BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

Week Dec 14, 1907

Item Metadata

Download

Media
pwv-1.0344221.pdf
Metadata
JSON: pwv-1.0344221.json
JSON-LD: pwv-1.0344221-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): pwv-1.0344221-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: pwv-1.0344221-rdf.json
Turtle: pwv-1.0344221-turtle.txt
N-Triples: pwv-1.0344221-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: pwv-1.0344221-source.json
Full Text
pwv-1.0344221-fulltext.txt
Citation
pwv-1.0344221.ris

Full Text

 nr turn % s rs_r_T_irr«_Trtt_-___
\ Kingsford Smith & Co.
I Stock and General
; AUCTIONEERS
a    Commission and Real Entate Agents,
a
I 860 Granville, Vancouver.
JUAiUUAJUUUUUlAJUUJUJUUUlA^
Victoria Edition
The Week
A British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vancouver B. -8.
2 -rinnrrjiryrirr-nnr-rnrM-a
Stewart Williams, R, c. Jintoa
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION AND
REAL ESTATE A6EHTS
Si FORT ST. VICTORIA, R. C.
3juajjU_UJUUUUUUUUUUUtlUt
Vol. IV.   No. 46
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1907
One Dollar Per Annum
The action of the Lieu-
A Serious tenant-Governor in connec-
Blunder. tion with the Asiatic Im
migration question and the
disallowance of Mr. Bowser's Natal Act
is being widely canvassed by the Press,
and although not all papers have gone
as far as the Province and the World in
demanding  his   resignation,   there is   a
general consensus of opinion that his conduct calls for an explanation.   The facts
are very simple, and the incident devoid
of complication, and before condemning -
him it would be more satisfactory if he
could be induced to state the reasons which
led to what can only be regarded as a
most regrettable circumstance.    With respect to the contract which Mr. Dunsmuir
so unwisely signed for the wholesale importation of Japanese labour to be.employed at the Wellington Collieries, it is
difficult to see how he can escape condem-1
-^ nation for conniving at a breach of the
law, since it is Certain that n6 considerable number of Orientals could be imported in compliance with its provisions.
That a man occupying the highest official
position should show this disregard of his
legal obligations.is a matter which.all will
regret and which in every sense is inimical
to the public interest.    It is not unfair
to carry the argument further and to question the propriety of a public servant running counter to public opinion even if
his action involved no breach of the law.
Por this policy there can be no defence,
indeed the only excuse that has been or
can be urged is the insufficiency of white
labour, but it remains to be seen whether
Mr. Dunsmuir exhausted every reasonable
means of procuring white labour before he
took a step which he knew would antagonize public opinion and intensify the impression only too prevalent on Vancouver
Island that he is apt to be unmindful of
11 the wishes of his own employees.   It is,
■ however, when Mr. Dunsmuir's conduct
in signing this labour contract is consid-
I ered in the light of his act as Lieutenant-
1 Governor  in  disallowing  Mr.   Bowser's
Natal Act, that the incident assumes its
true proportions.   If Mr. Dunsmuir had
I not been an employer of labour and had
had  no  financial  interest  in  importing
Japanese, it would be incumbent on him
1 to explain why he disallowed Mr. Bowser's
.Bill, but unfortunately while he is not
released from the obligation to explain his
conduct, few people now consider it neces-
1 savy.    The  Japanese contract furnishes
only too obvious a reason, and unless a
|very much stronger one is forthcoming it
I will be accepted as thc true one.    In this
connection it is difficult to exonerate the
Lieutenant-Governor    from    censure    in
allowing the Premier to lie under the imputation of having advised him in the
matter.    Mr. McBride has withstood the
most hostile criticism and the denunciation
{of his political opponents on the mistaken
[supposition that the Lieutenant-Governor
j acted on his advice or at any rate without
Ihis disapproval.   Mr. McBride with clue
regard to the responsibility of his own
.position, and the dignity of the Lieutenant-
Governorship has remained silent, but it is
I not   so   easy   to   understand   why   the
1 Lieutenant-Governor   should   have   been
willing to allow the Premier to be made
la scapegoat when a word from him would
J have informed the public of the true forwardness of the situation.    It is impossible to conceive that this aspect of the
case has been presented to him, or that
lie lias grasped it himself.    The outcome
is still uncertain, undoubtedly in the very
EDITORIAL
first week of the coming session, Mr.
Bowser's Bill will be re-enacted. If the
Lieutenant-Governor endorses it, as to act
constitutionally he must, he will stultify
his official conduct of last session. If he
disallows it, which is hardly conceivable,
some representation will have to be made
to the Federal Government which will
ensure the giving effect to the wishes of
the people of this Province constitutionally
embodied in Legislative enactment.
Most lovers of literature
A Prophet have heard of W. J. Daw-
In Babylon.     son.    He started life as a
theological student, entered
Didsbury College, became a Wesleyan
Methodist. Minister, and was pronounced
tion in New York. The gist of the book
is to show how utterly the various religious
denominations have failed to enlist the
sympathy of the masses, and how most
churches have developed into a species of
religious club, where the well-to-do take
their ease in Zion and the middle classes
envy them from afar. The book is a
serious contribution to the consideration
of social problems, it is brilliantly written
ancl its earnestness carries conviction. Of
course its tendency is altruistic as any
social work must be. The verdict of a
competent critic is as follows: "As a
narrative it is fascinating, as a picture of
the times it is accurate, tis an influence
for good it is powerful."
tolerated iu any frontier town. The garbage question is even more disgraceful,
not only because more inimical to the
public health but because the non-enforcement of the City By-laws is responsible
for the continuance of the nuisance. While
residents in the neighbourhood of James
Bay Flats ancl the Dallas Road have had
to put np with almost intolerable inconvenience the Council has had in its hands
a weapon which at any moment could have
terminated it. The appeals of those who
suffered were disregarded until public
opinion and the Press took the matter up
in earnest, and practically forced the Provincial , Government to intervene in a
matter which they should never have been
required to consider. Then the Council,
or at any rate the Mayor, began a course
of trickery and bluff unworthy of any
self-respecting man ancl despicable in
public servants. It was made to appear
Hint the scow was taking the worst of the
|?I. Policy
Dec. <907.
MUNICIPAL MISMANAGEMENT.
VICTORIA  THE  BEAUTIFUL-GOVERNMENT STREET UNDER THE MORLEY REGIME.
by the late Dr. Punshon to be one of the
most eloquent of the young divines of his
day. Later he joined the Congregational
in order to become pastor of the
historic Quadrant Church at Islington.
This brought him more into the limelight,
and he became a popular lecturer ancl
writer of fiction of the Socialist-religious
type. Four years ago he resigned his
pastorate to travel in the States. During
that time he has devoted himself almost
entirely to lecturing and the study of
social conditions, and the result is seen
in a remarkable book which he has just
published. It is entitled "A Prophet in
Babylon" and deals with the life story of
the popular pastor of a wealthy congrega-
As the date for the Muni-
Municipal Mis- cipal elections draws near,
Management,    the evidences of Municipal
mis-management accumulate. Thc two features most obtrusive ancl
most objectionable are the condition of our
streets nnd the garbage heaps. With the
former as with the latter the City Fathers
seem unable to cope, in spite of repeated
promises to commence re-laying Government street, it is the same disgusting condition in which it has been for many
months past. It is more than a month
since Alderman Henderson's negotiations
were said to have been carried to a successful issue, but there is no evidence
forthcoming that his scheme will end in
anything but smoke. Meanwhile the principal street of the Capital of this Province is in a condition which would not be
garbage out lo sea, when as a matter of
fuel it was mil iu commission. Then the
public were luld ihal garbage was only
being dumped tu lie burned when it was
in reality being buried with an insufficient
covering. Finally, the City .Medical
Officer, to the great Burprise of all who
know him, declared thai the garbage was
nm a menace to health but only a nuisance,
and the Mayor, without occasioning any
surprise to those who know him, charged
thc Provincial Health Officer witli being
actuated by political motives. Ami here
the matter rests, but not for long. A lew
days will see developments which will
bring up ibe Mayor and the Council with
a round turn, nml it js surely not too
much to hope that January will sec the
reproach of Municipal mis-managemenl
removed from Victoria. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1907-
Notes on
The Old Land.
By RAMBLER.
Glasgow, Sept. iv  1907.
As it is three weeks  since  I  last
inflicted a  letter  011 you,  I  suppose
you will think.I am either lost, strayed or stolen.    Last letter was from
Bath.    Before leaving there, I made
several   trips   round   the   unfortunate
Monmouth's stamping grounds.    Had
lunch in a very ancient tavern at St.
Phillip   Norton   where   he   slept   the
day before the ill-fated battle of Sedg-
moor.   Was sorry 1 had only one him
left  in  my camera and I  wanted  it
for the ruins of an old castle, formerly the stronghold of the long extinct
Hungerford family  at a  place  some
three miles distant called Furleigh, to
which I walked through a very beautiful  country,   consequently  have  no
photos  of this very interesting Inn.
Inside the "uins of the castle which
comprise   a   large   area,   is   a small
church which was erected about 600
years  ago,  the  parish   one,   but  the
Hungerfords who were apparently a
strange mixture of piety and deviltry,
appropriated it for a domestic Chapel,
and built a new parish church close
by.   The former, though not in use,
is in a good state of repair and it is
a veritable museum, the walks being
covered  with   armour,   weapons   and
relics of the family, while the vaults
to which there is access, contain many
stone  coffins   quite  intact,   in  which
are the remains of those Hungerfords
who died anywhere near. ■ They were
a  bad  lot  from all  accounts.    The
wife of one  killed her husband and
burnt his body in the kitchen fireplace,
for which latter piece of wifely kindness she was    hanged    at    Tyburn.
Their grandson to get even with the
son, with the aid of the castle priest,
tried his best to poison his wife, but
she  was too  smart  for him.    However,  as  she  was able to prove  the
intent,  hc  too came  to an  untimely
end on the scaffold.   The last of them
died   in   poverty   in   London   at   the
time  of  Charles   IT.   Their  vast  estates    are    now    in    the' * hands   of
strangers, and their castle in ruins, a
warning  to  the  wicked,  so  say  thc
righteous   people   of  the   neighbourhood.
By the way, Fnrleigh is not far
from  Spy    Park,    so    perhaps yotir
cousin,   Captain ,   may   be   in
possession  of some  of  'lie  Hunger-
ford relics.
We were rather loth to leave Bath.
We perfectly revelled in taking the
waters, guaranteed to cure all and
every ill, and only i_ a glass, cheap
at that, for it is quite yellow with a
nasty taste, so it must be efiicacious.
Arrived back in London some two
weeks ago. Spent a very enjoyable
ten days chere. Took in several
theatres. Saw Wyndham in thc
"Liars." Best piece of acting I think
I ever saw. The play is nothing,
simply depicting a phase of society
life. Only seven people on the stage,
but all good, could not have been
better.
1 lived pretty nearly in the
Museums and Art Galleries. The
first night we were in London, wc
went round to the Brompton Oratory.
After leaving Bath we spent a couple
of days at Glastonbury and Wells in
order to sec the ruins of the old Abbey at the former, and thc Cathedral
at the latter place, consequently had
to return by way of Bristol. From
that city to London it took just two
hours, never made a stop and travelled
on an average of over sixty miles an
hour. They do have a fine railway
system in England, with a road-bed
that cannot be beaten, and double
tracks, they can go any speed they
like apparently. Could not commence to read the names of the stations as we passed through.
Well, to return to London and the
Oratory, my wife wanted to return
thanks for mercies vouchsafed to her
on that particular run. As it happened they were celebrating the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin,
whatever that may mean, so the
Church was crowded, and T was very
much interested in the ceremony. Af-
The Merchants Bank
Canada
Established 1864..
Capital, fully paid $6,000,000
Reserve Funds   4,000,000
Head Office: Montreal.
Banking By Mail.
Deposits and withdrawals can
be made by mail; no delay, and
will receive prompt attention.
Savings Bank Department.
Interest allowed quarterly at
highest current rate.
Victoria Branch: R. F. TAYLOR,
Manager.
Cn.in.ese- made Skirts ^Overalls
MUST GO J
UNION-MADE
RN BRAND
BUTTING AHEAD.
ter celebrating a kind of Mass, a
procession went round the Church.
First came an effigy of Christ on the
Cross, then a lot of Priests in all
kinds of rigs, then on a raised platform a lull-sized statue of Mary attired in a modern costume, then more
Priests carrying banners and chanting. Now what struck me forcibly
was this: You will remember how in
the ancient Mesopotamian mythologies, the original high gods were
relegated to obscurity and eventually
were to the masses of the people only
a name, while the subordinate and
subsidiary usurped the place of their
"betters," so to speak. For instance,
Ea was the original great and omnipotent god amongst the Chaldean nations, but after many centuries had
passed away he was scarcely known
and Asshur in the latter had taken
his place. Now it appears to me the
same laws of evolution are at work
in the Christian mythology, to a
greater degre in the Roman Catholic
than in the Protestant phase of. it,
but still in both. The Roman Catholics have about ceased , to trouble
about Jehovah and Mary is gradually ousting her Son from his high
position. While the Protestant has
brought the Christ to the point of
the comparative eclipse of the Father.
On this particular occasion the image
of Christ was obtu a foot long and
no ope appeared to take any particular interest in it, while all the prostrating, honour and glory were to the
Mother Mary in life size. Moreover,
in the sermon, the Holy Ghost was
never mentioned, Jehovah only glossed over, and though the Son was
awarded the high attributes, to the
Virgin was given the worship as being the power behind the throne. ' In
a lesser degree the Protestant is gradually making the Son usurp the functions of the Father.
While on religion, you will have
noticed the deceased wife's sister
Marriage Act has at last passed. The
Bishops, especially the Archbishop of
Canterbury, and the Bishop of London, have placed themselves in the
wrong over it. I enclose an article
from the Conservative Telegraph upon the subject which is indicative of
lots of trouble ahead for the Church.
The fault lies with thc higher clergy
entirely, or rather a portion of them,
for they are by no means a compact
body, and are accordingly in no shape
to fight the solid Non-Conformist
phalanx. I had some very interesting conversations with the Suffragan
Bishop of Derby on matters of the
kind. He stayed in the same hotel
with us. A very liberal and sensible
who could see the dangers to the
Church through the intolerance of the
Ecclesiastical authorities to dissenters.
So much for religion, will now go
back to lighter subjects.
I would like to send you a photo
of myself. I am sure you would not
recognize me. Am falling gradually
into English ways. I now wear a
hard real necktie, and stand-up collars.   What do you think of that?
By the way, that "Times" book
store   is   a   wonderful   institution.   I
used to think good books cheap at
Mttdies, but it is not a patch to the
"Times." They almost give them
away, new as well as second hand.
Have bought quite a few, principally
travels. Am sending them home with
the wife's dry goods, so you will see
them. Do dearly love going round
the old book stalls.
Before leaving London, spent a day
at Richmond with some very nice
people we met in Guernsey. They took
us about eight miles up the river in
their punt boat. It is wonderful how
they manage to propel these boats
with their long poles, women as well
as men being experts at it. We had
tea on board and returned in the
moonlight, hundreds of boats on the
water, all with their lights constituting a very pretty scene.
How strangely one meets people in
London. One would think a thousand people knowing each other might
be in that huge city and not cross
each other's paths. One afternoon
we were down at that terrible part
of London near the bank. I was
mooning round looking for Thread-
needle Street. Close to and with his
back to me was a man with a top
hat and lonk coat. I went over and
asked him its whereabouts. He
turned round, looked at me and said,
"Why, we stayed together at Guernsey." So we had, and then. out. of
thousands in the streets I had accidentally picked him out. to ask a question.
Then, while driving to the hotel,
the bus stopped a moment at Piccadilly Circus. I happened to look over
at the sidewalk, and who should I
see walking ."with his stately stride"
but the great O. M. Malcolm. Thought
he was in B. C. Just had time to
draw his attention and find out where
he could be found.
By the heading of this letter you
will see we are ifi Glasgow, and it
is the Sabbath, and the Lord deliver
me from spending many more here.
Everything closed up tight. My wife
has gone to Church. It is called St.
Andrews. She resented the name, |
says they have no saint of that name.
I told her that shews she does not,
as she thinks she does, know everything, that she must remember she is
in Scotland, and that the Scotch are
notorious for having appropriated everything in sight as they do to this
day, even to other people's saints, and
that the R. C. Scotch are the worst
of the nation for appropriating. Of
course they do it nowadays in a legal
manner, but with no difference as regards ethics. Anyway they have evidently got hold of St. Andrews body
and soul, for there he is as large as
life in the front of the Church, and,
Scotch-like, his representative was
there at the door in the most barefaced manner taking in the "bawbees" before admittance was allowed.
But the worst instance of the mercenary spirit now pervading the
Church, I think, was exhibited in the
Carmelites Chapel at Kensington.
There they had three classes of seats,
id, 2d and 3d, so that the rich would
not be contaminated by coming into
contact with the poor. I wonder how
they will manage in Heaven. Of
course, there will not be exactly thc
same difficulty because it will not be
a case of "Sartor re-sartus."
Last night after dinner we took
in the city.    The crowd was simply
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OF
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
PHONE 893. VICTORIA
WHY   NOT   HAVE   THE   BEST
THE REPUTATION OF
James Buchanan & Co'sSCOTCH   WHISKIES
Is world-wide, and stands for the BEST that can be produced.
The following brands are for sale by all the leading dealer*:
RED SEAL BLACK AND WHITE
ROYALTIOUSEHOLD      VERY OLD LIQUEUR 8COTCH
RADIGER & JANION, Sole At-snU for B.C.
CHRISTMAS
GOODS
Ward's Safety Razors
Curley Ideal Safety Razors
Whiltt's Razor Strops
I. X. L. Carving Sets
I. X. L. Pocket Cutlery
Boker's Pocket Cutlery
I. X. L. Table Cutlery
All in great variety and at right prices
FOR SALE BY
E. G. PRIOR & e©..
LTD.
LTY.
VICTORIA,  VANCOUVER,  KAMLOOPS,  VZRNON.
Established 1867
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
52 Government St., Victoria, B. C.
Charles Hayward, President. F. Caselton, Manager.
We make a specialty of  Undertaking and Embalming,
An experienced certificated staff available at all times, day
and night.
Phones Nos. 48, 305, 404 or 594, Victoria. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1907
awful and about one-third drunk. Today they are still "full," but of religion instead of whisky. I asked the
girl at the restaurant where we get
most of our meals if they would be
open on Sunday. Before replying she
had to get her breath; I too it away
with such a question. She replied:
"Na, na, nay on the Saabaaaath." I
then inquired whether they did any
eating on Sunday. "Yes," she said,
"but only enough to live." I think
the Scotch are such hypocrites, saving my own parentage.
Before coming here I have been
chaffing about the English "as it is
spoken in England," and have been
insinuating that to hear the language
spoken properly one has to go North
of the Tweed, but I must quality my
views ' to a large extent. Here in
Glasgow amongst the lower classes,
and even as regards the small shopkeepers, it is almost an impossibility
to understand two words out of three,
but with that true Scottish characteristic of holding on to everything,
they have not lost or given away
their "Ns."
We went to the Trossachs the day
before yesterday and returned last
night. We went all through the house
of Rob Roy, and the McGregor clan,
also that of the McFarlanes. After
reading their respective histories I
am constrained to come to the conclusion that they were worse if anything than the Foweyites of the South
of England that I wrote you about in
a former letter. They were driven
from one part of the country to another on three separate occasions -for
their misdeeds in the way of murdering, raiding and stealing their
(neighbour's cattle and property. In
fact nothing movable was safe. We
Ivisited Rob Roy's cave which he frequented on the banks of Loch Lomond while outlawed. It is a beauti-
Iful country, and we travelled by boat
land stage. My wife says the present
jdescendents of the above clans are
Ino improvement upon their ancestors,
|i. e., as regards acquisitiveness, only
hey do it in a legal way, but then
he is not, unfortunately for her,
|Scotch, and cannot appreciate their
redominant qualities. As far as I
m concerned as regards language, I
nm commencing to loole upon myself
s a Sassenach.
We go North on Tuesday to Aber-
eenshire. While there I intend visit-
ng that place which is responsible
pr this world being inflicted by your
umble servant, viz., Peterhead, and
fitlso intend calling upon Jim F.'s
fyeople who have kindly invited us to
itay a day or two with them. When
e return South have arranged a date
o see your sister. We purpose go-
g as far North as Inverness.
For awful poverty, side by side with
irealth, Glasgow I believe beats Lon-
on. Hundreds and hundreds of poor
hildren practically with their naked-
ess uncovered in this inhospitable
limate, swarming in the streets. I
eep my pocket full of pennies to give
way to the poor little devils. It is
eart-breaking. The national increase
ere must be enormous. And the
rinking, women as well as men,
rouging the public houses spending
eir money on whisky and beer while
Iheir children are in a chronic state
f starvation.
If this country, I mean Great
tritain, comes to an untimely end
ke the ancient Empire, and a second
jlibbon writes a history of the De-
pine and Fall of the British Empire,
e will assuredly have to ascribe to
[rink the chief cause of such a catas-
ophe. It is breeding a race of de-
lenerates amongst the working
asses. How can children, neglected
'nd starved, be otherwise? It is
tough to make one a teetotaller. Can
uitc realize how hard it must be to
lose poor dipsomaniacs to throw off
[ie drink habit. I never was very
d, but I often have a great long-
lig for a drink come over me, I
tive my reward, however, for leav-
jig it alone, never have indigestion
d feel ever so much better without
Notes on
Provincial News
As Clear As Mud.
The Slocan Mining Review, which
may be admitted to have some
knowledge of mining matters in general and those of the Slocan in particular, waxes facetious in the following paragraph over the recent decision of the Appeal Court in the
celebrated Slocan Star and White
Mining case;
"After reading the finding of Justices Irving, Morrison and Martin in
the Star-White case, we in common
with the average lay reader reluctantly admit we do not savvy what
the two last named judges are talking about. We hope the day is not
far distant when all legal writings
and findings will be couched in good
old public school language, and then
there will be something intelligible
for the people and all' the lawyers will
be cither policemen or tinhorns. Our
mad staff lawyer has handed in the
following:
" 'I am bound to admit that the
black fissure, which is composed of
nitro-glycerine, blackjack, graphite,
nagyagite, melaconite, porous plaster
and other breakfast foods, hits the
apex on the extralateral, therefore
whereas moreover Harris to wit
makes it stick, which to me is as clear
as mud (see Noah vs. Moses vie. ii,
sec. 2, p. .3 a, e, i, o, u, and w and y
sometimes); but if White had a ace
in the crosscut and cordwood was
two and a half a rick, as in Adam
vs. Eve cap. (__ (see Fox's Book of
Tomatoes), then all will agree that
the party of the first part is, or should
be, particularly so, and if not why not
(as in High vs. Low, Jack and Game).
Judgment should be held up sine die,
status quo, ora pro nobis and Harris
should set 'em up.'"
j "It costs money to keep one's type-
j-riter in ribbons."—Tabasco Tage-
jatt. What will Mrs. Tageblatt say
I this?—Mexican Herald.
Scandals.
The New Westminster Daily News
is at its own game again—scavenging. In the face of a session of the
Federal Parliament and the important questions now occupying public
attention, it has nothing better to
dish up for its readers than a
redhaufee of the scandals of the past.
Like the ghosts of Richard's Victims they stalk around the editorial
sanctum. Of course there is nothing new, it is the Chepleaus, Carons,
Currans, and McGreevy, Conolly incidents which still have to do duty in
the New Westminster charnel house.
Surely this is worse than flogging a
dead horse, and a 'little up-to-dateness
might be appreciated even by readers
of the  News.
A Matter of Taste.
The Fernie Free Press sees nothing incongruous in the marriage of
a white woman to a Chinaman, at
least that is the only conclusion which
can be drawn from the following
paragraph in its latest issue:
"A Chinaman and a white girl were
married in Swift Current on Wednesday and according to press despatches much indignation is felt locally over the affair. Fernie has
tolerated white wives of negroes and
black wives of Japs, without losing
any pose. We are unable to say
whether the young men of Swift Current are worrying because a white
girl passed them up or whether it is
the gentler sex who deplore the sacrifice of a good Chinaman."
Beyond Reproach.
During the last strike at the Fernie
Mines, serious charges were brought
against President Sherman of the U.
M. W. A. One of these was that he
had approached the President of the
Coal Company for "funds." Mr. Lindsey has written a letter declaring that
there is no foundation for such a
charge, and by exonerating Mr. Sherman has made it incumbent upon his
accusers to recant. If they are not
merely mischievous meddlers they
will do so. Mr. Sherman is far from
perfect, and with some of his methods
The Week entirely disagrees, but a
charge of treachery and dishonesty
is a different matter, and should never
have been made if it could not be
substantiated.
MOO APPEARING UNDERWEAR
to Dm Traveller's Badge of Rnp-MtaMHty
Making one's toilet on a pullman car
ia a hurry up job. It's the custom to
rush to the wash room in one's underclothing and every man who has regard for respectability will be solicitous about the good appearance of hit
underwear.
"CEETEE"
Guaranteed Unshrinkable
Pure Wool
UNDERWEAR
to the most Comfortable _____ perfect
fitting underclothing on the market
also retain* Its original form, no matter
how often washed or how long worn.
It never irritates the skin. It makes
the wearer feel respectable before his
fellow travellers.
Always buy "CtetM" Underwear.
Look for the trade mark on each
garment.   Made and guaranteed by
The C. Turnbull Co. of Gilt, Lim tid
A Raincoat is one of the most useful garments a man can possess. The PICCADILY Rain Coat, besides being rain-proof, has
all the style of the regular well-tailored light overcoat.
Among other seasonable styles is the "topper" (short, lightweight overcoat). The PICCADILLY "topper" for 1908 will undoubtedly meet with the approval of fastidious men.
H.E. BOND &e©., Ltd.,    -
MANUFACTURERS
TORONTO
SfCTHML
BOOKCASES
YOU DONT GET OONf
WHENMUIBUYAaWUf
What Better Xmas
Gift Than a Nice
Bookcase?
A pleasure all the year round
to all the family.
BAXTER & JOHNSON
811 Government Street
Victoria, B. C.
The Y. B. 6. Novelty Works
rare  ANTIQUE,  ABTXSTZC    ABD    ABCHITEOTUBAL
DEBIONED TSOBX MASS TO OBDEB.
I am now ready to fulfil any orders (or all kinds of Banks, Stores,
Offices, Churches, Barber Shops and Hotel Bar Fixtures and Furniture.
1000 Granville StiMt           ::       ::       VANOOUVBB, B. 0.
T.  LeCAXB,  Proprietor.
1%
%] ©I wb
Canadian   Fiona   bulvat
BBITiaX COLUMBIA COAST
SEBTICE.
X-BOXI TABCOUTBB—
For Victorla-—S.S. Princess Victoria, 1
o'elock p.m. dally.
For Nanaimo—S.S. Joan, dally except
Sunday, at 1:10 o'eloek p. m.
For Skagway and Ketchikan, Alaska,
tailing at Prince Rupert, Port Ks-
sington and Port Simpson—Princess
Kay, May 19, 29, I p. m.
For Northern B. C. Ports—S.S. Amur,
tod and 18th of every month, 8 p.m.
Calls   at   Skidegate   first   trip   of
month and Bella Coola second trip
of month.
FBOK TIOTOBIA—
For Vancouver—S.S. Princess Victoria,
1 o'elock a. m„ dally.
For Seattle—S.S.    Princess    Beatrice,
1:10 a. m., dally, except Monday.
For West Coast, Vancouver Island—
S.S. Tees, 11 p. m., lst, 7th, 14th of
each month, for Clayoquot and Mos-
?uito Harbor;   20th of each month
er  Cape  Scott,  Quatsino,   Ahouset
and way ports.
FBOM SEATTLE—
Por  Victoria—S.S.   Princess   Beatrice,
11:30 p.m., daily, except Monday. -
For   rates   and   passage,   apply   at
Company's Offices,
TIOTOBIA       :: VANCOUVEB.
Elegant PERFUMES.
Perfumes are always a delight.
Neat, stylish cases, containing odors
of fragrant perfume, in handsomely
decorated, heavy glass bottles are extremely natty Christmas Gifts.
These holiday packages of Exquisite Perfume comprise fragrances
from foreign fields of flowers as well
as odors of our own land's offering.
They will delight you.
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
Government  Street, near Yates  St.
VICTORIA, B. C.
Victoria
FRUIT
and
Farm Lands
Write for "Home  List" and
information.
R.   S.   DAY
and
BEAUMONT BOGGS
Realty Brokers.
620  POBT  STBEET TIOTOBIA.
hepe was anQjd   .
Man ^©und6e,/§\
o Drank cSpints ~
as othepj^Dnnk tea
People aid "Itisllisky
, 4 Drink jo much Whisky
fill he told them fas g$&
THOMAS OATTEBALL
Builder  and  Seneral   Contractor.
Tenders   givei    on   Brick, Ston*    an
Frame, Alterations, Parquetry Floorln.
Office, Bank, Store and Saloon Kitting!
Pile Driving, Wharves and Dock Shed
constructed and repaired.
TIOTOBIA.
BOND SIGN  CO.
VANCOUVER THE WEEK, SATURDAY DECEMBER 14, 1907
L
♦ t
' ▼!
A 1
♦ i
if
The opinion expressed by Capt. Walbran in a recent issue of the Colonist,
that it is perfectly safe for ships like
The "Lusitania" to Dock at Alberni
confirms our statement that Alberni will be one of the
largest ports on the Coast.
Alberni Lots Are Now on the Market
and Are Selling.
bfc» Don't Wait for the Excitement Before Buying.   When the
excitement comes you ought to be able to take advantage of it.
Events during the next few months will prove that Alberni
is to be a Great City, and that we know it.
IF   YOU   HAVE   NOT   BOUGHT   A   FEW   LOTS
DO SO NOW.
^
^
HERBERT CUTHBERT & CO.
Victoria, Alberni, and Vancouver Island Real Estate
TIHBER AND MINES. Phone 1610        H 616 Fort St., Victoria
J>
^_M___ ___________! ^^_m *_______» ^m _____________ ^_\\_____. £________< ^____a ^__m --^m _________ ^_w
* Social and        *
J Personal. __
HUMMiMAAH-ftUkM haA-Alfl kullclil _____________
VICTORIA.
St. John's church on Wednesday
afternoon was the scene of a very
pretty and interesting wedding, when
the Rev. Percival Jenns assisted by
the Lord Bishop of Columbia, joined
in the holy bonds of matrimony Mr.
Alexander Gillespie, second son of
Mr. and Mrs. George Gillespie, and
Miss Rose Ellen Todd, second
daughter of Mrs. J. H. Todd, of St.
Charles street. The church which was
very prettily decorated by the friends
of thc bride, was crowded to the
doors. The ushers were Messrs. W.
Todd, Arthur Gore, E. P. Colley and
Kenneth Gillespie. Promptly on lh.'
stroke of two the bride arrived leaning on the arm of her brother, Dr.
Todd, gowned in a soft clinging
white Liberty satin, with a joke of
Duchesse lace and a beautiful veil of
thc same lace. Her bouquet was of
white roses, lillics-of-the-vallcy, asparagus and maidenhair fern. Miss
Florence Gillespie, the maid of honor,
wore a pretty frock of pale blue
gauze with a bouquet of white chrysanthemums and asparagus fern tied
with white t.iiie. Miss Violet Pooley,
in pale green Liberty satin, Empire
style, with pale green osprey in her
hair and Miss Butchart in pale pink,
made of thc snme material and in the
same style acted as bridesmaids. The
groom's present to the bridesmaids
was a little brooch with stones the
same colour as their frocks and to
the bride a very handsome diamond
ring. Mr. Dougald Gillespie and Mr.
I.indley Crease supported the groom'.
After the ceremony the wedding
party adjourned to the family residence. Leasowes, St. Charles street,
where a reception was held. The
house was beautifully decorated fof
the occasion. Mrs. Todd, in lavender
brocade,   received  her  guests  in  the
large hall, assisted by her daughter,
Mrs. J. F. Gillespie, in a very pretty
Empire frock of corn-colored chiffon,
and smart hat trimmed with roses in
different shades of brown. Mrs.
Charlie Todd in a flower silk; Mrs.
George Gillespie, in pale blue brocaded satin, large black picture hat,
with a touch of cerise on her bodice.
Among the guests were: The Lieutenant-Governor and Mrs. Dunsmuir,
the Lord Bishop of Columbia and
Mrs. Perrin, Lady Crease, Miss
Crease; the Hon. C. E. Pooley, Mrs.
Pooley, Miss Pooley; Rev. Percival
Jenns and Mrs. Jenns, Canon and Mrs.
Beanlands, Rev. Stanley Ard, Rev.
W. B. Allen, Mrs. Rocke Robertson,
Mrs. Robin Dunsmuir, Mrs. Butchart,
Miss Mary Butchart, Mrs. F. Pemberton, Mr. and Mrs. Lampman, Mr.
and Mrs. R. H. Pooley, Mrs. Flumerfelt, Mrs. Herman Robertson, Mrs.
McCallum, Mrs. Burton, Mr. Cam-
bell McCallum, Mrs. Gaudin, Miss
Gaudin, Mrs. Freeman, Mrs. W. S.
Gore, Mr. and Mrs. T. S. Gore, Mr.
Arbuckle, Mrs. Berkeley, Mr. and
Mrs. Gresley, Mrs. Alister Robertson,
Mrs. Bodwell, Mr. and Mrs. B. Heisterman, Mrs. A. Martin, Miss P.
Mason, Mr. and Mrs. J. Ambery, Mrs.
Muskett, Mrs. Farris, Mrs. Rithet,
Mrs. Genge, Mrs. Hanington, Miss L.
Hanington, Mrs. F. Hanington, Mrs.
Barnard, Miss Monteith, Mrs. Hugo
Beaven, Miss Fownes, Mrs. Cleland,
Dr. and Mrs. Watt, Miss Tilton, Miss
Perry, Miss Peters, Mr. J. Lawson,
Miss Drake, Mrs. Williams, Mrs.
Blaiklock, Mrs. Rome, Mr. and Mrs.
J. Anderson, Mrs. J. Irving, Misses
Irving, Mrs. Englehart, Mrs. McKay,
Miss McKay, Miss L. Eberts, Mrs.
Atkins, Mrs. Fleet Robertson, Dr.
Neucombe, Miss Keticombe, Mrs. Big-
gerstaff Wilson, Mrs. Ker, Mrs. Brett,
Mr and Mrs. Pumett, Mr. and Mrs.
Carew Gibson. Miss Dorothy Green,
Misses I'itts, Mrs. VV. Langley, Col.
Gregory, iVIessrs. S. Powell, J. !!.
Bell, Gore, Crease, Ross. Refreshment-; were served in the dining-room,
an handsome brass chandelier hung
over the centre of the table; carnation*, .ind asparagus fern were thc
decorations here. After some light
refreshment*;, the guests adjourned to
the drawing-room, where the cake was
cut by the bride, followed by the
usual speeches and toasts. The billiard room was arrayed with the many
beautiful and costly presents.
The annual Hockey Club dance,
which was given at the A.O.U.W.
hall on Saturday, Dec. 8th, was a
most successful affair. Miss Thain's
orchestra provided the music. Supper
was served at midnight. The colors
of the Victoria and Nanaimo clubs
were represented in the decorations.
