BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

Week Aug 17, 1912

Item Metadata

Download

Media
pwv-1.0344209.pdf
Metadata
JSON: pwv-1.0344209.json
JSON-LD: pwv-1.0344209-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): pwv-1.0344209-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: pwv-1.0344209-rdf.json
Turtle: pwv-1.0344209-turtle.txt
N-Triples: pwv-1.0344209-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: pwv-1.0344209-source.json
Full Text
pwv-1.0344209-fulltext.txt
Citation
pwv-1.0344209.ris

Full Text

Array Ballantine,
Jenkinson & Co.
Real Estate, Insurance and
a_    Financial Agents
hilephone 3415 1219 Langley St.
The Week
A Britisli Colombia Newspaper and Review,
Pabllshad at Victoria. B. 6.
HALL ftf WALKER
Agents
Wellington Colliery
Company's Coal
1232 Gov't St.
Telephone 83
°A*)\
Iol. 10.   No,
Tenth Year
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 17, 1912 vfo. 10.   No. 29.
Tenth Year
SHE IMMIGRATION ACT—There
is no part of the Dominion so deeply
interested in a wise ancl carefully
Inistered Immigration Act as British
Imbia. The reason for this is not far
lek. The Province is developing faster
lany other part of the Dominion; wages
liigh; there is a general depression
lighout the Western States, and Vic-
1 is regarded as the "Mecca" of labour-
lien. In response to the application of
■Ir two big railway corporations, who
|ed that they could not secure sufficient
labour to complete their contracts
the specified time, the
|er Government made the
<e of lowering the bars of
nmigration Act, ancl al-
labourers to come into
la without the usual $25
Ication,    to    work    "on
construction    alone."
nistake was followed by
j-esent Conservative Gov-
hnt, although it is only
j.o say that the continu-
of the policy was  due
to the mechanical action
Department than to the
(considered decision of a
Iter who had only recently
into  power.    Not only
the relaxed provisions
kd to the disadvantage of
puntry, but they haye also
abuse of the provisions
pelves  and  to  a  general
on the part of the im-
Ltion officers. The result
lit hundreds of men have
1 brought in through the
|y of employment bureaux,
of whom have only
led on railway constructor a few clays and then
I sent to swell the army of
I labourers engaged in city-
while   hundreds   have
in without making even
fcretence of going to the
lay. Today there are in
l.ria something like 3,000
(labourers who have been
loyecl either directly by the
lor by contractors on city
Of these half are now
Iwith little chance of eminent during the coming
er. Of those still at work,
Iry- large percentage ancl
ably a majority are not
Ish subjects, but they are
lng, British  subjects  witlf
and  families from eni-
nent which should proper-
■e  theirs.    Strong  repre-
Itions on this subject have
] made to Ottawa by pro-
it   citizens   of_  Victoria,
bed by the Premier aiid
(Attorney-General   of   the
lnce, and Mr. Barnard on
lrrival at Ottawa took the
It  up   with   the   Depart-
Jand with the Hon. Robert
|rs, the Minister of the In-
with the result that the
liter sent a very corn-
It Commissioner in the
|n of Mr. II. G. Johnston to investigate
natter. Mr. Johnston has promptly
led Victoria where he interviewed a
ler of those familiar with the subject,
|ling Mr. H, J. Sheen, the President
Trades and Labour Council.   He is
^siting Vancouver and Seattle ancl ex-
in a few days to make his report by
Ito Ottawa. That report cannot be
Ipated, but there is little doubt that the
Irons allegations of abuse of the Im-
Ition Act and the serious local conns created by the congestion of alien
Ir,   have  been   substantiated   to   Mr.
Johnston's satisfaction, ancl there is every
reason to hope that the relaxation of the
Act, which should never have been sanctioned, will be removed promptly. In addition to this investigation Mr. Barnard has
secured the definite promise of the Minister
that no further relaxation of the Immigration Act shall be made until a full judicial
enquiry has been held. There is certainly
great credit due both to Mr. Barnard ancl
the Minister for the prompt action which
they have taken and for the thorough
manner in which the question is being
handled.
tribution and of a permanent naval policy.
