicinity of Victoria. Another ni
that might be changed with adv;
age is Ross Bay, as the fact that
cemetery is located there leads pec
to believe that a man is a "dead o
if hc gives his address there.
Yours faithfully, ROSS BA\
UNDER CANVAS
The Boy Scouts in Camp
(Continued from Page 3)
that   the  whole   camp  is  under
most perfect control.
Probably few   people   in Victo
realize what a vast change this I
Scout  movement  is  going to  m<
in the youth of the town; many se
to look on it as a harmless fad.
these latter    would    only    take
trouble to go and see for themsel
what is being done for the good
the community in general and of
boys in  particular, they would 1(
their indifference in enthusiasm.
It is not the province of a weel
paper to go into details of the da
work; suffice it to say that not
minute is wasted from 6 o'clock
the morning, when the "Reveille"
sounded, to the "Last Post" a
o'clock. One troop goes to Esq
malt for musketry instruction; anotl
is taken down for bathing; somethi
is found for all to do.
The camp itself is a sight for s(
eyes;  scrupulously    clean    and tit
outside the   tents   are   neatly pi
blankets, whilst inside  everything
hung up in an orderly manner,
the officers are as enthusiastic as
boys; one said to me that he had
enjoyed a holiday so much for ye_
whilst Col. Hall, who is wrapped
in the enterprise, remarked that if
could manage  it he would visit
camp  three  time a  day,  instead
only once in the evening.   The wri
spent three of the happiest hours
the last six months in wandering o
the camp and inspecting everythi
Floreant exploratores.
L. McL. THE WEEK, SATUKDAY, JULY 9, 1910
THE MOTHERLAND
Memorial to King Edward
i a memorial to King Edward the
:rnors of the Princess Alice Me-
ial Hospital, Eastbourne, decided
:onsider the erection of a new
lital to bear the late King's name
.ell as that of Princess Alice.
Much Married People
isex archaeologists who visited
village of Birdbrook were shown
:hurch register containing the re-
s of the deaths of Mrs. Martha
.itt, who had nine husbands, and
man who had six wives.
English Sheep for Chicago
consignment of nearly 2,000
ipshire Down sheep from leading
:s in Hampshire and Wiltshire
Salisbury by special train on
Incsday for Bristol, where they
be shipped to Chicago for breed-
purposes.
London Opera House
lis city is to have the largest
finest Opera house in the world,
Mr. Thomas Beecham, son of the
>us pill manufacturer has decided
pend $2,600,000 of his father's
ey. in building an Opera House,
superior in every way to the old
:nt  Garden.
The White Scourge
order that instruction may be
on the treatment of phthisis
Ints, the South Staffordshire Joint
|ll-pox Hospital near Wolver-
pton, which since its erection
years ago has not had a single
lnt, is to be used as a sanatorium
consumptives.
I First Outdoor Strawberries
lie first consignment of English
|oor strawberries arrived at Co-
Garden on Monday from Botley
J Swanwick, in the Southampton
lict. Baskets of 4lb. each fetched
I apiece. The first consignment
Devon and Cornwall arrived
{Tuesday, and were sold at is. 4d.
I pound.
£5 for Bundle of Asparagus
Ixtraordinary prices were realised
lie annual asparagus show at Eve-
lrn on Monday. Hardly any of
bundles, which comprised 120
|s, made less than fifteen shillings,
a bundle weighing 191b. 6oz.,
Ich was exhibited by Mr. G.
Ight, of South Littleton, and took
1 championship cup, realised £5.
A Valuable Opinion
The Cape Times commenting on
celebrating of Dominion Day, says:
"It is not enough that Canada's
graceful recognition of South Africa
union should kindle reciprocity of
warm mutual regard. It should be
intensified and solidified in every possible way. Our producers and merchants should build up trade with Canada.
Divorce Commission
Mr. Plowden, the Metropolitan Magistrate, recently said: "I think the
common-sense view is that if both
parties to the marriage contract want
the contract cancelled and can satisfy the court that they have done their
best after years of endeavour to live
reasonably happy, lives together, and
that the contract has hopelessly broken down and life is unbearable, that
the contract has failed of itself, then
the parties should be allowed, under
stringent conditions, to get a divorce."
Building Canada's Navy
Engineer-Lieut. P. C. W. Howe has
been lent by the Admiralty to serve
as consulting engineer on headquarters staff at Ottawa in connection
with the organisation of the Canadian navy. Lieut. Howe, who was
appointed an engineer-lieutenant in
1898, passed a special course at the
Royal School of Naval Architecture
and Royal Naval College at Greenwich. He obtained the £50 Whit-
worth Exhibition in 1892 and the £60
National Scholarship in the following
year.
