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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Apr 17, 1909

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 t.nrrrr_TriT(r_Tvr_Yr_-rf~-Y
|| Try a ',
"CLUB HOUSE" SUNDAE ■•
AT OUR FOUNTAIN.
|> TCI* 1* V       eh««n"»*
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FOL. VI.   No
The Week
A British Columbia Review,
Pabllshed at Vietoria, B. C.
HALL & WALKER   :
Agents
WELURGTOM   COLLIERY
COM PART'S COAL
:
:
*•
1232:Goverament St. Telephone 83 "
PMt» t».-UJtM UU I i I ftJUUUtS
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 17, 1909
One Dollar Per Annum
/anted—
[Transportation.
The   British   Columbia
Electric Eailway has for
sometime   been   hauling
freight from Mount Tol-
|s|ie into the city.    The freight consists
gravel and sand, which has been used
Ior various purposes but mainly in connection with the construction and extension of transportation lines.    The City
JDouncil, acting on the advice of the City
parrister, has applied for an injunction
-restrain the carriage of freight/ on the
Iround that the Company is not entitled
■3 do this under the provisions of its
lharter.   The matter came up before Mr.
Justice Martin, who refused to grant the
ttj-*j,nction,. and it is understood that the
lase will be appealed to the  Supreme
J.ourt.   There are two ways in which the
matter may be looked at;   apaart altogether from the legal interpretation of
(he charter, most people will think that it
a very short sighted policy, from a
Business standpoint, to hamper tha Company in any way,, and that nothing better
lould happen than that they should be pre-,
pared to carry any kind of freight over
heir lines, which does not interfere with
lie business of the city.   There are many
leasons why such a policy must be in the
est interests of the community;; in the
[irst place it greatly facilitates lhe tran-
action of business, although such ith institution hits not been instituted in Victoria,
Ihe wholesale merchants have repeatedly
endeavoured to arrange for the conveyance
If merchandise, and for a connection with
[he E. & N. track.   Special rails have already been laid for this purpose, but the
|natter is held up pending a satisfactory
iderstanding with the city.   In England
lhe conveyance of light freight over city
Iramways is very general, the only stipu-
ation being that it shall not interfere with
lhe passenger and street traffic.   In Van-
louver, the system is in full force, and has
proved of immense advantage, in fact, it
Is a very determinate factor in the progress of any city..  There'is the further
lonsideration that by restricting the use of
permanent way and plant, the earnings of
jfhe operating company are kept down,
vhich prevents them from attaining the
Inaximum standard of economy, and from
■baking concessions to the public.   This is
Ivell illustrated by the experience of Van-
louver  where  the  added  income  from
transportation of freight has enabled the.
British Columbia Electric Eailway to re-
lluce the cost of electric light time after
lime, until in spite of the fact that wages
lind other items of cost are double as much
In Vancouver as in the large Eastern cities,
[he rate charged for electric lighting is the
lowest in Canada.   This demonstrates not
Inly the possibility of advantage to the
Lublic but illustrates the spirit in which
the ca?e has been met by the Company.
■The Week does not hesitate to say that a
policy which would in the slightest restrict
lhe conveyance of freight of any kind over
ttreet lines, provided always that proper
\af eguads are imposed "to protect the public, is diametrically opposed to progress
Ind development, and cannot be justified
In any ground.  This leaves untouched the
legal questions involved in the interpretation of the Company's charter, and although it seems as if this, as well as every
lither matter which can possibly be dragged
Into the Courts, must become the subject
If litigation, yet the clauses governing
lhe point at issue would not appear tp be
Very abstruse, and the difference not such,
Iven according to the plaint of the city,
Is to justify expensive and protractive litigation.   The trouble arises over Clause 25
of the original agreement, dated the 20th
ef November, 1888, between the Corporation of the City of Victoria, and certain
parties, who were then forming a street
railway company. The clause referred to
reads: ' The cars shall be used exclusively
for the carriage of passengers." On the
(ith of April, 1894, the Company went
to the Legislature, and obtained an Act,
Chap. 63. This Act was intended to cover
all the points dealt with in the original
agreement, and to make many important
additions. Among these additions are included matters set- forth in Clause 16 of
the new Act, part of which says: "In addition to the power conferred by the agreement, the said Company are hereby authorised to take, transport, and carry passengers, freight, express and mail matter,
upon and over the said" lines of railway."
The claim of the Company as set forth
when the case came before Mr. Justice
Martin, is that Clause 16 of the new Act
of 1894 is a contravention of Clause 25 of
the original agreement of 1888, and gives
them full-authority to carry freight without any reference to Clause 25. The city
on the other hand contends that the two
clauses must be read together. That both
aire operative now, and that the true interpretation is that while the Company may
carry freight, they can only.do so, if they
also carry passengers oyer the same lines.
The practical application of this would be
that, in the, case of the Mount Tolmie road
fOr instance, the Company must either, put
pn a car service for passengers, or discontinue hauling freight. The Week does not
pretend to offer any opinion as,to the correct . interpretation of these two clauses,
or as to the bearing of the Act of 1894, on
the agreement of 1888,. but it ventures to
"suggest that if the case is correctly stated,
the city: is hot justified in wasting money
to determine an interpretation which, even
if favorable to their contention, would v t
be in the public interest. There __- )
such population in the district affected as
would justify the running of a passenger
service, and to endeavour to force the Company to do so at a loss, might either lead
to the abandonment of the freight service,
or at any rate would create a situation
inimical to economic operation, and the*e-
fore in the end not a public advantage.
Resources
Of Canada
Eeaders of The Week will
remember that a - few
months ago Victoria .received a visit from a num--
ber of distinguished Mining Engineers
from the Old Country. Among them was
Mr. John Ashworth, President of the ffin- *.'
Chester Geological Survey.' Many' Vic:.
torians had the pleasure of meeting Mr.
Ashworth at the reception given by the
Provincial Government in the Parliament
Buildings, and found him io be a man
of keen observation, and, profound knowledge. It is no little compliment that Mr.
Ashworth should have delivered an address
to the Society of which he is President,
recounting many incidents of his Canadian
tour, and emphasizing the value of the
resources of the Dominion. The Colliery
Guardian just to hand contains a report
of his address, which is too lengthy for
reproduction, but which covers in an intelligent manner the principal mining districts visited. Mr. Ashworth does full justice to British Columbia, and confirms at
least one very important opinion expressed
by Canadian geologists, that the cOal measures of the Crow's Nest, Pass and
of Western Alberta belong to- the: same
horizon. Mr. Ashworth seems to have
missed nothing for he carries his resume
to the Nicola Coal field, then on to Vancouver Island, and refers flatteringly to the
development at Ladysmith, and Nanaimo.
There is one matter of very distinct importance, to which attention may Well be
directed, especially as an opinion from
such a competent, and disinterested authority is valuable. Mr. Ashworth refers
to the Labor question in the following
terms: "There is a great demand for
Asiatic labour, mainly Chinese and Japs,
both on the surface and also underground,
at the mir.es on Vancouver Island. A
Jap can be put to work which a white man
will not do, and therefore it is clear that
the Jap is the greater menace to white
labour than is the Chinaman. Already
there are thousands of Japs in the city of
Vancouver." The significant sentence is
that which declares .that "the Jap is a
greater menace to white labour than the
Chinaman." This confirms the opinion repeatedly expressed by The Week: Mr.
Ashworth concluded by describing the excursion as one of the most enjoyable trips
a man could possibly have, "accompanied
with kindred spirits and every reasonable
information on everything there was tp be
seen and as to the countrywherever we
happened to be."
The campaign for the erect-
Best Wishes,   -hig of a suitable home in
Victoria for the Y.M.O.A.
has been happily and successfully inaugurated. It has the good-will of every
right-thinking citizen, and men of all callings and occupations have gladly put their
shoulder to the wheel to ensure success.
The able speakers who, out of the fulness
of their experience elsewhere, enlightened
Victoria on the value of a Y.M.A.C. as
an asset in the community, laid the city
under an obligation. The case has never
been so clearly stated, and everyone now
realizes that the work is a public benefit,
and that it is no longer a question as to
whether Victoria can afford $100,000 for
such a purpose. As a matter of fact Victoria cannot afford not to carry this scheme
to success. Fourteen days may seem a
short time in which to raise so large an
amount, but raising money for a laudable
purpose is simply a matter of system and
proper organization, and Mr. Wilcox, Mr.
Brace and their army of assistants have
reduced this to a science.
The Pugsley There is a tendency in corn-
Debacle, menting upon the Pugsley
Debacle to regard the matter rather in its personal,
than in its public aspect. This is to belittle a great issue, and to miss its significance. If Mr. Pugsley were not a member of the Government, the question of
misappropriation of the funds of a certain
railway would be entirely a matter between himself and the railway, or other
parties concerned in financing it, but what
concerns the public is that a man, who
has been entrusted by the Premier, with
the administration of a great department,
has been declared guilty of misappropriation of funds by a commission presided
over by as competent, and fair-minded a
man as Judge Landry. It is almost inconceivable that after reading the report of
the Commission the Premier should have
declared that he did not consider it necessary to propose an investigation into Mr.
Pugsley's conduct. It is impossible that
the matter can rest here, and the Opposition has"' given notice that it will be
brought up* in the House on. Monday next.
The Colonist very properly remarks that
everyone would be pleased if Mr. Pugsley
should clear himself of the charge, but his
conduct in dodging the issue and the action
of the Premier in screening him on a technicality does not inspire confidence in Mr.
Pugsley's anxiety to face investigation.
The whole question resolves itself into
whether it is the intention of Sir Wilfred
Laurier to continue or to abandon a policy
under which wrong-doing in high places is
winked at, and the grossest instances of
maladministration, are only visited with
condign punishment, when public opinion
becomes so aroused that it is possible to
disregard it. If the Premier fails to-
realise this there is still one tribunal to
which Mr. Pugsley can be made to answer,
and there should be public spirit enough
to insist that the necessary proceedings be
instituted to ensure this. The way things
are going the record of the Laurier administration will become a record of "damaged
archangels."
The judgment of Mr. E. S.
An Important Lennie, confirming the as-
Judgment.        sessment   of   the   British
Columbia Southern Land
Grant, ia an important one for. the PrOr
vince. j If it should be sustained on appeal
it will mean the addition of $150,000 a
year to the funds available for expenditure
on development work. The money is required*, every dollar of it, for although the
Government has pursued a most progressiva and generous policy, the revenue is
by no means adequate to the demands
which are crowding in from every direction. No doubt the question will be fought
by the railway company, to the highest
Court; as the principle involved is an
important one neither side can afford to
give way, and the ultimate issue will be
awaited with interest.
Fighting Joe Martin has
The Sublime and laid siege in true militant
The Ridiculous,    fashion to  the  political
fortress of Stratford-on-
Avon. According to the cartoonist of the
Victoria Times he is armed with a new
suit of Semi-Eeady clothing, a silk topper,
and a carpet bag. The latter is a large
unwieldy receptacle, albeit capacious, and
is supposed to contain the draft of Joe's
campaign speeches in support of Woman
Suffrage, the abolition of the House of
Lords, and Free Trade. With such an
outfit, and such a programme, the "Stormy
Petrel" ought certainly to achieve something, it is safe to say that he will achieve
the one thing dearest to his soul—notoriety. It is not a little singular, although
distinctly characteristic of the man, that
he should have chosen three hopeless issues
on which to base his first apepal to an
English constituency. It is safe to say
that if he could have found anyone more
hopeless than these, he would have included, it. The chief interest of the contest
will circle round the possibility of a duel
between Joe Martin and Marie Corelli.
The petticoated sensationalist will certainly resent the intrusion into her special
preserve of the politicalsensationalist, and
it will be interesting to see whether ia sehSe
of "noblesse oblige" will restrain the fire-
eating democrat from an attack, which is
certain to be provoked by the strenuous
and susceptible novelist. Meanwhile
Shakespeare still "sleeps" hard by, and
one may have to conjecture whether his
immortal injunction against those who
might disturb his bones, applies to one
whose advent is pretty likely to create a
dust. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 17, 1908
j    At The Street   f
V Corner l
P By f wi Lauras* &
\f*%/>*f^/t»*\*m__t^$i r\f£
There is general indignation,
coupled with not a little amusement,
at the antics of -the City Council and
the City Solicitor who seem to think
that they have inherited whatever represents in the twentieth century the
divine right of kings to legislate and
rule. Everyone wants to see Victoria
become a clean, sanitary, beautiful,
progressive city. It is even now fairly clean, fairly sanitary and fairly
beautiful, and during the last three
years has begun to be progressive. It
seems, however, that anything which
savors of activity, and up-to-dateness,
vexes the souls of those good men
and true, who are the legitimate de-
' scendants of Bumble of immortal
memory.
No one believes that * the City
Fathers are purposely scotching the
wheels of progress. They themselves
have a- large stake in the City, and
are Undoubtedly anxious to promote
its interests, but there is something
either in. the air, or possibly in the
water of Victoria, which generates a
spirit of contrariness in its civic rulers
and impels them to undertake the
most extraordinary stunts for the
common weal, which unfortunately
operate for the common woe.
My vocabulary is limited, and I
cannot lay my hand on a dictionary
which would supply words adequately,
to characterize the last proposal of
the Council with respect to businesses
and occupations, which may not be
conducted in residential portions of
the city. If a few others had been
included, it would have been impossible to exist under the conditions
which would have been produced,
however, unless I am entirely mistaken the citizens will let their opinion of these proposals be heard in an
unmistakable manner. There is no
demand for such legislation as is proposed; it is unnecessary, it will hamper the ordinary avocations of life
and would benefit no one, If the
council does not wish Victoria to; be
dubbed a city of cranks, it would do
well to abandon, the proposed bylaw, and to let it be known that it
was only in a moment of obsession
that the idea originated.
The manner in Which Mr. E. A.
Wallace has laid out the grounds of
the Empress Hotel does credit to
himself,.and to the corporation which
has furnished the funds. The finished
work might well be described as^'The
metamorphosis of a mud flat," and is
a triumph of landscape gardening. I
do not know whether Mr. Wallace's
commission covers the North end of
the property near Humboldt street.
If it does, I would like to make the
suggestion that the appearance is
likely to be decidedly rocky for many
years to come, and a judicious expenditure on soil would enable him
to treat it more in harmony with the
balance of the grounds. At any rate
it would approximate more to that
thing of beauty which is a joy forever.
This leads me again to remark that
the improvement of the Empress
grounds only brings into greater contrast the wretched appearance of the
property East of Douglas street. I
suppose it would take money, the one
commodity of which the city is so
short just now, at any rate for civic
purposes, but it could be worth a great
effort to remove the eyesore, and
until it is done the picture will be
sadly marred.
The impression is growing that the
appointment of fire chief will be
either to Joe Wachter or to an outsider. The Week adheres to its original choice, and believes that, tab
ing    everything   into   consideration,
JAMES BUCHANAN & CO.
By Royal Warrants"
PURVEYORS TO THE ROYAL FAMILY.
Distillers of the
WORLD-FAMOUS RED SEAL AND BLACK AND WHITE
SCOTCH WHISKIES.
Unsurpassed for AGE, PURITY or FLAVOR
For Sale by all Dealers.
General Agents for B.C. and the Yukon Distri,_.
RADIGER ft JANION,
Headquarters for choice nursery stock.
Apple, pear, cherry, plum and peach trees
ahd small fruits, also ornamental trees,
shrubs, roses, evergreens, etc. Largest and
best assorted stock in British Columbia.
Ten per cent, cash discount on all orders
above $10.00.
PRICE LIST AND CATALOGUE ON
APPLICATION.
When You Drink
You want the best.    You've only to trjr   these   to  be  convinced of their goodness.
Rainier  Beer*, per doz.  quarts,
$2.25; pints, $1.50.
Sonoma Claret, per bottle, 35;
per gallon, $1.25.
Zinfandel, per bottle, soc;  per
gallon, $1.75.
Chateau   Margeau   Claret, per
bottle, 6ot.
St. Julien Claret, per bottle, 75c.
Chateau  la Touer Claret, -per
bottle;  $1.00.
Hout Sauterne, per bottle, soc.
D. Schmidt Sauterne, per bottle,
75c
Seward Dry Graves, per bottle,
$1.00.
Gilbey's Invalid Port, per bottle,
$i.2S.
DON'T DRINK ELK LAKE
when you can get "Perrier,"   the  famous  French  Lithia, "The
Champagne of Mineral Waters," per dozen, $1.75.
DIXI H. ROSS CO.
INDEPENDENT GROCERS. 1317 GOVERNMENT ST.
Tels. 53,105a and 1590.
Wachter  is  the best man in sight diffuence to me which leads the puh-
for the job.    He possesses more of cession.'"
the necessary qualification than any  „
other candidate, with the additional
advantage over some of them, of being thoroughly acquainted with the
city and of having worked harmon ■
iously with the fire brigade for many
years.
Arrangements for the big' race
meeting are well under way, -and
there is no reason why the project
should not be made a source of enjoyment and of profit, both to the
Country Club and to the city. The
undesirable element, which seems almost a . necessary adjunct to race
meetings will gain no footing in Victoria if Chief Langley has his way,
and the attitude of the press has made
it perfectly clear that in this regard, ^^^^
no laxity would be tolerated.    With
reference to the book-making end of A ]awsuit' seemingly interminable,
the proposition that will have to be has been settled amicably in Berlin
looked after by the management. All after dragging along in the courts
the public asks for is a square deal, 47-3 years! The suit began away back
if they get it they will patronize the in J430 between the local authority
"sport of kings," but if the methods of Friemar, a suburb of Gotha, and
Which have killed racing in the States, certain mill owners. A lawsuit of
are revived here it will mean, the end s«ch venerable age naturally came to
of racing in Victoria.' The whole °e looked on as an "institution," as
business willbe on its trial, and the one of the enduring things. The law-
names of the local directors are a ye." will miss a sure Source of in-
The Best He Knew.
Gladstone, a Jamaican negro, was
assistant to a district physician in
the Canal Zone, and, being rather
poor in his Latin, the bottles had
been numbered for his benefit. One
da, a Spanish laborer came in for
medicine, and the doctor , told his
worthy assistant to give him two pills
out of No. 6. After he had gone the
doctor asked:
"Gladstone, did you give the man
a dose of No. 6?"
"No, no, sah, Doctor; numbah six
war finished, so I just give him one
pill out of numbah foah and one out
or numbah two."
Victoria Fuel Co.
PHONE 13771
You want the best Coal, the "Burn all" kind, absolutely free
from Slate, Stones and Klinkers.
We are Sole Agents for The South Wellington Coal Mines
Company (Ltd.).
THIS COAL is admitted by all to be the finest Domestic Coal
mined.
Let us know if you want it quick.
YieTORIH FUEL COMPANY
PHONE 1377 618 TROUNCE AVE.
sufficient guarantee that an honest attempt will be made to give Victorians the genuine article.
come, for great sums of money have
been spent by the contending parties.
The 'cause of the trouble was the action of the 15th century mill-owners
in raising, without due permission,
the height of a dam in the river Nesse.
An important cablegram tells that
the Princess de Sagan has changed you_r c0°_'
the    style    of   wearing    her   hair,
Try This Scheme.