He is in favour of a fleet unit on the
Atlantic and the Pacilic, and he is in favour
of Imperial control of the Navy at all
times. These are the sentiments not only
a.- his own constituency but of British Colombia, ancl, unless The Week is mistaken,
of the whole of Canada. On the subject
of trade Mr. Barnard favours increased
preference within the Empire, ancl has little
doubt that this will be the next development.
It is in line with the attitude of the various
parts of the Empire towards the Motherland,   and   the   logical   sequence   of   the
MSNm"**'* ;* *";
': ■   ■    .■' ■      ,' * *        ' ■  .i .'1
-.' **      '..** *•**.7T'**_-;*M:**-,I3':--!
HOW CRICKET MATCHES MIGHT BE MADE  MORE   EXCITING:     SOME  BATEMAN SUGGESTIONS
n*iy**^::,:^,*^3__i«nr*i!*r^a™KW*i.:*.:W-i*K*ir^':**';<:'^.:;-*!iM.r*M *(--'.!.,*** *■/:■:* :.■.-*--   ::       *--*:
B-**H*_«i_IIMHB_M_)M_|______iMe_i^^
,**i^**.-.:. w***.i:i«^^
THE MEMBER FOR VICTORIA
—Mr. G. H. Barnard, M.P,, has returned to Victoria after a prolonged
absence. When he had completed his duties
at Ottawa he took a European trip, during
which he had the opportunity of meeting
many leaders of thought in the Old Country, ancl of getting in touch with the vital
topics which are of special interest to
Canada at the present time. Of these the
most important are Imperial Naval Defence
and Imperial Trade Preference. On both
of these Mr. Barnard holds sound views.
He is in favour both of an immediate con-
closer "rapprochement" which is now taking
place. Whilst in Ottawa, on his way back,
Mr. Barnard, found time to take up a number of important matters directly affecting
his constituency. He secured the despatch
of a Commissioner to investigate the Immigration Act ancl the immediate issuance
of the advertisements for tenders on the
breakwater. Other matters are receiving
his daily attention since his arrival in the
city. The Week congratulates Mr. Barnard
on his safe return in good health and
spirits, and Victoria on its active and
energetic representative.
THE FLYING LEGION—The Victoria Committee, whicii for several
months past has been working hard
in order to make suitable provision for the
entertainment of the "Flying Legion," certainly deserves credit for its pains, but
whether the game is worth the candle may
well be a matter of opinion. Of the four
cities originally proposed to be included,
two, Nanaimo ancl Alberni, have incontinently backed out, and one, Vancouver, has
not only backed out, but has done so in a
manner which renders it impossible for the
"Flying Legion" to include the Terminal
City in its territory. Just why'
Victoria still perseveres is not
very clear to the man in the
street, especially as the Committee of the "Flying Legion",
with characteristic shrewdness,
discovered whicii way the wind
was blowing and gave the local
Committee an opportunity to
cancel the engagement. If the
"Flying Legion" comes to Victoria, it goes without saying
that every member will be.
courteously received and heartily welcomed. Victoria will
not forget the claims of hos-'
pitality and the obligations
whicii it owes to members of ;a
neighbouring State, but a great
many people are unable to understand why under existing
conditions the City should
vote money to entertain visiting millionaires from any
country, and especially why
such a large expenditure and*
so much ceremonial reception,
including a reception in the
Parliament Buildings, should
be offered to American millionaires, when only two
months ago nothing of the.
kind was even suggested when
Victoria was visited by sixty of
the leading British merchant
princes. The fact that not a
finger has yet been moved
towards a suitable reception
for the Duke of Connaught
furnishes a significant comment on the expenditure of
some $5,000 on gentlemen
who, if reports be true, could
afford to buy up Victoria.
Finally, it must not be forgotten that the "Flying Legion"
was created primarily for the
purpose of boosting the Panama Exposition in San Francisco, and just now Panama
does not sound very goocl in
British ears. The least that the
"Flying Legion" can do before
accepting Canadian hospitality
is to publicly repudiate the
action of the American Senate
and dissociate itself from such
a reactionary policy. As the
Committee of the "Flying
Legion" seems to have appreciated the delicacy of the situation sufficiently to wire the
local Committee it is rather
surprising that it was not considered necessary at ihe same
time to clear up this important point—the
only thing that really matters, and the
only thing that could have. created any
misgivings in the minds of our San Francisco friends.
