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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Jun 5, 1909

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 FeTmnnwrrvrraTTOB-inmnni
CHOCOLATE EGG,
MALTED MILK and
"SUNNY JIM" SUNDAE
at
Terry's Fountain
S.E. Cor. Fort and Douglas.     £j
_ttJUJULttttJULSUUUUUUUUULt3
The Week
R British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria, B. C.
HALL & WALKER
Agents
WELLINGTON   COLLIERY
COMPANY'S COAL
1232 Government St. Telephone tt
_^SL9A_9JU___t_.tSL9A9.9 fJUUUUtSI
_h. VI.    No
/V^
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 5, 1909
One Dollar Per Annum
It is now several years since
nning Xhe Week had occasion to
nuck. direct attention to the va-
gariesm of Sheriff Richards,
that time he attained notoriety by the
anner in which he conducted an execu-
pn, converting it as nearly as he was able
1 a vaudeville show.   The dramatic in-
Iinct seems to be strong in the Sheriff and
chough that circumstance may not be ac-
untable for his recent appointment in
aection with the affairs of the Gardiner
ock Company, it may have something to
with the manner in which he has com-
krted himself since he is installed as
bceiver.   Few Sheriffs have made more
anders,   and   generally   speaking   run
iiuck to such an extent in the course of
week or so as Sheriff Eichards.    As
ag as his eccentricities went no further
Ian causing innocent amusement to the
okers-on, it was easy to tolerate his ac-
ssion as chief clown to the Stock Com-
any, but when it took the form of arrest-
Ig respectable citizens, casting them into
pe cells, and then preferring a baseless
barge against the leading actor it began to
lok as if it was time for a little sane
bntrol of the Sheriff as well as of the
lompany. There is no doubt that if Ed-
lard North were not restrained by considerations affecting the interests of his em-
loyers he would teach the Sheriff a les-
pn which would not soon be forgotten;
far as the leading actor is concerned he
as a far more serious account to settle,
jit probably realizes that with such a
parry the game is not worth the candle,
the opinion of The Week it is about
ae that the Government looked into the
Sheriff's Department with a view to pro-
cting the public from the inconvenience
hich results from a series of baseless
barges preferred by a man who is ob-
-Jously incompetent for some of the more
aportant duties which are occasionally
^signed to him.
■/anted—
In Inquiry.
The attention of The Week
has  been  directed to  the
manner in which the work
under  the  control  of  the
ity Engineer is conducted.   The charge
that work is gone over several times,
icause the whole of the material required
not assembled in .the first instance, that
frades and alignments are frequently al-
sred after a considerable amount of money
as been spent, involving excessive cost,
at there is no close control of the oper-
tions of the staff ancl workmen, and as a
Irmsequence the streets of the City are
tiered with debris and waste, which is a
iurce of danger, and which in case of a
jrious accident would probably cause the
|ity to be mulcted in heavy compensation
The final charge is that work is
immenced, then suspended indefinitely,
jien resumed and so on without any cer-
fiinty as to when it will be completed.
hese charges are being pressed in so many
jirections that they are entitled to serious
•nsideration ancl it is the duty .of the
Council to order  an  investigation.    In
laking this demand The Week does not
>se sight' of the fact that an inquiry has
>eady been held dealing with some of
lie methods employed to carry out public
lorks, nor did it seek to apportion the
'_sponsibility, and these are the two things
jviously lacking and which are largely
^countable for the thoroughly unsatisfac-
>ry state of the Engineering Department.
The Victoria race meeting
The Race opens    today;    everything
Meeting. that foresight and judgment
could do to ensure a successful season has been done. The preparations at the track are far more extensive
than the public is aware of and will conduce to the comfort and enjoyment of the
visitors. The most remarkable feature is
the number of horse boxes and stables
which have been constructed; if all these
are occupied there will be no lack of thoroughbred horseflesh to entertain the thousands who will flock to the Willows track.
The B. C. E. R. has done its share in constructing a loop, which will enable everyone to ride right up to the entrance of the
grounds. Two classes of people will attend the races, those who go for the sake
of the sport and those who go to make
money. With respect to the former it may
safely be predicted that they will be satisfied ; with respect to the latter, it is doubtful if anything will satisfy them, and in
any case they must take their chance. All
that the press is concerned about is to give
a good boost to good sport, and that now
seems assured.
The sale of Prince Rupert
Prince Rupert Jots is over. In Vancouver
Sale of Lots,    g^t 1,500 lots were sold,
netting in round figures
$1,100,000. In Victoria 500 lots were
sold, netting $320,000. From these
figures it will be seen that the average
realized did not differ greatly at the two
places. Most of the lots were sold to
Eastern Canadian and European buyers.
American and Canadian money was conspicuous by its absence. Less than 10 per
cent, of the money paid in Vancouver represented local investment, and it is probable that the same is true of Victoria. A
few lots were sold to men who have already
established or are about to establish businesses in Prince Rupert, and the higher
priced corner lots were purchased chiefly
for Canadian Banks; beyond this the outlay was one for investment, and the European capital was simply seeking a safe
outlet for permanent investment. The
total amount realised by the sale is within
$50,000 of tlie original estimate of The
AVeek, and cannot but be satisfactory both
to the G. T. P. and the Provincial Government. Nearly a million and a half
expended on lots in an undeveloped town-
site is a record, and shows that people
have confidence not only in the future of
Prince Rupert but of tlie Province ancl
the Dominion. Now that the sale is over
there is no harm in saying that Mr. Rand's
methods have not commended themselves
to Victoria. It would not have strained
his liberality to have given the Capital
City the big instead of the little end of
the sale, and to have allowed Victoria auctioneers to handle the business on a fairer
basis. It is currently reported that Mr.
Rand himself is one of the largest individual purchasers of Prince Rupert lots,
ancl that he is already forming a syndicate
in Vancouver to deal with his holdings.
The next step will be to watch the upbuilding of the new terminal city. There
will be plenty of time to watch it grow
before the first train pulls in from the
Prairie country.
Another wedding of a white
Yellow and woman to a Chinaman has
White. taken place at   Nanaimo,
and another parson has been
found willing to facilitate the marriage by
performing the necessary ceremony. This
is the first wedding of the kind which has
taken place in the Coal City and one of
the few which have disgraced the Province. Public opinion is strongly against
these unnatural unions, and stimulated by
the press make it decidedly uncomfortable
for one Chinaman who committed the offence against decency and morals in Victoria, but the trouble lies with the parson
who is willing to take blood money to do
what no self-respecting layman would
listen to for a moment. One wonders why
there is no Church consistory or Board
which takes cognizance of the conduct of
the Minister in such matters as this. There
is no difficulty in securing the strongest
possible pronouncement on the subject of
drinking or smoking, but on a matter
which affects the morale of the white races,
the churches are apparently silent. The
result of their supineness is that the evil
is growing, and they are responsible. Once
the churches set their face against these
marriages and the parsons refuse to perform the ceremony there will be an end of
them.
It is refreshing to find the
Taking Colonist at variance with
Notice. the Toronto Globe; it has
for so long imbibed its leading ideas from the Liberal journal that in
many respects it had become a Western
replica of George Brown's testament.
Lately, however, it has had misgivings,
and now it roundly accuses its mentor of
talking about what it does not understand;
and the Colonist is right for the ignorance
of the Eastern press on Western affairs is
profound. The trouble is that the right
men are not sent to gather information
and those who do come, instead of being
left untrammelled to gather their own data
are carefully steered into a rut, and kept
moving along the same track as their predecessors. Just why sport, scenery and
climate should be considered the only
assets of British Columbia it is hard to
understand. As a catch phrase the
"Sportsman's Paradise" sounds all very
well, but as a money-maker and a builder
up of the country, any one of our numerous industries discounts it. If the Toronto
Globe would send men with special
knowledge to examine the agricultural and
mineral resources of thc country, or even
if they would give prominence to the reports of the members of the Geological
Survey, who spend tlieir Summers here,
they would get far beyond the mere platitudes of description in which they now
indulge, and would tell the world something well worth knowing. As a matter
of fact the G. T. P. will traverse a country from the Rockies to the Coast capable
of yielding coal, copper, and silver-lead, in
possibly as large quantities as the Kootenay. It will open up a far larger area
of extremely fertile land than that which
lias attracted so much attention in tlie Interior for fruit growing and mixed farming purposes. After reading the editorial
in the Globe the only reasonable conclusion is that once more "the prentice hand"
has been at work.
It is rather interesting to
The Labour learn that labour in the
Problem. Hawaiin Islands is under
going a remarkable experience. For several years past there has been
a loud outcry against the predominance of
the Japanese, who seem to have corralled
everything in sight. Now comes the news
that the "little brown men" have learnt
the catechism of the Trades Unionist all
too well, and in consequence have become
so obstreporous that the planters have decided to dismiss them all and substitute
cheap Portugese labour. Anyone who has
watched the evolution of the labouring Jap
has anticipated some such denouement as
this. He is aggressive and intolerant of
control, and no sooner "feels his feet" than
he begins to be restless. It is quite possible that his very temperament will help
to solve the difficulty which has been confronting the white races. The real menace of the Chinaman lies in his docility
ancl remarkable powers of adaptation. It
is doubtful if the Jap is capable of developing either of these traits.