A Mother of Parliament
The Oxford Union, which appeals
for funds to defray the cost of necessary extension, arose from very
modest beginnings in 1823, as the
"United Debating Society," the meetings of which were held by turn in
the rooms of the members. At first
the University authorities discouraged the Union, and for a long time
they refused anything like direct
countenance. A local habitation was
found in 1852 by the acquisition of
the present site, which was enlarged
in 1878 by the purchase of the house
and garden belonging to the late Rev.
Hy. Wall, a famous dancer and bon
viveur, who had been Professor of
Logic.
rhe Song and the Man
(By Johnston McGulley)
■Continued from previous issue)
IDey can sing-a it all now, Mr.
[•eman MacGuire," he said. "Dey
proud to sing-a it. For me dey
it, after we had eaten. Dey will-a
lg half da night, because tomorow
■money comes, da first we have had
Ida America. It es da happy coun-
I   An' soon da wives an' da babies
come."
iThey like the  song, then?" Mac-
Ire asked.
|Love-a it!" replied Mucia.   "Es it
I da song of dees country?"
lYes,"   said  MacGuire,  "it  is   the
lg of the country."
lOf da freedom it speaks, Mr. Fore-
II MacGuire.    It es dat which es
lugh.    It es da grand song!"
lYes," assented MacGuire.
lit tell-a da story of dees Ian'," con-
Jied Mucia. His face was shining
li joy. MacGuire remembered the
Ipy faces of the others he had seen
lthe reflection of the camp-fires.
|denly he got upon his feet.
think I'll be going," he said,
losetti turned from the desk.   "In
|urry?" he asked.
have some reports to get out,"
MacGuire.    He  walked  to the
V, opened it, and passed into the
It.
Cosetti continued to fumble with the
papers on his desk as he listened to
MacGuire's departing footsteps. Then
he turned to Mucia. "You come too
soon," he snarled. "You should have
waited until MacGuire had gone."
"But " began Mucia.
"That's all right," interrupted Cosetti. "I forgot you didn't know why
I wanted you to come." He turned
his chair and looked Mucia in the
eyes. "Those men think a great deal
of you, don't they?" he asked.
"I try to help-a them," replied
Mucia.
"Bah! You do help them, of course.
It's because you can speak a little
English. Well, they'll do anything
you tell them to do, won't they? I
thought so." Cosetti paused a while.
"Do you want to make some money?"
he asked. "I mean, besides what you
make every day?"
Mucia's face glowed with pleasure.
"You have-a da extra work?" he
asked.
"Men don't make money by working," said Cosetti. "You'll be wiser
in a year or two. Now, I like you,
Mucia. When I camt here, ten years
ago, I started right where you are
starting now. I met another Italian
who gave me a chance—just as I am
going to give you a chance now. And
look at me! I've been here ten years.
I can talk English better than most
Americans. And I have got some
money, you can bet on that. How'd
you like to do as well?"
HOW ARE
YOUR FEET
7
Does not this warm weather
make them feel hot and tired?
Bowes'
Foot
Powder
Assures absolute comfort;
it quickly relieves tired,
aching   or   swollen   feet.
A perfectly safe and thoroughly
hygienic remedy; 25c per box,
at this store only.
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
1228 Government Street
Near Yates
BLUE PRINTS
Any Length in One Piece
Six Cents per foot
TIMBER AND LAND
MAPS
DRAUGHTING
Electric Blue Print &
Map Co.
1218 Langley St. - Victoria,'B.C.
"Of course " began Mucia.
"Of course you would," cut in Cosetti. He moved his chair closer and
pointed a lean forefinger across the
table between them. "How much
money do those men down there
think they are going to get?" he demanded abruptly.
"Two dollars for da each day," said
Mucia. "Twenty-five days, dat es da
fifty dollars. Twenty goes for da
board."
"You're a fool!" said Cosetti. "The
whole pack of you are fools. Who
said two dollars a day?"
"You told-a us—in New York."
"Ah!" said Cosetti. "That was in
New York. Do you know where you
are now? You are in Montana, two
hundred miles from a town of two
thousand inhabitants, seventy miles
from any sort of a town at all.
There's nothing out here but dirt and
rocks. You haven't any money. No
one in the pack of you ahs enough
money to get to the nearest city. You
have to eat to live. I'm the man
that dishes out the grub. I'm the
man that makes out the pay-roll. Understand? You'll get just what I say."
"But you say da two dollars for
da each day," protested Mucia.
"It's what I say now that counts.