SUFFRAGITIS—Just as if Victoria,
had not sufficient troubles of her
own to surmount, such as the
Water Supply, Suspended Sewerage Operations, Congested Labour Conditions and
the "Flying Legion," along comes the vanguard of a Suffragette Army to disturb our
(Continued on Paijc /./) THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 17, 1912
I
The talk is still of sub-divisions;
indeed, the activity of this line of real
estate business would be remarkable,
if it were not that Victoria has
lagged so long and is only just beginning to get into the game. There
is still plenty of good residential property within easy distance of the city
which has not been sub-divided. So
long as the property is well selected
and handled by a reputable firm, investors can make no mistake, for
whatever the croakers may say, Victoria is bound to go ahead, and has
hardly yet struck her gait. I do not
claim to have any expert knowledge
of real estate or sub-divisions, but I
cannot help noticing when a firm
makes remarkable sales. I happened
to be in Green & Burdick's office the
other day, and stretched out on the
desk I saw a blue print covered with
red markings. Thinking it was a
navigator's chart I asked a question
as to its purpose, and was told that
it was the map of "Cadboro Heights"
sub-division and the red marks indicated the lots that had been sold. As
this happened to be the afternoon of
the first day thc property was on the
market, I was not a little surprised to
notice that half the lots were already
sold. A few days later, when a friend
of mine wanted a lot, he learned to
his sorrow that only a few back lots
remained and that every waterfront
lot had been sold. Pretty much the
same experience attended the sale of
thc Stamford Park sub-division by
Moore & Johnston. Thanks to judicious advertising and courteous attention a large portion of this sub-division was bespoke in advance, and on
the first day of the sale twenty-one
lots, constituting one-fourth of the
whole property, were disposed of. In
a few days this subdivision will also
be "cleaned up." And so the tale goes
on, and all I have to say is that there
is no better investment today than
a lot in a good sub-division not too
many    miles    from    the    centre    of
Victoria.
* *   *
The Lounger has refrained from unburdening his mind on the subject of
a public swimming-bath, because
there has been no water here, and unfortunately our Victoria "English
Bay" has not yet been developed.
Still no one would be more enthusiastic in supporting a reasonable project
than the writer. It is a reproach to
any city of forty thousand people not
to have a public bath; indeed, I claim
that it is the duty of the Corporation
to provide one, and nothing but
supineness is accountable for the neglect. Wherever baths are available
they are used. I know of no finer
sight than to visit the splendid baths
at Sutro Park, San Francisco, where
at any time during the season two
thousand young people can be seen
disporting themselves. The eagerness
with which children seek every available bathing spot round Victoria
shows how great the need is, and the
Mayor who is first responsible for
carrying through a bath scheme will
be labelled "Public Benefactor."
* *   *
I notice by the advertisements in
the daily papers that today (Thursday) there is to be a sale of furniture
and effects at the Westholme Hotel.
Having been a pretty steady patron
of the Grill, I think I am entitled to
say something about this sale, and
what I have to say shall be put in the
form of the expression of a pious
wish, or rather several pious wishes,
and in order to give still more conciseness to them, they shall be numbered: I. That the result of the sale
may be that the creditors will be paid
in full. II. That the effects will be
purchased by someone competent to
run the hotel in a businesslike manner.
III. That it will not become the house
of assignation, and the happy hunting-ground of pimps, which it was
some time ago; but that the better
regime instituted by the sheriff may
bc continued. IV. That the License
Commissioners will realize that in
connection with this house they owe
a duty to the public and are under
a very serious responsibility.
*    *    *
• For the information of new-comers
it may be well that the following
facts should be made known. Victoria
is a city of beauty ancl of luxury;
it.also enjoys a few privileges, and
one which is prized the most highly
by those who have enjoyed it is the
opportunity of "paying in advance."
I have before me whilst writing a receipt from the "Telephone Company
for six months' rent which was demanded and paid in advance; I also
have before me a receipt for $3 from
the B. C. E. R., bearing the mystic
caption "Security Deposit Receipt, No.