Mrs. Bronson—Your husband kissed
Mrs. Woodson—I told him to.   The
Thought the Sagans had crept into cook thinks she is getting ahead of
some cave of obscurity.
me ahd will never leave.
Luck.
There once was a fellow named Dish
bone,
Who carried for luck a small wishbone;
And it does seem too bad
That while eating some Shad,
He should
Half a Loaf.
The negro's love of titles of whatever sort of amusing illustrated by a
story told by the governor of a
Southern state. It appears that the
congregation of a colored church in
strangle to death on a Georgia conceived the notion that it
fishbone.     would add gre3tiy t0 their dignity if
the pastor of the church were enabled to add the initials "D. D." to his
name. A member, hearing of an institution in the North which would,
for value received, confer" such a degree, enterd into correspondence
with that end in view. Reply came
to the effect, that the sum of $75
would obtain the desired dignity.
A difficulty arose, however, in that
the congregation were unable to raise
more than $39- Finally, after much
confabulation, the congregation delegated one of their number to see
the thing out.   Accordingly the fol-
STEEL-CLAD ELECTRIC IRON
. .   **• An Electric Iron
costs* less to operate and main-,
tain than any
other.
Easily attached,
to any electric
light socket. Invaluable to the
housewife. Unrivalled for laundry purposes.
You are particularly invited to call and examine them in*pur
Demonstration Rooms. *,. j   .
B. C. Electric Company, Limited
Corner Fort and Langley Streets.
' >.«__i/'** V '*,
mu&$-:Pfl
OFFICE EQUIPMENT
TYPEWRITERS, CASH REGISTERS, *   *
SAFES, DESKS, FILING CABINETS,
BAXTER & JOHNSON 809 Qovernment Street]
Victoria, B. C.
■■      If it's for the Office—ask us.
Interruption Resented.
"So you're still hunting work?"
"Yes, sir," answered Plodding Pete.
"Don't you know that out West
they are willing and anxious to give
men employment?"
"Sure I do. Dat's de reason I likes
dis territory. You can go on huntin'
work without being disturbed."
Willing To Oblige.
"When you feel any temptations
comin' along," said the friend and adviser, "you mus' say, 'Get thee behin'
me, Satan.'" _____________________________________________________________________________
"Dat's what I done said," answered lowin« messa*e was sent t0 the insti-
Mr. Erastus Pinkley, "an' den I 'ma- tution raentioned:
gines I hyuhs Satan answer me back,     "Kindly forward   our   pastor one
Da's all right.   We both gwine de 'D.,' we being uhable to afford the
same way nohow, an' don't make no other at this time."
1 Wedding
I   Breakfasts
if
I      Lunches
I" Tea Parties
You cannot do better than place your orders with us for
Wedding Cakes.
Very choice Confectionery, loose, by the pound, and also
put up in neat fancy boxes, suitable for gifts.
©lay's
619 Fort St.
Phone 101
:*s***»8*-»a***-»»^^^^^^ THE WEEK SATURDAY APRIt 17, 1909
Social and        %
Personal. $
If 'V's.' VP1*'!' 'V V IT _P 'A' 'A'T
Mr. Clarke Gamble spent the Easter
olidays with friends in Victoria.
* *   *
Mrs. Holmes and Miss Holmes left
Kuring the week for Mexico.
* *   *
J. Mrs. A. W. Bridgeman, and Miss
prake left during the week for England where th'ey intend spending the
(text three or four months.
*   *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Barnard spent
i few days in Seattle during the week.
* *   4
_ Mrs. C. M. Marpole of Vancouver
[jras visiting her mother, Mrs. Holmes,
tsquimalt, for a few days this week.
I, Mrs.  Lawford Richardson,  Nanai-
fio, has been spending a couple of
nonths in Victoria with friends.
*   *   *
*_* Miss Gladys Cambell, who has been
J.isiting friends in Victoria returned
:ome to Vancouver on Tuesday.
I
■of
■ Mrs.   Carew   Gibson   returned   to
■Vancouver on Tuesday last.
Mrs.  Rome,  Miss  Rome and  Mr.
■?red.  Rome  left for Vancouver  on
[(Wednesday to be present at the mar-
Mage of the former's son, Mr. Roy
|Rome and Miss Clare Charleson on
iaturday, 17th.
•H *   *   *
. The marriage of Miss Mary Baylis
tnd Lieut. J, H. Nankivill, R.N., was
iolemnized on Wednesday, 14th, at
lhe Archbishop's Palace, St. Andrew's
.hurch, by the Rev. Father Brabant.
*   *   *
The chief social event of the week
■was  the  marriage  of  Miss   Harriet
pusan Pemberton, youngest daughter
bf Mrs. J. D. Pemberton, "Gonzales,"
(Victoria, and Mr. W. Curtis Sampson
Molton Combe, Oak Bay, Victoria,
■vhich    was    solemnized   at    Christ
Church Cathedral on Wednesday af-
.ernoon at half past two bjr his lord-
ihip the Bishop of Columbia.
,   The bride who was given away by
her  brother,   Mr.  Fred.  Pemberton,
Was most beautifully gowned in soft,
Jclinging white Liberty satin with pan-
Apis of real Brussels lace with a yoke
ffland sleeves of Brussels net embroid-
Kered.   She wore a lovely old Brussels
tveil held in place by a coronet of
[orange blossom and sheath of Easter
lillies  tied  with  white  satin  ribbon
and her only ornament, the gift of
'the groom, a pendant of pearls and
iperidot.
The Misses Arminie, Phillippa and
Mab Pembertpn and Allison Beanlands, Helen Laundy and Theresa
Pemberton made most charming
bridesmaids wearing "Kate Greenway" flowered muslins and white muslin caps, with green ribbon, carrying
green baskets of daffodils.
' Mr. Sampson, the groom, was ably
.supported by Mr. H. A. Bromley,
Iwhile Mr. L. Crease, Mr. T. Pemberton, Mr. C. Pemberton, Mr. A. W.
Williams, Mr. Kingscote and Captain
McDonald acted as ushers.
There was a fully choral service the
choir rendering "The Voice that
Breathed O'er Eden," and "0 Perfect
•Love."
■ The church had been most beautifully decorated with greenery, daffodils and the wild white lilly.
I Mrs. J. D. Pemberton, mother of
the bride, looked very handsome in
a rich black satin gown relieved by
touches of old lace and a smart
black toque with white and black
plumes, and carried a bouquet of
white roses and lillies of the valley.
* Mrs. Hugo Beavan wore a smart
white suit with a white hat trimmed
with pale blue roses.
Mrs. J. D. Pemberton, in old rose
with hat of same tone.
A most delightful reception was
held at "Gonzales," the residence of
the bride's mother. The brjde received in the drawing-room which was
da'ntily decorated with pink carnations and begonias and white lillies.
The artistic hall was banked with
daffodils and asparagus fern gracefully arranged. The dining-room, which
was utilized for the cutting of the
cake and toasts, was fragrant with
the scent of lillies of the valley and
roses; the table was extremely dainty;
the cake forming the centre piece,
with lillies of the valley and bride
roses relieved by the green of asparagus fern and maiden hair were daintily arranged in little silver vases from
the centre to each corner, finished
with large true lover's knot in white
chiffon, the bridegroom standing under a huge arch of green with white
blossoms surmounted by a large true
lover's knot in white chiffon.
The bride's going away gown was
composed of a lovely pale blue brocaded silk, semi-fitting, with cloth
skirt of same tone and a hat to match
trimmed with maline and satin.
Mr. and Mrs. Sampson left for
Mr. F. Pemberton's summer house in
the country where the honeymoon
will be spent.
Among the numerous smart gowns
noticed were: Mrs. Flumerfelt, in dull
green satin trimmed with cream and.
gold and a hat of the same tone.  .
. Mrs. Dunsmuir, in a lovely goWn of
French blue hat of same shade trimmed with tulle and osprey.
Mrs. W. F. Bullen in a Violet broadcloth gown and black hat.
Mrs. Harold Robertson, in coral
pink crepe de chine, burnt straw hat
with pink roses.
Mrs. R. H. Pooley, grey green cloth
gown, Princess, with large black
mushroom hat with black and white
plumes.
Mrs. Wilby, in smart black and
white silk frock, burnt straw, with
pink roses.
Mrs. Archer Martin, in green satin
relieved by a yoke of ecrii net.
Mrs. P. de Noe Walker, in pale
blue silk, with touches of black, burnt
straw with black.
Mrs. A. Gillespie, green panne velvet, mauve hat.
Miss F. Gillespie, pale green frock,
burnt straw hat, pink roses and lillies
of the valley.
Miss Butchart, pale blue suit, with
revers of black, straw hat with pink
roses.
Miss Pooley, handsome gown of
green velveteen, yoke of ecru net,
black picture hat.
Miss V. Pooley; blue silk frock,
champagne colored hat.
Miss Bryden, champagne colored
crepe de chine, lace yoke, straw hat
trimmed with mauve and pink morning glories.
Miss Fitzgibbons, French blue cloth
Princess gown, hat with pink roses.
Miss Gaudin, smart blue tailor-
made, white hat, pink roses.
Miss Davie, black and white striped
suit, violet hat.
Mrs. Swinnerton, blue silk gown
and hat of same shade.
Miss G. Irving, in a dainty pink
frock, straw hat with pink roses and
pale blue velvet ribbons.
Miss F. Drake, lavender flowered
silk muslin, trimmed with silver ribbon, large burnt straw hat with violets.
Mrs. Audain, pale pink silk, hat with
plumes.
Mrs. N. Dupont, Alice blue straw
hat of same shade trimmed with roses.
Miss Devereux, white suit with
black stripe, black hat with black and
white plumes.
Mrs. Laing, in Alice blue.
Mrs. Lampman, in a yellow gown
with large black hat.
Mrs. Rithet, handsome black silk
lace coat over satin, large black hat.
Mrs. Prior, in a smart gown of elephant grey, hat of same tone with
ostrich plumes.
Mrs. R. Jones, grey crepe frock,
with Alice blue toque, white osprey.
Mrs. Edwards, in white with black
hat.
Mrs. Basil Combe, in brown over
green, brown hat with roses in shades
of burnt orange.
Oriental Cream
OB MACHOA!. BBAVTXnBB
BEAUTY THAT LASTS.
Where is the woman who has not
the praiseworthy desire to enhance
her personal charms and preserve as
long as possible her delightful power
of enchantment, which lasts as long
as her beauty? The Oriental Cream,
prepared by Dr. T. Felix Gouraud, of
New York City, is a harmless preparation for preserving the delicacy
of the complexion and removing
blemishes. It is the favorite toilet
article of the leading professional
artists, who owe so much of their
popularity to their personal charms.
Scarcely a star dressing room in the
land is without Gouraud's Oriental
Cream, which is the most wholesome
and perfect beautifier known. Druggists will supply you. No. 8.
JALLAND BROS.
Pine Groceries
FRESH  FRUIT  DAILY.
623 Yates St.    -    VICTORIA. B.C.
Koksilah Country Club.
The Golf Links at Koksilah will
open for play on the 15th instant.
The subscription is fixed at $25 per
annum for gentlemen and $10 per
annum for ladies, the year commencing on the 15th instant.
Non-residents on Vancouver Island
can subscribe for six months at half
the annual subscription, and visitors
being non-residents in Cowichan can
be introduced by members and have
the use of the links on payment of
$1 per day for which special tickets
will be issued.
Residents wishing their names entered on the list of subscribers will
kindly notify Mr. J. H. Whittome,
Duncan, who is also authorized to receive subscriptions.
F. H. MAITLAND-DOUGALL.
Corfield, V.I., April 2nd,  1909.
The New Grand.
The Moneta Five, three women and
two men, will head next week's bill
at the New Grand in a popular singing and instrumental act called "An
Evening at Home." All five are good
singers, and they introduce selections
on violin, flute, piano, mandolin, harp,
guitar and saxaphone. Another feature will be Cal. Stewart, the original
"Uncle Josh," who is known to every
one possessing a phonograph. He
delivers a monologue abwut his trip
from home to New York together
with a full line of "Uncle Josh" rube
talk, and finishes up with two songs.
Other items will be Frances Stol,
comedienne and coster singer; La
Mabel, in a series of serpentine dances
and plastic poses; Fox and Durkin,
in a comedy sketch, "The Female Detective"; Thos. J. Price in illustrated
song and new moving pitcures and
overture.
Prepare  yourself  against  Jack
Frost.
See BOLDEN
THE CARPENTER AND
BUILDER.
For your weather strips, etc.,
760 Yates St. Op. Dominion
Hotel. Phones: House, A.1125;
Shop, B1828 '""""
IMD&
wmmmmM»mmsimm»m»K
1 You Get What 1
1 You Want
1 When You
I Want It
AT THE
] Empire Hotel and
Restaurant
Meals, aoc and up.
Rooms, 25c and up.
Telephone 841,
Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
Bring your Family.
A. LIPSKY, Proprietor,
Milne Block
568 Johnson -Street,
VICTORIA, B.C.
Often at this time of the year. If
you feel, as many people do just
now, run down, week or nervous,
why not tone up the system and improve the appetite with
BOWES COMPOUND SYRUP OF
HYPdPHOSPHlTES.
No better spring tonic can be procured. One bottle, price $1, contains  sufficient for one month.
GYRUS H BOWES.
CHEMIST
Govt St., Near Yatea.
Telephones 425 and 450.
Doubtless the city water will soon be good. Jn the
meantime, however, one sniff seems enough. An easy
solution of the pure water question is to order from
your dealer a few cases of the famous White Rock
Lithia Water, certified by leading analysts as "absolutely pure." There are many other mineral waters,
but "White Rock" is the best of all and well worth
the little extra expense. Another excellent drink is
"C. & C." Ginger Ale, a strictly non-alcoholic substitute for malt and spirituous beverages, famous all
over the civilized world for its purity and deliciousness.
Its label, bearing the name of Cantrell & Cochrane,
Belfast, Ireland, is a strict guarantee of its goodness.
We have arranged to always keep a full stock of
"C. & C." Ginger Ale, both the Aromatic and the
Dry Imperial. For health's sake, do not put up with
an inferior brand. If your dealer does not handle
"C. & C." ask him to kindly procure it from Pither
& Leiser, corner of Fort and Wharf streets, Victoria,
Water t., Vancouver, and Nelson, British Columbia.
EMPRESS THEATRE
Cor. Government and Johnson Sts.
HIGH CLASS MOVING PICTURES   AND ILLUSTRATED SONGS.
COMPLETE CHANGE OF PROGRAM   EACH   MONDAY
WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY.
CONTINUOUS PERFORMANCE.       2 to 5.30. and 7 to 10:30 p.m.
Admission—10 cents.
Children's Matinee Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday—j cents. THfi WEEK, SATURDAY APRIL, 17 1909
On Misunderstandings.
By BOHEMIAN.
*1*1-. j-.      \J_T____t_l_r        by the severance of intimates, whether
A llv      W wdm        it be two men who have been as bro-
A Provincial Review and Magazine, pub-  th j      mm,„ si.n
llshed every Saturday by tners> or a man anQ a woman wno
"THF WFFK" PUBLISHING have enjoyed the finest and holiest in-
COMPANY, LIMITED.      ti,macies Tuhich. lifue affords'.  ™e
.    .      ;  closer and happier the association the
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER greater the tragedy if separation takes
1208 Government St., Victoria, B.C. Place'   There are some PeoPle in the
 . world who affect to believe that all
W. BLAKEMORE, Editor. things must have an end, and with
them they class even the purest
friendship. The theory is unfounded,
many such associations have lasted
all through life, and as some of us
would fain believe, are not even measured by its bounds.
•  The very contemplation of a sever-
Poverty is said to be the root of ance is destructive of happiness; per-
all misery, just as money is said to manence is the one element which
be the root of all evil; both pro- hallows the most intimate friendship,
verbs contain the kernel of a truth, and an association, which looks to
but neither is more than half a truth, less than this is not of the highest
I have sometimes wondered whether type,
there is any more prolific source of Life contains little that is worth
misery than misunderstandings I am living for beyond the pleasure which
sure there is no more acute form. two people may derive from congenial
The misery resulting from poverty companionship. It is not always that
is very real, very direct and very ob- either realizes its value, even at the
vious. The misery resulting from mis- moment of its highest fruition, but
understanding while not less real is there is a bitter awakening at its ter-
more complex, and in the very nature mination, and for sensitive souls, a
of things generally hidden from the blank vista of years stretches out to
vulgar gaze.   The misunderstandings a dark valley.
that occur in business, or in the or- Just because this relation is at once
dinary affairs of life which do not so sensitive and so delicate, it is
involve the cultivation of close per- oftentimes the butt of selfish and in-
sonal friendship usually result in ma- considerate attack. The means em-
terial loss of one kind or another, ployed are often insidious, and al-
For instance, two men do business ways ruthless. It is the first little
together for years to their mutual ad- misunderstanding which should be the
vantage, when in the course of some signal of danger, and which if rightly
deal, one of them imbibes the impres- interpreted may prevent a tragedy,
sion, rightly or wrongly, that the
other has been trying to get ahead
of him, or that everything has not
been open and above board, that is
the end of amicable relationship, probably without any explanation they
drift apart. The co-operation which
has been so beneficial is never renewed, and it may even happen that
their mutual estrangement becomes a
man seems to me to have been. He
is the first and the most notable of
those who, in the nineteenth century,
in Europe and in America, preached
the vision of the world as love and
comradeship."
With this estimate of Walt Whitman as the preacher of love and comradeship, Professor G. R. Carpenter
closes his life of the poet, published
this week in the English Men of Letters Series. The book, however, is
really a life of the man and not a
critical analysis of his writings.
Whether one likes him or not, he
was a great personality and it is this
personality that Professor Carpenter
sets before his readers. The change
that time has wrought in our opinion
of it, is tersely summed up.
"Then critics found his personality
turbulent and egotistic; the barbaric
yaup that he sounded over the roofs
of the world was thought to be his
own braggart voice. Now we see
that he spoke as the symbol of democracy."
^^^)ri^a^^
LITERARY NOTES.
In Defence of "Together."
A committee of self-appointed cen-
  _      '"_"°"_ .".__ sors has undertaken to stop the sale
matter of notoriety, and one or both .     ■      ,      ,;_ ,       :....,„__.'
in Canada of Robert Herncks   To-
may be prejudiced in the eyes of their
associates.
Similar experiences occur in political, and public life, colleagues, who ,,._,,
,       .         l     li.       1.          a   _. a an immoral book.   Such a proceeding
have been   together,   have   effected ...   ,       ■■_._■
gether" by appealing to the Dominion
authorities at Ottawa to prohibit its
importation on the ground that it is
good work, become estranged through
a little petty jealousy, or a little indiscreet tittle-tattle, which should
have been allowed to go in at one
ear and out at the other, but in the
absence of frank questioning, and
open explanation the poisonous suspicion which has been implanted, does
appears rather ridiculous in the face
of what the religious journals have
been saying about this novel, since it
was published last summer. The
"Churchman," for example, does not
appear to agree with the Canadian
remonstratorsl
"Robert Herrick is one of the most
serious and thoughtful of our novel-
t_,       .*.'*.  Jv' -■■■-■ "_ _.       'sts> anQ" his latest story, 'Together,'
There have been instances where . .     ,. „.,,,-
is to our mind his best,
not for young people.
