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Week Jul 23, 1910

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 ■ Afi * * * * o es oinnnr6"j b s &. s sin
,'*'     Just a Little Better        3
Terry's
Fountain
ALWAYS IN THE LEAD    ,
The Week
A British Columbia Review,
Published at Vietoria,  B. 6.
^mnr»5t«B5"ff»"»mirrrr»»TT|
HALL & WALKER "3
Agents
WELLINGTON   COUIEBY
COMPANY'S COAL
1232 Government St. Telephone 83
Vol. VII.   No.
■£ni_
THE WEEK, SATUKDAY, JULY 23, 1910
One Dollar Pee Annum
OT A MAN, NOT A GUN
The Victoria Times undertook to de-
ounce Mr. Barnard for certain state-
ients which he made at the annual nieet-
lg of the Board of Trade with reference
the attitude of Sir AVilfrid Laurier at
ie time of tlie Boer Avar. The Times also
tidertook to give Mr. Barnard the lie
cause he stated that the attitude of Sir
Wilfrid was absolutely summed up in the
icturesque, if not historic, phrase, "not
man, not a gun." It was hardly worth
hile answering the Times because the cir-
mistances have not been forgotten by
ictorians, even after the lapse of ten
ars, and the permanent impression left
i every mind was that Sir AVilfrid never
itended to send a contingent to South
frica; that he endeavoured to justify
s refusal, and that he only yielded to,
ie force of public opinion. It has reamed for a good Liberal, writing to the
ews-Advertiscr, in the endeavour to in-
ilpate Mr. Barnard, and exculpate Sir
If rid, to prove that the popular inipres-
on, as  recited above, is well founded,
i order to justify the delay of Sir Wil-;
id, this correspondent quotes from the
oronto Globe of October 3,  1899,  the
tails of an interview with the Premier,
ie quotation is too important to be cnr-
iled, and The AVeek makes no apology
r reproducing it, because the interview
it  only   shows  the  position   which  Sir
ilfrid actually took, but it reveals the
ner workings of his mind, and confirms
i opinion long entertained by thoso who
ive followed his public utterances, that,
o his great prototype,  Mr. Gladstone,
i is a master of casuistry and sophistry,
l spite of his close reasoning and consti-
tional argument the historic fact, is that
I his objections were swept away by the
erwhehning force of public opinion, and
•thing was allowed to prevent the send-
g of contingents, although it was done
ithout the sanction of Parliament and
ic voting of special funds.    Whether or
ot, the concise phrase which Mr. Bar-
ard, in common with many others, used,
indicate Sir Wilfrid's attitude is justi-
able the readers of The AVeek can judge
or   themselves,   and,   whilst  thanking  a
■oniinciit   Liberal   for   refreshing   their
icmory on the subject, they will not be
disposed to regard Sir Wilfrid's naval
olicy   with   the misgivings  begotten  of
lis historic and not easily forgotten indent.    The Premier said:
"As I understand the Militia Act, and
may say that T have given it some study
late, our volunteers are enrolled to be
sed in defence of the Dominion.    They
Canadian troops to be used to fight for
anada's   defence.      Perhaps   the   most
despread misapprehension is that they
annot be sent out of Canada.    To my
lind it is clear that occasion might arise
len they might be sent to a foreign land
fight. To postulate a ease: Suppose
pain   should   declare   war  upon   Great
tain.    Spain has, or had, a navy, and
at navy might bc got ready to assail- (Jala as part of the empire.    Sometimes
best method of defending one's self
to attack, and in that case Canadian
Mors might certainly be sent to Spain,
id  it, is quite certain  that they might
gaily be  so despatched  to the  Iberian
ninsula."   He then proceeded to say that
e case of the  South   African  republic
s not analogous.    "There is no menace
Canada, and although we may be will-
;' to contribute troops I do not see how
can do so. Then again, how could we
so without parliament granting us the
nicy. AAV simply could not do auy-
ng. In other words, we should have
summon parliament. The government
Canada is restricted in its powers,    ft
is responsible to parliament and can do
very little without the permission of parliament. There is no doubt as to the
attitude of the government on all questions
that mean menace to British interests, but
in this present case our limitations are
very clearly defined. And so it is that
we have not offered a Canadian contingent
to the home authorities."
THE NAAS INDIANS
The Colonist of the 21st. contained a
lengthy letter, signed "S. AAT. Pollard,
Chairman, Indian Land Committee,"
dealing with the attitude of the Naas Indians towards the land question. In the
head-lines he is stated to be "a member
of the Northern Band," which may be
true, but The AATeek begs leave to doubt
whether any Indian wrote the letter in
question. It bears traces of scholarship,
which make it far more probable that it
is a production of the same white missionary who recently flooded the Prince
Kupert papers with a statement of the
Indians' case, ancl who has constituted
himself a champion of their alleged rights.
But let that pass. The letter is a plausible plea that tlie Government should
withdraw all the Naas lands from settle-
were told that if they returned they would
be killed. The AVeek also knows that at
least one white settler and his family, who
had taken up a pre-emption on the Naas
Kiver in the Government Reserve, has
been driven out of the country by the
Indians, and has sought redress at the
hands of the Government. The cause of
tlie Indians will not be advanced by plausible letters composed by the missionary at
Aiyansh and signed by an Indian. Such
a letter will impose on no one, unless it
be on a tender-hearted editor who knows
so little of the Indians that he believes
they are prepared to become agriculturists.
WATER, ONCE MORE
The City of A7ictoria is still in the
throes of its agony on the water question.
It was a wise step to appoint a representative committee to investigate the matter.
But it is very discouraging to learn that
after several months work, neither the
Committee, the Engineers, nor the Council
are in possession of sufficient data to arrive at a decision. This only tends to
show the folly of the appeal which was
made to the ratepayers, a year and a half
ago, to settle the matter when there was
not a tithe of the information whicii is
" TALES OP MEAN STREETS."
Douglas Street, Victoria, A. D. 1910
ment, coupled with a statement that "One
thousand Indians are now making their
living off these lands, and are prepared to
cultivate these lands to meet the changing
conditions, and raise the produce that
would be required for the towns growing
up in Northern British Columbia." it
will take a good deal more than the assertion of Mr. Pollard to convince th,'
Government, or the general public, that
the Indians have any intention of cultivating land on a large scale. They live
entirely by fishing, hunting and hiring
themselves out for labout'. Although they
have occupied in the Niias Valley one of
the most fertile valleys in British Columbia, they have not done sufficient cultivation to supply a hundred, much less a
thousand, of their own people. The AA'eek
is in a position to know that when S. W.
Pollard states that "tliere is no trouble
threatened by the Indians of the Naas
Kiver Valley" and that ' they did not organise any campaign against the whites
last winter," he states what is not true.
The Week knows that white men were
threatened; that their footsteps were
dogged bv the Indians for weeks, and that
when  they  went  out of (lie Vallev  thev
now in the hands of the Committee. It
is also discouraging to find that, although
a special expert has been called in, iu tlie
person of M\ Burwell, the Mayor repudiates his report. Indeed, there is little
doubt but that if the Mayor could have
his way, he would keep on repudiating
until he obtained a report in consonance
with his own ideas. .Mr. Burwell has,
practically, endorsed Mr. Ashcroft's estimate of the cost of tunnelling, putting it
nf $3(1 per foot, and in this he is supported by recent experience at Coquitlam,
where the cost was $•'!__ per foot. In spile
of this, however, the Mayor says that Mr.
Burwell is wrong. It now evolves that no
survey has been made of the Sooke Bake
watershed, and no gauge of the rainfall,
and yet one would think that litis is the
elementary information that would be acquired. It leaves the matter of quantity
unascertained. With reference to quality,
the Committee has, for the first time, procured an analysis of the water, which
shows that iu the Lower Lake, nl any rate,
il is much inferior to Goldstream and
Elk Lake. The figures submitted to the
Committee dealing with cost show a minimum ,,f $2,000,000 as against a probable
maximum of $1,500,000 for Goldstream;
and this difference is accentuated by the
fact that even if the Sooke scheme were
carried out the City would have to compete with the Esquimalt Waterworks Company, and would only be in a position to
control the supply of the smaller part of
the district. At the close of a long sitting a sub-committee was appointed to interview the Esquimalt AVaterworks Company and to ascertain the best terms on
which the City could now acquire their
property. A\7ith all respect for the gentlemen who compose that committee, The
Week cannot but express regret for the
course adopted. It simply spells further
delay. The basis of expropriation was
settled by the local Legislature at its last
session. It was so settled at the request
of the City, and, in the opinion of The
AA'eek, upon an equitable basis, with a
compulsory arbitration clause. Docs the
Committee think that the Esquimalt
AVaterworks Company will expect less than
they are entitled to under the Act If
they ask more, the City will not entertain the proposition because it can fall
back upon its Clauses. It would have
been more business-like if the Committee
had reported upon the data before it, or
had expressed its inability to do so until
that data had been supplemented. If it
had then favoured the acquisition of the
Esquimalt AVaterworks Company, it could
go ahead in accordance with the statutory
provisions. By its present line of action
it is, perhaps unconsciously, endorsing the
policy of delay, which is daily increasing
the value of the Esquimalt Company's
property, and raising the price which the
City will, ultimately, have to pay for it.
COLONEL DENNISON
Al the close of the proceedings uf the
Canadian Club Luncheon on Tuesday the
President with a suspicion of a quizzical
lurking somewhere,  asked  the   Editor of
The Week if he was satisfied "now."  The
question was undoubtedly justified by the
circumstances, for, probably, the Editor
of The Week was the only editor present
who derived  unalloyed satisfaction  from
the proceedings.   Col. Dennison is at once
the most illustrious and most accomplished
of the guests of the A'ictoria Canadian
Club.    His reputation as an ardent and
eloquent Imperialist is world-wide, and his
services to the Empire are notable.   Like
most men who achieve anything of importance, he has made one subject his hobby,
and foi'more than forty years litis laboured
to cultivate Canadian sentiment in favour
of   true   Imperialism.   Descended   from
United  Empire Loyalist stock he is one
of the  Loyalists who has never contemplated service under another flag, and the
repudiation of his own;  and he has lived
to see the day when, in spite of the Little
Englnnders, Canada, as a  ivhole  is prepared lo endorse an Imperial policy.  Col.
Dennison's address was instructive to the
last  degree, and  if it  was altogether too
British for the local "dailies" as evidenced
by their lukewarm commendation, it must
not  he forgotten that the gallant  colonel
is himself a Canadian.   The Colonist gave
an  excellent  report of his address,  bill
neither the  Colonist nor the Times reported the most striking sentence which
he uttered.   After speaking of what would
happen if England lost her control of the
seas,  and  showing that,  inevitably,  Canada  would fall into the hands of Germany or the I'nited Stntes, he said "And
in such an event,  I for one would rather
fall into the hands of Germany, for we
should  tit  least be governed by it  people
of Imperial instincts." THE WEEK,  SATURDAY,  JULY 26,  1910
At The Street
Corner
By THE LOUNQER
It would not be a bad idea if our
local police in Victoria were stationed
a bit more frequently at the dock
where the Seattle boat discharges its
passengers and cargo. I don't want
anyone to run away with the idea
that the passengers want regulating;
they don't. But there is a lot of
traffic, especially on excursions, a lot
of passengers, and a lot of ordinary
traffic, and a policeman to regulate
the latter would be appreciated by
all.
*     *     *
The Provincial Government can
hardly bc congratulated with regard
to the way in which thc roadway
up to its principal entrance is being
laid. 1 understand that a company
styled "Hassam Road Company" secured the contract from the Government. Well, I hope that thc Government are sorry, and I know that the
Company ought to be. Here is a
Western Country on the verge of entertaining a politician, and a famous
politician, Sir Wilfrid Laurier. We
don't all agree with his politics. Personally, I agree with few of them;
but though I may not admire the
man as a politician, I may admire
him as a man. And I do. I don't
like his polities (that is merely a
matter of opinion), but I do think
that when Canada can boast of such
men as Sir Wilfrid Laurier and the
late Sir Henri Joly de Lotbiniere, she
is to be congratulated, and I do not
think that a cheap company like the
Hassam  should be allowed to make
British Columbia's Capital "cheap."
* *     *
It is not often that I am strenuous
enough to "lounge" up to Cadboro
Bay Road, but I did so last week;
much against my own inclinations.
The "boss" told mc that I ought to
go and see the new tennis, croquet
and bowling courts. The foregoing
is not as strictly a grammatical sentence as I would wish to see in my
column; but we won't say anything
about it. 1 was astounded to see the
number of ladies and gentlemen who
were using the various courts. There
are seven tennis courts, two croquet
lawns ancl two bowling greens.
Amongst the croquet enthusiasts I
noticed Mrs. Frank Barnard, Mrs.
Laing, Mrs. Little, Mrs. Bodwell, Mrs.
H. G. Barnard, Mrs. P. S. Lampman,
and Messrs. Geo. Kirk, B. Drake and
Dickson. Mrs. Langley was playing
tennis; so were the following ladies:
Mrs. Genge, Miss Nora Coombe, Miss
Rickaby. There were also a lot of
young fellows who arc well known in
our local banks. Will it bc too rude
to say that there were a few "old-
timers" amongst the tennis players?
I trust not, and if Messrs. Peter
Lampman and H. G. Barnard have
any ill feelings with regard to my so
designating them, I hope that they
will realise that I apologise beforehand. Bowls is a game which may
be less exacting, but is certainly no
less exciting than any other played
on the green turf. That appears to
be the opinion of Mr. Justice McDonald and also of Mr. Justice Galliher. It struck me that the various
courts up on the Cadboro Bay Road
are the fashionable rciidesc-vous for
the "man about town" who wants to
meet thc elite of Victoria Society.
* *     *
There was a note in The Week
lately with regard to the flower boxes
which have made the Imperial Bank
"a thing of beauty and a joy forever."
I should like to mention another
house whicii is doing its best to please
the public. It is owned by Mr. Lucas ancl is known as "Thc Commercial Hotel." "The Lounger" of
"The Week Staff" is glad to bc able
to congratulate Mr. Lucas on his
window appearance, and the same
"Lounger" is only sorry that there
are so many people living in a temperate climate, where practically all
(lowers can bc grown, who tire content to live without decorating their
homes ancl offices with those beauties
with which Nature has so abundantly   blessed   us.    Ancl   in   case   some
"carping critic" gets back at me by
saying that The Week has no flower-
box, I would respond by remarking
that we have no facilities for a box,
but that the editor makes it a point
to bring down a couple of roses
every morning, and that "The
Lounger" can always be seen with a
small piece of honey-suckle in his
button-hole.
Dust. The matter of dust has been
placed before Victorians so often
lately that it really is superfluous for
me to take the matter up. At the
same time I am compelled to say
something in view of the fact that
two men, both property owners in
the City, called my attention to the
fact that the City Sweeper, under or
ders, was sweeping a so-called ma
cadamized road, on View Street, between Broad and Douglas, last Friday night. The street looked like n
fog during a cyclone. Far be it from
me to throw blame where no blame
attaches; but the sweeper said that
he had been commissioned by the
City Council.   I will say no more.
There are some men in town who
seem to think that if they cover their
bodies with any kind of tight-fitting
apparel they are entitled to expose
themselves in public and can bathe
on a public beach. These curiously
minded men are wrong, and I hope
that the local police will see to it
that they are disabused of their ideas.
* * *
Last Sunday I "automobubbled." I
am ashamed of the incident, but in
view of the fact that I didn't pay for
the luxury, possibly I may be excused.
The other man paid. But I am glad
to hear that an Association has been
formed, under the title of "The Victoria Automobile Association," which
has for its programme good roads, a
fair speed limit and a properly sign-
boarded country. It is the idea of
the Association that Victoria should
fall in line with the rest of the Pacific Coast cities, and I, for one, fervently hope that she does so. The
Association is only in its infancy and
the following officers are elected pro
tem. This doesn't mean to say that
they won't continue. J. A. Turner,
popular all round town, is President;
Mr. A. Lee is Vice-President; Mr.
A. W. Bridgman, whom everybody,
including "The Lounger," knows, is
Treasurer; Mr. W. F. Glover is the
Secretary. If the Association succeeds
in improving the condition of "Victoria's Great Marine Drive," viz., that
stretch of road lying between the Dallas Hotel and the Oak Bay Hotel, it
will earn the thanks of all people who
live in Victoria, and of all people
who do not like to see a city habitually advertising a roadway which is
not in keeping with its advertisements, ancl which is bound to give
the tourist a bad idea both of the
truthfulness of thc advertising agency
and of the city which allows such
abominable roads to exist in her precincts.
q4.
O-Z^-fZyf,
Great Open-Air Whist Drive
Nearly 1,000 players took part in
tin open-air whist drive held at Ipswich on Wednesday in aid of a £25,-
000 fund for the erection of a sanatorium tis a memorial to King Edward.
The Whist drive took place amid
picturesque surroundings in an enclosure encircled by trees. Unfortunately, play was suddenly stopped
by a drenching rain which drove thc
players from thc tables.
A Human Choice
A conscientious Sunday-school teacher
had heen endeavouring to Impress upon
her pupils the ultimate triumph of
goodness over beauty. At the close of
a story in which she nattered herself
that this point had been well established, she turned confidently to a ten-
year-old pupil ancl inquired, "And now,
Alice, which would you rather be, beautiful or Rood?"
"Well," replied Alice, after a moment's
reflection, "I think I'd a great deal
rather  be  beautiful—and   repent."
^
THE PIANO THAT ALWAYS RETAINS THE CHARM OF YOUTH
KRANICH & BACH, "NEW ART" BELL, BROADWOOD, CHI CKERING, HAINES BROS.
MONTELIUS PIANO HOUSE, LIMITED
SOLE B. C. REPRESENTATIVES
1104 GOVERNMENT STREET
-COR. FORT STREET
SATURDAY,  JULY 33
Matinee and Evening Performance
"They've made the Whole World
Laugh."
THE OLDEST AND BEST!
Notable Tour of
RICHARD'S & PRINGLE'S
Famous Georgia
Minstrels
THEY ARE CATCHING!
..   ..  Seats on Sale Now
Matinee—25 and Soc
Evening—25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00
As Steam Is to
Machinery
So Is The
" Underwood "
to Business
Baxter & Johnson
COMPANY, LIMITED
721 Yates St. Phone 730
SWEDISH MASSAGE
MEDICAL GYMNASTICS
VIBRATORY TREATMENT
G. Bjornfelt, S.M.
Phone 1856
821 Fort St.
King Edward Mines
LIMITED
NON-PERSONAL LIABILITY
PORTLAND CANAL,  B.C.
We are offering the balance
of the first issue of shares
in this Company at ioc per
share. For Prospectus and
full particulars apply to	
KING EDWARD MINES, Limited
Room 8, Mahon Building      P. O. Box 772
Victoria, B.C.
The name on the Label should be SCHMIDT'S, if you
want the best in genuine imported Clarets and Burgundies. They have been on this market for the past
fifteen years and stand for the Popular Choice.
For sale by all liquor dealers.
"RADIGER & JANION
1318 Wharf Street 'British Columbia Agents
S. L. Wilson
J. Kennedy
VICTORIA GARAGE
S. L. WILSON, Manager
REPAIRING OF ALL  MAKES  OF CARS A SPECIALTY
AUTOMOBILES STORED, CLEANED AND FOR
HIRE DAY AND NIGHT
943 FORT STREET (Opp. Skating Rink)
Telephone 2326 VICTORIA, B.C.