3043." This also was a payment in
advance. These monies were demanded from a gentleman who has lived
in British Columbia for twenty years;
who occupies an important position
with a large commercial firm; who
brought his wife and family to settle
in Victoria, and who rented a furnished house on one of our principal
streets at a rental approximating to
$70 a month, which was also paid in
advance. I do not see why this admirable principle should not be carried a little further, and if the grocer,
the butcher and the milkman were
paid in advance, life would be one
blissful dream and paterfamilias
would have no bills to wrestle with at
the end of the month.
All things come to those who wait
and I find that many things are coming to "Lounger," who is almost a
veteran in the gentle art of correcting
abuses and "grouching" fof those
who do not want to "grouch" on
their own account. I am not going
to attempt a recital of the many
things which I have kicked about
and which have been remedied, but
I do want to express my devout
thankfulness to the powers that be for
co-operating with a poor scribe in trying to subdue the noises of a busy
city. Thanks to the increased vigilance of the police there is far less
tooting of horns, both in the day time
and at night, and, indeed, far less
unnecessary noise of every kind.
There is enough racket in this world
without adding to it, and I want to
make a last appeal to the guardians
of the peace to discourage the indiscriminate use of horns, tooters and
whistles of various kinds by the
young urchins who race the streets
and many of whom sell newspapers.
I do not wish to single out the vendors of any paper in particular, but
there is a favourite spot very near
to one newspaper office where the
boys congregate in the afternoons and
occupy the time from about three
o'clock till four in a very vile imitation of a German band. No doubt it
amuses them and I would hate to curtail their enjoyment, but it disturbs
the serenity of a few business people
whose offices are in that locality. I
am sure the boys who read my
columns, and they all do, will take a
hint on this subject.
Q&
*~tc*-t&*.
Sonic  husbands'   too  perfect  confidence  in
their wives amounts to impertinence.
It is almost worth writing a book to have
one sympathetic reader.—Arthur Symons.
Life  is  a comedy  for  those  who  think,  a
tragedy for those who feel.—Landor.
Most  card-playing  women  arc  strictly  virtuous.    Their  looks  compel  them, to  be   so.
Think of your ancestors and your posterity,
and  you  will  never  marry.
There's none so  blind  as those who won't
feel.
kflpflpTtt
SEAT71C
Chas.Pemy.mgp.
THEBESTOFEYEOTHING
IN THE HEART OF TMH
135RodmsWith&mh-50SahheRqoms 1
Did You Ever Try
Our Caramels?
Like the rest of our candies, they are noted for
their quality and freshness
Don't Pass Us By
Palace of Sweets
1013 Government St.
Victoria, B. C.
mch 9 Iv sept 9
Old Country Barber Shop
Honey and Flowers Hair Tonic
An  excellent  Tonic  Dressing  for  the
Hair, 50c, 75c and $1.00 per bottle
Charles Gordon  Steuart,  Hair Expert
Apl 20
637 Fort Street
s
July 27
Our Reputation
Has been built up by handling only the very best
goods of their respective kinds, based upon the
knowledge gained in many years of business experience.-   One of our best lines is
Carnegie's Swedish Porter
A pure and nourishing malt beverage, brewed from
the very best ingredients, by a house whose name
is an unfailing guarantee of excellence in quality.
As a pick-me-up it is unequalled, refreshes the
strong, banishes weakness and revives the spirits.
Order from your dealer for home use, and at
club or hotel insist upon
"Carnegie"
PITHER & LEISER
Victoria
Wholesale Agents for B. C.
Vancouver
Nelson
Mrs. D. B. McLaren
Teacher of Singing and
Voice Production
Terms on Application   Phone X2308
P. 0. Box 449   ■
Turkish Baths
Under New Management
Massage    and    Chrispody    Specialties
Lady  Masseuse in  attendance
Baths open from 8 a.m. to 3 a.m.
Phone 1856 821  Fort St.