Of railway charters it may
Railway be saicl their name is legion,
Construction,    but  the  percentage  which
get beyond the preliminary
stage is small. British Columbia has been
more fortunate than other parts of Canada in this respect, and few charters have
been granted which have not eventuated
in a practical manner. At the present
time the Province is on tlie eve of great
development. Activity is on foot in many
new districts and the clamour for the steel
road is general. The only big scheme
under way is the Grand Trunk Pacific, but
the Canadian Northern is close behind and
the Canadian Pacific is being pressed to
extend its construction on Vancouver
Island. The point which The Week wants
to make is that for Victoria the latter is
by far the most important project. The
Colonist has been urging rail connection
with the main land; it might just as well
urge an airship service to Mars. It is
quite possible that some day Seymour
Narrows will be bridged, but not within
the next fifty years, and why waste one's
energy on a scheme which is not within
the range of practical politics while we
have an unfinished project on our own
island, the completion of which must antedate mainland construction? Suppose
Seymour Narrows were bridged today,
what would happen ? A railway would be
constructed across the island to Quatsino
Sound, and a new Oriental port established. By this means Nanaimo and Victoria would be sidetracked, and much of the
business of the latter port at any rate diverted, but if the Island railway were first
of all continued to Cape Scot, it matters
not at what point a transcontinental, line
might cross the Island it would have to
cut the local railway and so establish connection. This is the one piece of work
most needed in the interests of Vancouver
Island and the one which the Development
League should bend «]1 its energies to
secure.
_______________________ THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 5, 1908
The Racing Meet.
The sixty days' race meeting under the auspices of the Victoria
Country Club which opens today promises to be, and, undoubtedly will be,
the biggest sporting event in the history of Victoria. The Directors have
spared no pains or expense in bringing to a culmination their extensive
plans. Under the patronage of the
Lieut.-Governor, suite and party, the
members of the Executive Council,
the Supreme Court Judges of British
Columbia, the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City, and the First Magistrate
of Vancouver, today's event promises
not only to be the inception of a big
financial success, but also a society
function as large and important as
any ever held here.
The patrons of the opening day
who journey to the Oak Bay Race
Course this afternoon will gaze in
wonder and as tonishment at the
wonderful improvements which have
been worked unde.' die wizard hand
of Robert F. Leighton, Manager of
the Victoria Country Club, and his
assistants. , Where in the days of the
old regime stood faded, and disconsolate looking structures, are now
buildings and appointments which
more than favourably compare with
any race track on the Continent, when
the size of the city is taken into consideration. 'A feature of the improvements which will certainly be agreeably appreciated by society especially
is the long row of private boxes constructed along the front of the grandstand. That ladies will undoubtedly
be frequent attendants over the whole
sixty days is practically certain as the
Club has provided those necessary
comforts and conveniences, that will
insure their attendance. Undesirable
features that are common on race
courses have been entirely eliminated
with the object of making a ladies
attendance possible at all times. An
entire absence of commissioners in
the stand has been insisted upon. All
business transactions are controlled
within a given area out of reach of
the grand-stand, so that annoyance
to' ladies in any shape or form will
be impossible.
This afternoon His Honour the
Lieut.-Governor, accompanied by his
oificial staff and party, will occupy the
Vice-Regal box at the rear of the
Judges' stand where they will be the
centre of society. They will be welcomed to the course by a reception
committee of club members and officials, over which Mr. D. R. Ker, the
president, will preside, and will be
conducted to the Vice-Regal box.
A feature of the opening day apart
from the races and the opening handicap will be the musical programme
conducted by the City Band under the
leadership of Bandmaster Sydney
Rogers, who has specially composed
a number of classic selections for the
entertainment of the Club's guests and
patrons.
Thc importance of the race meeting to Victoria is perhaps not fully
understood and embraced by her citizens. The success of the meeting
will undoubtedly mean the biggest
advertisement throughout the whole
North American continent that the
city has ever had. The name
"Victoria" will be in the mouths of
ninety million people during the next
sixty days, and millions who were
ignorant that Victoria is on the map
of the world will become acquainted
in a manner with the most beautiful
of all the Western cities. It is therefore not out of order to ask that
every citizen should work toward the
success of the meeting. Provided
that the meeting is conducted
throughout on the lines promised by
the directorate The Week will gladly
afford the Club its hearty support.
Quite a Politician.
"She was very diplomatic."
"Denied the engagement?"
"No;  but  she denied that it had
any real significance."
"Life is not all beer and skittles."
"No;  some few can afford champagne and golf."
JAMES BUCHANAN & CO.
By Royal Warrants
PURVEYORS TO THE ROYAL FAMILY.
Distillers of the
WORLD-FAMOUS RED SEAL AND BLACK AND WHITE
SCOTCH WHISKIES.
Unsurpassed for AGE, PURITY or FLAVOR.
For Sale by all Dealers.
General Agents for B.C. and the Yukon District
RADIGER ft JANION,
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Because it means the economy
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and Gas Radiators. Easy payments if desired.
Victoria Gas Company, Limited
Corner Fort and Langley Streets.
■ip ififififififififipififif
X Husic and      J
X   The Drama. J
ififififififififififififif
America's Representative Actor.
Of Nat C. Goodwin it may be said
with certainty of its affirmation by the
entire theatre-going public that he is
the most versatile actor, as well as
the most finished, natural and unctuous comedian playing in the Anglo-
Saxon tongue.
Thousands of his admirers throughout America go even further in their
enconiums of his artistry and declare
him to be the foremost living exponent of the Art Dramatic.
While much has been said and more
has been written to the effect that
Mr. Goodwin has needed to make but
little effort in gaining his assured
position at the top of the histronic
ladder owing to his possession of nature's most charily bestowed gift—
Genius, facts prove the reverse to be
the case.
" 'Genius' is work," is Mr. Goodwin's characteristic definition of this
much abused word, and it is his justifiable boast that he has never
shirked in any single particular, even
the slightest or least agreeable feature of his task.
By furnishing none but plays of
the cleanest and most wholesome
character and by giving his personal
attention to all his productions down
to the smallest detail, Mr. Goodwin
has succeeded, therefore, in attaining
a place in the affectionate regard of
all classes among the amusement loving public second to no actor on the
contemporary stage.
On his current tour Mr. Goodwin
presents his latest character creation,
"John Warden," in the "Easterner,"
a comedy-drama of California high
life, written especially for him and his
associate star, Edna Goodrich, by
George Broadhurst. A large company of specially selected players and
an elaborate scenic equipment are important accessories of the production,
on which Mr. Goodwin has spared no
expense in his determination to make
it complete in every detail.
That most versatile of actors and
unrivaled comedians, Nat C. Goodwin,
and thc beautiful Edna Goodrich, his
associate star, will furnish the attraction at the Victoria Theatre, on Monday, June 7th.
The play "The Easterner," gives
both stars splendid opportunities both
in comedy and in serious work, having
been written especially for Mr. Goodwin and Miss Goodrich by George
Broadhurst,
Thc cast calls for a lame company
of players and special and elaborate
scenery. The engagement is for one
night only.
"The Merry Widow" Really Coming.
We have been waiting so patiently
for the announcement of the coming
of that wonderfully fascinating operetta, "The Merry Widow" that one
can hardly believe the good news, but
it is now an assured fact that on June
14th the wonder of the age, "The
Merry Widow," at present the musical sensation of the entire world,
has preceded it to this city. When
Henry W. Savage's everywhere talked
about production of this Viennese
operetta comes here it will receive
a peculiarly warm welcome, as there
will be many in the audience who
have, no doubt, seen the piece both
in New York and Europe and have
been singing its praises continually.
Never in the history of the American stage has a musical piece been
preceded by such enthusiastic approval as that which has marked the
advent of "The Merry Widow." In
London, Vienna, Berlin, Copenhagen,
Hamburg, Munich, Dresden, Leipsig;
indeed, everywhere it has been produced, the piece swept all else before
it and the wonderful waltz which
takes its name from the title of the
piece has set all the world to dancing, whistling and singing.
Franz Lehar, who composed the
score, is probably the most popular
living musician in Europe, and Victor Leon and Lee Stein, who wrote
the splendid book, have made a place
for themselves as librettists which
may not be disputed.
The scenic investiture which Mr.
Savage has provided is of wondrous
beauty. Three acts show the brilliant
Marsovian Embassy in Paris; the
glorious fete, in Sonia's garden; and
the gayety and riot of Maxim's Restaurant, the atmosphere of which is
produced with clever fidelity without
shocking the most puritanical sensibilities.
Point of Law.
In a small southern town two roustabouts got into an argument about
the ownership of an opossum. During the disturbance Sam.assaulted Remus with a paving stone and in due
time was brought before the bar of
justice. Sam, in the meantime, had
engaged the services of a rising young
lawyer.
"We have heard the evidence," said
the young attorney at the trial, "and
I think, according to Blackstone, my
client is innocent."
It was then that Remus arose and
rubbed his bandaged hand dolefully.
"He may be innocent, sah, accord-
in' to Blackstone," he said, seriously,
"but accordin' to dat cobblesstone he
am guilty."
And the judge thought the same
and Sam was convicted.
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SEAGRAM'S 83, per bottle  $1.00
SEAGRAM'S STAR, per bottle 85c
WALKER'S CLUB, per bottle .$1.00
WALKER'S IMPERIAL, per bottle  85c
MAPLE LEAF RYE, Imperial quart bottle $1.00
RANIER BEER, Quarts, per doz. $2.25; Pints, per doz $1.50
PERRIER, the world's best Mineral Water, per doz $1.75
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Independent Grocers and Liquor Merchants.
1317 Government St., and 1316 Broad St.   Tels 52, 1053, 1590.
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Let us know if you want it quick.
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I   the Underwood leads
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COFFEE SPOONS  per doz.  $2.70
TEASPOONS	
DESSERT SPOONS
TABLESPOONS ...
DESSERT FORKS .
TABLE FORKS 	
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Challoner & Mitchell
Diamond Merchants and Silversmithi
1017 Qovernment Street Victoria, B. C THE WEEK SATURDAY JUNE 5, 1909
* if v if v * '*' * '*' 't' '*' '*' if
, Social and        *
Personal. $
t if i|» it i1 iji \f if if if if it .f
Mrs. A. E. McPhillips is spending
week or so in Vancouver with
iends.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Fulton intend tak'ng
[rs. Walter Langley's residence on
emberton   Road   for   the   summer
onths.