Read the Week
Those Little Angels
Neighbor—"How did that naughty
little boy of yours get  hurt?"
Ditto—"That good little boy of yours
lilt  him  in  the head with  a  brick."
Connting the Cost
"So you want to marry my daught*
do you, young man?"
"Ye-s, s-s-l-r."
"Well, can ynu support a family?"
"It-how ninny are there of you, s-stt THE AVEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 26, 1910
MUSIC
AND  THE   STAGE
The Victoria Theatre
IThe Empress Stock Company were
culiarly happy in their presentation
"The Man on the Box," last Mon-
|y and Tuesday. I had read Harold
cGrath's   version   of   the   story   in
Iok form, and I must confess that
did not care very much about it.
is far better as put on the stage,
e  characters were  well  sustained.
Judge Watts, a fussy, foolish and
hless idiot, Mr. D. M. Dunbar was
j_ellent; V. T.  Henderson made a
3d hero;   Charles   Ayres   as   Ned
anwright was good.    Miss Isabelle
|:tcher with her   "James"   brought
vn the house.
The Empress Stock Company is a
id one. One word of friendly ad-
e and criticism I should like to
:r. When playing before a char-
eristically British audience, such as
met with in Victoria, it would bc
ter for such words as "Lieutenant"
ie pronounced to cultivated opinon.
The Fatal Wedding" is melo-
ma. Good-old-fashioned melo-
ma. There are no actual murders
petrated, but there are several at-
ipts at them. The hero and the
lin were played by Messrs. Chas.
•es and V. T. Henderson, respec-
ly. Mr. Frederick Wilson as a
go" was inimitable. Mr. Chaun-
Southern in the role of "Dickie
ison" made the same hit with the
ience which he has made in pre-
is characters. Miss Till) Arm-
ng as the Irish landlady was a
it success and it goes without say-
that Miss Isabelle Fletcher in the
cipal part was all that could be
pcteel; and a bit more. I don't
I to see children on the stage, but
little prejudice of my own does
I prevent me from saying that Dul-
Cooper played her rather import-
part well.
The New Grand Theatre
orsch  and   Russell,  the  "Musical
roadcrs," are worth seeing. Their
t is a good one.    There is also
e a good playlet running entitled
c Other Woman," and as played
Alice  Mortlock  and  Company  is
[and away above  the average  of
'audeville  dramas.
Pantages Theatre
:ic Lewis & Lake this week havc
In playing their amusing farces to
Jacity houses this week.   One can't
sibly criticise these plays, because
arc a roaring farce throughout,
it is impossible to analyse a joke.
is quite  enough  to say that  if a
|i is in "the dumps" Lewis & Lake
take him out.
and I much enjoyed those which I
saw. This house has made a point of
catering to the best class of the public
and, I believe, is finding itself well
rewarded.
The Majestic Theatre
The Yates Street House has been
running a fine line of pictures during
the earlier part of the week, and 1
have no doubt but that there is just
as good a show on there on the evening of the day on which we publish.
But it stands to reason that I cannot speak with authority on a series
which has not yet arrived. The Majestic has always had good films and
has always pleased its audience.
Other Remarks
During the course of the past week
two extraordinary letters appeared in
the Victoria Times with regard to
Moving Picture Shows. The Times
was perfectly right to print the letters, because a newspaper-reading
public is entitled to have its views
put into the public press. My remarks are not directed against the
paper but against the writers. I will
admit that, occasionally, the films
shown are not all that they might
be. I have seen films which might
be called vulgar; I have seen films
of melo-dramas which are not, in my
opinion fit for young children. But
there is nothing in this world which
is entirely free from abuses. Wc
have to take the rough with the
smooth, and for the most part the
Moving Pictures afford a cheap
amusement, a clean amusement, and,
very often, an educational amusement. If there is anything wrong
the remedy is in the hands of the
Police, who are not always as wideawake as they should be, even in Victoria.
MOMUS.
*     *     *     *     *
New Grand Theatre
Mr. Henry Lee, "The American
Actor," in whom the spirit of wanderlust is strong, has made a complete tour of the world with his company. He not only excifed the wonder and admiration of the whole
world, but was the sensation of the
four continents. Mr. Lee's offering
will include speaking likenesses of
great men, past and present, including thc noted American humorist, the
late Mark Twain. Mr. Twain's vocal peculiarities arc portrayed so mar-
velously, that distinguished critics
have said that by closing one's eyes,
one might believe Twain alive again.
Mr. Lee not only assumes the form
and feature, face and limb, of various
celebrities of the world, but actually
becomes the men themselves by
means of diction and style. Mr. Henry Lee will bc thc feature of the
Grand bill next week.
A thoroughly enjoyable number
will be furnished by Harry Leeds
and Trixie LeMar, a duo of Austra-
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B0XES
All Women Like
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— the most original, most
charming of trinkets. Delicately designed and ornamented, a
"Vanity Box," worn on a chain,
forms a delightful finish to the
costume. Being useful, it
serves a double purpose.
JUST COME FROM
PARIS
See   them   in   our   window.
Gun-metal, Silver and very fine
French  Enamel.    Prices—
$2.50 to $27.00
W. H. WILKERSON
The Jeweler
915 Government Street
Tel 1606
I
BY THE SEA
The
Foul BayTcaRoon)S and
Bath Houses
NOW OPEN
This is the prettiest sandy bay
in Victoria
TAKE  COOK   STREET  CAR
The Empress Theatre j ]jan comedyists.   They have a number
j.s I have said before it is almost j 0f laugh-provoking    frolics    new  to
American audience, especially their
ludicrous boxing exhibition whicii is
extremely amusing. Miss LeMar is a
piquant Miss and quite an adept in
the manly art.
Vaudeville lovers of music will lind
a rare delight in Musical Irving. Mr.
Irving has developed tin offering for
vaudeville different from anything
ever presented, for he has achieved
every art to entertain and charm. As
an instrumental virtues, Irving is su-
pcb. His novel instrument of a
single string, on which he renders
popular and classical selections including numbers from Bohm, Pierne,
Scholtz and others, is marvelous.
Irving will doubtless capture the plaudits of every Grand patron next
week.
The Military Acrobatic Comiqties,
Black & McCone, present an entire
circus themselves. Mr. Black is :i
wonderful acrobat and his feats are
thrilling and sensational. An irresistible laugh-maker is Hal McCone, the
famous Barnum & Bailey clown, lie
has not only made millions of children laugh till over the world, but
has won the plaudits of as many
grown-ups as well, for his ludicrous
antics are surprising and original.
George O'Malley, the Agile Col-
legian, is an eccentric dancing comedian, who jusl can't make his feet
behave.    His  difficult   gyrations  and
lossible to say a word about  the
ic Moving Picture houses in town,
nise by the time my copy is on
street a new set of pictures arc
iig shown, f dropped into the
press last Wednesday and saw
te very excellent pictures. 1 should
to make two remarks with re-
to thc Empress.    The manager,
Icist courteous man, plays th* piano
11 press of business docs not call
to the door, at which times an
I trie piano docs the work. It is
iod electric piano, but there is 11c
hanical machine whicii really
es up to the playing of a man
has the mental ability to choose
Imusic to fit thc pictures, and thc
liability to play good stuff in a
which will please a music-lover.
111 a little bit critical on music,
ii it comes down to points, and
insider the manager of thc Em-
is a good pianist and one who
,'s how to adjust his selections to
pictures. The other remark which
|shed to make with regard to the
house is that the same manager
bowl of flowers with which to
his patrons. This is a little
cr, but it is one which pleases
people, and  1, for one, like to
Romano's Theatre
Romano's   Theatre   has   been
lng a good selection of pictures,
eccentric dances always set an audience wild with enthusiasm. O'Malley is a breezy, refreshing youth and
a natural born artist. He is one of
the rare delights of the season and
should be seen by everybody.
The song and moving pictures will
be billed as usual.
Good Show Coming
The Palace of Revelry, the beautiful First Part, which starts the fun-
making with Richards & Pringle's
Minstrels this season, is said to be
the most novel ancl expensive ever
carried by any minstiel company, Thc
scenery, costumes, setting and lighting effects are all conceived and designed by masters in their respective
fields. The company is the largest
and best ever carried under this well-
known title. The chief fun-makers
are Clarence Powell, Billy King,
Charley Wilson, Willie Nash, Elmer
Clay, Kid Langford, David Smith and
Oscar Cameron.
The vaudeville portion of the program embraces Fred Simpson, the
Trombone Virtuoso; Moor, the Hindoo Mystifier; the Alabama Quar-
tete; Clarence Powell, The Man Who
Talks About His Family; the big
spectacular song ancl dance, "Georgia
Flirtation," requiring the services of
a double sextette of singers and dancers, and thc One-Act Musical Comedy, "Blackvillc Guards." Fred Simpson's Challenge Band of 35 musicians and William Rohison's Operatic
Orchestra of 12 accompany the organization. There will lie a big free
street parade at noon. The date of
this company's appearance at the Victoria Theatre Saturday, July 23rd.
The matinees given by Richards &
Pringle's Famous Georgia Minstrels
have proven very popular, giving, as
they do, thc ladies ancl children opportunities to see thc really excellent
performance of these dusky sons of
Ham. There is always ,'i large number of the male clement, too, who find
it inconvenient to attend the evening
performance and who gladly visit the
matinees. The management announce
a special bargain matinee in this city
on Saturday afternoon when the same
performance will be given as at the
night show, but the prices will be
greatly reduced. The programme will
he strictly refined and ladies and children will find it greatly to their liking.
IWUJK
THEATRE
Yates Street, Just Below Government
WHERE EVERYBODY GOES
If you are dull and get the blues,
And do not know the place to choose
Come to the Majestic on Yates Street
Bring the friends you are apt to meet
And if on pleasure you are bent,
You won't regret the Dime you spent.
WE CATER TO LADIES AND  CHILDREN
CHANGE OF PROGRAMME
Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday
IV _
THE
New Grand
Week of July 25
Most Distinguished Announcement of the Season—the
American Actor
MR. HENRY LEE
Australia's Premier Comedy
Artists
Harry Trixie
LEEDS and LA MAR
In   Original   Laugh   Provoking
Frivolities
The Jingling Humorist
MUSICAL IRVING
The   Military  Acrobatic
Comiqties
BLACK and McCONE
In Thrillful and Laughable
Feats
GEORGE O'MALLEY
The Dancing Collegian
THOS J. PRICE
NEW MOVING PICTURES
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
PANTAGES
THEATRE
Week of July 25
See the
BIO SHOW
at the Johnson Street
House
Pun, Fast and Furious
Interesting
Instructive
RCMANO
THEATRE
CHANGE OF PROGRAMME THREE TIMES A WEEK
COOLEST AND MOST POPULAR THEATRE IN THE CITY
ADMISSION-TEN CENTS
Open afternoons 2 to 5.30, evenings 7 to 11
J
EMPRESS
THEATRE
GOVERNMENT ST., NORTH OF JOHNSON
GEO. A. LEVELLE, Mgr.
ONLY FIRST CLASS
Motion Pictures and Illustrated Songs
Matinee every day from 2 to 5 p.m.    Evenings from 7 to 11 p.m.
Admission
10 Cents THE WEEK,  SATURDAY,  JULY  23, 1910
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
•THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
120S  Government Street, Victoria, B. C.
W. BLAKEMORE, Editor
Bad Language
BY BOHEMIAM
1 wish that a lot of people whom
I know could have been with me la:t
Sunday night. I attended thc service
at Christ Church Cathedral, and was
well rewarded for my pains. The
Rev. Mr. Chambers of Winnipeg was
the preacher. Mr. Chambers is an
orator; he had a subject which was
evidently a matter' of heart interest
to him, and it was a subject which
interested me deeply. He spoke fervently about that habitual use of bad
language, filth and blasphemy, which,
to our shame be it said, is such a
feature of this Western Country of
ours.
It is no use trying to deny the indictment. The streets of Victoria and
Vancouver re-echo with language
which would not be tolerated in
Whitechapel. Respectable men, that
is to say, men who hold responsible
positions in the Western world of
commerce, are constant offenders. If
I were called upon to do so I could
name a dozen, and I believe that
I could make it a hundred, men of
recognized high standing in the two
cities referred to, who are habitual
users of language which would have
made Jack the Ripper go and commit suicide.
But the worst is not told. It is
from the mouths of babes and sucklings that we hear the words that
■ shock us most. An oath from their
lips is infinitely worse than the same
expression from a grown man. But
it is from the men that they learn
to swear. T lately read an excellent
little story which points a big moral.
The master of the house came home
and found bis wife dissolved in tears.
On inquiring the reason he wastoM
that "Little Willie had been overheard swearing on the streets." "I'll
teach the young beggar to swear,"
said the irate parent, but on his way
to little Willie's bedroom hc tripped
and barked his shins. After about
five minutes the mother put her head
out from the dining-room and said:
"I think that is enough for one lesson, dear."
And that is the crying evil; men will
carry this swearing habit back to
their homes. I don't speak as a
prude. A Bohemian is not usually
credited with very much in thc moral
line; in fact I don't condemn bad
language as a sin, but as a breach of
good taste. During my time at the
'Varsity a man who was known as
an habitual user of bad language had
a bad name. He was "bad form,"
than which there is no worse designation amongst cultivated Englishmen. There is no real satisfaction in
using swear-words. It is excusable,
perhaps, to say "damn" when your
pet corn is trodden upon; thc same
expression may be used when a car
is missed by a hair's-breadth, without
condemning the user thereof to the
eternal pains and torment. But thc
man who cannot conduct a conversation without the help of oaths, blasphemy and filth will not find me on
his calling list, and he will not find
very many  decent men on  it  either.
And, sad to say, men are not the
only offenders. I know women in
Western Canada of whom the same
indictment holds good. I am not
talking of the women who are the
occasion of frequent paragraphs in the
papers with regard to "The Social
Evil." I am referring to women who
consider themselves respectable, but
who do not think it a social crime to
swear in front of their children. It
is not the "sin" of the thing which
annoys mc, it is the abnormal conception of what constitutes "good taste"
and correct "form."
There is another feature about this
Headquarters for choice nursery stock
Apple, pear, cherry, plum and peach trees
and small fruits, also ornamental trees,
shrubs, roses, evergreens, etc. Largest and
best assorted  stock in  British  Columbia.
Ten per cent, cash discount on all orders
above $io.oo.
PRICE LIST AND CATALOGUE ON
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FURNITURE PACKING BY EXPERTS
For shipment to any part of the world.
Good Clean Materials.       Satisfaction Guaranteed.      Estimates Given.
Special Care taken witli Glass and China.
A Special feature of our business   is   re-upholstering  and   restoring
Furniture of all descriptions
STYLES & SHARP
PHONE 3149
805 FORT STREET
same evil. Western Canada and the'
Western States abound in men who
persistently use the name of their i
Redeemer to emphasize their remarks. |
The majority of these men will tell |
you that they do not believe in Jesus j
Christ, but that they use His name to I
add point to their words. A curious '
logic, and one which "Bohemian" does
not understand.
Evergreen  Trees  for  an  Evergreen'
City
In  conformity with  thc resolution >
of   the   Executive   Committee   your
committee appointed to prepare a paper on thc subject of the caption of
this  article,  beg  to  submit  the  fol-1
lowing:—
Whilst  your  committee  is  not  in '■
favour   of   planting   evergreen   trees j
and  shrubs   entirely,  it  nevertheless \
fully recognises their value, especial-
ly for a climate such as Victoria pos- j
sesses.    The streets of our city can |
be  made   a  great   advertisement  by '
judicious    planting.      If    trees    ancl
shrubs  that  can  only  be  grown  in
doors in the  East are  planted, they !
will prove an object lesson to every I
visitor and one  that  cannot be dis-,
pitted.   The extreme mildness of our
climate will at once be realised; there
will bc a living though silent witness
that  cannot  be  impeached.    Let  us
turn for a moment to the actual state
in and about the city.    The question
is    often    asked    why    our    Parks,
grounds, and boulevards are planted
to introduce trees and shrubs, many
of them of a deciduous character and
inferior to our native plants.   For instance the  Lombardy Poplar, a tree
far inferior to our native poplars and
again  the  Boston   ivy,  a   deciduous)
plant,   which,   whilst   ornamental   in)
summer,   serves  only  to  disfigure  a
building during the winter.    It is tot
bc supposed for one moment that the
people   in   the   eastern   cities   would
grow  that  so  called  Ivy  if  it  were
possible to successfully grow the real
thing?    And   here,   where   nature   is
so prodigal with her gifts, we turn
away to strange loves.   Why grow so
many   Horse   Chestnuts?    Surely   if
trees of a deciduous nature are wanted,  why   not   plant  the   large-leaved
Maple,   the  smooth  leaved  and   the
vine   Maple.    Wc  will  undertake  to
say that there is not a single speci-
Flannel
Silverware
Rolls
The best means of keeping
knives, forks and spoons. Being made of soft material, with
a separate pocket for each fork,
spoon or knife, they not only
present the articles . from
scratching one another, but
keep  them clean and  polished.
The Rolls are fitted to hold
half dozen or one-dozen pieces.
We know they are good—we
use them for our own stock.
Prices 50c to $1.00
Per Roll
Redfern & Sons
Diamond Merchants and
Jewellers
ioog Government Street
VICTORIA, B.C.
men   of   the   last   named   variety   in
Beacon Hill Park, possibly not in
Victoria; a most beautiful tree whose
leaves turn a brilliant red in autumn,
and still wc see numbers of that poor
apology for a tree, the Box Elder,
everywhere. Again the Silver Leafed
Poplar, an abomination for throwing
up suckers and disfiguring lawns and
boulevards, is planted everywhere,
but why go on with the list? It seems
endless but rather let us make an
attempt to direct attention to the
many evergreen trees and shrubs, both
introduced and native, suitable for
Streets and Boulevards.
Arbutus Menziesii. This is thc native tree that is most conspicuous
in appearance. It is best known as
the Madrona in California and Mexico. The fact of seeing it on our
streets will at once appeal to those
who have travelled; they will realize
the mildness of our climate ipso facto.
Laurus Nobilis Sweet Bay. This is
a tree in the old Douglas Garden 55
years old. Another old tree is in Mr.
Gore's garden on Burdette avenue,
also in the subdivided grounds of the
Trounce Estate in James Bay. In
the eastern towns of Canada and the
United States the Bay is cultivated
in tubs for porch and garden decoration, its hardiness here speaks
volumes. Amongst other plants for
Streets and Boulevards we would
mention:—Portugal Laurel, introduced; Common Laurel, introduced;
Tamarisk (for seaside streets), introduced; Bamboo (several hardy kinds),
introduced; Juniper (two varieties),
native; Juniper (Irish), introduced;
Deodar, Cedrus deodara (for wide
streets, introduced; Pinus contorts
(Scrub Pine), native; Barberry, Ber-
beris Darwinii, introduced; Barberry (three varieties, commonly known
as Oregon Grape), native; Hollies
(in great variety), introduced; Yew,
both introduced and native; Manzan-
ita, native; Ceanothus (smooth Mountain Balm), native; Evergreen Blue
Berry, native; Wild Box (pachysti-
ma), native; White Bark Pine. Flexible Pine, (for wide streets, native;
Rhododendrons, Laurestinus, introduced and native.
For Rock Work—Kinnikinick, native; Periwinkle, introduced. This
last is cultivated in pots in the East.
For Margins of Ponds—Labrador
Tea, native; American Laurel, native.
And your committee would recommend that when deciduous trees are
planted they should be alternated
with evergreen shrubs ancl vice versa.