"Aberdeen" Comfort and
Convenience
JUST OFF
VANCOUVER
STREET,
AND ONLY
SEVEN
MINUTES
FROM
POST
OFFICE
Is a happy memory to scores of those who ha
visited Victoria. It is the place to stay, whetl
as a visitor or as a permanent resident. In t
splendid new house which Mrs. Gordon has jt
completed the many points of excellence whi
always characterized the Old Aberdeen are s>
further accentuated. The distinctive decoratio
and furnishings combine refinement and so
comfort in the last degree, while guests' requi
ments are anticipated by all modern conveniene
941 McClure Street   -   Phone 101
"A Residence of Refinement"
Good Advertising— What It Is
EVERY HUMAN ACT and word is good
or bad advertising. If one is courteous,
sincere and sane he stamps himself as a man
of worth. The people he comes in contact
with remark his strength or weakness and
build for him a reputation in keeping with his
reliability and intelligence. He has advertised
himself for what he really is.
Realizing the truth of this we wish to advertise ourselves for success; to create a permanent
patronage and to avoid incorporating anything
in our attitude towards our customers that
would sacrifice the future to a petty present
profit.    We would make the name
"GORDON'S"
a synonym for all that could be desired in
the way of service and sincerity.
"To know our goods
is to use them."
739 Yates St.
Phone 1391
 - THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 17, 1912
Wm
_s_ffl>.i_m
THE
fr^m]
„,*i_:
DgjA c-uMig
The Transgressor
Ic   play   which   the   Allen   Stock
pany   has   been   running  at  the
|ria Theatre tllis week has much
pcommend   it.     It   is   clean   ancl
j:some, with a good moral, plenty
lcidc.it   and  a  certain   strain   of
ly which redeems it from senti-
lilism.   The whole play is written
the character of "Conway," the
;rged hero of the Bowery, splen-
Iplayed by Mr. G. D. Zucco.   In-
Ithis  capable  actor  is  seen for
rst time in a part which taxes
pwers  and   furnishes  him  with
liortunity to show what 'he can
Ido.    He rose to the occasion
ft no doubt that he is destined
_e his mark in a certain class
racters such as were rendered
by Charles Warner a quarter
itury ago.    His  elocution  is
perfect and he has a rich, beau-
lice;  his acting is good, with a
|endency to stiffness, and if he
rid of this he will undoubted-
Ime one of the best men in his
work.    Miss Felton did what
Id to  do  well,  as   she  always
Iher   versatility  is   indeed" re-
|)le, but it is a mistake to as-
as some of the critics assume,
le is equally good in everything.
1 liked her better in other parts
fie one she has in "The Trans-
that of a young lady slum-
I wonder whether it would
sible to persuade Mr. Allen to
the play associated for thirty
(•ith the name of Jennie Lee;   I
"Jo."   Here is a part which
Ifit  Miss  Felton  like a glove,
|e  detective  would  be  exactly
to Mr. Zucco.
The Empress Theatre
la long time since I laughed so
[s at the Empress Theatre this
During the years it has been
there may have been one or
Iter individual turns, but in my
there has never been a better
|id   show   there.    Of  the   five
three    are    absolutely    top-
rs;   one  is  first-class  and  an-
averagc.     This   makes   up   a
fair  standard.    I   have   never
Ibetter performance on the wire
|iat given by "Granto."    Even
cannot    understand    how he
led to  defy    all    the    laws of
|rium, and  after bounding  five
least in the air land safely on
Ire;   but he did this time after
fuming somersaults backwards
rwards without a slip, or with-
raising the slightest suspi-
[at he might possibly fail.   The
" mystifying spectacle is per-
its way.    It is a variation on
mystery of the suspended lady
laches   its   climax   when   both
[nd player turn topsy-turvy in
For those who like a clever
lical   puzzle   which   defies   no
feept those of stupidity, I can
jhly recommend "Onaip."   But
which really pleased me most
It of Lee Tung Foo.   Anything
jxcruciatingly   funny   than   a
|an masquerading in kilts as a
in can hardly be imagined, and
not   mere   "fooling,"   but   a
lever  burlesque  of  Sandy  in
glory,    not    forgetting   the
-r.   Lee Tung Foo is a clever
Ian;  he has an excellent voice,
leal quality, which he uses to
|lvantage; he has a keen sense
_ur and realizes the possibili-
all  his impersonations.    No
id    certainly    no    Scotsman,
lave missed seeing him in his
was more than a little pleased
|the excellence of t'he manage-
ld the entire absence of any
to  vulgarity.    In  this  rethink it is only fair to say
Jitters  are  improving,  at any
| the Empress.    Still, it must
forgotten    where vaudeville
|es   are   concerned    "eternal
should be the watchword.