* *   *
Miss Baker of Vancouver after a
lort visit with friends here, left last
unday evening for home.
Miss Pooley and Miss Violet Poo-
have returned from Portland.
*■**.**
Miss Elsie Bullen arrived early in
e week from Honolulu where she
is    been    spending    the    summer
onths.
* *   *
Mrs. Furlonger, mother of Mr. Ce-
1 Furlonger of the "Angela" is a
lest at the Empress.
*    *   *   *
Mrs. Little and Mrs. Freeman,
ockland Ave., have issued invitations
ir a garden party for Wednesday,
ine 9th.
* *   *
Mrs. J. H. Todd and Mrs. Hebden
tillespie are also giving an "at
ome" at the former's lovely resi-
ence on St. Charles St., on Thursday,
une ioth.
* *   *
Mrs. H. Tye entertained the Friday
ridge Club last week.
* *   *
Mr. Jack Cambie, on the staff of
he Bank of Montreal, has been
loved to Vancouver, leaving Victoria
ist Sunday.
* *   *
Mrs. Hickman Tye made a most
harming hostess last week when she
ntertained her friends at a smart
iridge tea. The house was elabor-
tely decorated with brown lilac and
[reenery, while the tea table was
ireatly admired, being most taste-
ully arranged with beautiful yellow
ulips.   Among the guests were:
Mrs. Blackwood, Mrs. Stewart Rob-
rtson, Mrs. J. Raymour, Mrs. Blackwood, Mrs. Pooley, Mrs. Gaudin, Mrs.
intherland, Mrs. Coles, Mrs. Phipps,
Ats, Roberts, Mrs. Ker, Mrs. Flum-
lerfelt, Mrs. W. Gore, Mrs. J. H.
'odd, Mrs. McCallum, Mrs. Mathews, Mrs. Matson, Mrs. Little, Mrs.
lullen, Mrs. Irving, Mrs. Englehart,
Mrs. Amberry, Mrs. Grahame, Mrs.
streatfield, Mrs. F. Barnard, Mrs. T.
Sore, Mrs. Rithet, Mrs. Freeman,
Mrs. Pierce, Mrs. Fagan, Mrs. F.
ones, Mrs. Courtney, Mrs. Tuck,
Ars. Hermann Robertson, Mrs. Hey-
and, Mrs. C. Todd, Mrs. Carmichael,
.Irs. Brett, Miss Wark.
The handsome prizes were won—
ist, brass bowl, by Mrs. Love; 2nd,
irass kettle, by Mrs. C. Todd; consolation, brass and silver trinket box,
>y Mrs. C. E. Pooley.
* *   *
Mrs. Pierce entertained at Bridge
on Tuesday last at Roccabella. The
drawing was very daintily decorated
with the wild dog daisy.
Those present were Mrs. C. M.
Roberts, Mrs. Rithet, Mrs. Matson,
Ars. T. S. Gore, Mrs. Heyland, Mrs.
Laing, Mrs. Irving, Mrs. Gibb, Miss
Wiles, Mrs. Tuck, Mrs. Gaudin, Mrs.
'hipps, Mrs. S. Robertson, Mrs. Love,
Mrs. Piggott, Mrs. Coles, Mrs. Strait,
Mrs. Grahame, Mrs. Tuck, Mrs. Car-
nichael.
The first prize was secured by Mrs.
_ove and the second by Mrs. Gibb.
* *   *
Mrs. Love, Burdette Avenue, left
in Wednesday evening on an ex-
^nded trip to the Old Country.
* *   *
Mrs. Berkeley, Burdete Avenue, en-
ertained her friends at Bridge on
Tuesday evening.
* *   *
Mrs. Sayward, Belcher street, was
imong thc numerous hostesses of the
>ast week, giving a most delightful
jarden party.
The Lieutenant-Governor's Yacht,
the "Dolandra," left early in the week
for Seattle. The party consisted of
His Honour the Lieut.-Governor and
Mrs. Dunsmuir, Misses Dunsmuir.
Col. and Mrs. Prior, Miss Perry, Mrs.
Wasson, Mr. Bromley, Mr. B. Drake,
Mr. Muskett. They went over for
the purpose of attending the opening
of the Exposition.
♦''*'»
The Misses Dunsmuir have returned from a most delightful trip from
the Orient.
* *   *
The marriage took place in Brantford, Ont., on Wednesday, June 2nd,
of Mr. J. A. Lindsay, of Victoria, to
Miss Naomi Ellen Adair, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Adair, of
Brantford, Ontario. Mr. and Mrs.
Lindsay are both well known in Victoria.
* *   *
Miss Dorothy Spencer leaves shortly for the Okanagan with Mrs.
Adams.
Oriental Cream
Building Permits Issued in Victoria
from May 21 to June a, Inclusive.
$1,000—Addition to dwelling, South-
gate St., T. Deakin, owner; Mr.
Marion, contractor.
$800—Frame building, in front of lots
113-4, block B, Mount Royal Milling Co.; work done by day labour.
$2,200—Brick building, Herald street;
Wing Yen Way, owner; Lim Ban^
contractor.
$i,9S0—Frame building, Alpha street;
R. Brydon, owner and contracto:.
$1,000—Frame building, Green stree**,
Edward Williams, owner and contractor.
$2,300—Frame building, Vancouver
St.; John Greenwood, owner; Mr.
Rochfort, architect; Geo. Rudd,
contractor.
$2,700—Frame building, Princess Ave.,
National Finance Co., owners; H-.
T. Knott, contractor.
$2,200—Frame building, Princess St.,
Prudential Investment Co., owners; H. T. Knott, contractor.
$1,900—Frame building, Queen's Ave.,
George McCandless, owner; H. A.
Miles, contractor.
$l,8oo—Frame building, Dundas St.,
H. C. Martin, owner; James Fair-
all, contractor.
$900—Frame building, Crescent St.;
E. L. Smith, owner and contractor.
$1,000—Frame building, Alpha street,
J. L. Hornibrook, owner and contractor.
$800—Frame building, Cowichan St.,
R. L. Wright, owner and cont'r.
$1,850—Frame building, Burnside Rd.,
W. C. Holt, owner and contractor.
$15,000—Brick building, Cormorant
St., Masonic Temple Association,
owners; Dunsdale & Malcolm, contractors.
$800—Frame building, Graham Street,
J. Swethurst, owner and cont'r.
$8,000—Frame building, Johnson St.,
Watson & McGregor, owners; A.
Maxwell Muir, architect; Parfitt
Bros., contractors.
$1,000—Brick, wood and glass building, Fort and Cook St., Wilkerson
& Brown, owners and contractors.
$2,500—Frame building, South Turner
St.; M. H. Dobie, owner and contractor.
•B MAOXOAX BEAT
BEAUTY THAT LASTS.
Where is the woman who has not
the praiseworthy desire to enhance
her personal charms and preserve as
long as possible her delightful power
pf enchantment, which lasts as long
as her beauty? The Oriental Cream,
prepared by Dr. T. Felix Gouraud, of
New York City, is a harmless preparation for preserving the delicacy
of the complexion and removing
blemishes. It is the favorite toilet
article of the leading professional
artists, who owe so much of their
popularity to their personal charms.
Scarcely a star dressing room in the
land is without Gouraud's Oriental
Cream, which is the most wholesome
and perfect beautifier known. Druggists will supply you. No. 8.
Prepare  yourself against  Jack
Frost.
See BOLDEN
THE CARPENTER AND     ...
BUILDER 8
For your weather strips, etc., g
760 Yates St. Op. Dominion g
Hotel. Phones: House, A.1125; if
Shop, B1828. «
%mmmmmmmtmm_mmmm^
Headquarters for choice nursery stock.
Apple, pear, cherry, plum and peach trees
and small fruits, also ornamental trees,
shrubs, roses, evergreens, etc. Largest and
best assorted stock in British Columbia.
Ten per cent, cash discount on all orders
above $10.00.
PRICE LIST AND CATALOGUE ON
APPLICATION.
I Empire Hotel and
jj     Restaurant
For 20c.
You get a good meal at 568
Johnson Street.
WINES, LIQUORS AND
CIGARS.
Family trade catered to.
Rooms, 25c and up.
Telephone 841.
A. LIPSKY, Proprietor,
Milne Block
568 Johnson Street,
VICTORIA, B.C.
Just Like New York.
"The village sot is going to plead
emotional insanity as an excuse for
robbing them hen roosts."
"What do you think of that?"
"I think his public spirit ought to
get him an acquittal. Ain't we aiming at making Plunkville a metropolitan town?"
"I kept my husband on a string
five years before I consented to marry himl"
"Why so long?"
"Well, you see, I waited until I
could see his way clear financially!"
Mother—My other little girl is very
frail, but I've taken precautions to
have baby grow up into a big buxom
girl.
Visitor—Indeed; and what have
you done?
Mother—I've had her christened
"Fairy."
'ttj*_,**i>: __axe_0—W_iasa^__. ^___B^*t_Mmm^^mMm*—mM_*__,
CHEHrCAl
Let Us Fill Your
Prescriptions
In all our business career we
have never permitted any but
the highest quality ingredients
to be used in any prescriptions
prepared here. We do a large
enough business to have new
goods (always pure goods) coming in continually, so our stock
is constantly replaced, fresh,
potent and reliable. Prices low
as is consistent with high
quality.
CYRUS H BOWES.
CHEMIST
Govt Su Near Yates.
A Bit of Old England
To sit and eat in comfort is perhaps a rarity outside of your
own home, but it is in this point that we excel others.
Breakfast
Lunches
Afternoon Teas
Dinners
To prove what we state pay us a visit.