Among those present were: Miss E.
Rickaby in blue; Miss L. Clarke,
white; Miss E. Nicholls, white; Miss
M. McDonald, Miss A. McQuade, blue
satin; Miss E. Locke, pink; Miss
Waterhouse (Seattle), blue chiffon;
Miss B. Roberts, white, Cameron,
Miss Crook, Miss B. Raymond, blue
Empire; Mr. and Mrs. W. Wilson,
Misses Fraser, Leiser, L. Hagerty,
lieany, Garvin; Messrs. York Holmes,
Darcy, Austin, E. Hardy, Grundy,. Mason, Evans, Virtue, Mr. and Mrs.
Murphy, Mr. F Clarke, C. Drake,
Bob Foster, Mrs. Simpson, Mr.
Bayne, R. Wilson, W. Burns, Newcombe, G. Wilson, W. Larimer,
Gooch, Frame, J. Hart, Dobson, H.
Shore, Futcher, Waterhouse, J. Law-
son, N. Brown, Col. Gregory and
many others.
*   *   *
On the second anniversary of their
marriage, December 6th, a surprise
party was given to C. W. McAllister,
manager of the Royal Dairy, and Mrs.
McAllister, at the home of her
parents, Hotel Canada. Among those
invited were Mr. and Mrs. E. M.
Brast, Mr. and Mrs. C. W. McAllister. Mr. and Mrs. G W. Andrews,
Mr. and Mrs. C. Coulson, Mr. and
Mrs. Lampen, Mr. and Mrs. R. Mar*
shall, Miss M. Marshall. Mr. J. Coates,
Miss M. Robertson, Miss E Eccles,
Mrs. II. Higgins, Miss A. Eccles, Mr.
1? Morris, Miss May Eccles. The entertainment took the form of .1 progressive whist party. The ladies'
first prize was drawn by Mrs. G. \Y.
.Andrews and the gentlemen's bv Mr.
Wm. McAllister. 'The booby prizes
were won by Mrg, F. Morris and
Miss E, Eccles.   After the whist party
there was a dainty lunch served and
the company left after singing Auld
Lang Syne.
* *   *
The first session of the newly formed skating club which is to meet every
Tuesday afternoon from five to seven,
was held last Tuesday at the rink on
Fort street. The members present
were: Miss M. Dunsmuir, Mrs. Langley, Mrs. J. Langley, Mrs. J. Lawson,
Mrs. D. Mason, Mrs. V. Mason, Mrs.
L. Eberts, Mrs. N. Bell, Mrs. P. Mason, Mrs. W. Troupe, Mrs. M. Newcombe, Mrs. G. Hickey, Mrs. V. Hickey, Mrs. P. Irving, Mrs. W. Day,
Mrs. G. Irving, Mrs. W. Johnstone;
the Messrs Wright, Hagerty, Harvey,
Troupefi Fraser, Monteith, Martin,
Bromley, McDougal, Cain, Mason,
McCurdy, Lawson, Arbuckle, J.
Brown, B. Irving, H. Eberts, B. Prior,
Capt.  Hughes.
Miss Rose Anderson came over
from Seattle on Monday last and is
staying with  friends ill Victoria.
•      *       *       Hi
Mrs. Keith Wilson is staying with
her mother,  Mrs.  E.  li.  King.
Mr. and Mrs. Mellin of Duncans, are
registered at the Balmoral, also Miss
Robertson.
* #   si-
Mrs. Pierce    of   Vancouver is the
guest of her sister, Mrs. F. H, Worlock, Dallas Road.
Commencing at a post marked M.
B. Southeast Corner, situated about
40 chains north and 40 chains east of
Lot 325, N. E. Cor.; thence 40 chains
north; thence 40 chains west; thence
40 chains south; thence 60 chains east
to point of commencement, containing  240  acres.
Dated November 15, 1907.
De. 14 MARK BRENNAN.
1£__
The Christmas number of Westward Ho Magazine comes to hand
this week with a hundred pages of
finely illustrated western reading matter. The issue is replete with stories,
sketches, and well-written articles. It
is embellished with a very effective
cover design by Mr. S. P. Judge. Altogether the issue is very creditable
to its publishers, and should receive
a substantial support from the
western public—Saturday Sunset.
TAKE NOTICE tliat M. Brennan,
of Ootso Lake, occupation Farmer,
intends lo apply ior permission to
lease the  following described land:
b*M
MESSRS. WILLIAMS & JANION'
Duly Instructed by the Officer Commanding Will Sell By
public auctionI
AT THE
NAVAL   YARDS,   ESQUIMALT,
—on—
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 18, AT n A.M.
A Quantity of
NAVAL STORES
including canvas and leather hose,
couplings, copper hot water cans, I
baths, pillow slips, blankets, counter-j
panes, ward room dining room chairs, J
arm chairs, couch, horse hair mattresses, pillows, cartridge boxes, 20o|
4-iuch shells, 150 3-pound shells,
quantity of rope, old copper and brass, j
mess kettles, 100 cans of tinned meats,
barricoes, tubs, oil drums, coal bag,
shovels, packing, 2 pair blue plush
curtains, salt meat, etc. Also the following E. P. ware, Ai quality tea and
coffee service, 4 table candlesticks,
dish covers, cruel, breakfast dish, 4
sets of entree dishes, 24 table forks,
12 small forks, 1 set of desseret knives
and [orks (new), 12 lish knives, soup
and sauce ladles, cup and tureen, nut
crackers, mustard pot, sugar, sifter-;,
skewers, egg, gravy, dessert, salt,
table, and teaspoons, toast rack,
salver, sugar tongs, finger bowls;
water hollies, pickle jars, decanters,
champagne glasses, tumblers, etc. etc, |
The Auctioneer
STEWART  WILLIAMS. THE WEEK, SATURDAY DECEMBER 14, 1907
1
Rest
Present.
Account or
Value
Undivided
Per Share.
Profits.
$260.00
$11,000,000.00
235.00
4,500,000.00
226.00
3,000,000.00
217.00
2,500,000.00
THI BANK Of VANCOUVER
(TO BE INCORPORATED BY ACT OF PARLIAMENT OF CANADA.   CHARTER APPLIED FOR)
This proposed bank is being organized and will have its Head Office in Vancouver with its directors chosen by the subscribers to
its stock at the organization meeting.
The Western Provinces and British Columbia in particular have for some considerable time felt the urgent need of an institution
such as the proposed Bank of Vancouver. The formation of new industries and the developing of those already established, has been
seriously retarded for want of ordinary financial accommodation, and the primary object of this new bank will be to alleviate tlie situation
by largely confining its operations to the splendid field awaiting it in the Pacific Coast Provinces, and more especially in British
Columbia.
The bank proposes to do business on the safe and well-laid-down lines of the old established banks, and will earn their respect and
goodwill by a continuation of this policy.
The Bank of Montreal has its head office in Montreal.
The Bank of Toronto has its head office in Toronto.
The Bank of Ottawa has its head office in Ottawa.
The Bank of Hamilton has its head office in Hamilton.
The standing of these banks is beyond question.
Par Value
of Stock
per Share
Tbe Bank of Montreal     $100.00
The Bank of Toronto        100.00
The Bank of Ottawa        100.00
The Bank of Hamilton '.       100.00
The above banks, while doing a general banking business throughout the Dominion, each aims at fostering and developing business
and trade, SPECIALLY IN THEIR RESPECTIVE CITIES AND DISTRICTS.
THE BANK OF VANCOUVER will aim to do the same, that is, to encourage and promote legitimate business in BRITISH
COLUMBIA PARTICULARLY.
The Capital asked for is $2,000,000.00 in 20,000 shares of $100.00 each. The first $500,000.00 of stock is offered the public
at a premium of 10 per cent., that is, at $110.00 per share.
Payments can be made in full or on the instalment plan. Interest will be allowed at 3 per cent, per annum upon the par value
of the stock until organization.
The provisional directors, when appointed, will reserve the right to increase the premium upon the remainder of the stock, also
to allot or reject any subscription in whole or in part.
SUBSCRIPTION FOR STOCK
THE BANK OF VANCOUVER
CHARTER APPLIED FOR.   TO BE INCORPORATED BY ACT OF THE PARLIAMENT OF CANADA.
CAPITAL, $2,000,000, IN 20,000 SHARES OF $100 EACH, WITH $10 PREMIUM ON EACH SHARE.
I, the undersigned, hereby subscribe for  Shares of the Capital Stock
of THE BANK OF VANCOUVER (charter applied for), to be incorporated by an Act of the Parliament of Canada at this Session,
at the price of $110.00 per share, to be payable as follows:—$10.00 premium on each Share hereby subscribed upon the signing hereof;
$10.00 upon each Share of Stock within 30 days after date of subscription; and $10.00 on each Share pf Stock upon allotment by the
Provisional Directors of said Bank, and eight equal monthly payments of $10.00 each per Share, the first of such payments to be
made 30 days after allotment and the succeeding payments at intervals of 30 days. I reserve to myself the right to pay these Shares in
full upon allotment.
The Shares of Stock so subscribed for shall not be assignable or transferable until the same are paid up in full.
I hereby make and appoint the Secretary of the Provisional Board, when appointed, as my Attorney to sign and subscribe my name to the
Subscribers' Agreement in the Stock Books of the said Bank, and to accept such shares as may be allotted to me and to register me therein as the
holder of the said Shares.
I further hereby make and appoint (as a term of my application for shares herein contained) the Secretary aforesaid my proxy to vote for me
and on my behalf at all meetings of the Shareholders or Subscribers of the stock of the said Bank, and at any adjournment thereof, at which I may not
be personally present, upon and in respect of all shares of the stock of the said Bank which shall be allotted or transferred to me.
Signature
(SEAL)
Date
Name in full
WITNESS:
Occupation
Address ..
THE IMPERIAL TRUST CO., LIMITED, of Vancouver, has agreed to act as trustees for the Subscribers, and all payments until the sum of
$250,000.00 of Capital Stock is paid up must be made by cheque, draft, post ollice or express oflice order, payable to the order of The Imperial Trust Co.,
Limited, and thereafter to The Bank of Vancouver.
Interest at the rate of three per cent, per annum will be allowed until the organization of the said Bank.
All money so paid in, except the premium money, which will be applied toward expenses of incorporation, will hc deposited by The Imperial
Trust Co., with tlieir Bankers, THE MOLSONS BANK, and should the Bank not organize, the said money will be returned to the subscribers with
in+erest by the Trust Co.
For all further particulars apply to the Imperial Trust Co., Ltd., Vancouver, B.C., Kingsford, Smith & Co,, 860 Granville St., Var couver, B.C.;
Champion & Pound, Fairfield Building, Vancouver, B.C., or to L. U. Conyers & Co., and E. C. Bagshawe, Victoria, B.C. All communications and
remittances should be mailed to the Acting Secretary, P. O. Box 890, G. P. O., Vancouver, B.C. THE WEEK  SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14  1907.
Incorporated 1906.1
Capital, J500,000.00|
Capital increased
in 1907
to  . ..$2,000,000.00|
Subscribed
Capital,    $650,000
Beserve . . »60,000|
Surplus, Jan. 30,
1907   .  .  $130,000
J. B. MATHEBS, Oan. Kan.
IN   CLOSING   UF   ESTATES
either as Executors or Assignees
the Dominion Trust Co., Ltd., is
never influenced by ulterior motives. Their entire ambition,
effort, ancl energy is directed towards securing the best possible
returns for all concerned.
Name this company executor in
your will. Blank will forms furnished free of charge and stored
in our safety deposit vaults,
when we are made your executor.
DOMINION TRUST CO.,
Limited.
328 Hastingi St., West.
Vancouver, B. C.
This has been exemplified in several  whelmed,   and   conspicuous    among
remarkable instances during the pre- these the ecclesiastical dogmas which
sent generation.   We can recall men  have  for so long block the way of
who by sheer force of character and  progress,
intellectual capacity    towered   above
their fellows; they    attained    power,
wielded    influence,    and    determined
policy, but their reign was brief; they
could not retain the position they had
gained,  all  because  they  were  deficient in those qualities which would
have endeared them to their followers.
This explains the conspicuous failure
of such a brilliantly gifted man as Ed-
ward  Blake, who with  all his great To the Editor;
attainments possessed no magnetism      I see the Vancouver City Council
and did not give himself the trouble  have  been  proposing  a  s?heme not
to cultivate the true art of living.
J$t}_A-enr7r4J^.
CORRESPONDENCE.
Rats, Panthers and Garbage.
r
It   is   so   in   every   walk   of   life,
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday ky
COMPANY, LIMITED.
very practicable to keep infected rats
,   . out of the city.   I  do not write to
every     day     men     support     their
fellows   for   their    personal    merits recommend any scheme, but it may
rather than their ability.    In seeking interest them to know what is done
a   position,   amiability   and   geniality elsewhere.   In the Old Country and in
count for more than skill or acquire- Eastern   Canada   rat   catching   is   a
ment. The men of whom others speak ^    _ do __Qt knQw whether &iy
well are those who never think it is
too much trouble to try to please. The have a rat catchers  umon' but lf you
men whose memories are green today employ one, he charges more per head
and who although they are dead yet than the city allows in Victoria.    1
speak, are men who felt as well as reraember a  good  story of a Vicar
worked   for   the   race.     Livingstone, ^  ^ fae had  engaged  the  raf
Gordon and Lincoln,  although intellectually inferior are greater powers
catcher at a price, when he saw thc.
in the world today than Rhodes, number of live rats he went back on
Palmerston, or Jefferson, and all be- his bargain because the Vicar 'had
cause their lives exemplified the spirit been told that the rat catcher could
which led Abou Ben Adhem to say gix cents a piece for the Uve rats
to the Angel, "I pray thee then write ,, , . . .     ,
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING  «" a* one who loves his fellow men."  They are sold for tram,n* temer Ao*
The thing we are most apt to for- >n rat pits.   The rat catcher was m-
get is that we may be just as difficult  dignant and opening his wire cage he
lift  Government Street. .Victoria, B.C.
(II  Hastings  St Vancouver,  B.C.
W. BLAKBIIORB. .Manager and Editor
The Art of Living.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER t0 *?et on with as others with whom let them all out in the Vicar's hall
 we are impatient, and that every so-  ^   ^   remark.   1<You   fflay  kfiep
cial relation depends for its maintenance upon the principle of compro- your rates-
mise. In   Manchester,   England,   it  is  a
The best that life has to give any rule of the Port 'hat a11 shiPs t]f
of us is congenial social intercourse. come UP the canaI have to W for
Important social functions rightly un- rat catchinS when they "nve-and
derstood are but a means to an end;  in   this  way  th°«san<ls  of  rats   are
  they should  be  so  regarded and so killed every year    Could we do tllls
The Editor has handed me a long used.   They fill a very important place
and   very   interesting  letter   from   a  in the economy of life;   their princi-
subscriber at Bamfield.    It was sent  Pal function is to bring about introductions and to break the ice.   With-
for publication, but is too lengthy in . .       ,   , .   ,    ,
1  i'"""1--"     > B   J        out   them   many   people   of   kindred
its present form, although with the tastes admirably adapted to increase
permission of the writer it will be each other's happiness, whether in
used in our Christmas edition. The the closest or the less intimate relationships,   would   never   be   made.
letter deals  with  a  subject which  I
,,   .       , Those, therefore,  who   decry  public
have discussed at considerable length .                ,         .     ,
nave uioi-uoocu                                 •*, dances and parties  have never mas-
i.n British Columbia.
Then, as to panthers, I rather think
the brute that did the damage, by
killing two prize rams two days after
my friend got them home from Victoria fair was killed a few days ago.
But these were not the only lopes my
friend had. Do we offer sufficient to
make it worth while to exterminate
these destructive brutes in our neighbourhood?   I should like to see the
in The Week and which has elicited tered the phl:iosophy 0f the question, Price    raised    for    both    rats    and
much  correspondence.    It originated and   if   they   could   have   their  way Pa^thers-
in  a  complaint  by  new-comers  that would  narrow  down   the   groove  in
Victorians are unsociable and exclu- which Pe°Ple move until we should a11
,   . t travel in a rut, and life would be ren-
sive.    It developed into a brief sym- ,      , ,     .     ,       ,
•        u-=»«yi -■ dered monotonous by its boredom.
posium on the Simple Life. The letter      At the same time if the advantage
furnishes a peg on which to hand a is not followed on the best may be
art of living.   Do we get enough out ^ ^ ^ .J^.^ ^  - ^ ^P. tw0  old tubs of b   ts?    l am not
of life?    Do the majority of us get tQ ^.^  a fgw kjndred sp|rits ^  surprised that this did not strike the
all we might?   Do we make the best naturally gravitate.   When this circle  May°r-
As to the disposal of garbage very
few towns have the facilities which
the sea offers. Could anything be
better?
The Mayor proposed another
scheme but the citizens rejected it.
But     Alderman     Vincent
knows about boats.
Victoria, 12th December, 1907.
No Excuse.
Tommy—It's  too  bad  yer  grandmother died day 'fore yesterday.
Benny—Why so?
Tommy—Why,    dere's    a    corkin'
of this world?    I often think that if is formed there will be a community
thc grumblers would pause to reflect, of interests and a oneness of desire
they would cease to grumble.    Is it which may be fruitful of the best re-
not a fact that too many people fail suits.
of attaining happiness because they This circle of friendship is the link
miss their opportunity. My own be- between a man's daily avocation and
lief is that we ask too much, and that the cultivation of his best instincts,
if fate refuses what we ask, we are Without it he is not unlike a rudder-
too apt to regard ourselves as ill- less barque. To cultivate such a ,.
used mortals, and to brand life as circle constitutes the art of living as
a cheat. contrasted with the vogue of existing.  	
I am not referring so much to ma- When the busy man, and especially
terial gain as to social and personal the man of comparative wealth whose
relations. Thc richest man in this every spare moment is taken up with
world is he who has a true friend, social functions and ambitious designs,
the poorest is he who, though pos- begins to realize how little these con-
scssing millions, lacks one. There tribute to peace of mind, and real
can be no enjoyment without social happiness, there will be a readjust-
converse, and no satisfying converse ment, and it will be upon the lines of
except with kindred spirits. We may simpler living and the cultivation of
meet men at the club, in the street, ln natural instincts instead of the pro-
the office, or at public gatherings, who pagation of artificial emotions,
stimulate the intellect and arouse the Life today is too complex, and the
passions and the emotions. This is number of those who have tired of
one of the most necessary influences it is consequently increasing. Wag-
if character is to be developed and ner's "Simple Life" even though like
the fighting instinct maintained. But Moore's Utopia," it be the work of
it is warfare, and when the pendulum an idealist, has aroused many a re-
swings to the other extreme, self re- sponsive echo. W. J. Dawson's
liance is neither so much in evidence, epochal book, "A Prophet in Baby-
nor so satisfying, and man yearns for lon," will attract still wider attention,
the sympathy and encouragement of All indicate the struggle of a human
his fellows. spirit to escape from thc bondage of
Few men have achieved anything in this  social   death,  and  unless  I  am
the  public  service  without  the  sup- greatly mistaken, the time is at hand
port of friends, and men who com- when   there   will    be   a   revolution
mand   that   support   solely   by   their throughout   the   civilized   world   in
natural  abilities  are  apt to lose  it. which many false ideals will be over-
"F."
Gifts Worth
Giving
Nothing else does quite so
well for a Man's or a Boy's
Christmas as something he can
wear. What he wears he'll appreciate.
Man or Boy—what makes so
satisfactory a Christmas Gift as
a Suit, Overcoat or Rain Coat?
Come in and see what we
can do for him.
pit-Reform
?3Govehhheht5t. Victor
^
Victoria's Greatest
Christmas Store
We are making a bigger hit than ever before for the cream of
the Christmas trade. In every department stock has been doubled
in anticipation of your requirements, making an infinitely larger
and broader variety to choose from than we have heretofore
attempted. Vast throngs of people, too, are already finding this
Christmas Store very helpful in its suggestiveness of what to
give. Prices plainly marked on every article is helpful—then
agaiu our large army of over '0 (regular staff) experienced clerks
are not only on hand promptly, but each one takes the greatest
pride in aiding selection. Gift hunters are finding our Showroom
a mine of gift things, brimful of objects of real merit that carry
with them genuine pleasure and elicit lasting gratitude from the
recipients.   Just now we are quoting
Wonderfully Low Prices on Necklets
Brooches and Bracelets.
NECKLETS—Elegant Diamond-set platinum finished Necklets,
the very latest conceptions; lovely combinations of pearls and
diamonds, diamonds and emeralds, pearls and amethyst, pearl and
peridot, pearl and tourmaline, etc. Necklets of every nameable
precious stone, ranging in price from $12.00 up to $3,500.00.
BROOCHES—An immense stock, which includes many beautiful and exclusive inexpensive Brooches, particularly suitable for
gift-making. Very handsome combinations of Diamonds and
emeralds, diamonds and pearls, diamonds and opals, turquoise and
pearl, fancy turquoise matrix, topaz, garnets, etc., etc., an unlimited assortment from $2 to $500.
BRACELETS-Ranging from $12.00 to $300.00.
CHALLONER & MITCHELL
DIAMOND MERCHANTS AND SILVERSMITHS
47 and 49 Gouernment St., Victoria.
^
Think of the number of typewriters that seemed popular a
few years ago.
Think of the different ones
seeking public favor to-day.
Then think of the Remington,
which has been the Standard since
typewriters were invented, and
which maintains its supremacy
so ely through enduring merit.
The man who seeks experience may seek it anywhere, but
the man who heeds experience
buys the
Remington
Have you tried the new Remington escape*,
ment ? It will be a revelation to you of the
lateft and beit in typewriter achievement.
Remington Typewriter Company
New York and Everywhere
REMINGTON TYPEWRITER CO.
LIMITED
542 Pender Street, Vancouver.
THE STANDARD STATIONERY CO.
1220 Government St., Victoria, B. O.
A Similarity.
"Them mosquitos," remarked Farmer Corntossel irritably, "makes me
think of them city visitors we had
week before last."
"How's that, Hiram?" asked his
patient wife.
"They come pretty near bein' the
worst singers an' the biggest eaters
I ever saw."
"Women as a sex are such poor
things," said Lady Woolseley recently, and she declared that they were
created out of the leavings and that
woman was made of scraps left after
the creation of man and moreover
she is two parts cat and one part
angel. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER i_. 1907.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Superstructure ot Swing Span.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Superstructure Metal for
Swing Bridge, North Arm, Fraser
River," will be received by the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works, Victoria, B.C., up to and in-
eluding Tuesday, the 31st of December,
1907, for manufacturing and delivering,
f. o. b„ scow at Vancouver or New
Westminster, all the metal work required for the superstructure of a steel
swing span.
Drawings, specifications, condition of
contract and tender may be seen by
intending tenderers on and after Tuesday, the 26th of November, 1907, at
the office of the Public Works Engineer,
Lands and Works Department, and at
the office of the Provincial Timber In
spector, Court House, Vancouver, B.C.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certificate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner in
the sum of two hundred and fifty ($250)
dollars, which shall be forfeited if the
party tendering decline or neglect to
enter Into contract when called upon
to do so. The cheques or certificates
of deposit of successful tenderers will
be returned to them upon the execution
of the contract.
The successful tenderer will be
called upon to furnish a bond, himself
and two securities, satisfactory to the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, In
the sum of $1,000 each, or to furnish a
bond of a Guarantee Company satisfactory to the Honourable the Chief
Commissioner in the sum of $3,000 for
the due fulfilment of the work contracted for.
Upon the execution of the contract
and a satisfactory bond being supplied,
signed with the actual signatures of the
tenderers and enclosed In the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not neoes-
sarlly accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 30 Public Works Engineer.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
T. L. No. '—Take notice that A. G.
McClarty of Mt. Pleasant, Timber
Cruiser, Intends to apply for a special
timber license over the following described  lands:
S.W. Corner—Commencing at a post
standing on the west bank of Mill
Creek, Howe Sound, in a northerly direction, about 20 chains from the mouth
of Mill Creek and in the angle of Lot
1337; thence north 120 chains; thence
east 53 chains; thence south 120 chains;
thence west 53 chains.
Located Oct. 22nd, 1907.
Nov. 16 A. G. McCLARTY.
LAND REGISTRY ACT.
In the matter of an application for a
Duplicate Certificate of Title to
Lot 5 of Lot 7 of Section 10, (Map
280), Esquimalt District, Victoria
City.
Notice Is hereby given that lt Is my
Intention at the expiration of one month
from the first publication hereof to issue
a Duplicate of the Certificate of Title
to said lot, issued to George A. Cold-
well on the 6th day of June, 1899, and
numbered 6296C.
Land Registry Office, Victoria, B.C.,
the 21st day of November, 1907.
S.  Y.  WOOTTON,
Nov. 23 Registrar-General.
COAST   LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Wm. H. Flett and
Albert B. Moses, of Seattle, Wash., Timber Dealers, intend to apply for a special
licence over the following described
lands:
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
on the north shore of Hunter Island, on
Lama passage at the mouth of Fanny
Creek, at a post planted in the northwest corner and marked "Lake's N.W.
Cor.," running 80 chains south, SO chains
north and 80 chains west to place of
beginning, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
on the east shore of Hunter Island on
Fitzhugh Sound, In an unnamed bay
about 2 1-2 mlles south of Pointer Island
Lighthouse, marked "Lake's S.E. Cor.,"
running 40 chains west, 80 chains north,
40 chains west, 40 chains north, 80
chains east more or less to shore, thence
120 chains south along shore to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
No. 8—Commencing at a post planted
on the east shore of Hunter Island on
Fitzhugh Sound, ln an unnamed bay
about 21-2 miles south of Pointer
Island Lighthouse, marked "Lake's N.E.
Cor.," and running 80 chains west, 80
chains south, 80 chains east, 80 chains
north to place of commencement, containing  640 acres more or less.
Located October 16,  1907.
WM. H. FLETT,
ALBERT   B.   MOSES,
Nov. 23 Per Harry A. Lake, Agent.
DISTRICT OF RUPERT, B. C.
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. A. Mc-
Eachran, lumberman, of Victoria, B.C.,
lntende to apply for a special timber
license over the following described
lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner of section 5,
township 25, situated ln the vicinity
of the West Arm of Quatsino Sound,
about one mile distant ln a northerly
direction from the northeast, corner of
timber lease 196: thenee cast 80 chains,
south 80 chains, west 80 chains, north
80 chains to post of commencement.
No. 2—Commencing at a post .planted
at the southwest corner of section 8,
township 25, about one mile distant In
a northerly direction from northeast corner of timber lease 196; tiience east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains, west SO
chains, south 80 chains to post of commencement.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner of section 4,
township 25, about one mlle distant in
an easterlv direction from claim No.
2; thence east 80 chains, south 80 chains,
west 80 chains, north 80 chains to post
of commencement.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner of section 9,
township 26, about one mile distant in
aneasterly direction from claim No. 2;
thence east 80 chains, north 80 chains,
west 80 ohalns, south 80 chains to post
of commencement.
No, 5.—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner of section 16,
township 26, about one mile in a northerly direction from claim No. 4; thence
east 80 chains, north SO chains, west
80 chains, south 80 chains to post of
commeneement.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner of section 17,
township 25, about one mile In a northerly direction from claim No. I; thence
north SO chains, west SO chains, south
80 chains, east 80 chains to post of
commencement.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner of section 18,
township 26, about one mile westerly
from claim No. 6; thence north SO
chains; west 80 ehains, south 80 chains,
east 80 chains to post of commencement.
No. 8—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner of section 13,
township 32, about one mile westerly
from claim No. 7;; thence north 80
chains; west 80 chains', south 80 chains;
east SO chains to post of commencement.
No. 9—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner of section 14,
township 32, about one mile westerly
from claim No. 8; thence north 80
chains, west 80 chains, south 80 chains,
east 80 chains to post of commencement.
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner of section 16,
township 32, about one mile westerly
from claim No. 9; thence north 80
chains, west 80 chains, south SO chains,
east 80 chains to post of commencement.
No. 11—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast corner of section
22, township 32, about one mile northerly from claim No. 10; thence nortli
SO ehains, west 80 chains, south 80
chains, east 80 chains to post of commencement.
Dated  October  22nd,   1907.
J.  A. McEACHRAN,
Nov. 23        Per Geo. H. Jackson, Agent.
B. C
Timber Maps
of All Districts
VANCOUVER MAP and BLUE-PRINT CO,
Suite 20-ji Crowe aud Wilson
Chambers,
VANCOUVER, B. C.
PARLIAMENT  BUILDINGS,
VICTORIA.
NOTICE ls hereby given that the
drive-ways in front and rear of the
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, AHK
NOT PUBLIC THOROUGHFARES and
may be used only by those who have
business with the Departments or are
desirous of entering and viewing thu
building.
Automobiles, tally-hos or other vehicles carrying sight-seers may pass
along the drive-way ln front of the
building, but at a speed not exceeding
tour miles an hour. Through traffic
of any kind or description along the
drive-way in the rear of the building ls
strictly prohibited.
By order of the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., lst August, 1907.
Aug 10 '	
COAST LAND DISTRICT.
District of Stuart River.
TAKE NOTICE that J. C. Carruthers,
of Nelson, B.C., occupation Traveller, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
East bank of Stuart River, and about
one and a half miles distant ln a northwesterly direction from the Southwest
oorner of the Indian Reserve on Stuart
River; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 10 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
JOHN CLEMENT CARRUTHERS.
Oct. 12 Geo. Agu, Agent.
DISTRICT  OF  RUPERT.
TAKE NOTICE that J. H. Allan, of
Victoria, occupation Trader, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at
south end of small Islet ln Forward
Inlet, Quatsino Sound; north of Lot Sil;
thence northerly about SO chains and
thenoe southerly around Islet to point
of commencement, containing about 40
Dated Sept. 19th, 1907.
Oct. 12 J. H. ALLAN.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE   NOTICE   that   Ralph   Gibson,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation Chalnman,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:—
Commencing at a post planted at  the
northeast corner of Rosabella Good-
wyn's purchase; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to place
of commencement and containing 640
acres.
Date July 19th,  1907.
Oct. 19. RALPH GIBSON.
NOTICE  TO  LOGGERS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Piles.
ALTERNATIVE sealed tenders, superscribed "Teuder for Piles, Bridge,
North Arm, Fraser River," will be received by the Honourable the Chiel'
Commissioner of Lands and Works,
Victoria, B. C, up to and including
Tuesday, the 31st of December, 1907,
for furnishing and delivering at the
bridge site on the North Arm of the
Fraser River, on the line of the Cemetery Road, fir and cedar piles.
About six hundred (600) will be required, varying in length from twenty
(20) to forty-five (45) feet. They must
be straight, sound, and not less (han
ten (10 Inches at the small end. No
butts  will be accepted.
Further printed particulars can be obtained on application to the undersigned.
Tenderers must state the price per
lineal foot for piles delivered.
The successful tenderer will be furnished with a list giving the number
of piles required and the length of each.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certificate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, in
the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars ($260), which shall be forfeited
if the party tendering decline or neglect
to enter into contract when called upon
to do so, or fail to complete the work
contracted for. The cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful ten-
tenderers will be returned to them upon  the  execution  of the  contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the form supplied, signed
with the actual signatures of the tenderers, and enclosed in the envelope furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 30 Public Works Engineer.
eighty chains; thence west eighty
chains; thence north eighty chains;
thence east eighty chains to post of
commencement.
Dated Nov. Sth, 1907.
Nov. 30 ALVA MALONEY,
District of Rupert.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
T. L. No. 6, Howe Sound—Take notice
that A. G. McClarty of Vancouver, B.C.,
Timber Cruiser, intends to apply for a
special timber license over the following described  land:
N.W. Corner—Commencing at a post
standing at the northeast corner of
Timber Limit No. 13425 on the east
side of Howe Sound, and about one-
half mlle south of Britannia Wharf,
and running east 80 chains, south 80
chains, west 80 chains, north 80 chains.
Located October 18th, 1907.
Nov. 16 A. G. McCLARTY.
COAST  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Michael Crane,
of Port Harvey, B.C., occupation, Timber
Cruiser, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands: Situate on Quatse Bay, Coast
District:
Commencing at a post planted on the
north shore of Quatse Bay at the S. W.
corner of old T. L. 7712; thence north
30 chains; thence east 60 chains; thence
south 20 chains more or less to shore
of Quatse Bay; thence westerly following shore of Quatse Bay to point of
commencement, containing 60 acres,
more or less.
Dated October 2nd,  1907.
Nov.   9 MICHAEL  CRANE.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
T. L. No. 3—Take notice that A. G.
McClarty of Mt. Pleasant P.O., Timber
Cruiser, Intends to apply for a special
timber license over the following described lands:
N. E. Corner—Commencink at a post
standing at the southeast corner of
Timber Limit No. 13278, one mile up
Cedar Creek, Howe Sound, and in a
westerly direction; thence south 130
chatns; thence west 49 chains; thence
north 130 chains; thence east 49 chains.
Located Oct 23rd, 1907.
Nov. 16 A. G. McCLARTY.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
T. L. No. 5—Howe Sound—Take notice
that A. G. McClarty of Vancouver, B.C.,
Timber Cruiser, intends to apply for
a special timber license over the following described  lands:
N. E. Corner—Commencing at a post
planted on the north side of Bolder
Creek, about 60 chains from creek, and
about 129 chains from the Beach ln a
northwesterly direction from Beach and
southwesterly from Mill Creek and running west 80 chains, south 80 chains,
east  80  chains,  north  80  chains.
Located Oct.  26th,  1907.
Nov.  16 A. G. McCLARTY.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
T. L. No. 2—Take notice that A. G.
McClarty of Mt. Pleasant, P.O., Timber
Cruiser, Intends to apply for a special
timber license over the following described lands:
S.W. Corner—Commencing at a post
standing on the east bank of Mill Creek,
Howe Sound, in a northwesterly direction from Beach, on north line of Lot
13103 and at the S.E. Corner of Timber
Limit No. 13104; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains.
Located  Oct.   22nd,  1907.
Nov. 16 A. G. McCLARTY.
COAST LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that John Manson, of
Cortez Island, occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Situate on Mist Island, Port Harvey
Bay:
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner of Mist Island; thence following the shore line of said Mist Island
ln a northerly, easterly, southerly and
westerly direction to point of commencement, being all of Mist Island,
and containing 40 acres more or less.
Dated  October   9th,   1907.
JOHN MANSON.
Nov. 9 By Michael Crane, Agent.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
Ditsrict of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Richard P.
Bishop, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
Chainman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
land:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of Rosabella Good-
wyn's purchase; thence south 40 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 40
chains; thence west 80 chains to place
of  commencement  and   containing  320
Date July 19th, 1907.
Oct. 19. RICHARD P.. BISHOP.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
T. L. No. 2—Take notice that A. G.
McClarty,   of  Vancouver,  B.C.,  Timber
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Mabel Gresley,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married
woman, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
land:—
Commencing at a post planted on tbe
south bank of the Nechaco River south
of Henry Holmes' pre-emption; thenoe
south 40 chains; thence west 80 chalna;
thence north 80 chains, more or less, to
the south bank of said river; thence
easterly along the bank of said river to
place of commencement and containing
300 acres, more or less.