The book is
It demands
separation of this kind has been effected by political opponents for sin-
_        , .. ... some experience of judgment.    But
ister purposes.   One of the readiest , ,  .       ,
, _.,     for those who can bring those quah-
means to hand in such cases is the   . . ,.       .    .
,      .        t . ,    .   .. „        ,.*     ties and time to the reading, it is
bearing of false witness.   How often ... 	
exceptionally worth while."
What the "Churchman" finds
has a man been weak enough to listen to the lie that so and so said so        . 	
,        , , .     ,.      .. ,      ceptionally worth while,   would, one
and so about you, and heeding it has        ,,".,-',        , .     ,
,, ,.  ,. would think, be safe to permit the
nursed enmity.    From all these ex- ' £
,,._,,      . Canadians to read.   The Chicago   In-
penences, it may safely be deduced      .   ■ „ , .
*,.'-, ,    ,* ,. -ii    t        tenor,   however, is even stronger in
that the man who believes ill of an- ,
other without absolute proof is a fool,
because there are so many motives,
which lead unscrupulous people to
make use of the ready lie. There are
few instances in which it is not both
its praise:
"There is a fine constructive philosophy in it, a healthful, wholesome,
uplifting wisdom that should make
many soul-perplexed men and women
SOCIAL AND PERSONAL.
.  ,                  _.••*._.■_._,_. deeply grateful to Robert Herrick.   In
policy and duty to go straight to the \ J °
,      , .,           ,   ,         .             , truth a remarkable book."
other fellow and demand an explanation;   in nine cases out of ten the
explanation will remove the grievance, The Prophet of Love and
or at any rate will show that the Comradeship,
mischief-making meddler, who inter- "Whitman's  analogues,   I   suspect,
venes, had an axe to grind, and in are rather to be found in great per-
the process, became a false witness. sonalities, in men who bring a mes-
And suppose one whom we had ac- sage to their brothers, a truth mainly
counted friend has said a harsh thing expressed in their lives and only in-
about us, may he not have had, or cidentally through their writings,—
have thought he had, ample justifi- such men, shall we say, as Francis
cation; no man is perfect, and there of Assisi or George Fox, or many an
are few who do not give occasion for Oriental teacher of earlier or later
offense, not intentionally perhaps, but times. These are the great acceptors
in such form that in sober moments and unifiers of life; their teachings
it could not be justified; and even and examples pass beyond the con-
loyal friends may be sensitive, and fines ot literature or politics; they
hasty. show new and noble ways of living.
But the tragedies of life are caused Of this type, in his own degree, Whit-
A most delightful dance was given
on Thursday evening last by Mrs.
Thos. Tye and Mrs. Beauchamp Tye.
The house was massed with jonquails
and spring flowers, with smilax and
asparagus fern. The supper table was
very attractive with large bowls of
daffodils and fern. Mrs. T. Tye wore
a very handsome gown of black satin,
relieved by touches of real lace, while
Mrs. B. Tye was greatly admired in
a dainty Empire gown of pale pink
crepe 'de chine. Miss Thain's orchestra provided a very attractive programme. Among those present were:
Mrs. Fagan, in pale pink; Mrs. Coles,
black; Mrs. Erb, in white lace gown;
Mrs. R. H. Pooley, in white satin;
Mrs. Herman Robertson, in a black
spangled robe; Mrs. Genge, in white;
Mrs. Harold Robertson, white spangled gown; Mrs. Alexis Martin, in
white; Miss Page, in white taffetta;
Miss D. Page, soft white satin; Miss
Mason, pale green chiffon; Miss D.
Mason, pale blue silk muslin; Miss
Drake, silk flowered muslin; Miss Gillespie, in white satin Empire; Miss
Newling, in grey crepe de chine; Miss
Clute, flowered organdy; Miss Pooley,
flowered muslin; Miss V. Pooley, pale
green touches of ecru; Miss Monteith, pale blue; Miss T. Monteith,
white; Miss Arbuthnot, Dresden silk;
Miss Savage, embroidered Japanese
taffetta; Miss Lugrin, white; Miss N.
Lugrin, pale pink; Miss King, white
silk; Miss Irving, white satin; Miss
G. Irving, white crepe de chine, Empire; Miss Blackwood, pale green
brocaded satin; Miss V. Blackwood,
white crepe de chine; Miss Eberts,
pale green crepe de chine, gold corsage; Miss Gaudin, in white; Miss
McKay, white silk; Miss N. Newcombe, white nuill over yellow; Miss
Devereux, white lace over white taffetta; Miss Johnson, pale ping mull,
Empire; Miss' Heyland, white Brussels net with black and silver embroidery; Mrs. Wm. Troupe, pale
green satin; Misses Taylor and tne
Messrs. Lowrie, Mclntyre, Dean,
Bamford, Julier, McCurdy, Cambell,
Dr. Rogers, Gore, Bromley, Gillespie, Cambie, Bullen, Templeton, Lan
dry, Brown, Erb, Hagerty, Bridge
man, Col. Gregory, McDougal, Jeph
son, Coles, Dr. Fagan, Holmes, Major
Bennett Capt. Sullivan, Vernon, Bell,
Arbuckle, Hogg, Gillespie, Martin,
Hebden, Pemberton.
*   *   *
Mrs. Crotty, Burdette Avenue, entertained at bridge on Wednesday afternoon.
A. Y. P. Exposition.
Japan's participation in the Alaska
Yukon-Pacific Exposition will provide the world with such a show of
the life, customs and resources of the
rising eastern empire as has never
been shown at any other international
Something New
We are now able to offer to our patrons
AGUARANTEE
on our splendid Une of PLATED KNIVES, FORKS and SPOONS.
This line which is specially made for us is guaranteed to have
MORE SILVER than any other.standard make and we GUARANTEE to replace '*__;__
Free of Charge
any of these goods which, after use, do not prove satisfactory. This
condition we believe accompanies no other flatware made.
Prices as follows:—
COFFEE SPOONS  per doz. $2.70
TEASPOONS  " 3-i5
DESSERTSPOONS             " 4-95
TABLESPOONS  " 5-85
DESSERT FORKS   " 4-95
TABLE FORKS  " 5.85
DESSERT KNIVES    " 4-95
TABLE KNIVES    " 5-4°
Challoner & Mitchell
Diamond Merckaits and Silversmiths
1017 Government Street Victoria, B. C.
pss&m-a:^^
I
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co'y |
1016 Government Street, Victoria, B. C.
Ohas. Hayward, Pres.
R. Hayward, Sec.
F, Caselton, Manager
Oldest and most up-to-date
Undertaking Establishment-
in B. 0.
Established 1867
Telephones—48,   594,   1905,   305,   or  404.
_
lair. For the big event which opens
on June 1 the Nipponese have brought
together a more comprehensive exhibit of their people, resources and
products than has ever been displayed
before. Instead of the usual exhibit
of a pagoda and a few Japanese jugglers and contortionists, so common
at expositions, the Japanese government has taken in hand the preparation of a thorough exhibit, with the
idea not only of amusing the visitor,
but of instructing the world in Japan's
commercial status, and of increasing
her trade with the nations of the
Pacific.
T. Takasawa, Imperial Commissioner to the Exposition, arrived in
Seattle a month ago to take personal
charge of the erection of Japan's
building, which is now almost complete. He was accompanied by K.
Hayashi, special consular agent, who
will be attached to the local Japanese
consulate this summer, and will look
after the interests of thousands of
his countrymen who will visit the
United States to see the Exposition
Japan's building is of the architecture of that nation a century ago. It
is being erected by skilled workmen
of Japan, who are residents of the
Northwest. Much of the material has
been imported from the Orient, and
the building will be typical of the land
it represents. For the collection of
the exhibits it will house, Japan is
spending 200,000 yen, half of which
is appropriated by the government,
the other half by Japanese business
men through the Japanese Exhibition
Society. The value of the exhibit will
be many millions of yen, for the government of Japan is entrusting to its
commissioner some of the rarest and
most sacred of its relics and documents.
As in the case of the U. S. Government, Japan will have a complete
mint in operation in its building. The
war equipment and methods of Japan
will be shown, with models of aged
war junks, and modern battleships,
of old time swords and armor, and
modern rifles. The fisheries and manufactures, the tea growing and agriculture, will be, displayed. And for
entertainment there will be Jpanese
theatres and art exhibits, and the tea
gardens with kimona garbed geishas,
which have contributed so much to
the romantic lore of the islands.
Among the government displays at
the A. Y. P. Exposition, Japan will
run a close race for first place, barring the mammoth display which
Uncle Sam is preparing. The International tone given to the A. Y. P.
by the displays of the nations of the
Pacific is one of the Expositions leading attractions, and Japan is more
than doing her share in this department.
"I'm sorry," said the man tailor,
"that your last gown didn't please
you. I hope that won't prevent you
sending your friends to us." "I'm
afraid it will," replied Mrs. Swellman.
"I don't want to get them into bad
habits."
!fe^M«uawiawwiaiMM
_____ THE WEEK  SATURDAY, APRIL 17, 1908
VICTORIA LAND DISTBICT
. District of Coast
■ lake notice that W. Wentworth Bell,
li Toronto, Ont., engineer, intends to
Inly for permission to purchase the
■'lowing described lands:—Commencing
la post planted about SO chains north
list of the north west corner of Lot
J. S.A.W. script; thence east 40 chains;
lence north 40 chains; thence west 40
lalns, more or less, to lake; thence
lutherly along lake 40 chains, more or
fa, to point of commencement.
Dated Pebruary 16th, 1909.
W.  WENTWORTH  BELL.
pb. 2. J.  R. Morrison,  Agent.
■'    VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
_W District of Coast
Take notice that Llllas Ross, of Vic-
irta, married woman, Intends to apply
- permission to purchase the following
scribed lands:—Commencing at a post
'anted about 20 chains north or tue
uth west corner of Lot 28; thence west
_ chains; thence north 40 chains;
ence east 40 chains; thence south .it
ains to point of commencement,
bated February 16th, 1909.
LILLYS ROSS.
lib. 27 J.  R. Morrison,  Agent
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
■Take notice that William Fernie, of
Ijctoria, capitalist, Intends to apply tor
I'rmission to purchase the following
■scribed lands:—Commencing at a post
■anted about 20 chains north of the
Krth west corner of Lot 25, Anaham
■.ke; thence running west 80 chains;
lence south 40 chains; thence east 80
■ains; thence north 40 chainB to point
I commencement.
■Dated February 15th, 1909.
II WILLIAM FERNIE.
lib.   2. 3.   R.  Morrison,   Agent.
I     VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
■{Take notice that Edith Rose Scott, of
[Incouver, B.C., spinster, intends to ap-
t for permission to purchase the fol-
■wing described lands:—Commencing at
■post planted about 20 chains north of
T-e north-west corner of Lot 26, Anaham
like; thence east 80 chains; thence
girth 40 chains; thence west 80 chains;
lence south 40 chains to point of com-
Ibncement.
■l>t.ed February 15th, 1909.
EDITH ROSE SCOTT.
i 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
I     VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
I District of Coast
ITake notice that Susan Mary Baiss, of
Jfctoria, B.C., married woman, intenas
I; apply for permission to purchase the
■ llowing described lands:—Commencing
li a post planted about 3 miles east of
■ilmon river and about 16 miles north
I. Anaham Lake; thence north 40
lialns; thence east 40 chains; thence
fcuth 40 chains; thence west 40 chains
\> point of commencement.
(Dated February 15th, 1909.
« SUSAN MARY BAISS.
feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
(District of Coast
Take notice that Chartres C. Pember-
n, of Victoria, B.C., lawyer, intends to
ply  for  permission  to  purchase  the
llowing described lands:—Commencing
a post planted about 3 miles east ot
Imon River and about 14 miles north
Anaham    Lake;   thence   north    80
a,lns;   thence  east  40  chains;  thence
ith 80 chains; thence west 40 chains
point of commencement.
Dated February 16th,  1909.
, CHARTRES C. PEMBERTON.
I'eb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
IImM District of Coast
I Take notice that .Katherine Phylllss
lurrell, of Victoria, marled woman, in-
ends to apply for permission to pur-
hase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about 3
niles east of the Salmon River and
bout 15 miles north of Anaham Lake;
hence north 80 chains; thence east 40
hains; thence south 80 chains; thence
rest 40 chains to point of commence-
lent
Dated February 16th, 1909.
. KATHERINE PHYLLISS BURRELL.
Feb 27
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that William S. Maher,
if Victoria, capitalist, intends to apply
lor permission to purchase the fellow-
ng described lands:—Commencing at
i post planted about 40 chains south of
he south west corner of Lot 28, Ana-
tam Lake; thence south 40 chains;
;hence west 20 chains; thence north 40
lhains; thence east 20 chains to point
>f commencement.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
WILLIAM S.  MAHER.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that James Stevenson
i3aiss, of .Victoria, rancher, intends to
■apply for permission to purchase the
■following described lands:—Commenc-
ling at a post planted near Morrison
Itrail to Lewis Creek (branch ot __ai-
Bmon River) and about 10 mlles from
■forks of said trail and Palmer trail;
Ithence north 80 chains; thence east 80
Ichains; thence south 80 chains; thence
■west 80 chains to point of commence-
Iment, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
- JAMES   STEVENSON  BAISS.
I Feb 27
VICTOBIA LAND DISTBICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Charles T. Dupont,
of Victoria, capitalist, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following
described    lands:—Commencing    at    &
post planted  about  4  miles  north of
Fish  trap where Palmer trail  crosses
Salmon Biver; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 40 chains to point of
commencement,   containing   320   acres,
more or less.
Dated February 16th, 1909. .
CHARLES THOMAS DUPONT.
I Feb 27
VICTOBIA LAND DISTBICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Charles Poole, of Vlc-
trlao, laborer, Intends to apply for permision to purchase the following described lands:—Comencing at a post
planted on the east shore of Anaham
Lake, about 2 mlles from head of lake;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains to lake; thence westerly along
lake 80 chains, more or less; thence
northerly along lake 80 chains, more ol
less, to point of commencement, contam-
<ng 640 acres, more or less.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
fjj_.-« * ■*. -H-ia   -"a/-*.
I Feb 27
6HBALES "POOLE.
VICTOBIA LAND DISTBICT
District of Coast
ITake notice that Janet E. Mesher, of
Vietoria, married   woman,    intends  to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 8 miles east of
forks' of Palmer trail and Morrison's
trail to Lewis Creek, and about 100
chains east of small lake lying north or
trail; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 320 acres, more
or less.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
JANET E. MESHEB.
Feb 27 J. B. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTBICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Isabella Bell, of
Toronto, married woman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 8 miles east of
Fish trap on Palmer trail, and about 40
chains south of small lake near Lewis
Creek; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 40 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence east 40 chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more
or less,
Dated February 16th, 1909.
ISABELLA BELL.
Feb 27 J. B. Morrison, Agent.
VICTOBIA LAND DISTBICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Mary L. Dupont, of
Victoria, married woman, intends to apply for permision to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 4 1-2 miles soutn
of the Indian ranch on Salmon River;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 40 chains to point of commencement.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
MARY L. DUPONT.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Michael Finnerty, of
Victoria, farmer, Intends to apply for
permision to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 4 miles east of Salmon
Eiver and about 7 miles north of Anaham Lake; thence west 40 chains! thence
south 40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of commencement,  containing  160 acres.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
MICHAEL FINNERTY.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Charles C. Revans,
of Victoria, farmer, Intends to apply for
permission   to  purchase   the   following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 4 miles north of Anaham
Lake;  thence south  80  chains;   thence
west 40 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 40 chains to point of commencement.
Dated February 15th,  1909.
CHARLES C. REVANS.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTEICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Ellen S. Bell, of Victoria, widow, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the north east corner of Lot
27, S.A.W. script; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thehce west 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
Dated February 16th,  1909.
ELLEN S.  BELL.	
Feb 27 ,      J. R. Morrison, Agent
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that J. Stirling Floyd, or
Victoria, clerk, intends to apply, for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a . post
planted at the south, west, corner of
Lot 28, S.A.W. script, near Anaham
Lake; thence south 80. chains: thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
J.  STIRLING FLOYD.
Feb 27 J. B. Morrison, Agent.
VICTOEIA LAND DISTEICT
District of Coast
Take notice that John V. Clegg, of
Victoria, accountant, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 80 chains south oi
the south east corner of Lot 28, S.AW.
script, near Anaham Lake; thence east
80 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 40
chains to point of commencement.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
JOHN V. CLEGG.
Feb 27 J. B. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast
Take notice that H. P. O'Farrell, of
rancher, intends to apply ror
permission   to   purchase   the   following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 40 chatns north of Lewis
Creek  (branch of Salmon River)  at a
point  about  13  miles  from  mouth  of
creek;   thence south  40  chains;  thence
west 40 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 40 chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more
or less.
Dated  February  16th,   1909.
HENRY PERCY O'FARRELL.
Feb 27
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Marlon Maher, oi
Victoria, married woman, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at
a post planted near the south bank of
Lewis Creek (branch of Salmon River)
and about 12 miles from mouth of creek;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
MARION MAHER.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Isabella McQulllai
of Victoria, married woman, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the narrows on
Salmon River, near the foot of Anaham Lake, on west bank of river; thence
west 40 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence east 40 chains, more or less to
lake; thence northerly along lake to
point of commencement.
Dated February 16th,  1909.
Isabella Mcquillan.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast
Take notice that Joseph D. Virtue, of
Victoria,  accountant,   Intends  to  apply
for permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted west of the Salmon River, about
1 1-2 miles from foot of Anaham Lake;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 40
chains, more or less,' to river; thence
northerly 80 chains along' river; thence
west 40 chains, more or less, to point
of commencement.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
JOSEPH D. VIRTUE.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the Reserve existing on Lot 228, Rupert District, is cancelled.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Department of  Lands,
Victoria, B.C., March 17th, 1909.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Land Registry Offlce, New Westminster.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Land Registry Offlce, New
Westminster," will be received by the
Honourable the Minister of Public
Works, at the Department of Public
Works, Victoria, B.C., up to and including Monday the 26th of April next, for
tha erection and completion of a Land
Registry Offlce at New Westminster,
B.C.
Specifications, conditions of tendering
and contract, may be seen at the offlce
of the Public Works Engineer, Victoria,
B.C.; at the offlce of the Government
Agent, at New Westminster; and at the
offlce of the Provincial Timber Inspector, Vancouver, B.C.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque, or certificate
of deposit oh a chartered bank in Canada, made payable to the Hon. the
Minister of Public Works, or by cash,
in the sum of five per cent, of the
amount of the tender, which sum shall
be forfeited if the party tendering decline to enter into contract when called
upon to do so, or fail to complete the
work contracted for.
The cheques, certificates of deposit,
or cash, of unsuccessful tenderers will
be returned to them after the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the forms supplied signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed in the envelope
furnished.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Pubile Works,
Victoria, B. C, 27th March, 1909.
apl. 3
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that David H. Bale, ot
Victoria, contractor, intends to apply for
permission  to  purchase  the  following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 3 miles south of Indian
house on Salmon Elver; thence south 80
chains;  thence  east  40  chains;  thence
north 80 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated February  15th,  1909.
DAVID   H.   BALE.