/
We Grow ©ur ©wn
Produce
Parties catered to and tables reserved.
eetaeBaeieis
Cosy Corner Cafe and Tea Rooms
a®$*3ms*8»-33N3ms^^
MEN, WOMEN AND CHILDREN
Can learn many a lesson by seeing Moving Pictures which aire of a good
class both comic and melo-dramatic Complete change of programme on
MONDAYS, WEDNESDAYS AND FRIDAYS.
Continuous performance, 2:00 to 5:30—7:00 to 10:30 p.m.
ADMISSION TEN CENTS
EMPRESS THEATRE
Children's Matinees—Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday—Five Cents.
■_f^tli__f__-______._______M
±-L
__________
____________
_____________
M__________m__t THE WEEK, SATURDAY JUNE 5, 1919
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"IHE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
PaMllked at VICTORIA aie VANCOUVER
1208 Government St., Victoria, B.C
W. BLAKEMORE, Editor.
Some Great
Preachers.
By BOHEMIAN.
Not every man is a sermon-taster,
but it is astonishing how many men
there are scattered up and down the
world who inherit the critical faculty,
and the instincts of the woman whom
Ian Maclaren rendered immortal under the title of "The Sermon Taster."
Scotland is essentially the land of
preaching, and every Scotsman be he
high or low born can tell when he is
hearing good stuff, and when the
preacher is only beating the air or
marking time. I was reminded of
this characteristic of the canny race
by what happened on Sunday night.
I had been hearing Dr. Denney deliver one of the soundest and most
satisfactory sermons it has been my
lot to hear for many years. It was
just such a sermon as one might expect from a Scotch Professor, who
has made his mark as a writer on
theological subjects. His deliverance
was scientific in the best sense, it
violated none of the highest traditions of sermon making and it revealed the keen appreciation of all the
subtleties of exposition. Any who
looked for fireworks would be disappointed, but it occurred to me at the
time, and I have not since altered my
opinion, that anyone who could judge
a sermon would derive the keenest
satisfaction, and comfort from Dr.
Denney's deliverance.
I walked home with an old Presbyterian elder who had imbibed the
pure milk of the gospel in Glasgow.
Perhaps I spoke a little too enthusiastically and his comment might
have been half in rebuke of my appreciation, and half in hesitating approval of the sermon. He was very
non-committal, absolutely declined to
give one word of praise, and finally
concluded "I heard nothing that I
hadn't heard in Glasgow forty years
ago." Now this man was a sermon-
taster, and although he -is a right
down good fellow, I am inclined to
think that his Gospel milk has turned
a little sour.
It seemed to me that nothing could
be more gratifying than the fact that
an advanced theologian and critic like
Dr. Denney should have no new message to deliver where the Eternal
verities are concerned. The fact is
consoling and comforting. I knew
Dr. Denney twenty years ago in Edinburgh, when he was just beginning to
he talked about. Since then he has
gone far, and must now be considered
in the front rank of expositors. He
is by no means a great preacher, and
will always be more marked in the
class-room than in the pulpit, but he
comes from a land which has produced the greatest of preachers.
I should like to recall a few, stimulated thereto by the re-awakening of
Dr. Denney. Professor Elmslie was
one of the best; I heard him first in
Aberdeen, later in Glasgow, and quite
frequently after he settled in London.
I have always deeply regretted that
his brilliant career was so abruptly
terminated soon after he had commenced his work in London. In a
short time he had caught public attention, and men of all denominations
were turning towards him as a brilliant, broad-minded, leader of religious thought. He was a man of culture, with a fine style, and a noble
presence. He had the singular gift
of winning the confidence of his
hearers, as much by his manner as
his matter, and if he had lived would
hardly have been second to any man
in the metropolis as a potent influence for good.
Another fine preacher from the
North, who rounded up his life's work
in London, is Dr. Munro Gibson, one
of the few Scotch divines who has
lost nothing of the ruggedness of
manner, and broad accent to which he
was born, and yet strange to say
neither of his peculiarities has handicapped his usefulness in the least, and
he has enjoyed a remarkable degree
of personal popularity.
Going a little further back I well
recall the polished deliverances of
Principal Tulloch, who was for many
years the Queen's favorite preacher in
Scotland, and who was frequently
called to officiate at Balmoral. He
was a man of remarkably fine presence, stately and dignified, every inch
a courtier. He looked like a Prince
of the Roman Church. His eloquence
was not unlike that of Dr. Punshon,
though perhaps more tranquil. He
could not be considered a great theo
logian, but he only just missed being
a great preacher.
Several times in the seventies I
heard Dr. Hugh Cairns, both in Edinburgh and in London; he was a
mighty preacher, a big, fine, impressive man, with a powerful voice, and
an authoritative manner; he preached
like a law giver to whom the final
word had been committed and against
whose verdict there was no appeal.
He possessed rugged eloquence in a
high degree, and as he reasoned of
"judgment to come," many in his audience quailed. He belonged essentially to a day, and to a school; but both
have passed, and milder methods now
prevail.'
I suppose I should class John Watson (Ian Maclaren) with the great
Scotch preacher, but I have always
believed that his preaching was just a
little bit below the standard of his
lecturing and writing, and I doubt if
it possessed any of the elements of
permanence.
But let me conclude this brief and
discursive sketch with a reference to
the noblest Scotsman of them all—
Dr. Maclaren of Manchester, the man
who for forty years has been the centre of religious life in the great cotton
capital, and who every year has more
surely mounted towards the pinnacle
which he now occupies, as the greatest of all living preachers. More brilliant men have come and gone, all the
Christian churches have contributed
their quota, he has seen Liddon,
Lightfoot, Gregory, Church, Farrar,
Dale, Binney, Elmslie, Martin, Spur-
geon, Punshon, Hughes all pass, but
neither his popularity nor his power
hav^ waned, and men instinctively
turn to his ripened judgment, and unsurpassed insight into the profound
mysteries of religion for light and
leading.
Eggs are getting so high priced in
the capital of the United States that
the Washington -Herald predicts that
soon they will be sold only in drug
stores on doctors' prescriptions.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
North  Dairy  Farm  School.
Sealed Tenders, superscribed "Tender
for School-house," will be received by
the Hon. the Minister of Public Worka
up to noon of Wednesday, the 80th day
of June, 1909, for the erection and completion of a two-room frame School-
house, situated near the Pumping station on the Quadra Street extension, ln
the  Saanich Municipality.
Plans, specifications, contract and
forms of tender may be seen on and
after the 7th day of June, 1909, at me
offices of W. Campbell, Esq., Secretary
of the School Board, Royal Oak; ana
at the Public Works Department, Victoria, B.C.
Each proposal must be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank
of Canada, made payable to iue Honourable the Minister of Public Works,
for a sum equivalent to ten per cent, of
the amount of the tenders, which shall
be forfeited if the party tendering decline to enter into contract when called
upon to do so, or if he fail to complete
the work contracted for. The cheques
or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them
upon the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the forms supplied, signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed in the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
"Victoria, B.C., June 2nd, 1909.
june 6
"Now,  good digestion wait on appetite and  health
on both."—Shakespeare.
The above well known quotation headed the menu
of a banquet of the Baltimore Segar Leaf Association, tendered to the members of the National
Segar Leaf Tobacco Association, held May nth
last at Hotel Belvidere, Baltimore, Maryland,
when G. H. Mumm & Co.'s Extra Dry was the
one champagne listed and served exclusively.
Another high-class banquet, which took place
recently at Hotel Belvidere, Baltimore, was the
dinner to the Twentieth Annual Congress of
the National Society Sons of the American Revolution, by the Maryland Society, on Saturday, May
ist, last, which also listed and served exclusively
G. H. Mumm & Co.'s Extra Dry.
This all tends to show that no prominent banquet
is complete without G. H. Mumm & Co.'s Champagne.
LICENSE    TO    AN    EXTRA-PROVINCIAL  COMPANY.
"Companies Act, 1897."
rm*,Mw.
CANADA:
Province of British Columbia.
No. 488.
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that the "A.
R. Clarke and Company, Limited," is
authorized and licensed to carry on business within the Province of British Columbia, and to carry out or effect all or
any of the objects of the Company to
which the legislative authority of the
Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head offlce of the Company is I
situate at the City of Toronto, in the I
Province of Ontario. i
The  amount   of   the   capital  of  the j
Company is two hundred thousand dol- |
lars, divided into two thousand shares
of one hundred, dollars each.
The head offlce of the Company in
this Province is situate at the City of
Victoria, and Thomas H. Allice, Commercial Traveller, whose address Is Victoria aforesaid, is the attorney for tho
Company.
Given under my hand and Seal of
Offlce at Victoria, Province of British
Columbia, this eighteenth day of May,
one thousand nine hundred and nine.
l[__<: -. MAN4.
MONDAY, JUNE 7
America's   Greatest   Comedian   and
Most Beautiful Actress.
NAT. C. GOODWIN
EDNA GOODRICH
And Company
1
j In the Latest Success
j THE EASTERNER
IA Company of Unusual Excellence.
Artistic Performance.
Complete Production.
Prices—-50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50, $2.00.
Sale now open.
(L.S.)
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies. 1
The objects for which this Company
has been established and licensed are:
, To carry on business as hide, skin,
leather, glove, mitt, wool and moccasin
merchants, and to manufacture, buy,
sell and deal in hides, skins, leather,
gloves, mitts, wools, moccasins and thc
by-products thereof and all articles entering in the manufacture thereof and
the sale and disposition thereof,
june 5
I
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
t       * *" -
Fuel for Public Buildings.
Whole or separate sealed tenders will
be received by the Hon. the Minister of
Public Works up to and Including
Thursday, the 17th day of June, 1909,
for supplying and delivering best lump
and washed nut coal required at the
Provincial Government Buildings at Victoria, Vancouver and New Westminster,
B.C., as enumerated hereunder, during
the nine months ending 31st March,
1910, to be delivered in such quantities
and at such times as may be directed
during the period above stated.