Date July 23rd, 1907.
Oct. 19. MABEL GRESLEY.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Maud Jeffrey,
of London, Ontario, occupation Spinster,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north bank of the Nechaco River near
the fourth rapid, about six miles below
Fraser Lake; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south to
the bank of the said river; thence easterly along sa'd river to place of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Date July 29th, 1907.
Oct. 19. MAUD JEFFREY.
NECHACO LAND DISTRK'T.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that James Nelson
Currie, of Glencoe, Ontario, occupation
Merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following describe!
land:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north bank of the Nechaco River about
two miles below the second rapid below Fraser Lake; thence north 80 chalna;
thence west 80 chains; thence south to
bank of said river; thence easterly along
bank of said river to place of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or
Date July 29th, 1907.
Oct. 19.       JAMES NELSON CURRIE.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Duncan R.
Irvine, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
Mining Engineer, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
south bank of the Nechaco west of E. N.
McBeth's application to purchase; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chalna;
thence east to bank of Nechaco River;
thence southerly along said bank to
place of commencement, and containing
320 acres, more or less.
Date July 23rd, 1907.
Oct.  19. DUNCAN R.  IRVINE.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Harold Whyte, of
Victoria, B. C„ occupation Student, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of Rosabella Good-
wyn's purchase; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Date July 19th, 1907.
Oct. 19. HAROLD WHYTE.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
T. L. No. 4—Take notice that A. G.
McClarty of Mt. Pleasant P.O., Timber
Cruiser, intends to apply for a special
timber license over the following described land:
S.W. Corner—Commencing at a post
standing at the southerly northwest
corner of Lot 1337 about one mlle westerly from the mouth of Mill Creek and
^FiTHim Gone
Manage r
TIMBER MAPS
Office ^honl /534
Residence 4-38
Advertise
ycur   SKEENA   DISTRICT   timber
and land notices in
"TheNorthCoast"
Printed   and   published   at    Port
Simpson,  B.C.
Vancouver office, 536 Hastings St.
P. F. Godenrath & Co., owners.
posted up  to date  every day
ELECTRIC BLUE PRINT L MAP CO.
VICTORIA. B.C..
CHANCERY    CHAMBERS. SZ   LANGLEY'STREET
BLUEPRINTING
DRAUGHTING OFFICE.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that Edgar McMicking, of Victoria, B.C., occupation, Physician, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
two miles distant and ln a westerly direction from the Stuart River and
about three miles south of Stuart Lake,
marked E. M.'s S. E. Corner; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement and
containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated   6th   November,   1907.
Nov.   9 EDGAR  McMICKING.
COAST  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Michael Crane,
of Port Harvey, occupation, Timber
Cruiser, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner, being on the shore of
Thompson Sound, 40 chains south of
S. E. corner of T. L. 9300; thence north
40 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 80 chains:
thence south 20 chains more or less to
shore; thence In a westerly direction,
following shore line, to point of commencement.
Date  October  18th,   1907.
Nov.  9 MICHAEL  CRANE.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
TAKE NOTICE that Alva Maloncy, of
Centralia, Wash., occupation, Timber
Cruiser, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
live chnins snuth of the south shore of
Johnstons Straits, and 24 dogrees west
of south of Milly Island;  thencfi south
Complete    set of Maps shoYY/ny all
TIMBER   LICENCES
and other lands   taken  up in British Cotumbi
Blue   Prints   can be   obtained at .short ,
Cruiser, Intends to apply for a Special
Timber License to cut and carry away
timber over the following described
lands:
S. W. Corner—Commencing at a post
planted on east bank of Lillooet River,
bout flve and one-half mlles from Port
luglas and running east 40 chains;
i rth 80 chains; west 40 chains; north
! chains; west to line of lot 986; thence
u..owing line of lot 935 to River; thence
following river back to beginning.
J. CROW.
Nov. 16 Agent, A. G. McClarty.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
T. L. No. 1—Take notice that I, A. G.
McClarty, of Vancouver, B.C., Timber
Cruiser, intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a speclnl Timber License
over the following described land:
N.W. Corner—Commencing at a post
planted about half way between Spring
Creek and Tapella Creek, west of Lillooet, and at southwest corner of T. L.
No. 13267 and southeast corner of T. L.
No. 6346 and running thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains.
Located October 17th, 1907.
GRANT & KERR,
Nov. 16 Agent, A. G. McClarty.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
T. L. No. 2—Take notice that I, A. G.
McClarty of Vancouver, B.C., Timber
Cruiser, Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special Timber License over the
following  described  land:
N. E. Corner—Commencing at a post
planted about half way between Spring
Creek and Tapella Creek, west of Lillooet, and at southwest corner of T. L.
No. 13267 and southeast corner of T. L.
No. 6346 and running thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north  80 chains; thence east 80 chains.
Located Oct.  17th,  1907.
GRANT & KERR.
Nov. 16 Agent, A. G. McClarty.
up Cedar Creek Valley; thence east 40
chains, along line of Lot 1337; thence
north 40 chains along line of lot 1337 to
T. L. 13103; thence west 35 chains,
more or less to S. W. Corner of T. L.
13103; thence north to N. W. corner of
T. L. 13103; thence west 63 chains to
S. W, corner of T. L. 13104; thence south
90 chains to T. L. 13278 and following
line of same to beginning.
Located Oct. 23rd, 1907.
Nov. 16 A. G. McCLARTY.
DISTRICT OF CASSIAR.
TAKE NOTICE that The Hidden
Creek Mining Co., of Vancouver, occupation,  , intends to apply for
permission   to   purchase   the   following
described  land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of Lot 308, Cassiar
District; thence north 40 chains; thenoe
west 40 chains; thence south to shore
line of Goose Bay, thence easterly along
shore line to the south boundary of
Lot 308 and thence west to point of
commencement, containing about 200
acres.
Date Nov.  llth, 1907.
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Nov. 16 Per J. H. McGregor
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
T. L. No. 1—Tako notice that A. G.
McClarty of Vancouver, B.C., Timber
Cruiser, Intends to apply for a Special
Timber License to cut and carry away
timber over the following described
lands:
N.W. Corner—Commencing at a post
planted on the line of Lot 936 about
eleven and one-quarter miles from Port
Douglas and about 260 yards east of
Wagon Road and running east 60 chains;
south 120 chains; west to river, following bank of river to 10-Mlle Homestead,
thence following line of homestead back
to river; thence following river to line
of lot 936; thence following line of Lot
936 back  to beginning.
Located  Oct.  16th,  1907.
J. CROW.
Nov. 16 Agent, A. G. McClarty. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1907
m
*%
THE
Chartered Bank of British Columbia
To Be Incorporated by Act of Parliament of the Dominion of Canada.
The Following Have Applied for Incorporation and will be the Provisional Directors
T. W. PATTERSON, Esq., Capitalist, Victoria, B. C.
J. A. MITCHELL, Esq.,   Capitalist, Victoria, B. C.
W. H. MALKIN, Esq.,
W. H. Malkin Co., Wholesale Groceries, Vancouver, B.C.
R. P. McLENNAN, Esq.,
McLennan, McFeeley & Co,, Wholesale Hardware,
Vancouver, B. C.
H. T. CEPERLEY, Esq.,
Ceperley, Rounsefell & Co., Brokers, Vancouver, B.C
F. W. JONES, Esq.,  Lumberman, Victoria, B. C.
J. A. HARVE , Esq., K.C, Oranbrook, B.C.
SOLICITORS
GEORGE H. COWAN, Esq., Vancouver, B.C.
TRUSTEES
YORKSHIRE GUARANTEE & SECURITIES CORPORATION, VANCOUVER, B. 0.
X
PROSPECTUS
The Chartered Bank of Britisli Columbia is being
formed to meet in part the increased banking accommodation required by the natural and steady expansion of business, coincident with the great development of the country and especially of British Columbia, and, while organizing to conduct a general
banking business, will give special consideration to
the industries and commerce of the Province, and is
being established primarily for this purpose, and
through its connections in Great Britain, the United
States and Eastern Canada, it will be able to greatly
facilitate the investment of outside capital in the
various enterprises of the Province.
British Columbia, with its great wealth of raw
material in timber and minerals largely developed,
with its opportunities for cattle ranching, mixed
farming and fruit growing, with its fisheries and
its increasing maritime trade with the Orient, Australia, Mexico and South America, and, above all,
in the approaching development of its vast Central Northern Interior and Vancouver Island by
railway constructions will be immensely benefited by
the establishment of a Chartered Bank having its
Chief Office in the Province and controlled by a
Board of Directors entirely familiar with the resources and the needs of the country, whose names
alone are a guarantee for the success of the undertaking.
Under the banking laws of Canada a Chartered
Bank has also this additional earning power—that
for every dollar of paid-up capital it can issue its
bills to that amount, thus doubling the earning
power of its Stockholders' money.
Por instance, the Authorized Capital of the
Chartered Bank of British Columbia is $2,000,000.
If this were fully paid-up the Bank could issue
$2,000,000 in bills, thus earning for its stockholders'
dividends on $4,000,000, giving the Bank a double
earning power on its capital.
The profits on Bank Stock are distributed to the
Stockholders in two ways:
1. Dividends paid direct to the stockholders.
2. Profits over and above dividends placed
to Rest Account, which increases the
value of their stock.
It is therefore scarcely necessary to point out
that the shares of chartered banks in Canada are
recognized   as  being  among  the  safest  and  most
profitable of investments.
Bank stock offers to the investor:
1. A safe investment.
2. An investment easily convertible.
3. A profitable investment.
4. An investment increasing in value.
The opportunity for investment in the stock of
a new bank in Canada is rare.
It is impossible to get stock in a Chartered Bank
at other than market prices.
The stock of a chartered bank that has been going
for some time sells so readily that it must be purchased at the large premiums at which the shares
sell in the open market.
Banks have the power of easily increasing the
amount of their capital stock, but whenever they
do so the new stock must first be offered pro rata
to existing shareholders.
In every case where this has been done the existing shareholders have taken up the whole of the issue,
and the general public has been unable to obtain any
part of it.
The following table shows what some Canadian
Banks have done in the past for their shareholders:
Bank.
Par Value.
Montreal   $100
Commerce   $100
Nova Scotia   $100
British  $100
Merchants    $100
Dominion   $100
Toronto    $100
Boyal  $100
Hamilton  $100
Traders    $100
Imperial   $100
Standard   $100
Molsons   $100
East. Townships ... $100
Ottawa  $100
Present Annual
Selling Dividend
Price  Now Paid
Per Cent.
10
$235
$100
$279
$155
$15li
$220
$202
$225
$185
$125
$213
$190
$156
$215
12
12
10
10
10
1
11
12
10
8
10
The actual returns of existing Canadian Banking
Institutions to shareholders, after setting aside a
portion of the yearly earnings as a "Reserve Fund,"
or "Rest Account," have ranged for the past ten
years from 6 to as high as 12 per cent, per annum,
and payable half-yearly.
During recent years the earnings of many
Chartered Banks in Canada have been over 15 per
cent, per annum.
Directors
The gentlemen who have consented to act as
Provisional Directors are large stockholders who
have been successful in their own business affairs
and in whom the public has the highest confidence.
Their selection will have to be ratified by the
first meeting of the shareholders. Additional directors will also be selected from among the Shareholders at the said meeting by the Shareholders
themselves, so that they will have a direct opportunity of seeing that the affairs of the Bank are
entrusted to careful and competent management.
Arrangements have been made whereby the office
of General Manager will be filled by a well-known
and experienced banker.
Terms of Subscription
The terms of subscription are $10 premium on
each share upon the signing of subscription; $10
upon each share of stock within thirty days after
date of subscription, and $10 on each share of stock
upon allotment by the Provisional Directors, and
eight equal monthly payments of $10 each per share,
the first of such payments to be made thirty days
after allotment, and the succeeding payments at intervals of thirty days. On payments made in advance
of monthly instalments, interest at the rate of. 3 per
cent, per annum will be allowed.
Applications for Stock
Applications for stock may be made to the
Secretary of The Chartered Bank of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C. All cheques, drafts, money
orders ancl other remittances on account of subscriptions for stock should be made payable to The
Yorkshire Guarantee & Securities Corporation,
Ltd., Vancouver, B.C.
Subscription Forms
For further information or forms of subscriptions for stock address A. L. Dewar, Secretary,
Vancouver, B.C.
HEAD OFFICE
VANCOUVER, B. C.
CAPITAL $2,000,000,    -    in 20,000 of $100 Each,    -    With $10 Premium.
J THE WEEK, SATURDAY DECEMBER 14  1907.
•POOO-00*0-<_K>00©00-*»00-0000000000-0-0^^
■sooo-oooo-o-o-o-ooooooo-oooooo--^^
HOLIDAY
CHINA
LAVISH   PROVISION   OF
XMAS GIFTS
We can satisfy every fancy
in the matter of holiday
gifts if something in pottery,
art glass, china or bric-a-brac
is favored in the impulse to
buy.
Never before has our collection of beautiful wares
been so large — because
never before have the
great factories of Europe
turned out such a number
of exquisite styles and we
couldn't resist buying most
of them.
You '11 appreciate this when
you come to view them and
will agree with us that while
our purchases have been
lavish every piece meets the
requirements of good taste.
Make Purchases Now,  and
We Shall Deliver When \ou
Wish.  Do It Now!
USEF
Are Much the Best«The Most Appreciated.
We cannot advise too strongly the wisdom of buying PRACTICAL CHRISTMAS GIFTS-articles that
are needful and useful every day of the year. Articles of usefulness, such as furniture pieces, rugs, drapes,
china, etc., will find an unusually warm welcome in any home. The utility side of the gift will be the means
of making your gift remembered and blessed many days after this Christmas has been forgotten. Newness,
style and quality, combined with money-saving prices should appeal to you whose heart is large—and purse
limited. To those citizens of moderate income this store offers innumerable GOOD THINGS at moderate prices.
For months past we have been gathering together from the world over a Christmas stock of "usefulness" such
as is not offered elsewhere in this big province. We extend to everyone a very hearty invitation to spend as
much time as possible at this store.   - ou are most certainly welcome.
FOR THE
MEN.
QUAINT,   PRACTICAL,
DEN FURNISHINGS
The man who comes in
here with preconceived ideas
as to what he wants in den
"fittings" will have' no
trouble satisfying them. The
man who comes with an open
mind will And us willing to
show him the latest grotesques and quaint bits which
are most always practical as
well as fanciful.
We make a point to secure all the new things
worth while, as they appear,
so you may drop in often
and gather in the "real
finds." Just now our line
of Tobacco Jars, Beer Steins,
Pipe Trays, etc., is exceptionally good.
The Windows Contain Gift
Suggestions of Much Merit.
Watch the Windows!
Uncommonly Nice Gifts in the Rug Section.
Uncommonly nice gifts are these beautiful new Mohair Rugs, and a gift, too, with
which any home keeper would be delighted. Tliere isn't a better wearing or a more
artistic rug made. One would go a long way towards brightening any room. The
almost everlasting wearing qualities of these rugs means that your gift would be in
evidence long after the usual "gift ideas" have passed into nothingness.
We have made a big purchase direct from the largest manufacturers, and are in
a position to offer you some unusually good values, The range of colorings and
sizes is very large. We shall be pleased to show yon these splendid rugs if you can
spare us a moment of your time.    Shown on Second Floor.
 $7.50
....$12.00
 $9.00
Size 30 in. x 12 in., each $1.50
Size 36 in. x 18 in., each. $2.75
Size 54 in. x 24 in., each $5.00
I Size 64 in. x 30 in., each.
I Size 72 in. x 36 in., eueh.
I   Size 72 in. x 36 in., each.
New Dinnerware For Your Christmas Table.
Just in lime for Christmas! Fortunate, indeed, are we to be able to offer you such
unusually dainty Dinnerware for your Christmas table—and a stock pattern, too.
We have just received a big shipment of one of the prettiest Dinnerware lines we
have ever shown. This pattern we have added as an "Open Stock" to our already
large offering of these.   For a medium-priced service, you cannot equal these values.
The ware is semi-porcelain of hest quality. Most people, unless they looked
corefully, would say it was china, it resembles it so closely. It is belter than China,
though, because it's stronger. The decoration is a pretty wreath of pink roses and
green leaves so placed they make a most, attractive decoration. A gold line around the
edges adds still further to the rich effect.
You may purchase these in sets or by the piece. The advantages of this
"Elastic" style, when some pieces are broken, will make you bless the "Open Slock."
Simply come here and replace the broken parts. No delay at all. We have made up
two sets as below.   Come in and get the prices '' by the piece.''
Dinner Set, 97 pieces $12.00 Dinner Set, 119 pieces $16.00
FREE-A VALUABLE BOOK
Ask for a copy of our beautiful
Book on Cut Glass, "Things Beautiful." This book gives the history of
Cut Glass and illustrations showing
tlie process of manufacture. Tells you
how to keep and clean your Cut Glass
and gives many useful hints on table
decoration.
COMPLETE HOME FURNISHERS VICTORIA, B.C.
FREE-A CHRISTMAS HELP
We have prepared a very interesting and helpful book on Christmas
Giving which we shall he pleased to
send or give to anyone asking for a
copy. It offers hundreds of Gift suggestions—more particularly gifts both
serviceable and sensible.
PLEASED TO SEND A COPY
______________________________     000-00000000-0-->C>00*000***>0<>0000-00 «,
&£J2ooooooooooooooooooo6oooooo6d6o6oo<xx^
I Sporting
Comment.
The Victoria Hockey Club made
an auspicious commencement on Saturday last when both the ladies and
gentlemen teams won their matches.
The former defeated the Nanaimo
lddies after a very hard game by the
score of 2—0, while the men won
from Seattle rather easily. The local
ladies showed a better knowledge of
the game than they have done for
several years past, and it was very
evident that they had done considerable practicing. There are still some
minor points where they can improve
their play, but it is not expected that
they can learn everything at once
and at their next match a further
improvement will be looked for. Although they won their game, they
had no snap, the visiting ladies making them play all the time. It would
be hardly fair to criticize the individual players, but special mention
has to be made of little Miss Vincent
in goal. This young lady covered
herself with glory, making several remarkable stops and had it not been
for her brilliant work the score might
have been different. The other players did effective work and if the
ladies continue to improve as they
have done since last season, there is
very little doubt as to where the
championship will rest this season.
The match between the Seattle and
Victoria Clubs was far from being interesting. The locals were never in
danger, during the first half scoring
sufficient goals to carry them through
without difficulty. The Seattle Club
is to be congratulated on the showing
that was  made, in view of the  fact
that it was the first time the players
had ever been together. The team
is composed of several very promising players and as the season progresses there is every reason to expect a better showing from the visitors from across the line.
In the evening the local club entertained the visiting teams at a very
enjoyable dance in the A.O.U.W. hall.
The arrangements for the dance were
in the hands of a capable committee
and everything ran off smoothly. The
hockey dance has now come to be
looked on as the social event of the
season and the affair on Saturday
evening was certainly in keeping with
their past efforts.
As far as the race for the championship of the City League is concerned, the Egeria team is practically
down and out. This team was expected to make a good showing but
their performances have been very
disappointing to their followers. Their
last defeat took place on Saturday
when the Esquimalt team lowered
their colours. With the Egeria team
out of the running, it appears as it
nothing can stop the James Bays from
winning the League. This club has
made a very fine showing and with
only a few more games to play it is
likely that they will land the pennant.
This afternoon will witness the
fourth match between the James Bay
and Victoria Rugby Clubs and a hard
game is looked for. This match will
bear an important part in the selection of a team to meet Vancouver the
following Saturday.
The Vancouver team is very strong
and every effort should be made to
pick the best players that can be got
together in this city. In this match
it is absolutely that all petty jealousies  should be overlooked and  every
player work for the honour of Victoria. It is not the Victoria Club,
nor the James Bay Club but Victoria
as the Capital of the Province that
has to be represented and unless the
very best team is selected, the aggregation will meet the same fate as the
teams have during the last few years.
The All-Star Vancouver Club is said
to be a wonderful combination, but
there is never a team but what there
is one better, and if thc strongest
players in Victoria are selected it
would not be any surprise if the Mainlanders are defeated. It is rumoured
on the streets that several players
who have been in harness this season
will be unable to accompany the team
to Vancouver. This is not as it should
bc. There is hardly a player who
cannot get away from business long
enough to make the trip to Vancouver
and it is hoped that every effort will
be made to have these players in their
places when they journey to Vancouver on December 21st.
The most important match that has
ever been played in this city will be
played at Oak Bay on January 4th,
when the Stanford University team
will run up against thc Victoria aggregation. This will be a notable event
in Rugby Football and it is hoped
that the citizens of Victoria will respond liberally and attend the game
in crowds. Now that the game is
assured it is up to the local players
to get busy. The Southerners will
conic to Victoria in thc pink of condition and unless the locals arc able
to go the whole distance it will be
all Stanford. In the games this season the local players have not shown
very good form in tackling. This
is one department in which there can
bc a big improvement and unless thc
boys learn the trick of getting their
opponents  in  a proper  manner  they
will certainly have a big score piled
up against them. As in the game
against Vancouver every player will
be fighting for Victoria and every
effort should be made to get in form.
In this connection it might be pointed
out that the James Bay team is in
better fettle than the members of the
Victoria Club, and it would not be a
bad idea if all the players endeavoured to get in as much road work
as possible. It might also be arranged that the players could use the
J. II. A. A. gymnasium. If this could
bc secured a dummy could be set up
and the players given instructions in
tackling. This is absolutely essential
if the game is to be won and that is
what every lover of good clean sport
in this city is looking for. There is
not much time to get to work and
thc selection committee should get to
work at once and pick their team and
then see that they get in shape. All
depends on the condition of the
players and if those who have the
honour of being selected have the interests of the game at heart they will
leave no stone unturned in their efforts to be ready for the fray. Buck
up boys and get busy.
news,' so it is to thc Moyie Leader
that Victorians are indebted for the
following item:
"Mrs. Dunsmuir of Victoria is
credited with being the most heavily
insured woman in North America, if
not in the world, carrying policies
amounting to $1,000,000."
Another Removal.
Andrew Colville, for some years
colliery superintendent at Coal Creek,
and who distinguished himself by the
evidence which hc gave in the celebrated compensation case, has felt the
employ of the C. N. P. Co. and gone
east.
An arrangement has been reached
between the Amateur Federation of
Canada and the Canada Amateur
Athletic Union in regard to the amateur status of Canadian athletes for
thc Olympic games. This is as it
should bc, everybody unite for lhe
honour of Canada; let petty differences go and if Canada docs not take
her share of the prizes at the contest it will be surprising.
Setting An Example.
Thc Conservatives of Golden know
their business, and do not shirk it.
Not content with sending delegates
to thc Vancouver Convention, they
followed thc matter up by holding a
meeting on their return to hear the
report of their representatives. In
this way the interest of the Convention was kept up and its enthusiasm
passed on. The example of Golden
is one which could be copied with advantage by every constituency in the
Province, a delegate, like a member,
should render an account of his stewardship.
The Black Hand.
"You say you had an experience
with the black hand while in New
York?"
"Yes. And a terrible experience it
was, T had three aces and the other
man had five clubs.
Our Example.
An Item of News.
It still appears to bc true that one
has to go away from home to learn
Michigan woman breaks her arm
while spanking her son. One case
where "it hurts me more than it does
you, my dear." THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1907.
$? ^^fc'%^^^<$9fl^ ■#"#?
f
?4?
A Lady's Letter *
By  BABETTE.
Dear  Madge:
There is no doubt that, to the majority of women, evening dress presents far greater possibilities of be-
comingness and attractiveness than
any other style of dress. The materials of the present day are soft,
light and delicate, and should fall in
graceful, clinging lines if properly
manipulated in the making of the
gown. Skirts are worn fairly long
all round, and lengthen into a medium
train at the back. Lace tucks, and
embroidery form the chief trimmings
and these are introduced into folds
which, in surplice or fichu effects,
form the greater part of the bodice.
Sleeves are small, and deep and
draped waistbands give the most becoming  line  to  the  waist.
Among the new materials, the first
place must be given to the delicately
printed or painted chiffons. One
model which attracted my attention
lately is of pale blue chiffon, with a
painted design of flowers in pale
blues and heliotropes. Bands of
this lovely design border the rounded panels that form the front and
back of the skirt, and single sprays are
placed at intervals round the skirt,
framed in the narrow lace which is
arranged in stripes, curves, and frills
on the pale blue chiffon. On the
bodice the folded bretelles, falling
over lace and chiffon sleeves, are of
the painted material, while the little
vest is finished with a heavy guipure
applique and a band of pearl and
silver embroidery.
It would really seem as though
the tailors were going to have a good
time of it at last. For years now
they have lamented, and with good
reason, the over-elaboration of the
so-called "tailor" gown, which has
very frequently been adorned with
trimmings quite as intricate as those
which have characterised the smartest
gowns supplied by the dressmakers.
Now, however, things have changed,
and there seems every prospect that
in the immediate future tailor gowns
will once more return to their original and severe simplicity. The
skirts will be perfectly plain and
trimmed only with some rows of
tailor-stitching, except in those cases
where braiding of various kinds will
be allowed to exercise its undoubted
charm. Round the hips, too, the
skirts of those who wish to be in advance of the fashion will fit as
smoothly to the figure as the proverbial glove. In fact, special corsets
are being made in Paris with a view
to reducing the size of the hips, while
leaving plenty of room at the waist.
This should be good news for those
who have allowed themselves to be
scared of late by the perennial bogey
of tight-lacing, more useful sometimes
to the newspapers than even the sea-
serpent in the dull season.
It is true that thc tailors will be
making close-fitting coats cut with
very long basques, which havc almost
the effect of a second skirt, and which
will be moulded closely to the figure,
but this will not necessitate anything
so ridiculously out of proportion as
that contour which is indiscriminately described as a wasp-waist or an
hour-glass  figure.
That women marry for love as
much as ever they did in bygone days
is insisted upon by a lady of my
acquaintance. The average girl of today (she says) while necessarily more
independent and vastly better informed than her grandmother, is as womanly and delicate in her attitude
toward the opposite sex as the woman of any known age. The fact
that wooing and wedding have developed a greater elasticity in recent
years does not imply that it has become a mere artificial business. The
average modern girl marries for love.
It means this—thc cap has to be
fitted to its proper owners, and not
flung indiscriminately at the sex as
common to all. There are women in
plenty who, now that some of thc
reserve between the sexes has been
removed, have taken every advantage
of the freedom. They spare no feminine cleverness in bringing a husband into the net. Love, with all its
tender beauty, has no meaning for
them. They simply cast their net and
scoop out the most eligible life partners from the meshes. It is a great,
exciting game. But into its artificial
atmosphere the average modern girl
never enters. On the contrary, she is
gloriously free from the taint, "Heart"
is at the base of her life's one romance.
There is not a Jack for every Jill
and, come to that, not a Jill for every
Jack. There may be secret yearnings
in the minds of women, whose twin
soul has never come, but all the
same, the average girl of today still
asks to be loved for herself alone.
She recognizes that her one chance of
future happiness hinges upon the sincerity of the halo about her wedding.
Thorean says: "Ignorance and
bungling with love are better than
wisdom and skill without. Our life
without love is like coke and ashes."
Next Federal Election
By W. A.
As the time draws nearer for a
Federal General Election, the leaders
of both of the great political parties
in Victoria are naturally enough asking their friends and themselves what
the chances are for the election of
their candidates, and the placing in
power of their respective parties.
That the Conservatives will elect
their man in the city is admitted by
the large majority of the populace,
irrespective of party, and that the
Liberals anticipate this is proved by
the strenuous efforts the local organizers are making to concert any possible waverers to their allegiance.
The majority of the business element of Victoria have been, are, and
always will be, Conservative. The
residential people of independent
means can also be claimed by the
same party, and it is the weighty
vote of the working population, represented by the mechanics, the
artisan, and the labourer, that the
Liberal organizers are vainly endeavouring to swing into line.
Besides these there are the growing youth, just attaining majority and
full of the zeal and fire of first manhood.
Time was, in this Province, when
the young men required quite a bit of
advice on matters political, and the
chances for an earnest and hard working organizer to sway a substantial
number to his side were many. Now,
it is different; the average boy of
fifteen is as well posted in politics
as many a man of forty, and the
young man of twenty-one is as capable on conversing intelligently and
has as good a discrimination in
choosing his party, as the same forty-
year-old. That the young vote in
Victoria is solid on Conservative lines
the last sweeping victory in the Provincial elections in this city amply
proved, and not a single loophole has
been given the opposing party to
retrieve their position  since.
The working man is aroused, and
bristling with anger over the Asiatic
question. He knows the attitude of
the Conservative party on the subject, for it has gone on record in a
comprehensive resolution passed at
the Convention held in Vancouver
last month, a resolution so well to the
point, so devoid of ambiguity, that
even a child may know that the Tories
of B. C. are against the influx of
Asiatics. But no one knows the attitude or the inner thoughts of thc
Liberal Government on this score, and
the average working man, the bone
and sinew of the Western world, does
a lot of thinking, and the result is
bad—very bad indeed, for the Government at Ottawa.
The recent speech of Sir Wilfrid
Laurier is so antagonistic to and contemptuous of the expressed wishes of
the people of B. C. that it is impossible for the Province to have any
confidence in his handling of the
question.
Regarding the  other  parts  of the
Province, Vancouver has made her
record as a Conservative city, and to
judge by the trend of events, will
place a yet larger vote in the same
direction. Outlying places have been
largely kept in line by promises from
Ottawa—unfulfilled.
The people of Comox—Atlin, will
long remember the word which come
to the Central Conservative Club from
the Skeena: "No use running a man,
people crazy for G. T. P.," which, being interpreted, meant that the general results of the general elections
were known before the election for
that district was held. The majority
of the voters would go Government,
the plum for that part of the Province being the specific construction of
the G. T. P. at once.
The old argument that the Liberals
still hold the popular confidence
as being evidenced by their increased
majority at the last election is annihilated. There are fifteen per cent,
more Conservatives in the city of Victoria today than there were two years
ago. There are 50 per cent, more in
the whole Province than there were
at that time. When the country, nay,
the whole world, was in a prosperous
condition, when money was plentiful
and industries were being pushed, the
vast army of toilers throughout the
Dominion were strongly averse to any
action by which the balance of harmony might be disturbed. "Good
times," especially in our West, are
like birds of passage, extremely sensitive to cold influences, and prone
to take alarm and wing their way-
south at the first indications of a
storm, hence the need of careful fostering and avoidance of any act likely to disturb them. The people of
Canada, and particularly of the West,
are fully aware of these peculiarities,
hence, when affairs progress smoothly, it is deemed wise, by an immense
majority, to let well enough alone. But
now that the pricking of hard times
is again felt, when the main industries of the country are shut down
at a moment's notice, when thousands of men throughout the Dominion are forced into idleness, then
"Richard will be himself again," and
the electors, freed from the accursed
fear of "losing their jobs," will vote
for what they always knew as the
most progressive party—the Conservative.
It is not yet generally known what
a tremendous influence "Better terms"
will have in the next General Election in B. C. People have only just
begun to realize the immense importance this is to our Province. They
have begun to realize the splendid
action of one man standing alone and
fighting the question out against overwhelming odds. They have understood that this was the act of a man
of extraordinary statesmanlike attributes, and that Premier McBride is
today, a very large apple on the political tree, as he is the big apple of
B. C, that land of big apples.
Our only fear now is that his high
attainments will eventually force him|
into the Federal field, to the loss of|
the Province.
There are no Rough Seams in
"CEETEE"
UNDERWEAR
A Slur on Auntie's Manners.
She was a very pretty little girl,
with eyes of blue and hair of gold.
but she didn't like soap and water
very much, because it was so wet, she
said.
One day she went to tea with her
auntie, and her hands were just at
shade grubbier than usual. You see,
she had been going to make marbles1
from some soft asphalt that the road-
makers  had left over.
"Effie," said her aunt, "how dirt)
your hands arc! What would you saj
if Auntie came to the table with
hands like that?"
"Oh, said the little lady of the golden locks, "I'd bc too polite to say
anything about it."
Then auntie changed the subject.
j& UNX
<csiif>^
Comfort is
absolutely
guaranteed
Look for the name " CEETEE " on
every garment
M.d. In Canada by
C. TURNBULL CO.
Of Gait, Limited     m
Qiveable
Usefuls
WANTED
TIMBER
LANDS
I have connections with Eastern
capitalists wanting timber lands, saw
mills and logging outfits. I would
like to meet cruisers or others having
these properties for sale. If you have
not money to pay for advertising or
licenses I will advance it.
E. R. CHANDLER
Suite 1 and a, Jonea Building,
407 Hastings Street, Vancouver, B. C.
For Men      Y. M. C. A.
No Xmas Present could be
more appreciable to the recipient than one of these:
SUIT OASES $10 TO $25
Plain, good leather; newest
ideas.   Al values.
FITTED   SUIT   CASES   $25,
$35, $40 AND $55
Handsomely    equipped     with
toilet   requisites,   nickel   or
silver fittings. Grand values.
MOTOR BUGS $10
Good for either the Auto or the
Steamer — all shades, the
most exclusive designs; best
values we ever handled in
high-class Rugs.
Sea & Gowen's
The Gentlemen's Store
64 Government Street, Victoria, B.C.
Best Buy.
The Mean Thing.
Praise from a husband's lips is always pleasant to the wife; but the
praise may be too discriminating to
suit her.
"I  thought it was  nice of you  to
(tend for 140 Pan lllu.tritte.l
catalog. An Indispensable book of
rendy reference tor man and boy
.hooter.. Mailed tor 4 cent* In
Nttimpi to cover portage. Beautiful
Ten Color Hanger torwarded tor
glx cente In stamnw.	
J. STEVENS ARMS A TOOL CO.
P. O. Boz 400?
Chlcopee Falls,
Mass., U.S.A.
BEST   BUT  IN  VICTORIA  OF  BUSINESS PROPERTY. WITH WATER
FRONTAGE ON JAMES BAY.
Double Corner on Wharf and Government streets, with 100 feet water
front nge on James Bay. This property
has the Post Ofllce to the North, th*
C. P. R. Hotel to the East, Parliament
Buildings to the South, and a Steamship Company's wharf to the West of It.
As an Hotel Site the situation of these
lots ls unrivaled in the City of Victoria,
hundred of thousands of dollars have
been spent ln valuable improvements on
all sides of them by the Provincial Government, the City Council and th*
C. P. R.   Price $52,500.
Easy terms can be arranged with deferred payments bearing Interest at 7
per cant.
For further particulars apply to
A. O. P. FRANCIS, Broker.
610 Pender Street,
VANCOUVER.  B. C.
STEVENS
IN   CAMP   OR   FIELD-AT
MOUNTAIN OR 8HORE
There I s always • ohanoa
to enjoy some shooting
TO SHOOT WELL VOU MUST BE EQUIPPED WITH
A RELIABLE FIREARM; the only kind we hiv*
been miking for upwards of fifty years.
Our Line: RIFLES, PISTOLS. SHOTGUNS,
x RIFLE TELESCOPES, ETC.     ,
Ask your Dealer, and insist on the
STEVENS. Where not sold by Retailers ve ship direct, express prepaid, upon receipt of Catalog price.