Feb. 27 J.  R.  Morrison,  Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Elsie Bell, of Victoria, married woman, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 1 1-2 miles north
west of tlie north west corner of Lot
27; thence north 20 chains; thence west
40 chains; thence south 20 chains; thence
east 40 chains to point of commencement.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
ELSIE BELL.
Feb.  27 J.   R.  Morrison,  Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice  that  Arthur Davies  Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Comencing  at   a  post   planted  at   the
south east corner of Lot  26,  Anaham
Lake;  thence south  40  chains;  thence
west 40 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 40 chains to point of commencement.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
ARTHUR  DAVIES.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
"LAND EEGISTEY ACT.'
In the matter of an application for a
Duplicate   Certificate   of   Title   to
Sub-division 4 of Suburban Lot 12,
Victoria City.
NOTICE is hereby given that it is my
intention at the expiration of one month
from the date of the first publication
hereof to issue a Duplicate Certlflcate
of Title to said land issued to Walter
Dunbar  Klrkaldy  Gibson  on  the   26th
day   of   October,   1894,   and   numbered
18783A.
Land Eegistry Offlce, Victoria, B. C,
the 26th day of March, 1909.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
apl 24 Registrar-General of Titles.
NOTICE.
NOTICE ls hereby given that the reserve placed upon certain lands ln the
vicinity of Lower Kootenay River, District of Kootenay, notice of which appeared ln the British Columbia Gazette
of the 14th of August, 1884, ls cancelled, for the purpose ot disposing of
such lands by public auction, and to
permit of giving effect to the recommendations contained In the report of
Mr. W. F. Teetzel, a commissioner appointed to adjudicate upon the claims of
certain squatters upon the said lands,
but for no other purpose.
ROBERT A  RENWICK.
Deputy Commissioner of Lands and
Works, Lands and Works Department.
Victoria, B. C, 6th October, 1908.
JanS.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast
Take notice that Jessie Clara Bell, of
Victoria, spinster, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on Palmer trail, about 6 mlles
north west of J. Lunos' ranch on Upper
Salmon River and about 1 mile east or
Towdestan Lake; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 40 chains to point of
commencement, containing 320 acres,
more or less.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
JESSIE   CLARA   BELL.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Frederick Stewart
Burell, of Victoria, accountant, intenas
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted on the west bank of
Salmon River, about 10 chains north oi
ford on the Bella Coola Ootra Lake trail
and near the foot of Anaham Lake;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east 80 chains, more or
less, to river; thence northerly along
river to point of commencement
Dated February 16th, 1909.
FREDERICK STEWART BURRELL
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that George C. Mesher, of
Victoria, contractor, intends to apply for
permision to purchase the following described  lands:—Commencing  at   a   post
planted about 4 miles south of .Indian
ranch on  Salmon  River;  thence  south
80 chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 40 chalna
to .point of commencement
Dated February 16th, 1909.
GEORGE C.  MESHER.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Elizabeth M. Coulthard, of Victoria, widow, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 3 1-2 mlles
southerly from Indian ranch on Salmon
River; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 40 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains to point of commencement.
Dated February 16th,  1909.
ELIZABETH M. COULTHARD.
Feb.  27 J.  R.  Morrison,  Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District- of Coast
Take notice that Francis Barton, of
Victoria, merchant, intends to apply ior
permission   to   purchase- the   following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 1 mile south of Blayney's
pre-emption; thence,  south    80 Chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence north su
chains; thence west 40 chains to point
of comencement
Dated February 16th, 1909.
FEANCIS BABTON.
Feb.  27 J.  B. Morrison,  Agent.
NOTICE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that the Beserve on Lot 29a, Bange 4, Coast District, ls cancelled.
B. A BENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of
Lands and Works.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., 15th October, 1908.
Cm
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Coal Prospecting Notice—Tumbo Island.
Notice is hereby given that Arthur S.
Blakemore will within 60 days from this
date, apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a License to prospect for Coal under the
area described as follows:—
Commencing at a post on a stump at
the centre of the north shore of Tumbo
Island at high water mark; thence north
one mile; thence west one mlle; thence
south one mile; thence east one mile
to place of beginning.
February  llth,   1909.
apl 17 ARTHUR S. BLAKEMORE.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT.
Coal Prospecting Notice—Tumbo Island.
Notice ls hereby given that Clarice
Blakemore will within 60 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Com-
misioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
License to prospect for Coal under the
area described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at thc
extreme westerly end of Tumbo Island
at high water mark; thence north one
mlle; thence west one mile; thence south
one mile; thence east one mile to place
of beginning.
February llth, 1909.
apl 17 CLARICE BLAKEMORE!.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT.
Coal Prospecting Notice—Tumbo Island.
Notice Is hereby given that William
Blakemore will within 60 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
License to prospect for Coal under the
area described as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
extreme easterly end of Tumbo Island
at high water mark; thence north one
mile; thence east one mile; thence south
one mile; thence west one mile to the
place of beginning.
February llth, 1909.
apl 17 WILLIAM BLAKEMORE.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT.
Coal Prospecting Notice—Tumbo Island.
Notice Is hereby given that Barbara
Blakemore will within 60 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
License to prospect for Coal under the
area described as follows:—
Commencing at a post made on a
stump at the centre of the north shore
of Tumbo Island at high water mark;
thence north one mile; thence east one
mile; thence south one mile; thence west
one mile to the place of beginning.
February llth, 1909.
apl 17 BARBARA BLAKEMORE.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Alternative Sealed Tenders, superscribed "Tender for Wharf, Prince Rupert," will be received by the Honourable the Minister of Public Works up
to noon of Tuesday, the 27th April,
1900, for the erection and completion
of a reinforced concrete wharf with timber superstructure at Prince Rupert,
B.C.
1. For  wharf complete inolnslv* of
slips:
2. For  wharf complete  exclusive of
slips.
Plans, Specifications, Contract and
Forms of Tender may be seen on and
after the 27th day of March, 1909, at
the offices of the Government Agent,
Prince Bupert; of the Government
Agent, New Westminster; of the Provincial Timber Inspector, Vancouver;
and at the Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C.
Each proposal must be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank of
Canada, made payable to the Hon. the
Minister of Publio Works, for a sum
equivalent to ten per cent of tha
amount of the tender, which shall be
forfeited if the party tendering decline
to enter into contract when called upon
to do so, or if he fail to complete the
work contracted for. The cheques or
certificates of deposit of unsuccessful
tenderers will be returned to them upon
the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the forms supplied, signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed in the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
EDWARD MOHUN,
EDWABD HOHUN,
Assistant Engineer.
Public Works Department
Victoria, B.C., 19th March, 1909.
apl 24
_Ua__
SA*
CANCELLATION OF  RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve covering the fractional sections
31, 32 and S3, Denman Island, notice
of which was published in the British
Columbia Gazette of October 21st 187*,
Is cancelled.
ROBT. A RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of
Lands and Works.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., December 17th, 1101.
Dec. 17
LICENCE    TO    AN    EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANY.
"Companies' Act 1897."
Canada:
Province of British Columbia.
No. 469.
This is to certify that the 'Winnipeg
OU Company, Limited," ls authorised
and licensed to carry on business within
the Province of British Columbia, ana
to carry out er effect all or any of the
objects of the Company to which the
legislative authority of the Legislature
of British Columbia extends.
The head offlce of the Company ls
situate at the City of Winnipeg, in the
Province of Manitoba.
The amount of the capital of the
Company ls fifty thousand dollars, divided into five hundred shares of one
hundred dollars each.
The head office of the Company in this
Province ls situate at the City of Victoria, and Andrew Wright, Financial
Agent, whose address is Victoria aforesaid, is the attorney for the company.
Given  under my Hand and  Seal of
Offlce at Victoria,  Province of British
Columbia,  this  third day of February,
one thousand nine hundred and nine.
(L. S). S. Y. WOOTTON.
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has been established and licensed are:
To purchase, acquire, hold, and operate oil refineries, plant and machinery
of all kinds; to carry on the bustnem>
of buying, leasing, letting and selling
petroleum and oil lands; buying, selling,
producing and manufacturing all kinds
of oil and all products and compounds
thereof, and all articles and substances
of which oil ls an Ingredient; of sink-
ink, boring, making, putting down, and
building oil wells, and all buildings and
erections which may be requisite ln connection therewith and of otherwise developing and operating upon petroleum
oil lands; of erecting, leasing, buying,
letting and selling oil refineries together
with all such buildings and works as
may be necessary ln connection with tho
production and sale of oil products and
all compounds thereof, and all sud-
stances and articles of which oil ls an
Ingredient; to manufacture, buy, sell,
and deal In oil producers, machinery,
supplies, and utensils of all kinds; to
carry on the business of storing, tanking and warehousing refined and crude
oil and all products and compounds
thereof, and all substances and articles
of which oil ls an Ingredient and granting warehouse receipts for the same;
to construct, equip and operate pipe
lines and other contrivances or appliances for the transportation of ou;
the doing of all such other acts ana
things as are Incidental or conducive
to the attainment of any of the objects
aforesaid.
BRADSHAW & DAVIE
Solicitors for the Bald Company,
mch 20
WING ON
Employment Agent
Wood and Coal for Sale.
Also Scavenging.
170-9 Government St
Phone «3
VICTORIA, B.C. I
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 17, 1909.
Provincial Elections Act
VICTORIA CITY ELECTORAL DISTRICT
** ^B,*e**7$BJ2*t °W,€*l0M taT» "*** a*& wit* m* •**taul* *»• 'oUowUw person.' names being rrtaUwd oi the List of Totem for tbe above distriot
on tae grounds set forth. «wv»» -«*_.-_*«.»
-* ~ ~  - -—-■ -*••■ *----_* ___■ _a. __dot. distriot
_   a. A_° *0-V_t__-__ TAKE NOTICE that X will, on Monday, the 3rd day of Mav   lano  .♦ «___ ,.
Bastion Square, Victoria, hold A Court of BMUlon'for th. pugos. of^^Si| a_?d SitomiaS* SldrtSLtio«   0'0l0*k '» ** *or,noon' «* **• Court tion..,
Unless the person objected to or  some other Provincial Voter on his behalf __..*_«_!.   * _.""J""*01"-
not w.U founded, I .ban strike the nam* of th. person so objiotid" otftiw sa_dLi.fcPP•", at tte "ld 0ourt »»* ******* »• that th. said objection Is
n_Lt____ a__tm TCh du o-f Anvil.  lQIM
KABVEY COMBE, Bsgistrar of Voters.
DatM this 7th day of April, 1909.
Christian Name and Surname of Voter.
Abbott, Frank	
Abbott, Frank  	
Abbott, Ralph Lome ,
Abolafia David	
Ackrill, Francis Herbert	
Adams, George Kennet Baker ..
Adams, Joseph  ,.
Adelson, Aaron 	
Algar, Charles Duncan  	
Allen, John	
Anderson, Charles Ferdinand  ..
Anderson, Herbert Glass 	
Andreoli, Kinaldo 	
Arbuckle, Matthew	
Aria, Thomas 	
Arkless, Thomas 	
Arnold, Archibald Andrews	
Ashton, Edgar 	
Atack, George Day 	
Aubin,  Charles William	
Baillie,  Peter    	
Baird, William  	
Baker,  Clarence  	
Baker, Frederick Charles	
Baker, Frederick Charles 	
Barbour, Bobert S	
Barnler, James Lambert	
Barrack, George 	
barrett,  William  	
Barton, William Henry 	
Basso, Nicholas	
Beaumont, Arthur 	
Bechtel, Daniel Arthur 	
Begg, Alexander 	
Belt rey, Arthur Edward	
Berryman, William 	
Black, William	
Blake, Henry Charles 	
Blygh, Andrew	
Boorman, Harry Eustace  	
Boorman, William Scoons 	
Booth, Charles  	
Borde, Louis Auguste	
Brakes, Henry 	
Bremner, Allan	
Brenchley, Arthur 	
Brewer, Harry	
Brock, Frederick George	
Calwell, James   '.,..	
Campbell, Alexander Blackwood
Campbell, John  	
Carruthers, JWllliam John
Residence,
-uarruLiiuia,    vviiiiaiu   «ivu_i   ............ ,o_   .._i_ __i_*cc
Casselton,   Richard    .. 112 First Street
California Saloon, John Street	
33 Johnson Street	
46 Yates Street	
Empress Hotel	
634 Gorge Road	
Dl Blanchard Street 	
Hillside Avenue and Cook Street	
21 St. Louis Street 	
Lot 7, Oakland District 	
Cor. Russell Street and Esquimalt Street
48 Store Street	
Balmoral Hotel, Douglas Street	
840 Johnson Street	
East side Richmond Avenue	
162 Government Street	
California  Hotel	
9 South Park Sheet 	
Dominion Hotel 	
11 Whittaker Street	
76 John Street 	
50 Yates Street	
68 South Road, Spring Ridge	
64 John Street 	
64 John Street	
64 John Street  	
160 Fort Street	
460 Superior Street	
5   Sisters  Block
348 Douglas Street  ...
Cor Sunnyside Av and Craigflower Rd..
47 Rock Bay Avenue	
32 Bay Street	
312 Douglas Street	
9 Humboldt Street 	
44 Rae Street	
Brunswick Hotel, Yates Street 	
Henley Point, Beacon Hill 	
Turpels Yard 	
140 Fort Street	
129 Michigan Street 	
129 Michigan Street 	
61 St. Lawrence Street	
42 Chatham Street ...	
Howard Street off Edmonton Road	
Gordon Hotel, Yates Street 	
120 Belleville Street	
Burnside Road 	
46 Hillside Avenue	
113 Pandora Street	
87 Henry Street	
2831 Bridge Street 	
31 Work Street	
Profession, Trade or Calling.
Catterall, John 	
Catterall, William	
Christopher, David Baxter ..
Clark, Lawrence	
Clark, Lawrence	
Clegg, John 	
Clyde, Archibald  	
Clyde, Frederick	
Cornish, Charles J	
Cort,  George Harris   	
Cowan, James Edward ......
Cox, John Graham 	
Craig, Thomas P.  	
Cruickshank, George 	
Davis, James 	
Dennis, Arthur George ......
Devereux, William E	
Dier, Elmore D.	
Dodgson, H. A. M	
Earl, Wesley 	
Evans, John  ....
Evans, Timothy Richard ....
Ferris, Frank Elwood  	
Fowler, Stanley 	
Fox, William Charles	
French,  Charles  Hunt   	
Galligher, John ;	
Gates, Benjamin 	
Goudie, Edward John	
Goudie, Thomas	
Gregg, Frank Beck 	
Greig, John	
Haggart,  William   	
Harper,  William   	
Harrison, George Benjamin .
Heathcote, Frederick William
Hicks, William 	
Higgins, Thomas	
Higham, Robert Mulllns ....
Humber, Frank Russell ......
Jamieson, James Robert ....
Johnson, James 	
Jordan, William Grahame ...
King, Walter H	
Lambeth, William  	
Lavin, Patrick 	
Leitch, Archibald	
Le Messurier, Thomas ..'....
Lester, Henry William	
McCue, Michael	
McLaren, Thomas William ...
McLean, Laughlin 	
Mapleton, John Charles  	
Mathews, Harold Leslie  .....
Mesher, Frederick James	
Murray, Edward 	
Murray, James Thomas 	
Murray, Robert 	
Nellor, Fred. James	
Nesbitt, John Saunders 	
Norton, Mark 	
Osterhout, Smith Stanley
Parry, George E	
Patterson, Robert	
Patterson, William  	
Pearce, John S	
Pearce, Edward, Sen'r	
Phillips, James 	
Phillips, Josiah Eva	
Pooley, William Henry	
Potts, Thomas 	
Pridham, Edward Rendall  ,..
Rice, Charles  	
Richmond, John	
Rogerson, Frederick	
Rounding, Samuel  	
Scott, William 	
Shaw, John	
Shaw, John	
Sheaft, Percy Richard 	
Stewart, Alexander  	
Stewart,  Charlas   	
Swords,  Robert   	
Tallyard, James  	
Tulk, Samuel 	
Turner, Richard William
Tyson, John  	
West, John Harvey	
Wheatcroft, Fred	
Wlckwire, Aylmer McNeil  ...
Wood, Benjamin Lomas 	
Woods, John	
Worth ington, Thomas Irwin ..
Yates, Henry Myers 	
Voungson, John  ,
47 First Street -.   ..
47 First Street  ..
Sumas Street	
571 Henry Street	
571 Henry Street 	
208 Pandora Avenue 	
616 Henry Street  	
28 Rock Bay Avenue	
1282 Gladstone Avenue 	
Jubilee Alley, Johnson Street	
221 Pandora Street 	
42   King's   Road   	
574 Hillside Avenue	
9 Bay Street	
Rock Bay Hotel	
12% Third Street	
126 Richardson Street	
45 Fernwood Road	
68 North Chatham Street 	
15 Ellis Street	
Empire Hotel	
14 Market Street  	
42 King's Road	
12 King's Road 	
26 Third Street	
25  First Street  	
Rock Bay Hotel	
Cor. Stanley Av. and N Chatham St...,
Alpha Street	
SS. Quadra	
87 John Street	
134 Cormorant Street 	
30 John Street	
Garbally Road	
42 Second Street	
118 Dallas Road
14 Market Street  Salesman
Bartender   	
Marine Fireman 	
Steamboat Man. 	
Chemist	
Carpenter	
Minister	
Letter Carrier	
Merchant	
Retired	
Engine Driver	
Sealer	
Clerk  ,
Labourer 	
Marine Engineer	
Bricklayer	
Marine Fireman	
Window Dresser	
Seaman	
Insurance Superintendent
Ship Carpenter	
Steward 	
Boiler-maker 	
Driver	
Moulder   .....
Real Estate Agent ..
Teamster	
Bookkeeper 	
Teamster 	
Professor of Music .
Boiler-maker	
Cabinet Maker	
Student 	
Author	
Merchant	
Bartender	
Groom	
Ship Carpenter	
French Polisher	
Bookkeeper	
Clerk	
Engineer	
Plumber	
Gentleman	
Clerk	
Wholesale Merchant .
Clerk	
Salesman ..-	
Blacksmith	
Miner	
Ship Carpenter 	
Manufacturer	
Gentleman	
Plumber 	
Clerk	
Bookkeeper   ,
Iron Ship Worker ...
Boilermaker	
Gentleman	
Boilermaker	
Boilermaker	
Driver	
Longshoreman	
Clerk	
Merchant	
Boilermaker	
Tanner 	
Labourer	
Grocer 	
Civil Engineer	
Dentist  .
Electrician 	
Stove Mounter  	
Seaman	
Clerk 	
Master Mariner 	
Carpenter 	
Carpenter 	
Fur Buyer	
Boilermaker's Helper
Labourer	
Lineman	
Fireman	
Tailor	
Millhand	
Manufacturer	
Milkman  	
Agent 	
Clerk
634 Gorge Road	
19 Rae Street	
Topaz Avenue	
36 Bridge Street	
Work Street, near Point Ellice Bridge..
46 Hillside Avenue	
9 Bodwell Street	
240 Simcoe Street	
SS. Charmer	
547 Henry Street	
Garbally Road	
911 Blanchard Street	
Jubilee Saloon	
64 Fourth Street	
Clarence Hotel 	
24 Vlning Street	
42%  Bridge Street	
50 Second Street 	
39 Princess Avenue	
42 First Street 	
213 Douglas Street 	
Bridge Street near Bay	
Clarence Hotel	
42% Bridge Street 	
Topaz Avenue 	
80 Fairfield Road	
63 Henry Street	
Dallas Hotel	
16 North Road	
329 Douglas Street 	
Beacon St., N. side, near Simcoe St...