For Parks and Large Grounds—All
the coniferous introduced trees, pines,
firs, cedars, cypresses and junipers.
And amongst our native trees, Douglas Fir, none more beautiful; Balsam is a most noble    tree;    Cedar;
_
DANGER!
DO YOU KNOW that there are more fatal diseases contracted
from the dust you sweep off your floors and carpets, than
from any other source?
AND YET at the cost of a few cents a week, by using our sweeping compound, Dustless Waxine, you need run no such risk.
WAXINE collects all dirt and dust as you sweep it across your
rooms and saves you the necessity of dusting.
WAXINE contains a disinfectant that is sure destruction to germs
and microbes.
WAXINE also contains an expensive essence that will drive away
fleas and other pests.
WAXINE will keep an oiled floor, or oilcloth, always bright and
glossy, and carpets sweet and clean.
WAXINE leaves a refreshing odor in your rooms.
WAXINE is cheaper than anything else of its kind on the market.
WAXINE is used by many of the principal stores, offices, banks,
theatres and private houses of Victoria and Vancouver.
WAXINE is manufactured in Victoria by Victoria people, who
spend their money in Victoria.
Prices:
25-lb box, $1.00; 50-lb box, $2.00; 100-lb box, $3.75; 250-lb box, $7.50
AMBERINE FLOOR OIL—Our Floor Oil will stand the test as
against any other make, in fact it is the best floor oil made.
Use it.   Per gallon  $1.00
ACME METAL POLISH—Our Metal Polish, which is unequalled,
should be used by everybody.
IMPERIAL WAXINE CO.
PHONE 1968
1602 DOUGLAS STREET
Amateurs' printing and developing   done   at   shortest ]
notice.
A. H. MAYNARD, 715 Pandora St.
Victoria Musical Society
Patron—His Excellency Earl Grey, Governor-General
Hon. President—The Hon. T. W. Patterson, Lieut.-Governor
Season 1910-11
Artists
LIZA LEHMANN JOSEF HOFMANN
With Vocal Quartette, will rer.- Pianist
der    her    own     compositions, March
'Daisy Chain,' 'Persian Garden'
November MISCHA ELMAN
ELLEN TERRY Violinist
England's Greatest Actress
December April
The Committee have much pleasure in announcing the engagement of the above Artists. Tickets for any one Entertainment
may be subscribed for in advance at $4.00 each.
500 Season Tickets, entitling Holders to one
seat for each of the four Entertainments, will
be issued at $8.00 for the Course.
Applications for same should be addressed to Mr. C. Denham,
Hon. Secretary, Box Office, Victoria Theatre.
The Box Office will be open to Subscribers one clay in advance
of the general public.
Prices of Boxes for the Season
No. 1—Ground Floor, 8 seats $100.00
No. 2—Ground Floor, 4 seats  50.00
No. 3—Ground Floor, 3 seats   37-5°
No. 4—Balcony, 6 seats    50.00
No. 5—Balcony, 6 seats   50.00
No. 6—Gallery, 6 seats    30.00
No. 7—Gallery, 6 seats   30.00
Note—The Balcony and Gallery Boxes will be sold to bona-fide
Musical Students at Half-Price. Applications for same must come
through Teachers.
GEO. PHILLIPS, Director.
Juniper; Yellow Cedar; White Pine,
a most striking tree; Scrub Pine;
Yellow Pine, Flexible Pine, White
Bark Pine, none to be seen in Victoria; Hemlock, a most graceful tree;
Spruce, two varieties; Yew; Arbutus.
Surely with this list of native ancl
introduced evergreen trees and shrubs
there is no need to plant so many indifferent varieties of introduced deciduous plants, whicii only serve to
disfigure the city in the Autumn ancl
Winter by littering the paths with
fallen leaves. Let us use our hest
endeavours to induce the park auth
orities to spend more thought al
money on our native evergreen platl
and to educate the public taste in tl
same direction, not only for the rJ
son that such plants are beautifi
but as a step towards the preser-l
tion of many wild plants now in d;|
ger of extinction, ancl as an obj|
lesson to visitors to our beauti|
Evergreen   City.
J. R. ANDERSON.
C. C. PEMBERTOX,
E. A. WALLACE,
Committeii
Victoria. B.C.. July 8th, 1910. THE WEEK, SATUKDAY, JULY 23, 1910
WtF>
THE MOTHERLAND
Less Tobacco Smoked
From May I, 1908, to April 30, 1909,
[the tobacco cleared for home con-
[ sumption amounted to 102,413,6291b.,
[while from May 1, 1909, to April 30,
11910, the amount was 93,289,007 lb.,
lthe decrease being 9,124,6191b.
Relic of Caxton Days
No less than £1,520 was paid at
[Sotheby's on Tuesday for a fifteenth-
| century specimen of block book print-
ling, consisting of a few leaves and
■ containing a grotesque alphabet. The
linitial  letter bore the date  1464.
The first scene in the "revue" called
"Hullo People" is laid in the Zoo,
where Col. Roosevelt enters in a
weird suit and a sombrero made of
the American flag and proceeds to
tell everybody how to run their own
business.
The "Silent Ones"
The Southern Nigerian Government
Ireports the successful conclusion of
■operations against the members of
■the secret society known as the "Si-
llent Ones," whose chief with 200 followers  surrendered.
Public School Spirit of Softness
In distributing prizes at Rossall
I.School on Tuesday the Archbishop of
lYork strongly condemned the effemi-
Iiiacy and self-indulgence which, he
■declared, prevail at public schools and
■universities. "Coddling" mothers, he
Isaid, should be kept at bay.
Memorial   to   King   Edward
It is proposed to limit the cost of
lthe King Edward VII memorial at
■Delhi (India) to four lakhs of rupees
((about £40,000). Lord Minto will
lict as president of the committee,
l.vhich will collect subscriptions from
til parts of India.
Miss Margaret Cooper
Miss Margaret Cooper, whose
linging has for a considerable time
Been one of the most charming features of thc entertainments at the
fralacc Theatre, London, has just
peen married to Mr. Arthur Humble-
crofts, son of the rector of Waldron,
Sussex.
Police Dogs for Glasgow
The Town Council of Glasgow has
Ircqucsted Major Richardson to sup-
Iply some of his police dogs for night
Iduty in that city. They arc used to
lact as scouts, to pursue escaping
■criminals, and, if necessary, to pro-
Itect the policeman in case of attack.
Lady de Bathe (Mrs. Langtry).
Iwho has bought the Weslcyan Cba-
Ipel at Kentford, where her pretty
Ihome is, and fitted it up as a games
Iclub and reading-room for her stable
[employes and the villagers, opened
lthe club on Monday with an enter-
Itainment in which she took a leading
Ipart.
Not Going to Rupert
Rev. J. S. Sutherland, of Halifax,
jannounced to his congregation today
■that he had declined the call to him
|from the Presbyterian church in
Prince Rupert, B.C., and that he had
[telegraphed this fact to Prince Ru-
|pert.
Whiskey  Drinking Halved
Alcoholic consumption per head of
■(population for thc year ending March
I31  last was, the Treasury states:
England Scotland Ireland
(Spirits,  gallon.    0.41       0.93       0.54
■ Beer,   barrel..    0.79      0.27       0.63
As compared with Dr. Dawson
Inurnns' estimate for 1906, England
[drank one-half less whiskey and
■Scotland and Ireland nearly one-half
less.
Fun With Teddy in a London
Music Hall
It has been the established custom
if the London musical comedies and
|nusic halls to poke fun at thc English politicians, but such a frank and
Brutal roasting as Col. Roosevelt gets
In the new "revue" at the Empire
■Theatre is possibly unprecedented on
llic English stage. His every characteristic— his speechifying, hunting.
Iceth, strenuously, arc all grossly
laricatured in a manner that calls
lorth the unrestrained laughter of the
Irnwds flocking to thc Empire night-
Lucky Find of £80 Pendant
A farmer's wife, Mrs. Elizabeth
Belcher, of Marston St. Lawrence,
Northants, was informed by the Bow
street magistrate on Tuesday that she
might keep a diamond pendant, worth
£80, she had found in  the street.
Mrs. Belcher had summoned the
Commissioner of Police to show cause
why he should not deliver up the
pendant to her.
Thc claimant said she found the
pendant in Mayfair over a year ago
and took it to a jeweller to be valued.
He handed it over to the police. Advertisements had been inserted in
newspapers, but no owner had been
found.
The magistrate said the woman had
had a lucky find, and made an order
for the pendant to bc given up to her
But he pointed out that if the owner
came forward he would have a claim
against her.
Speak Kindly
Elbert   Hubbard   of  the   Philistine
says:
Should the Angel Gabriel come to
me and in a confidential undertone
declare that a certain man, or any
man or any angel was a vilifier of the
truth, a snare to the innocent, a pi
ferer, a sneak, a robber of grave
yards, I would say, "Gabriel, you
arc troubled with incipient paranoia
—I do not believe a word of what
you say. Thc man you mention may
not be a saint but he is probably
just as good as you or I. In fact
I think he must be very much like
you, for wc are never interested in
either a person or a thing that does
not bear some direct relationship to
ourselves. Then Gabriel, do you not
remember the words of Bishop Be
gum, who said that no man applies
an epithet to another that cannot
with equal truth be applied to him
self. When we remember that
hoarse gutteral cry of "Away with
him,—away with him!" and when w
recall that some of the best and
noblest men who have ever lived have
been reviled and traduced by so-
called good men—certainly men who
were sincere—how can we open out-
hearts to the tales of discredit of
any man?
Fear of Educated Wife
The Duchess of Marlborough gave
the students of the Bedford College
for Women an interesting picture of
the American girl graduate on Wednesday, when she presided over a
meeting at Sunderland House in support of the scheme for removing the
college from Baker-street to Regent's
Park. One hundred thousand pounds
is wanted for thc new college, and
nearly half tllis sum has been obtained.
Thc duchess spoke of the splendid
type of college-bred woman which
America produced. Men had not
found that college-bred girls made
less devoted wives and mothers.
If women were tactful enough nut
always to worst their husbands in
argument—(laughter)—and to keep
any superabundance of knowledge up
their sleeves, there seemed to be little
opposition on ti husband's part to his
wife being well educated.
It was difficult to comprehend why
there should be such rooted objection
on the part of Englishmen to the
higher education of their wives. There
must bc some secret fear that, hard
as they found it to understand a woman now. it would be absolutely beyond their ken wcre she highly educated.
It was certainly not a fact to be
proud of that England for want of
funds could not provide the training
ground required in order to prepare
its young women lo enter useful and
successful careers.
YOU LOVED KB
You loved me.
The  knowledge  went  through   me   like
wine;
The passion that filled me was wholly
divine,
When you whispered those words, with
my head on your breast;
Not even my faith could have brought
me such  rest.
All sorrow  fell from me and vanished
in bliss,
When you crushed on my lips that first
exquisite kiss.
You  loved  me.
Not only your voice told me so;
'Twas  your  soul  that  spoke to  me  in
passion's  first glow.
You  crushed  me up to you,  unheeding
your power;
Your kisses fell on  me like rain on a
flower.
No human achievement, no worship of
men,
Can bring me such happiness ever again.
You loved me.
What odds if your fancy roams free?
I know  that your life love ls no one
but me.
It was I who first quickened your soul
in your breast.
Tho'  others  may  follow,  you  gave  me
your best.
No woman on earth, be she holy or bad,
Can   ever  take  from   me  what  once  I
have had.
Tho'  you   wound  with   your folly,  you
never   can   kill
The   love   you   created—it   lives   In   us
still.
And  when  you  return and  your  follies
confessed,
I'll  forget in  your arms that you ever
trangressed.
—Helen Roslyn.
FOB OURSELVES
Last night I heard a lady at the corner
of the street,
Who  was  talking  to  an  audience  of
men;
Her  voice   was   slightly   cracked,   but,
oh!   her   sentiments   were   sweet,
And   her   audience   applauded   loudly
when
She declared that all the Radicals were
lying,   craven  fools,
Who ought not to be In  offlce for a
day,
And   she   advocated   teaching   women's
suffrage in our schools
To   the   little   boys   when   going   out
to play.
Then she turned upon the Unionists, and
said they were as bad,
They'd    no    notion    of    a    woman's
mighty brain.
And  having used up all the cogent arguments she had,
She   proceeded   to   enforce   them   all
again.
They   were   not   exactly   novel,   though
the emphasis was strong,
But I listened patiently to all she said,
Till   It   suddenly   occurred   to   me   I'd
stayed  a   bit  too  long,
So I  tore  myself away and  went  to
bed.
But as I lay there pondering the theme,
it  seemed  to  me
That  the case as put before  us  wns
too weak.
Tliere are heaps of other matters, where
we  women  ought   to  be
In   sole   charge,   If   we   had   got   the
chance to speak.
We could supplement the Army, and fill
up the Navy too;
We could certainly administer finance,
We  could   manage  all   our  little  Bills,
and put them safely through,
We could  teach  our  foreign  enemies
to dance.
A Parliament of women  would  extract
the people's cash,
If the  members  weren't  too  ugly  or
too old.
Though  It's  true  that  we  might  spend
It in a manner rattier rash
tin official robes of velvet and of gold.
Hut nt least we know that In our gowns
we should look  really nice,
Not  like   things  In  scarlet  robes  and
horsehair wigs;
While   as   preachers   wc   could   fill   the
empty churches In a trice,
And our congregations wouldn't snore
—like  pigs.
Oh! It will lie Merrle England when we
women hnve our way,
And  can   run  the  British  Empire  on
mir own.
You   will   find   some  sweeping  changes
made when once we hold the sway,
From the cottage to the mansion and
the   Throne.
But—extend    your    programme,   ladies!
llo not merely voting seek!
That's   a  detail;   you   will   realise   it
when
We hnve gained our own omnipotence,
but (In a whisper speak),
Will   it   answer   if   wc   quite  abolish
men?
—Madge St.  Maury.
A lad Who wns being quizzed about,
his father's lack of accomplishments
wns nsked: "What docs your father
know?"
There wns no hesitation In the answer: "I don't believe hc knows anything except liis own business; lint lie
knows   that—and  minds   it!"
Nice for Supper or Tea at
the Camp
Jockey Club Sardines, per tin  50c
White Bear Smoked Sardines, 2 tins  515c
King Oscar Smoked Sardines, 2 tins 25c
Skipper Sardines, -^-lb. tin, smoked 35c
C. & B. Sardines, in oil, per tin 35c
Albert Sardines (boneless) in oil, 40c and 25c
in tomato  *SC
D. & G. Sardines in oil or tomato, per glass 60c
Madame Angot Sardines in oil, 2 tins 25c
Andre Sardines in oil, per tin  *»5C
Louis Trefavenne Sardines, per tin 25c
Canadian Sardines in good oil, 4 tins 25c
Filets of Anchovies, per tin  «SC
Filets of Soles, per tin   50c
Mackerel in oil, per tin  40C
Royans a la Vatel, per tin  35c
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
Independent Grocers and Wine Merchants
Tela.: 50, 51, sa and 1590 1317 Government Street
SS3NNinO 0tt3H S.DOO       SS3NNinO QV3H SOOQ
ALWAYS
IN
CONDITION
1,1
DOCS H EAD
GUINNESS
theSTOUTyqu re used to
s NOTEthe above docs head 1
LABEL IS ON EVERY BOTTLE, f
DOGS   HEAP  GUINNESS DOGS  HEAD GUINNESS
PITHER  &  LEISER
Wholesale Agents for B. C.
VICTORIA      VANCOUVER NELSON
Open 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Cotton
Crepe
Waist Patterns
Hand Embroidered, regular price,
JULY SALE PRICE  $1.00
Visit Us for Special Week-End Bargains
Oriental Importing Co.
510 CORMORANT STREET   -
OPP. E. & N. DEPOT THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 23, 1910
*J
''
Dominion and Provincial News
Fire Away
No less than $15,000 will be spent
at once in advertising lands in Fire
Valley. A Vancouver syndicate recently acquired 6,000 acres in the district, which has been subdivided into
10-acre fruit tracts.
Lead for Japan
A car of lead was shipped from the
Trail smelter during the week, consigned over the Great Northern for
Kiobe, Japan. Lead is beginning to
move now and this carload will be
followed by others.
Fire Protection
The need for more protection
against the outbreak of bush fires is
always felt at this season of the year
and as these are frequently caused
by sparks emitted from passing locomotives, the railway companies might
establish a service using chemical extinguishers in like manner as the weed
burners are utilized.
,    Ferry Across the Fraser
The secretary of the Mission District Board of Trade has received
word from government to the effect
that the first assistant engineer of
the public works department at Victoria will shortly make an examination of the Fraser River and report re the establishment of a ferry
across the Fraser.
Something Like an  Endowment
A man writes to a Chicago paper,
stating that he is greatly interested
in aviation, and that to encourage the
science he proposes to offer a prize
of 500,000 to the first man who flics
around the earth. He adds by way
of postscript that he has not the
money now, but that he will have it
when claimed.
Fire Near Arrow. Lakes
A serious bush fire broke out on
Thursday near thc Arrow Lakes
Lumber Co.'s camps at Galena Bay.
Practically the whole of the season's
cut of logs, the camp buildings,
stores, several log cars and standing
timber, and other things were completely destroyed. The cause of the
fire was a spark from the logging
locomotive and owing to the extreme
heat and dryness of the timber the
least spark would cause a conflagration.
Alpinists
Two parties of alpinists are at present in the Selkirks, north of the
C.P.R. track, endeavouring to make
an assent of Mt. Sandford, the
highest of thc many mountains of the
Selkirk range. One' party organised
by Prof. Holway, of Minneapolis, ancl
consisting of himself and Howard
Palmer and F. Butters, of Boston, left
Beavermouth, under the guidance of
M. Dainard, of Golden, taking canoes
down the Columbia to Gold Creek,
and striking into thc interior from
that point.
Hurrah For Us
Arthur Stringer of New York, the
well-known writer of Western stories,
recently published a remarkable article
about thc American in Canada. We
quote the following:
A state department report of last
December disclosed that the total American investments in Canada had already reached the colossal sum of
$226,800,000. This sum was approximately divided as follows:
168    companies,    average
capital $600,000 $100,800,000
Investments in British
Columbia mills and timber      50,000,000
Land deals in Alberta, etc.   10,000,000
Investments in lumber and
mines in Alberta       5,000,000
Packing plants         5,000,000
Implement distributing
houses        4,000,000
Land deals in British Columbia        2.000,000
Total    $226,800,000
The Irrigation Convention
At the irrigation convention that
will be held at Kamloops at the beginning of August there will be gathered together many men to whom
thc subject of irrigation has a keen
interest. Hon. Clifford Sifton, chairman of the Canadian conservation
commission, has been invited to attend. R, H. Campbell, superintendent
of forestry, Ottawa, will be present.
Premier McBride and Hon. Thos.
Taylor will be in attendance, as will
also Martin Burrell, M. P., R. B. Bennett, K.C, and Wm. Pearce of the
C. P. R. service, Calgary. Prof. Et-
cheverry, of the department of agriculture, university of California, will
read a paper on a practical subject
and will deliver a lecture in the evening, illustrated by lantern slides.
Charles Wilson, K.C, has been asked
to read a paper on the new water
legislation and there is promise that
in point of interest the convention this
year will be most successful. There
is a marked interest manifested in the
event and most of the large irrigation companies will send delegates to
the gathering and the various other
bodies entitled to representation will
send delegates.