A home for young men away from
home. Comfortable Reading Room,
Library, Game Room, Billiards, Hot
and Cold Shower Baths, Gymnasium
and efficient instruction.
Manitoba Free Press on file for
Middle West visitors.
40 BROAD STREET
VICTORIA
HOLLY TREES
Men Iran as Matt to feoo, according
lo to.   Write lor lead ___ tree estate*
JAY & CO. VICTORIA, B. C.
EMPRESS
Drug Hall.
Our
Tonic Bitters
is a
Preventative of
Grippe.
unprejudiced   judge.     I   really   don't
think I am such a very  good ham-
tell   that   carpenter,   who  seemed  to merer.
think that women know nothing, that "Oh, he knew what I meant," said
T could hammer nails like lightning," Mr.   Morse,  cheerfully.    "You  know
said Mrs. Morse to her husband. "But lightning never  strikes  twice  in  the
I'm afraid, dear, that you are not an same place, they say."
GEO. A. FRASER
30 & 32 Government St.
VICTORIA.
AT EN T S
rjM^_fflE__Bnai_]
We solicit the business of Manufacturers,
Engineers and others -wlio realize the advisability of having their Patent business transacted
by Experts, Preliminary advice free. Charges
moderate. Our Inventor's Adviser sent upon request. Marion & Marion, Reg'd., New York I,.fe
Bids. Montreal: and Washington, D.C., U.SA.
Leave Your Baggage Check, at thc
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.      A. E, KENT, Proprietor
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St.. Victoris THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1907.
sent a sketch entitled Willie, which
pleases well. Mr. Bartlett sings some
good parodies. The Hazzards have a
nice musical act, Miss Hazzard does
some clever dancing, while Mr. Hazzard shows more than ordinary ability
as a pianist and is good in this particular line. James Dunn as a mimic
is a good entertainer and has made
a good impression throughout the
week. Miss Crawford sings in her
usual pleasing manner, "My Mother
Was a Northern Girl." A splendid
series of motion pictures makes up
a good programme and one that is
giving  good  satisfaction.
For next week the following artists
are booked. The Three Azards, a
wonderful trio of acrobats and hand
to hand balancers; Hall & Colborn,
comedy sketch artists; Dancing Davey, the best novelty dancer on the
stage; John T. Chick & Co., in their
screaming farce, Charity begins at
Home; Miss Crawford will sing "Let
Me Hear the Songs My Mother Used
to Sing," and the Pantagescope in
new pictures will complete a good
programme.
lliill «. MAN4.'
MONDAY, DECEMBER 16.
JOHN CORT presents
MAUDE FEALY
In the Great English Success
THE   STRONGER SEX
The Play with the Record of Seven
Solid Months at the Apollo
Theatre, London.
A  Dramatic  Comedy in Three Acts
by John Valentine.
By arrangement with Mr. Otho Stuart
Prices :50c, 75c, $1.00 and $1.50.
Box office opens io a.m. Friday, December 13.
Mail orders accompanied by cheque
will receive their usual attention.
COMING—KUBELIK.
The World's Greatest Violinist, Victoria, January 7th.
I Jlusic and      f
I   The Drama.*
The Man On the Box.
On Monday last Max Figman featured the perrenial "Man on the Box"
at the Victoria Theatre. It was a
good show, admirably staged and well
played. The weakest feature was in
the women folk, but Max himself was
inimitable in a character which he
has made his own. He has a fine
stage presence, and an easy rollicking manner and ""-reminds one of
Charles Collette, the celebrated patter
artist. A crowded house was delighted with the representation which may
be written down as a great success.
"The Rollicking Girl."
On Wednesday night last Manager
Ricketts staged the Rollicking Girl at
the Victoria Theatre. It proved to
be a popular musical comedy and attracted a good house. The comedian
Snitz Edwards was very entertaining
in the part of the Viencse Wig-
maker, Schamtz, and Miss Lila Blow
both acted and sang well as Ilona.
The dresses and mounting were much
above the average, and the chorus
danced well, For a popular price show
it was a  good  one.
mature years fulfill the promise of
their childhood. *
Kubelik may be said to have lived
with a violin since his borth. Since
his eighth year he has certainly lived
for it. His rise was rapid, but from
his eighth to his twelfth year, probably no boy ever worked harder or
in a more ambitious manner. From
twelve, until he was eighteen at
Prague, Kubelik remained under the
famous master, Sevcik, during which
time he perfected that marvelous
technique which has been the despair
of his competitors, and the astonishment of his auditors.
At eighteen the dark, slender boy,
with the massive forehead, shaggy
black hair and long, prehensile fingers,
performed wonders on the violin,
which had been a lost chord since
the passink of Paganini. His first
visit to America in 1900 provoked the
greatest enthusiasm ever awakened
by an instrumentalist in the metropolis. Music lovers and press united
in proclaiming that the reports cabled
from Europe has not been exaggerated in the statement of his powers.
It is indeed a fortunate thing that
Kubelik ancl his rare genius is to be
heard in this city during this season,
and those who are interested in the
local management should receive the
patronage of the entire community
for this visit. Kubelik has been engaged by the Victoria Musical Society
for its concert on January 7th.
Kubelik's Career.
No other virtuoso in modern music
has risen to such an excited plane in
so short a time as has Jan Kubelik.
A little more than a decade ago, his
name had never been heard outside
thc Bohemian village of Michle, in
which he was born. There lie passed
his boyhood in the humble home of
his father, a gypsy gardener. In this
obscurity without any advantages not
enjoyed by his lowly companions, the
divine talent which since has enthralled  the  world,  quietly  flowered.
Before he reached this twentieth
year, the continent of Europe was
voicing his wonders. He had not attained his majority when America had
added its paens to the constantly
swelling praise. Early declared a
"child marvel" he speedily commanded the respectful consideration given
none but consummate artists. His
career thus has entirely overthrown
the traditions that prodigies never in
Concert.
On Thursday evening an excellent
concert, contributed entirely by local
talent, was held in Central Hall, the
proceeds which were considerable,
were donated to the funds of St.
Saviour's church.
Pantages   Theatre.
The programme that is presented
at the Johnson St. Theatre this week
is all that could be desired in the
shape of a novel and refined entertainment and one that is pleasing the
patrons of the house in every particular.
Thc feature Oli th
the Rusticano Trio
Musician.-*, who hav
lighted those who have heard them
and have made a big hit, such talent
ed performers are seldom seen in
caudeville, and it is a treat to lovers
of good music and singing to lira-
such clever artists.   The Bartletts pre*
programme is
Singer.*- and
certainly  de-
New Grand.
A strong bill arranged for the coming week is head by the four Onetti
Sisters, European specialty gymnasts
in a sensational and graceful acrobatic turn, and includes also the
Three Keltons, musical artists, featuring little Gladys, champion trick
buck dancer and Xylophone soloist;
Walter McCulloch, in his own original
one-act dramatic creation "The Absinthe Fiend"; Fairman and Raymond
in "Connubial Felicity," a satire on
married life; Augusta Nalson, high
class vocalist; Thos. J. Price, singing the illustrated song, "As Long
as the World Rolls On"; New Moving Pictures and a new overture by
the orchestra under the direction of
Mr.  Nagel.
BEDDING
PLANTS
Cbeap Prices.   Get our price list.
Johnston's Seed Store
City Market
VICTORIA
I   TRAVELLERS' GUIDE  |
VICTORIA
Standards of "Semi-ready.
Tn-B       Tn_t       Ty».G
Height
4 Yon could oot make a coat made
(or tbe short man, in Type E, look
well 00 the latter man, in Type 1
There may be a difference of six inche.
in his height, and there should be t
difference oi several inches in the length
of the coat. The waist of the short
coat would set up near the (boulders
of thc tall man.
_ The Semi-ready Physique Type
System, with its seven distinct types,
its 35 variations, and 15 sizes of each
variation—takes into account height
and weight, and alio the width and
the shape of every man.
4 A perfect Ct end • (miked-to-measura
gsnnent at $18 to $20 and $25. Better
tailored tkan uy custom tailor CH
f_*m_\j ia it in his back chop.
STRAND HOTEL
VICTORIA
The home ol nil theatrical and vauder He
artists while in the Capital city, alto oi
other kindred bohemians,
WRIQHT & PALCONER, Proprietor*.
CAMBORNE
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining men and
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
BANFF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
Banff's Most Popular $2 a Day Hotel
Close to Station and Sulphur
Baths.
N. K. LUXTON, Proprietor.
PHOENIX.
Deane's Hotel
PHOENIX, B. C.
New. Modern hot water system. Electric
lighted. Tub and shower baths and laundry in
connection.   The miners' home.
" DANNY " DfiANE, Proprietor
ROSSLAND
Hoffman House
ROSSLAISD, B. C.
Rates $1.00 per day and up.   Cafe in
Connection.
QREEN & SNITH. Prop's.
NELSON.
HOTEL HUME
NELSON,   B. C,
Leading Hotel ol! Uie Kootennys.
J. FRED HUME,       -       Proprietor.
Silver King Hotel,
NELSON, B. C.
The home of the Industrial Workers
ofthe Kootenays.
VV. E. llcCandlish,     -      Proprietor
Royal Hotel
NELSON, B. C.
The West Family Hotel in lh*_ City.
$1.60 a day.
Mrs. Wm. Roberts,        Proprietress
B. WILLIAMS & CO.,
Sole Agents
Yates Street     -     -     Victoria, B.C.
When You
Want a Drink
Don't forget to visit
The Vernon Bar
P. JENSEN, Proprietor.
Travellers knew "The Vernon" j
well, and they will find the bar in j
the same place, opposite Victoria 1
Theatre, Cor. of Douglas and View. ,*
WEEK DECEMBER 16TH
The New Grand
SULLIVAN a COMIBIMt,    Pr»|_rUtars.
M.H.f.m.nt mt MBT. jMMMH.
THE FOUR ONETTI SISTERS
European Specialty Gymnasts.
THE THREE KELTONS
Novelty Musical Act.
walter Mcculloch
One  Man  Drama  shdlu shrdluuu
One-Man Drama
"THE ABSINTHE FIEND."
FAIRMAN AND RAYMOND
Comedy Sketch
AUGUSTA MALSON
Refined Vocalist.
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrator
"As Long As the World Rolls On."
NEW MOVING PICTURES
"Harbadk in Yellowstone."
"The Athletic Dude,"
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M. Nagel, Director.
Pantage's
Theatre
JOHNSON STREET
VICTORIA, B. C.
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE
Matinees (any part of house).... 10c
Evenings, Balcony  lOe
Lowsr Floor 20c
Boxes    lOo
Matinees
Every Afternoon
at
3 O'CIock.
Night Performances
8 and 9.15
poultbt msraro FAYS.
Readers oi our macazlne, because It
teaches th* best methods of handling
fowls for profit. Tells how to get sggs
ln winter, and raise chicks ln lumaur,
Shows house-plans, handy appliances,
etc., as well as Illustrating and describing the different breeds. Every lssus
worth the pries of a year's subscription.
Wt will send lt one year and Include a
large book on poultry for 10c. Sample
free. Poultry Advocate, Pstrolsa, Ontario.
NOTICE
MESSRS. WILLIAMS & JANION
Duly in structed by Courian, Babayau
& Co., will dispose of a large quantity
of their well known stock of Oriental
Rugs, Carpets, Portiers, Embroideries,
Benares ware, etc., etc., next week.
The Auctioneer   - Stewart Williams.
COAL
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo Collier!*it.
New Wellington Coal.
The best household coal in the marke   at
current rater   Anthracite conl Ar sale.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA
Holland French and
Japan Bulbs
For Fall Planting.
SEEDS, TREES, PLANTS
for the farm, garden, lawn, boulevard or conservatory, Acclimated
stock. Oldest established nursery on
the Mainland of B. C.   Catalogue free.
M. J. HENRY,
3010 Westminster Rd, Vancouver, B.C. 10
£THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1907.
Musings Without
Malice.
By LALLY BERNARD.
Have you ever tried to write exactly what you think? It sounds easy,
but is extremely difficult. You may
imagine that you can pen six paragraphs without a sort of sub-conscious attempt to write what someone
wants you to say, but it is only one
mon or one woman in a thousand who
can divest themselves of that obnoxious "inner vision" of the reader
who may scan what they read and
find fault with it. A woman journalist is nothing but a woman, who as
a little girl has most likely been
trained in that school, which means
"hush dear, little girls should not say
those sort of things." You know
what I mean, you who are scanning
these lines! that is if you are a woman, and not an American woman!
for the real secret of the "Charming
American" is the absolute and entire
candour with which she expresses
opinions which she has never been
trained during childhood to confine
to the ideas which children "ought
to express." I am not defending the
American child, usually they "upset
the apple cart" of dignified society.
I just point out the fact, that it is
extremely hard for the ordinary Canadian, or Englishwoman, to really
say just what she thinks on matters
in general. I don't know that you
would like hre if she did—she is not
an easy sort of person to pair off for
a dinner party and she is distinctly
upsetting at a five o'clock tea. The
girl who has been brought up in a
"hush dear" school, is really an easier
sort of being to adjust in society.
Oh, for a page of "unsaid" "unwritten thoughts," something that have
been bottled up for half a lifetime,
something that would be fatal to further conversation and, so to speak,
turn the world up side down. I must
confess to a sort of malicious admiration for the dreadful small boy, who,
for the joy of saying what he thinks,
really and truly thinks, gets his head
punched by another boy, or receives
the chastisement due to his audacity
on another part of his anatomy, from
an enraged adult. He is extremely
likely to grow into a wide-awake and
courageous citizen, for he knows full
well that it is stimulating, rather than
depressing, to receive the due reward
of his freedom of speech.	
So much then for an excuse for
musing at random on everything in
general and nothing in particular, using the medium of print and paper,
just because one has been trained in
a school, which means the sealing up
of thoughts when face to face with
those who do not agree with them.
I make no excuse, for this species
of cowardness is so common that one
knows full well that there are thousands of men and women in exactly
the same sort of terror when they
meet their human kind in the ordinary   run   of   every-day  intercourse.
I have always been interested in
Spiritism—perhaps mainly through
the fact that some of my ancestors
who had nothing else to bequeath me.
left me with the intolerable legacy
of a sort of "second sight"—and the
only reason that I have not devoted
more time to the study of pyschical
research is that it produces physical
conditions which are horribly uncomfortable, and secondly that the human
beings who surround one, arc quite
as difficult to reach and understand,
as disembodied spirits—more so per*
haps—who does not know that wail
of some one who has lost their nearest and dearest." Oh, if I had only
understood." Now why don't we understand? What is the great mystery—that is why democracy is hard
at work trying to down barriers between sections of human beings, and
in nine cases out of ten, the people
who are most actively engaged in
trying to down these barriers between
sections in society, arc neglecting the
barriers which exist between themselves and  those nearest  to them.
The art of living is complex:
Shakespeare asserted that love was
"blind." Well, perhaps love is, but
blind people are extraordinarily sen
sitive, and .they use the "fifth sense"
where we don't really try to use the
first!      .*,.....
The reason that I don't like the
idea of suffrage for women, is that we
should lose more than we should
gain. I am not quite sure that privileges are not more precious than
"rights." I say I am not sure, not
quite certain to be strictly honest—
and we have privileges which we are
in danger of losing as we enter the
maelstrom of public affairs. I claim
for women the privilege of idleness,
complete and entire—and I know that
many busy women will combat this
idea—but the reason is: we are not
constituted as men are, and what is
more, I am not sorry that we are
not. Our intuition is stronger than
our logic, and our intuition has saved
many a dire situation. This power
oi ;divination goes from us, in the
tumult of public life, and our endeavour to understand fully, what the
.egistration of our "vote and influence" would mean. One does not understand, from the point of view of
cold reason, why our, brains should
not be just as powerful as the brains
of men, perhaps they are, certainly
the average woman, is the equal of
the average man, but it must be that
"brute force" or "physical force"—is
allowed to dominate this world. I
only know that the perfect human
being is the man who has a sort of
feminine strain of sympathy and understanding, and that in moments of
peril you turn to him, rather than to
one of your own sex, with a faith
which is not altogether the result of
long centuries of training. This is
honest—it may be extremely bad for
men to hear, but the right men who
hear it, will understand, and the
others don't matters in the least! I
would have women privileged to have
delicious hours of pure idleness, when
all their brain forces are at rest, and
(Continued on Page Eleven)
LICENCE TO AN EXTRA-PROVINCIAL
COMPANY.
"Companies Act, 1897.'
Canada:
Province of British Columbia.
No.  417.
THIS is to certify that "The New
Zealand Insurance Company" is authorised and licensed to carry on business
within the Province of British Columbia, and to carry out or effect all or any
of the objects of the Company to which
the legislative authority of the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company ls
situate at the City of Auckland, In the
Colony of New Zealand.
The amount of the capital of the
Company ls one million pounds, divided
into ten thousand shares of one hundred pounds each.
The head office of the Company In
this Province is situate at Victoria, and
James Hill Lawson, merchant, whose
address is Victoria ,B.C, is the attorney
for the Company.
Given under my hand and seal of
office at Victoria, Province of British
Columbia, this 28th day of November,
one thousand  nine hundred and seven.
(L. S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has been  established and  licensed are:
To carry on the business of fire and
marine Insurance in all Its branches or
such of those branches as the Company shall from time to time determine,
and to do all such other things as are
Incidental or conducive to the attainment of those objects.
Dec.  14,	
TAKE NOTICE that A. W. Harvey,
of Victoria. B.C., land surveyor, intends
to apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands nnd Works for permission to
purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted on the
north bank of the Kispoix River. IIftv
mlles above Hazelton; thence following
the sinuosities of the north bank of the
Kispoix River, first southerly and then
northerly about four miles to a post
due east of the point of commencement;
thenco cast 58.22 chains to point of
commencement, containing 150 acres,
more  or  less.
Dated September 12th, 1907.
Oct. 19 ARTHUR W. HARVEY.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
'   TAKE NOTICE that Harry McMicken
Keefer of Vancouver, occupation Broker,
Intends to apply for permission to lease
the  following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on the
N. E. Coast of Savary Island and about
25 chains from the easterly end of the
Island, thence west 20 chains to low
water mark; thence south 400 chains
along low water mark; thence east 20
chains to high water mark; thence north
400 chains to point of commencement,
and containing eight hundred acres,
more or less.
Dated  Dec.  2nd,   1907.
Dec 14      HARRY  McMICKENKEEFER.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick Patrick Rogers of Vancouver, occupation
carpenter, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner of Lot 1347, G. I„ New
Westminster district; thence west 20
chains; thence north 20 chains; thence
east 20 chains; thence south 20 chains
to point of commencement, containing
40 acres more or less.
Dated  November 26th,   1907.
FREDERICK PATRICK ROGERS.
Dec. 14
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a licence to prospect for
coal  on   the  following  described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the claim of S. A.
Ramsay, being about sixteen miles west
of McCoy's Cove on the north side of
Cumshewa Inlet, Moresby Island, Queen
Charlotte Islands Group; thence north
80 chains; west 80 ehains; south 80
chains; east 80 chains back to the place
of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located this 4th day of December,
A.D.  1907.
WALTER  B.   PITFIELD.
Dec. 14 A. A. McPhail, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for coal
on  the  following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
miles west of the northwest corner of
the claim of S. A. Ramsay, being about
eighteen miles west of McCoy's Cove
on the north side of Cumshewa Inlet,
Moresby Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence south 80 chains; east SO
chains; north 80 chains; west 80 chains
back to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located this 4th day of December,
A.D.   1907.
JOHN A. McMASTER,
Dec.   14 A.  A.   McPhail,  Agent.
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a licence to prospect for
coal   on  the  following described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the claim of John
John A. McMaster, being about eighteen
miles west of McCoy's Cove on the
north side of Cumshewa Inlet, Moresby
Island, Queen Charlotte Islands Group;
thenoe north 80 ehains; east 80 chains;
south SO chains; west SO chains back
to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located this 4th day of December,
A.D.   1907.
J. A. HINTON,
Dec. 14 A. A. McPhail, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a licence to prospect
for coal on the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the claim of John
A. McMaster, being about eighteen miles
west of McCoy's Cove on the north side
of Cumshewa Inlet, Moresby Island,
Queen Charlotte Islands Group; thence
south SO chains; west 80 chains; north
80 chains; east 80 chains back to the
place of commencement, containing 640
acres.
Located this 4th day of December,
A.D.  1907.
THOMAS COOPER,
Dec. 14 A.   A.   McPhail,   Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for coal
on   the   following  described   lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest eorner of the claim of John
A. McMaster, being about eighteen miles
west of McCoy's Cove on the north side
of Cumshewa Inlet, Moresby Islands,
Queen Charlotte Islands Group; thence
north SO chains; west SO chains; south
SO chains; east 80 chains back to the
place of commencement, containing 640
acres.
G. A. FRASER,
Dec. 14 A. A. McPhail,  Agent.
Charlotte Islands Group; thence south
80 chains; west 80 chains; north 80
chains; east 80 chains back to the place
of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located this 4th day of December,
A.D. 1907.
D. C. McDONALD,
Dec.  14 A. A.  McPhail, Agent.
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a licence to prospect for
coal on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
miles north of the northwest corner
of the claim of Robert Hamilton, being
about six miles north of the Cowgitz
mines on the north shore of Skiedgate
Inlet on Slate Chuck Creek, Graham
Island, Queen Charlotte Islands Group;
thence south 80 chains; east 80 chains',
north 80 chains; west 80 chains back to
the place of commencement, containing
640 acres. ; •
Located this 26th day of November,
A.D. 1907.
J.  H.  YOUNG,
Dec. 14 A. A. McPhail, Agent.
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for
coal  on  the  following described* lands:
Commencing at a post planted at tho
northwest corner of the claim of J. H.
Young, being about six miles north of
the Cowgitz mines on the north shore
of Skidegate Inlet, on Slate Chuck Creek,
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence south 80 chains; west 80
chains; north 80 chains; east SO chains
back to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located this 26th day of November,
A.D.  1907.
J.  F.  YOUNG,
Dec 14 A. A. McPhail, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coai
on the following described lands:
Commencing at the post planted at
the northwest corner of the claim of
J. H. Young, being about six miles north
of the Cowgitz Mines on the north shore
of Skidegate Inlet, on Slate Chuck Creek,
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence north 80 chains; east 80
chains; south 80 chains; west 80 chains
back to the place of commencement,
containing 640 acres.
Located this 26th day of November,
A.D.  1907.
FRED. YOUNG,
Dec. 14 A.  A.  McPhail,  Agent.
NOTICE ls hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for coal
on   the  following  described   lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the claim, of J.
H. Young, being about six miles north
of the Cowgits Mines on the north
shore of Skidegate Iniet, on Slate Chuck
Creek, Graham Island, Queen Charlotte
Islands Group; thence north 80 chains;
west 80 chains; south 80 chains; east
80 chains back to the place of commencement containing 640 acres.
Located this 26th day of November,
A. D. 1907.
ROBERT YOUNG,
Dec. 14 A. A.  McPhail,  Agent.
foreshore lands in Rivers Inlet, commencing at a post planted on the east
bank of a small creek at tlie heaf of -
Rivers Inlet on the south shore, being
the southeast corner post;, thence southwesterly along high water mark for _.
chains; thence north 10* chains; thence
north easterly 30 chains; thence south
10 chains to point of commencement;
containing thirty acres more or less.
Staked Nov. 18, 1907.   ,.
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL,
George Young, Agent,
TAKE NOTICE that George Young ,
and Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C„ Timber Dealers, intend to apply for the 1
rite to purchase the following described
lands in Kildalla Bay, Rivers Inlet; commencing at this post planted on the east
side of the Bay about one-third of a
mile from the point at the mouth of the
Bay. being the southwest corner post;,
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80*
chatns; thence west 90 chains to beach;
thence south along beach to point of
commencement; containing 40 acres,,
more or less.
Staked Nov. 25, 1907.
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL,
Dec. 7 *    George Young, Agent.*
LICENSE     TO     EXTRA-PROVINCIAL
COMPANY.
COAST  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that James Rendall,
of Darrlngton, Washington, by occupation, a laborer, Intends to apply for a
special timber licence over the following described lands: Situate in the vicinity of KIngeome Inlet:
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner, being at Francis Point,
south shore of KIngeome Inlet; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 40 chains more or
less to shore; thence ln a westerly direction, following shore line, to point
of commencement.
Dated  October  9th,  1907.
Nov.   9 JAMES  RANDALL.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
and Arthur Bell of Victoria. B.C., Timber Dealers, intend to apply fnr special
license over the following described
lands nn the Sheemahantz River. Rivers
Tnlet:
No. I—Commencing at a post planted
on the snuth bank of the Sheemahantz
River nt tlie northwest corner, beiug one
mile east and 10 chnins south of the
mouth nf Evelyn River; tbence east 120
cliains; tbence south 40 chains; thence
west SO chains; thence snuth 40 ehnlns;
thence west 40 chnins; thence north SO
chnins to point of commencement,
Nnv.  9th,   1907.
No. 2—Commenolng nt n post ni ••••!,■
on the snuth bank of the Sheemahantz
River, five chains west of tho mouth
Of Marvel Creek, being tbe southenst
corner, thence west 6*1 chains; thence
nnrth 100 chnins; thence onst 61 ohnlns;
thence south 100 chains In point of
commeneement.
Nov.  Sth,  1907.
Nn. a—Commencing nt n post planted
10 chains east nf the southeast corner
of T. It, 14065, and nbout nne and one-
half miles west of tho Neechantz River
being the northeast corner post; thenoe
soulh 100 ohnlns; thonco wost 61 chnins;
thonce north 100 chains; thence west 64
chains tn point of eommeneement,
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL,
Deo. 14 George Young, Agent.
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
days after date 1 Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for
coal  on   the  following described   lands:
Commenolng at a post planted two
mlies west of the northwest corner of
the claim of John A. McMaster, being
nbout twenty miles west of McCoy's
Cove, on the north side of Cumshewa
Inlet, Moresby Island, Queen Charlotte
Islands Group; thenoe south 80 chains;
east SO chains; north 80 chains; west
SO chains bnck to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
C. J.  SPRATT,
Dec.  14 A.  A.  McPhail,  Agent.
NOTICE Is nereby given that thirty
days after date 1 intend to apply to
the Hon, Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a licence to prospect for
coal   on   the  following described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest eorner of the claim of C. J.
Spratt. being nbout twenty mlles west
of McCoy's Cove, on the north side
of Cumshewa Inlet, Moresby Island.
Queen Chnrlotte Islands Group; thenco
nnrth so chains; east SO chains; south
SO chnins; west 80 chains back to the
plnce of commencement, containing 840
acres.
I ocated this Ith day of December,
A.D.   1907.
J. W.  RUTLEDGE,
Dec.   14 A.   A.   McPhail,   Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
dnys nfter dnte 1 intend to apply tn
the linn, chief Commissioner of Lands
nml Wnrks fnr a license to prospeot for
conl   nn   the  following described   binds:
Commencing nt a post planted at the
northwest enrner of the claim of C. J.
Spratt. being about twenty miles west
Of McCoy's Cove nn the north side of
Cumshewa Inlet. Moresby Island, Queen
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that Horace Bunnell.
of Vancouver, occupation, Timber
Cruiser. Intends to apply for n sfooial
timber licence over the following described   lands:
Commencing at a post planted aboul
280 chains north of the southeast corner of lease number 222; thenoe east
one hundred and sixty (160) chains;
thence nortli forty (40) chaii*'*: theme
west nne hundred and sixty chains;
thence south forty (40) chains to place
of  commencement.
Staked  October  28th,  1907.
Nov. .10 HORACE BUNNELL.
DISTRICT OF CASSIAR.
TAKE NOTICE that The Hidden
Creek Mining Co., or Vancouver, occupation,  , intends to apply for permission to lease the following described
land, about 3 acres:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south east corner post of Lot 479; thence
north one chain; thence southwesterly
parellel to high water mark, about 30
chains to west boundary of Lot 479;
thence south about one chain forty links
to high water mark and thence along
high water mark to point of commencement.
Dated Nov. 25th, 1907.
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Dec. 7 Per J. Herrick MacGregor.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
and Arthur Bell of Victoria, B. C, Timber Dealers, intend to apply for the
rite to lease the following described
foreshore lands, commencing at a post
planted at the northeast corner about
one hundred feet west from the month
of a small creek on the north shore
of Owekano River or about 250 yards
east of the small Island at its mouth;
thence westerly for 25 chains along high
water; thence north 4 chains to the
post of the B. C. C. Co. (October 28),
thence west 30 chains; tbence south 20
chains; thence east 30 cmalns; thence
north 10 chains; thence east 25 chains;
thence north 10 chains to point of commencement, containing 75 acres, more
or less.
November   18,   1907.
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL,
George Young, Agent,
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
nnd Arthur Bell of Victoria, B.C., Timber Dealers, Intend to apply for the
rite   to   lease   the   following   described
''Companies Act, 1897."
canadaT- )
Province of British Columbia., )
No.  414. *'■<;. *
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that "The
British ' and Canadian Land Company,
Limited," is authorised and' licensed to*
carry on business within the Province*.
of British Columbia, and to carry out
or effect all or any of the objects of
the Company to which the legislative*
authority of the Legislature of British
Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company is
situate at the City of Toronto, in the
Province of Ontario.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is five hundred thousand dollars, divided into five thousand shares
of one hundred dollars each.
The head office of the Company in
this Province is situate at Victoria, and
Charles W. Wilson, gentleman, whose
address is Victoria, B.C., is the attorney
for the Company.
Given under my hand and seal of
office at Victoria, Province of British
Columbia, this 21st day of November,
one  thousand  nine hundred  and  seven.
(L. S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which the Company
has been  established  and licensed  are:
1. To deal in lands and real and
personal property, as principals as well
as agents or factors for others, in the
Dominion of Canada and elsewhere, and
to acquire the same upon such terms as
may be agreed upon, and to pay therefor
in cash or In paid-up non-assessable
shares In the capital stock of the Company;
2.,To acquire, own, lease, sell and dispose of shares, debentures and securities in any other companies engaged in
the same business which this Company
is authorised to carry on, and to purchase the assets of such other companies or of any persons doing a similar
business, and to pay for the same,
wholly or in part in cash, non-assessable
shares, bonds or securities of the Company;
3. To issue.bonds or debentures in
such amounts,, for such purposes and
bearing such rate of interest as the
majority of shareholders may determine,
and to secure the same by transferlng
to a trustee or to trustees . the whole
or part of the Company's property, real
or personal, movable or immovable.
4. To sell, improve, lease, divide,
mortgage, charge or dispose of or otherwise deal with all or any part of the
property of the Company, whether real
or personal:
6. To take and accept mortgages,
charges and liens on real or personal
property, or any other security whatever, and bearing interest or otherwise,
as the Company may see fit, from purchasers or debtors of the Company, and
to sell, assign or otherwise dispose of
all or any of such securities, and to
borrow money, draw, make, accept, endorse and execute any bills of exchange,
promissory notes, bonds, debentures,
guarantees and evidences of indebtedness of all kinds or other negotiable
securities, and to secure the same by
mortgages or otherwise upon the property or assets of the Company, and
generally to use its credit in any other
way for the purpose of facilitating the
conduct of any business which the Company is authorised to perform:
6. To amalgamate with any other
company having objects similar to those
of the Company, or to sell or otherwise
dispose of the undertaking, or any part
thereof, for sueh consideration as the
Company shall see fit, and in particular for the bonds, shares, debentures,
stock or securities of any other company having objects similar to those of
the Company:
7. To apply the bonds, debentures,
funds and capital stock of the Company,
and to issue fully paid-up shares of
the Company In payment or part payment of the purchase price of any property, real or personal, acquired by the
Company, or of the goodwill, rights and
franchises in the same or in payment for
services rendered and work performed
for the Company, and in the purchase of
the bonds, stocks, property or assets of
any other company or companies having
objects similar to those of the Company,
and carrying on business in the Dominion of Canada or elsewhere:
8. To advance money to purchasers
or lessees of the Company's lands for
building purposes or for improvements,
and to take mortgages, hypothecs, Hens
and charges to secure payment of the
purchase money of any property sold
by the Company, or of any money due
to the Company from purchasers for
building purposes or other improvements, and to sell or otherwise dispose
of said mortgages, hypothecs, liens and
charges, and temporarily, and pending
the obtaining of Investments therefor
In the manner hereinbefore provided for,
to Invest the surplus funds of the Company ln such approved securities as
trustees are usually authorised to invest funds which are entrusted to them.
Dec. 7	
DISTRICT   OF  CASSAIR.
TAKE NOTICE that The Hidden Creek
Mining  Co.,   of  Vancouver,   occupation,
 , intends to apply for permission
to   lease  the  following  described  land,
about  40  acres:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of Lot 479; thence following high water mark south and
west to the southeast corner of Lot 308;
thence east five chains; thence north
and east following a line parallel to
high water mark about 80 chains to a
point 5 chains south of point of commencement and thence to said point of
commencement.
Dated Nov. 25th, 1907.
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Dec. 7 Per J. Herrick MacGregor. 12
THE WEEK, SATURDAY DECEMBER 14, 1907,
&>f^f*f%/*m^y»» __<f\/__$Jfy._
At The Street
Corner
nesday afternoon I was attracted to
Williams and Janion's Auction Room
by their red flag. I found a book sale
in full swing and during the few
minutes which I spent there, added to
my somewhat slender stock of knowledge of human nature. First I learned
that there is nothing like an auction
for forcing people to give fancy prices
when they have made up their minds
I know it is too soon yet to write to gfit a thing    j saw several sets
a  Christmas  letter;   I   may  exercise  of  books  sold at  more  per  volume
my privilege in this respect next week,  than they could have been purchased
but thoughts of Christmas instinctive- for in the local book stores- 0" the
,    ,   . ..   _. .  -,,    .      other hand sets of books which had
ly bring up recollections of  Charles      . .    „    .        ,       , . ,     .
originally been bought on the mstal-
Dickens and as I have been lounging  ment p,an at $2 so tQ $J 0Q each so,d
round the city the last few days, I for so cents a volume. Knowing a
have witnessed several incidents, little about books I had no difficulty
which would have attracted his atten- in understanding the latter incident.
tion and led to some of those inimitable sketches which no one could limn
as he could.
The fact is that these subscription
books contain a bushel of chaff to a
grain of wheat, and out of thirty
volumes   the  literature  really  worth
For instance, early in the week I preserving could probably  be  corn-
noticed several well known citizens Pressed int0 three- in which case the
,   ,,.         „. . ,        . .                 .     , purchaser paid enough.
holding official positions, to wit, the
.    ,,  ,.   . nrr        ,    „    . What interested me most, however,
Mayor, the Medical Officer, the Sam- ,       ...           .                 ,  ...