Angel Hotel, Langley Street 	
Corner David and Turner Streets	
12 Bridge Street 	
20 Second Street 	
Rock Bay Hotel 	
%   Rendall  Street	
Lot 80, Fairfield Road  	
Cor. Gorge and Garbally Roads  	
34 Walnut Street  	
Cor. Cadboro Bay Rd. and Belcher St..
1610 Belcher Street 	
(1 Work Street	
Gorge Road	
W. C. T. U., Yates St	
524 John Street	
Lot 80, Fairfield Road	
i. King's Road 	
61 Bellot Street 	
424 Work Street  	
5 Penwell Street	
Bridge Street, near Bay Street	
S Gorge Road 	
7 Speed Avenue	
Str. Pilot	
116  North Pembroke Street  	
Regent's Park, Cadboro Bay Road ....
Burnside Road  	
Conductor	
Steward	
Dentist	
Mariner	
Fisherman    ...
Machinist	
Teamster	
Transfer Man	
Fireman	
Boilermaker	
Agent .-■•.. i ..;	
Grocer 	
Longshoreman	
Plumber	
Master Mariner	
Labourer 	
Painter ,
Contractor	
Teamster	
Mariner   t,
Teamster	
Miner 	
Contractor 	
Steamboatman	
Clergyman	
Jeweller	
Mlllman	
Miner	
Architect	
Miner	
Gardener	
Stonecutter 	
Engineer	
Mariner  	
Cabinet Maker 	
Labourer 	
Carpenter 	
Painter 	
Bookkeeper 	
Carpenter 	
Clerk 	
Hardware Clerk	
Fireman   	
Foreman Moulder ...
Hotel Worker	
Advertizing Manager
Master Mariner	
Ship Carpenter ......
Traveller ,
Mason	
Furniture Maker ....
Miner 	
Carpenter 	
Tailor	
Fireman 	
Clerk 	
Bookkeeper	
Seaman 	
Nature of Objection.
Ceased to reside in the District
Ceased to reside in the District
Ceased to reside in the District
Ceased to reside in the District
Ceased to reside ln the District
Ceased to reside ln the District
Ceased to reside in the District
Dead.
Ceased to reside in the District
Dead.
Ceased to reside ln the District
Ceased to reside in tho District
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District
Ceased to reside ln the District
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District
Ceased to reside in the District.
Dead.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Dead.
Ceased to reside in the District
Ceased to reside ln the District
Ceased to reside in the District
Ceased to reside in the District
Ceased to reside in the District
Ceased to reside in the District
Dead.
Ceased to reside in the District
Ceased to reside in the District
Dead.
Ceased to reside ln the District
Dead.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Dead.
Ceased to reside ln the District-
Ceased to reside in the District
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Dead.
Dead.
Dead.
Ceased to reside in the District
Dead.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Dead.
Ceased to reside in the District
Ceased to reside ln the District
Ceased to reside in the District
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District
Ceased to reside in the District
Ceased to reside in the District.
Duplicate Name on List
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District
Dead.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Dead.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Dead.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Duplicate Name on List
Dead.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Dead.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Dead.
Ceased to reside ln the District
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District
Ceased to reside ln the District
Ceased to reside ln the District
Dead.
Dead.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Dead.
Dead.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Dead.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Duplicate Name on List
Dead.
Duplicate Name on List.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Dead.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Dead.
Dead.
Dead.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Dead.
Dead.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Dead.
Ceased to reside ln the District
Dead.
Dead.
Dead,
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Dead.
Ceased to reside in the District
Dead.
Ceased to reside ln the District
Dead.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Dead.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Dead.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Dead.
Ceased to reside in the District.
__|_________________EB
«m_______m_wm________________-_m___ THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 17   1909.
Provincial Elections Act
ESQUIMALT ELECTORAL DISTRICT
TAKE NOTICE tbat objection! have been filed with me against the following- persons' names being retained oa the List of Voters for tbe above distriot
on the grounds set forth. \a*>j___-
AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE tbat I will, on Monday, tbe 3rd day of May, 1909, at tbo bonr of 10 o'clock ln tho forenoon, at tbo Court House,
Bastion Square, Vietoria, bold a Court of Bevision for tbo purpose of bearing aad determining said objection*.
Union tbe person objected to or some other Provincial Voter on his behalf appears at tbe said Court and satisfies me tliat the said objection to
not well founded, I shall strike the nams of the person so objeoted to off tbe said List.
Sated this 7th day of April, 1909. KABVEY GOHBE, Begtotrar of Votero.
Christian Name and Surname of Voter.
Allison, Alfred 	
Allen, Samuel	
Alexander, Thomas 	
Anderson, William Harold Kerr 	
Annett, John Sheridan 	
Atkinson, Charles D. Trlsham	
Argyle, Albert Abercombie	
Bainbridge, Richard Taylor 	
Barber, William Davln 	
.Barker, Qeorge	
Blrse, James Charles	
Batterbury, John	
Battersby, John Qeorge ..............
Bennett, John .-;'* 'em
Bennett, Noble John .........  .......
Blanchard, Herman Samuel 	
Bennett, Frederick Morris	
Bergen, Otto *..'• ;..... ...;....
Black, William    ......   .....
Blatchford, John Saunders	
Boyd, David	
Brooks, Benjamin ...	
Bufton, Stephen	
Burton,  William Albert  .*..*.*	
Clarke, James Henry  i	
Craig, James Joseph  ................
Crouch, Sidney i.i	
Christopher,- John William ....-	
Campbell, Donald	
Carmichael,   John	
Carter, Alexander 	
Chisholm,   Reiney	
Clement, Thomas Moyes 	
Coutts, Alexander	
Dack, Septimus 	
De Courcey, John	
Davidson, Daniel  	
Deane, David	
Dixon, Joseph Marion 	
Emery, John	
Ervine,  James   	
Emery, Arthur Samuel  	
Fea,  Henry   	
Fisher, William Henry 	
Forsen, Alexander Enoch 	
Fountain, George  *.	
Fraser,  Norman Stewart  	
Furlonge, Alexander Montgomery S...
Garslde,  Harrison  	
Gibbons, Charles Harrison 	
Graylen, Arthur James 	
Griffin, Patrick Power 	
Harvey, Charles  	
Henderson,  John  	
Hammond, Charles .".	
Henderson, Edward Ernest	
Hill, Robert Oakshott	
Hodgklns, Henry  	
Hogan, John  ........
Holligan, James Joseph 	
House, Herbert   	
Hubbard, Frederick William	
Humby, Arthur George 	
Howard, Victor Llewellyn	
Ingle, Alfred ••
Irish, Arthur Milroy  ;....
Irving,  John	
Johansen, Johnson Frederick 	
Jenkins,  Edward  	
Jeves, Henry Mathew	
Johnston, William	
Jones, Arthur  	
Kiell, James  _.-."..._	
Kermode, Thomas ;	
Kneebolter, Samuel 	
Kerrlson, Thomas William	
Lambard, Phillip John	
Logan, Hugh 	
Lafontaine, George	
Lodwick, ■ Geoffrey   	
Lomax, William	
McAuslan, James ..*	
MacDonald, Charles	
MacKenzie, Donald	
MacKenzie John Roderick	
McCloskey, James	
McCosh, Allan Percival	
McDonald, Murdock	
Mclnnes, Angus	
Mclnnes, Nell	
McNeal, William	
McPhee, Norman	
McKay, Kenneth	
Mcintosh, Robert William	
McBeth, Alexander	
Mairs, James H. 	
Marshall, William	
Mason, Walter	
Milne, James	
Mullens, Joseph Frank	
Murray, Allan Grlerson .-.*	
Malbon, Edward John	
Mann, Gilbert	
Martin, Thomas	
Miller,  James   ....	
Morrison,. James	
Neary, Patrick	
Nelson, William Wesley
Nichols,  Walter  	
Ogilvle, John ,
Olford, Richard Edward
O'Neill, Edward  	
Paine, George Fred'k Vosper
Park, Arthur	
Patterson, Samuel  	
Payne, Hubert St. John
Perry,  Calvin   	
Poole, Walter  	
Pooley, Thomas Edward
Poulton, George	
Preston, Frank 	
Prlndiville, Edward 	
Pender, Arthur Geo. John ..,
Phillips,   Richard   	
Prisk, Thomas	
Qulnn,   Bernard   	
Richardson, Robert John ..
Ridge,  Richard  	
Ross,  Robert Spence
Residence.
Roye, Samuel  Albert Head
Foster's Pier, Esquimalt  	
S.W. %,Sec. 14, Tp. 11, Port Renfrew..
The Alders	
Quarantine Station, William Head	
Sec. 61, Millstream, Highland District...
Pike Lake Road, Highland District	
Rocky Point, Metchosin	
2 Wharf Street, Esquimalt 	
Bay Terrace, Esquimalt & Dunsmuir Rd.
Daylesford, Constance Avenue	
Work Point Barracks	
Old Esquimau Road  	
N. side Craigflower Rd. nr. Gorge Rd...
Happy Valley,  Metchosin   .*	
Port Renfrew	
Craigflower Rd., Cor. Lampson St	
S.W. hi, Sec. 14, Tp. 11, Port Renfrew..
Goldstream Power House	
Globe Hotel, Esquimalt 	
Head Street, Esquimalt	
Coach & Horses Hotel	
Coach & Horses Hotel	
Esquimalt Hotel	
S.W. hi, Sec, 14, Tp. 11, Port Renfrew...
Gore Street	
Royal Naval Yard	
Gore Street, Esquimau	
Colwood..	
Otter Point 	
Coach & Horses Hotel  	
Esquimalt Hotel 	
Constance Cove Road 	
Bailey Cottage, Esquimalt Road	
The Alders	
Work Point Barracks 	
Work Point Barracks 	
Coach & Horses Hotel, Esquimalt Road.
Esquimalt	
Millstream 	
Glengary, Metchosin	
Cedars,  Colwood   	
Old Esquimalt Road, near Pottery .....
1 Gore Street, Esquimalt _-.-	
Coach & Horses Hotel, Esquimalt Road.
Port Renfrew  	
Constance Cove Rd., near Esquimalt Rd.
Port Renfrew	
Sec. 7, Range 5, Malahat District	
Helmcken Road	
Head Street ... .-■   .....
Esquimau Road facing Wharf Street...
Port Renfrew 	
Half-Way House, Esquimalt Road	
Coach & Horses Hotel, Esquimalt Road.
Near Masonic Hall, Esquimalt	
Colwood 	
Near Half-Way House  	
Naval Hospital  	
Esquimalt Hotel 	
Esquimalt Road	
Constance Avenue, Esquimalt Road ....
S.W. % Sec. 14, Tp. 11, Port Renfrew..
Esquimalt   ........	
Wharf Street	
Work Point Barracks	
Beaumont	
Goldstream	
Metchosin	
Beaumont Avenue	
Wharf Street   	
Port Renfrew	
Ship Inn ..... ...,	
Rose Bank, East Sooke 	
Quarantine   Station   	
S.W. hi See. 14, Tp. 11, Port Renfrew...
Head Street, near Gore Street	
Port Renfrew	
Esquimalt Road   	
Admiral Road	
Sooke Road	
Albert Head *.*	
Wharf Street, Esquimalt ..............
Old Esquimalt Road	
Constance Cove,  Road	
Esquimalt Road, near Head Street	
Coach & Horses	
Quarantine Station 	
S.W. y_ See. 14, Tp. 11, Port Renfrew..
S.W. hi Sec. 14, Tp. 11, Port Renfrew..
Coach & Horses Hotel ■	
Head Street  ......  .....
Constance Cove Road 	
Port Renfrew	
Port Renfrew	
Work Point Barracks	
Millstream  .......
Esquimalt Rd, N. side, nr Half-Way Hse
Esquimalt	
Coach & Horses	
Constance Avenue	
N. hi S.E. % Seo 22, Tp 11, Port Renfrew
Work Point Barracks	
Lampson Street, Esquimalt 	
Metchosin	
Strawberry Vale, Burnside Road ......
Hamilton Powder Wks, Magazine, Parsons Bridge 	
Esquimalt Hotel  	
Port Renfrew	
Half-Way House 	
Coach & Horses,* Esquimalt	
Hospital Street	
Wharf Street	
Constance Avenue	
Colwood	
Craigflower Farm, Craigflower 	
The Rectory	
Constance Avenue	
Happy Valley	
Fern Hill, Lampson Street  	
Millstream Road, Highland District	
Port Renfrew	
Esquimalt	
Albert Head 	
Miller's House, Parson's Bridge	
Port Renfrew	
New Inn, Esquimalt Road  	
Coach & Horses, Esquimau Road 	
Esquimalt Road, near Half-Way House..
William Head Station	
Profession, Trade or Calling.
Robinson, William
Ryan, Thomas Walter
Shorey, Henry William ...
Smith, William Luther ...
Scott,  William  	
Searle, Herbert James	
Skinner, James Alexander
Slavln, Francis Patrick
Wharf Street, Esquimalt
Work Point Barracks ...
Gore Street	
Esquimalt	
Esquimalt Hotel	
Work Point Barracks
Lampson & Lyall Street
Constance Avenue	
Smith, Samuel   I Port Renfrew
Spreadbow, Edwin    Boom Hse, Gordon River, Port Renfrew
Port Renfrew
Esquimalt Road (Eversley)
Stewart, William Louts	
Stuart, Gilzean Roland W.	
Stubbs, Frank     Colwood Park, Colwood
Tylor, John Glbbert  j Port Renfrew	
Tylor,  Owen Gllkes   * Port Renfrew	
Taylor, Henry  i Work Point Barracks 	
Unsworth, John     Esquimalt	
Woodward, Charles  I Work Point Barracks	
Walmsley, Peter j Goldstream	
Williams, Edwin i Admiral's Road 	
Witty, John Frederick    Bilstone, Metchosin 	
Weber, Adolph   :    Wharf Street	
White, Samuel     Wharf Streut, Esquimau  	
Williams, Reg. L. Musprat     Work Point Barracks 	
Woodley, George    Coach & Horses 	
Wright, Charles     Ferncllffe, Metchosin 	
Toung, John      Gordon River, San Juan, Port Renfrew.
Young, William      Wharf Street, Esquimalt 	
Naval Pensioner	
Logger   .....
Labourer 	
Physician 	
Lime Burner	
Farmer	
Painter  	
Pattern Maker	
Clerk in Holy Orders
Warrant Officer ......
Corporal P. A. M. C.
Labourer 	
Accountant ......  ...
Farmer	
Woodsman	
Plasterer 	
Logger	
Electrician 	
Sailor	
Carpenter	
Carpenter	
Ship Carpenter 	
Labourer	
Logger    	
Miner   ........
Inspector of Engines
Army Staff Sergeant .
Farmer ... .........
Farmer	
Piper 	
Labourer 	
B.  ...
G. A.
Labourer ,
Carpenter
Labourer .
Sapper R.
Gunner, R. C.
Butcher	
Civil Engineer   	
Farmer	
Farmer	
Farmer	
Carpenter	
Expense Store Ace	
Labourer   ....
Logger	
Cab Driver 	
Logger 	
Farmer	
Rancher	
Journalist *
Founder 	
Hook Tender 	
Bartender	
Boilermaker	
Blacksmith	
Farmer	
Chief Writer R. N	
Nurse	
Hostler	
Millman	
Draughtsman	
Logger	
Shipwright	
Hotel Keeper	
Gunner, R. C. G. Av	
Machinist  	
Hotel Keeper <
Farmer	
Bricklayer	
Engine Fitter	
Blacksmith	
Bartender  	
Farmer	
Deck Hand 	
Logger	
Warrant Officer, Imp. Forces
Farmer	
Navy Armourer ,-.-.	
Labourer	
Gentleman ...... ...... ....
Rancher	
Boatman	
Ship Carpenter .* .*.*.■	
Labourer ..   .......	
Civil  Servant	
Iron Worker's Helper .......
Gentleman ...... ........
Logger 	
Logger 	
Carpenter ......	
Labourer  ........ ..
Labourer	
Logger	
Blacksmith	
Corporal, R. C. G. A. .......,
Farmer 	
Labourer   .
Labourer	
Labourer	
Clerk  	
Rancher    	
Gunner, R. C. G. A. 	
Labourer  *.-.*
Farmer	
Farmer ......	
Caretker 	
Labourer	
Logger 	
Saloon Keeper	
Miner	
Copper Smith .......
Fireman	
Ordinance Foreman .
Surveyor 	
Rancher 	
Preacher 	
Fastener	
Farmer	
Barrister	
Farmer 	
Logger 	
Chief Engineer	
Railway   Engineer   .
Gentleman	
Mine Manager	
Saloon Keeper .....
Carpenter   	
Coachman 	
Watchman 	
Farmer	
Gentleman	
Gunner, R. C. G. A .
Foreman of Works .,
Dock Yard Employee
Labourer ......   ...
Aetg Bonb. R. C. G. .
Teamster	
Miner    	
Miner 	
Miner 	
Hook Tender 	
Rancher.	
Farmer	
Farmer	
Farmer	
Gunner, R. C. Q. A, .
Cook
Nature of Objection.
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Dead.
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Dead.
Ceased
Ceased
Dead.
Dead.
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District
to reside in the District
to reside ln the District
to reside ln the District
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District
to reside in the District,
to reside ln the District,
to reside in the District
to reside ln the District
to reside in the District.
Dead.
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Dead.
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Dead.
Ceased
Dead.
Dead.
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Dead.
Dead.
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
.Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Dead.
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Dead.
Dead.
Ceased
Ceased
DSftd.
Dead.
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Dead.
Dead.
Dead.
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
CeasSd
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Dead.
Dead.
Dead.
Dead.
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Dead.
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Dead.
Ceased
Dead.
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Sapper, R. E I Dead.
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
to reside ln
to reside in
the District
the District,
the District
the District
the District
the District,
the District
the District,
the District
the District,
the District
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
in the District,
in the District
in the District
in the District,
in the District,
in the District,
in the District.
to reside in the District
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District.
to reside in the District.
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
to reside In
io reside in
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District.
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
ln the District
ln the District,
in the District
in the District,
ln the District
in the District
in the District.
in the District -
in the District,
ln the District
in the District,
ln the District,
ln the District
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District
to reside in the District,
to reside ln the District.
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District
to reside In the District,
to reside in the District
to reside ln the District.
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
ln the
In the
in the
ln the
ln the
in the
ln the
in the
ln the
ln the
ln the
ln the
ln the
in the
ln the
ln the
ln the
in the
District
District
District
District
District
District.
District.
District
District.
District
District
District.
District
District
District
District.
District
District.
to reside ln
to reside in
to reside in
to reside In
to reside in
to reside In
to reside ln
to reside ln
to reside In
te reside in
to reside ln
to reside in
to reside ln
to reside ln
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
to reside ln
to reside ln
to reside ln
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District
the District
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District.
to reside tn the District.
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
ln the District.
In the District.
ln the District.
In the District.
In the District.