Although the first convention of the
association was held at Calgary only
three years ago, thc work of the conventions has shown results and much
has been done to advance the principle of irrigation and a closely allied
subject, the conservation of water.
With respect to the latter, it may be
pointed out that at the convention at
Lethbridge last year a resolution was
adopted covering the east slope of
the Rocky Mountains in order to prevent thc deforestation of that, area
and the consequent rapid melting of
snow at the headwaters of the mountain streams, causing destructive
floods and water waste. The government has done as requested in this
instance and the result will be the permanent conservation of the natural
water supply in that area.
At previous conventions certain
legislation has been asked for, and
other steps taken to secure the advancement of irrigation and a fair
apportionment of water to users, with
the result that good has come of thc
recommendations, for the provincial
and federal governments have given
evidence that they recognize that
when it number of practical irriga-
tionists, representing three important
provinces, get together and decide
that a certain course is advisable, what
is in effect expert counsel is being
offered ancl thc recommendations carry weight. This year thc convention
will havc the working of the new
water act under consideration and the
work of thc convention in this regard will have its effect with the
board of water commissioners who
arc carrying out thc provisions of the
measure. Altogether, there is promise of the sessions of the convention being replete with interest, not
only to British Columbians but to
irrigationists in Alberta and Saskatchewan.
The visiting delegates will be
shown orchards and farms in the vicinity where irrigation has long been
practised and others in thc early
stages of development. All that is
needed to make thc convention the
success it should he is a large and
representative attendance ancl thc indications point to this want being
tilled. Apart from the work of thc
sessions, visitors will find Kamloops
an attractive city, with the rolling
hills, the great navigable waterways
and the thousands of acres of valley
lands in lhe hands of irrigation companies. It is hoped that every body
entitled to send delegates will not
fail to participate in this, thc fourth
annual convention of the Western
Canada Irrigation association.
Arranging; It
Irate Tailor (who has called frequently to collect, without success)—"My
clear sir, 1 wish you'd make some definite arrangement with me."
The Man—"Why, surely—let's see—
well,  suppose ynu  call  every  Monday."
McLaughlin Buick
Runabout Cars
A more serviceable and artistically designed Runabout Car has
never before been produced. The McLaughlin Buick 20 h.p. Runabout is the height of perfection, and the last word in motor car
construction, made from the highest possible grade of materials.
They give satisfactory service where others fail. Better let
us show you one priced at
$1,400
WESTERN MOTOR AND SUPPLY CO.
New Premises, 1410 Broad Street
Telephone 695 - R. P. CLARK, Manager
No.  3080
"Companies Act, 1897"
CERTIFICATE    OF    RE-INCORPORATION
I HEREBY CERTIFY that "The Vic-
torla-Phoenlx Brewing Company, Limited Liability," has this day been re-
Incorporated and registered as "The
Victorla-Phoenlx Brewing Company,
Limited," under Section 5 of the "Companies Act, 1897," as a Limited Company, with a capital of three hundred
thousand dollars, divided Into three
thousand shares of one hundred dollars
each.
Given   under   my   hand   and  heal   of
offlce  at  Victoria,   Province  of  British
Columbia, this seventeenth day of June,
one thousand nine hundred and ten.
(L.S.) J. P. McLEOD,
Acting Registrar of Joint Stock
Companies.
The   following   are   the   objects   for
which the Company has been incorporated :—
The manufacturing and brewing of
lager beer, steam beer, ale and porter,
and to engage in and carry on the general business of brewers, distillers and
bottlers.
To manufacture, buy and sell malt,
and to engage in and carry on the general business of maltsters, and also to
manufacture, buy and sell lee, and to
carry on the general business of ice
dealers.
To erect, build, purchase, lease, or
otherwise acquire breweries, distilleries,
malthouses and other buildings, plant,
machinery and other personal property
for the purpose of carrying into effect
the aforesaid objects, and the business
of  the  Company.
To carry on any other business which
may seem to the Company capable of
being conveniently carried on In cot
nectlon with the above or calculated
directly or Indirectly to enhance the
value of or render profitable any of
the Company's property or rights.
To purchase, lease, or otherwise acquire ancl own such real estate and
personal property as the Company may
deem necessary or expedienf for the
-mi-poses and business of the Company,
and to sell, rent or dispose of the same
when deemed expedient.
To establish, buy and sell. In any part
of British Columbia, the Dominion of
Canada, or elsewhere, agencies for the
sale by wholesale and retail of the
manufactures and products of the Company's business.
To sell, improve, manage, develop,
lease, mortgage, pledge, dispose of, turn
to account, or otherwise deal with all or
any of the property and rights of the
Company.
To use steam, water, electricity or
any other power as a motive power, or
otherwise, In connection with the Company's business.
To enter Into partnership or Into any
arrangement for sharing profits, union
of interest, reciprocal concession or co.
operation with any person or Company
carrvlng on or about to carry on any
business which the Company Is authorised to carry on, or any business or
transaction capable of being conducted
so as directly or Indirectly to benefit
tills Company, and to take or otherwise
acquire and hold shares or stock In o:
securities of and to subsidise or otherwise assist any such Company or person, and tn sell. hold. re-Issue with or
without guarantee, or otherwise deal
witb such shares and securities.
To acquire nnd undertake all or any
nart of the business, property and liabilities of any person or eompany carrying nn any business which this Company is authorized to carry on, or possessed of property suitable for tbe purposes of this Company: and to pay for
same in paid-up and non-assessable or
other shares of tills company,
other shares of this Companv.
To sell the undertaking of the Company or any part hereof, for such consideration as the Company may think
fit. and In particular for shares, debentures or securities of any other compnny having objects altogether, or in
part, similar to those of this Company.
To promote nny other Company fo"
the purpose of acquiring alt, or nny of
the Property, rights, nnd liabilities of
the Company, or for any other purpose
which may seem directly or indirectly calculated to benefit this Company.
To remunerate any person or persons |
for service rendered, or to be rendered
in placing any shares or securities of
tlie Compnny, or In relation to the establishment of tbe Co nnny. either in
money or in shares partly or fully paid
up.
To borrow or raise, or secure the payment of money in such manner as the
Company shnll think lit and in particular by tlie issue of debentures or debenture stock charged upon nil or any
of the Company's property (both present nnd future! including its uncalled
"■■'iiital and to purchase, redeem or pay
off any such  securities.
Tn lend 01* advance money to such
persons on such terms as may seem expedient, and In particular to customers
of and persons having dealings with
tlie Companv nnd to guarantee tbe performance of contracts by such customers or persons, and to take securities for the repayment of such loss or
advances or the performance of any
contracts so guaranteed.
To divide any of tlie property in specie anions* the members,
Generally to make, do and execute nil
sue'' acts, deeds, covenants and things
•is tlio Compnny may deem necessary,
expedient, Incidental or otherwise, to the
attainment of all or nny of the fore-
iroing objects, or to tlie conversion or
disposal of any security held or acquired
by the Company.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Burroug
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Burroughs Webster, of Vancouver, B.C.,
occupation Accountant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the west bank of the
Chilco River, about 80 chains north of
the northeast corner of 4347; thence
west 40 chatns; thence south to the
north boundary of Lot 347 (being 80
chains more or less); thence east along
the north boundary of L. 347 to the
river bank, being 3B chains more or
less; thence following the said river
bank northerly 80 chains more or less
to point of commencement and containing 300 acres more or less.
Dated  June  4th,  1910.
ROBERT BURROUGHS WEBSTER
je25
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert
TAKE NOTICE that W. W. W. Wilson, of Russell, Manitoba, occupation
Student-at-Law, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described  lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
one mlle north of the north-west corner of Section 12, Township 21, thence
north 40 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement and
containing 320 aeres more or less.
Dated June 15, 1910.
William Wilbur Wilfred Wilson
jy 23 F. M. Kelly, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert
TAKE NOTICE that R. H. Keay, of
Shellmouth, Manitoba, occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 20 ehains north of the south-east
corner of Timber License 35038, thence
north SO chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement and
containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated June  16,  1910.
RICHARD HENRY KEAY,
jy 23 F. M. Kelly, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert
TAKE NOTICE tllat W. S. Bartley, of
Russell, Manitoba, occupation Jeweller,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about 80
chains north of the North-west corner
of Section 12, township 21, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 ehains; thence
north SO chains; thence east SO chains
to point of commeneement and containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated June 15, 1900.
WILFRED STANLEY BARTLEY,
jy 23 F. M. Kelly, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert
TAKE NOTICE that D. C. McDonald,
of Russell, Manitoba, occupation Agent,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted one mile
west of the north-east eorner of Section 12, township 21, thence west SO
chains: thenee south 40 chains; thence
east SO chains', thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement and containing 320 acres more or less.
Dated June  15,   1910.
DONALD CROMWELL McDONALD
jy 23 F. M. Kelly, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert
TAKE NOTICE that W. L. Ney. of
Russell. Manitoba, occupation Bank
Clerk, intends tn apply for permission to
purchase tbe following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of section 12, township 21, thence west SO cbalns; thence
south 40 chains; thence east SO chains;
thence north 40 chatns to point of commencement and containing 320 acres,
more or less.
Dnted  June  15,  1910.
WILLIAM LOCKYER NEY.
jy 23 F. M. Kelly, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT-
District of Rupert
TAK 10 NOTICE that R. A. Jones, of
Russell, Manitoba, occupation Clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted near
small lake about 120 chains west of
the north-west corner of Section 13,
township 21, theuce north SO chains,
thence west SO chains; thynce south SO
chains; thence east 80 chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
ncres more or less.
Dated June 16, 1910.
REGINALD  AMBROSE  JONES.
jy 23 F. M. Kelly, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert
TAKE! NOTICE that Angus Sutherland of Russell, Manitoba, occupation
Farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted near small lake about 120 chains
west of tlie north-west corner of Section 13, Township 21. tbence east 40
chains, thence south SO chains; thence
west 10 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 320 acres more or less.
Dated June 16, 1910.
ANGUS SUTHERLAND,
iv 23 F. M. Kelly, Agent.
P. Leonard James, A.R.A.I.C.I
Architect
1006 GOVERNMENT STREET
Phone No. 269
LICENCE    TO    AN    EXTRA-PROVINl
CIAL COMPANY
"Companies Act,  1897"
Canada:
Province of British Columbia,
No. 693
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that "Boulter!
Waugh & Co., Limited," is authorised
and licensed to carry on business within
the Province of British Columbia,
to carry out or effect all or any of thJ
objects of the Company to which thi
Legislative authority of the Legislatur|
of British  Columbia extends.
The head oflice of the Company il
situate at the City of Montreal, In thj
Province of Quebec.
The amount of the capital of till
Company Is flve hundred thousand doll
lars, divided into five thousand sharef
of one hundred dollars each.
The head offlce of the Company ll
this Province is situate at 514 Fori
Street, Victoria, and Harold Brucl
Robertson, Solicitor, whose address ll
Victoria, B.C., is the attorney for thi
Company.
Given   under  by   Hand   and   Seal
Ofllce  at  Victoria,  Province of BritisI
Columbia,   this   eleventh   day   of  Junf
one thousand nine hundred and ten.
(L.S.) J. P. McLEOD,
Acting Registrar of
Joint Stock Companlel
The objects for which this Companl
has  been  established  and  licensed arj
To carry on throughout the Dominio
of Canada the business of importer
exporters, manufacturers, and dealet|
ln Hats, Caps, Garments, Furs
Wearing Apparel, and as General FuJ
rlers, Clothiers and Outfitters, and
dressers and dyers of furs, with pow^
to do all business of a like nature
Incidental thereto,
jy 16
LICENCE    TO    AN    EXTRA-PROVll|
CIAL   COMPANY
"Companies Act, 1897."
Canada:
Province of British Columbia,
No.   603
THIS   IS   TO   CERTIFY   that   "T|
Campbell Manufacturing Company," (I
mlted),   is   authorized   and   licensed
carry on business within the Provinl
of  British Columbia,  and  to carry o|
or effect all  or any of the objects
the  Company  to  which   the  leglslatll
authority of the Legislature of Brltl|
Columbia  extends.
The   head  ofllce  of   the  Company
situate at the City  of Montreal  In tf
I'rovluee of Quebec.
Tbe amount of the capital of tl
Company ls seventy-five thousand d<f
lars, divided Into seven hundred aa
fifty shares of one hundred dolla|
each.
The bead ofllce of the Company In th
Province Is situate at 514 Fort StreJ
Victoria, and Harold Bruce RobertsoT
Barrister-at-law, whose address is 51
Fort Street, Victoria, Is the attorn|
for  the  Company.
Given  under   my  Hand   and   Seal
Ofllce  at Victoria,  Province of Britif
Columbia,   this   twenty-fourth   day
June,   one  thousand  nine  hundred  ai|
ten.
(L.S.) J. P. McLEOD,
Acting Registrar of
Joint  Stock Companle
The objects for which this compail
has been established and licensed arl
Tlie manufacture and sale of clothiif
and  clothing supplies.
jyio
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that A. G. O'Farrell
of London, England, occupation StocT
Broker, Intends to apply for permissirt
to purchase the following describe
lands:—Commencing at a post planta
about 9 miles south of the Salmon Riva
ford on the Bella Coola Ootsa Lakl
Summer trail and marked the N. Yl
corner; thence east 40 chains; thenci
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chainl
thence north 40 chains to point of conf
mencement.
Located June 21st,  1910.
A. G. O'FARRELL,
jy 16 J. R. Morrison, Agen|
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE  NOTICE     that    Mrs.  DorotlJ
O'Farrell, of Dublin, Ireland, oceupatio
Married  Woman,  intends  to  apply  t<\
permission   to   purchase   the   followlr
described lands:—Commencing at a posl
planted at the south end of Takia Lair
on   the   Bella   Coola   and   Ootsa   LaW
trail   and   marked   the   N.   E,   cornel
thence west 40 chains;  thence south  t|
chains;  thence east  40  chains more
less   to   Lake;   thence   northerly   alonl
lake   to   point   of   commencement   an|
containing 160 acres more or less.
Located   June   21st,   1910.
MRS. DOROTHY O'FARRELL,
jy 16 J. R. Morrison, Agen|
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Mrs. Rose O'Fal
rell, of London, England, oceupatio]
Married Woman, intends to apply fj
permission to purchase the followiii
described lands:—Commenolng nt a poi
planted about 8 miles south of til
Salmon River ford on the Bella Coof
and Ootsa Lake summer trail and mar*)
ed the N. W. corner; thence east
chains; tbence south 40 chains; thenl
west SO chains; thence north 40 chaif
to point of commencement.
Located June 21st.  1910.
MRS.  ROSE O'FARRELL.
jy 16 J. R. Morrison, Agei|
'_____-!
CANCELLATION  OF  RESERVE
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
serve existing upon the lands embrao1
in special Timber Licences No. 202!
situated near Sechelt Inlet, New WeJ
minster District, is cancelled, and til
the said lands will be open for locatil
under the provisions of the Land Af
at midnight on October 14th, 1910.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lai|
Lands Department,
Victoria.  Julv  14.  1910.
jy 16 THE  WEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 23, 1910
LICENCE    TO    AN    EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANY
"Companies Act, 1897"
Canada:
Province of British Columbia,
No.  590
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that "Prince
Rupert Coal Fields, Limited," is authorized and licensed to earry on business
within the Province of British Columbia, and to carry out or effect all or
any of the objects of the Company to
which the legislative authority of the
Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head ofllce of the Company is
situate at the City of Montreal in the
Province of Quebec.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is five million dollars, divided
Into fifty thousand shares of one hundred  dollars  each.
The head office of the Company in
this Province Is situate at the City of
Victoria, and Henry G. Lawson, Solicitor, whose address is 908 Government
Street, Victoria aforesaid, is the attorney for the Company.
Given   under   my   hand   and   seal   of
offlce  at   Victoria,   Province  of  British
Columbia,  this sixth  day  of June,  one
thousand nine hundred and ten.