The approximate annual consumption
of coal at each of the buildings named
ls as follows:—
Best lump coal in sacks—
Parliament Buildings, Victoria. 230 tons
Government House, Victoria... 110   "
Court House, Victoria ...*....    60   "
Jail, Victoria  100   "
Court House, Vancouver     88    "
Court House, New Westminster   70   "
Provincial Hospital for Insane,
New Westminster      60   "
Jail, New Westminster     40   "
Wash nut coal in bulk—
Provincial Hospital for Insane,
New Westminster  1200   "
The above-mentioned quantities are
not guaranteed; the quantity actually
required may be under or above the
figures stated.
Whole tenders shall be accompanied
by a cheque in the sum of $300, and
separate tenders by a cheque in the sum
of $100 on a chartered bank of Canada,
made payable to the Hon. the Minister
of Public Works, which will be forfeited
if the party tendering decline or neglect
to enter into the contract -wnen caiieu
upon to do so.
The cheques of unsuccessful tenderers
will be returned upon the execution or
the contract.
The Department is not bound to accept the lowest or any tender.
Tenders must be signed by the actual
signature of the tenderers.
Forms of tender can be furnished on
application.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C., 3rd June, 1909.
june 5
MONDAY, JUNE 14
Henry W.  Savage's  New York
Production of the
Operatic Sensation of the World.
TtfE  MERRY  WIDOW
(Die Lustige Witwe)
Music by Franz Lehar.
Year in New York
Six Months in Chicago.
Five Months in Boston.
Prices—soc, 75c, $1, $1.50, $2, $2.50.
Mail orders accompanied by remittance will receive their usual prompt
attention.
Box Office opens Friday, June nth.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Benson  School.
Sealed Tenders, superscribed "Tender
for School-house," will be received by
the Hon. the Minister of Public Works
up to noon of Thursday, the 10th day
of June, 1909, for the erection and completion of a large one-room frame
school-house at Benson Road, Delta
Municipal Schol District.
Flans, specifications, contract and
forms of tender may be seen on and
after the 17th day of May, 1909, at the
offices of the Government Agent at New
Westminster; of N. A. McDairmid, Esq.,
Secretary of the School Board, Ladnei,
B.C., and at the Public Works Department, Victoria, B.C.
Each proposal must be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank 01
Canada, made payable to the Hon. the
Minister of Public Works, for a sum
equivalent to ten per cent, of the amount
of the tender, which sail be forfeited ir
the party tendering decline to enter into
contract when called upon to do so, or
if he fail to complete the work contracted for. The cheques or certificates
of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will
be returned to them upon the execution
of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the forms supplied, signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed ln the envelopes
furnished.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., May 13th, 1909.
may 22
WEEK JUNE 7
The New Gran;
••LllVM A CeMIBIM,    Praarlatoi
Manai.iR.al at ■•■T. JANIIMH.
FRANK V. SEYMOUR ANI
EMMA HILL
Eccentric Comedians
"The Minx and The Mixer." ]
LEO. COOPER & CO.
Presenting the  Dramatic  Play]
"The Price of Power."
EDWARD BARNES
Champion Ragtime Pianist of tl
World, assisted by Mabel Robif
son,   featuring  "Highland  Mar]
Fling."
MLLE RIALTA
Supported   by   J.   Louis   Mi^
Lyric Tenor.
Picturesque   Singing  and   Posi|
Oddity
"The Artist's Dream."
SLATER BROCKMAN
Singer,  Impersonator and  Liglj
ning Change Artist.
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrail
"The Sweetest Thing on Earth]
NEW MOTION PICTURES
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA.
REFLECTIONS
The fact is Dudleigh, the mo J
ment a man takes to a pipe, ha
becomes a philosopher. It's the
poor man's friend; it calms the
mind, soothes the tender, and!
makes a man patient under dif J
Acuities. It has made more good!
men, good husbands, kind mas**]
ters, indulgent fathers than any
other blessed thing on this uni-j
versal earth. This is not a jesL
but a truth, solved only by]
Dudleigh's mixture.
Th* Army
and Navy
Cigar Store.
Richardsoi
Pheae 346
Mrs. Melville Parri
SOPRANO
CONCERT,
ORATORIO,
OPEE
VOICE PRODUCTION AND
EXPRESSION IN SINGINH
Pupils Received at Residence.
1645 OAK BAY AVENUE,
(Near Terrace Ave.)
M_m_mm.
I
v#?(V#a\»v
Don't
Forget
Us
When you require that
TENNIS
RACQUET
or anything in the Tennis line. J
We have everything you mayj
want and our prices are right.
Ask for Price List.
1909 Tennis Guides just
received.
| M. W. WAITT & CO., Limited j
I HERBERT KENT, Mgr.
| 1004  Government  Street.]
>,\mmmw.w.mmmmmm#. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 5, 1909
Don't Buy
A Refrigerator
because it looks good, but satisfy yourself that it is good—
that the walls are built right-
that it has a perfect circulation
of air—that it is economical in
the use of ice. Then ask if it
is guaranteed to give lasting
satisfaction.
You can't see what is between the walls of a refrigerator, yet the difference between a good and a poor
refrigerator is usually found
between tbe walls where you
can't see it.
Let Us Tell You
The Difference
between the celebrated McCray Refrigerator and others—and show you what
is between the walls. If the wails are
not built so that they will keep cold
air ln and warm air out, your refrigerator will use much more ice than is
necessary. Don't melt your money
needlessly—come in and let us show
you the best refrigerator made, and
explain why the McCray is economical in the use of ice.
You can purchase a McCray Refrigerator with perfect safety because
every McCray Refrigerator is guaran-
. mi 1111 teed to give lasting satisfaction. Re-
lllnlll member that our store is the only
place in this city where McCray Refrigerators can be obtained.
We have Refrigerators
from $12 to $100.
TO RETAILERS
Isn't it poor business to
carry a large stock in your
little town when the quantities you require may be purchased from us on short
notice. We help you. Prompt
and satisfactory service guaranteed.
English Carriages"
ft Popular Style
THE "ENGLISH" GO-CART AND CARRIAGE A
FAVORITE THIS YEAR.
The English style of go-cart or carriage has taken the popular
fancy this season and many stylish Whitney English carts are to
be seen in Victoria this year. There is much to commend them.
The cart is a most comfortable style and nothing better in go-cart
comfort is offered. The superior finish on these Whitney carts
distinguish them. The leather cloth hood gives ample protection
for the sum and we have "boots" which, combined with the hood,
completely protects baby from the elements—from rain and cold.
Pleased to have you come in and see the great values we are
offering in these carts.   See these priced at $25, $30, $35, $40, $50.
Hammocks From Each $1.25
Hammock time is here so come in and get your hammock
today and enjoy a happy hour under a tree or on your porch
tomorrow. We are ready for you with an excellent assortment of hammock styles, offering you much latitude in the
matter of price.
Palmer's Arawana hammocks are stocked and other well
known makes are also shown—every one worthy and excellent value. Come in today and let us show you some of
these hammock styles which are priced from, each $1.25
New Iron Cribs From $9.00
STYLISH DESIGNS AMONG THESE NEW ONES. "
We are ready for you mothers who have been looking
for something attractive in the way of metal cribs for little
ones, with a grand collection of new arrivals just priced.
Come in and see these attractive new styles and let us
show you a few of the special features of our cribs—such as
the special drop sides, the superior no-rustable spring, etc.
These cribs come from the largest metal bed makers in
the world and have the same marks of superior workmanship
and materials as characterize their beds. Let us show you
the offerings at $9.00 to $14.50.
easy and
economical
ice cream making
. The Lightning helps you
more than any other freezer.
Time, turning and strength,
ice and salt, saved by the
Wheel Dasher aad Automatic Twin Scrapers,
and  deliciously light  and
velvety ice cream made.
We Show a Big Range
from $2.75 to $20.
IDEAL GIFTS FOR
JUNE BRIDES.
You are safe in sending
cut glass to the June
bride—if the glass bears
the "Libbey" mark of
quality. The young home-
keeper delights in having
the table as dainty as it is
possible to make it and
nothing helps so much in
table decoration as beautiful cut glass.
"Libbey" Cut Glass is
the very finest made and
is recognized as such. The
name "Libbey" is graven
in every genuine piece.
SOLE VICTORIA AGENTS
for
"OSTERMOOR" MATTRESSES
$15.00.
WEILER BROS.
Complete Home Furnishers
VICTORIA, B. C.
TO DEALERS
We solicit correspondence
from dealers who are not
already acquainted with us
and who wish to get
acquainted with the largest
wholesalers of Homefurnish-
ings in the West. Try furniture as a "side-line"—we
help you.
OLLA iPODRlDA
^^^ti^mmmmm
Mere Man—Women in our legisla-
;es—absurdl
suffragette—And why not, pray?
Mere    Man —What's   the   need?
isn't women been laying down the
1 to us for ages?
own importance." Probably this explains some reckless slaughterings of
incautious pedestrians.
One Requisite.
Colonel—What do army regulations
ike the first requisite in order that
man may be buried with military
nors?
Private Macshorty—Death, yer yer
norl
A Percentage.
The other people's business man
persisted in trying to extract information from a prosperous looking elderly man next him in the Pullman
smoker.
"How many people work in your
office?" he asked.
"Oh," said the elderly man getting
up and throwing away his cigar, "I
should say, at rough guess about two-
thirds of them."
NInsult to Injury.'
Gunner—I never saw such an au-
cious barber.   I told him the lather
was putting on my face was an
lult.
juyer—And did he apologize?
junner—I   should   say   not.    He
rted to rub it in.
Excellent Reason.
The Dominie—How is it, my young
friend, that your mother always does
the carving when you have company
to dinner?
Freddie—'Cause dad always says
things while he's doing it.
silencer which is on exhibition at the
Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition.