In the District.
ln the District.
lh the District.
ln the District,
ln the District,
ln the District.
In the District
In the District
ln the District.
Farmer
Boilermaker's Helper
Farmer	
Engineer	
Boatman  	
Major, R. C. G. A.
Fireman 	
Farmer	
Miner	
Labourer 	
Dead.
Dead.
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Dead.
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
ln the District.
In the District,
ln the District
in the District,
in the District,
ln the District,
tn the District. THE WEEK,  SATURDAY, APRIL. 17, 1908.
Provincial Elections Act
SAANICH   ELECTORAL DISTRICT
TAKE NOTICE tbat objections have been filed with me against tbe following perrons named being retained on tbe Met of Voters for tbe above district
on tbe grounds set forth.
AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE tbat I will, on Monday, tbe third day of Kay, 1309, at the hour of eleven o'clock In tbe forenoon at Tennyson
Road, Maywood, bold a Court of .Revision for the purpose of hearing and determining the said objections.
Unless tbe person objected to, or some other Provincial voter on his behalf, appears at the said Court and satisfies me tbat the said objection is not
veil founded, I shall strike the name of such person off the said list.
Dated this 8th day of April, 1909.
WILLIAM QBAHAM, Bcgistrar of Voters.
Christian Name and Surname of Voter.
Anderson, Aug. Corbett ...
Bruce, James Alexander ..
Case, Henry Oscar 	
Daley, James Bradford ...
Flesh,  Charles   Sherman   .
Ferguson, Everard Percival
Ferguson, Samuel Gardiner
Garnham, William 	
Percival,  Everard   	
Pamphlett, Robert 	
Bobbins,  John   	
Spotts, Frederick Walter ..
Stevens, David  	
Yates, James Stuart 	
Residence.
Strawberry Vale, Colquitz P.O	
Strawberry Vale, Colquitz P.O.	
Strawberry Vale, Colquitz P.O	
Colquitz Lake District, Colquitz P.O	
Chas. Spring's Lot, Holland. Avenue,
Maywood P.O	
Strawberry Vale, Colquitz P.O ,
Strawberry Vale,. Colquitz P.O	
Corner Wilkinson and Cary Roads, colquitz P.O	
Glanford Avenue, Victoria P.O.	
Tennyson Road, Maywood P.O. ..,	
Strawberry Vale, Colquitz P.O.  ;.
West Saanich Road, Heal P.O	
Westwood Farm, West Saanich Road,..
Craigielea Farm, Gorge Rd, Victoria P.O.
Profession, Trade or Calling.
Farmer	
Farmer	
Teacher	
Farmer	
Farmer .,	
Farmer	
Farmer	
Farmer	
Farmer	
Marina Engineer
Farmer	
Farmer	
Farmer	
Barrlster*-at-Law
Nature of Objection.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside i'n the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Deceased.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Deceased.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Provincial Elections Act
ISLANDS ELECTORAL DISTRICT
TAKE NOTICE tbat objections have been filed witb me against the following persons named being retained on the List of Voters for the above distriot
on tbe grounds set forth.
AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that I will, on Monday, the third day of May, 1909, at the hour of eleven   o'clock  ln  tbe  forenoon   at   Ganges
Karbour,   bold   a   Court   of   Revision for the purpose of bearing and determining tbe said objections.
Unless the person objected to, or some other Provincial voter on bis behalf, appears at the said Court and satisfies me tbat tbe said objection Is not
well founded, I shall strike the name of such person off the said list.
Dated this 8th day of April, 1909.
FBANK O. NORRIS, Registrar of Voters.
Christian Name and Surname of Voter.
Residence.
Allen, Robert White	
Allberry, Henry Percy
Arthur, Clarence 	
Ashby, John  B	
Bennett, Frederick 	
Bowyer, Frederick 	
Bown, Charles Quinton ....
Brien, Daniel  	
Carter, Ralph  R	
Carpenter, John	
Chamberlain, Chas. Henry
Cepe, Joseph	
Clark, Samuel  	
Connorton, Thomas 	
Cooke, Fred	
Conery, Socrates Tobias ..
Cottell, Charles   	
Cundell, Christopher Wm.
Dawson, Henry	
Dunckle, Gus Theophilus .,
Elder, Ernest James	
Elliot, George  	
Evans, William Edward ..
Forrester,  David  G	
Freeman, George Arthur ..
Furze, John 	
Franklin, Florian Herschel
Gardner, George 	
Gardner, Alfred	
Georgeson, John 	
Grubbe, Robert	
Graham, John 	
Harrison, Ernest Leopold ..
Gaunt, Cyril  	
Harris, James  	
Hamilton, Andrew Victor .
Hardie, Alexander  	
Harrison, William Edward
Herron, Thomas E	
Howard, Henry Newton ...
Howard, George H	
Irwin, Joseph T	
Irwin, Earl Bruce	
Jones, Wm. Went. Eaton ..
Johnson, Henry  	
Karlberg, August	
Kelly, Henry  	
Kelly, Henry Bennett	
Knowles, Robert Earle ....
Knight, William Francis ..
Lannan,  William   	
Lldgate, Thomas Richard .
Manley, Harry 	
Marriott, Walter 	
Mason, Job	
McDonald,  Duncan   	
McLean, Thomas William .
McLean, Robert John 	
Miller, John 	
Moore, J, C	
Morris, Tom Raymond ....
McKinley, George 	
O'Neill,  Joseph   	
Otto,  John   	
Paddon,  George  Locke  ...
Pruyn, Thomas Dorland	
Roe, William Burns  	
Sculthorpe, Alf. Clem. Fish. .
Schultz, Charles John 	
Scovlll, James Henry 	
Simpson, Albert	
Si veil, Alfred Gilbert  	
Shepard, John Smith 	
Stephenson, Albert Edmond
Thomas, Morris Asbury
Thompson, Robert William ..
Townsley,  Guy   	
Trefusis, Robert Peel 	
Warne, William  	
Wain, Henry 	
Wilson, Harold	
Williams, George 	
Mallamott Farm, North Saanich 	
Sidney   Island   	
Sidney 	
North Salt Spring Island	
Mayne Island  	
Thetis Island	
North Saanich 	
Sidney    	
Sidney 	
South Salt Spring Island  	
Sidney	
Sidney	
Pender Island 	
North Saanich	
Sidney 	
South Salt Spring Island	
Sidney  	
South Salt Spring Island  	
Sidney  	
Kuper Island	
Sidney  	
Portland Island	
Sidney  	
Sidney Island	
North Saanich	
Sidney Island 	
Ganges, Salt Spring Island	
Ganges Harbour 	
South Salt Spring Island	
Galiano Island	
Galiano Island	
Salt Spring Island	
Ganges Harbour, SpU Spring Island ...
North Saanich .. 	
Fulford Harbour	
Pier Island	
Sidney  	
Salt Spring Island, Central Settlement.
Fulford Harbour	
Sidney  	
South Salt Spring Island	
Salt Spring Island	
Sidney  	
Sidney  	
North Saanich  ■	
Sidney Island	
Salt Spring Island	
Salt Spring Island 	
Meadlands Farm, North Saanich 	
Sidney 	
North Saanich	
Sidney  	
Ganges Harbor, Salt Spring Island ....
South Pender Island	
Vesuvius Bay, Salt Spring Island 	
Pender Island	
North Saanich 	
Sidney	
Fulford Harbor	
Pender  Island   	
North Saanich	
Sidney 	
North Saanich	
North Saanich	
Mayne   Island   	
Profession, Trade or Calling.
Farmer	
Farmer '.'	
Marine Engineer
Farmer  	
Farmer  	
Farmer 	
Hotel Keeper ...
Deckhand 	
Baker    ,
Carpenter .......
Cook	
Fisherman 	
Carpenter	
Farmer	
Bartender	
Farmer	
Deckhand 	
Farmer	
Clergyman ...
Fireman ...
Fisherman ...
Waiter	
Farmer	
Farmer	
Labourer ....
Stenographer
Farmer	
Light House Keeper
Farmer	
Farmer	
Seaman	
Farmer	
Farmer	
North Saanich ....
Pender Island	
North Saanich ....
Saturna Island
James  Island   ....
Sidney 	
Portland Island ...
Salt Spring Island
South Salt Spring .
Sidney  	
Sidney  	
Sidney 	
Ganges	
Sidney 	
North Saanich ....
Sidney 	
Beaver Point	
Edgerman	
Carpenter	
Farmer 	
Purser	
Farmer	
Painter 	
Logger ......
Steamboatman
Farmer	
Farmer	
Farmer	
Rancher 	
Farmer	
Butter-maker .
Farmer	
Seaman	
Farmer	
Farmer .....*.
Miner	
Farmer	
Farmer	
Farmer ....
Rancher
Farmer ....
Rancher
Blacksmith
Carpenter ..
Storekeeper
Farmer .'	
Engineer	
Farmer	
Seaman  	
Farmer	
Farmer	
Farmer	
Carpenter	
Preacher of Gospel
Carpenter 	
Fireman  	
Gentleman ....
Lumberman ...
Farmer	
Railway Clerk
Farmer	
Nature of Objection.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Dead.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District
Ceased to reside in the District
Ceased to reside in the District
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District
Ceased to reside in the District.
Name put on Voter's List by mistake
and that he is not entitled to vote.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
^jj^^T THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 17, 1909
For the April Weddings
HANDSOME "LIBBEY CUT GLASS—THE BEST GIFTS.
Fortunate are we to receive this big shipment of new things in "Libbey" Cut Glass, in time for the
after-Easter weddings. The new things are exceptionally handsome and if a friend of yours is going
to be one of the brides of after-Lent you cannot do better than send her a piece of this beautiful
glass. Handsome Cut Glass is always appreciated by brides. They delight in making their table dainty
and "different" and nothing helps more than this sparkling crystal. There's nothing lovelier—nothing
that even pretends to be so fine—the chief charm of the table where the-best is is the sole criterion.
See the striking show in the cut glass room—the finest room for showing glass in Western Canada.
Come in.
No. JI PATTERN
Here Are a Few New Prices:
COLOGNE BOTTLES, at each, $7.50 and $7.00
OIL BOTTLES, at each $6.00
DECANTERS, at each, $16.00 and $10.00
COMPOTES, fine pattern, at each  $12.00
SPOON TRAYS, from each, $9.00 to $5.00
BOWLS, big range, from $40.00 to  $6.00
SUGARS AND CREAMS, from per pair, $16 to....$5.00
VASES, from each, $35.00 down to $3.50
HANDLED NAPPIES, from each, $7.50 to $3.00
NAPPIES, many patterns, from $8.00 to  $2.50
CELERY TRAYS, from each, $12.00 to $6.00
FLOWER BASKETS, at each, $20.00 and $6.00
CANDLE STICKS, at $7.50 and $6.00
WHISKEY JUGS, from $18.00 to $10.00
TUMBLERS,  from per dozen $20.00
WATER BOTTLES, from each, $14.00 to  $4.50
MAYONAISE AND STAND, at each $12.00
ICE TUBS, at each, $16.00 and $15.00
,  No. 300   1-pt. jus
' VERNA PATTBRN
Do You Need
New Blinds
You'll need new blinds for your new home and when getting them get
blinds of good quality. It doesn't cost any more—when you get them
here, for we use nothing but the very best Hand made oil opaque, the finest
lancasters or the very best Scotch Hollands. We mount the blinds on the
famous Hartshorn rollers—the improved kind—using no tacks at all. The
blinds cannot pull off. In other words we put "Weiler Quality" into every
blind we make and sell them at the right prices.
We would like very much to show you the new Scotch Hollands. We
have these splendid blind materials in pretty moss greens and creams-
striped and plain. Attractive blinds may be made from these and durable
too.   Let us figure on your blind needs—we can save you money.
Down Cushions, $1.25 to $3.25
TO FILL THOSE COVERS OF YOURS.
We have just received a fine line of new down cushions—a fine assortment of sizes and weights. These are filled with finest quality down and
will make that cushion cover you worked last winter into a swell wedding
gift. Covered in fine white cambric. If you want an extra cover or two
to make cushions for some one's canoe you'll find us ready with a fine line
of suitable covers. These cushions come at many prices, ranging from
$1.25 to $3.25.
HAV1LAND DINNER WARE
If you are looking for something handsome in the way of wedding gifts
for your daughter or some other close relative or friend, come in and
choose one of these handsome Haviland China Dinner Services. Every
bride delights in having the table "just right" and nothing will help more
than a service of this beautiful china. You won't find it elsewhere in the
city, nor will you find elsewhere as dainty ware. Prices are very reasonable,
ranging from $35 to $95.
Let Us Show These Velvet Carpet Squares
SOME FINE NEW PATTERNS ARE SHOWN—PRICES ARE VERY REASONALBE.
Velvet Squares make excellent floor coverings. They are rich in appearance and stand lots of
wear. We show some very fine patterns in a choice of colorings broad enough to suit you. This
range of sizes will be suitable for any ordinary room. Come in and let us show you these and other
lines of carpet squares we show, for we have an unusually large collection this season. In Tapestry
Squares, Brussels Squares, Wiltons, and Axminsters you'll see some handsome lines.
VELVET SQUARE, size 10-6x12.   Price $32.00    VELVET SQUARE, size 12x13-6.   Price.. ...$42.00
VELVET SQUARE, size 9x10-6.   Price $24.00     VELVET SQUARE, size 9x12 ft.   Price $27.50
TO RETAILERS
Isn't it poor business to
carry a large stock in your
little town when the quantities you require may be purchased from us on short
notice. We help you. Prompt
and satisfactory service guaranteed.
WEILER BROS.
Complete Home Furnishers
VICTORIA, B. C.
TO DEALERS
We solicit correspondence
from dealers who are not
already acquainted with us
and who wish to get
acquainted with the largest
wholesalers of Homefurnish-
ings in the West. Try furniture as a "side-line"—we
help you.
if
Short Story if
*ifififi?ifififififififif
MRS. DARCY AND THE
DOCTORS.
By Harold Susman.
Mrs. Darcy was rich.
She was very rich indeed.
In fact, she was so rich that it made
(er sick.
She suffered from fatty degeneration of the bank account.
She had been everywhere; she had
leen everything; she had done everything.
Sh had all the diamonds she could
year, and all the rubies, and all the
beads;  all the silks, and satins, and
felvets, all the feathers, and laces, and
1'ewgaws.
There was nowhere she couldn't go;
lere was nothing she couldn't have;
Ihere  was  nothing  she  could  do—
fxcept be happy.
It bored her to do this, and it
jiored her to do that, but it bored her
nost of all to do nothing.
It bored her to ride, and to drive;
bored her to stand up, and it bored
ler to sit down.
It bored her to eat, and to drink,
|nd to sleep.
So she sent for the doctor—Dr.
{Hack.
He gave her pills.
I She grew worse.
So she sent for a second doctor—
)r. Green.
He gave her powders.
She grew still worse.
So she sent for a third doctor—Dr
White.
Dr. White was a modern doctor, a
very modern doctor, an ultra-modern
doctor.
He said that he was as umch a
meta-physician as a "matter-physician"!
"What is the trouble with you?"
said Dr. White.
"Everything!" said Mrs. Darcy.   .
"You have a beautiful home," said
Dr. White.
"I am tired of it," said Mrs. Dacy.
"You have beautiful jewels," said
Dr. White.
"I am tired of them," said Mrs.
Darcy.
"You have a beautiful face," said
Dr. White.
"I am tired of it!" said Mrs. Darcy.
"How do you pass your time?" said
Dr. White.
"I don't pass it," said Mrs. Darcy.
"It passes itself. I am too tired even
to pass the time! My hands are too
tired to embroider. My eyes are too
tired to read. In'' fact, my brain is
too tired—to think!"
"And what makes you so tired?"
said Dr. White.
"That is what I want you to find
out!" said Mrs. Darcy.
"I have already found that out, my
dear lady," said Dr. White. "I found
that out very quickly. In fact, I
found it out as soon as I looked at
you. I might even say I found it out
before I loked at you. I suspected
it as soon as I looked at—you. I
suspected it as soon as I looked at—
your home!"
"Dear me!" said Mrs. Darcy. "And
what is the matter with me? What is
the name of my complaint?"
"You are quite right to call it a—
complaint!" said Dr. White. "It is
not a disease. It is merely a—complaint. But it is a serious one—for
you. I will not name it. It might
offend you. The name is not a pretty
one!"
"And can you help me?" said Mrs.
Darcy.
"I can try," said Dr. White.
"Oh, can you only try?" sighed
Mrs. Darcy. "And must you leave
the rest—to nature?"
"Yes, I must leave the rest to—
your nature!" said Dr. White.
"Will you make out a prescription?"
said Mrs. Darcy.
"If you like," said Dr. White, and
he wrote a few words on a crap of
paper.
"Oh, the pills I have taken, and thc
powders!" sighed Mrs. Darcy.
"I will give you neither pills nor
powders," said Dr. White.
"Must I take your—prescription inside or outside?" said Mrs. Darcy.
"Inside!" said Dr. White, with a
strange smile.
He handed the scrap of paper to
Mrs. Darcy, and left immediately.
Mrs. Darcy gave the prescription to
her secretary.
The secretary gave it to the maid.
The maid gave it to the butler.
The butler gave it to the page.
And the page took it to the chemist.
The chemist looked at the scrap of
paper, and read what was written on
it, appeared very much surprised and
then handed it back to the page,
"This is not for me,' said the chemist.   "It is for—Mrs. Darcy!"
So the page took the prescription
back to the butler.
The butler gave it back to the maid.
The maid gave it back to the secretary.
And the secretary gave it back to
Mrs. Darcy.
"The chemist says that this not
for him," said the secretary. "He
says it is for you!"
"For me!" said Mrs. Darcy. "What
a nuisance! I am so tired. I am so
bored. I am so weak. I am too tired
to read it. You must read it for me.
What does it say?"
The secretary looked at the scrap
of paper and became very red in the
face.
"What does it say?" demanded Mrs.
Darcy. "Why don't you read it to
me?"
"I—I don't understand it!" said the
secretary.
"Well, it is not necessary for you to
understand it!" said Mrs. Darcy. "If
it is for me, you are not supposed to
understand it I If it is for me—I will
understand it!    What does it say?"
"It says," said the secretary, 'Prescription for Mrs. Darcy, with Dr.
White's compliments: Do something
ior somebody!'"
"What does that mean?" cried Mrs.
Darcy.
"I—I told you that I didn't—understand it, Mrs. Darcy!" said the
secretary,
"Well, why don't you understand'"
cried Mrs. Darcy. "What do you suppose I have you for? I am too weak
to open my own letters, so I have
you to open them for me! I am too
weak to understand my own letters,
so I have you to understand them fur
mel And if I get crazy letters from
crazy doctors, and my secretary is too
crazy to explain the situation to me—
I shall'go crazy myself!"
And Mrs. Darcy worked herself into violent hysterics.
But all the rest of the day and all
through the night Mrs. Darcy heard
the words ringing in her ears, saw the
words dancing before her eyes—"Do
something for somebody!"
She almost wondered if there was
anything in this advice, in this strange
advice, this peculiar "prescription."
But then her old doctors came with
tlieir old remedies, Dr. Black with his
pills and Dr. Green with his powders,
and she soon forgot the new doctor
with his new notions and his impertinences and his insults.
"Do something for somebody!"