(L.S.) J. P. McLEOD,
Acting Registrar of
Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
have been established and licenced are:
To carry on the businesses of colliery
proprietors, mine owners, coke manufacturers, coal dealers, smelters, iron
masters, steel converters, tin plate makers, Iron founders, miners, prospectors,
metallurgists, refiners and manufacturers of oil and other substances from
ores, minerals and other natural products, powder manufacturers, electricians, engineers, shipbuilders, shipwrights, brick makers, pulp and paper
manufacturers, loggers, lumber merchants, manufacturers of timber, timber
growers, saw mill owners, cannerymen,
fisherymen, ship owners, carriers, warehousemen, merchants, builders, contractors, farmers, hotel and restaurant
keepers and store keepers, or any one
or more of the said businesses from
time to time, and to buy, sell, export, manipulate, prepare for the market
and  deal  in  merchandise  of  all  kinds;
To search for, prospect, explore, mine,
win, open, develop and work collieries,
mines, minerals, quarries, coal, coal oil,
wells, ores, minerals and other deposits;
To acquire by purchase, lease, hire,
discovery, license, location or otherwise, and hold lands, estates, coal lands,
leases and licenses, deposits of oil and
petroleum, quartz and placer mines, and
.mineral claims, leases or prospects, mining lands and mineral rights, collieries,
quarries, clay, timber lands or leases,
timber claims or licenses to cut timber,
pulp leases, surface rights and rights
of way, water rights and privileges,
foreshore rights, mills, factories, elevators, coke ovens, furnaces for smelting,
treating ores and refining metals, ships,
steamboats and other vessels, tramways
and railway sidings on property owned
or controlled by the Company, or adjacent thereto, roads, wharves, docks,
terminal facilities, buildings, machinery,
plant, stock-in-trade or other real or
personal property, as may be deemed
advisable, and to equip, operate and
turn the same to account, and to sell,
lease, or otherwise dispose of the same,
or any of them, or any interest there-
in;
To construct, carry out, repair, maintain, improve, manage, work, control
and superintend any roads, ways, adits,
levels, shafts, tunnels, tramways and
railway sidings on property owned or
controlled by the Company, or adjacent
thereto, brides, coaling stations, reservoirs, water courses, aqueducts, docks,
wharves, terminal facilities, furnaces,
coke ovens, plant, engines, machinery,
mills, factories, elevators, warehouses,
ships, steam vessels and boats, dwelling houses, buildings, and other works
and conveniences which may seem di-
rectlv or indirectly conducive to any of
the objects of the Company, and to contribute to or otherwise aid or take part
in any such operations, and to purchase,
hire or build, and repair, navigate and
trade with ships, steam vessels and
boats for the purposes of the company,
and also railway waggons or trucks or
any other rolling stock, and also steam
or  other  locomotive   or  motive  power;
To treat, make merchantable, transport and trade in coal, coke, ores,
metals, metallic substances and minerals of every description, and the products thereof, and to trade In substances used In getting, reducing, treating or making merchantable, coal, coke,
ores, metals, metallic substances, minerals, and precious stones or In manufacturing products   therefrom:
To clear, manage, farm, cultivate, irrigate, plant, build on or otherwise
work, use or Improve any land which,
or any interest in which, may belong
to the eompany, and to deal with any
farm or other products thereof, and
nlso to lay out into town sites, said
lands or any parts  thereof;
To establish, operate and maintain,
stores, trading posts and supply stations for the purposes of the company,
nnd the supplying goods to any of Its
employees or the occupiers of any of
its lands, or any other persons, and
for bartering and dealing in the products of mine and forest, and the carrying on of the general business of
traders and  merchants;
Tn construct dams, and Improve
rivers, streams and lakes, and to divert
tlie whole or pnrt of the water of such
streams and rivers as the purposes of
tbe company may require, subject, however, to the provisions of any Statute
having reference thereto;
To construct, equip, maintain, complete and operate, tram-ways, upon
lands owned or controlled by the companv: to use nny motive power In the
operation of the same; to take, transport and carry passengers and freight
nn such tramways, and for the purposes
thereof, to use, construct and equip all
necessary wnrks, telephones, telegraphs,
buildings, appliances and conveniences;
To erect, construct, operate, and maintain compressed air and electric works,
power houses, generating plant, and
inch other appliances and conveniences
ns are necessary nnd proper for tbe
generating of compressed air and electricity, aiid for transmitting tbe snme
to be used ns a motive power for trnm-
wavs or other works of the eompany,
md to be supplied by the company as
notlve power for hauling, propelling,
pumping, lighting, heating, smelting, reducing, milling or drilling or any other
iporntions of any nature or kind whatsoever for whicli compressed nlr or
Plectriclty mny lie used, supplied, applied, or'required, and to produce, um,
sell, lease and dispose of. In nny mil flier the company mny see fit. electric
light, bent or power. Provided, how-
■ver. Hint any supply, distribution or
ransmlsslon of electric, hydraulic, pneu-
mtlo or other power or force for tbe
uirposes of heat, light or power be-
ond   the   limits   of   the   lands   of   Hie
company, shall be subject to local  and
municipal control in that behalf;
To contract with any person, body
corporate or politic for supplying compressed air and electricity or water
power, to any such person, body corporate or politic, or to any streets,
ways, lanes, passages, tramways, mines,
smelters, mills, manufactories, ships,
warehouses, public or private houses,
buildings and places, and from time to
time lay down, carry, fit up, connect
and finish, any cumulative storage battery, cable, wiring, pipes, flume
switches, connections, branch, burner,
lamp, meter, transformer or other apparatus, for or in connection with any
compressed air, water or electric main,
pipe, lead or cable, which for such
purposes may be required, and to let
any such apparatus for hire for such
sum as may be agreed upon;
To acquire, operate and carry on the
business of a power company, subject
to local and municipal regulations In
that behalf;
To undertake any or carry Into effect
all such financial, trading or other operations or businesses In connection with
the objects of the company, as the
company may think fit;
To acquire and carry on all or any
part of the business or property, and
to undertake any liabilities of any person, firm or association or company,
possessed of property suitable for the
purposes of this company, or carrying
on any business which this company is
authorized to carry on, or which can
be conveniently carried on in connection with the same, or may seem to
the company calculated directly or Indirectly to benefit the company, and,
as the consideration for the same, to
pay cash, or to issue any shares, stocks
or obligations of this company;
To enter into partnership or into any
arrangement for sharing profits, union
of interest, co-operation, joint adventure, reciprocal concessions or otherwise, with any person or company, carrying on or engaged in, or about to
carry on or engage in, any business or
transaction which this company ls authorized to carry on or engage ln, or any
business or transaction capable of being conducted so as directly or indirectly benefit this company, and to lend
money to, guarantee the contracts of,
or otherwise assist any such person or
company, and to take or otherwise acquire shares and securities of any such
company, and to sell, hold, re-issue,
with or wtihout guarantee, or otherwise deal with the same, notwithstanding the provisions of Section 44 of the
said Act;
To sell or dispose of the property of
the company, or any part thereof, for
such consideration as may be deemed
advisable, and In particular for shares,
debentures or securities of any other
company having objects altogether or
in part similar to those of this company;
To promote any company or companies for the purpose of acquiring all
or any of the property and liabilities
of this company, or for any other purpose which may seem directly or indirectly calculoted to benefit this company;
To purchase, take on lease or in exchange, hire or otherwise acquire, any
real or personal property, and any
rights and privileges which may he
necessary or convenient for the purposes  of the business  of the company;
To enter Into any arrangements with
any government or any authority, municipal, local or otherwise, that may seem
conducive to the company's objects, or
any of them, and to obtain from any
such government or authority, any
rights, privileges and concessions, which
the company may think It desirable to
obtain, and to carry out, exercise and
comply with, or, If deemed advisable,
dispose of any such arrangements,
rights,  privileges and  concessions;
To obtain any Act of Parliament or
Legislature for enabling the company
to carry any of its objects Into effect,
or for any other purpose that may seem
expedient, or to oppose any proceedings or applications which may seem
calculated directly or Indirectly to prejudice  the  company's  interests;
Notwithstanding the provisions of
Section 44 of tbe said Act, to take or
otherwise acquire, hold, vote by its
duly appointed proxy, sell, pledge or
otherwise dispose of, and deal witb the
shares, debentures and other securities
In any other company, having objects
altogether or In part similar to those
of this company, or carrying on any
business capable of being conducted so
as directly or Indirectly to benefit this
company, and more particularly, but not
so as to limit the foregoing, the debentures and other securities of any railway eompany, owning or authorized to
construct and operate a railway line or
lines, connecting with any of the company's properties whereby and over
which the company mny ship Its coal
and   other products;
To endorse, guarantee and secure the
payment nr satisfaction of the bonds,
coupons, mortgages, deeds of trust, debentures, securities, obligations, evidences of indebtedness and shares of
tbe cnpital stock of other corporations,
and nlso to gunrantee nnd secure the
payment nnd satisfaction of dividends
on shares of the capital stock of such
other corporations, provided such other
corporations, fall within the description
of corporations mentioned in tlie last
preceding section;
To npply for, purchnse or otherwise
acquire nny patents of Invention, licenses, concessions and the like, conferring nny exclusive or non-exclusive
or limited right to use, or nny secret
or other information as tn nny Invention, which mny seem rnpable of being
used for any of the purposes of the
company, or tlie acquisition of which
may seem calculated directly or Indirectly to benefit the compnny, and to
use, exercise, develop, or grant licenses
in respect to. or otherwise turn to nc-
count the property, rights nr information so acquired;
'I'o purchnse. acquire, apply for. register, secure, bold, own or sell or otherwise dispose of. any and nil copyrights,
trade marks, trade names and distinctive  marks;
'I'o distribute any of tiie property i>r
P'o company among its members in
specie;
'I'o pay ont nl' the funds of the company all expenses of. or Incidental to
Hie formation, registration and advertising of the company, and to remunerate any person or company fnr services rendered or to he rendered in
placing or assisting tn plnee. or tlie
'.vnnrn.nteelng tlie placing of any shares
■n tbe Company's capital, or anv debentures or oth er securities of the company, or in or nlinut Hie formntton or
promotion nf tbo compnny or Hie conduct of Its business:
Tn soil. Improve, manage, develop, exchange, lease, dispose of. turn to no-
■oniit. or otherwise deal witb tlie under-
loklng nr all or nny pnrt of the property nnd rights of the compnny. with
power tn accept ns tbe consideration,
■niv shares, stocks or obligations of any
'••ther company,
jy in
GOVERNMENT
AUCTION
SALE
OF
QUESNEL
TOWN LOTS
Notice is hereby given that all vacant
lots in the
Townsite of Quesnel
will be offered for sale at Quesnel by
PUBLIC AUCTION
ON
Monday, Aug. 1
"LAND  REGISTRY  ACT"
In the matter of an application for a
Duplicate Certificate of Title to
Subdivisions Nos. 3, 53 and 54 of
Section XXV (Richmond Estate)
Vietoria District.
NOTICE is hereby given that it is
my intention at the expiration of one
month from the date of the first publication hereof, to issue a Duplicate
Certificate of Title to above land issued
to Robert Paterson Rithet on the 23rd
day of August, 1882, and numbered
4016A.
Land   Registry  Offlce,   Vietoria,   B.C.,
the 9th day of June, 1910.
J.  P.  McLEOD,
je 11 Deputy Registrar-General
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Duncan
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Merchant,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner of Lot 336, thence 40
chains north; thence 40 chains east;
thence 40 chains south to the north
boundary of Lot 336; thence west along
the said north boundary of Lot 336
40 chains to point of commencement and
containing 160 acres more or less.
Dated May 30th,  1910.
je25 CHARLES   DUNCAN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Gonzales,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Fisherman, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 80 chains south of the southeast corner of Lot 331; thence 80 chains
north to the south-east corner of Lot
331; thence west 80 chains along the
south boundary of Lot 331; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated  June  lst,  1910.
je25 JOSEPH GONZALES.
Over one hundred lots will be offered at this sale, the terms of sale
being 25 per cent, cash and the balance in three equal annual instalments with interest at the rate of 6
per cent, per annum.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner  of Lands
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., June 27, 1910.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Cadboro Bay School
Sealed Tenders, superscribed "Tender
for School-house," will be received by
the Honourable the Minister of Public
Works up to noon of Monday, the 18th
July, 1910, for the erection and completion of a two-room frame school-
house at Cadboro Bay, Saanich Electoral District.
Plans, specifications, contract, and
forms of tender may be seen on and
after tbe 6th day of July, 1910, at the
Public Works Department, Victoria,
B. C.
Each proposal must be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank of
Canada, made payable to the Honourable the Minister of Public Works, In
a sum of $300, whicii shall be forfeited
If the party tendering decline to enter
Into contract when called upon to do so,
or if he fail to complete the work contracted for. The cheques or certificates
of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers
will be returned to them upon the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the forms supplied, signed
with tbe actual signature of the tenderer, nnd enclosed in the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or nny tender not necessarily nccepted.
F. C. GAMBLE.
Public Works Engineer
Public Works Depnrtment,
Victorin, B.C., 5th July, 1910.
jy !i
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Const, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE thnt Caroline B.
Barnes, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Stenographer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at n post
planted about 135 chains north of the
northeast corner of Lot 347 on the west
hank of the Chilco River (being nbout
sn chains north nf the N, E. corner of
R. B. Webster's .application to purchase); thence west 60 chains; thence
smith to the nnrth boundnry of R. B.
Webster's application tn purchase, being
50 chains more or less: thence east .15
chains more nr less to tbe river; thenee
following the river bnnk northerly to
point nf commencement nnd containing
200 ncres more or less.
Tinted June Ith.  lit 10.
je25 CAROLINE  B.  BARNES.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Gustav Bram-
well Ehrenborg, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Architect, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the south-west corner
of Lot 333; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, more or less, to
the north-east corner of Lot 333; thence
south 80 chatns; thence west 80 chains
along the north boundary of Lot 334
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, and being Lot 333.
Dated  June  lst,  1910.
GUSTAV BRAMWELL EHRENBORG.
je25
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Frank McGinn,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of Lot 342; thenoe
80 chains, more or less to the northwest corner of Lot 342; thenee south
65.76 chains more or less to the shore
of Eagle Lake; thence following the
said shore to the south-east corner of
Lot 342; thence north 37.92 ehains to
the point of commencement containing
412 acres, more or less, and being Lot
342.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je 25 FRANK McGINN.
NOTICE is i.ereby given that the
waters of Shoo-wah-tlans and Wood-
worth Lakes, in Range 5, Coast District,
and the waters of all streams flowing
into said lakes, and all streams flowing
therefrom, are reserved, subject to the
rights of existing records only, for the
use of the Crown.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands
Lands Department,
Victoria, B.C., April 29th, 1910.
apr 30
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert
TAKE NOTICE that A. R. Tingley,
of Russell, Manitoba, occupation Barrister, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
nt the south-east corner of Section 13,
township 21, thence west 80 chains;
thence north SO chains; thence east SO
cbnlns; tbence south 80 chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
ncres  more or less.
Dated June 15,  llHO.
ARCHIBALD REUBEN TINGLEY.
jy 23 F. M. Kelly, Agent
A'ICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert
TAKE NOTICE thnt O. W. Goodbun,
of Shellmnutli, Manitoba, occupation
Farmer, Intends to apply for permission tn purchnse the following described lands:—Commencing at a post plnnted about 20 chains nortli of the southeast corner of Timber License 35088,
thence south 40 chains: thence east K0
cliains: tiience nortli 40 chains; thence
west SO chains to pnlnt of commencement and containing 320 ncres, mure or
less.
Hated  June  in.  mm.
OSCAR    WILLIAM    GOODBUN,
jy 2,'l !•'.  M.   Kelly.   Agent.
VICTORIA  LAND  DISTRICT
District "f Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Annie O'Farrell.
nf Bournemouth, England, occupntion
Spinster, intends tp npply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
ahnut 5 miles smith nf the Salmon
River ford on tlie Bella Cnnla nncl Ont-
sn Lake summer trail ami marked tlie
N.W. corner; tbence enst so chains:
tbence smith 10 chains: thonoe west sn
chains; tiience nortli tn chnins tn pnlnt
of commencement.
Located .Tune 2i*t.  run.
ANNIE O'FARRF.LT.,
jy Hi J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District  of  Rupert
TAKE NOTICE Hint W. A. S. Wilson
nf Russell, Manitoba, occupation Clerk,
intends tn apply fm* permission to purchase Hie following described lnnds:—
Commencing nt a pnst. planted at the
south-west corner nf Section is, tnwn-
shlp s. tiience enst 40 chnins; thence
north sn chnins; tiience west 40 chnins;
tiience smith so chains to point nf commencement nnd containing 320 acres
more ur less.
limed June 15.  run.
William Alexander Sanderson Wilson
jy 2:; P.   M.  Kelly.   Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District   of  Rupert
TAKE NOTICE Hint G. E, Swallow,
nf Russell. Manitoba, occupntion Physician, Intends to apply fm* permission
to purchase the fnllowing described
lands:—Commenolng nt n post planted
■it Hie north-west corner of Section 7,
township s. tbence cast in cliains;
thence soutli mi chains: thence west in
chains: thence north SO cliains to polm
of commencement, and containing 320
acres  more nr less.
Dated   June  15.   11110.
GEORGE ERNEST SWALLOW.
Jy 2:: I*'.  M.   Kellv.   Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Katie Gibson, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Stenographer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west bank of the Chilco River,
about 55 chains north of where the said
river flows out of Chilco Lake, and being at the north-east corner of R. H.
W. Edmond's application to purchase;
thence west SO chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains more or
less to river bank; thence following
the west shore of the river southerly to
point of commencement and containing
640 aeres more or less.
Dated June 3rd, 1910.
je 25 KATIE GIBSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that Eva Gunn, wife
of John William Gunn, of Suthwyn,
occupation farmer Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land:
Commencing     at     a     post     planted
about 5 chains from the north bank of
Salmon River and beside the south-east
corner   post   of   lot   392   as   surveyed,
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to this post, containing
640 acres and being lot 393 as surveyed,
whicii land was located by me on the
14th day of June, 1910.
Dated June 25th, 1910.
EVA GUNN.
jy 2 William Forrest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that John McBeth,
of Parkdale, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described land:—Commencing
at a post planted about 60 chains from
the north bank of the Salmon River
and beside the north-west corner post of
lot 395, as surveyed, thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains,
containing 640 acres and being lot 395,
as surveyed, whieh land was located by
me on the 14th day of June, 1910.
Dated June 25th, 1910.
JOHN  McBETH.
Jy 2 William Forrest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that John William
Gunn, of Suthwyn, occupation Farmer,
Intends to apply for.permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about 5
chains from the north bank of the Salmon River and beside the south-east
corner post of lot 392 as surveyed;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains, containing 640 acres, and
being lot 392, as surveyed, which land
was located by me on the 14th day of
June, 1910.
Dated  June   25th,   1910.
JOHN WILLIAM GUNN.
jy 2 William Forrest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that David M. Robinson, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
School Superintendent, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the north-west corner
of Lot 340; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 65.76 chains, more or less, to the
shore of Eagle Lake; thence following
the said shore to the south-west corner
of Lot 340; thence north 84.60 chains,
more or less, to the point of commencement, and containing 607 acres, moro
or less, and being Lot 340.
Dated  June  2nd,  1910.
je 25 DAVID M. ROBINSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that George Henry
Lawrence Hobson, of Vancouver, B.C.,
occupation Insurance Agent, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—-Commencing
at a post planted at the south-east corner of Lot 343; thence north 40.04
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
soutli 40.04 chains to the north-west
corner of Lot 344; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 320 acres, more or less, and being
Lot 343.
Dated June  2nd,  1910.
je 25     George Henry Lawrence Sobion.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that John Anquetel
Norman, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Gentleman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west bank of Chilco River about
15 chains north of where the Chilco
River flows out of Chilco Lake; thence
west 20 chains; thence south to the low
water mark on the shore of Chilco Lake
being 40 chains (more or less); thence
following the sinuosities of the shore
northerly to point of commencement and
containing 40 acres more or less.
Dated June 3rd,  1910.
je25 JOHN  ANQUETEL NORMAN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Alfred Gonzales,
of Vancouver, B.C.. occupation Fisherman, Intends to apply for permission
to purchnse the following described
lands:—Commencing nt a post planted
about SO chains soutli of the southenst corner of Lot 331; theuce SO chains
west; thence SO ehnlns snuth: thence So
cliains east; tiience SO chains north to
point nf commencement and containing
fi*IO acres more nr less.
Dnted   June   lst,   1910.
Je 25 ALFRED  GONZALES.
LAND REGISTRY ACT
III the matter of nil application for a
Duplicate certlllcnte of Title to Lot
■11,   Victorin   West.
NOTICE is hereliy given that It Is
my Intention at the expiration nf one
month from the dnte nf the first publication hereof to issue a Duplicate Certificate nf Title to said land Issued to
Charles Pollock on the Sth day nf May,
1SH9, and numbered 4811.
Lund Registry Otllce. Victoria, B.C.,
the  ioth dnv  or June,   1910.
J. P. McLEOD.
Jy 9 Deputy Registrar General
VICTORIA   LAND  DISTRICT
District  of  Rupert
TAKE NOTICE that Alex  MeDonagh
of Russell.  Manitoba,  upatlon  Agent,
intends to apply t'm* permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing al a post planted about one
mile north of the north-west corner nf
section 12, township 21. thence north
sn chafns, thence west sn cliains. tiience
south Sil chains, tiience east sn cluiins
to pnlnt of commencement and containing 640 -icres more 01* less.
ALEXANDER McDONAGH.
Jy 23 F. M.  Kelly.  Agent. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 23, 1910
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the Reserve existing on Crown Lands in the
vicinity of Babine Lake, situate in
Range 5, Coast District, notice ot which
was published in the British Columbia
Gazette, dated December 17th, 1908, is
cancelled in so far as said Reserve relates to lots numbered 1519, 1618, 1517,
1516, 1515, 1510, 1607, 1506 1606A, 1503,
1501, 1502, 1612, 1511, 1506, 1504, 1613,
1614, 1609, 1508, 1530, 1627, 1628, 1529,
1531, 1532, 1533, 1534, 1535, 1637, 1539,
1636, 1638, 1540, 1541, 1544, 1543, 1545,
1646, 1542, 1547, 1548, 1649, 1560, 1520,
1521, 1522, 1523, 1624, 1526, 1626 and
1551.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands
Lands Department,
Victoria, B.C., June 16th, 1910.
je25
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the Reserve existing on Crown Lands in the
vicinity of Babine Lake, and situate in
Cassiar District, notice of which bearing
date June 30th, 1908, was published in
the British Columbia Gazette, dated July
2nd, 1908, is cancelled.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands
Lands Department,
Victoria, B.C., June 16th, 1910.
je26
MINERAL AOT
Form F
Certificate of Improvements
NOTICE
"Jacob"  Mineral  Claim,   situate  ln  the
Victoria Mining Division of Renfrew
District.     Where   located—Bugaboo
TAKE NOTICE that I, C. R, Carter,
acting agent for John Bentley, Free
Miner's Certificate No. 46076B, L. N. Anderson, Free Miner's Certificate No.