1   ' was the relative market price of dif-
tary Inspector, and "our own artist" ferent    books      When    Shakespeare
approaching a rendezvous from differ- wrote his immortal couplet anent
ent directions. It was afternoon, rain Coasar, dead and turned to clay stop-
was pouring down, the streets and pinS a hole t0 keeP the wind away,
, , .... , he was laying down a principle which
roads everywhere ankle deep in mud. ,-     .                 ..   ■-.__.
applies to many other things, among
Victoria officialdom as personified by them  books     who would  have  be.
these august personages, huddled un- lieved that Willison's Life of Laurier,
der umbrellas, and trapesed with un- an edition de luxe, of which only 1,000
steady steps towards the garbage heap ; copies were Printed' and sold to ad"
T           _       . _       .           . ,   . mirers of the great statesman at $25
on  James   Bay  flats.   A  careful   in- ,     ...       ,    ,. ..         .    ,    ...   .
each,  did  not elicit a single bid, in
spection,    sundry   sniffs,    momentus spite of the honied    ccents and per.
shakes of the head indicated to the suasive manner of the people's own
observer that neither the chief ma- auctioneer? On the other hand, who
gistrate nor his satellites suffered any would have thought that a lady on
inconvenience from the proximity of the one side of the table and a popu-
Chinatown refuse or scampering lar pedagogue on the other would
rodent. , have run to nearly double their mar-
Then an adjournment was made to ket value, four volumes of unexpur-
the Dallas Road and the three con- gated Italian novels?   The supposi
scientious public servants wended
their way to the park and as far east
as Moss Street, where preparations
have been made for' the new dump.
Here again an interesting colloquy
took place. One could see from the
eloquent  gestures of the  party that
its members were_ quite unable, to un- -degree .-who figure largely in French
derstand why any sensible man
should object to their project for getting rid of garbage, and as they retraced their steps it was evident to the
most casual observer that Bumbledom would put down its  foot upon
tion is that both the lady and the
pedagogue were anxious to secure
them in order to destroy, and so withdraw them from circulation.
One of the most coveted lots was
a smal set of books dealing with thc
history of well known ladies of high
history. If I remember rightly in
this case the lady outbid all com-'
petitors.
It was very gratifying to a lover
of literature to find that the old English  novelists  were  appreciated  and
any suggestion to shift the dump to fetched the highest prices. A set of
the western corner of Heywoodl Thackeray sold for $50 and one of
avenue. It would take a Dickens to'Dickens for $48, whilst Smollett
do justice to the eccentric vagaries of fetched a good price and a translates little coterie of quidnuncs search- tion of Rabelais figured among the
ing for—smell. | high ones.
Passing down Fort Street on Wed-      I was equally pleased to notice that
LOOK AT  THIS
♦
A
♦
♦
♦
WE ARE GIVING AWAY
FREE
$400 Worth of
TALKIOG MACHINES.
HOW WE DO IT
We intend to give away Ten beautiful new style Aluminum
Tone Ann Talking Machines to be drawn for in the following
manner: With every 50c worth of goods purchased at our store
up to the evening of January 31st, 1908, we will give a numbered
coupon which will entitle you to a chance to win one of these fine
Machines at our grand drawing. Should Ihe holder of a winning
number already own a Talking Machine we will give 50 nice new
Records instead.
FLETCHER  BROS.
Talking Machine Headquarters.
93 Government St. Victoria.
cheap American books either elicited
no bids or were disposed of for a few
cents per volume. After all Victorians
appreciate literature, and have no desire to purchase their books by the
ton. A book lover is always a book
lover; he will spend his last dollar
and if necessary pawn his shirt to
secure the desired volume, and I am
proud to know that the race is well
represented in the City of Victoria.
I have been asked to throw out a
suggestion to the Real Estate Agents
of the Capital City. I have already
thrown out several which they do not
appreciate, but that is only because 1
have been dissembling my love. If
they would only realize it, I am their
best friend. The suggestion is that
they should open their offices a little
earlier in the morning and take a
shorter lunch hour. I know a gentleman who came to the town with his
wife on the 4th inst.; he began to
look around for a small furnished
house. On Monday last he went to
three real estate offices, to which he
had been recommended, between 9.30
and 10 o'clock in the morning. They
were all closed. He went to one of
the three at 2 o'clock, the agent had
not returned from lunch. When leaving the latter office he met a friend
who advised him to take a bedroom
at the Poplars, one of the most comfortable boarding houses in the City;
he interviewed the lady of the house,
took the room and is .now settled
there for the winter. I do not in the
least regret tfcis, but would point out
that if he could have found either of
the real estate agents at his office he
would probably have rented a furnished house at four times the price he
is paying for a bedroom.
I hope as it is near Christmas time
the real estate men will for once exercise the virtue of forgiveness
towards the
C&i
fK^-ft*.
WHAT IS
"EXCLUSIA"
9
The merrriest, maddest
game ever played by the
human race.   Kings,
Princes, Presidents and
Peoples of all races and all
colors have joined in this
entrancing pastime; now
resurrected for the
benefit (?) of the people of
British Columbia in the
year of Our Lord 1907; and
sold by T. N. Hibben & Co.,
Government Street, Victoria
at the price of
10 cents.
J
Angell
Engraving Co.
PHOTO-ENGRAVERS
and DESIQNERS
In All Branches
518 Hastings St.
Vancouver, B. C.
"Dixi Tea' Limerick
An old lady, Miss Martha Jane Lea,
Said, " It's odd, but it's true as can be
That when I eat cheese
I most always sneeze
Unless I drink good 'Dixi' Tea."
Why buy expensive Teas, when, the famous "Dixi" blends
at 35c and 50c lb. are even better.   Try them and see.
"Dixi" Coffee, a -delicious blend of Java and Mocha,
per lb., 40c.     None nicer.
Better leave your orders with us for Xmas Turkeys.
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
UP-TO-DATE GROCERS:      1317 GOVERNMENT ST.
MNHMMMMMMMM
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
The
Poodle
Dog
Grill
Yates Street
Victoria, B. G„ is
The only real
Grill in British
Columbia—the
only place
where you can
actually obtain
your choice of
meats and all
the delioacies of
the season.
SMITH & SHAUGHNESSY
Proprietors
Yates Street, Victoria, B. C.
00000000000000000000000000c
The Present Purchasing Period
Is upon us and we would call your serious attention to
useful Gifts being the most appreciable ones.
A PERMANENT AND PLEASURABLE PRESENT WOULD
BE A GOOD
Gas Heater
Really an absolutely necessary thing in every refined B. C. house.
The cleanest and most economical of all heating apparatus.
Some new arrivals just to hand;   exceptionally fine heaters;   all
popularly priced.
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, Ltd.
CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS.
You Can't Be
Santa Claus
in an ill-fitting suit of clothes. You
won't look the part. A Santa Claus
that bags at the knees does not inspire respect. Don't let your family
be ashamed of its Santa Claus. Come
to-day and let us measure you for a
suit... Price only $15.00
SCOTLAND WOOLEN MILLS
29 Johnson Street,
VICTORIA.
538 Hastings Street,
VANCOUVER. £T rmnorrmnr TsnsTYv. mnnn. i^j
S
Kingsford Smith & Co.
Stock and General
AUCTIONEERS
Commission and Real Estate Agents.
860 Granville,
Vancouver.
IJUIS.JUUUUUUAJ
Vancouver Edition
The Week
fl British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vancouver B. 6.
.
j inroTnnnnrYrinnrinnnri** irv f
Stewart WllUama R. c. Janion
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION AND
REAL ESTATE A6EHTS
Si FORT ST. VICTORIA, B. C.
3JUUUUL8. J...ISL ft g ii A«_UUUUU<:
Vol. IV.   No. tf
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1907
One Dollar Per Annum
The Ottawa correspondent
Laurier's 0f the Victoria Times fairly
Manifesto.        divides   honours  with  the
gentleman who during the
last session of the Federal Parliament
acted as correspondent to the Colonist.
Both sets of despatches are lurid, partizan
and pur-blind. Perhaps the day will dawn
yhen even party hacks will realize that
extravagant statement defeats its object.
It would be an insult to the intelligence of
any body of Canadians, whatever their political proclivity, to suppose that they could
appreciate or be influenced by such despatches as those referred to. The Times
of Tuesday last contained a fair specimen
of this class of work in the despatch which
commented on Sir Wilfred Laurier's
speech in the debate on the address from
the throne. The correspondent can hardly
be held responsible for the scare head-lines
whieh declared that the Premier "Tore II.
L. Borden's Platform to Shreds," and that
he electrified the House of Commons.
These picturesque phrases may be attributed to the poetic fancy of the Times
■ staff, but in the body of the despatch itself
we read how great was the contrast between the two political parties; "that it
was patent to everybody that the Opposition was bowled off its feet in the first
innings; that Mr. Borden's speech was an
expurgated edition of his utterances dur-
ing^iis Western tour, carping criticism and
unsubstantiated charges of corruption,
which have become so fashionable for the
Opposition in the absence of harmony,
strength and anything approaching a definite policy. He scarcely aroused the
enthusiasm of his followers because there
was nothing particularly new or striking
in his speech." Then hey! presto! Sir
Wilfred Laurier followed and what a difference ! "He simply electrified the House.
He was eloquent, adroit, and witty and as
he tore the arguments of the Opposition
to shreds and tatters, the enthusiasm
among his followers was immense." It is
really astonishing that there should be such
an unbridgable distance between the
Leader of the Government and the Leader
of the Opposition. But let that pass. At
tlie moment The Week is more concerned
with those portions of Sir Wilfred's speech
which concern British Columbia, and if
he electrified his followers in the House,
he certainly tried to electroplate the people .
of tbis Province. One thing he said which
all reasonable men will commend, and for
whicli he should receive credit from all
parties, that his Government would do
nothing to weaken the Anglo-Japanese
Treaty. Sir Wilfred well knows that the
only people in Canada who will criticize
this observation are those who form the
irreconcilable minority of Asiatic Exclusion Leagues, but tlieir number and their
influence is a negligible quantity. Canadians of all classes realize tliat Imperial
obligations are binding upon them and
tliat the true interests of Canada lie in
supporting the broad, foreign policy of
the Mother Country. It is satisfactory to
know tliat Sir Wilfred has imbibed the
popular sentiment and will stand for it,
but, this is about the only satisfactory thing
in his speech from the standpoint of Britisli Columbia. When he went on to declare tliat he did not share the Western
prejudice against the commingling of the
Asiatic and White races, he certainly ran
counter to the instincts and judgment of
every Western man. Further, after
sketching the trouble which he admitted
might arise from an influx of Asiatics, he
altogether failed to appreciate tlie efforts
of the Province to prevent this, or the
EDITORIAL
Legislation of the Provincial Government
passed for that purpose. He declared that
the duty of his Government was to pursue
the same course as was adopted some six
or seven years ago when they passed the
last Chinese Immigration Exclusion Act.
Not a word about the Natal Act, the
measure recommended by the Colonial
Secretary to the Canadian Government as
the basis of safe Legislation upon this subject. He declared that Mr. Borden's statements on this subject during his recent
tour in British Columbia Avere an appeal
to passion and prejudice, and yet what
Mr. Borden said was that if his party were
returned to power he would be guided
by the wishes of the representatives of this
Province. Apparently Sir Wilfred has
no appreciation for the constitutional
method of representation. It is. equally
evident that the Province has nothing to
expect from him on this matter. At the
end of his speech he frankly avowed "The
people of British Columbia have certain
views upon this question; I would not be
honest to myself and with them, were I
Columbians, but it is satisfactory to have
it so definitely stated that there can be
no mistake as to the intentions of the
Federal Government, and it remains that
on the two great questions whicli are agitating men's minds, and which are most intimately associated with the well being of
the Province, Sir Wilfred Laurier is hopelessly at variance with the vast majority
of our people.
A Reign
Of Terror,
According' to the Seattle
papers something approaching a reign of terror prevails in that City. Thousands of men out of employment parade the
streets, hold-ups occur every day and assaults are common. In Vancouver conditions arc by no mefans as bad as that, but
at least one thousand labouring men are
idle and of these probably two to three
hundred in distress. The condition has
been brought about by the shut-down of
the lumber mills and the discontinuance of
other out-door industries. It has, however, been accentuated by a considerable
Granville Street, Vancouver, Looking North from the Hudson's Bay Co.'s Buildings.
to say that I share those feelings." That
is about all that can be said on the matter.!
The Premier of Canada does not share the
views of the people of the Province of
British Columbia on the Asiatic question,
and since the delivery of the speech in
question, has stated that he will not express any opinion as to his attitude towards
the re-enactment of the Natal Act by the
Provincial Legislature, until such an Act
is actually passed. The attitude of Sir
Wilfrid on the other great subject whicli
is occupying the attention of British Columbians'— 'Better Terms"—is equally unsatisfactory. He makes a personal attack
upon _\Ir. McBride for his action in the
matter, and declares emphatically that, the
subject was closed at the Ottawa Conference. He takes credit for the fact that
not a word of dissent from the terms of the
settlement was heard on the floors of the
House, conveniently ignoring the subserviency of the representatives from this
Province who so flagrantly flouted the
wishes of their constituents, and he made
it perfectly clear that as far as he and
his Government were concerned a deaf
ear would be turned to any further appeal.
Of course all this was expected by British
influx of the unemployed from American
cities near the line. Whilst inflammatory
speeches are to be deprecated and those
who make them will have to be taught tliat
the law has a strong arm, at the same time
men cannot be allowed to starve, and it
is incumbent on the city authorities and
mi the Provincial Government to take
practical steps to meet the conditions. The
City has already voted $;j,000 to be expended on public works and probably the
amount will have to be largely increased
during tlie next month or six weeks. It
should see that the money is earned by
work, and not squandered on loafers. The
Provincial Government might, reasonably
make an appropriation for necessary work
at Point Gray, aud the appeal of the deputation who interviewed the Government
on this subject may well be granted. The
matter is in the capable hands of Mr.
Bowser who may be trusted to rise to the
occasion. Meanwhile it cannot be too
insistently pointed out that there is every
reason for believing that the present state
of affairs will be of short duration. The
money stringency is rapidly readjusting
itself and those in thc best position to
judge are of opinion that early in the new
year normal conditions will prevail so far
as the labour market is concerned. This
is a time when organized labour is on its
trial. If the Trades Unions show that
they appreciate existing conditions ancl
that they are prepared to meet them by
moderate concessions there will be no prolonged period of idleness, and no acute distress. If they are autocratic and unyielding there will be a contest, in which they
will be worsted and the outcome of which
will be the alienation of the public sympathy and support without whicli they
would be powerless to enforce their legitimate demands.
Four    months    ago    The
Western Week announced that influ-
Banks. ential gentlemen were about
to form a Western Bank with
headquarters at the Coast. This was the
outcome of a series of articles on the
financial situation which had been running
in these columns. The articles showed
how greatly Western development and
business were handicapped through being
in the hands of Eastern financial institutions, and especially through the deportation of currency. This matter attracted
attention throughout Canada, with the
result that the opening for a truly Western
Bank was realized, and the efforts of the
gentlemen who are now associated with
the Chartered Bank of British Columbia,
and the Bank of Vancouver have culminated in practical shape. With the former
Bank are allied some of the wealthiest and
most influential men in the Province. Mr.
Dewar, the chief promoter, has surrounded himself with a Board of Directors who will carry confidence. They are
well known men with large interests at
stake and witli the capacity to direct any
financial institution for the benefit of those
for whom it is designed. The head office
will be at Vancouver and Mr. Dewar will
be General Manager. The Victoria end
of the business has so far been conducted
successfully by Mr. Murison, a Bank
Manager of many years' experience, who
has thoroughly ingratiated himself with
Victoria capitalists. The Bank of Vancouver has not yet published its directorate, but the preliminary business is being handled by men of position and influence in the City, who express their confidence in being able to carry the enterprise to a successful issue. Western investors cannot do better than support these
typically Western institutions. The only
Bank doing business in British Columbia
which is not a mere Branch of an Eastern
Bank, is the Northern, and the splendid
success which it has already achieved sufficiently demonstrates the wisdom of its
policy. Emancipation from the control
of Eastern Banks should be the aim of
Western Canada.
President Roosevelt is the
Roosevelt's man of the hour on whom
Declaration.      the eyes of the whole world
are focussed. His integrity
of character, his tenacity of purpose, his
administrative capacity and liis fearless
policy have stamped him as a man of
exceptional force and merit. The recenl
financial panic in the States is by many
attributed to liis hostile attitude to Trusts.
It may have been affected by his enforcement of the law, but there can be no doubt
that the simple explanation is that tlie
people are afraid to leave tlieir money in
tlie hands of men who havc been proved unworthy. In this connection President
Koosevclt's declaration that he will not
stand for re-election is a doubtful omen. THE WEKK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1907.
Notes on
The Old Land.
By RAMBLER.
Glasgow, Sept. 1, 1907.
As it is  three weeks  since  I  last
inflicted a  letter  011 you,  I  suppose
you will think I am either lost, strayed or stolen.    Last letter was from
Bath.    Before leaving there, 1 made
several  trips   round  the  unfortunate
Monmouth's stamping grounds.   Had
lunch in a very ancient tavern at St.
Phillip   Norton   where   he   slept   the
day before the ill-fated battle of Sedg-
moor.   Was sorry 1 had only one lilvii
left in my camera and I  wanted it
for the ruins of an old castle, formerly the stronghold of the long extinct
Hungerford  family  at a  place  some
three miles distant called Furleigh, to
which I walked through a very beautiful  country,  consequently  have   no
photos of this very  interesting Inn.
Inside the "uins of the castle which
comprise   a   large   area,   is   a small
church  which was erected about 600
years  ago,  the  parish   one,  but  the
Hungerfords who were apparently a
strange mixture of piety and deviltry,
appropriated it for a domestic Chapel,
and built a new parish church close
by.   The former, though  not in use,
is in a good state of repair and it is
a veritable museum, the walks being
covered  with   armour,   weapons  and
relics of the family, while the vaults
to which there is access, contain many
stone   coffins   quite   intact,   in  which
are the remains of those Hungerfords
who died anywhere near.   They were
a   bad  lot  from  all  accounts.    The
wife of one killed  her husband and
burnt his body in the kitchen fireplace,
for which latter piece of wifely kindness  she  was    hanged    at    Tyburn.
Their grandson to get even with the
son, with the aid of the castle priest,
tried his best to poison his wife, but
she was too smart for him.    However, as  she was able to prove the
intent,  he  too came to an untimely
end on the scaffold.   The last of them
died   in   poverty   in   London   at   the
time  of  Charles  II.   Their  vast  estates    are    now    in    the    hands   of
strangers, and their castle in ruins, a
warning  to  the  wicked,  so  say  thc
righteous   people   of  the   neighbourhood.
By  the   way,   Farleigh   is   not  far
from  Spy    Park,    so    perhaps your
cousin,   Captain   ,   may  be  in
possession  of some of the  Hunger-
ford relics.
We were rather loth to leave Bath.
We perfectly revelled in taking the
waters, guaranteed to cure all and
every ill, and only 2d a glass, cheap
at that, for it is quite yellow with a
nasty taste, so it must be efficacious.
Arrived back in London some two
weeks ago. Spent a very enjoyable
ten days there. Took in several
theatres. Saw Wyndham in the
"Liars." Best piece of acting I think
I ever saw. The play is nothing,
simply depicting a phase of society
life. Only seven people on the stage,
but all good, could not have been
better.
I lived pretty nearly in the
Museums and Art Galleries. The
first night we were in London, we
went round to the Brompton Oratory.
After leaving Bath we spent a couple
of days at Glastonbury and Wells in
order to see the ruins of the old Abbey at the former, and the Cathedral
at the latter place, consequently had
to return by way of Bristol. From
that city to London it took just two
hours, never made a stop and travelled
on an average of over sixty miles an
hour. They do have a fine railway
system in England, with a road-bed
that cannot be beaten, and double
tracks, they can go any speed they
like apparently. Could not commence to read the names of the stations as we passed through.
Well, to return to London and the
Oratory, my wife wanted to return
thanks for mercies vouchsafed to her
on that particular run. As it happened they were celebrating the Annunciation of thc Blessed Virgin,
whatever that may mean, so thc
Church was crowded, and I was very
much interested in thc ceremony. Af-
The Merchants Bank
Canada
Established 1864.
Capital, fully paid $6,000,000
Reserve Funds     4,000,000
Head Office: Montreal.
Banking By Mail.
Deposits and withdrawals can
be made by mail; no delay, and
will receive prompt attention.
Savings Bank Department.
Interest   allowed   quarterly
highest current rate.
at
Victoria Branch: R. F. TAYLOR,
Manager.
Chinese- made Oxiirts ^Overalls
MUST GO!
UNION-MADE.
RN BRAND
BUTTING AHEAD.
ter   celebrating  a   kind   of   Mass,  a
procession  went  round  the   Church.
First came an effigy of Christ on the
Cross,  then  a  lot  of  Priests  in  all
kinds of rigs, then on a raised platform a full-sized statue of Mary attired in a modern costume, then more
Priests carrying banners and chanting.    Now  what struck me  forcibly
was this:   You will remember how in
the  ancient   Mesopotamian  mythologies,   the   original    high   gods   were
relegated to obscurity and eventually
were to the masses of the people only
a  name,  while  the  subordinate  and
subsidiary usurped the place of their
"betters," so to speak.    For instance,
Ea was the original great and omnipotent god amongst the Chaldean nations, but after many centuries  had
passed away he was scarcely known
and Asshur in the latter had taken
his place.   Now it appears to me the
same laws of evolution are at work
in  the  Christian    mythology,    to a
greater degre in the Roman Catholic
than  in  the  Protestant  phase  of  it,
but still in both.   The Roman Catholics   have  about   ceased   to trouble
about Jehovah and  Mary is  gradually ousting her Son from his high
position.    While the Protestant has
brought  the  Christ to  the  point  of
the comparative eclipse of the Father.
On this particular occasion the image
of Christ was obtu a foot long and
no one appeared to take any particular interest in it, while all the prostrating, honour and glory were to the
Mother Mary in life size.   Moreover,
in the sermon, the Holy Ghost was
never mentioned, Jehovah only glossed  over,  and  though  the  Son  was
awarded the high attributes, to the
Virgin was given the worship as being the power behind the throne.   In
a lesser degree the Protestant is gradually making the Son usurp the functions of the Father.
While on religion, you will have
noticed the deceased wife's sister
Marriage Act has at last passed. The
Bishops, especially the Archbishop of
Canterbury, and the Bishop of London, have placed themselves in the
wrong over it. I enclose an article
from the Conservative Telegraph up
on the subject which is indicative of
lots of trouble ahead for the Church.
The fault lies with the higher clergy
entirely, or rather a portion of them,
for they are by no means a compact
body, and are accordingly in no shape
to fight the solid Non-Conformist
phalanx. I had some very interesting conversations with the Suffragan
Bishop of Derby on matters of the
kind. He stayed in the same hotel
with us. A very liberal and sensible
who could see the dangers to the
Church through the intolerance of the
Ecclesiastical authorities to dissenters.
So much for religion, will now go
back to lighter subjects.
I would like to send you a photo
of myself. I am sure you would not
recognize me. Am falling gradually
into English ways. I now wear a
hard rea! necktie, and stand-up collars.   What do you think of that?
By the way, that "Times" book
store  is  a   wonderful   institution.   I
used to think good books cheap at
Mudies, but it is not a patch to the
"Times." They almost give them
away, new as well as second hand.
Have bought quite a few, principally
travels. Am sending them home with
the wife's dry goods, so you will see
them. Do dearly love going round
the old book stalls.
Before leaving London, spent a day
at Richmond with some very nice
people we met in Guernsey. They took
us about eight miles up the river in
their punt boat. It is wonderful how
they manage to propel these boats
with their long poles, women as well
as men being experts at it. We had
tea on board and returned in the
moonlight, hundreds of boats on the
water, all with their lights constituting a very pretty scene.
How strangely one meets people in
London. One would think a thousand people knowing each other might
be in that huge city and not cross
each other's paths. One afternoon
we were down at that terrible part
of London near the bank. I was
mooning round looking for Thread-
needle Street. Close to and with his
back to me was a man with a top
hat and lonk coat. I went over and
asked him its whereabouts. He
turned round, looked at me and said,
"Why, we stayed together at Guernsey." So we had, and then out of
thousands in the streets I had accidentally picked him out to ask a question.
Then, while driving to the hotel,
the bus stopped a moment at Piccadilly Circus. I happened to look over
at the sidewalk, and who should I
see walking "with his stately stride"
but the great 0. M. Malcolm. Thought
he was in B. C. Just had time to
draw his attention and find out where
he could be found.
By the heading of this letter you
will see we are in Glasgow, and it
is the Sabbath, and the Lord deliver
me from spending many more here.
Everything closed up tight. My wife
has gone to Church. It is called St.
Andrews. She resented the name, |
says they have no saint of that name.
I told her that shews she does not,
as she thinks she does, know everything, that she must remember she is
in Scotland, and that the Scotch are
notorious for having appropriated everything in sight as they do to this
day, even to other people's saints, and
that the R. C. Scotch are the worst
of the nation for appropriating. Of
course they do it nowadays in a legal
manner, but with no difference as regards ethics. Anyway they have evidently got hold of St. Andrews body
and soul, for there he is as large as
life in the front of the Church, and,
Scotch-like, his representative was
there at the door in the most barefaced manner taking in the "bawbees" before admittance was allowed.
But the worst instance of the mercenary spirit now pervading the
Church, I think, was exhibited in the
Carmelites Chapel at Kensington.
There they had three classes of seats,
id, 2d and 3d, so that the rich would
not be contaminated by coming into
contact with the poor. I wonder how
they will manage in Heaven. Of
course, there will not be exactly the
same difficulty because it will not be
a case of "Sartor re-sartus."
Last night after dinner we took
in the city.   The crowd was simply
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OF
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
PHONE 893. VICTORIA
WHY   NOT   HAVE   THE   BEST
THE REPUTATION OF
James Buchanan & Co'sSCOTCH   WHISKIES
Ii world-wide, and stands for the BEST that can be produced.
The following brands are for sale by all the leading dealers:
RED SEAL BLACK AND WHITE
ROYAL HOUSEHOLD      VERY OLD LIQUEUR 8C0TCH
RADIGER & JANION, Sole AfenU for B.C.
CHRISTMAS
GOODS
Ward's Safety Razors
Curley Ideal Safety Razors
Whiltt's Razor Strops
I. X. L. Carving Sets
I. X. L. Pocket Cutlery
Boker's Pocket Cutlery
I. X. L. Table Cutlery
All in great variety and at right prices
PGR SALE BY
e. g. prior & ee..
LTD.
LTY.
VIOTORIA,  VANCOUVER,  KAMLOOPS,  VERNON.
Established 1867
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
52 Government St., Victoria, B. C,
Charles Hayward, President. F. Caselton, Manager.
We make a specialty of Undertaking and Embalming.
An experienced certificated staff available at all times, day
and night.
Phones Nos. 48, 305, 404 or 594, Victoria. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1907
awful and about one-third drunk. Today they are still "full," but of religion instead of whisky. I asked the
girl at the restaurant where we get
most of our meals if they would be
open on Sunday. Before replying she
had to get her breath; I too it away
with such a question. She replied:
"Na, na, nay on the Saabaaaath." I
then inquired whether they did any
eating on Sunday. "Yes," she said,
"but only enough to live." I think
the Scotch are such hypocrites, saving my own parentage.
Before coming here I have been
chaffing about the English "as it is
spoken in England," and have been
insinuating that to hear the language
spoken properly one has to go North
of the Tweed, but I must quality my
views to a large extent. Here in
Glasgow amongst the lower classes,
and even as regards the small shopkeepers, it is almost an impossibility
to understand two words out of three,
but with that true Scottish characteristic of holding on to everything,
they have not lost or given away
their "Ns."
We went to the Trossachs the day
before yesterday and returned last
night. We went all through the house
of Rob Roy, and the McGregor clan,
also that of the McFarlanes. After
reading their respective histories I
am constrained to come to the conclusion that they were worse if anything than the Foweyites of the South
of England that I wrote you about in
a former letter. They were driven
from one part of the country to an-
* other on three separate occasions for
their misdeeds in the way of murdering, raiding and stealing their
neighbour's cattle and property. In
fact nothing movable was safe. We
visited Rob Roy's cave which he frequented on the banks of Loch Lomond while outlawed. It is a beautiful country, and we travelled by boat
and stage. My wife says the present
descendents of the above clans are
no improvement upon their ancestors,
i. e., as regards acquisitiveness, only
they do it in a legal way, but then
she is not, unfortunately for her,
Scotch, and cannot appreciate their
predominant qualities. As far as I
am concerned as regards language, I
am commencing to look upon myself
as a Sassenach.
We go North on Tuesday to Aber-
leenshire. While there I intend visit-
ng that place which is responsible
or this world being inflicted by your
tumble servant, viz., Peterhead, and
ilso intend calling upon Jim F.'s
>eople who have kindly invited us to
itay a day or two with them. When
ve return South have arranged a date
o see your sister. W-e purpose gong as far North as Inverness.
For awful poverty, side by side with
irealth, Glasgow I believe beats Lon-
lon. Hundreds and hundreds of poor
hildren practically with their naked-
less uncovered in this inhospitable
limate, swarming in the streets. I
eep my pocket full of pennies to give
way to the poor little devils. It is
eart-breaking. The national increase
ere must be enormous. And the
rinking, women as well as men,
ironging the public houses spending
leir money on whisky and beer while
leir children are in a chronic state
f starvation.
If this country, I mean Great
ritain, comes to an untimely end
ke the ancient Empire, and a second
ibbon writes a history of the De-
ine and Fall of the British Empire,
will assuredly have to ascribe to
•ink the chief cause of such a catas-
ophe. It is breeding a race of de-
jnerates amongst the working
asses. How can children, neglected
id starved, be otherwise? It is
lough to make one a teetotaller. Can
lite realize how hard it must be to
ose poor dipsomaniacs to throw off
drink habit. I never was very
d, but I often have a great long-
g for a drink come over me. I
ve my reward, however, for leav-
g it alone, never have indigestion
d feel ever so much better without
"It costs money to keep one's type-
•iter in ribbons."—Tabasco Tage-
itt. What will Mrs. Tageblatt say
this?—Mexican Herald.
Notes on
Provincial News
As Clear As Mud.
The Slocan Mining Review, which
may be admitted to have some
knowledge of mining matters in general and those of the Slocan in particular, waxes facetious in the following paragraph over the recent decision of the Appeal Court in the
celebrated Slocan Star and White
Mining case:
"After reading the finding of Justices Irving, Morrison and Martin in
the Star-White case, we in common
with the average lay reader reluctantly admit we do not savvy what
the two last named judges are talking about. We hope the day is not
far distant when all legal writings
and findings will be couched in good
old public school language, and then
there will be something intelligible
for the people and all the lawyers will
be either policemen or tinhorns. Our
mad staff lawyer has handed in the
following:
" 'I am bound to admit that the
black fissure, which is composed of
nitro-glycerine, blackjack, graphite,
nagyagite, melaconite, porous plaster
and other breakfast foods, hits the
apex on the extralateral, therefore
whereas moreover Harris to wit
makes it stick, which to me is as clear
as mud (see Noah vs. Moses vie. ii,
sec. 2, p. 3 a, e, i, 0, u, and w and y
sometimes); but if White had a ace
in the crosscut and cordwood was
two and a half a rick, as in Adam
vs. Eve cap. 6% (see Fox's Book of
Tomatoes), then all will agree that
the party of the first part is, or should
be, particularly so, and if not why not
(as in High vs. Low, Jack and Game).
Judgment should be held up sine die,
status quo, ora pro nobis and Harris
should set 'em up.'"
Scandals.
The New Westminster Daily News
is at its own game again—scavenging. In the face of a session of the
Federal Parliament and the important questions now occupying public
attention, it has nothing better to
dish up for* its readers than a
rechaufee of the scandals of the past.
Like the ghosts of Richard's Victims they stalk around the editorial
sanctum. Of course there is nothing new, it is the Chepleaus, Carons,
Currans, and McGreevy, Conolly incidents which still have to do duty in
the New Westminster charnel house.
Surely this is worse than flogging a
dead horse, and a little up-to-dateness
might be appreciated even by readers
of the  News.
A Matter of Taste.
The Fernie Free Press sees nothing incongruous in the marriage of
a white woman to a Chinaman, at
least that is the only conclusion which
can be drawn from the following
paragraph in its latest issue:
"A Chinaman and a white girl were
married in Swift Current on Wednesday and according to press despatches much indignation is felt locally over the affair. Fernie has
tolerated white wives of negroes and
black wives of Japs, without losing
any pose. We are unable to say
whether the young men of Swift Current are worrying because a white
girl passed them up or whether it is
the gentler sex who deplore the sacrifice of a good Chinaman."
Beyond Reproach.
During the last strike at the Fernie
Mines, serious charges were brought
against President Sherman of the U.
M. W. A. One of these was that he
had approached the President of the
Coal Company for "funds." Mr. Lindsey has written a letter declaring that
there is no foundation for such a
charge, and by exonerating Mr. Sherman has made it incumbent upon his
accusers to recant. If they are not
merely mischievous meddlers they
will do so. Mr. Sherman is far from
perfect, and with some of his methods
The Week entirely disagrees, but a
charge of treachery and dishonesty
is a different matter, and should never
have been made if it could not be
substantiated.
SOOD APPEARING UNDERWEAR
to Hm Traveller's Bad* st RwpMttUHty
Making one's toilet on a pullman car
is a hurry up job. It's the custom to
rush to the wash room in one's underclothing and every man who has regard for respectability will be solicitous about the good appearance of hit
underwear.
"CEETEE"
Guaranteed Unshrinkabl*
Pure Wool
UNDERWEAR
it the most comfortable aad perfect
fitting underclothing on the market
also rttalnt Its original ftm, no matter
how often washed or how long worn.
It never irritates the skin. It makes
tbe wearer feel respectable before his
fellow travellers.
Always buy "CmIh" Undarwsir.
Look for the trade mark on each
garment.   Made and guaranteed by
The C. Turnbull Co. of Gilt, Lim tad
s_t
A Raincoat is one of the most useful garments a man can possess. The PICCADILY Rain Coat, besides being rain-proof, has
all the style of the regular well-tailored light overcoat.
Among other seasonable styles is the "topper" (short, lightweight overcoat). The PICCADILLY "topper" for igo8 will undoubtedly meet with the approval of fastidious men.
H. E.BOND & CO., Ltd.,     -
MANUFACTURERS
TORONTO
SECTIONAL
BOOKCASES
YOU DONT GET DONE
WHEN VOU BUVA&WUf
What Better Xmas
Gift Than a Nice
Bookcase?
A pleasure all the year round
to all the family.
BAXTER & JOHNSON
811 Government Street
Victoria, B. C.
The Y. B. 6. Novelty Works
ram antique, abtistic   _un>
DESieWSD WOBK MASS TO OBDEB.
ABCKXTEOCTTBAX
I am now ready to fulfil any orders for all kinds of Banks, Stores,
Offices, Churches. Barber Shops and Hotel Bar Fixtures and Furniture.
1000 Granville Street     i:     it     ::     :i       ::       VAVOOUVBB, __. 0.
V. LeCAIB,  Proprietor.
oabadiav   Piano   baxlway
■BRISK COLUMBIA COAST
SEBVICE.
FBOM VABCOT7TEB—
For yietorla—S.S. Princess Victoria, 1
o'clock p.m. dally.
For Nanai.10—S.S. Joan, dally except
Sunday, at 1:30 o'clock p. m.
For Skagway and Ketchikan, Alaska,
calling at Prince Rupert, Port Be-
sington and Port Simpson—Princess
Hay, May 19, 29, f p. m.