The possibilities of the invention
are immense. Most of us would be
w'lling to submit to an increased
charge for a sleeping car berth if we
were insured against ripping snorts
of sleeping fellow passengers. Hotel
rooms separated only by a wooden
door and transom should command a
higher rental if a snore silencer were
supplied and adjusted to each guest.
Without sleep there is no joy in
this life. If the woman's invention
is what it is said to be, she is a
benefactress of mankind. The invention consists of a silver cord that de-
gresses the tongue and is held in
place by a bridle on the chin. A kind
of gag, perhaps suggested by the device used in the olden time to punish gossips.
answered   the   foreman   innocently,
"but he left his verdict with me."
Debuts.
"My daughter," said Mrs. Newcash,
proudly, "comes out tonight.".
"How strange!" cried Mrs. Kashier.
"So does my husband. How long was
your daughter in for, may I ask?"
The Reason.
Father—It's near midnight and I
can't see why Anna's fellow hasn't
sense enough to go home.
Little Willie (in the next room)—
He can't go, papa. Sister's sitting on
him.
The Exception.
•arling, I like your face so sweet,"
ie lover said: "your form so neat,
>ur lovely waving auburn hair,*
mr   forehead,    milky   white   and
square.
mr lips that curve so prettily,
iur azure eyes—in fact with me
3t everything about you goes,
:cept—except your saucy noes.'"
Two of a Kind.
Doctor Quackem—"You call yourself a lawyer. Why, you couldn't try
a can of lard I"
Lawyer Briefless—"And you, sir,
couldn't cure a ham."
Tax on Statesmanship.
Congress has officially decided to
call the Panama canal "The Panama Canal." How it must have made
Congress' head ache to think of such
an appropriate name.
Heredity.
Father (furiously)—I won't have
you encourage that young man. I tell
you there was a time when his father
squeezed me.
Daughter (innocently)—I guess it
must run in the family, for the son
did the same thing to me.
The Better Part.
A delightful little story is told of
Prosper Merimee, the French author.
He was once guest at a royal hunt,
when hares, pheasants and other game
were driven before the Emperor and
his followers, and the servants picked
up the victims of the sport.
Among all the members of the
hunting party, Prosper Merimee-
alone had no trophy to display.
"How does this happen?" asked
some one.
"Where game is so plenty, the
merit of a marksman seems to me to
lie in hitting nothing," replied Merimee with grave courtesy, "so I fired
between the birds."
Defined.
"A true bohemian is a nrn who
borrows a dollar and then invites you
to lunch with it."
"Wrong again. A true bohemian is
a man who invites himself to lunch
with you and then borrows a dollar."
Mrs. Bunsby—If tliat young man's
coming here to see you every day in
the week, you had better give him a
hint to come after supper.
Miss Bunsby—I don't think it's
necessary, pa. That's what he comes
after.
Slightly Twisted.
Fastboy-Really, dear, you shouldn't
wait supper for me this way when I'm
detained at the office.
Mrs. Fastboy—Supper, you idiot!
The maid just laid the table for
breakfast.
She Knew.
"Is it a platonic affection?"
"Purely.   He gave me a penwiper
for my birthday."
An observant person notes that
:re is more than one kind of
mken chauffeur who is a peril to
j public, and calls attention to the
ap  who  is  "intoxicated with   his
Alaska-Yukon Exposition.
Henceforth there should be no
more complaints for divorce on the
grounds that a husband snores and
deprives a wife of needful sleep. A
Seattle woman has invented a snore
Furnished in Advance.
After facing a jury for a couple of
hours the judge was congratulating
himself that the case was about over,
when he accidentally discovered there
were only eleven jurors present.
"How's this?" he queried in surprise.   "Where is the twelfth man?"
"He went to a funeral, your honor,"
A Cause for Joy.
Jamie was begging his father for a
second helping of preserves. "When
I was a boy," said his papa, "my
father only allowed me to have one
helping'."
Jamie was silent for a minute, and
then asked: "Aren't you glad you live
with us now, daddy?"
He Traveled Light.
"That hallroom boarder moved today."
"I didn't see any trunk go out."
"There was none. I guess he placed
his effects in an envelope and mailed
'em to the new address."
The Poor Man's Game—Knicker—
Mr. Taft proves that golf is a poor
man's game.
Bocker—Poker goes it several better; it makes a rich man poor.
Hyker—"George Washington certainly was a man of note in his day."
Pyker—"Yes; and he's also a man
of note today."
Hyker—"How's that?"
Pyker—"I saw his picture on a
banknote this morning."
Bell Boy (knocking at door)—Six
o'clock, sir.
Voice Inside—Six? Confound you,
boy, why didn't you tell me before? THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 5, 1909
Housekeeping goods will soon be needed. The first essential towards good housekeeping
is a good .Gas Bange. The June benedict-to-be should see that his bride experiences the
joy of a stove that's always ready, an oven that's always right, and a heat that can be
regulated scientifically.
Home comfort cannot be assured with
coal or wood fires for cooking purposes.
Don't cook the cook over a red-hot range
on a warm day. Avoid this by cooking
with gas; just a turn of the tap—no
worry, no work, no waste of fuel or
time. Gas makes home comfortable
summer or winter.
Gas Range comfort means that you can
cook any meal of the day, summer or
winter, with ease and comfort. Let one
of our men set up a gas range in your-
kitchen and you will find that you have
the most modern and convenient cooking apparatus. The cost of maintenance
is far less than for a coal range.
WE WOULD LIKE YOU TO CALL AND SEE   OUR  FINE   STOCK OF GAS RANGES AND GAS
STOVES.   EASY PAYMENTS IF DESIRED.
GAS
Ranges
VICTORIA GAS COMP'Y
Limited
Cor. Fort and Langley Streets, Victoria, B. C.
i
At The Street   f
Corner i
■7 TIM LMJMM
At the suggestion of a prominent
real estate man I took advantage of
the perfect weather of the present
week to stroll through nearly every
street of the city. My object was to
check up his statements as to the
slovenly manner in which the engineering department does its work.
I do not want to make my letter a
mere catalogue of costly blunders and
piled up nuisances, but I will say this,
that hardly in any instance does thc
City Engineer see that workmen remove rubbish which is created by
their operations. A job is finished
and there may be an accumulation
of rock, earth or debris, ranging from
a cart load to many tons, but there it
lies a monument of neglect and slovenliness. That, however, is not the
worst feature of the case. All these
rubbish heaps are sources of danger.
I know of two instances in whicli a
gentleman, driving his , own motor,
crashed into a heap which had been
left by the city workmen without protection or warning of any kind. In
both cases a serious accident was
narrowly averted. If thc pile had
been rock instead of earth, the result
would probably have been fatal. This
condition of things prevails in scores
of places in the city today, but I
would particularly mention Douglas
street, South Turner street and Cook
street. I know that to leave such
material at night without a danger
light is a breach of a By-law; I also
know that any person could recover
compensation from the City in case
of injury or damage, but neither of
these considerations seem to be
weighty enough to influence the
Streets Committee or the City Engineer to do their duty. I suppose
they are waiting for another  Point
Ellis bridge catastrophe to wake them
up.
* *     *
I strolled down to the Willows
track on Wednesday, and was astonished at the improvement made.
Somebody has spent a pile of money;
the track has been stripped of thc
stones which were such a conspicuous feature in the past; the meadow
enclosure is mantled with a vivid
green, which is most grateful to the
eye, and which lends a charm to the
whole enclosure. The extension oi
stabling accommodation is almost beyond belief and there will surely be
no difficulty in housing 500 horses.
Perhaps the greatest improvement is
the planking over of the enclosure in
front of the Grand-Stand, it is now
arranged to slope at an easy angle, so
that everyone can see the course. Another great improvement is the removal of the refreshment room to the
back of the grand-stand. People requiring to use them will not have to
force their way through a crowd of
spectators. Possibly, however, the
greatest public convenience will prove
to bc the construction of the loop of
the railway which will enable visitors
to ride in the cars to the entrance
of the grounds. Altogether the affair has been handled in a thorough,
businesslike, practical manner, and if
the same common sense is applied to
the conduct of the races Victoria will
be benefited beyond the wildest expectations of the promoters.
* w       w
I notice from a paragraph in the
daily press that the Secretary of thc
Y. M. C. A. is appealing to those who
subscribed the $100,000 for the new
building to "pay up." This should
not be necessary, although possibly
the excitement aroused by the very
vigorous campaign may have led to
rash promises in some instances; still
Victoria cannot afford to make a
worse record than other cities when
it comes to the matter of paying up,
and there is no reason to doubt that
every dollar subscribed will be collected. The point, however, is that
the money is needed at once to pay
for the land, and that until this is
secured it will be impossible to talk
about building. In this connection it
occurs to me that the campaign started out with a private subscription
slightly in excess of $20,000 which is
about equivalent to the cost of the
land; surely there is no difficulty in
collecting this amount, which was
guaranteed by well to do backers of
the campaign. Every one would like
to see Mr. Brace and his committee
busy at work on the building even if
it involves a little personal sacrifice
on the part of those who promised to
furnish the funds.
*     *     *
A good deal has been said on the
streets, and a little in the press, about
the conduct of roystering gents, who
tear up and down the country roads
in automobiles principally between
the hours of ii p.m. and 8 a.m. No
one wants to prevent the owners of
the motors from earning an honest
penny, and no one wishes to deprive
peacable citizens of the refreshing privilege of a night ride, but something
is due to those who want to sleep as
well as to those who want to make a
night of it, and there is no doubt that
too little consideration is shown by
the latter for the former. No part of
the city is immune from the noisy
visits of these disturbers, and the
only remedy is for the police to notify those who let out motors for hire
that they are expected to exercise
some control over their fares; if not,
the privileges whicli they at present
enioy will undoubtedly be curtailed.