The idea! When she was too sick
even to do anything for herself!
"YwU have been staying with James
late ■_,, haven't you, John?"
"Yes."
"They say his new wife has an awful temper. How did she strike you?"
"With anything that came handy."
The Old Stand-By.
"Funny,"  remarked the man who
was touring   the   rural   sections, "I
have met hundreds of farmers in the
hist few weeks and all wore a broad
•rin."
" \lways wear broad grins this time
vi iue year, mister," laughed the man
with the pitchfork.
"H'm! How can they be in such a
good humor when we are just over a
money panic?"
"Farmers don't, think of money
panics or-anything else this time of
year, stranger; they are too busy
reading the good old jokes in the
igcS farmer's almanacs." 10
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 17, 1909
A WORD TO THE
All those who do not should know the comfort, convenience and cleanliness attendant upon the use of Gas for cooking purposes. You will then realize why the
housewife with a Gas Range takes pleasure in doing her own cooking and baking. You can regulate a Gas Range to a nicety, it will, boil, broil or bake better
than either a coal or wood fire. With Gas there is no kindling to chop, no eoal to carry, no ashes to sift,—no worry, none of the old-time difficulties to contend
with.   Be sure to try a Gas Stove or a Gas Range in your new home.
If you use Gas for cooking purposes you will
find your kitchen pleasantly cool, your fuel
(just a match-scratch) ever ready and your expenses greatly lessened. A Gas Stove or a Gas
Range is a' boon all the year round, but in the
heat of summer it is indeed a blessing. Why
not make your new kitchen an ideal one with
a good Gas cooking apparatus?
If you have not hitherto looked into the merits
of Gas for cooking, we cordially invite you to
call and inspect our large stock of new Gas
Ranges and Gas Stoves. Visit our warerooms
and let us show you the different styles and
explain their merits and.their price-reasonableness. It is a pleasure to us to explain the simplicity of cooking with Gas.
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, Limited
Cor. Fort and Langley Streets, Victoria, B. C.
Sporting Comment
The result of the five-mile race at
Oak Bay last Friday must have been
very encouraging to the members of
the J.  B.  A.  A., who were instrumental in ocnducting the race.   With
a field of ten starters, five went the
full distance, while the majority of
the others went, more than half way.
The winner, E. Coleman, proved himself a good five-miler, much to my
surprise as hitherto he has been content with a mile.    Second went to
Leo Sweeney, while third was fought
for by.E. Carrol and C. Thomas, the
former eventually winning out.   The.
dark horse of the race was J. Sweeney
but he proved somewhat of a false
alarm as he was one of the first to
drop out. Two very important lessons
.can be taken from this race.  The first
is that they will be popular not only
with lovers of racing but also with
the contestants.   Secondly, there are
two or three young fellows belonging
to the Bays, who with a little attention will develop into good long distance   men.   I particularly   refer to
Carroll and Thomas, both of whom
are not out of their teens and with a
little coaching from older runners will
certainly make good.
I am pleased to see that the Bays
are arranging for another race on
May ist and if it proves as exciting
as the first did the spectators will
have no kick coming. The fact that
Colema, the winner of last Friday's
race and Baylis are matched, should
tend to draw a good crowd.
The result of the football match
between the Victoria Wests and California was a great disappointment to
the many people who journeyed to
Oak Bay to see the match,. The California team is composed of a well-
balanced bunch of players, the majority of whom learnt to play in the
Old Country and who know the fine
points in connection with the game.
The Wests on the other hand depend on a kick and rush game which
on Monday was useless against the
Southerners. The weakness of the
Wests lies in their forward line, which
on Monday failed to register a single
shot against the opposing goal tender.
On several occasions openings were
given for shots, but the locals endeavoured to rush the ball through in a
bunch. In some instances these tactics may be alright, but it is a cinch
that goals cannot be scored unless the
forwards shoot.
The lacrosse players are now considering the advisability of forming a
purely amateur league, which will include teams in B. C. which do not
intend to play professional. After the
disclosures that have been made in
connection with B. C. Amateur Lacrosse Association, which have proved
that practically every team on the
Mainland has been dishing out the
coin, ti would be well for the locals
to make haste slowly otherwise the
same conditions as existed in the old
league will creep into the new.
It is very amusing to read in some
of the local papers of finds that have
been made by the Victoria Baseball
Club. I am not referring to the management of the baseball club in the
least, but when the statement is made
that a new catcher in Brock Robertson has been unearthed it only goes
to show that somebody is talking
about something of which he knows
nothing. Robertson has been playing
around Victoria ever since he was a
kid and last year he did the greater
part of the receiving for the locals
and this year he is a find. The same
might be said of Johnson, who impressed some of the older heads by
his work last Sunday. Although this
is his first attempt to gain senior recognition he has been putting up a
good game in the school matches. I
hope the locals do make some finds in
order to strengthen their team, but
don't unearth wonders who have been
public favorites for some years.
It is rumored on good authority
that the Victoria Yacht Club is endeavouring to have the International
cup race take place in Victoria this
year. This Would be a great boom
to yachting in this city and I hope
they may be successful in their efforts.
It is with regret that I learn of
the loss of Champion Pointer, Victoria Boy, owned by Jack Wolfenden. Boy was the king of all Pointers
now being exhibited in B. C. and his
loss will be felt very keenly by all
breeders of Pointers,
UMPIRE.
CORRESPONDENCE
The Week accepts no , responsibility
for the views expressed by Its correspondents.
Communications will be Inserted
whether signed by the real name of
the writer or a nom de plume, but the
writer's name and address must be
given to the Editor as an evidence of
bona fides. In no case will it be
divulged without consent.
Editor The Week.
Sir,—I was pleased to find your
correspondent, Clement Cane, agrees
with me about the Irish Flag, as exhibited here on festive occasions, and
allows "it is oniy a rebel flag, as it
does not bear the 'Crown above" the
harp." In his own words, "such is the
Irish national flag." Your correspondent goes back as far as Henry VII
for support of his opinion, that no
mention can be found of the "Crown
above the harp."
Surely in all those years, the Government has been compelled to make
many changes "in Ireland.
The rebellion of 1798, for instance,
which it is supposed gave the idea
(shortly afterwards) of adding the
Crown to the Irish flag. I hold, the
so-called "flag of Ireland" is not acknowledged (in the United Kingdom) by law and order unless pro
perly qualified by the "Grown," to go
heart and hand with the Union Jack;
the brightest and most' "cleanly" flag
in the universe.    I would like your
correspondent to bear in mind I mean
no offence Wheri writing in this way,
especially as the "National party" in
the British House of Commons, and
throughout the country do not at all
resent being designated "rebels," but
quite the contrary,—thCy glory in it I
There are thousands of good and
true "Irish Loyalists" in the dear did
land,  Who  have "long  since  grown
heart sick and weary  of sham patriots (?) and niartyrs (?), who have
a keen eye for the main chance when
they flaunt   the   "green   flag,"—too
often with deadly effect!   Of this no
doubt your correspondent is aware,
but "to the pure all things are pure."
I  have sound and reliable, living
authority (in   support   of   my own
knowledge) for   saying   the correct
Irish flag is "green with the Crown
above the harp."    And more power
to it,—long may it remain soil
When Ingram was a student at
Dublin University (Trinity College),
he becarhe a "young Irelander" and
wrote his celebrated poem which
caused such a furore in those days
(somewhere in the forties); commencing—
"Who fears to speak of ninety-eight?
(the rebellion)
Who blushes at the name?
When cowards mock the patriot's
fate,
Who hangs his head for shame?''
In a few years, upon more mature
consideration he was unable to resist
becoming a "loyal Irishman" and
"hung his head for shame" when any
reference was made to his celebrated
poem! To use his own words the
"bombast was more than he could endure," and he came to the conclusion
"Repeal  of the Union would be a
grave mistake, with men who talk
so much and did so little I" Tl
"Loyal Irishman" was never moi
proud of the Union with Englar
than he is today; and will continue i
until Ireland is blessed or cursed 1
"Home Rule." Which it is to be tin
alone can tell. Then the "Lord 1
between us and harm";—the Atlant
and the.continent notwithstanding.
LOYALIST.
Building Permits Issued From Ap
8th to 14th, Inclusive, 1909.
$1,100—Brick building, Cormora
street, lot 590, block N; Wah Yi
Co., owner;   D. C. Frame, architei
$6,000—Frame building, lot 2, bloi
3, A.  Emason, owner;    Hooper
Watkins, architects.
$1,900—Frame building, Blanchaj
St., lot 720, block Q, J. J. Sparroi
owner; J. J. Sparrow, architect.
$1,800—Frame building, Langfoi
St., lot is, block 6-10, H. Fowle
owner.
$1,800—Frame building, Coburg S
lot 3S, block 20, Daniel Welsto
owner; Alex. White, architect.       <
$1,800—Frame building, Broad ai
Johnson streets, lot 657, block U, Li
Chung Lee Wey, Lee Yan You, owi
ers; Hooper & Watkins, .architects.
$800—Frame building, Francis S
lot. 3, block 4-5, McLeod, owner.
$1,650—Frame building, Quadra Si
lot 4 blk is, A. E. Matthews, owne
A. E. Matthews, architect.
$2,700—Frame building, Burdetl
Ave., lot 21, block 1, Shandley, owne
$10,000—Brick building, Langley Si
T. S. Gore, owner; W. R. Wilso;
architect.
Uncle Allen Sparks was returnin
gloomily from the funeral of an a<
quaintance.
"Well," he said, brightening visibl
after a period of profound though!
"his life was a useful one, after al|
He once planted a tree." THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 17, 1968
11
VICTORIA LAND DISTRIOT
District of Coast
ike notice that John D. Bell, of VlC-
_, banker, intends to apply for per-
on to purchase the following aes-
ed lands:—Commencing at a post
lted on the east Bhore of Anaham
e, about 2 miles from head of lake;
ice east 80 chains; thence north 4»
ins, more or less* to lake; thence
ihalns, more or less, south westerly
g lake to point bf commencement,
aining 320 acres, more or less,
ated   February   15th,   1909.
JOHN   D.   BELL.
27 J. B. Morrison, Agent
WIFICATE OF THE REGISTRATION OF AN EXTRA-PROVIN- ;
CIAL COMPANY.
"Companies' Act, 1897."
874. .* ;  : -   '
HEREBY CERTIFY that "The Mi-
ran Trust Company" has this day
l registered as an Extra-Provincial
lpany. under . the "Companies' Act,
7," to carry out or effect all or any
he objects of the Company to which
legislative authority of the Legis-
re of British Columbia extends,
he head office of the Company is
ate at the City of Grand Rapids,
t County, Michigan, U.S.A
he amount of the capital of the
lpany is Two hundred thousand dol-
, divided Into Two thousand shares
)ne hundred dollars each,
he  head offlce of the Company ln
Province is situate at No. 1114
gley St., Victoria, and William John
lor, Barrlster-at-law, whose address
ictoria aforesaid ls the attorney for
Company, not empowered to issue
transfer stock.
he time of the existence of the
ipany is thirty years from the lst
of June, AD., 1889;
he Company is limited,
lven unde" my hand and Seal of
.e at Victoria, Province of British
imbia, this sixteenth day of March,
thousand nine hundred and nine.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies,
ie objicts for whlcn this Company
been established and registered are:
o carry on a trust deposit and secy business, and any other business
ior. zed by the provisions of Act. No.
of   the   Public   Acts   of   1889   as
nded, the same being Sections 6156
1189 of the Compiled Laws of 1897
he State of Michigan, U.S.A
24
VICTORIA LAND DISTBICT
District of Coast
ake notice that George Edward Wilson,' of Victoria, gardner, Intends to
ly  for  permission  to  purchase  the
owing described lands:—Commencing
post planted at the south east cor-
of Lot 26, near Anaham Lake; thence
;h 40 chains; thence eaBt 20 chains;
ice south 40 chains; thence west 20
Ins to ■ point of commencement, coning 80 acres, more or less,
ated February 15th) 1909.
GEORGE EDWARD WILKERSON.
27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
TICE is hereby given that thirty
s after date the following parties
■nd to apply to the Honourable, the
ef Commissioner of Lands and
rks, for a license to prospect for
1 and Petroleum on lands situated
the North Beach of Graham Island;
ten Charlotte Group:
o. 1. Commencing at a post planted
ihalns north of the southeast corner
_ot 6, being the S. W. C.j thence east
chains; thehce north 80 chains;
ice west 80 chains; thence south SO
Ins to point of commencement; con-
ilhg 640 acres,
ated March 11, 1909.
GEORGE YOUNG,
P. Harrison, Agent.
To. 2. Commencing at a post planted
chains north of the S. E. C. of Lot
>eing the N. W. C; thence east 80
ins; thence south 80 chains; thence
t 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
point of commencement; containing
acres,
lated March 11, 1909.
JOHN YOUNG,
P. Harrison, Agent
To. 3. Commencing at a post planted
ohains south of the S. E. C. of Lot
being N. W. Corner; thence east 80
ins; thenoe south 80 chains; thence
st 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
point of commencement; containing
lated March 11, 1909.
M. HAMILTON,
P. Harrison, Agent.
Io. 4. Commencing at a post planted
r miles east and 120 chains north of
S. E. C. of Lot 6, being the N. W. C;
nee east 80 chains; thence south 80
lins; thence west 80 chains; thence
'th 80 chains to point of commence-
nt; containing 640 acres,
lated March 12, 1909.
J. B. CLEABIHUE,
P. Harrison, Agent
-To. 5. Commencing at a post planted
ir miles east and 40 chains north of
S. E. corner of Lot 6, being the
W. C; thehce east 80 chains; thence
ith 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
mce north 80 chains to point of com-
mcement; containing 640 acres.
)ated March 12, 1909.
W. BRYCE,
P. Harrison, Agent.
.o. 6. Commencing at a post plantea
ir miles east and 40 chains north of
S. E. C. of Lot 6, being the N. B.
rner; thence south 80 chains; thence
st 80 chains; thence north 80 chains-,
mce east 80 hains to point of com-
ncement; containing 640 acres.
)ated March 12, 1909.
N. H. WHITEHEAD,
P. Harrison, Agent.
To. 7. Commencing at a post plantea
the S. E. C. of Lot 6, being the N. E.
thence west 80 chains; thence south
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
■th 80 chains to point of commence-
nt; containing 640 acres,
.ated March 11, 1909.
MARGARET YOUNG,
P. Harrison, Agent
To. 8. Commencing at a post planted
i mile east and half a mile north
the S. E. C. of Lot 6, being the S. W.
thence east 80 chains; thence north
,chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
ith 80 chains, to point of commence-
nt; containing 640 acres.
)ated March 11, 1909.
A. W. YOUNG,
P. Harrison, Agent.
To. 9. Commencing at a post planted
_ mile east and half a mile north
the S. E. C. of Lot 6, being the N.
C:; tiience east 80 chains; thence
ith 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
nee north 80 chains to point of com-
ncement, containing 640 acres.
Jated March 11, 1909.
B. M. YOUNG,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 10. Commencing at a post planted
two miles east and half a mile north
of the S. E. C. of Lot 6, being the S.
W. C; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains;- thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement; containing 640 acres.
Dated March llth, 1909.
MALCOLM W. YOUNG,
P. Harrison, Agent
i_io. 11. Commencing at a post planted seven miles east and 40 chains north
of the S. E. C. of Lot 6, being the S. W,
C:>; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres;
Dated March 10, 1909.
J. JOHNSON,
P. Harrison, Agent   .
So. 12. Commencing at a post planted seven miles east and 40 chains north
of the S. E. C. of Lot 6, being the N. W;
C; thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated March 10, 1909.
G. McCALLEN,
P. Harrison, Agent.  .
No."13. Commencing at a post planted seven miles east and 40 chains north
of the S. E. C. of Lot 6, being the N.
E. C; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated March 12, 1909.
D. DONALD,
P. Harrison, Agent.
. No. 14. Commencing at a post planted two miles east and half a mile north
of the S. E. C. of Lot 6, thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 'acres.
Dated March 11, 1909.
JOHN S. YOUNG,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 15. Commencing at a post planted one mile west of the S. E. C. of Lot
6, being the N. E. C; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 ohains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
Dated March 11, 1909.
H. CURRY,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 16. Commencing at a post planted two miles west of the S. E. C. of
-Lot 6, being the N. E. O; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
Dated March 11;  1909.
S. CURRY,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 17. Commencing at a post planted two miles and sixty chains west and
one mile north of the S. E. corner of
Lot 6; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated March 11, 1909.
J. CURRY,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 18. Commencing at a post planted two miles and sixty (60) chains wost
and one mile north of the S. E. C. of
Lot 6; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 -acres.
Dated Uth March, 1909.,
C. HARRISON,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 19. Commencing at a post planted four mlles east and 120 chains north
of the S. E. C. of Lot 6, being the S. E.
C.j thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east' 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated March 12, 1909.
A J. KITTO,
F. Harrison, Agent.
No. 20. Commencing at a post planted four miles east and 120 chains north
of the S. E. C. of Lot 6, being the S. W.
C; thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated March 12, 1909.
T. LIDDELL,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 21. Commencing at a post planted four mlles east and 120 chains north
of the S. E. C. of Lot 6, being the N.
E. C; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated March 12, 1909.
D. SOULE,
P. Harrison, Agent
No. 22. Commencing at a post planted six miles east and two and a half
miles north of the S. E. Cornerf of Lot
6, being the N. E. Corner; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres,
Dated March 12, 1909.
W. J. SANDERS,
P. Harrison, Agent
No. 23. Commencing at a post planted six miles east and two and a half
miles north of the S. E. C. of Lot 6,
being the S. W. C; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
Dated March 12, 1908,
A. WHEELER, JR.,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 24. Commencing at a post planted seven mlles east and three and a
half miles north of the S. E. C. of Lot
6, being the S. W. C; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains
to point of beginning, containing  640
fLQTQtt
E. K. CAMERON,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 25. Commencing at a post planted seven miles east and two and a half
miles north of the S. E. C. of Lot 6,
being the S. W. C; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
Dated March 12, 1909.
H. E. HOPPER,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 26. Commencing at a post planted one mile south of the S. E. C. of Lot
11, being the N. E. Corner; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains to point of commencement containing 640 acres.
Dated March  12,  1909.
L. S. BELL,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. ?7. Commencing at a post planted seven miies west ahd two and a half
north.of the S. E. C. of Lot 6, being
the N. E. C; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated March 12, 1909.
M. WHEELER,
P. Harrison, Agent
No. 28. Commencing at a post planted six miles east and 40 chains north
of the S. E. C. of Lot 6; being the S. E.
O; thenci north 80 chains; thehce west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated March 12, 1909.
M. M. ELLIS,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 29. Commencing at a post planted six miles east and 40 chains north
of the S. E. Cdrner of Lot 6, being the
N. E, C; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated March '12,  1909.
E. F. NASON,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 30. Commencing at a post planted seven miles east and 40 chains north
of the S. E. C. of Lot 6, being the S.
E. C; thence north 80 chatns; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated March 12, 1908.
F. FOX,
may 8 P. Harrison, Agent.