For Northern B. C. Ports—S.S. Amur,
Ind and ltth of every month, 8 p.m.
Calls   at   Skidegate   first   trip   of
month and Bella Coola second trie
of month.
»OX TIOTOBIA—
For Vancouver—S.S. Princess Victoria,
1 o'elock a. m., daily.
For Seattle—S.S.   Princess   Beatrice,
1:10 a. m., dally, except Monday.
Por West Coast, Vancouver Island—
S.S. Tees, 11 p. m., lst, 7th, 14th of
each month, for Clayoquot and Moa-
?uito Harbor;   20th of each month
er  Cape  Scott,  Quatsino,  Ahouset
and way ports.
I-BOX SEATTLE—
For  Victoria—S.S.   Princess   Beatrice,
11:30 p.m., dally, except  Monday.
For   rates   and   passage,   apply   at
Company's Offices,
VICTOBIA VASrOOUVEB.
Elegant  PERFUMES.
Perfumes are always a delight.
Neat, stylish cases, containing odors
of fragrant perfume, in handsomely
decorated, heavy glass hottles are extremely natty Christmas Gifts.
These holiday packages of Exquisite Perfume comprise fragrances
from foreign fields of flowers as well
as odors of our own land's offering.
They will delight you.
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
Government Street, near Yates St.
VICTORIA, B. C.
Victoria
FRUIT
and
Farm Lands
Write for "Home  List" and
information.
R.   S.   DAY
and
BEAUMONT BOGGS
Realty Brokers.
620 FOBT  STBEBT VICTOBIA.
THOMAS CATTZBALL
Bnllder  aad  General   Contractor.
Tenders glvei on Brick, Stone an
Frame, Alterations, Parquetry Floorlni
Office, Bank, Store and Saloon Flttlngi
Pile Driving, Wharves and Dock Shed
constructed and repaired.
TIOTOBIA.
BOND SIGN CO.
VANCOUVER
Signs
ELECTRIC
BOARD
METAL
BULLETIN
GLASS
COTTON
SHOW CARD
In up-to-dal. atylea.   Entlmstea and
deaignifurnlahed. THE WEEK, SATURDAY DECEMBER 14, i9°7
V
t.
^
The opinion expressed by Capt. Walbran in a recent issue of the Colonist,
that it is perfectly safe for ships like
The "Lusitania" to Dock at Alberni
confirms our statement that Alberni will be one of the
largest ports on the Coast.
Alberni Lots Are Now on the Market
and Are Selling.
8fe, Don't Wait for the Excitement Before Buying.   When the
excitement comes you ought to be able to take advantage of it.
Events during the next few months will prove that Alberni
is to be a Great City, and that we know it.
IF   YOU   HAVE   NOT   BOUGHT   A   FEW   LOTS
DO SO NOW.
^
V
HERBERT CUTHBERT & CO.
Victoria, Alberni, and Vancouver Island Real Estate
TlflBER AND MINES. Phone 1610 616 Fort St., Victoria
J)
* Social and        %
__ Personal. *
AMilSHi k^^^^^m^^^k^^^A |Iaau feA___l ^_______L ___J______i ils
T 'I' 'I! 'I' 1' 'JI' 'I' 'l' V 'I' VP 'JU' Tp
VICTORIA.
St. John's church on Wednesday
afternoon was the scene of a very
pretty and interesting wedding, when
the Rev. Percival Jenns assisted by
the Lord Bishop of Columbia, joined
in thc holy bonds of matrimony Mr.
Alexander Gillespie, second son of
Mr. and Mrs. George Gillespie, and
Miss Rose Ellen Todd, second
daughter of Mrs. J. H. .Todd, of St.
Charles street. The church which was
very prettily decorated by the friends
of the bride, was crowded to the
doors. The ushers were Messrs. W.
Todd, Arthur Gore, E. P. Colley and
Kenneth Gillespie. Promptly on the
stroke of two the bride arrived leaning on the arm of her brother, Dr.
Todd, gowned in a soft clinging
white Liberty satin, with a joke of
Duchesse lace and a beautiful veil of
the same lace. Her bouquet was of
white roses, lillies-of-the-valley, asparagus and maidenhair fern. Miss
Florence Gillespie, thc maid of honor,
wore a pretty frock of pale blue
gauze with a bouquet of white chrysanthemums and asparagus fern tied
with white t.iiie. Miss Violet Pooley,
in pale green Liberty satin, Empire
style, with pale green osprey in her
hair and Miss Butchart in pale pink,
made of the same material and in thc
same style acted as bridesmaids. The
groom's present to the bridesmaids
was a little brooch with stones the
same colour as their frocks and to
the bride a very handsome diamond
ring. Mr. Dougald Gillespie and Mr.
Lin.dley Crease supported the groom.
After the ceremony thc wedding
party adjourned to the family residence, Leasowes, St. Charles street,
where a reception was held. The
house was beautifully decorated for
the occasion. Mrs. Todd, in lavender
.brocade,  received  her  guests   in  the
large hall, assisted by her daughter,
Mrs. J. F. Gillespie, in a very pretty
Empire frock of corn-colored chiffon,
and smart hat trimmed with roses in
different shades of brown. Mrs.
Charlie Todd in a flower silk; Mrs.
George Gillespie, in pale blue brocaded satin, large black picture hat,
with a touch of cerise on her bodice.
Among the guests were: The Lieutenant-Governor and Mrs. Dunsmuir,
the Lord Bishop of Columbia and
Mrs. Perrin, Lady Crease, Miss
Crease; the Hon. C. E. Pooley, Mrs.
Pooley, Miss Pooley; Rev. Percival
Jenns and Mrs. Jenns, Canon and Mrs.
Beanlands, Rev. Stanley Ard, Rev.
VV. B. Allen, Mrs. Rocke Robertson,
Mrs. Robin Dunsmuir, Mrs. Butchart,
Miss Mary Butchart, Mrs. F. Pemberton, Mr. and Mrs. Lampman, Mr.
and Mrs. R. H. Pooley, Mrs. Flumerfelt, Mrs.. Herman Robertson, Mrs.
McCallum, Mrs. Burton, Mr. Cam-
bell McCallum, Mrs. Gaudin, Miss
Gaudin, Mrs. Freeman, Mrs. W. S.
Gore, Mr. and Mrs. T. S. Gore, Mr.
Arbuckle, Mrs. Berkeley, Mr. and
Mrs. Gresley, Mrs. Alister Robertson,
Mrs. Bodwell, Mr. and Mrs. B. Heisterman, Mrs. A. Martin, Miss P.
Mason, Mr. and Mrs. J. Ambery, Mrs.
Muskett, Mrs. Farris, Mrs. Rithet,
Mrs. Genge, Mrs. Hanington, Miss L.
Hanington, Mrs. F. Hanington, Mrs.
Barnard, Miss Monteith, Mrs. Hugo
Beaven, Miss Fownes, Mrs. Cleland,
Dr. and Mrs. Watt, Miss Tilton, Miss
Perry, Miss Peters, Mr. J. Lawson,
Miss Drake, Mrs. Williams, Mrs.
Blaiklock, Mrs. Rome, Mr. and Mrs.
J. Anderson, Mrs. J. Irving, Misses
Irving, Mrs. Englehart, Mrs. McKay,
Miss McKay, Miss L. Eberts, Mrs.
Atkins, Mrs. Fleet Robertson, Dr.
Neucombe, Miss Neucombe, Mrs. Big-
gerstaff Wilson, Mrs. Ker, Mrs. Brett,
Mr. and Mrs. Purnett, Mr. and Mrs.
Carew Gibson, Miss Dorothy Green,
Misses Pitts, Mrs. VV. Langley, Col.
Gregory, Messrs. S. Powell, J. B.
Bell, Gore, Crease, Ross. Refreshments were served in the dining-room,
an handsome brass chandelier hung
over the centre of the table; carnations and asparagus fern wcre the
decorations here. After some light
refreshments, the guests adjourned to
the drawing-room, where the cake was
cut by the bride, followed by the
usual speeches and toasts. The billiard room was arrayed with the many
beautiful and costly presents.
The annual Hockey Club dance,
which was given at the A.O.U.W.
hall on Saturday, Dec. 8th, was a
most successful affair. Miss Thain's
orchestra provided the music. Supper
was served at midnight. Th'e colors
of the Victoria and Nanaimo clubs
were represented in the decorations.
Among those present were: Miss E.
Rickaby in blue; Miss L. Clarke,
white; Miss E. Nicholls, white; Miss
M. McDonald, Miss A. McQuade, blue
satin; Miss E. Locke, pink; Miss
Waterhouse (Seattle), blue chiffon;
Miss B. Roberts, white, Cameron,
Miss Crook, Miss B. Raymond, blue
Empire; Mr. and Mrs. W. Wilson,
Misses Fraser, Leiser, L. Hagerty,
lleany, Garvin; Messrs. York Holmes,
Darcy, Austin, E. Hardy, Grundy, Mason, Evans, Virtue, Mr. and Mrs.
Murphy, Mr. F Clarke, C. Drake,
Bob Foster, Mrs. Simpson, Mr.
Bayne, R. Wilson, W. Burns, Newcombe, G. Wilson, W. Larimer,
Gooch, Frame, J. Hart, Dobson, H.
Shore, Futcher, Waterhouse, J. Law-
son, N. Brown, Col. Gregory and
many others.
*   *   *
On the second anniversary of their
marriage, December 6th, a surprise
party was given to C. W. McAllister,
manager of the Royal Dairy, and Mrs.
McAllister, at the home of her
parents, Hotel Canada. Among those
invited were Mr. and Mrs. E. M.
Brast, Mr. and Mrs. C. W. McAllister. Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Andrews,
Mr. and Mrs. C. Coulson, Mr. and
Mrs. Lumpen, Mr. and Mrs. R. Marshall, Miss M, Marshall, Mr. J. Coates,
Miss M. Robertson, Miss E. Eccles,
Mrs. H. Higgins, Miss A. Eccles, Mr,
F. Morris, Miss May Eccles. Thc entertainment took thc form of a progressive whist party. The ladies'
lirst prize was drawn by Mrs. G. W.
Andrews and the gentlemen's by Mr.
Wm. McAllister. The booby prizes
were won by Mrs. F. Morris and
Miss E. Eccles.   After the whist party
there was a dainty lunch served and
the company left after singing Auld
Lang Syne.
* *   *
The first session of the newly formed skating club which is to meet every
Tuesday afternoon from five to seven,
was held last Tuesday at the rink on
Fort street. The members present
were: Miss M. Dunsmuir, Mrs. Langley, Mrs. J. Langley, Mrs. J. Lawson,
Mrs. D. Mason, Mrs. V. Mason, Mrs.
L. Eberts, Mrs. N. Bell, Mrs. P. Mason, Mrs. W. Troupe, Mrs. M. Newcombe, Mrs. G. Hickey, Mrs. V. Hickey, Mrs. P. Irving, Mrs. W. Day,
Mrs. G. Irving, Mrs. W. Johnstone;
the Messrs Wright, Hagerty, Harvey,
Troupefi Fraser, Monteith, Martin,
Bromley, McDougal, Cain, Mason,
McCurdy, Lawson, Arbuckle, J.
Brown, B. Irving, H. Eberts, B. Prior,
Capt.  Hughes.
Miss Rose Anderson came over
from Seattle on Monday last and is
staying with friends in Victoria.
* *   *
Mrs. Keith Wilson is staying with
her mother, Mrs.  E. H. King.
Mr. and Mrs. Mcllin of Duncans, are
registered at thc Balmoral, also Miss
Robertson.
* *   *
Mrs. Pierce of Vancouver is the
guest of her sister, Mrs. F. H. Worlock, Dallas Road.
Commencing at a post marked M.
B. Southeast Corner, situated about I
40 chains north and 40 chains east of
Lot 325, N. E. Cor.; thence 40 chains
north; thence 40 chains west; thence
40 chains south; thence 60 chains east
to point of commencement, containing  240  acres.
Dated November 15,  1907.
De. 14 MARK BRENNAN.
The Christmas number of Westward Ho Magazine comes to hand
this week with a hundred pages of
finely illustrated western reading matter. The issue is replete with stories,
sketches, and well-written articles. It
is embellished with a very effective
cover design by Mr. S. P. Judge. Altogether the issue is very creditable
to its publishers, and should receive
a substantial support from the
western public.—Saturday Sunset.
TAKE NOTICE that M, Brennan,
of Ootso Lake, occupation Farmer,
intends to apply for permission to
lease thc following described land:
MESSRS. WILLIAMS & JANION]
Duly Instructed by the Officer Commanding Will Sell By
PUBLIC AUCTION
AT THE
NAVAL  YARDS,   ESQUIMALT,
—on—
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 18, AT 11 A.M.]
A Quantity of
NAVAL STORES
including canvas    and    leather hose,l
couplings,   copper   hot   water   cans,|
baths, pillow slips, blankets, counterpanes, ward room dining room chairs,]
arm   chairs,   couch,   horse   hair   mattresses,  pillows, cartridge  boxes, 200J
4-inch   shells,   150  3-pound  shells,
quantity of rope, old copper and brass,!
mess kettles, 100 cans of tinned meats,!
barricoes,  tubs, oil  drums,  coal  bagX
shovels,   packing,  2  pair   blue   plush
curtains, salt meat, etc.   Also the following E. P. ware, Al quality tea and
coffee   service,   4   table   candlesticks,
dish  covers, cruet,  breakfast dish,  4
sets of entree dishes, 24 table forks,
12 small forks, 1 set of desseret knives
and forks (new), 12 fish knives, soup
and sauce ladles, cup and tureen, nut
crackers, mustard pot, sugar, sifters,]
skewers,   egg,   gravy,   dessert,   salt,!
table,    and    teaspoons,    toast    rack,!
salver,    sugar    tongs,    linger    bowls,
water bottles,  pickle jars,  decanters,
champagne glasses, tumblers, etc. etc.
The Auctioneer
STEWART WILLIAMS. THE WEEK, SATURDAY DECEMBER 14, 1907
Rest
Present.
Account or
Value
Undivided
Per Share.
Profits.
$260.00
$11,000,000.00
235.00
4,500,000.00
226.00
3,000,000.00
217.00
2,500,000.00
THE BANK OF VANCOUVER
(TO BE INCORPORATED BY AOT OF PARLIAMENT OF CANADA.   CHARTER APPLIED FOR)
This proposed bank is being organized and will have its Head Oflice in Vancouver with its directors chosen hy the subscribers to
its stock at the organization meeting.
The Western Provinces and Britisli Columbia in particular have for some considerable time felt the urgent need of an institution
such as the proposed Bank of Vancouver. The formation of new industries and the developing of those already established, has been
seriously retarded for want of ordinary financial accommodation, and the primary object of this new bank will be to alleviate tlie situation
by largely confining its operations to the splendid field awaiting it in tlie Pacific Coast Provinces, and more especially in British
Columbia.
The bank proposes to do business on the safe and well-laid-down lines of the old established banks, and will earn their respect and
goodwill by a continuation of this policy.
The Bank of Montreal has its head office in Montreal.
The Bank of Toronto has its head oflice in Toronto.
The Bank of Ottawa has its head office in Ottawa.
The Bank of Hamilton has its head office in Hamilton.
The standing of these banks is beyond question.
Par Value
of Stock
per Share
The Bank of Montreal     $100.00
The Bank of Toronto        100.00
The Bank of Ottawa        100.00
The Bank of Hamilton       100.00
The above banks, while doing a general banking business throughout the Dominion, each aims at fostering and developing business
and trade, SPECIALLY IN THEIR RESPECTIVE CITIES AND DISTRICTS.
THE BANK OF VANCOUVER will aim to do the same, that is, to encourage and promote legitimate business in BRITISH
COLUMBIA PARTICULARLY.
The Capital asked for is $2,000,000.00 in 20,000 shares of $100.00 each. The first $500,000.00 of stock is offered the public
at a premium of 10 per cent., that is, at $110.00 per share.
Payments can be made in full or on the instalment plan. Interest will be allowed at 3 per cent, per annum upon the par value
of the stock until organization.
The provisional directors, when appointed, will reserve the right to increase the premium upon the remainder of the stock, also
to allot or reject any subscription in whole or in part.
SUBSCRIPTION FOR STOCK
THE BANK OF VANCOUVER
CHARTER APPLIED FOR.   TO BE INCORPORATED BY ACT OF THE PARLIAMENT OF CANADA.
CAPITAL, $2,000,000, IN 20,000 SHARES OF $100 EACH, WITH $10 PREMIUM ON EACH SHARE.
I, the undersigned, hereby subscribe for  Shares of the Capital Stock
of THE BANK OF VANCOUVER (charter applied for), to be incorporated by an Act of the Parliament of Canada at this Session,
at the price of $110.00 per share, to be payable as follows:—$10.00 premium on each Share hereby subscribed upon the signing hereof;
$10.00 upon each Share of Stock within 30 days after date of subscription; and $10.00 on each Share of Stock upon allotment by the
Provisional Directors of said Bank, and eight equal monthly payments of $10.00 each per Share, the first of such payments to be
made 30 days after allotment and the succeeding payments at intervals of 30 days. I reserve to myself the right to pay these Shares in
full upon allotment.
The Shares of Stock so subscribed for shall not be assignable or transferable until the same are paid up in full.
I hereby make and appoint the Secretary of the Provisional Board, when appointed, as my Attorney to sign and subscribe my name to the
Subscribers' Agreement in the Stock Books of the said Bank, and to accept such shares as may be allotted to me and to register me therein as the
holder of the said Shares.
I further hereby make and appoint (as a term of my application for shares herein contained) the Secretary aforesaid my proxy to vote for me
and on my behalf at all meetings of the Shareholders or Subscribers of the stock of the said Bank, and at any adjournment thereof, at which 1 may not*
be personally present, upon and in respect of all shares of the stock of the said Bank whieh shall be allotted or transferred to me.
,   Signature  (SEAL)
Date
Name in full
WITNESS:
Occupation
Address
THE IMPERIAL TRUST CO., LIMITED, of Vancouver, has agreed to act as trustees for the Subscribers, and all payments until the sum of
$250,000.00 of Capital Stock is paid up must be made by cheque, draft, post ollice or express ollice order, payable to the order of Thc Imperial Trust Co.,
Limited, and thereafter to The Bank of Vancouver.
Interest at the rate of three per cent, per annum will be allowed until the organization of the said Bank.
All money so paid in, except the premium money, which will bo applied toward expenses of incorporation, will be deposited by The Imperial
Trust Co., with tlieir Bankers, THE MOLSONS BANK, and should the Bank not organize, the said money will be returned to the subscribers with
interest by the Trust Co.
For all further particulars apply to the Imperial Trust Co., Ltd., Vancouver, B.C., Kingsford, Smith & Co., 860 Granville St., Vancouver, B.C.;
Champion & Pound, Fairfield Building, Vancouver, B.C., or to L. U. Conyers & Co., and E. O. Bagshawe, Victoria, B.C. All communications and
remittances should be mailed to the Acting Secretary, P. O. Box 890, Ot. P. O., Vancouver, B.C. THE WEEK  SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14  1907.
Incorporated 1905.
Capital, J600.000.00
Capital Increased
to  ...W.OOO.OOO.OO1
Subscribed _.\
Capital,    $660,000
Beserve . . $50,000|
Surplus, Jan- iwinn'
1907   .  •  $180,000
J. B. MATHEBS, den. Han.
IN   CLOSING   UF   ESTATES
either as Executors or Assignees
the Dominion Trust Co., Ltd., Is
never influenced by ulterior motives. Their entire ambition,
effort, and energy is directed towards securing the best possible
returns for all concerned.
Name this company executor in
your will. Blank will forms furnished free of charge and stored
in our safety deposit vaults,
when we are made your executor.
DOMINION TRUST CO,
Limited.
328 Hastingi St, West.
Vancouver, B. C.
The Week
__. Provincial Review and Uagailne, published •very Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
lilt Government Stmt..Victoria, B.C.
Ml Haitlngi  St Vancouver,  B.C.
W. BLAKBMORB. .Manager and Kdlter
The Art of Living.
The Editor has handed me a long
and very interesting letter from a
subscriber at Bamfield. It was sent
for publication, but is too lengthy in
its present form, although with the
permission of the writer it will be
used in our Christmas edition. The
letter deals with a subject which I
have discussed at considerable length
in The Week and which has elicited
much correspondence. It originated
in a complaint by new-comers that
Victorians are unsociable and exclusive. It developed into a brief symposium on the Simple Life. The letter
furnishes a peg on which to hand a
few stray thoughts with respect to the
art of living. Do we get enough out
of life? Do thc majority of us get
all we might? Do we make the best
of this world? I often think that if
the grumblers would pause to reflect,
they would cease to grumble. Is it
not a fact that too many people fail
of attaining happiness because they
miss their opportunity. My own belief is that we ask too much, and that
if fate refuses what we ask, we are
too apt to regard ourselves as ill-
used mortals, and to brand life as
a cheat.
I am not referring so much to material gain as to social and personal
relations. The richest man in this
world is hc who has a true friend,
the poorest is he who, though possessing millions, lacks one. There
can be no enjoyment without social
converse, and no satisfying converse
except with kindred spirits. We may
meet men at the club, in the street, ln
the office, or at public gatherings, who
stimulate the intellect and arouse the
passions and the emotions. This is
one of the most necessary influences
if character is to be developed and
the fighting instinct maintained. But
it is warfare, and when the pendulum
swings to the other extreme, self reliance is neither so much in evidence,
nor so satisfying, and man yearns for
thc sympathy and encouragement of
his fellows.
Few men have achieved anything in
thc public service without the support of friends, and men who command that support solely by their
natural   abilities   are  apt  to  lose  it.
This has been exemplified in several
remarkable instances during the present generation. We can recall men
who by sheer force of character and
intellectual capacity towered above
their fellows; they attained power,
wielded influence, and determined
policy, but their reign was brief; they
could not retain the position they had
gained, all because they were deficient in those qualities which would
have endeared them to their followers.
This explains the conspicuous failure
of such a brilliantly gifted man as Edward Blake, who with all his great
attainments possessed no magnetism
and did not give himself the trouble
to cultivate the true art of living.
It is so in every walk of life,
every day men support their
fellows for their personal merits
rather than their ability. In seeking
a position, amiability and geniality
count for more than skill or accmire-
ment. The men of whom others speak
well are those who never think it is
too much trouble to try to please. The
men whose memories are green today
and who although they are dead yet
speak, are men who felt as well as
worked for the race. Livingstone,
Gordon and Lincoln, although intellectually inferior are greater powers
in the world today than Rhodes,
Palmerston, or Jefferson, and all because their lives exemplified the spirit
which led Abou Ben Adhem to say
to the Angel, "I pray thee then write
me as one who loves his fellow men."
The thing we are most apt to forget is that we may be just as difficult
to get on with as others with whom
we are impatient, and that every social relation depends for its maintenance upon the principle of compromise.
The best that life has to give any
of us is congenial social intercourse.
Important social functions rightly understood are but a means to an end;
they should be so regarded and so
used. They fill a very important place
in the economy of life; their principal function is to bring about introductions and to break the ice. Without them many people of kindred
tastes admirably adapted to increase
each other's happiness, whether in
the closest or the less intimate relationships, would never be made.
Those, therefore, who decry public
dances and parties have never mastered the philosophy of the question,
and if they could have their way
would narrow down the groove in
which people move until we should all
travel in a rut, and life would be rendered monotonous by its boredom.
At the same time if the advantage
is not followed on the best may be
missed. Casual acquaintances should
result in some permanent friendships,
and in the formation of little circles
to which a few kindred spirits will
naturally gravitate. When this circle
is formed there will be a community
of interests and a oneness of desire
which may be fruitful of the best results.
This circle of friendship is the link
between a man's daily avocation and
the cultivation of his best instincts.
Without it he is not unlike a rudderless barque. To cultivate such a
circle constitutes the art of living as
contrasted with the vogue of existing.
When the busy man, and especially
the man of comparative wealth whose
every spare moment is taken up with
social functions and ambitious designs,
begins to realize how little these contribute to peace of mind, and real
happiness, there will be a readjustment, and it will be upon the lines of
simpler living and the cultivation of
natural instincts instead of the propagation of artificial emotions.
Life today is too complex, and the
number of those who have tired of
it is consequently increasing. Wagner's "Simple Life" even though like
Moore's Utopia," it be the work of
an idealist, has aroused many a responsive echo. W. J. Dawson's
epochal book, "A Prophet in Babylon," will attract still wider attention.
All indicate thc struggle of a human
spirit to escape from the bondage of
this social death, and unless I am
greatly mistaken, thc time is at hand
when there will be a revolution
throughout the civilized world in
which many false ideals will be over
whelmed, and conspicuous among
these the ecclesiastical dogmas which
have for so long block the way of
progress.
CORRESPONDENCE.
Rats, Panthers and Garbage.
To the Editor:
I see the Vancouver City Council
have been proposing a scheme not
very practicable to keep infected rats
out of the city. I do not write to
recommend any scheme, but it may
interest them to know what is done
elsewhere. In the Old Country and in
Eastern Canada rat catching is a
trade. I do not know whether they
have a rat catchers' union, but if you
employ one, he charges more per head
than the city allows in Victoria. 1
remember a good story of a Vicar
who, after he had engaged the rat
catcher at a price, when he saw the
number of live rats he went back on
his bargain because the Vicar had
been told that the rat catcher could
get six cents a piece for the live rats.
They are sold for training terrier dogs
in rat pits. The rat catcher was indignant and opening his wire cage he
let them all out in the Vicar's hall
with the remark; "You may keep
your rates."
In Manchester, England, it is a
rule of the Port that all ships that
come up the canal have to pay for
rat catching when they arrive—and
in this way thousands of rats are
killed every year. Could we do this
in British Columbia.
Then, as to panthers, I rather think
the brute that did the damage, by
killing two prize rams two days after
my friend got them home from Victoria fair was killed a few days ago
But these were not the only lopes my
friend had. Do "we offer sufficient to
make it worth while to exterminate
these destructive brutes in our neigh
bourhood? I should like to see the
price raised , for both rats and
panthers.
As to the disposal of garbage very
few towns have the facilities which
the sea offers. Could anything be
better?
The Mayor proposed another
scheme but the citizens rejected it
Where was Alderman Vincent that he
did not point out that it required
two old tubs Of boats? I am not
surprised that this did not strike the
Mayor. But Alderman Vincent
knows about boats.
"F."
Victoria, 12th December, 1907.
No Excuse.
Tommy—It's too bad yer grandmother died day 'fore yesterday.
Benny—Why so?
Tommy—Why, dere's a corkin'
game on dis  afternoon.
Gifts Worth
Giving
Nothing else does quite so
well for a Man's or a Boy's
Christinas as something he can
wear. What he wears he'll appreciate.
Man or Boy—what makes so
satisfactory a Christmas Gift as
a Suit, Overcoat or Rain Coat?
Come in and see what we
can do for him.
aaa@a a a<a,
pit-Reform
n Govhpeiit5t. Victor
IT
Victoria's Greatest
Christmas Store
We are making a bigger hit than ever before for the cream of
the Christmas trade. In every department stock bas been doubled
in anticipation of your requirements, making an infinitely larger
and broader variety to choose from than we have heretofore
attempted. Vast throngs of people, too, are already finding this
Christmas Store very helpful in its suggestiveness of what to
give. Prices plainly inarked on every article is helpful—then
again our large army of over '0 (regular staff) experienced clerks
are not only on hand promptly, but each one takes the greatest
pride in aiding selection. Gift hunters are finding our Showroom
a mine of gift things, brimful of objects of real merit that carry
with them genuine pleasure and elicit lasting gratitude from the
recipients.   Just now we are quoting
Wonderfully Low Prices on Necklets
Brooches and Bracelets.
NECKLETS—Elegant Diamond-set platinum finished Necklets,
the very latest conceptions; lovely combinations of pearls and
diamonds, diamonds and emeralds, pearls and amethyst, pearl and
peridot, pearl and tourmaline, etc. Necklets of every nameable
precious stone, ranging in price from $12.00 up to $3,500.00.
BROOCHES—An immense stock, which includes many beautiful and exclusive inexpensive Brooches, particularly suitable for
gift-making. Very handsome combinations of Diamonds and
emeralds, diamonds and pearls, diamonds and opals, turquoise and
pearl, fancy turquoise matrix, topaz, garnets, etc., etc., an unlimited assortment from $2 to $500.
BRACELETS-Ranging from $12.00 to $300.00.
^
CHALLONER & MITCHELL
DIAMOND MERCHANTS AND SILVERSMITHS
47 and 49 Gouernment St., Victoria.
J
Think of the number of typewriters that seemed popular a
few years ago.
Think of the different ones
seeking public favor to-day.
Then think of the Remington,
which has been the standard since
typewriters were invented, and
lich maintains its supremacy
ely through enduring merit.
The man who seeks experience may seek it anywhere, but
the man who heeds experience
buys the
Remington
Have you tried the new Remington escapement . lt will be a revelation to you ol the
latest and bea in typewriter achievement
Remington Typewriter Company
New York and Everywhere
REMINGTON TYPEWRITER CO.
LIMITED
542 Pender Street, Vancouver.
THE STANDARD STATIONERY CO.
1220 Government St., Victoria, B. O.
A Similarity.
"Them mosquitos," remarked Farmer Corntossel irritably, "makes me
think of them city visitors we had
week before last."
"How's that, Hiram?" asked his
patient wife.
"They come pretty near bein' the
worst singers an' the biggest eaters
I ever saw."
"Women as a sex are such poor
things," said Lady Woolseley recently, ancl she declared that they were
created out of the leavings and that
woman was made of scraps left after
the creation of man and moreover
she is two parts cat and one part
angel. THE WEEK, SATURDAY DECEMBER 14  1907.
HOLIDAY
CHINA
LAVISH   PROVISION   OF
XMAS GIFTS
We can satisfy every fancy
in the matter of holiday
gifts if something in pottery,
art glass, china or bric-a-brac
is favored in the impulse to
buy.
Never before has our collection of beautiful wares
been so large — because
never before have the
great factories of Europe
turned out such a number
of exquisite styles and we
couldn't resist buying most
of them.
You '11 appreciate this when
you come to view them and
will agree with us that while
our purchases have been
lavish every piece meets the
requirements of good taste.
Purchases Now,  and
We Shall Deliver When Yon
Wish.  Do It Now!
USEE
Are Much the Best-The Most Appreciated.
We cannot advise too strongly the wisdom of buying PRACTICAL CHRISTMAS GIFTS-articles that
are needful and useful every day of the year. Articles of usefulness, such as furniture pieces, rugs, drapes,
china, etc., will find an unusually warm welcome in any home. The utility side of the gift will be the means
of making your gift remembered and blessed many days after this Christmas has been forgotten. Newness,
style and quality, combined with money-saving prices should appeal to you whose heart is large—and purse
limited. To those citizens of moderate income this store offers innumerable GOOD THINGS at moderate prices.
For months past we have been gathering together from the world over a Christmas stock of "usefulness" such
as is not offered elsewhere in this big province. We extend to everyone a very hearty invitation to spend as
much time as possible at this store.   .* ou are most certainly welcome.
FOR THE
MEN.
QUAINT,   PRACTICAL,
DEN FURNISHINGS
The man who comes in
here with preconceived ideas
as to what he wants in den
"fittings" will have no
trouble satisfying them. The
man who comes with an open
mind will find us willing to
show him the latest grotesques and quaint bits which
are most always practical as
well as fanciful.
We make a point to secure all the new things
worth while, as they appear,
so you may drop in often
and gather in the "real
finds." Just now our line
of Tobacco Jars, Beer Steins,
Pipe Trays, etc., is exceptionally good.
The Windows Contain Gift
Suggestions of Much Merit.
Watch the Windows!
Uncommonly Nice Gifts in the Rug Section.
Uncommonly nice gifts are these beautiful new Mohair Bugs, and a gift, too, with
which any home keeper would be delighted. There isn't a better wearing or a more
artistic rug made. One would go a long way towards brightening any room. The
almost everlasting wearing qualities of these rugs means that your gift would be in
evidence long after the usual "gift ideas" have passed into nothingness.
We have made a big purchase direct from the largest manufacturers, and are in
a position to offer you some unusually good values. The range of coloring's and
sizes is very large. We shall be pleased to show you these splendid rugs if you can
spare us a moment of your time.    Shown on Second Floor.
Size 30 in. x 12 in., each $1.50
Size 36 in. x 18 in., each $2.75
Size 54 iii. x 24 ip., each $5.00
Size 64 in. x 30 in., each.
Size 72 in. x 36 in., each.
Size 72 in. x 36 in., each.
..$7.50
.$12.00
..$9.00
New Dinnerware For Your Christmas Table.
Just in time for Christmas! Fortunate, indeed, are we to be able to offer you such
unusually dainty Dinnerware for your Christmas table—and a stock pattern, too.
We have just received a big shipment of one of the prettiest Dinnerware lines we
have ever shown. This pattern we have added as an "Open Stock" to our already
large offering of these.   For a medium-priced service, you cannot equal these values.
The ware is semi-porcelain of best quality. Most people, unless they looked
corefully, would say it was china, it resembles it so closely. It is better than China,
though, because it's stronger. The decoration is a pretty wreath of pink roses and
green leaves so placed they make a most attractive decoration. A gold line around the
edges adds still further to the rich effect.
You may purchase these in sets or by the piece. The advantages of this
"Elastic" style, when some pieces are broken, will make you bless the "Open Stock."
Simply come here and replace the broken parts. No delay at all. We have made up
two sets as below.   Come in and get the prices "by the piece."
Dinner Set, 97 pieces $12.00 Dinner Set, 119 pieces $16.00
FREE-A VALUABLE BOOK
Ask for a copy of our beautiful
Book on Cut Class, "Things Beautiful." This book gives the history of
Cut Glass and illustrations showing
the process of manufacture. Tells you
how to keep and clean your Cut Glass
and gives many useful hints on table
decoration.
S~_
■MWrtom^
COMPLETE HOME FURNISHERS VICTORIA, B.C.
FREE-A CHRISTMAS HELP
We' have prepared a very interesting and helpful book on Christmas
Giving which we shall be pleased to
send or give to anyone asking for a
copy. It offers hundreds of Gift suggestions—more particularly gifts both
serviceable and sensible.
PLEASED TO SEND A COPY
loooo-oooo-doddo-doooooooo^^
Sporting
Comment.
The Victoria Hockey Club made
an auspicious commencement on Saturday last when both the ladies and
gentlemen teams won their matches.
The former defeated the Nanaimo
ladies after a very hard game by the
score of 2—0, while the men won
from Seattle rather easily. The local
ladies showed a better knowledge of
the game than they have done for
several years past, and it was very
evident that they had done considerable practicing. There are still some
minor points where they can improve
their play, but it is not expected that
they can learn everything at once
and at their next match a further
improvement will be looked for. Although they won their game, they
had no snap, the visiting ladies making them play all the time. It would
be hardly fair to criticize the individual players, but special mention
has to be made of little Miss Vincent
in goal. This young lady covered
herself with glory, making several remarkable stops and had it not been
for her brilliant work the score might
have been different. The other players did effective work and if the
ladies continue to improve as they
have clone since last season, there is
very little doubt as to where the
championship will rest this season.