C&i
<r%*-p&t~,
The countiy farmer and his wife,
happening to be in Cambridge on
business, spent an afternoon watching
the seniors play their annual match.
"Betsy," he whispered, "jest you
look at that fellow twirling his hat.''
"What about him. Briggs?" asked
his wife.
"He be full  six feet, ain't he?"
Nat Goodwin, at the Victoria Theatre June '/th.
"Aye, an' a bit over, I should say."
"Weighs  about sixteen  stone?"
"You're not far out."
"Well," muttered Briggs. meditatively, "football do develop 'em. that's
sartain."
"Yes," said Mrs. Briggs, approvingly, "he's a rare well-set-up young
chap."
"Chap!" echoed Farmer Briggs.
"Betsy, I jest heard a feller say as
th.it chap's in his third year. Talk
about oatmeal porridge. Why, it
ain't in it wi' football."
Out of Date.
The merry widow's out of date,
There's little doubt of that-
VVe very rarely see of late
Those widths of hat-
But don't think yours is useless y
O,  no,  indeed!    O,  no!
It can be o'er a garden set
To keep off frost and snow.
That "peace in the Balkans" ma)
a queer sort of rumbling sound. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 5, 1908
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
Queen Charlotte Islands.
I-CE NOTICE  that I,  Arcadus 01-
of Everett,   Washington,   black-
I. Intend to apply for permission to
•act for coal over the following dead  lands:—Commencing at a post
|;d on Gundus Slough, on the east
lind two miles from its outlet into
lit Inlet;   thence   south   80 chains;
. east 80 chains; thence north 80
';; thence west 80 chains to point
nmencement,   and   containing  640
.* more or less,
led November 10th, 1908.
ARCADUS GIGDBRE,
A. B. Allard, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
Queen Charlotte Islands.
IKE NOTICE that I, Gus Wincell,
Tattle, Washington, intend to apply
Jjrmission to prospect for coal over
[.■ollowing .described lands:—Coming at a post planted at the north-
Jcorner of Mark Strong's location;
e north 80 chains; thence east 80
b; thence south 80 chains; thence
180 chains to point of commence-
I containing 640 acres more or less,
led November 10th, 1908.
GUS WINCELL,
|'9 A. B. Allard, Agent.
[SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
Queen Charlotte Islands.
EE NOTICE that I, James Mullen,
attle, Washington, lumberman, in-
Jto apply for permission to pros-
Jor coal over the following descrlb-
lids:—Commencing at a post plant-
Be mile north from the north-west
|r   of    Richard    Giguere's    claim;
east 80 chains; thence south 80
; thence west   80   chains; thence
.80 chains to point of commence-
land containing 640 acres, more or
|sd November 10th, 1908.
JAMES MULLEN,
|9 A. B. Allard, Agent..
[SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
Queen Charlotte Islands.
_m NOTICE that I, Mark Strong,
little, Washington, intend to apply
brmission to prospect for coal over
[following   described   lands:*—Coming at a post  planted on Masset
and one mile north of James Mul-
coal   location;   thence   south   80
[s;  thence  east   80  chains;  thence
80 chains; thence west 80 chains
■lnt of commencement, and contaln-
■40 acres, more or less.
Ted November 10th, 1908.
MARK STRONG,
|29 A. B. Allard, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
Queen Charlotte Islands,
CE NOTICE that I, Frank Demers,
||.ncouver, B.C., carpenter, Intend to
for   permission   to   prospect   for
bver the following described lands:
fnmenclng at a post planted at the
■-east corner  of Richard Giguere's
thence north   80 chains;   thence
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
|e west 80 chains to point of com-
ement,  and   containing   640   acres
[ or less.
led November 10th, 1908.
FRANK DEMERS,
A. B. Allard, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
Queen Charlotte Islands.
CE NOTICE that I, John Demers,
[mcouver, B.C., carpenter, intend to
for  permission   to  prospect  for
|&ver the following described lands:
nmencing at a post,planted at the
|-east corner of Arcadus Giguere's
thence south   80 chains;   thence
ISO chains; thence north 80 chains;
le west 80 chains to point of com-
T_ment, and   containing   640 acres,
I or less,
led November 10th, 1908.
JOHN DEMERS,
|29 A. B. Allard, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
Queen Charlotte Islands.
IKE NOTICE that I, Ira Hardy, or
fie, Washington, intend to apply for
ftssion to prospect for coal over the
wing described lands:—Commencing
■post planted at the south-east cor-
pf James Mullen's location; thence
80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
south 80 chains; thence west 80
Is to point of commencement, and
lining 640 acres, more or less,
led November 10th, 1908.
IRA HARDY,
[29 A. B. Allard, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
Queen Charlotte Islands.
IKE  NOTICE  that   I,   James    E.
le,  of Seattle,   Washington,   Intend
Jply for permission to prospeot for
|over the following described lands:
nmencing  at   a  post  planted  one
/north of the north-east corner oi
Hardy's  location;  thence  south  80
Is;  thence east  80  chains;   thenoe
li 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
Tint of commencement, and contaln-
140 acres, more or less,
lted November 10th, 1908.
JAMES E. MOORE,
ft!9 A. B. Allard, Agent.
' SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
Queen Charlotte Islands.
[KE NOTICE that I, William Simi-
|of  Seattle,  Washington,   Intend to
for permission   to   prospect   for
fiver the following described lands:
nmencing at a post planted at the
-west   corner   of E. Moore's loca-
thence   north   80  chains;  thence
[80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
le west*80 chains to point of com-
lement,  and containing    640 acres,
[ or less.
led November 10th, 1908.
WILLIAM  SIMISON,
A. B. Allard, Agent.
DAL  PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Rupert District.
ITICE is hereby given that Chris
fetrom will within 30 days from
■date apply to the Assistant Com-
loner of Lands at Victoria, for a
pe to prospect for coal on the land
Jnder the area described as follows:
•nmencing at a post on the N. W.
Ir of section 18, township 27; thence
one mile,  thence south one mile;
west one mile; thence north one
Ito place of beginning.
Ted 22 March, 1909. may 8
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE ls hereby given that the reserve existing on lands on' the Black-
water and Euchinlko Rivers, ln Cariboo
District, and Range 4, Coast District,
notice of which was pubUshed ln the
British Columbia Gaiette of July 2nd,
1908, and bearing date of June 80th,
1908, is cancelled.
ROBERT A, RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., May lst, 1909.
may 8
CANCELLATION  OF  RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve existing on lands on Mud River,
in Cariboo District, and Range 4, Coast
District, notice of which was published
ln the British Columbia Gazette of July
2nd, 1908, and bearing date of June
30th,  1908,  ls cancelled.
ROBERT A, RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., May lst, 1909.
may 8
COAL PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Tumbo Island.
NOTICE is hereby given that Arthur
E. Hepburn will within 30 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a license to prospect for coal under the
area described as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
extreme easterly end of Tumbo Island
at high water mark; thence north one
mile; thence east one mile; thence south
one mile; thence west one mile to place
of beginning.
Dated  27  April,  1909.
may!
COAL  PROSPECTING NOTICB.
Tumbo Island.
NOTICE ls hereby given that Harry
Mclvor Hepburn will within SO days
from this date apply to the Assistant
Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for
a license to prospect for coal under
the area described as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
extreme westerly end of Tumbo Island
at high water mark; thence north ono
mile; thence west one mile; thence
south one mile; thence east one mile
to place of beginning.
Dated 27 April, 1909. may 8
COAL  PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Tumbo Island.
NOTICE ls hereby given that Frank
H. Hepburn will within 30 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
license to prospect for coal under the
area described as follows:—
Commencing at a post made on a
stump at the centre of the north shore
of Tumbo Island at high water mark.
Thence north one mile; thence west one
mile; thence south One mile; thence east
one mile to place of beginning.
Dated 27 April, 1909. may 8
COAL  PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Tumbo Island.
NOTICE ls hereby given that Barbara
G. Hepburn will within 30 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
license to prospect for coal under the
area described as follows:—
Commencing at a post made on a
stump at the centre of the north shore
of Tumbo Island, at high water mark;
thence north one mile; thence east one
mile; thence south one mile; thence
west one mile to place ot bginning.
Dated 27 April, 1909. may 8
COAI -SPECTING  NOTICE.
. jpert District.
NOTICE is hereby given that Theresa
Elliott Pilling will within 30 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
license to prospect for coal on the land
and under the area described as follows:
Commencing at a post on the S. W.
corner of section 3, ln township 31;
thence north one mile; thence east one
mile; thence south one mile; thence west
one mile to place of beginning.
Dated 22 March, 1909. may 8
COAL   PROSPECTING  NOTICE.
Rupert District.
NOTICE is hereby given that E.
Miles will within 30 days from this date
apply to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands at Victoria, for a license to
prospect for coal on the land and under
the area described as follows:
Commencing at a post on the S. E.
corner of section 4, ln township 81,
thence north one mile, thence west one
mile, thence south one mile, thence east
one mile to place of beginning.
Dated 22 March, 1909. may 8
COAL   PROSPECTING  NOTICE.
Rupert District.
NOTICE ls hereby given that George
Nordstrom will within 30 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
license to prospect for coal on the land
and under the area described as follows:
Commencing at a post on the N. W.,
corner of section 26 ln township 30;
thence south one mile; thence east one
mile; thence north one mile; thence west
one mile to place of beginning.
Dated 22 March, 1909. may 8
COAL  PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Rupert District.
NOTICE is hereby given that A. E.
Pilling will, within 30 days from this
date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a license to prospect for coal on the land
and under the area described as follows:
Commencing at a post on the N. E.
corner of section 23, township 30, thence
south one mile, thence west one mile;
thence north one mile; thence east one
mile to place of beginning.
Dated 22 March, 1909. may 8
COAL PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Rupert District.