Understand that? It's what I say
right now. If I say one dollar instead of two, what are you going to
do about it?"
"You say da two," persisted Mucia.
"And now I say one. You understand that? I say twenty-five dollars
instead of fifty."
"But da board! It es twenty of da
dollars.   We have-a but da fivc left."
"Isn't that enough? You get your
grub, don't you? And you can't spend
anything out here if you want to.
What do you want money for?"
"To save," cried Mucia. "To bring
da wives an' da children."
"To bring    So you've got  the
fever, too, have you? Well, you just
forget it. I say five dollars a month
is enough to save. You wouldn't
know what to do with it if you had
thirty. Now, I'll tell you what's
what. You can boss those men down
there. They'll do anything you say.
You tell them—tell them anything,
only let them know that they get one
dollar a day instead of two. Tel!
them it was a mistake.    I don't care
Vancouver Island
Cold Storage and
Ice Company
VICTORIA, B.C.
Goods received at all hours.
Expert attention given.
Consignments solicited
Phone 2282    P.O. Box 875
If You Are Particular
About   your   tea,   try   some   of   these.
We will be pleased to send you samples.
Golden Tipped Ceylon (in bulk), per lb 50c
Specially Blended Ceylon (in bulk), 3 lbs. for $1.00
Orange Pekoe (in bulk), per lb 50c
Djargeeling, extra rich and flavory, per lb 60c
Best Ceylon, special picking, per lb 75c
GREEN TEAS
Uncolored Japan, per lb 50c
Young Hyson, per lb 60c and 50c
Gunpowder, per lb 60c and 50c
Spiderleg, per lb (Soc and 50c
Come in and talk Tea to us and wc will put up something
special for you.
H. 0. KIRKHAM
Phone 178
FANCY GROCERIES
Corner Fort and Douglas Street
Bevan, Gore & Eliot
LIMITED
Members Vancouver, Victoria, Spokane and
Stewart Stock Exchanges
PRIVATE WIRE TO VANOOUVER
DAILY TELEGRAPHIC QUOTATIONS
ALL ACTIVE STOCKS BOUGHT AND SOLD ON
COMMISION
LISTED STOCKS SOLD ON MARGIN
STEWART TOWNSITE LOTS FOR SALE
Room 1-4, Hibben Block
1122 Qovernment St.       =       Victoria, B.C.
P. 0. Box 249
Phones 163 and 2124
Phone R 313 Hand Made Goods a Specialty
LADIES' SHIRT WAISTS, UNDERWEAR, ETC
THE BON TON
.-.MRS. J. E. ELLIOTT/.
LADIES' AND CHILDRENS' OUTFITTERS
AN UP-TO-DATE PLACE TO BUY NECKWEAR, ETC.
730 YATES STREET
VICTORIA, B.C.
what you tell them, only fix it up
some way. If they howl, say to them
that they can't help themselves, tell
them they're out here and havc to
stay or starve tq death walking back.
They'll take their little dollar and bc
glad to get ti. They ought to bc
glad they don't have to do with fifty
cents. And I'll give you"-—Cosetti
lowered his voice and leaned forward
across the tabic—"I'll give you just
one hundred dollars a month extra.
Docs that suit you?"
(To be continued)
Satisfaction
We guarantee quality and satisfaction with every purchase of
Groceries.
Phone orders carefully attended to.
A. POOL
623 Yates St. Phone 448
Watson's Old Stand IO
TIIE WEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 9,  1910
EDITORIAL NOTES
WATER
It is possible that, if Victoria
had more water it would have less
dust, but the signs of the times are
not very favourable. The Fire
Chief complains of low pressure
in Esquimalt, and every evening
those who water tlieir gardens run
short. Thus early in the season
have we struck the feeble flow.
Meanwhile, the Esquimalt Waterworks Company, with whom our
only hope of salvation lies, is busy
laying mains. One wonders what
would happen, but for the enterprise of this firm; one wonders
also how long a Mayor who knows
everything will shut his eyes to
such a self evident fact.
A GOOD CHOICE
The Board of Trade is to be
congratulated on the election of
Mr. Goulding AVilson as its President. Apart from his many estimable personal qualities, whicli
have rendered him one of the most
popular men in Victoria, Mr. Wilson belongs to a pioneer family
and is the head of one of its most
important business firms. It is to
be hoped that his acceptance of the
present oflice is an indication of
his willingness to yield to the repeated entreaties of his friends to
take a more prominent part in
public affairs generally. It has
long been the opinion of The Week
that Mr. Goulding AVilson is the
one man who could produce order
from chaos in municipal affairs.