The match between the Seattle and
Victoria Clubs was far from being interesting. The locals were never in
danger, during the first half scoring
sufficient goals to carry them through
without difficulty. The Seattle Club
is to be congratulated on the showing
that was made, in view of the fact
that it was ;the .first time .the players
had ever been' together. The team
is composed of several very promising players and as . the season progresses there is every reason to expect a. better showing from the visitors from across the line.
In the evening the local club entertained the visiting teams at a very
enjoyable dance in the A.O.U.W. hall.
The arrangements for the dance were
in the hands of a, capable committee
and everything ran off smoothly. The
hockey dance has now come to be
looked on as the social event of the
season and the affair on Saturday
evening was certainly in keeping with
their past efforts.
As far as the race for the championship of the City League is concerned, the Egeria team is practically
down and out. This team was expected to make a good showing but
their performances have been very
disappointing to their followers. Their
last defeat took place on Saturday
when the Esquimalt team lowered
their colours. With the Egeria team
out of the running, it appears as it
nothing can stop the James Bays from
winning the League. This club has
made a very fine showing and with
only a few more games to play it is
likely that they will land the pennant.
This afternoon will witness the
fourth match between the James Bay
and Victoria Rugby Clubs and a liard
game is looked for. This match will
bear an important part in the selection of a team to meet Vancouver the
following Saturday.
The Vancouver team is very strong
and every effort should be made to
pick the best players that can be got
together in this city. In this match
it is absolutely that all petty jealousies  should be overlooked and  every
player work for the honour of Victoria. It is not the Victoria Club,
nor the James Bay Club but Victoria
as the Capital of the Province that
has to be represented and unless the
very best team is selected, the aggregation will meet the same fate as the
teams have during the last few years.
The All-Star Vancouver Club is said
to be a wonderful combination, but
there is never a team but what there
is one better, and if the strongest
players in Victoria are selected it
would not be any surprise if thc Mainlanders are defeated. It is rumoured
on the streets that several players
who have been in harness this season
will be unable to accompany tlie team
to Vancouver. This is not as it should
be. There is hardly a player who
cannot get away from business long
enough to make the trip to Vancouver
and it is hoped that every effort will
be made to have these players in their
places when they journey to Vancouver on December 21st.
The most important match that has
ever been played in this city will be
played at Oak Bay on January 4th,
when the Stanford University team
will run up against the Victoria aggregation. This will be a notable event
in Rugby Football and it is hoped
that the citizens of Victoria will respond liberally and attend the game
in crowds. Now that the game is
assured it is up to the local players
to get busy. The Southerners will
come to Victoria in the pink of condition ancl unless the locals are able
to go the whole distance it will be
all Stanford. In the games this season the local players havc not shown
very good form in tackling. This
is one department in which there can
he a big improvement and unless the
boys learn the trick of getting their
opponents in a  proper  manner they
will certainly have a big score piled
up against them. As in the game
against Vancouver every player will
be fighting for Victoria and every
effort should be made to get in form.
In this connection it might be pointed
out that the James Bay team is in
better fettle than the members of the
Victoria Club, and it would not be a
bad idea if all the players endeavoured to get in as much road work
as possible. It might also be arranged that the players could use the
J. B. A. A. gymnasium. If this could
be secured a dummy could be set up
ancl the players given instructions in
tackling. This is absolutely essential
if the game is to be won and that is
what every lover of good clean sport
in this city is looking for. There is
not much time to get to work and
the selection committee should get to
work at once and pick their team ancl
th'en see that they get in shape. All
depends on the condition of the
players and if those who havc the
honour of being selected have the interests of the game at heart they will
leave no stone unturned in their efforts to be ready for the fray. Buck
up boys and get  busy.
news, so it is to the Moyie Leader
that Victorians are indebted for the
following item:
"Mrs. Dunsmuir of Victoria is
credited with being the most heavily
insured woman in North America, if
not in the world, carrying policies
amounting to $1,000,000."
Another Removal.
Andrew Colville, for some years
colliery superintendent at Coal Creek,
and who distinguished himself by the
evidence which he gave in the celebrated compensation case, has felt the
employ of the C. N. P. Co. and gone
east.
An arrangement has been reached
between the Amateur Federation of
Canada and the Canada Amateur
Athletic Union in regard to the amateur status of Canadian athletes for
the Olympic games. This is as it
should be, everybody unite for the
honour of Canada; let petty differences go and if Canada does not take
her share of the prizes at the contest it will  be  surprising.
Setting An Example.
Thc Conservatives of Golden know
their business, and do not shirk it.
Xot content with sending delegates
to the Vancouver Convention, they
followed the matter up by holding a
meeting on their return to hear the
report of their representatives. In
this way the interest of the Convention was kept up ancl its enthusiasm
passed on. The example of Golden
is one which could be copied with advantage by every constituency in the
Province, a delegate, like a member,
should render an account of his stewardship.
The Black Hand.
"You say you had an experience
with the black hand while in New
York?"
"Yes. And a terrible experience it
was, I had three aces and the other
man had live clubs.
An Item of News.
It still appears to be true that one
has to go away from home to learn
Our Example.
Michigan   woman  breaks  her  arm
while  spanking  her  son.    One   case
where "it hurts me more than, it does
you, my dear." 8
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1907.
■J? _fyfy<fy_%>T$!T%.<%!<%_<$?-■$? <!$?«$?
* A Lady's Letter *
Y By  BABETTE. _f
*^f 9-jj?
Dear  Madge:
There is no doubt that, to the majority of women, evening dress presents far greater possibilities of be-
comingness and attractiveness than
any other style of dress. The materials of the present day are soft,
light and delicate, and should fall in
graceful, clinging lines if properly
manipulated in the making of the
gown. Skirts are worn fairly long
all round, and lengthen into a medium
train at the back. Lace tucks, and
embroidery form the chief trimmings
and these are introduced into folds
which, in surplice or fichu effects,
form the greater part of the bodice.
Sleeves are small, and deep and
draped waistbands give the most becoming line  to  the waist.
Among the new materials, the first
place must be given to the delicately
printed or painted chiffons. One
model which attracted my attention
lately is of pale blue chiffon, with a
painted design of flowers in pale
blues and heliotropes. Bands of
this lovely design border the rounded panels that form the front and
back of the skirt, and single sprays are
placed at intervals round the skirt,
framed in the narrow lace which is
arranged in stripes, curves, and frills
on the pale blue chiffon. On the
bodice the folded bretelles, falling
over lace and chiffon sleeves, are of
the painted material, while the little
vest is finished with a heavy guipure
applique and a band of pearl and
silver embroidery.
It would really seem as though
the tailors were going to have a good
time of it at last. For years now
they have lamented, and with good
reason, the over-elaboration of the
so-called "tailor" gown, which has
very frequently been adorned with
trimmings quite as intricate as those
which have characterised the smartest
gowns supplied by the dressmakers.
Now, however, things have changed,
ancl there seems every prospect that
in the immediate future tailor gowns
will once more return to their original and severe simplicity. The
skirts will be perfectly plain and
trimmed only with some rows of
tailor-stitching, except in those cases
where braiding of various kinds will
be allowed to exercise its undoubted
charm. Round the hips, too, the
skirts of those who wish to be in advance of the fashion will fit as
smoothly to the figure as the proverbial glove. In fact, special corsets
are being made in Paris with a view
to reducing the size of the hips, while
leaving plenty of room at the waist.
This should be good news for those
who have allowed themselves to be
scared of late by the perennial bogey
of tight-lacing, more useful sometimes
to the newspapers than even the sea-
serpent in the dull season.
It is true that the tailors will be
making clpse-fitting coats cut with
very long basques, which havc almost
the effect of a second skirt, and whicli
will be moulded closely to the figure,
but this will not necessitate anything
so ridiculously out of proportion as
that contour which is indiscriminately described as a wasp-waist or an
hour-glass  figure.
That women marry for love as
much as ever they did in bygone clays
is insisted upon by a lady of my
acquaintance. The average girl of today (she says) while necessarily more
independent and vastly better informed than her grandmother, is as womanly and delicate in her attitude
toward the opposite sex as the woman of any known age. The fact
that wooing and wedding havc developed a greater elasticity in recent
years does not imply that it has become a mere artificial business. The
average modern girl marries for love.
It means this—the cap has to be
fitted to its proper owners, and not
firing indiscriminately at the sex as
common to all. There are women in
plenty who, now that some of the
reserve between the sexes has been
removed, have taken every advantage
of the freedom. They spare no feminine cleverness in bringing a husband into the net. Love, with all its
tender beauty, has no meaning for
them. They simply cast their net and
scoop out the most eligible life partners from the meshes. It is a great,
exciting game. But into its artificial
atmosphere the average modern girl
never enters. On the contrary, she is
gloriously free from the taint, "Heart"
is at the base of her life's one romance.
There is not a Jack for every Jill
and, come to that, not a Jill for every
Jack. There may be secret yearnings
in the minds of women, whose twin
soul has never come, but all the
same, the average girl of today still
asks to be loved for herself alone.
She recognizes that her one chance of
future happiness hinges upon the sincerity of the halo about her wedding.
Thorean, says: "Ignorance, and
bungling with love are better than
wisdom and skill without. Our life
without love is like coke and ashes."
Next Federal Election
By W. A.
As the time draws nearer for a
Federal General Election, the leaders
of both of the great political parties
in Victoria are naturally enough asking their friends and themselves what
the chances are for the election of
their candidates, and the placing in
power of their respective parties.
That the Conservatives will elect
their man in the city is admitted by
the large majority of the populace,
irrespective of party, and that the
Liberals anticipate this is proved by
the strenuous efforts the local organizers are making to concert any possible waverers to their allegiance.
The majority of the business element of Victoria have been, are, and
always will be, Conservative. The
residential people of independent
means can also be claimed by the
same party, and it is the weighty
vote of the working population, represented by the mechanics, the
artisan, and the labourer, that the
Liberal organizers are vainly endeavouring to swing into line.
Berides these there are the growing youth, just attaining majority and
full of the zeal and fire of first manhood.
Time was, in this Province, when
the young men required quite a bit of
advice on matters political, and the
chances for an earnest ancl hard working organizer to sway a substantial
number to his side were many. Now,
it is different; the average boy of
fifteen is as well posted in politics
as many a man of forty, and the
young man of twenty-one is as capable on conversing intelligently ancl
has as good a discrimination in
choosing his party, as the same forty-
year-old. That the young vote in
Victoria is solid on Conservative lines
the last sweeping victory in the Provincial elections in this city amply
proved, and not a single loophole has
been given the opposing party to
retrieve their position since.
The working man is aroused, ancl
bristling with anger over the Asiatic
question. He knows the attitude of
the Conservative party on the subject, for it has gone on record in a
comprehensive resolution passed at
the Convention held in Vancouver
last month, a resolution so well to the
point, so devoid of ambiguity, that
even a child may know that the Tories
of B. C. arc against the influx of
Asiatics. But no one knows the attitude or the inner thoughts of the
Liberal Government on this score, and
the average working man, the bone
and sinew of the Western world, does
a lot of thinking, and the result is
bad—very bad indeed, for the Government at Ottawa,
The recent speech of Sir Wilfrid
Laurier is so antagonistic to and contemptuous of the expressed wishes of
the people of B. C. that it is impossible for the Province to have any
confidence in his handling of thc
question.
Regarding the  other  parts  of the
Province, Vancouver has made her
record as a Conservative city, and to
judge by the trend of events, will
place a yet larger vote in the same
direction. Outlying places have been
largely kept in line by promises from
Ottawa—unfulfilled.
The people of Comox—Atlin, will
long remember the word which come
to the Central Conservative Club from
the Skeena: "No use running a man,
people crazy for G. T. P.,",which, being interpreted, meant that the general results of the general, elections
were known before the election for
that district was held. The majority
of the voters would go Government,
the plum for that part of the Province being the specific construction of
the G. T. P. at once.
The old argument that the Liberals
still hold thc popular confidence
as being evidenced by their increased
majority at the last election is annihilated. There are fifteen per cent,
more Conservatives in the city of Victoria today than there were two years
ago. There are 50 per cent, more in
the whole Province than there were
at that time. When the country, nay,
the whole world, was in a prosperous
condition, when money was plentiful
and industries were being pushed, the
vast army of toilers throughout the
Dominion were strongly averse to any
action by which the balance of harmony might be disturbed. "Good
times," especially in our West, are
like birds of passage, extremely sensitive to cold influences, and prone
to take alarm and wing their way
south at the first indications of a
storm, hence the need of careful fostering and avoidance of any act likely to disturb them. The people of
Canada, and particularly of the West,
are fully aware of these peculiarities,
hence, when affairs progress smoothly, it is deemed wise, by an immense
majority, to let well enough alone. But
now that the pricking of hard times
is again felt, when the main industries of the country are shut down
at a moment's notice, when thousands of men throughout the Dominion are forced into idleness, then
"Richard will be himself again," and
the electors, freed from the accursed
fear of "losing their jobs," will vote
for what they always knew as the
most progressive party—the Conservative.
It is not yet generally known what
a tremendous influence "Better terms"
will have in the next General Election in B. C. People have only just
begun to realize the immense importance this is to our Province. They
have begun to realize the splendid
action of one man standing alone and
fighting the question out against overwhelming odds. They have understood that this was the act of a man
of extraordinary statesmanlike attributes, and that Premier McBride is
today, a very large apple on the political tree, as he is the big apple of
B. C, that land of big apples.
Our only fear now is that his high
attainments will eventually force him I
into the Federal field, to the loss of|
the Province.
There are no Rough Seams in
"CEETEE"
UNDERWEAR
^0UNS%    fix
guaranteed
Look for the name " CEETEE " on
every garment.
M.d. In Canada by
C. TURNBULL CO.
Of Gait, Limited     aw
Qiveable
Usefuls
WANTED
TIMBER
LANDS
I have connections with Eastern
capitalists wanting timber lands, saw
mills and logging outfits. I would
like to meet cruisers or others having
these properties for sale. If you have
not money to pay for advertising or
licenses I will advance it.
E. R. CHANDLER
Suite 1 and a, Jones Building,
407 Hastings Street, Vancouver, B. C.
For Men      Y. M. C. A.
No Xmas Present could be
more appreciable to the recipient than one of these:
SUIT OASES $10 TO $25
Plain, good leather; newest
ideas.   Al values.
PITTED   SUIT   CASES  $25,
$35, $10 AND $55
Handsomely    equipped    with
toilet   requisites,   nickel   or
silver fittings.  Grand values.
MOTOR BUGS $10
Good for either the Auto or the
Steamer — all shades, the
most exclusive designs; best
values we ever handled in
high-class Rugs.
Sea & Gowen's
The Gentlemen's Store
64 Government Street, Victoria, B.C.
Best Buy.
BEST  BUY  IN  VICTORIA  OP  BUSINESS PROPERTY. WITH WATER
FRONTAGE ON JAMES BAY.
Double Corner on Wharf and Government streets, with 100 feet water
frontnge on James Bay. This property
has the Post Office to the North, the
C. P. R. Hotel to the East, Parliament
Buildings to the South, and a Steamship Company's wharf to the West of lt.
As an Hotel Site the situation of these
lots Is unrivaled ln the City of Victoria,
hundred of thousands of dollars have
been spent in valuable Improvements on
all sides of them by the Provincial Government, the City Council and the
C. P. R.   Price $62,600.
Easy terms can be arranged with deferred payments bearing interest at 7
per cent.
For further particulars apply to
A O. P. FRANCIS, Broker.
510 Pender Street,
VANCOUVER.  B. C.
STEVENS
A home for young men away from
home. Comfortable Reading Room,
Library, Game Room, Billiards, Hot
and Cold Shower Baths, Gymnasium
and efficient instruction.
Manitoba Free Press on file for
Middle West visitors.
40 BROAD STREET
VICTORIA
HOLLY TREES
Mem tr*m ____»__ to $5.00, Meordng
to sbe.   Write tor seed nd tree cata-
JAY & CO. VICTORIA, B. C.
EMPRESS
Drug Hall.
A Slur on Auntie's Manners.
She was a very pretty little girl,
with eyes of blue and hair of gold,
but she didn't like soap and water-
very much, because it was so wet, she
said.
One day she went to tea with her
auntie, ancl her hands were just ai
shade grubbier than usual. You see,
she had been going to make marbles1
from some soft asphalt that the road-
makers  had left over.
"Eflic," said her aunt, "how dirty
your hands arc! What would you saj
if Auntie came to thc table with
hands like that?"
"Oh, said the little lady of the golden locks, "I'd be too polite to say
anything about it."
Then auntie changed the subject.
IN  CAMP  OR   FIELD-AT
MOUNTAIN OR SHORE
""       There lulwiyss chines
to enjoy iome shooting
TO SHOOT WELL VOU MUST BE EQUIPPED WITH
A RELIABLE FIREARM: thi onl/ kind we hive
been miklnf for upwirdi of fifty yean.
Our Line: RIFLES, PISTOLS, SHOTGUNS,
A RIFLE TELESCOPES, ETC.      ,
Aik yonr Dealer, and Insist on the
STEVENS. Where not Sold by Retailers, we ship direct, express prepaid, upon receipt of Catalog price.
Mead for Id* Pace Uliutrnted
catalog.   An lndUpenHtble book of
"rente far am and boy
Mulled far A cent* In
ready reference
•hooter*.
■tn nip-its cover poatn-ze. Beautiful
Ten Color Hanger forwarded far
■lie cenu In itawpg.
J. STEVENS ARMS _. TOOJs CO.
P. O. Bos 4097
Chieopee Falls,
Mais., U.S.A.
The Mean Thing.
Praise from a husband's lips is always pleasant to the wife; but the
praise may be too discriminating to '
suit her. unprejudiced  judge.     I   really   don't
"I thought it was nice of you to think I am such a very good ham-
tell   that   carpenter,  who  seemed   to  merer."
think that women know nothing, that "Oh, lie knew what 1 meant," said
I could hammer nails like lightning," Mr. Morse, cheerfully. "You know
said Mrs. Morse to her husband. "But lightning never strikes twice in thc
I'm afraid, dear, that you are not an  same place, they say."
Our
Tonic Bitters
is a
Preventative of
Grippe.
GEO. A. FRASER
30 & 32 Oovernment St.
VICTORIA.
ATENTS
Ka_3ia55Ei3n^
We solicit the business of Manufacturers,
Engineers and others who realize the advisability of having their Patent business transacted
by Experts. Preliminary advice free. Charges
moderate. Our Inventor's Adviser lent upon request Marion & Marlon, Reg'd., New York Life
Bids, Montreal; and Washington, D.C., U.SJL
Leave Your Baggage Cheek* at th*
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 241.      A. E. KENT, Proprietor
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
AU kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SRSH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER  14, 1907.
sent a sketch entitled Willie, which
pleases well. Mr. Bartlett sings some
good parodies. The Hazzards have a.
nice musical act, Miss Hazzard does
some clever dancing, while Mr. Hazzard shows more than ordinary ability
as a pianist and is good in this particular line. James Dunn as a mimic
is a good entertainer and has made
a good impression throughout the
week. Miss Crawford sings in her
usual pleasing manner, "My Mother
Was a Northern Girl." A splendid
series of motion pictures makes up
a good programme and one that is
giving  good  satisfaction.
For next week the following artists
are booked. The Three Azards, a
wonderful trio of acrobats and hand
to hand balancers; Hall & Colborn,
comedy sketch artists; Dancing Davey, the best novelty dancer on the
stage; John T. Chick & Co., in their
screaming farce, Charity begins at
Home; Miss Crawford will sing "Let
Me Hear the Songs My Mother Used
to Sing," and the Pantagescope in
new pictures will complete a good
programme.
MONDAY, DECEMBER 16.
JOHN CORT presents
MAUDE FEALY
In the Great  English  Success
THE   STRONGER SEX
The Play with the Record of Seven
Solid Months at the Apollo
Theatre, London.
A Dramatic  Comedy in Three Acts
by John Valentine.
By arrangement with Mr. Otho Stuart
Prices :50c, 75c, $1.00 and $1.50.
Box office opens io a.m. Friday, December  13.
Mail orders accompanied by cheque
will receive their usual attention.
COMING-KUBELIK.
The World's Greatest Violinist, Victoria, January 7th.
I riusic and      *
I   The Drama. *
I ■*^^^$i#^^^?j?^?HNi?
The Man On the Box.
On Monday last Max Figman featured the perrenial "Man on the Box"
at  the  Victoria Theatre.    It  was  a
good show, admirably staged and well
played.    The weakest feature was in
the women folk, but Max himself was
1 inimitable   in   a   character  which   he
1 has made his own.    He has a  fine
! stage presence, and an easy rollicking   manlier   and "■"■reminds    one   of
I Charles Collette, the celebrated patter
I artist.   A crowded house was delight-
' ed with the representation which may
be written down as a great success.
"The Rollicking Girl."
On Wednesday night last Manager
Ricketts staged the Rollicking Girl at
the Victoria Theatre. It proved to
I be a popular musical comedy and at-
' traded a good house. The comedian
Snitz Edwards was very entertaining
in the part of the Viencse Wig-
maker, Schamtz, and Miss Lila Blow
both acted and sang well as Ilona.
The dresses and mounting were much
above the average, and the chorus
danced well. For a popular price show
it  was  a  good  one.
mature  years   fulfill  the  promise  of
their  childhood.
Kubelik may be said to have lived
with a violin since his borth. Since
his eighth year he has certainly lived
for it. His rise was rapid, but from
liis eighth to his twelfth year, probably no boy ever worked harder or
in a more ambitious manner. From
twelve, until he was eighteen at
Prague, Kubelik remained under the
famous master, Sevcik, during which
time he perfected that marvelous
technique which has been the despair
of his competitors, ancl the astonishment of his auditors.
At eighteen the dark, slender boy,
with the massive forehead, shaggy
black hair and long, prehensile fingers,
performed wonders on the violin,
which had been a lost chord since
the passink of Paganini. His first
visit to America in 1900 provoked the
greatest enthusiasm ever awakened
by an instrumentalist in the metro
polis. Music lovers and press united
in proclaiming that the reports cabled
from Europe has not been exaggerated in the statement of his powers.
It is indeed a fortunate thing that
Kubelik and his rare genius is to be
heard in this city during this season,
and those who are interested in the
local management should receive the
patronage of the entire community
for this visit. Kubelik lias been engaged by the Victoria Musical Society
for its concert on January 7th.
Kubelik's Career.
No other virtuoso in modern music
has risen to such an excited plane in
so short a time as has Jan Kubelik.
A little more than a decade ago, his
name had never been heard outside
the Bohemian village of Michle, in
which he was born. There hc passed
his boyhood in the humble home of
his father, a gypsy gardener. In this
obscurity without any advantages not
enjoyed by his lowly companions, the
divine talent which since has enthralled the world,  quietly flowered.
Before he reached this twentieth
year, the continent of Europe was
voicing his wonders. He had not attained his majority when America had
added its paens to the constantly
swelling praise. Early declared a
"child marvel" he speedily commanded the respectful consideration given
none but consummate artists. His
career thus has entirely overthrown
the traditions that prodigies never in
Concert.
On Thursday evening an excellent
concert, contributed entirely by local
talent, was held in Central Hall, the
proceeds which were considerable,
were donated to the funds of St.
Saviour's church.
Pantages Theatre.
The programme that is presented
at the Johnson St. Theatre this week
is all that could be desired in the
shape of a novel and refined entertainment ancl one that is pleasing the
patrons of the house in every particular.
The feature on the programme is
the Rusticano Trio of Singers and
Musicians, who have certainly delighted those who have heard them
and have made a big hit, such talented performers are seldom seen in
vaudeville, ancl it is a treat to lovers
of good music and singing to hear
such clever artists.   The Bartletts pre-
New Grand.
A strong bill arranged for the coming week is head by the four Onetti
Sisters, European specialty gymnasts
in a sensational and graceful acrobatic turn, and includes also the
Three Keltons, musical artists, featuring little Gladys, champion trick
buck dancer and Xylophone soloist;
Walter McCulloch, in his own original
one-act dramatic creation "The Absinthe Fiend"; Fairman and Raymond
in "Connubial Felicity," a satire on
married life; Augusta Nalson, high
class vocalist; Thos. J. Price, singing the illustrated song, "As Long
as the World Rolls On"; New Moving Pictures and a new overture by
the orchestra under the direction of
Mr.  Nagel.
BEDDING
PLANTS
Cheap Prices.   Get our price list.
Johnston's Seed Store
City Market.
VICTORIA
L
TRAVELLERS' GUIDE
1
VICTOBIA
Standards of "' Semi-ready.'
Tn.B       Tn.?        Ty*.G
Height
_ You could not make a coat made
(or the short man, in Type E, look
well on the latter man, in Type F
There may be a difference of six indicia his height, and there should be ;
difference of several inches in tbe lengtl
of the coat. The waist of the short
coat would set up near the shoulders
of the tall man.
_ Tht Semi-ready Physique Type
System, with its seven distinct types,
its 35 variations, and 15 sizes of each
variation—takes into account height
and weight, and alio the width and
the shape of every man.
4 A perfect lit sal > nniiM-to-iMMUM
lament at $18 to $20 an J $25. Better
tutored tbaa any custom tailor ess
f—My Jo it ia Lie bacV shop.
TU SiiHi of Sunt
B. WILLIAMS & CO.,
Sole Agents
Yates Street     -     -     Victoria, B.C.
STRAND HOTEL
VICTORIA
The home ol nil theatrical and raudev lie
artists while in the Capital city, alto of
other kindred bohemians.
WRIGHT & FALCONER, Praprl.tors.
CAMBORNE
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining men and
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
BANFF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
Banff's Most Popular $_ a Day Hotel
, Close to Station and Sulphur
Baths.
N. K. LUXTON, Proprietor.
PHOENIX.
Deane's Hotel
PHOENIX, B. C.
New. Modern hot water system. Ulectrlt
lighted. Tub and shower baths and laundry in
connection.   The miners'home.
" DANNY " DBANE, Proprietor
ROSSLAND
Hoffman House
ROSSLAND, B. C.
Rates {1.00 per day and up.   Cafe in
Connection.
QREEN & SrilTH. Prop's.
NELSON.
HOTEL HUME
NELSON,   B. C,
Leading Hotel of the Kootennyi.
J. FRED HUME,       -       Proprietor.
Silver King Hotel,
NELSON. B. C.
The home of the Industrial Workers
ofthe Kootenays.
W. E. ncCandllsh,
Proprietor
Royal Hotel
NELSON, B. C.
The Best Family Hotel in Ur. City.
$1,90 a day.
Mrs. Wm. Roberts,
Proprietress
When You
Want a Drink
Don't forget to visit
The Vernon Bar
P. JENSEN, Proprietor.
Travellers  knew "The Vernon"
well, and they will find the bar in \
the same place, opposite Victoria j
Theatre, Cor. of Douglas and View. ,
WEEK DECEMBER 16TH
The New Grand
SULLIVAN * COMISIHI.    Pronators.
Manai.in.nt af HOST. jAXISON.
THE FOUR ONETTI SISTERS
European Specialty Gymnasts.
THE THREE KELTONS
Novelty Musical Act.
WALTER McCULLOCH
One  Man  Drama  shdlu  shrdluuu
One-Man  Drama
"THE ABSINTHE FIEND."
FAIRMAN AND RAYMOND
Comedy Sketch
AUGUSTA MALSON
Refined Vocalist.
THOS. J. PRICE, Sonfe Illustrator
"As Long As the World Rolls On."
NEW MOVING PICTURES
"Harbadk in Yellowstone."
"The Athletic Dude."
t
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M. Nagel, Director.
Pantage's
Theatre
JOHNSON STREET
VICTORIA, B. C.
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE
Matinees (any part ot house).... 10c
Evenings,  Balcony   lOo
Lower Floor  20c
Boxes    10c
Matinees
Every Afternoon
at
3 O'CIock.
Night Performances
8 and 9.15
POTOTBT XEEPXVQ PATS.
Readers or our magazine, because lt
teaches the best methods of handling
fowls for profit. Tells how to get ens
ln winter, and raise chicks In summer.
Shows house-plans, handy appliances,
etc., as well as Illustrating and describing the different breeds. Every Issue
worth the price of a year's subscription.
We will send lt one year and Include a
large book on poultry for BOc. Sample
free. Poultry Advocate, Petrolea, Ontario.
NOTICE
MESSRS. WILLIAMS & JANION
Duly in structed by Courian, Babayau
& Co., will dispose of a large quantity
of their well known stock of Oriental
Rugs, Carpets, Portiers, Embroideries,
Benares ware, etc., etc., next week.
The Auctioneer   - Stewart Williams.
COAL
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo Collierici.
New Wellington Coal.
The best household coal in tho marke   at
Current ratei.   Anthracite coal for sale.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA
Holland French and
Japan Bulbs
For Fall Planting.
SEEDS, TREES, PLANTS
for the farm, garden, lawn, boulevard or conservatory. Acclimated
stock. Oldest established nursery on
the Mainland of B. C.   Catalogue free.
M. J. HENRY,
3010 Westminster Rd, Vancouver, B.C. 10
ZTHE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1907.
Musings Without
Malice.
By LALLY BERNARD.
Have you ever tried to write exactly what you think? It sounds easy,
but is extremely difficult. You may
imagine that you can pen six paragraphs without a sort of sub-conscious attempt to write what someone
wants you to say, but it is only one
mon or one woman in a thousand who
can divest themselves of that obnoxious "inner vision" of the reader
who may scan what they read and
find fault with it. A woman journalist is nothing but a woman, who as
a little girl has most likely been
trained in that school, which means
"hush dear, little girls should not say
those sort of things." You know
what I mean, you who are scanning
these lines! that is if you are a woman, and not an American woman!
for the real secret of the "Charming
American" is the absolute and entire
candour with which she expresses
opinions which she has never been
trained during childhood to confine
to the ideas which children "ought
to express." I am not defending the
American child, usually they "upset
the apple cart" of dignified society.
I just point out the fact, that it is
extremely hard for the ordinary Canadian, or Englishwoman, to really
say just what she thinks on matters
in general. I don't know that you
would like hre if she did—she is not
an easy sort of person to pair off for
a dinner party and she is distinctly
upsetting at a five o'clock tea. The
girl who has been brought up in a
"hush dear" school, is really an easier
sort of being to adjust in society.
Oh, for a page of "unsaid" "unwritten thoughts," something that have
been bottled up for half a lifetime,
something that would be fatal to further conversation and, so to speak,
turn the world up side down. I must
confess to a sort of malicious admiration for the dreadful small boy, who,
for the joy of saying what he thinks,
really and truly thinks, gets his head
punched by another boy, . r receives
the chastisement due to his audacity
on another part of his anatomy, from
an enraged adult. He is extremely
likely to grow into a wide-awake and
courageous citizen, for he knows full
well that it is stimulating, r 'ier than
depressing, to receive the due reward
of his freedom of speech.
So much then for an excuse lor
musing at random on everything in
general and nothing in particular, using the medium of print and paper,
just because one has been trained in
a school, which means the sc.ling up
of thoughts when face to face with
those who do not agree with them.
I make no excuse, for this species
of cowardness is so common that one
knows full well that tliere are thousands of men and women in exactly
the same sort of terror when they
meet their human kind in the ordinary   run  of  every-day  intercourse.
I have always been interested in
Spiritism—perhaps mainly through
the fact that some of my ancestors
who had nothing else to bequeath me,
left mc with the intolerable legacy
of a sort of "second sight"—and the
only reason that I have not devoted
more time to the study of pyschical
research is that it produces physical
conditions which are horribly uncomfortable, and secondly that lhe human
beings who surround one, are quite
as difficult to reach and understand,
as disembodied spirits—more so perhaps—who does not know that wail
of some one who has lost their nearest and dearest." Oh, if I had only
understood." Mow why don't we understand? What is the great mystery—that is why democracy is hard
at work trying to down barriers between sections of human beings, and
in nine cases out of ten, the people
who are most actively engaged in
trying to down these barriers between
sections in society, are neglecting thc
barriers which exist between themselves and those  nearest  to them.
The art of living is complex;
Shakespeare asserted that love was
"blind." Well, perhaps love is, but
blind people are extraordinarily sen
sitive, and they use the "fifth sense"
where we don't really try to use the
first!
The reason that I don't like the
idea of suffrage for women, is that we
should lose more than we should
gain. I am not quite sure that privileges are not more precious than
"rights." I say I am not sure, not
quite certain to be strictly honest—
and we have privileges which we are
in danger of losing as we enter the
maelstrom of public affairs. I claim
for women thc privilege of idleness,
complete and entire—and I know that
many busy women wil! combat this
idea—but the reason is: we are not
constituted as men are, and what is
more, I am not sorry that we are
not. Our intuition is stronger than
our logic, and our intuition has saved
many a dire situation. This power
of divination goes from us, in the
tumult of public life, and our endeavour to understand fully, what the
registration of our "vote and influence" would mean. One does not understand, from the point of view of
cold reason, why our brains should
not be just as powerful as the brains
of men, perhaps they are, certainly
the average woman, is the equal of
the average man, but it must be that
"brute force" or "physical force"—is
allowed to dominate this world. I
only know that the perfect human
being is the man who has a sort of
feminine strain of sympathy and understanding, and that in moments of
peril you turn to him, rather than to
one of your own sex, with a faith
which is not altogether the result of
long centuries of training. This is
honest—it may be extremely bad for
men to hear, but the right men who
hear it, will understand, and the
others don't matters in the least! I
would have women privileged to have
delicious hours of pure idleness, when
all their brain forces are at rest, and
(Continued on Page Eleven)
LICENCE TO AN EXTRA-PROVINCIAL
COMPANY.
"Companies Act, 1897."
Canada:
Province of British Columbia.
No.   417.
THIS Is to certify that "The New
Zealand Insurance Company" is authorised and licensed to carry on business
within the Province of British Columbia, and to carry out or effect all or any
of the objects of the Company to which
the legislative authority of the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company is
situate at the City of Auckland, in the
Oolony of New Zealand.
The amount of the capital of the
Company ls one million pounds, divided
into ten thousand shares of one hundred uounds each.
The head office of the Company in
this Province is situate at Victoria, and
James Hill Lawson, merchant, whose
address is Victoria ,B.C is the attorney
for the Company.
Given under my hand and seal of
office at Victoria, Province of British
Columbia, tills 28th day of November,
one  thousand  nine  hundred  and  seven.
(L. S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has  been  established  and  licensed  are:
To carry on the business of fire and
marine insurance in all its branches or
such of those branches as the Company shall from time to time determine,
ii nil to do all such other things as are
incidental or conducive to the attainment of those objects.
Doc.   14.	
TAKE NOTICE that A. W. Harvey.
of Victoria. B.C., land surveyor, Intends
to apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for permission to
purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted on the
north bank of the Kispoix River, fifty
milps above Hazelton; thence following
the sinuosities of the north bank of the
Kispoix River, lirst southerly and then
northerly about four miles to a post
due east nf the point of commencement;
thence east 58.22 chains to point of
(•ommencement, eontalnlng ISO aeres,
more or less.
Dnted September 12th, 1(107.