44913B; Carl Stromgren, Executor, and
H. M. Shore, Executrix of the estate of
Sidney Shore, deceased, Free Miner's
Certificate No. 40864 B, Wm. Harrison,
Free , Miner's Certificate No. 41007B,
John H. Smith, Free Miner's Certificate
No. 40823B, E. J. Smith, Free Miner's
Certificate No. 45083B, Elizabeth Berryman, Free Miner's Certificate No. 45066B
and Oliver Snaith, Free Miner's Certificate No. 44938B., intend, sixty days from
the date hereof, to apply to the Mining
Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a
Crown Grant of the above claim.
And further take notice that action,
under section 37, must be commenced
before the Issuance of such Certlflcate
of Improvements.
Dated this Sixteenth day of June, A.D.
1910.
je 26 C. R. CARTER.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Reginald Foulkes
Cottrell of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the south-east corner of Lot 336;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
ehains; thence south 80 chains, more
or less, to the south-west corner of Lot
336; thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 606 acres
of land, more or less, and being Lot 336.
Dated June 2nd. 1910.
je    REGINALD FOULKES COTTRELL
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that (Mrs.) Sarah
Catherine Coles, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Married Woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at
a post planted at the south-east corner
of Lot 345 on the shore of Eagle Lake;
thence north 44.23 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 99.57 chains,
more or less, to the north shore of Eagle
Lake; thence following the said shore in
an easterly direction to point of commencement, and containing 568 acres,
more or less, and being Lot 345.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
(MRS.) SARAH CATHERINE COLES
je 25
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that William R. Blind,
of Vancouver, B.C., Real Estate Agent,
intends to apply for permission to purchase thc following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of the Chilco River about 136
chains north from where the said river
flows out of Chilco Lake (being at or
near the N. E. corner of Katie Gibson's
application to purchase; thence 80 chains
west; thence 80 chains north; thence 80
chains east more or less to river bank;
thence following the west shore of river
southerly to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated June Srd, 1910.
je  25 WILLIAM  R.  BLIND.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Gibson, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner of Lot 337 and the
south-east corner of Lot 334; thence
80 chains west along the south boundary of Lot 334; thence south 60 chains;
thence east to the shore of Eagle Lake;
thenee following the shore of Eagle
Lake In a northerly and easterly direction to the south-west corner of Lot
337; thence north 46.49 chains, more or
less, to point of commencement, and
containing 400 acres, more or less.
Dated June 2nd,  1910.
je25 JOSEPH   GIBSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that David Blair of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Architect,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands :-—
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of Lot 328; thence west
40 chains to the north-west corner of
Lot 328; thence south 40 chains to the
south-west corner of Lot 328; thence
west 40 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 480 acres,
more or less.
Dated May 31st, 1910.
je 26 DAVID BLAIR.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Stanley Street,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner of Lot 332; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to the north-west corner of Lot 332,
(being the north-east corner of Lot
217); thence south along the east boundary of Lot 217 eighty chains to the
south-west corner of Lot 332; thence
east 80 chains, more or less, to point
of commencement, (excepting any part
of Lot 332 that may not be at present
Crown lands), and containing 600 acres,
more or less, and being Lot 332.
Dated June lst, 1910.
je 25 STANLEY STREET.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that John Atkinson,
of St. Marks, occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 6 chains
north of the Salmon River and about
38 chatns south from the north-west
corner post of lot 396 as surveyed on
the west boundary line of said lot 396;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 ehains; thence
east 80 chains; which land was located
by me on the 14th day of June, 1910,
containing 640 acres.
Dated June 25th, 1910.
JOHN  ATKINSON.
Jy 2 William Forrest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Richards
Brown, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Accountant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 5 chains south of the confluence
of Lingfield Creek and the Chilco River
on the west bank of the Chilco River,
being about one and one-half miles north
of the N. E. corner of W. R. Blind's
application to purchase; thence west 80
chains: thence north SO chains; thenee
east 80 chains more or less to the west
shore of the Chilco River; thence follow the said shore southerly to poini
of commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
Dated June 3rd. 1910.
je 25     CHARLES RICHARDS BROWN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that John Simons, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Accountant,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing nt a post planted at the
N. E. corner of Lot 343; thence N. SO
chains; thenee W. SO chains; thence S.
SO chains to the N. W. corner of Lot
343: thence E. along the north boundary of Lot 343 eighty chains to point
of commencement nnd containing 640
aeres, more or less.
Dnted May 30th,  1910.
je 25 JOHN SIMONS.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Const. Rnnge Three (31
TAKE NOTICE thnt Tena Blnnchnrd.
W'fe of Onirics T-T'illhui'tnn Blanchard.
nf Lydiatt, occupntion Fnrmer. Intends
to apply for permission to purchnse the
following described lnnds:—Commencing
at a post plnnted nhout 70 cbnlns north
nf the Snlmon River nnd beside the
north-west enrner pnst of lnt 391. ns
stirvevnd: tbence south SO chains; Ihence
cist 40 chnins: tlmnce nortli SO chains:
tbence west 40 cbnlns. nnd being lot
TU n« surveyed, wbicb lnnd wns loented
bv me nn the 14th dny of June, 1910,
nml enntnlns 320 ncres.
Dated   June   25th.   1910.
TENA BLANCHARD.
|v 2 Wllllnm Forrest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT   '
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Edward Arthur
Morris, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Tobacconist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-west corner of Lot
335; thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 chains more or less along the west
boundary of Lot 336 to the north-east
boundary of Lot 335; thence west 8u
chains; thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 620
acres of land more or less and being
Lot 335.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je 25     EDWARD ARTHUR MORRIS.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that James Ross, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation, Accountant,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of the Chilco River, about 2
miles northerly from the confluence of
Lingfield Creek with the Chilco River
and about one mile northerly from the
N.E. corner of Chas. R. Brown's application to purchase; thence west 80
ehains; thence south 80 chains more or
less to the north boundary of Chas. R.
Brown's application to purchase; thence
east 80 chains more or less along the
north boundary of Brown's application
to purchase to the Chilco River; thence
following the west bank of the Chilco
River northerly to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres more or
Dated June 4th, 1910.
je 25 JAMES ROSS.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that George William
Hobson, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Insurance Agent, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the south-east corner of Lot 334,
thence north 19.53 chains to the southeast corner of Lot 343; thence east along
the south boundary of Lot 343 eighty
cliains to the east boundary of Lot 341;
thence south along the eastern boundaries of Lots 341 and 342 to the shore
of Eagle Lake; thence following the said
shore northerly and easterly to point
of commencement, and containing 396
acres, and being Lot 344.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je25        GEORGE WILLIAM HOBSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Jonathan Rogers,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Contractor, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner of Lot 347; thence
east 61.40 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 90.91 chains to the
bank of Chilco River; thence following
the river bank southerly to point of
commencement and containing 588 acres,,
more or less, and being Lot 347.
Dated June  2nd,  1910.
je25 JONATHAN   ROGERS.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that George William
Coles, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the south-east corner of Lot 346;
thenee north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east SO chains to point of commencement, and containing 492 acres of land
and being Lot 346.
Dated June  2nd,  1910.
je 25        GEORGE WILLIAM COLES.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT      '
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Cecil Croker
Fox, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Architect, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the south-east corner of Lot 334;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south SO chains, more or
less, to the south-west corner of Lot
334; thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640 acres
and being Lot 334.
Dated  June  2nd,  1910.
je 25 CECIL   CROKER   FOX.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Mary Gibson, ot
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Stenographer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 80 chains south of the south-east
corner of Lot 331; thence 80 chains east;
thence 80 chains east; thence 80 chains
south; thence SO chains west; thence 80
chains north to point of commencement,
und  containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated June lst, 1910.
je 25 MARY GIBSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NO,|,TCE that Fred Gibson, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing nt a post planted at the
N. W. corner of Lot 332. thence 40
chnins west to the north-west corner of
Lot 217; thence 40 chains south; thence
10 chnins west; thence SO chains north;
thence 80 chnins east tn point of commencement nnd containing 480 acres,
more or less.
Dated Jue 1st,  1910.
je FRED GIBSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Rnnge 2
TAKE NOTICE thnt Maurice Gintz-
burger. of Vancouver, B.C.. occupation
Real Estate Agent, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lnnds:—Commencing at a post
plnnted at the north-east corner of Lot
331. thenee SO ehnlns enst; thence SO
chnins south; thence SO chains west tn
the south-east corner of Lot 331; thenee
SO ehnlns north along the enst boundary
nf snld T.ot 331 to point of eommeneement, nnd eontnlulng 610 ncres, mnre nr
less.
Dnted June 1st.  1910.
ie 25 MAURICE GTNTZBURGER.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District nf Const. Rnnge 2
TAKE XOTICE tliat John Chnrles
Thurston Crnfto of Vancouver, ooeunn-
"nn Cviil Engineer. Intends to anply
fnr permission tn purchase the follnw-
Ine described Inmls;—Commencing nt n
ret plantod nt the fouth-wst enr"er of
lot 831; thenee o"«t SO cbnlns; then"*-*
north SO e'-nin*-*; tbence west SO chains,
Mienee south SO chnins to point nf commencement, nnd enntnlnlng 640 ncres, be-
inc  1 nt  339.
p.,teii   '"ne 2nd,   lO'O.
je 25     John Charles Thurston OrottB.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Harlow
W. Edmond, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation, Gentleman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the west bank of the Chilco
River about 55 chains north of where
the said river flows out of Chilco Lake;
thence west 20 chains; thence south 40
chains more or less to the north boundary of John A. Norman's application
to purchase; thence following the said
north boundary in an easterly direction
to low water of the river a distance of
10 chains more or less; thence following the west shore of the river northerly to point of commencement and containing 40 acres more or less.
Dated June 3rd, 1910.
je5      ROBERT HARLOW W. EDMOND
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Joseph
Sharp, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 80 chains south of the southeast
corner of Lot 331 and adjoining Mary
Gibson's, Joseph Gonzales' and Alfred
Gonzales' locations; thence 80 chains
north to the southeast corner of Lot
331; thence 80 chains east; thence 80
chains south; thence 80 chains west to
point of commencement, and containing
640 acres  more or  less.
Dated June lst,  1910.
je25 HENRY   JOSEPH   SHARP.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that Alexander Good,
of St. James, occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
one chain west of the trail which runs
along the east bank of the Salmon
River, known as the Ootsa Lake Trail
from Anaham Lake, said post being
about 15 chains north-west from an
oblong lake (partly meadow) on the
east side of the said trail and said post
being nearly equidistant between lots
surveyed respectively as Lots 387 and
388 and said post being William Setter's
north-west corner post and William
Brown's south-west corner post, which
land was located June 13th, 1910, and
contains 640 acres.
Dated  June   26th,   19»0.
ALEXANDER GOOD.
jy 2 William Forrest. Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick Hems-
ley Shanks, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Secretary, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the northeast corner of Lot
345; thence north 40 chains; thence
west SO chains; thence south 40 chains
to the north-west corner of Lot 345;
thence along the north boundary of Lot
345 eighty chains to point of commencement, and containing 320 acres, more
or less.
Dated   May   30th,   1910.
je 25 FREDERICK HEMSLEY SHANKS
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Frances Dunlop)
of Vancouver, occupation Stepographer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase  the following described  lands:—
Commencing  at  a post  planted  at  the j
southeast corner of Lot 330; thence 80 (
chains   east;   thence   80   chains   north;
thence 80 chains west to the northeast I
corner   of   Lot   330;   thence   80   chains
south along the east boundary of said
Lot 330 to point of commencement and]
containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated   June   1st,   1910.
je 25 FRANCES  DUNLOP.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Colin C. McLennan, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Hotel Clerk, intends to apply for permission    to   purchase    the    following   described  lands:—Commencing at a  postl
planted at the south-east corner of Loti
341;  thence north  80  chains,  more  orl
less,   to  the north-east  corner  of  Lot!
341;    thence   west    80    chains;    thence]
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
to point of commencement, and containing  640 acres,  more or less and beingl
Lot 341.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je26 COLIN  C.  McLENNAN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur W. Jarvis
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Bank
Manager, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the north-west corner of Lot 337;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 78.38
chains along the north boundary of Lol
338 to the shore of Eagle Lake; thence
following the said shore in a westerly
direction to the south-west corner ot
Lot 337; thence north 45.49 chains to
the point of commencement, and containing 462  ncres and being Lot 337.
Dated June '2nd,  1910.
je 25 ARTHUR   W.   JARVIS.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that Annie McBeth,
wife of John McBeth, of Parkdale, occupation Farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 65 chains north of the
Salmon River, and beside the northeast corner of lot 396 as surveyed;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north SO chains, containing 640 acres,
and being lot 396 as surveyed, which
land was located by me on the 14th
day of June,  1910.
Dated  June   25th,   1910.
ANNIE McBETH.
Jy 2 William Forrest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that William Ralph
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Merchant,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of Lot 34S; thence
south SO chains; thence west 49.61
chains to the shore of Eagle Lake;
thence followin r tbe said shore northerly to the south boundary of Lot 346;
thence following the satd boundary east
53.15 chains to point of commencement
and containing 46S acres and being Lot
34S.
Dnted June 2nd, 1910.
je 25 WILLIAM RALPH.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that George Phillip
Carr, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Postninn, Intends to npply for permission to purchase the following described lnnds:—-Commencing nt a post
planted at the Intersection of the N. W.
eorner nf L. 330 and the east boundary
of Chnrles Skinner's pre-emption (Lot
329); thence north 40 chains more or
less to the north-east enrner of said
pre-emption; thenee east 40 chains;
tbence north 40 cbnlns; thence east 40
ehnlns; thenee south SO chains tn thu
nnrth-enst corner of L. 330; thence
west SO chnins more nr less along tbe
nnrth boundnry of snid Lot 330 to point
of commencement and containing 4Sn
ncres  mnre or less.
Dnted Mav 31st. 1910.
,1c 25 GGEORGE PHILIP CARR.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast. Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that John Dnvld
Breese, of Vnncouver. B.C.. occupation
Insurance Agent. Intends to imply for
permission tn purchnse the fnllowing
described lnnds:—Commencing at a pnst
rented nt the south-we«t enrner of Lni
330 on the shnre of Cochin Lnlte; thenee
onst nlong tbe north boundary of Lnt
331. 53.SS chnins: thence north Sn
chains to the north-east eorner of Lnt
330: thenee west tn the east boundary
ef Chnrles Skinner's pre-emption (Lot
Vn. S-'nv. Ihence "nuth nlong the snld
boundary 27.01 cbnlns tn the shnre nf
■""ncbln Lake: thence following the snH
shore southerly nnd eisterlv to noint of
commencement i«d contnlning 559 acres
nnd being Lot 330.
Dnted Mny  31st. 1910.
ie 25 JOHN  DAVID BREESE.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Hlllman
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Florist,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner of Lot 331 on the
shore of Cochin Lake; thence east 53.8S
chains along the north boundary of
Lot 331 and the south boundary of Lot
330 to the north-east corner of Lot 331;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 53.91 chains, more
or less, to the shore of Cochin Lake;
thence following the shore of Cochin
Lake in' a north-easterly direction to
point of commencement and containing
5S2.8 acres, and being Lot 331.
Dated May 31st,  1910.
je 25 CHARLES  HILLMAN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Alexander Mo-
gee, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Gentleman, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west bank of the Chilco River
about two and one-half miles north of
the north-east corner of Lot 347; thence
west 50 chains; thence south 80 chains,
thence east to the river, being 35 chains
more or less; thence following the said
river In a northerly direction to point
nf commencement and containing 300
acres more or less.
Dated  June 4th.  1910.
je 25 ALEXANDER  MOGEE.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three  (3)
TAKE NOTICE that William  Setter.l
of St. Andrews, occupation Farmer, intends  to apply  for permission  to pur-l
chase the following described lands: Com-1
menclng at a post planted about onel
chain   west   of  the   Trail  which   runsl
along the east bank of the Salmon Rlverl
known as the Ootsa Lake Trail,  froml
Anaham Lake, said post being about 15|
chains north-west from an oblong lake"
(partly meadow) on the east side of thel
said  trail,  and  said  post being nearly!
equidistant   between   lots   surveyed   as)
Nos.   387  and 388,  which land was loJ
cated by me on the 13th day of JuneJ
1910,  containing 640 acres.
Dated June 25th,  1910.
WILLIAM SETTER,
jy 2 William Forrest, Agentl
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Halybur-I
ton Blanchard, of Lydiatt, occupation]
Farmer, intends to apply for permis-l
sion to purchase the following describJ
ed lands:—Commencing at a post plant*!
ed about 70 chains north of the Salmon]
River and beside tho north-west cornea
post of lot 391 as surveyed, thenci
south 80 ehains; thence west 80 chains!
thence north 80 chains; thence east 8<f
chains, containing 640 acres, which lancl
was located by me on the 14th day o]
June, 1910.
Dated   June  25th,   1910.
Charles Halyburton Blanchard.
jy 2 William Forrest, Agentl
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that (Mrs.) Eleano|
Mary Crofts, of Vancouver, B.C., occu
patlon Married Woman, intends to apl
ply for permission to purchase the foil
lowing described lands:—Commencing al
a post planted at the north-east cornel
of Lot 338; thence west 80 chainsl
thence south 78.38 chains to the short
of Eagle Lake; thence following the salt
shore to the south-east eorner of Lol
338; thence north 84.60 chains to poinl
of commencement, containing 640 acresf
more or less, and being Lot 338.
Dated  June 2nd,  1910.
(MRS.) ELEANOR MARY CROFTJ
je25
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that (Mrs.) Catherinl
Blair, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Married Woman, intends to apply fol
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a posl
planted at the north-west corner oi
Charles Skinner's pre-emption (Lot 329)1
thenee east 80 chains; thence north 4(1
ehains; thence west 80 chains; thencq
south 40 chains to point of commence-!
ment and containing 320 acres, more oi|
Dated May 31st, 1910.
Je 25        (MRS.) CATHERINE BLAIR.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast. Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that William Brown,
nf Hendlngly, occupation Farmer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands: Commencing at n post planted about one
chain west of the trail which runs along
the east bnnk of the Salmon River,
known ns the Ootsa Lake trail, from
Annham Lnke, snid post being about 16
ehnlns north-west from an oblong lakp
(partly meadow) on the east side of
tbe said trail and snld post being nearly equidistant between lots surveyed
respectively as lots 3S7 and 3SS, and
snld post being William Setter's northwest corner post and Alexander Good's
south-east corner post which land was
lneated June 13th, 1910, and contains
640 ncres.
Dated   June   25th.   1910.
WILLIAM  BROWN.
jy 2 Wltllam Forrest. Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District nf Const, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that George Munro.
of Winnipeg, oecupatlnn Banker, Intends to apply for permission to nnr-
ehnse the following described lands: Commencing nt n nost planted nbont five
ehains nnrth nf the Salmon River nnd
hcide the south-east enrner pn«t of Lot
311 ns surveyed, thence north ninnc
'be enst boundary line of Tot Jin; 40
ehn'ns: thenee enst 40 chains; thenee
°nutb SO chnins; thence west 40 chains;
thenee north 40 chains to snid post,
enntnlnlng 320 acres, which lnnd wns
loented by me June 14th, 1910.