WELCOME VISITOR
Mr. Scott, the courteous representative of the Mining & Scientific Press of San Francisco, called
on The Week on Thursday afternoon. Mr. Scott is in Victoria
in the interests of his paper, which
is the property of a well-known
mining journalist, Mr. T. A.
Richard, who left California two
years ago to accept an important
position in London, England. Mr.
Rickard still retains the proprietorship of The Mining & Scientific Press, which is very capably
edited by Mr. De Kalb and Mr.
Bain. The paper deals chiefly
with Metalliferous mining and
Metallurgical work, on which it is
a standard authority; it also
makes a special feature of mining
correspondence, and has organized
a board of correspondents in every
active mining district.
work in the Old Countiy, that indefatigable lady is becoming established as one of the most popular
lecturerers of the clay. Three papers to hand this week, the Brighton Argus, the Islington Daily
Gazette and the South-Eastern Advertiser, all give lengthy reports of
her lectures, and speak of 'packed
audiences" ancl "enthusiastic receptions." Miss Cameron has, undoubtedly, found her metier, and
under the auspices of the Canadian Government is doing the best
missionary work that has ever been
clone in England for the Dominion. "Inter alia" she is not forgetting the Province in whicli she
spent her life, for in the report of
her lecture in the Cinque Ports'
Assembly Rooms, we read: "In
simple thrilling language Miss
Cameron told of the richness of
British Columbia, its size, the fertility of its soil ancl the incalculable number of fish in its waters."
LAWN TENNIS
The new Victoria courts are
undoubtedly the finest in Western
Canada. Indeed, only in Montreal
and Toronto can their equals be
found. There are six grass courts,
one cinder court, two croquet lawns
and two howling greens, ancl already the confidence of the faithful few who stood by the proposition has been amply justified.
There is a large increase in membership and the game of tennis has
received a decided impetus. The
club-house is a credit to the committee and the architect, but most
of the credit belongs to Miss Violet Pooley and the other ladies
without whose determined ancl energetic aid the project would not
have been carried through. Everyone will congratulate Bernard
Schwengers on his decisive victory at Spokane. It is a great pity
that the champion cannot be induced to go to Niagara, where, in
the opinion of the best judges, he
would defeat all-comers.
AN ACTIVE FIRM
Messrs. Bevan, Gore & Eliot,
Ltd., have just made a move which
stamps them as one of the most
enterprising firms in the Province. They have amalgamated the
important businesses of Bevan
Bros. & Gore of Vancouver, and
Eliot & Bromley of Victoria. The
amalgamation is due to the great
success Avhich each firm has
achieved in the brokerage business ; success whicii is no surprise
to those who are personally acquainted with the members of the
two firms. All are gentlemen of
the highest integrity ancl of great
personal popularity ancl their
English associations have enabled
them to get in touch with capital,
and to interest leading London
financiers in British Columbia investments. The firm is a member
of the Victoria, Vancouver, Spokane and Stewart Stock Exchanges, ancl besides dealing extensively in listed and unlisted
stocks, will also handle listed
stocks on the margin basis. The
Vancouver office is under the personal direction of Mr. Bevan,
whilst the Victoria business is
managed by Mr. Victor Eliot.
GOOD WORK
Judging from the flood of
newspapers which bring tidings of
Miss   Agnes   Deans   Cameron's
KYRLE SOCIETIES
Possibly many readers of The
Week may not know just what a
Kyrle Society is, although there
are surely some who will remember that in various parts of the Old
Country such a society exists.   It
! is a voluntary, ancl may very properly be termed a philanthropic
organization for encouraging the
cultivation of window gardens. In
. the majority of instances the gardens consist simply of flower
boxes, and in the large cities with
their slums and mean streets, only
those who have witnessed it know
what brightness is created by tho
presence of a beautiful mass of
bloom. The Society encourages all
persons to decorate their window
sills in this manner, but in the
case of very poor people it donates
both the boxes and the flowers on
condition that they are properly
tended. The Society has been in
existence for many years, and it is
generally admitted that it has been
eminently successful in achieving
its purpose. Considering the glorious climate of Victoria, and the
profusion of bloom which can be
developed by judicious attention
and plenty of watering, there is no
reason why the excellent example
set by the Imperial Bank should
not be more widely followed;
least of all is there any reason why
people  who  have  window  boxes
Baxter & Johnson Co, Ltd.
$1.25
For ioo Sheets Good
Quality Carbon Paper
at
Baxter & Johnson
COMPANY, LIMITED
721 Yates St. Phone 730
SWEDISH MASSAGE
MEDICAL GYMNASTICS
VIBRATORY TREATMENT
S. Bjornfelt, S.M.
Phone 1856
821 Fort St.
should allow them to be neglected.