MOMUS.
The Crystal Theatre
A big feature this week at the Crystal Theatre was the singing of Miss
Schaffcr who made a hit with some
of the latest successes. Spraguello
and Norton, who appeared in a comedy singing and talking act, were also
much in favour with the large audiences which heard .them at the beginning of the week. Some splendid
comedy was seen in the moving picture entitled "Spring a Surprise"
which fairly brought down the house.
Amateur night on Wednesday was
marked by the appearance of some
new performers who have not hitherto competed for the weekly prize offered by the management aud adjudged by the audience.
Romano's Theatre
Scenes from the works of Charles
Dickens appearing on the moving picture screen afforded twenty minutes
pleasure to crowded houses at Romano's last Monday and Tuesday.
Many of the principal and best known
characters were portrayed with a
fidelity which would have delighted
Cruickshank, "Phiz" and other
Dickens' illustrators. This type of
picture is a pleasing innovation and
one which it is hoped may be continued.
The Majestic Theatre
"The Laurel Wreath of Fame" was
the title of a powerful Essanay
drama at the Majestic during the
middle of the current week, and
painted in graphic detail thc struggles
and tribulations which beset the path
of the unknown composer. Some
splendid European views of daily happenings were also shown by the Warwick Company of England this week
at the Yates Street house.
The Allen Players
With the coming of "The Squaw
Man" to the Victoria Theatre next
week the Allen Players will open their
tenth week in summer stock here, and
no better vehicle, perhaps, could be
chosen than this stirring Western
drama that achieved success in the
United States and also in England.
The cast for this show appears exceptionally strong and includes two
new names for the Allen Company.
These are P. R. Allen himself, director of the company, who will appear
as "Grouchy," the cowboy; and Mr.
E. Mitchell, an English actor who
will be seen in the part of Henry
Kerhill.
The Squaw Man, having been to
Victoria several times, is well known
and has always been very popular
with theatre patrons. It will run this
time for a full week with a matinee
on the Saturday afternoon, a thing
never accomplished with it before in
this city.
Miss Verna Felton will play the interesting part of Nat-U-Ritch, the Indian woman, and will be seen in her
shortest speaking part of the repertoire. Olher characters are taken by
the following: James Wynncgate,
Mr. Zucco; Sir John Applcgatc, Byron Eagan; Big Bill, Mr. Conners;
Diana Kerhill, Miss Hudars; Cash
Hawkins, Mr. Kenck; Shorty, Mr.
Stokes; Toby Warner, Mr. Clapp;
Lady Elizabeth Kerhill, Mrs. P. R.
Allen.
A special engagement has been
made to fill the cast, a young Victorian, having been billed in the part
of Nat-U-Ritch's little son.
Princess Theatre
"Sunday," The Girl from the West,
proved a most artistic success as well
as a financial one the past week. It
is a play which depends entirely upon
clever, capable acting, and this it received in a marked degree from the
Williams Stock Co. The character
parts of Touser, Davery and Lively
—all with some big, devoted purpose
in their hearts—(and each one showing it in an entirely different manner), were splendidly conceived and
acted by Arthur Belasco, Wm. Heater
and Byron Aldenn. Mr. Foster
stepped out from comedy parts to
give an excellent idea ol Jackey. .Miss
Page scored the hit of her engagement, giving a most finished performance of the part of "Sunday." It
seems rather a pity that such conceptions of character as was shown
by the Williams company should last
only one brief week, but such is stock.
Next week the Princess has a treat
in store for its patrons. It presents
Conan Doyle's great masterpiece.
"Sherlock Holmes." This play ran
for several years in London, England,
with Mr. William Gillette in the leading role. It was also a success in
New York city. Conan Doyle was
knighted during the run of this play,
and it is considered one of his greatest
efforts. The Williams company will
have entirely different types of character to portray from anything they
have yet done, and considerable interest is aroused by the production.
Richard Lonsdale will play Sherlock
Holmes; Mr. Williams, the great
criminal Moriarity, and Miss Page
Alice Faulkner.
Sherlock Holmes all week—Wednesday and Saturday matinee.
A Jew is a man who talks through his nose
and makes you pay through yours.