Dated Jene 25th. 1910.
GEORC-E MUNRO.
jy 2 William Forrest. Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast. Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Minnie Living-I
stone of Vancouver, B.C., occupation!
Spinster, Intends to apply for permis-f
sion to purchase the following described]
lands:—Commencing at a post plantedl
at the north-east corner of Lot 349 i
thence west 61.40 chains; thence south!
SO chains; thence east to the banks ofr
Chilco River, being 85 chains, more oH
less; thence northerly to point of com-1
mencement and containing 640 acresj
more or less, and being Lot 349.
Dated June 2nd. 1910.
je 25 M1NNTF. LIVINGSTONE.
%&M
CANCELLATION   OF   BESEBVE
NOTICE is herehy given that the re-1
serve existing upon the lands embraced!
In special Timber Licences Nos. '_8962,|
2S963 and 2S964, situated In Goldstreaml
District, is cancelled, and that the saldl
lands will be open for location underl
the provisions of the Land Act at mid-f
night on October 14th, 1910.
ROBT. A. RENWICK.
Deputy Commissioner of  I.andfJ
Lands Department,
Victoria,  July   14,   1910.
Jy 16
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert tl
TAKE NOTICE thnt Frederick Rojf
Janes, of Victorin. B.C., Clerk, intendif
tn applv for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Com!
mencing nt a post planted on the soutli
shore of Georgie Lnke. about 60 chatnf
from enstern end; thenee south 41
ehnlns; thence west 40 chains; thencJ
nnrth 40 chnins; tiience east 40 chain!
following shore of lake to point ol
commencement, and containing 16|
acres,  more or less.
FREDERICK  ROY  JANES,
jy 16 F. M. Kelly, Agenlf
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District nf Cnast
TAKE NOTTCE thnt E.  O'Farrell,
Dublin, Ireland, occupation Barrister, irl
tends  to npply  for  permission   to  pin]
chase the fnllowing described  lands:-
Commenctng at a post plnnted  nbout i
iniles In n south-easterly direction frnj
foot of Tnkln Lake on the Bella Cool
nnd   Ootsn   Lnke   trail   nnd   mnrked   tlf
S.   W.   enrner:   tbence   north   40   ehilnjl
thenee enst  SO  chains;  thence  smith   r
cbnlns;  thonce west  SO chains to pol'|
nf  ennitnetieptueiit.
Dated June 21st. 1910.
E.  O'FAP.REl.L.
jy 16 J. R. Morrison. Agei| THE WEEK, SATURDAY, Jl'LY 23,  1010
Your Windows Should
Be Screened.
Adjustable Screens, 25c
There's no excuse for a "houseful of flies"—-not when window screens
are priced at such easy figures. We have the adjustable kind from, each 25c.
With window screens of good quality priced at such low prices there's
no reason why your home shouldn't have a complete equipment. These
screens are ea"ily put into position and easily removed, and they are
"effective."
Come in and get a few for your home and overcome the fly pest.
Screen doors priced from $2.25—a superior quality door of stylish
design.   The screen door gets lots of hard use, so it pays to have good ones.
Camp Furniture and
Camp Furnishings—
The Best Place to Outfit
There's no better place to outfit for tbe Summer camp, because there
is no other place in the city that show8 anything like such a complete
stock of everything necessary in camp furniture and camp furnishings.
You can get everything necessary right here under the one roof—
splendid assortments and prices that make but little impression on your
pocketbook.   Come in and see what we have in—
Folding Camp Furniture, Camp Blankets,
Camp Bedding, Camp Meat Safes,
Camp Crockery, Cooking Utensils
And all such lines. You'll be agreeably surprised at the choice offered,
and you'll agree, with hundreds of others, that this is Victoria's headquarters for camp furnishings.
"Cool Off
With Delicious
Home Made Ice Cream
Ice-cream is a food and a wholesome one—if properly made. Make
it yourself in your own home, and in a Lightning Ice-cream Freezer, and
you'll be sure of having pure, wholesome food and a delicious dish for
the Summer season.
The Lightning Freezer makes ice-cream quicker and easier and at less
cost than other makes. It turns easily and uses little ice and salt.
Patented dasher8 make a cream that is incomparable in delieiousness.
We have just received a big shipment of these and have a full range
of sizes.   Prices start as low as $2.75. ...'
A book of recipes goes with each freezer, showing how dainty dishes,
for all the year may be easily and quickly prepared.
Good Food
Easily Kept Qood
With a Qood Refrigerator
Good food doesn't remain good very long during a scorching Summer
day—miles3 it is kept in a healthy place. And there's a big difference
between a "cold" place and a healthy storeroom.
Some refrigerators are "ice boxes" alright, but tliere are a whole lot
that aren't health preservers—not by any means. We have been most
careful in the selection of the makes of refrigerator we handle, because
we realize that the health of the family depends upon it.
You'll find our refrigerators are safe, and they are also economical
iu ice-consumption.   Priced from $12.00.
We still have a few McCray refrigerators left—just a limited "upply.
If you would secure one of the best refrigerators made anywhere, come and
get one of these.
FURNISHERS OF
CHURCHES
SCHOOLS
BOATS
SINCE 1862
AT VICTORIA, B.C.
Complete Home Furnishers
Victoria, B.C.
FURNISHERS OF
HOMES
HOTELS
CLUBS
SINCE 1862
AT VICTORIA, B.O.
SOCIETY
|Mr. Leslie Foot is visiting his bro-
er in the city.
* *   *
[Mr. Irving H. Wheatcroft is a
Jiest at thc C. P. R. Hotel here.
* *   *
I Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Shallcross re-
|rned during the week from Alberni.
* *   *
IMr. and Mrs. W. Finch Page have
|ft on a short visit to the Interior.
* *   *
J Mr. Lowry, after several months'
lisence from Victoria, returned from
|tc East last week.
j[(       -tt       )[C
J Miss Stevens of Nanaimo is the
Itcst of Mrs. McB. Smith, Esquimalt
load.
* *   *
I Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Roberts leave
irtly for Banff   for   a    couple of
eeks.
»   *   *
[Mrs. Carew Gibson of Vancouver
lis a  guest at the  Empress during
week.
* *   *
[Miss Phyllys, who has been the
Jest of Mrs. John Hirsch of Dun-
|ns, returned home during the week.
* *   *
|Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Gore motored
Inn Victoria to Cowichan Lake last
|nday, returning on Monday.
* *   ♦
J\Ir. and Mrs. Cbandley and child
|tl Miss Leary spent the past week
| Riverside  Hotel,  Cowichan Lake.
* *   *
klr. and Mrs. Gibb (Imperial Bank)
l-e returned from a trip to the
ll Country ancl the Continent.
Mr. and Mrs. Cecil McGill have
been spending a month at their Summer house on Shawnigan Lake.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Bass and family left  on  Monday last  for  Prince
Rupert.
* *   *
Miss Lorna Eberts left today for
Duncans as the guest of Mrs. John
Hirsch.
* *   *
Miss Ada Keast is the guest of
her brother, Mr. Hubert Keast at
Cowichan Lake.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. G. 0. Leaske of Victoria were among the numerous visitors to the Terminal  City last week.
* *   *
Mrs. Beresford Hogg and Mr. Colin Hogg are enjoying a holiday at
Lakeside Hotel, Cowichan Lake.
* *   *
Col. and Mrs. Arthur Jones have
left for the Old Country where they
expect to spend the next six months.
Mr. ancl Mrs. Irwin are now residing at Knowle House, Head street,
for the Summer months.
* *   *
Mrs. Arthur Gore, Cook street,
leaves next week for Vancouver to
visit friends.
* *   *
Mr. Frank Sehl' ancl Mr. Hermann
Sehl were among the visitors at Riverside  Hotel this week.
* *   *
Mr. ancl Mrs. George Matthews
and family leave on Monday by the
Prince Rupert to take thc Northern
trip.
* •(•    *
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Heisterman arc spending the Summer months
at Mr. D. R. Ker's Summer house in
the  country.
Miss Vera Corbould, who has been
the guest of her sister, Mrs. E. O. S.
Scholefield, has returned to New
Westminster.
* *   *
The Misses Bodwell and Miss Josephine Oudin (Spokane) are guests
at the Strathcona Hotel, Shawnigan
Lake.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. R. Wilby ancl Miss
Gaudin enjoyed a week end at Pier
Island with Mr. and Mrs. James Harvey.
* *   *
Mr. Sydney Pitts and Miss Marian
Pitts left last Saturday for Portland.
Ore., the latter to take part in the
tennis tournament.
* *   *
Bishop Perrin, Mrs. Perrin ancl
family have returned to town after
a fortnight spent in thc country at
Mrs. Beale's bungalow on Cadboro
Bay.
* *    *
Among the numerous guests at the
Riverside Hotel, Cowichan Lake, who
motored from the city early this week
were Mr. and Mrs. S. Goucher and
family.   Mrs.   F.   Ford   and   Mr.   X.
Gowen.
* *   *•:•
Mrs. Arthur Robertson was hostess
at a most charming "At Home" on
Thursday last. The house was profusely decorated with roses and sweet
peas, while the tea table was very
daintily arranged with sweet peas ancl
ferns.
The Song and the Man
(By Johnston  McGulley)
(Continued from previous issue)
What Wu tbe Matter
Tlie Talkative Man—Tliere are seven
towns III this State without puhllc libraries.
Tlie Silent Man—Don't they know Carnegie's address, or are they afraid to
ask?
Deadly Talk
"I'm dying to see that show."
"You   oUKht   to.     It's   perfectly   kill
ing.'
"What-a you mean?'' asked Mucia.
"Why you give-a me da hundred?
Where you get-a it?"
—with freedom's holy light.
"I don't suppose you have any sense
at all, havc you? Well, just listen to
this. Men are scarce. You can't
make a white man come out here because he can get just as much money
and live where it's a little decent. So
I have to get newcomers. Scc? Because men arc so scarce ancl the road
wants them in a hurry, 1 get two dollars for every man I get. They are
listed at two dollars a clay. They
get one dollar. I get thc other dollar. See? The compauy doesn't
care. It gets the work and pays for
it. doesn't it? It's my little game,
The officers are wise, and they don't
care. They tell me to go ahead as
long as I keep enough men in camp
to rush things. Understand now?
I'm the whole thing clown here. If
you want to work you have to do it
at a dollar a day. If you don't you
can starve while walking back to thc
nearest town. And when you get
there you'l probably get jailed. They
don't like to have foreigners hanging
around."
"Don't like"—Mucia stumbled lo his
feet—"don't like to have-a foreigners
around?" he asked unbelievingly.
Then he threw out an arm oratoric-
ally. "Dees es da free country," he
said. "It es da free for all men. Der
es  no foreigner here."
Cosetti glared at him. "You're a
fool," he said. "You'll get over that.
1 had that, too, when I first came.
Well, what do you say?"
"Dey would kill-a me," said Mucia
hoarsely.
"1 don't see why. They can't help
themselves. You can explain that to
them. I'd do it myself, only it will
be better to have some one who came
with them do it."
"You afraid," said Mucia. "Dey
would kill-a you, too."
"I guess you don't know there're a
few hundred men camped down thc
line. They'd pack the whole lot of
you out of camp in two hours if they
got the word. They don't like you
any too well as it is."
"I  not understand—" began Mucia.
"I don't care whether you understand or not. Are you going to take
the hundred ancl do as I say? That's
what I want to know. Don't you see
you can't do anything else?"
"Wc can," said Mucia. "We can
stop-a da work!"
Cosetti sprang to his feet. His face
was purple with sudden anger. "Do
it!" he screamed. "And if you do,
you don't get a cent. V" report everv
one of you for breaking tools. I'll tell
the paymaster you have caused more
damage than the money you've earned
would pay for. I'll tell him the company doesn't owe you a cent. Ancl
then I'll have you kicked out of
camp, and you'll walk fifty miles before you get anywhere, and starve
while you're doing it. You'll do just
as  I  say,  Mucia."
"Wc want-a what we earn!" Mucia
cried. "We work-a hard. Wc break-a
no tools. Wc eat not-a much, an' we
pay-a da board. It es not fair to
cheat us!"
"I don't care whether it is fair or
not. That isn't the question, Don't
you see what you're up against?"
"I shall tell-a da Mr. Foreman MacGuire," Mucia said.
"lie hasn't a thing to say about it,"
replied  Cosetti.
(Continued on  Page 11) to
THE WEEK,  SATURDAY, JULY 26, 1910
Gas Demonstration And Salesroom
Our new demonstrating room here is filling a long-felt want in Victoria. It is
right in the business part of the city where ladies are shopping every day. It is
right up-to-date with a full line of modern gas goods absolutely needed by up-to-date
people—
Gas Ranges, Gas Stoves, Gas
Radiators, Gas Water Heaters,
Etc., Etc.
Everything required in good gas apparatus.   It is in charge of a man who knows this business from A to Z, one who is thoroughly competent in every way to
show the goods and demonstrate the safety, economy and simplicity of gas for heating and cooking purposes.
WE CORDIALLY INVITE VICTORIANS TO CALL HERE EVEN IF THEY  DO  NOT DESIRE  TO  BUY.   THEY ARE  WELCOME  EVEN
MERELY AS SIGHTSEERS.   IF THEY WISH TO PURCHASE THEY WILL BE SURPRISED AT OUR REASONABLENESS OF PRICE.
A fine "Gurney" Gas Stove, a splendid cooker, connected free for $20.00
An exceptionally good and handsome "Jewel" Stove, connected free for $28.00
An unrivalled "Jewel" Gas Range, with two Oven", one small oven for breakfast
and light cooking, the other a large and roomy oven for baking bread and
roasting meat; connected free for  $40.00
Hotplate Gas Cookers, up from  $2.50
Gas Toasters, the newest device, right up-to-the-minute 50c
Victoria Gas Company, Limited
652 YATES STREET
Salesroom
652 YATES STREET
YACHTING NOTES
Owing to the time devoted to the
International Regatta, local yachtsmen are now dealing with an accumulation of sordid business, and in consequence things have been very quiet
around the yacht club, with the Secretary away, at Stewart. However,
Commodore Cuppage has announced
his intention to call a meeting of the
Management Committee to arrange
for a club cruise and weekly races.
It has also been suggested that some
Saturday afternoon might be devoted
to manoeuvres by the sailing craft,
assisted by the power boats, and a
plan to carry out this idea is under
consideration.
The Commodore also remarked that
Victoria was one of the hardest
places to inform the general public
of what was in their own interests;
that is to say, to make them really
grasp the facts. In illustration of
this statement hc declared that even
now, the majority of Victorians did
not know of the great compliment
paid them when it was decided at the
annual meeting of the International
Yacht Racing Association, that Victoria should bc the meeting place of
the International Regatta for the next
two years. With the experience gained this season, Victoria has a chance
to make thc next Regatta an even
greater success than the last, and
with each meeting better than thc
previous one there is reason to anticipate that the International Regatta
will come to be a permanent annual
event in this city.
It is remarkable what can bc done
in three years by a few people with
courage and perseverance. In 1907,
the present Commodore—who was
then Secretary—took the flag of the
Victoria Yacht Club which had been
forced to vacate the inner harbor,
and requested Mr. Ben Temple to
fly it over his boat house "just to
keep the flag flying." There it stayed until 1908 when, owing to the efforts of three determined gentlemen,
the Victoria Yacht Club opened its
new club house. It was during the
darkest hour of the Club's history in
1907 that it was predicted by the present Commodore that 1910 would see
the International Regatta held in Victoria. He says: "Victorians do not
yet realize what incalculable benefits
will accrue by making Victoria the
yachting centre of the Pacific Northwest. Victoria does not lend herself
naturally for a city of smoky industries, but with her breezy waters and
delightful climate, she may well prove
thc Mecca for the yachtsman and the
power boat enthusiast."
The oniy thing that is likely to
worry the Yacht Club is the limited
space for anchorage with the increasing number of boats, and the narrowness of thc steamer channel. This reminds the writer of a true story lately overheard in a Victoria restaurant.
A Scotch Captain of a sailing vessel was relating some of his experiences—real and fictitious—when he
happened to mention that he was in
Victoria twenty-three years ago.
"Say, Cap'n Sandy," said one of
his audience, "twenty-three years is
a mighty long time; you must find
an awful lot of change in Victoria?"
The captain regarded his questioner
sadly. "Boys," he said, "on ma first
visit here we dropped anchor in the
Royal Roads and I was one of them
who moved the Skipper into Victoria.
In the harbor they were drilling and
blasting a rock, and today they are
still drilling thc same rock. Now.
maw boys, there's not much change
in Victoria."
CORRESPONDENCE
The Week accepts no responsibility
for the views expressed by its correspondents. Communications will be
inserted whether signed by the real
name of the writer or a nom de
plume, but the writer's name and address must be given to the Editor as
an evidence of bona fides. In no case
will it be divulged without  consent.
Does Farming Pay?
Dromore, South Salt Spring,
- July 13th, 1910;
The Editor of The Week.
Sir,—In your issue of July 9th you
claim that farming as a whole does
not pay. If this is so it shows a state
of affairs which calls for considerable
missionary work from the Department of Agriculture, for the fault
must lie with the wrong methods employed by the farmers themselves.
Perhaps we on the Gulf Islands are
in a more favourable position than
others in B. C, but certainly your
statement does not hold good here.
With poultry returning over $2 per
lien with pork at 10 to 12 cents per
pound, and with butter and mutton at
their present figure, giving profits of
from $20 to $40 per cow, and from
$4 to $5 per head for sheep (all above
profits are net) there must be something wrong somewhere if there is
not a good profit shown on the
amount of capital invested. But here
is probably the crux, for if thc capital is insufficient the income of course
is proportionate and may not cover
the cost of living.
Be this as it may, many men here
without a cent more income than their
farms produce, arc living well ancl
saving money, which money, I notice, 1
they invest in agricultural machinery
amongst other things, which they]
surely would not do did not their
experience warrant them in thus
spending it.
Merc, on Fulford Harbour, our destiny is to become a summer resort,
once the Saanich tram line is completed, our conditions arc going to bc
very   different   in   the   future,   but   I
could indicate men amongst my neighbours who are admirable illustrations
of my contention.
I believe thc impression is only
too common that any individual can
become a farmer, however great a
duffer he may have proved himself
at other matters. Let him try his
hand at it, however, and he will inevitably prove a failure.
A scientific farmer needs to be possessed of more, and more varied,
knowledge than many a professional
man, and, with the present day competition, the unscientific man must go
to the wall. This is the kind of man
who may truly say his farming does
not pay. Perhaps in the districts alluded to the farmers havc more land
than they can manage with the help
available, or it may bc that their income is sufficient, or they may have
other interests, but that money cannot be made by proper farming, or
by the growing of small fruits is incredible.
Orchard work under present conditions is perhaps over lauded, but we
may some day get a scheme of universal co-operation such as I have
advocated in your columns on several
occasions whicii will remedy this.
Yours truly,
W. J. L. HAMILTON
the ignorant and criminal, and yol
shut out the peaceable and indus
trious Chinese, because, you say, wL
are heathen and smoke opium. Yol
say the truth; we are heathen and wj
do smoke opium; but you are Chris|
tian and you drink whisky. And
I wcre a woman I would rather m*
husband smoke opium every time thai
drink your Christian whisky. Opiun
Dtits him asleep; opium makes liin
harmless like a corpse; whisky make;
him wild like a beast; whisky wakes
up devil and makes him brute. 'Merican man comes home full of whisky
—kicks wife; Chinaman comes home
full of opium—wife kick him. You b(
Christian, we be heathen. With my
knowledge of your American saloon
if I were to return to my country
and the issue were a choice betweer
the opium den of my heathen China
and the saloon of your Christian America, I would choose for my people
opium rather than whisky."