NOTICE is hereby given that Charlie
Nordstrom will within 30 days from this
datfr apply to the Assistant Commis-
slonsr of Lands at Victoria, for a license to prospect for coal on the land
and under the area described as follows •.—
Commencing at a post on the N. W.
corner of section 18, township 17, thence
east one mlle, thence south one mile,
thence west one mile, thence north one
mile to place of beginning.
Dated 22 March, 1909. mays
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that I, William Slml-
son, of Seattle, Washington, Intend to
apply for permission to prospect tot
coal over the following described lands:
—Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner of E. Moore's location; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated November 10th, 1908.
WILLIAM SIMISON,
may 29 A. B. Allard, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Richard Gi-
guere, of Everett, Washington, hotel-
keeper, Intend to apply for permission
to prospect for coal over the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the north-west corner of Arcadus Giguere's licence; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 10th, 1908.
RICHARD GIGUBRE,
may 29 A. B. Allard, Agent.
NOTICE.
NOTICE ls hereby given that the Reserve existing on Lot 223, Rupert District, is cancelled.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Department  of  Lands,
Victoria, B.C., March Nth, 1909.
NOTICE.
NOTICE ls hereby given that the Reserve on Lot 29a, Range 4, Coast District, ls cancelled.
R. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of
Lands and Works.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., 15th October, 190S.
Sm
RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the following Lots, situated ln Cariboo District, are reserved for University purposes from pre-emption, sale or other
alienation under the Land Act:—Lots
1,454; 1,462; 1,465; 1,473; 1,456; 1,455;
1,453; 1,461; 1,464; 1,472; 1,826; 1,438;
1,444; 1,460; 1,463; 1,471; 1,326; 1,437;
1,443, 1,449 and 1,462.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., May 27th, 1909.
may 29
fill
&M
RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the following Lots, situated in Cariboo District,
are reserved from alienation under the
Land Act, except by pre-emption:—Lots
1,470; 1,316; 1,324; 1,442; 1,461; 1,312;
1,319; 1,329; 1,447; 1,468; 999a; 1,314;
1,322; 1,440; 1,459; 1,481; 1,310; 1,317;
1,327; 1,445; 1,466; 1,476; 1,479 and 1,476.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., May 27th, 1909.
may 29
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Richard Gl-
guere, of Everett, Washington, hotel-
keeper, intend to apply for permission
to prospect for coal over the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the north-west corner of Arcadus Giguere's licence; thence north 80
chains; thence east SO chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 10th, 1908.
RICHARD GIGUERE,
may 29 A. B. Allard, Agent.
"COMPANIES ACT, 1897."
NOTICE  is  hereby  given  that  Clarence Wilton Bradshaw, barrister-at-law,
of  Victoria,   B.C.,   has   been  appointed
the new attorney of the "Interprovincial
Land Company."
Dated this 10th day of May, 1909.
S. T. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies,
may 22
NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to the provisions of the Revised
Statutes of Canada, 1906, Chapter 115,
Sec. 7, and Chapter 143, Sec. 84, the
undersigned will, at the expiration of
thirty days from the date hereof apply
to the Governor in Council for the approval of the area plans and site of
certain proposed works to be constructed at Thetis Cove, Esquimalt Harbour,
Vancouver Island, British Columbia,
upon the following described foreshore
and submerged lands:—Commencing at
high water mark at the north-westerly
corner of the Esquimalt and Nanaimo
Railway Station grounds, known as tne
Esquimalt Station; thence south flfty-
four degrees west (S. 54 deg. W.) a distance of four hundred and seventy-three
feet (476ft.) more or less, along boundary of foreshore applied for by the 13.
F. Graham Lumber Company (the plans
of which are filed) to the shore of
Richards Island, thence south nineteen
degrees and thirteen minutes west (S.
19 deg. 13 min. W.) a distance of one
hundred and fifty feet (150 ft) along
boundary of foreshore applied for by
the B. F. Graham Lumber Company,
thence south eighty degrees east (S. so
deg. B.) a distance of four hundred
and eighty feet (480 ft) more or less to
high water mark, and thence following
high water mark to point ot commencement the whole containing 3.86 (three
and eighty-five one hundredths) acres
and shown coloured red on plan made
by T. S. Gore P. L. S. under date May
7th, 1909.
The said works consist of the construction of a booming ground for logs
within the area above described, and the
erection of a saw-mill upon the foreshore and extending Into the water, and
a plan of the said proposed works and
a description of the proposed site has
been deposited with the Minister of
Public Works at Ottawa and duplicates
thereof in the Land Registry Office at
Victoria, B.C.
Dated Victoria, B.C., May 21st, 1909.
may 22 PERCY DAVID HILLIS.
COAL  PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Rupert District.
NOTICE ls hereby given that Ole
Strandwald will within 30 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
license to prospect for coal on the land
and under the area described as follows:
Commencing at a post on the S. B.
corner of section 19, township 27, thence
north one mile, thence west one mile,
thence south one mile, thence east one
mile to place of beginning.
Dated 22 March, 1909. may 8
COAL  PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Rupert District
NOTICE ls hereby given that Olaf
Strandwald will within 30 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
license to prospect for coal on the land
and under the area described as follows:
Commencing at a post on the S. W.
corner of section 21, township 27, thence
north one mile, thence east one mile,
thence south one mlle, thence west one
mile to place of beginning.
Dated 22 March, 1909. may 8
COAL PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Rupert Distriot.
NOTICE is hereby given that Harold
Strandwald will within 30 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
license to prospect for coal on the land
and under the area described as follows:
Commencing at a post on the N. W.
corner of section 15, township 27, thence
south one mile, thence east one mile,
thence north one mile, thence west one
mile to place of beginning.
Dated 22 March, 1909. may 8
NOTICE ls hereby given that 30 days
after date I Intend to apply to the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for eoal
and petroleum under the foreshore and
under the water on the lands in and
opposite Denman Island, Comox District, and described as follows:—Commencing at a post planted on the set
beach near the intersection of the centre line of section 20 and High Water
Mark, Denman Island; thence west 40
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 30 chains, more or less, to High
Water Mark; thence southerly along sea
beach, to place of commencement
Dated this 26th day of Maroh, 1909.
G. C. CAREW GIBSON,
may 16 B. Priest, Agent
COAL  PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Rupert District.
NOTICE is hereby given that Philip
Nordstrom will within 30 days from this
date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a license to prospect for coal on the land
and under the area described as follows:
Commencing at a post on the N. E.
corner of section 13, township 30; thence
south one mile; thence west one mile;
thence north one mile; thence east one
mile to place of beginning.
Dated 22 March, 1909. may 8
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Court House, Fernie.
Sealed Tenders, superscribed "Tender
for Court House, Fernie, B.C.," will
be received by the Hon. the Minister
of Public Works up to noon of Wednesday, the Oth day of June, 1909, for the
erection and completion of a Concrete
and Brick Court House at Fernie, B.C.
Plans, specifications, contract and
forms of tender may be seen on and
after the 10th day of May, 1909, at the
offices of the Government Agent at
Fernie; the Government Agent at Nelson; the Government Agent at Revelstoke, and at the Public Works Department, Victoria, B.C.
Each proposal must be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank of
Canada, made payable to the Hon. the
Minister of Public Works, for a sum
equivalent to ten per cent, of the
amount of the tender, which shall be
forfeited If the party tendering decline
to enter into contract when called upon
to do so, or If he fail to complete the
work contracted for. The cheques or
certificates of deposit of unsuccessful
tenderers will be returned to them upon
the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the forms supplied, signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed ln the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
EVERED CRIDDLE,
Supervising Architect
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., May 4th,  1909.    may 8
COAL PROSPECTING   NOTICB.
Rupert District.
NOTICE Is hereby given that C. D.
Johnson will within 30 days from this
date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a license to prospect for coal on the land
and under the area described as follows:
Commencing at a post on the S. W.
corner of section 22, township 27, thence
north one mile, thence east one mlle,
thence south one mile, thence west one
mlle to place of beginning.
Dated 22 March, 1909. may 8
JALLAND BROS.
Fine Groceries
FRESH  FRUIT  DAILY.
3 Yatea St    •    VICTORIA. B.C
WING ON
Employment Agent
Wood and Coal for Sale.
Also Scavenging.
1709 Government St Phone as
VICTORIA, B.C.
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
AU kiads ef Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
Oe-BRS
TELEPHONE 5«4
North Government St., Victorin
Dr. W. F. Fraser
DENTIST
Haa Established Himself At
723 Yates Street,
Garesche Block
Where he is prepared to perform
dental operation according to tiie
latest scientific methods. Specialist
in Crown and Bridge work.
Phone a-Si. Hours: 9 aan., 4 pjn.
Prompt, Careful.
LSave Your
j Baggage Checks at
I  The Pacific
I    Transfer
Co.
No. _ FORT ST.
VICTORIA
\{ A. E. KENT, Preprietar
if
I —
^,M>,'*M',M>'-M>**»,-M^ I
*WmVmWmWmVmWmWnW«*W^'mWm'i!*i9S8|
Pfcaae 249.
MAPS
OF
Timber and Land.
The   kind   that   show   what's
taken  up  and   what's  vacant.
Electric Blue Print & Map Co.
1218 Langley Street
Victoria. B. C.
Houses Built
ON THE
Instalment
Plan
D. H. BALE
Contractor and Builder.
Phone 1140.
Cor. Fort and Stadacona Streets THE WEEK, SATURDAY JUNE 5,  1909,
t
VICTORIA COUNTRY CLUB
Summer Race Meeting]
June 5th to August 14th.
Six Races Daily, Rain or Shine
lst Race at 2.30 Sharp.
For Private Boxes and Season Tickets apply to
R. F. LEIGHTON,
Manager.
J. E. SMAET,
Secretary.
%

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