The  book of life begins with  a man  and
woman in a garden and ends with revelations.
yet.
"Have   you   purchased   your   new   car
Mrs. Noorich?" asked the visitor.
"No, Mr. Smithers, I ain't. I can't make
up my mind whether to get a gasoline car or
a limousine car. Maybe you can tell me—
does limousine smell as had as gasoline?" inquired the lady.
SONG FOR THE NEW PARTY
My country, 'tis of Me,
Sweet land  of mostly  Me,
Of Me  I  yell.
Land to whicii I am sent,
Beyond all argument,
Choose Me for President
Or go to—well.
Princess Theatre
Formerly A.O.U.W. Htll
Cor. Yates & Blanchard Sts.
WEEK   COMMENCING   MONDAY
AUGUST 19TH
The Williams Stock Co.
Will  Present
SHERLOCK HOLMES
Prices ioc, 20c ancl 30c
Matinees Wednesday and Saturday
10c and 20c
Curtain, 8.30 p.m. Matinees,  2.^5
Reserved   Seats   on   sale   at   Dean   &
Hiscock's, cor.   Broad and  Yates  Sts.
Bttaress
WEEK AUGUST 19
The Vision of Loveliness
MLLE. LA DEODIMA
With thc Form Divine
DANIELS & CONRAD
A Refined Musical Act
Robt. Louise
ROGERS  &  MACKINTOSH
In Their Laughable Playlet
"The Green Mouse"
The Messenger and The Lady
Harry Lucy
HOLDEN &  HARRON
The Witching Wire Walker
LINA PANTZER
TWILIGHT MOTION PICTURES
Vietoria Theatre
WEEK COMMENCING MONDAY
AUGUST 19
The Allen Players
Will Present
"The Squaw Man"
The Crystal Theatre
Broad Street
The Largest, Best Furnished and Most Comfortable Vaudeville and
Picture Theatre in the City.
Two Acts of Vaudeville, changing Mondays and Thursdays.   Four
Reels of First Run Pictures, changing Monday, Wednesday
and   Friday.   The   Best   Music—three-piece
Orchestra—in the City.
The biggest Fan on the Coast, removing 37,000 cubic feet of air every
five minutes, insuring you fresh and cool air.
Hours;  Pictures from 1.30 to 5.30 and 6.30 to 11.00.
Vaudeville, 3.00 to 4.00 and 7.00 to 11.00.
Farmers'Ex-
change, Ltd.
618 Johnson Street
Phone 331S
Our Special Saturday Prices
New Laid Eggs     50C
Fresh Dairy Butter, per lb 40C
Special Creamery Butter, per lb      40c
Spring Chickens, per lb '40c
"Olivet" Preserving Cherries, per crate    $3.00
Extra Fine Peaches, per crate $1,25
Local Apples, 4 lbs  25c
Local Honey .25c
Also Beans, Corn, Cauliflower and many other vegetables
Our spring milk-fed chickens form a real delicacy for the week-end.
There is nothing better to be bought for money,
aprilzo S oct 26
"' Kt,
•"""•W. «l
New Fall Styles in
Tan Boots
Women's Tan Russia Calf High
Cut Button Boot, made with high
toe, short vamp and has Goodyear
welted sole.
Women's Tan Willow Calf, High
Cut Blucher Pattern Boot, made
on medium last and with military
heel. This boot is made with
heavy sole and is guaranteed
waterproof.
Mail  Orders Promptly  Filled
H. B. Hammond Shoe Co.
Hanan & Son, Sole  Agentl  Broidwalk  Skuffen       Wichert & Gardiner,
N. Y. for Children N. Y.
PEMBERTON    BUILDING,    621    FORT    STREET
Chas. Hayward
President
Reginald Hayward
Sce'y-Treas.
F. Caselton
Manager
The B. C. Funeral Co.
(Successors to Charles Hayward)
Late of 1016 Government Street, have removed to their new building,
734 Broughton Street, above Douglas.
Phones 2235,  2236,  2237,   2238,
Established 1867
HALL & FLOYER
Real Estate Agents
Financial Brokers
Members Real Estate Exchange and Victoria Stock Exchange
April 27
What you want, the way you want it
Afternoon Tea, Dainty Luncheons,
Special Teas for parties by arrangement.    Do not forget—We always
keep on hand guaranteed
New Laid Eggs.