A Heathen's Rebuke
Sometimes a realization of the real
nature of the liquor traffic and the
licence system may bc gathered from
consideration from the viewpoint of
people who do not tolerate these
evils. Some time ago, at a gathering
of literary people in New York city,
one of the speakers was the editor
of a Chinese newspaper, and his
theme was thc exclusion of Chinamen from thc United States. In his
address hc compared the opium vice I
to alcoholic indulgence, saying: "You
have singled out my people from all
hitman creation as unworthy of your
hospitality. You let in Italian, you
let the Hun, thc Turk, the Jew and
the Russian, you let in the underworld  of Europe and Asia—the idle.
Sen. Jonathan P. Dolllver, of Iowa,
In illustration of the actions of a Congressional antagonist who was making
an effort to patch up an old measure
rather than accept a new one, tells this
story:
A kindly old lady sympathizing with
a one-legged man exclaimed, "It must
be a terrible thing to go through life
without your leg, but you must remember, my poor man, it will be restored
to you in the next world."
"I know it will, mum, but that ain't
very encouragln', for it was cut off
when I was a baby, an' it won't comt
within a couple of foot of the ground
when it's restored."
Deceivers, Ever
They were arguing about the allege,
inborn strain of deceitfulness in woman
and she retaliated by citing the Instances of men deceiving their wives.
"I suppose," said he, "that you hole
that a man should never deceive lib
wife."
"Oh, no," she smiled back at him;
shouldn't go so far as that. How wouh
lt be possible for the average man t<
get a wife if he didn't deceive Her?"
"Rubber"
Ella—The musicians are staring at u
all the time.
Ktella—Yes, they seem to be a sor
nr rubber band. THE WEEK, SATUKDAY, JULY 26,  1910
li
One Hour of a
Woman's Life
By Margaret Kinloch
|She had sat alone for an hour or
(ire, gazing into the fire, with her
lebrows     slightly     contracted,     as
ough trying to solve some difficult
lablem.   The dark circles under her
j;s  and  deadly pallor of her face,
Ith its white strained look, showed
tns of a severe mental struggle.
JHe was coming shortly for his an-
Jer and she was no nearer making
i her mind now than she was three
K- ago, when she had last seen him.
le wondered vaguely, if any other
|*man  was  in the same perplexing
Ration as herself.   The question she
Is trying to decide was a moral one,
ll consisted of the choice between
fnding the rest of her days in lux-
and ease with the man she loved,
| in the continued daily torture of
presence of a husband whom she
|retly   loathed   and   despised,   and
was leaving on the morrow for
liusiness  trip  to  England,  at  the
|ught of which she was passionate-
grateful; it would be a slight re-
le from his detested presence.
In whichever way her decision lay,
felt there would always be a sense
|;hame and degradation.    She was
a  particularly  religious  woman,
| somehow the Puritan teaching of
childhood clung around her, and
[could not wholly escape from its
nories.   If only she could consult
leone, but that was impossible, she
It decide for herself, and at once,
lof course she would tell him that
[whole thing was impossible, they
mad to think of going away to-
ler.   She was so proud, she could
I bear  to have  the  finger  of the
(d pointed at her in scorn.    They
say good-bye, and never meet
In after today.   She looked up ner-
ply at the clock, it was almost tea-
How the   minutes    flew!    He
Ild soon be here.   She longed for,
I dreaded  his   coming;   when   thc
of his presence was on her, her
Iment would no longer be sway-
|y reason; when his lips rested on
she knew what her answer must
She rose and began to pace the
rapidly,  actio.,   bringing   relief
ler over-wrought nerves.    If only
lething would prevent his coming,
1 thought, but that  was  very un-
By,   he   was   always   so   punctual,
1 could not recall a single instance
■vhich he had failed to appear at
1 appointed time.    The only thing
Jo, was to make up her mind to rein firm, and resist his pleading,
lie  suddenly stood  still  in  front
liis portrait, the eyes looked out
I seemed to hold her, she began to
Je softly to herself, as she thought
■their first meeting. It was an
Jfinable some thing' in those same
that had first attracted her and
laled a newer meaning in life's
|teries. She had never really lived,
she had known him, she had ex-
fled like a flower in the light of
llove and now she must give him
and forever, while her whole soul
II out for him. And he? Would
J'orget? There would be lots of
lien ready to console him. The
light was maddening, death itself
■Id be preferable. She clenched
|hands wildly, her brain seemed on
She could not, and would not
; him up.   She would go with him
lie end of the earth if lie wished
|She would defy all the laws of
| and man, which tended to keep
apart.      Frightened    by    the
ligth   of   her   passion,   she   sank
|i exhausted on the sofa, and fell
a   state   of   semi-consciousness,
which  she was  roused by the
brance of the butler with the tea-
and very soon a visitor was an-
Iced.   His air as he advanced into
loom, was that of a man to whom
Je is a think unknown.   He came
|trd joyously, and taking both her
said, "You have made up your
Ito come, and believe me darling,
■vill never regret it."    "No, no,"
Inswercd passionately, "I cannot,
Je  not  go.    Do  not  tempt  me
It.    It would bc a life-long re-
lor us both.   I have decided.    T
|:d   before  ynu  came,   I   cannot
go." She spoke hurriedly and as she
faced him with quivering lips, there
was a hunted look in her eyes. "Dear,"
he said, "you are tired, you don't
know what you are saying. You must
come with me. You will never regret
it, I cannot, and will not live without you." He drew her gently down
beside him, and kissed her. She began to waver, the sense of his presence was overpowering, her decision
seemed to vanish, the whole world
seemed to crumble beneath her feet.
She tried to resist him, but with her
head on his shoulder, and his kisses
on her lips, she felt completely at his
mercy. He ceased to argue but
watched the quivering of her closed
eyelids, as he depicted their life together in the gay capitals of Europe.
She trembled slightly, like one with
a sudden chill, then lay perfectly still,
and when she opened her eyes again,
he looked into their purple depths,
and knew that victory was his, as her
answer came like the far off sobbing
of the sea.
Half an hour afterwards she was
alone, thinking of the details in connection with her departure, and conjuring up the remarks of her friends,
and the comments in the society papers when her flight became known.
Mechanically she picked up a
volume of Christine Rossetti whicii
lay on a table near, and began to turn
over the leaves, more to relieve the
tension of her thoughts than for the
set purpose of. reading. Her attention
was suddenly riveted on the words of
"Isodora."
"I must choose twixt God and Man,
And I dare not hesitate,
Oh! how little is life's span,
And Eternity, how great."
The verse came like a shock to her
over-wrought brain, and had the same
sobering up effect as a cold water
shower on an intoxicated man. Her
whole mind became illuminated, it
was as though some unknown hand
had pulled her back from the brink
of a great whirlpool ready to engulf
her. The book slipped from her hands
to the floor, while an awful look of
pain and despair gathered in her eyes.
She had not reckoned with God or
Eternity, she had only thought of
herself. But what if there should be
a hereafter? What if Eternity were
more than a dream? She was buying
her present happiness at the expense
of her own soul and his, and,after all,
it might only be for a very short
time. Life was so uncertain, and then
afterwards, who knows? Her head
was throbbing painfully; everything
became misty as she sank unconsciously on her knees, calling dumbly on a Deity, she had of late years
all but forgotten but whom she vaguely believed would help her to bear
the awful anguish she was called upon to endure. How long she knelt
there she never knew. She had lived
a lifetime of suffering in the past hour,
her soul torn between the conflicting
passions of love, jealousy and hatred.
For a brief moment she had known
the joy of surrender, swiftly followed
by the agony of renunciation. She
had attained the Calvary of human
sorrow, henceforth, there would be
nothing but burnt ashes in the depths
of her being to feed the flame of any
emotion, either pleasure or pain, she
might experience.
When she rose a few minutes later
she seemed to have suddenly grown
old, while the future stretched wearily and blankly in front of her, as
she went slowly upstairs to dress for
dinner.
=i* * * -j: -j:
Next day on ringing the bell somewhat impatiently, and asking for the
lady of the house, a frequent and well
known visitor paled perceptibly, on
receiving the answer to his enquiry
from the French butler, "Madame is
not at home, she left this morning
for Europe with Monsieur."
Taking- Care of the Neighbors
The new clerk at the drug-store returned the prescription to the old customer with a request that he wait till
tlie boss  returned.
"But why can't you fill It out?"
"I  could  If you  was a stranger,  but
I   ain't  to  till   'em   for folks  that   lives
about here."
Vacationists
Remember that good pure
Soap, pure Complexion Cream,
good Face Powder or Talcum
are needed in your grip.
BOWES'  BUTTERMILK
TOILET LOTION
Is unrivalled for giving that
cool, dainty look so much to be
desired. It banishes sunburn,
keeps the face soft and vel-
vetty, makes hands and arms of
lily whiteness. 25c and 50c a
bottle here only.
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
1228 Government Street
Near Yates
BLUE PRINTS
Any Length in One Piece
Six Cents per foot
TIMBER AND LAND
MAPS
DRAUGHTING
Electric Blue Print &
Map Co.
1218 Langley St. -  Victoria,'B.C.
The Song and the Man
(Continued from  Page  9)
Outside there were steps on the
gravel. The door was flung open, and
MacGuire entered. "I've got this
much to say about it," he said angrily
"I've been listening to you, Cosetti,
and I'll say that you treat your own
countrymen like dogs. I'll say you
are a damned scoundrel, and I'd like
to smash your head. You ought tp
be run out of the country."
"Hard words don't do any good,"
smiled Cosetti.
"You will help-a us?" cried Mucia,
seizing MacGuire by the arm. "You'll
help-a us, Mr. Foreman MacGuire?"
"You don't understand, Mucia,"
said the foreman. "I can't do anything. Cosetti has told you the truth.
The company doesn't care. You have
to do as Cosetti says or else walk out
of camp and starve. And I wouldn't
advise you to do that. Some of the
ranchers around this part of the country would kill an Italian on sight.
I'm sorry, Mucia, but I can't help you.
But I'll promise you this: if ever
I get the chance I'll beat in the head
of this scoundrel here. And I'm going to ge the chance."
"You can't help-a us?" cried Mucia.
He stumbled toward thc door. "An'
we thought dees da happy country,"
he moaned. "Already we were loving
it. We thought da wives an' da
little ones could come-a soon, an' we
would be happy. We—why, we learn-
a da song because it es da song of
dees country. Down-a at da camp da
men are now singing it. An' I taught-
a 'em—I taught-a 'em."
"I know, Mucia," said MacGuire
softly.
At the door the Italian turned suddenly. There was rage in his face.
"I not take-a da hundred dollars!" he
screamed. "I take-a da dollar a day
as da others. Your country es a lie;
you arc a lie. Cosetti. You. MacGuire. arc a lie. because you lct-.t
him do it. an' try nothing to stop-a
him. An' your song—your song es a
lie. An' da wives an' da little ones—
dey cannot come. An' dc es nothing
but-a da hard work an' nothing for da
work except bread. You are all a lie.
Nothing to hope.   An' da wives an' da
little ones* "    Mucia  was  sobbing
against the dour. "Nothing but-a da
hard work, nothing to hope," lie cried
Vancouver Island
Cold Storage and
Ice Company
VICTORIA, B.C.
Goods received at all hours.
Expert attention given.
Consignments solicited
Phone 2282    P.O. Box 875
Barrington Hall
THE STEEL CUT BAKER-IZED COFFEE, in sealed tins.
Per lb 50c
Just try it once.
OUR PURE MOCHA AND JAVA COFFEE         has that
delicious rich flavor.   Per lb 40c
We make a Specialty of Fresh Fruits
H. 0. KIRKHAM
Phone 178
FANCY GROCERIES
Corner Fort and Douglas Street
Bevan, Gore & Eliot
LIMITED
Members Vancouver, Victoria, Spokane and
Stewart Stock Exchanges
PRIVATE WISE TO VANCOUVER
DAILY TELEGRAPHIC QUOTATIONS
ALL ACTIVE STOCKS BOUGHT AND SOLD ON
COMMISION
LISTED STOCKS SOLD ON MARGIN
STEWART TOWNSITE LOTS FOR SALE
Room 1-4, Hibben Block
1122 Government St.       -       Victoria, B.C.
P. O. Box 249
Phones 163 and 2124
REMEMBER
We  are   the   only   firm   that
can please in
ARTISTIC DECORATING,
PAINTING,
PAPER-HANGING or
SIGN WORK
C H. Tite & Co.
Phone 2050   - 620 Johnston St.
Satisfaction
We guarantee quality and satisfaction with every purchase of
Groceries.
Phone orders carefully attended to.
A. POOL
623 Yates St. Phone 448
Watson's Old Stand
bitterly.    "An' da wives an' da little
ones "    He threw open the door,
turned toward them, thc tears streaming down his cheeks, but with eyes
blazing. His lists were clenched al
his sides. "Lies!" he cried. "All
lies!"    And then he was gone.
And through the open  door there
came, from the distance down by the
camp-fires, the echo of the song,
(The end)
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria 12
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 23, 1910
EDITORIAL NOTES
CIVIC WORK
The Colonist thinks that there
is a great improvement in the appearance of the City streets and
in the general conduct of civic
work. It is inevitable that work
must tell, even though it be spasmodic, instead of being continuous, and Tlie Week has no doubt
but that the City Engineer will
produce order from chaos, but
meanwhile it invites the Colonist
to study its cartoon on the front
page of tlie current issue. "Lest
we forget" the things that were.
OUR LAND DEFENCES
The London Times states authoritatively that the report of General French on the military conditions in Canada will make very
unsatisfactory reading for those
who are providing the sinews of
war. This will be no surprise to
a majority of people, who realise
that the Canadian military authorities are altogether too intolerant
of tlie advice of those who could
instruct them. In fact, the record of the last fifteen years shows
that very little of this good advice
has been taken, and that militarism in the Dominion has been
largely exploited for tlie glory of
millionaire stock-brokers and lumbermen. General French is a
practical soldier and with him
militarism is a business. That
liis report will be discouraging to
Sir Frederick Borden one can
readily believe, but that ought not
to prevent its acceptance by the
Government,
ENTERPRISE
The interest in the Xaas River
lands is greatly enhanced by the
enterprise of the well-known capitalist, Mr. James Rear of Vancouver, who has acquired control of a
large tract for colonization purposes, and left for London on
Tuesday last to close the financial
arrangements of his scheme. Mr.
Rear has secured a bunch of the
finest land in British Columbia
which must inevitably become the
base of supplies for Prince Rupert and the Portland Canal mining districts. He is arranging to
put at least two hundred families
into the country within a year and
they will all be of English descent.
RAILWAY STRIKES
Tlie Canadian Pacific Railway
Co. bas just averted a strike which
would have affected the whole
of their Eastern Division. The
Grand Trunk lias not been as fortunate, and at tlie time of writing
there are many thousands of men
lying idle and the whole of thc
Grand Trunk system is in a state
of chaos. The details of the dispute have not been published, but
it is generally known that it is a
question of a higher wage schedule. It is a notorious fact that
the Grand Trunk pays thc lowest
wages of any railway on the Continent and exacts the longest
hours. There is little doubt but
that   its   employees   will   emerge
from the present conflict victorious; and it is not a little singular
that the Company should have refused arbitration. It is greatly
to be regretted that the Conciliation Act could not have been com-
pnlsorily employed.
BANK DEPOSITS
Three years ago Tlie Week published a series of articles on currency, in which it pointed out that
local depositors had $21,000,000
lying in the banks on which they
were drawing three per cent interest, whilst the hanks were investing the money in the Prairies and
even in the East at rates varying
from ten to twenty-five per cent.
It is pointedly asked why this
money could not be made available for local development. After
considering the matter for three
years The Colonist has come to
the conclusion tliat the suggestion
was a good one; it now endorses
the stand of Tlie Week and writes
in the hope that the owners of
these millions may see if they cannot discover means whereby Victoria money can be used more
largely in enterprises directly for
the advantage of Victoria.
some boisterous companions, came
flying clown the hill, in a big
heavy car, at the rate of something
like forty miles an hour. The
Victoria gentleman drove into the
nearest place of refuge. The big
car did not. slacken speed, and
carried away the mud-guard and
axle-cap of the smaller machine.
An inch more, and the impact
would have resulted in a terrible
catastrophe. This is not the first
time, by many, that The Week has
received complaints of Coombe's
recklessness, and, if they are as
well founded as the last, tlie authorities have no right to allow hiin
to retain his license for a single
dav.
RECKLESSNESS
There is a chauft'env in Victoria named Coombe who should
be deprived of his license in the
interests of public safety and of
chauffeurs who try to behave decently. Last Sunday, as a well-
known gentleman and his wife
were climbing Sooke Summit in
their little auto, this man, with
ULTRA VIRES
The new City Solicitor, Mr. Mc-
Diarmid, possess legal knowledge
and some sense of humour. He
had the discernment and the courage to tell the Mayor that his new
liquor by-law would not hold
water, and consequently the ridiculous actions proposed against
tlie New England and Levy's Restaurants were promptly withdrawn. The Week has always
1 maintained that any man of British descent would insist on having
a glass of beer with his meals if
he wants it—and would get it.
The same man would inevitably
refuse to be hound down to have
his supper not later than eleven
o'clock. In this matter tlie sympathies of The Week arc entirely
in accord with the views of AV. C.
Ward, as expressed in his letter to
the local papers. It is, however,
equally convinced that such laws
as are not ultra vires should
enforced, and in this connectiol
begs to inform the authorities thi
there are some hotels in Victor!
where it is as easy to buy a driJ
on Sunday as it is on any othl
day—and that without buyif
meals. This is a subject wortl
of attention, and unless the polf
get busy it is the intention of Tj
Week to say more on the subje
A NATIONAL SPIRIT
We hear a good deal these dq
ahout Canada being a "Natiol
and about the cultivation of a "II
tional Spirit."   If nationhood al
a  national spirit mean anythi
they     mean     solidarity,     coi
d'esprit, pluck and courage.   Sol
observers will be apt to think tl
Canada exhibits very few of thj
qualities, outside the columns'
the   newspapers.   Nothing   ml
disgraceful has been witnessed!
the history of the Dominion tl|
the   cowardice   of  the  gangs ]
white   labourers   in   Vancou^
who, at the bidding of a hand
of unruly Dagoes, left their wc
and were so intimidated that tl
have not since shown up.   Thil
a precious specimen of the sujl
iority of the 'white man," anq
the achievements of Trades UnJ
ism, yet it can be matched al
tlie   American   Continent.
nothing is more conspicuous tofl
traveller  than the growing cl
ardice  bf  the  people,   wlienq
physical   violence   is   threatei
The irony of the situation is
phasized when one recalls the
sent    agitation    against   ligli-J
with tlie fists and remembers
the natural weapon of the Dagl
tlie knife or the stiletto.
ALV0 von ALVENSLEBEN, limited.
Members of Vancouver Stock Exchange
and Victoria Stockbrokers' Association
Real Estate
Timber Lands
Mining Properties
Has Opened Offices at=
mi QOVERNMENT STREET
We respectfully solicit listings of City Property, Improved Farms, Farm Lands
and Timber Tracts.
We have some very fine buys in Stewart Townsite Lots and Inside Properties
in Victoria and Vancouver.
Phone 2445
1111 Government St. P. 0. Drawer 618

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