This is one of the "little things"
within the reach of every resident
of Victoria, which, if followed up,
would contribute not a little to the
many charms of the City Beautiful.
DUST
One irate reader of The Week
has chronicled a "kick" against the
eternal dust question in the Correspondence columns of the current issue. It is not easy to say
which part of the City suffers most
from this perpetual plague, but
The Week thinks that at the present moment that portion of Rockland Avenue, lying between Cook
and Linden takes the cake. For a
year the street remained ungraded
and The Week time after time
called attention to its dangerous
condition. Finally, a deputation
of property owners waited on the
Mayor, and one disgruntled individual interviewed the City Engineer, although the latter gentleman forgot the circumstance.
Then about a month ago the street
was graded, leaving a surface of
fine soil and sand, without any
macadam or other covering. A
little later the City workmen came
again and dug a trench in order to
lower the water pipes, which since
the grading had lain on the surface of the road. After the trench
was dug two red lights were set
up, and nothing more was done
for a week, it being, presumably,
intended that the residents should
have a special opportunity for
studying trenches, aud the unique
system of laying water mains a
few inches below the surface.
This week the water pipes wore
lowered ancl the trench filled.
Meanwhile, for a month, or thereabouts, all the tally-hos in Victoria, nearly all the hacks, at least
three-fourths of the automobiles
and probably twenty-five per cent,
of the transfer teams have been
grinding the surface of this road
until at the present time there is
an average of six inches of fine
dirty dust. The other six inches
has been deposited in consecutive
layers on the gardens, the furniture, the curtains ancl even the
bed-clothes of the unfortunate residents. Appeals to the Mayor ancl
City Engineer have been unavailing. A petition has been sent in,
asking that the street be asphalted;
no doubt this will take time, but
there is nothing to prevent the Engineer from having this dust heap
I
A Wife's Art Displayed is
Bread Well Made
For Bread and Pastry we can well recommend these unrivalled |
brands of Flour:
Lake of the Woods, per sack  $1.801
Robin Hood, per sack  $1.851
Royal Household, per sack  $1.801
Moffet's Best, per sack    $1.751
Vancouver Milling Co., per sack   $1.801
Snowflake, per sack  $1,751
Dixi Pastry, per sack   $1.65 J
Calgary Flour, per sack   $1.65 ]
Small Sacks of Bread or Pastry Flour, each  50c
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
Independent Grocers and Wine Merchants
Tels.: 50, 51, 52 and 1590 1317 Government Street!
DO YOU KNOW IT ?
Now-a-days in Great Britain and the Continent not to
know "Cordon Rouge" is to argue yourself unknown. The
man who orders the finest of all brands of Champagne,
G. H. Mumm & Co.'s "Cordon Rouge," proclaims at once
his good standing in society—the society which, being the
best, demands the best. "Cordon Rouge," vintage 1900,
on account of its unapproached quality, exceeding purity
and natural dryness, is no wused at all the exclusive clubs,
high-class banquets and first-class functions. This famous
champagne is now recognized as the best in the best
circles—known as a passport of healthful reliability.
Nothing is too good for the people of B. C, they arc
sagaciously discerning. They will now have an opportunity of testing the unrivalled "Cordon Rouge" for themselves, as we have just placed in stock a fine consignment
of this King of Wines, which will be listed at all leading
hotels, bars and cafes. If your licensed grocer says he
cannot supply you with "Cordon Rouge" for home use,
kindly telephone us and we will gladly give you the name
of a dealer who can.
PITHER   &   LEISER
Corner Fort and Wharf Streets
CLEAN SWEEP SALE
Special For Today
Cotton Crepe Kimonas
Over Two Hundred to Choose From
Regular Price, $1.25 wg
July Sale  /-DC
Regular Price, $1.50 {___,_
July Sale  VUC
Regular Price, $1.75 £ 1  f\/\
July Sale  $1.UU
Regular Price, $2.75 and $3.00 fl» 1   pa
July Sale  <pl.uU
Extra Special Prices on all grades of Pongee Silks.
Open 8.00 a.m. to 10.00 p.m. daily.
Oriental Importing Co.
510 CORMORANT STREET   •
OPP. E. ft N. DEPOT
drenched with calcium chloride,
which was so effective on the very
same length of roadway last year.
Meanwhile the inhabitants are exclaiming: "How long, oh Lord,
how long?"
Generous
Club    Waiter    (fishing:)—I    drean
last night, sir, that you gave me a
bill.
Stingy Member — Indeed, Jam
That's a little high for a tip but—ei
you may keep it.

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