Oct. Ill ARTHUR W. HARVEY.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE notice that George Young
and Arthur Bell of Victoria. B.C.. Timber Denlers, intend to apply for special
license over the following described
lands on the Sheemahantz River. Rivers
Inlet:
No.  1 Commencing at n post planted
nn the south bnnk of the Sheemahantz
River at the northwest corner, being ono
mile east and 10 ehnlns south of tbe
mouth of Evelyn River; thence east 120
ehains; thence south 40 chains; thenee
west SO ehnlns; thenee south 40 ehains;
thence west 40 chains; thence north SO
chains to point of commencement.
Nov.   iltli,   1007.
No. 2—Commencing at a post pbnte*l
on the south bnnk of the Sheemahantz
River, flve chains west of the mouth
of Marvel Creek, being the southeast
corner, thenee west 0*1 ehains: thenee
north 100 chnins; thence oast (14 ehains;
thenee south 100 chains to point of
commencement.
Nov.  Sth.  1007.
No. 3—Commencing at 0 pnst planted
10 chains east of the southeast corner
of T. L. 140(5.ri. and about one and one-
half mlles west of the Neechantz River
being the northeast corner post; thenee
sonth 100 ehains; thence west IM chains;
thenee north 100 ehains: thence west (14
chains tn point of commencement.
GEORGE YOUNO & ARTHUR BELL,
Dee. 11 George Young, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Harry McMicken
Keefer of Vancouver, occupation Broker,
Intends to apply for permission to lease
the  following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on the
N. E. Coast of Savary Island and about
25 chains from the easterly end of the
Island, thence west 20 chains to low
water mark; thence south 400 chains
along low water mark; thence east 20
chains to high water mark; thence north
400 chains to point of commencement,
and containing eight hundred acres,
more or less.
Dated  Dec.  2nd,  1907.
Dec 14      HARRY  McMICKENKEEFER.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick Patrick Rogers of Vancouver, occupation
carpenter, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner of Lot 1347, G. I., New
Westminster district; thence west 20
chains; thence north 20 chains; thence
east 20 chains; thence south 20 chains
to point of commencement, containing
40 acres more or less.
Dated  November  26th,   1907.
FREDERICK PATRICK ROGERS.
Dec.14
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a licence to prospect for
coal  on  the  following  described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the claim of S. A.
Ramsay, being about sixteen miles west
of McCoy's Cove on the north side of
Cumshewa Inlet. Moresby Island, Queen
Charlotte Islands Group; thence north
80 chains; west SO chains; south SO
chains; east 80 chains back to the place
of eommeneement, containing 640 acres.
Located this 4th day of December,
A.D.  1907.
WALTER  B.   PITFIELD.
Dec. 14 A. A. McPhail, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for coal
on  the following described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
miles west of the northwest corner of
the claim of S. A. Ramsay, being about
eighteen miles west of McCoy's Cove
on the north side of Cumshewa Inlet,
Moresby Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence south SO chains; east SO
chains: north SO chains; west 80 chains
back to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located this 4th day of December,
A.D.   1907.
JOHN A. McMASTER,
Dec.   14 A.  A.   McPhail,   Agent.
 *	
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a licence to prospect for
eoal  on  the  following described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the claim of John
John A. McMaster, being about eighteen
miles west of McCoy's Cove on the
north side of Cumshewa Inlet, Moresby
Island, Queen Charlotte Islands Group;
thenee north 80 chains; east SO chains;
south SO chains; west 80 chains back
to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located this 4th day of December,
A.D.   1907.
J. A. HINTON,
Dec. 14 A. A. McPhail, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a licence to prospect
for coal on the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the claim of John
A. McMaster, being about eighteen miles
west of McCoy's Cove on the north side
of Cumshewa Inlet, Moresby Island,
Queen Charlotte Islands Group; thence
south SO chains; west 80 chains; north
80 chains; east 80 chains back to the
place of commeneement, containing 640
acres.
Located this 4th day of December,
A.D. 1907.
THOMAS COOPER,
Dec.14 A.   A.   McPhail,   Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for coal
on   the  following  described   lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the claim of John
A. McMaster, being about eighteen miles
west of McCoy's Cove on the north side
of Cumshewa Inlet, Moresby Islands,
Queen Charlotte Islands Group; thence
north SO chains; west SO ehains; south
SO chains; east SO chains back to the
place of commencement, containing 640
acres.
G. A. FRASER,
Dec. 14 A. A. McPhail, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for
coal  on  the  following described   lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
miles west of the northwest corner of
the claim of John A. McMaster, being
ahout twenty miles west of McCoy's
Cove, on the north side of Cumshewa
Inlet, Moresby Island, Queen Charlotte
Islands Group; thonce south SO chains;
cast .sO chains; north SO chains; west
SO chains back to the place of commeneement. eontalnlng 640 acres.
C.  J.  SPRATT,
Doc.   14 A.  A. McPhail,  Agent.
NOTICE Is nereby given that thirty
days after date 1 Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a licence to prospect for
coal  oil  the  following described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the claim of C. J.
Spratt, being about twenty miles west
of McCoy's Cove, on the north side
of Cumshewa Inlet, Moresby Island,
Queen Charlotte Islands Group; thenee
nnrth SO ehains; east SO chains; south
SO chains; west SO chains back to the
place of commencement, containing 640
acres.
located this 4th day of December,
A.D.   1007.
J. W. RUTLEDGE,
Dee.   14 A.  A.  McPhail,  Agent.
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
davs after date I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds
and Works for a license to prospect for
conl   on   the   following  described   lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the claim of C. J.
Spratt. being about twenty miles west
of McCoy's Cove on the north side of
Cumshewa Inlet, Moresby Island. Queen
Charlotte Islands Group; thence south
80 chains; west 80 chains; north 80
chains; east SO chains back to the place
of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located this 4th day of December,
A.D. 1907.
D. C. McDONALD,
Dec.  14 A. A. McPhail, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a licence to prospect for
coal  on  the following described  lands:
Commencing at a post pla.ited two
miles north of the northwest corner
of the claim of Robert Hamilton, being
about six miles north of the Cowgitz
mines on the north shore of Skiedgate
Inlet on Slate Chuck Creek, Graham
Island, Queen Charlotte Islands Group;
thence south 80 chains; east 80 chains;
north SO chains; west 80 chains back to
the place of commencement, containing
640 acres.
Located this 26th day of November,
A.D. 1907.
J. H. YOUNG,
Dec. 14 A. A. McPhail, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for
coal  on  the following described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the claim of J. H.
Young, being about six miles north of
tho Cowgitz mines on the north shore
of Skidegate Inlet, on Slate Chuck Creek,
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence south SO chains; west 80
chains; north 80 chains; east 80 chains
back to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located this 26th day of November,
A.D.  1907.
J.  F.  YOUNG,
Dec 14 A. A. McPhail, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal
on the following described lands:
Commencing at the post planted at
the northwest corner of the claim of
J. H. Young, being about six miles north
of the Cowgitz Mines on the north shore
of Skidegate Inlet, on Slate Chuck Creek,
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence north SO chains; east 80
chains; south 80 chains; west 80 chains
back to the place of commencement,
containing 640 acres.
Located this 26th day of November,
A.D. 1907.
FRED. YOUNG,
Dec. 14 A.  A.  McPhail,  Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for coal
on  the  following described   lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the claim of J.
H. Young, being about six miles north
of the Cowgits Mines on the north
shore of Skidegate Inlet, on Slate Chuck
Creek, Graham Island, Queen Charlotte
Islands Group; thence north SO chains;
west 80 chains; south 80 chains; east
80 chains back to the place of commencement containing 640 acres.
Located this 26th day of November,
A. D. 1907.
ROBERT YOUNG,.
Dec. 14 A. A.  McPhail, Agent.
foreshore lands in Rivers Inlet, commencing at a post planted on the east
bank of a small creek at the heaf of
Rivers Inlet on the south shore, being
the southeast corner post; thence southwesterly along high water mark for 30
chains; thence north 10 chains; thence
north easterly 30 chains; thence south
10 chains to point of commencement;
containing thirty acres more or less.
Staked Nov. 18, 1907.    ,
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL,
George Young, Agent,
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
and Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C., Timber Dealers, intend to apply for the
rite to purchase the following described
lands In Kildalla Bay, Rivers Inlet; commencing at this post planted on the east
side of the Bay about one-third of a
mile from the point at the mouth of the
Bay, being the southwest corner post;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 90 chains to beach;
thenee south along beach to point of
commencement; containing 40 acres,
more or less.
Staked Nov.  25, 1907.
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL.
Dec- 7 George Young, Agent.
LICENSE     TO     EXTRA-PROVINCIAL
COMPANY.
COAST  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that James Rendall,
of Darrington, Washington, by occupation, a laborer, Intends to apply for a
special timber licence over the following described lands: Situate in the vicinity of KIngeome Inlet:
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner, being at Francis Point,
south shore of KIngeome Inlet; thence
south 40 chains; thenee east 80 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 40 chains more or
less to shore; thence ln a westerly direction, following shore line, to point
of commencement.
Dated October 9th,  1907.
Nov.   9 JAMES  RANDALL.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that Horace Bunnell,
of Vancouver occupation, Timber
Cruiser. Intends to apply for a "cecial
timber licence over the following described   lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
280 chains north of the southeast corner of lease number 222; thence east
one hundred and sixty (160) chains:
thence north forty (40) chains; theme
west nne hundred and sixty chains;
thence south forty (40) chains to place
of  commencement.
Staked  October  28th,  1007.
Nov. 30 HORACE BUNNELL.
DISTRICT OF CASSIAR.
TAKE NOTICE that The Hidden
Creek Mining Co., or Vancouver, occupation, *— , intends to apply for permission to lease the following described
land, about 3 acres:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south east corner post of Lot 479; thence
north one chain; thence southwesterly
parellel to high water mark, about 30
chains to west boundary of Lot 479;
thence south about one chain forty links
to high water mark and thence along
high water mark to point of commencement.
Dated Nov. 25th, 1907.
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Dec. 7 Per J. Herrick MacGregor.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
and Arthur Bell of Victoria, B. C, Timber Dealers, intend to apply for the
rite to lease the following described
foreshore lands, commencing at a post
planted at the northeast corner about
one hundred feet west from the mouth
of a small creek on the north shore
of Owekano River or about 250 yards
east of the small island at its mouth;
thence westerly for 25 chains along high
water; thence north 4 chains to the
post of the B. C. C. Co. (October 28),
thence west 30 chains; thence south 20
chains; thence east 30 cmalns; thence
north 10 chains; thence east 25 chains;
thence north 10 chains to point of commeneement, containing 75 acres, more
or less.
November  18,  1907.
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL,
George Young, Agent,
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
and Arthur Bell of Victoria, B.C., Timber Dealers, intend to apply for the
rite   to   lease   the   following   described
"Companies Act, 1897."
canada7~ )
Province of British Columbia. )
No. 414.
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that "The
British and Canadian Land Company,
Limited," is authorised and licensed to
carry on business within the Province
of British Columbia, and to carry out
or effect all or any of the objects of
the Company to which the legislative
authority of the Legislature of British
Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company is
situate at the City of Toronto, in the
Province of Ontario.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is flve hundred thousand dollars, divided into flve thousand shares
of one hundred dollars each.
The head office of the Company in
this Province is situate at Victoria, and
Charles W. Wilson, gentleman, whose
address ls Victoria, B.C., is the attorney
for the Company.
Given under my hand and seal of
office at Victoria, Province of British
Columbia, this 21st day of November,
one  thousand  nine hundred  and  seven.
(L. S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which the Company
has been established and licensed are:
1. To deal in lands and real and
personal property, as principals as well
as agents or 'factors for others, in the
Dominion of Canada and elsewhere, and
to acquire the same upon such terms as
may be agreed upon, and to pay therefor
in cash or in paid-up non-assessable
shares in the capital stock of the Company;
2.,To acquire, own, lease, sell and dispose of shares, debentures and securities in any other companies engaged in
the same business which this Company
is authorised to carry on, and to purchase the assets of such other companies or of any persons doing a similar
business, and to pay for the same,
wholly or In part in cash, non-assessable
shares, bonds or securities of the Company;
3. To issue bonds or debentures in
such amounts,, for such purposes and
bearing such rate of Interest as the
majority of shareholders may determine,
and to secure the same by transferlng
to a trustee or to trustees the whole
or part of the Company's property, real
or personal, movable or immovable.
4. To sell, improve, lease, divide,
mortgage, charge or dispose of or otherwise deal with all or any part of the
property of the Company, whether real
or personal:
5. To take and accept mortgages,
charges and liens on real or personal
property, or any other security whatever, and bearing interest or otherwise,
as the Company may see fit, from purchasers or debtors of the Company, and
to sell, assign or otherwise dispose of
all or any of such securities, and to
borrow money, draw, make, accept, endorse and execute any bills of exchange,
promissory notes, bonds, debentures,
guarantees and evidences of indebtedness of all kinds or other negotiable
securities, and to secure the same by
mortgages or otherwise upon the property or assets of the Company, and
generally to use Its credit In any other
way for the purpose of facilitating the
conduct of any business which the Company is authorised to perform:
6. To amalgamate with any other
company having objects similar to those
of the Company, or to sell or otherwise
dispose of the undertaking, or any part
thereof, for such consideration as the
Company shall see fit, and in particular for the bonds, shares, debentures,
stock or securities of any other company having objects similar to those of
the Company:
7. To apply the bonds, debentures,
funds and capital stock of the Company,
and to issue fully paid-up shares of
the Company in payment or part payment of the purchase price of any property, real or personal, acquired by the
Company, or of the goodwill, rights and
franchises in the same or in payment for
services rendered and work performed
for the Company, and in the purchase of
the bonds, stocks, property or assets of
any other company or companies having
objects similar to those of the Company,
and carrying on business in the Dominion of Canada or elsewhere:
8. To advance money to purchasers
or lessees of the Company's lands for
building purposes or for improvements,
and to take mortgages, hypothecs, liens
and charges to secure payment of the
purchase money of any property sold
by the Company, or of any money due
to the Company from purchasers for
building purposes or other improvements, and to sell or otherwise dispose
of satd mortgages, hypothecs, liens and
charges, and temporarily, and pending
the obtaining of investments therefor
in the manner hereinbefore provided for,
to invest the surplus funds of the Company In such approved securities as
trustees are usually authorised to invest funds which are entrusted to them.
Dec. 7      	
DISTRICT   OF  CASSAIR.
TAKE NOTICE that The Hidden Creek
Mining   Co.,   of  Vancouver,   occupation,
 , intends to apply for permission
to  lease   the  following  described  land,
about 40 acres:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of Lot 479; thence following high water mark south and
west to the southeast corner of Lot 308;
thence east five chains; thence north
and east following a line parallel to
high water mark about 80 chains to a
point 5 chains south of point of commencement and thence to said point of
commencement.
Dated Nov. 25th, 1907.
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Dec. 7 Per J. Herrick MacGregor. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14,  1907.
11
Musings Without Malice
(Continued from Page Ten)
they are storing up the force which
is their peculiar dower—that "something" which is akin to a storage battery or reservoir of unexplainable, unthinkable influence. There is no
word which will suit its quality; it
is an essence and its distilling a secret process which no brain can quite
penetrate. Too vague to be called
reverie, too intangeable for dissection.
Those women who have nearly reached the "heights" in this world, will
understand its significance—the woman who knits, knows something of
it—ask her what she has been thinking of, and ten chances to one she
will answer "nothing." The woman
who sits by the fire-side, with a sleeping infant cradled in her arms, crooning softly to herself as she looks into
the flames, will answer you just in
the same way. She is honest—she
does not know, but some day the
world knows, when her unconcious
gathering of force makes itself felt—
you cannot discuss this subject, for it
goes too deep into the "isms" of life.
But we Canadian women must, if
necessary, struggle to secure for ourselves these hours of absolute and
entire idleness—it means so much, in
a country in the process of making
—it means that we endow our children
with a force to combat the nerve
troubles which lead to excess in any
direction. Our democratic phase of
society leaves us all in a curious state
of unrest. We try to compass too
much, and fail to recognize our limitations. The fierce pride of the old
class distinctions in the British Isles
were not without their uses as well
as abuses. The wife of the proud
yeoman had none of the struggle and
tumult of modern society. She was
just as exclusive in her own way, as
the wife of the squire. The pride of
the members of the City of London
Guilds prevented them from ever
"aping the quality" they were secure
on their own ground, and wanted no
wider field. Serenity and clearly defined class distinctions prevented the
nervous strain of the present day,
which wears so many people to death.
It was Napoleon who said; "Nothing
is stolen—everything is paid for,"
and we pay for our extraordinary social evolution, which is not an unmitigated blessing, in some respects.
I remember with much amusement,
a citizen of one of the most terribly
"energised" of Western Canadian
cities, confided to me that "it was
waste of time to go to Victoria, it
was quite dead and had been dead
for some years!" I looked at his
nerve-racked face, and wondered what
his estimate of the life of a man or
of a city meant—Victoria is in reality
blest. You do not see the driven expression on the faces of its people
which is so common in our Eastern
Canadians, and the inhabitants of the
great American cities. Possibly that
Nor-Westerner had come across the
Dump-heap on the James Bay flats—
it is certainly the first thing which is
apt to strike one's delicate olefactory
nerves, and he may have thought that
the whole of Victoria was in a state
of decomposition! I really should not
wonder.
But—joking apart—this particular
portion of the great province should
produce a race of people with steady
nerves and placid temperaments—a
most magnificent asset in the building
of a new nation. It is quite true that
the prices you pay for food and lodging, render this no Elderado for the
worker who earns a modest wage. I
speak of course of the "modest" wage
of that inferior section of the community, who are found engaged in
professional work, and journalism,
etc—work which it is true entails a
large expenditure before you are allowed to practice your business, but
, which we all recognise as of quite
secondary importance to the occupations of driving dust carts, etc.
I notice that barbers' shops and
real estate offices are numerous in
this beautiful city. One can only
suppose that people are anxious to
get rid of the burden which housekeeping entails. The boarding-houses
indicate the same state of affairs, and
it appears that the luxurious male inhabitants of the place, are ready and
willing to let some one wield the
razor for them, for the paltry sum
which that luxury entails, but the Socialistic spirit cannot tolerate the idea
of the wives and mothers of the race
requiring household help at a reasonable price, for such little burdens, as
the carrying of firewood, scrubbing
and washing! Oh, no—what does it
matter, a delicately built woman may
stand in the drizzling rain and heave
up armfuls of "waste wood" from the
saw-mills, into the window of a woodshed, but the husband finds it economical to have his chin shaved by a
barber—his time is too precious for
this important toilet adornment—he
most likely has to attend a meeting
where the iniquity of allowing the
Chinese to enter the Province is in
session. There are fees to be paid
for the up-keep of the organizing secretary of his "Union," a fee that
would go far towards paying for the
"China boy" who might help his wife
with the arduous and never-ending
duties of the household and leave her
leisure to see more of the children.
But no, a sort of wave of absolute
selfishness seems to envelope those
who clamour loudly for the exclusiveness of the only available help in
households. They do not see that
they are hurting the very core of
community life—the home. It does
not matter if the mother, forced to
work from morning until night, finds
but little time to look after the
youngsters, who, left to themselves,
find heir recreation in the streets.
Talk of the "yellow peril"—the peril
which besets this country lies in the
waning influence of the parents in the
home. Juvenile courts are an outcome of this state of affairs. We hear
on every side of petitions for legislation which will curb the evils among
children, who have become as it were,
"wards of the street." Good, wholesome food, at a reasonable price, eggs,
butter and milw, in plenty, and the
companionship of the parents instead
of street companions, would remedy
many of the evils of which we read.
I once heard a police court missionary in London, England, speak
on the subject of juvenile criminals,
and he asserted that one of the roots
of this class of crime was to be found
in the everlasting "errands" on which
children were sent. How on earth is
a hard-driven mother to avoid sending her children on errands if she
has no leisure—and perhaps an infant in arms—to prevent her doing
the necessary shopping herself? An
over-driven woman is not a fascinating companion, for either adult or
child. You seek your recreation elsewhere if you are a wise man, but are
you a "wise man" if you put burdens
on shoulders which are not fit to bear
them? To be a good housekeeper,
good house-drudge and home-maker
at the same time, would be an accomplishment which would be impossible
for any man, and more than impossible for the woman who brings children into the world. We talk a great
deal about the problems of "nation
building," but it strikes me that we
are trying to legislate for everyone
but the real "nation builder"—the
mother of men.
The Vision.
Long  had  she knelt  at  the  Madonna's
shrine,
Within   the   empty   chapel,   cold   and
gray;
Telling her beads, while grief with marring line
And   bitter  tear  stole  all   her   youth
away.
Outcast was she from what Life hnldeth
dear,
Banished   from   joy  that  other  souls
might win;
And  from  the dark beyond  she  turned
with fear,
Being so branded by the mark of sin.
Yet when at last she raised her troubled
face,
Haunted    by    sorrow,    whitened    by
alarms;
Mary leaned down from out the pictured
place,
And laid the lleele Christ within her
arms.
Rosy  and  warm  she  held  Him  to   her
heart,
She—the   abandoned   one—the   thing
apart.
—Virna Sheard, in The Canadian
Magazine.
Binks (who ordered a pancake half
an hour previously):   "Er—I say, will
that pancake be long?"
Waitress: "No, sir; it'll be round."
Then  he  waited  patiently  another
half-hour.
This
Self-Working
Washer
SENT FREE
For One
Full Month
on
Trial
Union SS. eo., of B. £.
LIMITED.
This Company ls not supported by
Government subsidies, but by the goodwill and patronage of the travelling
public and shippers.
Steamers leave Company's wharf for
Van Anda, Lund, Herlot Bay, Hoslcyn
Inlet, Surge Narrows. Granite Point,
Ilk Bay. Hardwick Island, Bear
River, Salmon River, Port Harvey
and all logging camps every Monday
at t p. m.
Only Asks Consideration on Its Merits
Let the Machine Speak For Itself
The 1900 Self-Working Washer pays for itself in what it saves
for you.
That is what I claim for it and what I am prepared to establish.
If after 30 days' trial you feel that the machine is not al] it is
represented to be, send it back at my expense.
If you keep it, you can if you wish, pay for it in weekly or
monthly instalments, out of what it saves for you.
This machine will make you independent of laundries and
washer-women, and save you worry with your maid.
It will take care of your lingerie, and wash spotlessly all heavy
garments besides.
It cannot wear out clothes or break buttons. There is no
rubbing, stretching or tearing.
The 1900 SelfWorking Washer washes by driving the soapy
water through the threads of the clothes, just as if you held them
under a high water fall of soapy water.
All that is necessary to start the machine is to turn a water
faucet or an electric light key. As soon as a tubful of clothes is
washed a twist of your fingers switches the power to the wringer
and wrings the clothes out.
Your maid can have a big washing out before 9 o'clock in the
morning without any drudgery, fretfulness or dissatisfaction.
Remember, you can test the truth of this without it costing
you a penny.
Write for the machine today or send for my illustrated washer
book.
ADDRESS ME:
V. W. S. BACH, Mgr. 1900 WASHER CO.
355 YONGE STREET, TORONTO 645
IMPORTS   OF   CHAMPAGNE
FROM JANUARY 1ST TO DECEMBER 1ST (llmonths)
1906 1907
Cases Cases
G. H. Mumm & Co    96,703 108,574
Moet & Chandon       64,397 70,204
Pommery & Greno Co     36,454 44,967
Vye Clicquot     24,252 37,027
The above facts will show that Mumm's is still
in the lead. "Unrivalled!" "Unequalled!"
"Unexcelled!" is the connoisseurs' verdict on
MUMM'S CHAMPAGNE,-the Wine of Kings
and people who know.
For your Xmas Dinner you '11
require Mumm's. If your
dealer   cannot   supply   you
Phone
PITHER & LEISER
Sole Agents.
FIGURES TELL THE TALE-
Van Anda, Lund, Lewis Channel. Shoal
Bay, Port Neville, Port Harvey, Chatham Channel, Tribune Channel,
Broughton Island, every Thursday
at 8 p. m.
Pender Harbor, Nelson Island. Marble
Bay, Blubber Bay, Lund. Manions,
Whalstown, Read Island, Bute Inlet,
every Monday at 11 a. m.
Welcome Pass, Pender Harbor, Agamemnon Channel, Hotham Sound, Vancouver Bay, Deserted Bay, Jervis
Inlet, every Friday at 9 a. m.
Sechelt, Buccaneer Bay, Nelson Island,
Granite Island, Van Anda, Marble
Bay, every Saturday at 1 p in.
PRINCE RUPERT, PORT ESSINGTON (for Hazelton); PORTLAND
CANAL, ALERT BAY, HARTLY
BAY and Cannery Points.
on 1st, 10th and 20th Each Month
by nsw steel-built steamer
CAMOSUN
This steamer ls built ln watertight
compartments, with double bottom to
Insure the safety of passengers ln case
of collision or wreck.
For berths and passage apply
tt Wharf Street, Carrall Street,
Victoria. Vancouver.
EDUCATIONAL.
ST. ANDREW'S
COLLEGE
TORONTO
A ■•aldeatlal aad Day School lor Boys
Handsome New Buildings. Larg"
Athletic Field. Carelul Oversight in
every Department. First Class Staff.
Lower and Upper School. Boys prepared for the Universities and Business.
Calendar sent on Request.
Rev. D. Bruce Macdonald, M.A..LL.D-
Principal
AUTUMN   TERM   COMMENCES
SEPTEMBER 11TH 1907.
UPPER CANADA
COLLEGE   TORONTO
TIMBER
If you have any
timber for sale
list it with us
We can sell it
BURNETT, SON  & CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,   B. C.
P
il 1 t__ J\ I -3  and Trade Marks
obtained in all countries.
Autumn Term begins Wednesday, Sept. llth.
Examinations for Entrance Scholarships,
Saturday, Sopt. 14th. 	
Courses for University, Royal Military College, and Business.
The Regular Staff comprises ^graduatespi
English and Canadian Universities, with additional special instructors.
Senior and Preparatory Schools in scpsriito
buildings. Evory modern equipment, fifty
acros of ground, 4 Rinks, Gymnasium, Swimming Bath, etc. ....       ...      .
Entrance Scholarships for bnlli resident, and
day pupils.  Spoolal scholarships for sons of old
^Successes last Year: 2 University Scholarships; 10 flrst-olasR honors 115 passes; (I passes
into the Royal Military College.
H. W. AUDEN, M.A. (Cambridge). Principal.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Enjineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville Si
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
BARGAINS
 IN	
Fruit
Lands
ARROW LAKES
Now is the time to buy. We have
large and small tracts of good land
and prices to suit all.
Some snaps in Coait property.
Kincaid & Anderson
Real Estate, Insurance and Financial
Agents
First Street   ::   ::   Revelstoke, B. C.
iTAIlrORINC
We Will Cut You
The best fitting suit you ever put on
your back and make it up from the
best material.
We solicit your patronage.
PEDEN'S
Tailoring Parlor
Fort St. 12
THE WEBK, SATURDAY DECEMBER 14, 1907,
At The Street
Corner
1
p By THB LOUNGER p
I know it is too soon yet to write
a Christmas letter; I may exercise
my privilege in this respect next week,
but thoughts of Christmas instinctively bring up recollections of Charles
Dickens and as I have been lounging
round the city the last few days, I
have witnessed several incidents,
which would have attracted his attention and led to some of those inimitable sketches which no one could limn
as he could.
For instance, early in the week I
noticed several well known citizens
holding official positions, to wit, the
Mayor, the Medical Officer, the Sanitary Inspector, and "our own artist"
approaching a rendezvous from different directions. It was afternoon, rain
was pouring down, the streets and
roads everywhere ankle deep in mud.
Victoria officialdom as personified by
these august personages, huddled under umbrellas, and trapesed with unsteady steps towards the garbage heap
on James Bay flats. A careful inspection, sundry sniffs, momentus
shakes of the head indicated to the
observer that neither the chief magistrate nor his satellites suffered any
inconvenience from the proximity of
Chinatown refuse or scampering
rodent.
Then an adjournment was made to
the Dallas Road and the three conscientious public servants wended
their way to the park and as far east
as Moss Street, where preparations
have been made for the new dump.
Here-again an interesting colloquy
took place. One could see from the
eloquent gestures of the party that
its members were quite unable to understand why any sensible man j
should object to their project for getting rid of garbage, and as they re-1
traced their steps it was evident to the |
most casual observer that Bumbledom would put down its foot upon'
any suggestion to shift the dump toI
the western corner of Heywood
avenue. It would take a Dickens to'
do justice to the eccentric vagaries of
this little coterie of quidnuncs searching for—smell.
Passing down Fort Street on Wed
nesday afternoon I was attracted to
Williams and Janion's Auction Room
by their red flag. I found a book sale
in full swing and during the few
minutes which I spent there, added to
my somewhat slender stock of knowledge of human nature. First I learned
that there is nothing like an auction
for forcing people to give fancy prices
when they have made up their minds
to get a thing. I saw several sets
of books sold at more per volume
than they could have been purchased
for in the local book stores. On the
other hand sets of books which had
originally been bought on the instalment plan at $2.50 to $3.00 each sold
for 50 cents a volume. Knowing a
little about books I had no difficulty
in understanding the latter incident.
The fact is that these subscription
books contain a bushel of chaff to a
grain of wheat, and out of thirty
volumes the literature really worth
preserving could probably be compressed into three, in which case the
purchaser paid enough.
What interested me most, however,
was the relative market price of different books. When Shakespeare
wrote his immortal couplet anent
Coasar, dead and turned to clay stopping a hole to keep the wind away,
he was laying down a principle which
applies to many other things, among
them books. Who would have believed that Willison's Life of Laurier,
an edition de luxe, of which only 1,000
copies were printed, and sold to admirers of the great statesman at $25
each, did not* elicit a single bid, in
spite of the honied ccents and persuasive manner of the people's own
auctioneer? On the other hand, who
would have thought that a lady on
the one side of the table and a popular pedagogue on the other would
have run to nearly double their market value, four volumes of unexpur-
gated Italian novels? The supposition is that both the lady and the
pedagogue were anxious to secure
them in order to destroy, and so withdraw them from circulation.
One of the most coveted lots was
a smal set of books dealing with the
history of well known ladies of high
degree who figure largely in French
history. If I remember rightly in
this case the lady outbid all com-'
petitors.
It was very gratifying to a lover
of literature to find that the old English novelists were appreciated and
fetched the highest prices. A set of
Thackeray sold for $50 and one of
Dickens for $48, whilst Smollett
fetched a good price and a translation of Rabelais figured among the
high ones.
I was equally pleased to notice that
♦
4
♦
♦
LOOK  AT  THIS
WE ARE GIVING AWAY
FREE
$400 Worth of
TALKIOQ MACHINES.
cheap American books either elicited
no bids or were disposed of for a few
cents per volume. After ail Victorians
appreciate literature, and have no desire to purchase their books by the
ton. A book lover is always a book
lover; he will spend his last dollar
and if necessary pawn his shirt to
secure the desired volume, and I am
proud to know that the race is well
represented  in the City of Victoria.
I have been asked to throw out a
suggestion to the Real Estate Agents
of the Capital City. I have already
thrown out several which they do not
appreciate, but that is only because 1
have been dissembling my love. If
they would only realize it, I am their
best friend. The suggestion is that
they should open their offices a little
earlier in the morning and take a
shorter lunch hour. I know a gentleman who came to the town with his
wife on the 4th inst.; he began to
look around for a small furnished
house. On Monday last he went to
three real estate offices, to which he
had been recommended, between 9.30
and 10 o'clock in the morning. They
were all closed. He went to one of
the three at 2 o'clock, the agent had
not returned from lunch. When leaving the latter office he met a friend
who advised him to take a bedroom
at the Poplars, one of the most comfortable boarding houses in the City;
he interviewed the lady of the house,
took the room and is now settled
there for the winter. I do not in the
least regret this, but would point out
that if he could have found either of
the real estate agents at his office he
would probably have rented a furnished house at four times the price he
is paying for a bedroom.
I hope as it is near Christmas time
the rea! estate men will for once exercise the virtue of forgiveness
towards the
Q&
*"%>«-£€*>
r
HOW WE DO IT
Wo iniend tn give away Ton beautiful now stylo Aluminum
Tout! Ann Talking Machines to be drawn for in the following
manner: With every 50c worth of goods purchased nl our store
up to tho evening of January 31st, 1908, we will give a numbered
coupon whieh will entitle ynu to a chance lo win ono of those fine
Machines at our grand drawing. Should tho bolder of a winning
number already own a Talking Machine wo will give 50 nice new
Records instend.
♦
♦
t
♦
♦
WHAT IS
"EXCLUSIA"
0
The merrriest, maddest
game ever played by the
human race.   Kings,
Princes, Presidents and
Peoples of all races and all
colors have joined in this
entrancing pastime; now
resurrected for the
benefit (?) of the people of
British Columbia in the
year of Our Lord 1907; and
sold by T. N. Hibben & Co.,
Government Street, Victoria
at the price of
1 10 cents.
L	
^
"Dixi Tea' Limerick
An old lady, Miss Martha Jane Lea,
Said, " It's odd, but it's true as can be
That when I eat cheese
I most always sneeze
Unless I drink good-'Dixi' Tea."
Why buy expensive Teas, when the famous "Dixi" blends
at 35c and 50c lb. are even better.   Try them and see.
"Dixi" Coffee, a delicious blend of Java and Mocha,
per lb., 40c.     None nicer.
Better leave your orders with us for Xmas Turkeys.
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
UP-TO-DATE GROCERS:      1317 GOVERNMENT ST.
O0-|>CKX><><XK>0-O*0-O*00-0-O0-^^
\.
;-fr_t
i -Si**
iv/**
MS*
|fc'JI
&   -
Je,ll*l__
*
',,^t
Ittri
JQj >v
__.
___\        ' •J-WW-'B
;■ .*■:}»-■ '1
l|| [[{     B           '   .4"
WWII -'M''~ria&*~$>
v. .£:■;. ■"_.■:■:.
£i*    -**?.*         '**
I
The
Poodle
Dog
Grill
Yates Street
Victoria, B. O., is
The only real
Grill in British
Columbia—the
only place
where you can
actually obtain
your choice of
meats and all
the delicacies of
the season.
SMITH & SHAUGHNESSY
Proprietors
Yates Street. Victoria, B. C.
00000-000*00<X>0000-000^^
The Present Purchasing Period
Is upon us and we would call your serious attention to
useful Gifts being the most appreciable ones.
A PERMANENT AND PLEASURABLE PRESENT WOULD
BE A GOOD
Gas Heater
Really an absolutely necessary thing in every refined B. C. house.
The cleanest and most economical of all heating apparatus.
Some new arrivals just to hand;   exceptionally fine heaters;   all
popularly priced.
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, Ltd.
CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS.
Talking Machine Headquarters. 4
Victoria. J
FLETCHER  BROS.
93 Government St.
Angell
Engraving Co.
PHOTO-ENGRAVERS
and DESIQNERS
In All Branches
518 Hastings St.
Vancouver, B.C.
You Can't Be
Santa Claus
in an ill-fitting suit of clothes. You
won't look the part. A Santa Claus
that bags at the knees does not inspire respect. Don't let your family
be ashamed of its Santa Claus. Come
to-day and let us measure you for a
suit. Price only $15.00
SCOTLAND WOOLEN MILLS
29 Johnson Street,
VICTORIA.
538 Hastings Street,
VANCOUVER.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.pwv.1-0344221/manifest

Comment

Related Items