. and petroleum under the foreshore and
under the water on the lands in and
opposite Denman Island, Comox District,, and described as follows:—Commencing at a post planted on the sea
beaoh near the intersection of the centre line of section 20 and High Water
Mark, Denman Island; thence west 40
chains; thehce north 80 Chains; thence
east 30 chains, more or leSs, to High
Water Mark; tnence southerly along sea
beach to place of commencement
1   Dated this 25th day of March, 1909.
G. C. CAREW GIBSON,
may 15 E. Priest, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that H. Teb-
but will, after the expiration of thirty
days from this date, apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands and
Works, at Victoria, for a Coal Prospecting License oyer the following described area on Saturna Island:
Commencing at the northwest corner
of section 11, thence north one mile;
thence east one mile; thence south one
mile; thence west one mile to place of
commencement.
Dated April lst; 1909.
may 15
NOTICE is hereby given that C. C. L.
Alexander will, after the expiration of
thirty days from this date, apply to the
Assistant Commissioner of Lands and
Works, at Vietoria, for a Coal Prospecting License over the following described
area on Saturna Island.
Commencing at the northeast corner
of the southeast quarter of section 17,
thence south one mile and east one
mile, and north one mile and west one
mile to the place of beginning.
Dated April lst, 1909.
may 15
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days
after date I intend to apply to the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum under the foreshore aiid
■under the water on the lands in and
opposite Denman Island, Comox District,
and described as follows:—Commencing
at a post planted on the sea beach, at
a point about 10 chains north from the
post between sections 11 and 12, Denman Island; thence west 50 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence east 80
chains to High Water Mark on Denman
Island; thence northerly along shore line
to place of commencement.
Dated this 25th day of March, 1909,
M. A. GREEN,
may 15 E. Priest, Agent
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum under the foreshore
and under the water on the lands ln and
opposite Denman Island, Comox District, and described as follows:—Commencing at a post planted on the sea
beach near the intersection of the line
between sections 3 and 4) Denman Island
and High Water Mark; thence west 60
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 60 chains, more or less, to High
Water Mark on Denman Island; thence
northerly along shore line to place of
commencement.
Dated this 26th day of March, 1909.
F. CAREW GIBSON,
may 15 E. Priest, Agent
NOTICE is hereby given that E. M.
King will, after the expiration of thirty
days from this date, apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands and
Works, at Victoria, for a Coal Prospecting License over the following described area on Saturna Island.
Commencing at the northeast corner
of the southeast quarter of section 17;
thence west one mile; thence north one
mile; thence east one mile, and one mile
south to place of commencement.
Dated April lst, 1909.
may 15
NOTICE is hereby given that L. Alexander will, after the expiration ot 30
days from this date, apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands and
Works, at Victoria, for a Coal ProB-
pecting License over the following described area on Saturna Island.
Commencing at the northeast corner
of the southeast quarter of section 17,
thence south one mile, and west one
mile, and north one mile, and east one
mile to the place of beginning;
Dated April 1st, 1909.
may 15
NOTICE is hereby given that H. M.
King will, after the expiration of thirty
days from this date, apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands and
Works, at Victoria, for a Coal Prospecting License over the following described
area on Saturna Island.
Commencing at the northeast corner
of the southeast quarter of section 17;
thence east one mile; thence north one
mile; thence west one mile, and one
mile south to place of commencement.
Dated April lst, 1909.
may 16
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect
for coal and petroleum under the foreshore and under the water on the lands
in and opposite Denman Island, Comox
District, and described as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted on the sea
beach near the intersection of the line
between sections 28 and 27, Denman
Island and High Water Mark; thence
west 55 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence east 65 chains, more or less, to
High Water Mark on Denman Island;
thence northerly' along shore line to
place of commencement.
Dated this 25th day of March, 1909.
E. CAREW GIBSON,
may 16 E. Priest, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Hon. the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum under the
foreshore and under the water on the
lands in and opposite Denman Island,
Comox District, and described as follows:—Commencing at a post planted on
the sea beach near the intersection of
the line between sections 28 and 27,
Denman Island and High Water Mark
on Baynes Sound; thence west 55 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 74
chains, more or less, to High Water
Mark on Denman Island; thence southerly along shore line to place of commencement.
Dated this 25th day of Maroh, 1909.
T. A. CABEW GIBSON,
may 15 E,  Priest,  Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum under the foreshore
and under the water on the lands ln and
opposite Denman Island, Comox District,
and described as follows:—Commencing
at a post planted on the sea beach near
the intersection of the line between sections 5 and 10, Denman Island and High
Water Mark; thence west 60 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thehce east 80
chains; thence north 30 chains, more or
less, to High Water Mark, on Denman
Island; thence northerly along shore
line to place of commencement.
Dated this 25th day of March, 1909.
A. D. BARCLAY,
may 15 E. Priest, Agent.
NOTICE ls hereby given that 30 days
after date I Intend to apply to the Hon.
the Chief Commissionei of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for coal
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Hon. the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum under the
foreshore and under the water on the
lands in and opposite Denman Island,
Comox District, and described as follows:—Commencing at a post planted
on the sea beach, near the Intersection
of the line between sections 6 and 10,
Denman Island and High Water Mark;
thence west 60 chains; thence north 60
chains, more or less, to High Water
Mark on Denman Island; thence southerly along shore line to place of commencement.
Dated this 25th day of March, 1909.
A R. GREEN,
may  15 E.  Priest, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Hon. the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum under the
foreshore and under the water on the
lands in and opposite Denman Island,
Comox District, and described as follows:—Commencing at a post planted on
the sea beach near the intersection of
the line between sections 3 and 4, Denman Island and High Water Mark;
thence west 40 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains or less
to High Water Mark, on Denman Island;
thence southerly along shore line to
place of commencement.
Dated this ,25th day of March, 1909.
F. W. GREEN,
may 15 E. Priest, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Hon. the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum under the
foreshore and under the water on the
lands ln and opposite Denman Island,
Comox District, and described as follows:—Commencing at a post planted
on the sea beach at a point about 10
chains north from the post between sections 12a and 18, Denman Island; thence
west 80 chatns; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 30 chains, more or less, to
High Water Mark, on Denman Island;
thence southerly along shore line to
place of commencement.
Dated this 25th day of March, 1909.
may 16 E. PRIEST.
NOTICE ls hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to
the Hon. the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a license to prospect for eoal and petroleum under the
foreshore and under the water on the
lands in and opposite Denman Island,
Comox District, and described as follows:—Commencing at a post planted on
the sea beach, at a point about 10 chains
north from the post between sections
12a ahd 18, Denman Island; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to High Water Mark on Denman Island;
thence northerly along shore line to
place of commencement.
Dated this 25th day of March, 1909.
P. LE POER TRENCH,    .
may 15 E. Priest, Agent.
"LAND REGISTRY ACT." .
In the matter of an application for a
Duplicate Certlflcate of Title to part
of section 20, range 8, Quamichan
District, and part of section 1, range
8, Somenos District, containing ln
all 35 1-3 acres.
NOTICE ls hereby given that lt is my
Intention at the expiration of one month
from the date of the lirst publication
hereof to Issue a Duplicate Certlflcate of
Title to said lands Issued to James
Robertson on the 12th August, 1899, and
numbered  5446C.
Land Registry Offlce, Victoria, B.C.,
the 8th day of April, 1909.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
may 15 Registrar-General of Titles.
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds ef Building Material
LUMBER
snsJt
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St.. Victoria
Y. M. C. A.
40 BROAD STREET.
Dr. W. F. Fraser
DENTIST
Has Established Himself At
723 Yates Street,
Garesche Block
Where he is prepared to perform
dental operation according to the
latest scientific methods. Specialist
in Crown and Bridgework.
Phone a6i. Hours: 9 a.m., 4 p.m.
Make Some
Money on
the Side
CYPHERS
INCUBATORS AND
BROODERS
Will enable you to do this without trouble. Call and see us or
write.
WATSON &
McGregor
647 Johnson St.
-rssbrbs
I Prompt, Careful.
ii
if
ft Leave Your
f{ Baggage Checks at
The Pacific
Transfer
Co.
i
if
li
if
%
\i
ft
if
if
if
if
it
if
v
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
A. E, KENT, Proprietor
Phoie U%.
MAPS
OF
Timber and Land.
The   kind   that   show   what's
taken  up  and   what's  vacant.
Electric Blue Print & Map Co.
1218 Langley Street
Victoria. B. C
Houses Built
ON THE
Instalment
Plan
d. hTbale
Contractor "and Builder.
Phone 1140.
Cor. Port and Stadacona Streets ?__-&
„,_ ,.....mu.L.**mma*mmmm*mmm.
12
THE WEEK, SATURDAY APRIL 17, i**
Salome.
. My friend J. J. Edwards of Springfield, Ohio, sends me this touching
note concerning a presentation of the
play of Salome given in that city:
The stage was set representing the
vestibule of a medieval cathedral with
about a half-mile perspective to the
apse. Herod's throne was a Gothic
chair from Queen Bess' front room
and his robe was papal, probably Six-
tus IV or even Alexander VI while
the slave to chop John's koko was
dressed a la toreador de Madrid.
Salome had a pink jersey, two brass
medals, and a girdle with deep but
scanty fringe, a la Sam T. Jack's
Princess. After her winning the signet of favor from Herod, the tor*
eador exited for a minute, during
.which a gurgle and thud was heard,
when he entered from the left with a
tray under a green rag with a hump
in the middle. This grusome outfit
was deposited upon a table, the rag
lifted exposing John's head bearded
Svengali style and as Salome wiggled
before it; a sepulchral voice, hoarsened by nicotine and barleycorn, said
bheware! It makes "Three Weeks"
seem like McGuff's First.—Elbert
Hubbard.
How to Prepare a Husband.
A good many husbands are utterly
spoiled in the cooking. Some women
set them constantly in hot water;
others let them freeze by carelessness
and indifference. Some keep them in
a pickle all their lives. It is not reasonable to suppose that any husband
can be tender and appetizing treated
in this way, but they are really delicious when properly prepared. In selecting your husband you should not
be guided by the silvery appearance,
as in buying mackerel, nor by the
golden tint, as in picking salmon. Be
sure to select him yourself, as tastes
differ. Do not go to market for him.
The best are always brought to your
door. But it is far better to have
none unless you will patiently learn
how to cook him.
A preserving kettle of the 'finest
porcelain is best; but if you have
nothing but an earthen pipkin, it will
do, with care. See that the linen in
which you wrap him is nicety washed
and mended, with the required number of buttons and strings securely
sewed on. Tie him in the kettle by
a strong comfort cord. The duty cord
is breakable and apt to let him fly out
of the kettle and become burnt and
crusty on the edge. Of course, you
know that like a crab or lobster, you
have to cook him alive. Set him near
a clear, steady fire of love, neatness
and cheerfulness. If he sputters and
fizzles, do not be' anxious. Some do
this until, they are quite done. Add a
little sugar in the form of what confectioners call kisses, but no vinegar
or pepper on any account. A little
spice will improve him, but it must
be used with judgment. Do not stick
any sharp instruments into him to see
if he is becoming tender. Stir gently,
watching the while lest he lie too flat
and too close to the kettle, and so become flabby.
If thus treated you will find him
d'gestible, agreeing nicely with you
and the children. He will keep as
long as you like, unless you become
careless and set him in too cold a
place.—Ethel Weiland, in Woman's
Home Companion.
A reporter of the Cincinnati Enquirer—John R. McLean's newspaper
—was once sent into a small town
in southwestern Ohio to ge the story
of a woman evangelist who had been
greatly talked about. The reporter
attended one of her meetings and occupied a front seat. When those who
wished to be saved were asked to
arise, he kept his seat and used his
note-book. The woman approached,
and, taking him by the hand, said:
"Come to Jesus."   "Madam," said the
newspaper man, "I'm here solely on
business to report your work."
"Brother," said she, "there is no business so important.as God's.", "Well,
maybe not," said the reporter; "but
you don't know John McLean."—Argonaut.
The teacher Was giving a geography
lesson, and the class, having traveled
from London to Labrador, and from*
Thessaly to Timbuctoo, was thoroughly worn out.
"And now," said the teacher, "we
come to Germany, that important
country governed by the Kaiser. Tommy Jones, what is a Kaiser?"
"Please 'm," yawned Tommy Jones,
"a stream 0' hot water springin' up
an' disturbin' the earth!"—Argonaut,
Devotion to An Idea.
Watt   Gozup—Isn't   it   something
startling for old Hunks tp be drop
ping into extravagant habits at his
time of life?
Muskum Downe—Yes; he has just
found out that there is an inheri
tance tax, and he's opposed to it on
principle. He says he is going to see
to it that his heirs don't have to pay
any such tax.
Her Way.
"When a young man tries to kiss
you, you should give him a smart
smack on the ear."
"Charlie tried it last evening mamma, and I gave him a good smack on
the mouth; at least, I think it was a
good one, because he teased me for
another."
The Color.
Miss Knox—Yes, he actually said
your cheeks were like roses.
Miss Passay (coyly delighted)—Oh,
come, now, that's laying it on rather
thick.
Miss Knox-Yes, he remarked about
that, too.
Disappointed.
Sympathetic Friend—Well, never
mind. Cheer up, old chap. Don't look
so glum. She'll be out in. a fortnight.
Disconsolate Husband (of imprisoned suffragette)—Yes, but hang it,
some of 'em got a month I
Pardonable Curiosity,
'Rivers, what brand is that cigar
you'de smoking?"
"It's a Flor de Ranke. Making :.
memoranduni of it, Brooks? I'll teill
you where you.can "
"I'm writing the name of it, old
man, in my list of 'Things to Be
Avoided.'"
A Trust Buster.
Teacher—Tommy, what is a trust-
buster?
Tommy—Pa is.
Teacher—In what way, Tommy?
Tommy—Well, ma told him when
he went to the club last night that
she'd trust him to come home sober,
and he didn't.
Loaded.
Judge W. L. Walls, of Cody, Wyoming, has a sarcastic humor which
has made many culprits squirm, and
among the number was a defendant
in a recent cattle-stealing case who
was trying to explain that it would
have been quite impossible for him
to bring into town the beef he was
accused of having stolen and butchered, owing to the fact that his two
pack-horses were heavily loaded with
other things.
One horse, he had told the jury,
was packed with his fur overcoat,
mining implements, etc.
"And what was on the other
horse?" inquired the judge.
"Well, there was a gallon of whiskey—there was a gallon of whiskey
 "   The flustered defendant could
think of nothing else.
"I knew a gallon of whiskey, was
a load for a man," said the judge
dryly, "but I didn't know it was a
load for a horse."
A Sufficient Reason.
Brooke—"Cheeplee doesn't think
it's proper to wear a watch with a
dress suit." .
Lynne—"He has never both at the
same time."
The New Way.
"I understand you kissed your wife
several times on leaving the house
this morning?"
"Yes, that is a fact."
"Why! You haven't kissed her for
a long time before, have you?"
"No, but we are about to get a
divorce and I want her to feel pleasant about it."
Just Punishment.
The "open door" in China
May be quite proper, but—
If could only catch the "mutt"
Who leaves the door wide open when
The MerCury is down to ten
We'd chain him to the knob with glee
And with a red-hot pitchfork we
Would make him keep it shut.
WEEK APRIL 19
The New Grand
•ULLIMN A C-9MI9IM,    Praprlatara.
■•■■(•moat of «orr. JAMIIMa.
THE MONETA FIVE
In Their Latest Lyric Luxury
"An Evening At Home."
CAL. STEWART
The Original Uncle Josh
"The Grocery Store Story Teller."
LA MABEL
. Serpentine Dances and Plastic
Poses.
FRANCESSTOLL
America's Favorite Comedienne
and Coster Singer.
C. Roy Abigail
FOX and DURKIN
Comedy Sketch
"The Female Detective"
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrator
"I'd Like to Have a Sweetheart
Just Like You."
NEW MOVING PICTURES
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M. Nagel, Director.
as -■ "Advertising is to business what §
steam is to machinery."
IT IS
A FACT
that in the neighbourhood Of
$20,000,000
Is Invested
annually in advertising in North
America.
The two principle reasons for
this enormous waste are:—
(1) Chosing of mediums
which DO NOT CARRY CONFIDENCE    and    DO    NOT
1 REACH THE BUYERS.
(2) Advertisements not carefully written—too crowded, bad
display, poor composition.
It is our business to know
f1* where to place your advertisements and how to write them,
$ in order that you may obtain
the best possible results.
We  are  quoting  SPECIAL
|j RATES for writing series of 12,
25 and 100 advertisements.
Illustrations, Designs, Engraving. Booklets and Circulars
compiled and distributed.
The Newton
Advertising
Agency
G.W. Newton, Mgr.,
W. F. Quick, Asst. Mgr.
§ Phone 1283. P.O. Box 781.
Telegraphic  Address:
"Publicity,' Victoria, B.C.
1208 Government Street,
Victoria, B.C.
The Best
East or West
DUDLEIGH'S
MIXTURE
Seldom Equalled. '
Never Surpassed.
S&7  Richardson
Cigar Store.     a%IVU«ai UOV11
Phoae 346
Mrs. Melville Parry
SOPRANO
CONCERT,
ORATORIO,
OPERA.
VOICE PRODUCTION AND
EXPRESSION IN SINGING.
Pupils Received at Residence.
1645 OAK BAY AVENUE,
(Near Terrace Ave.)
"A Moderi
Ananias"
The production by the
Dramatic Club
of the
Knights of
Columbus
Of   that   bright   and   catchj|
comedy of John A. Fraser's,
entitled
"A MODERN ANANIAS"
is being eagerly looked forward
to. Two performances will bJ
given—on the evenings of nex-J
Monday
and
1
the 19th and 20th, at Institute
Hall,  View  Street.   Some  off
Victoria's leading amateurs have!
the principal parts in the caste
and each member is furnished]
with, a most effective playing]
j. part.   The plot the complicate
is most interesting from sUrtJ
to finish.
iac^i-Xioicoxa^opoiopoiae^l
The story is briefly this:   Lysantj
Lyon was in his infancy deserted
his mother and taken care of by|
bachelor uncle who grew immense
rich in California.   Lysander is mal
his uncle's heir and goes to Euro!
to  study.    To  inculcate  economic]
habits he is restricted to a small
lowance and meeting a rich widol
whose hold on life is slender, he ma
ries her unknown to his uncle,
his marriage he finds himself stej
father to a fleshy old maid to whoa
on her mother's death, the expectd
fortune reverts.   Meantime, the
has become guardian of Nellie Go]
dengate  and  decides  that bis tv
wards  should marry.    Unknown
Lysander  he  crosses  the  continei]
at a time when that young gentlema;
is paying a surreptitious visit to An
erica.    Lysander  meets  Nellie  an
scrapes acquaintance with her,  bu]
owing to Francisco's blunder, think
her name is Prudence—the name
her friend.   In order to avoid a mai
riage with Nellie, whom he thinks
has never seen, he invents a storj
to the effect that he is already maj
ried and then the complications en
sue.   Finally he is forced to confesj
all his   deceptions   except   one—thi
truth  about  Baby.    Nellie  forgive]
him and so does the uncle for
fibs and also his first marriage btl
both imagine Baby to be a little child
Then the truth comes to the surfaci
when, by an almost superhuman e:
fort of nerve, he marries his stej
daughter  to  his  uncle and himsej
weds Nellie.
Seats are now on sale at M.
Waitt's, Government street.

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