Jhe TEA KETTLE   u» douglas st.
MISS M. WOOLDRIDGE, Proprietress        Opposite the Victoria Theatre THE WEEK,  SATURDAY,  AUGUST  17, 1912
The Week
A Provincial Newspaper and Review
published every Saturday by
"The Week" Publishing
Company, Limited
Published  at  1208 Government  St.,
Victoria, B.C., Canada
WILLIAM BLAKEMORE, Editor
"Flanelled Fools
and Muddied
Oafs"
By Bohemian
No one resents Kipling's picturesque definition of a cricketer as "a
flannelled fool and muddied oaf." It
was one of those good humoured,
grotesque characterizations which was
bound to stick, and which hit off a
distinctive feature of the cricketer.
Anyone who recalls a first-class county team just leaving the pavilion and
beginning their stroll across the field
to the wickets, huge, athletic, good
humoured, flannelled, at once sees
that Kipling hit the mark.
Next week will witness the carnival
of cricketers in Victoria, and I sincerely hope that for this King of
Games we shall have King's weather
and the crowd which it deserves.
There will be line sport and close finishes and as a life-long cricketer I
am not a little proud of the fact that
the game is "making such remarkable
headway in British Columbia.
Quite recently a cricketer of international fame visited Victoria; he was
anxious to have, a game, and several
local enthusiasts managed to draft
him into a team which shall be nameless. Of a score which ran to 170
he contributed 8 when he was smartly
caught in the slips from a "break"
ball of the Victoria captain, L. S. V.
York. This might have happened to
any .international player, but all the
same it was a feather in Lou's cap.
Cricket week is a time to indulge in
reminiscences. Indeed, anyone who
sits round the the pavilion on the
Jubilee Ground when a match is in
progress will hear one and another
speaking of "red letter days" of the
long ago. There are a few old-timers,
of whom our dear friend C. E. Pooley was one of the foremost, and ex-
Governor Dewdney perhaps the most
conspicuous survivor, who could always be relied on to recall some historic incident in Old Country cricket
of forty or fifty years ago.
I am afraid that I must plead guilty
to advancing years myself, when I
speak of the first important cricket
match I ever saw. It was in 1868
at the Molineux grounds, Wolverhampton, between an all-England
eleven and twenty-two local players
In the eleven were Carpenter, Mc
lntyre and Daft. The ground was
small and the ball was constantly
lifted into the Waterloo Road whicii
ran alongside.
In those days it was the invariable
custom for the all-England eleven to
play twenty-two local men. 1 remember once a splendid representative
team was playing a Worcestershire
twenty-two at Dudley. As the time
for drawing the wickets drew near
Shaw and Morley, the two great Notts
bowlers, who were doing thc trundling, had a colloquy. I heard Shaw
shout to the umpire and ask how
much time there was. The answer
came back, "Twenty minutes before
the train goes." Shaw nodded to
Morley; they then settled down to
serious business; the remaining five
wickets were disposed of in ten
minutes, and the visiting team caught
the train.
. I saw the first match ever played
ill England between an Australian
and English team. It was on Trent
Bridge Grounds, Nottingham. The
Home team had five or six Notts men
in, for at that time, and indeed for
some years thereafter, Notts was the
champion county. Alec Bannerman
was the star bowler and I well remember how he ran up the crease to
follow his ball, and would run up so
far that the batsmen were afraid of
hurting him, but he rarely missed a
chance.
I remember in this match William
Gunn fielding on the boundary, took
a marvellous catch, I think from G. J.
Bonner, so high in the air that he had
to leap up at least two feet to get it.
Gunn himself was about 6 ft. 4 in.
high and was for many years the
terror of heavy hitters, as he could
run like a deer and used to cover the
boundary in inimitable style.
Never shall 1 forget the first appearance of the demon bowler, Spof-
forth. Tall, lanky, with a long run
and a spread-eagle action which went
a long way to nonplus the batsman.
Spofforth was over six feet high, and
delivered the ball from a very high
point, his arm being extended vertically in the air to its utmost limit.
As a result the ball came very fast
off the pitch and bounded high. For
several  seasons  Spofforth  was  most
destructive    and   was    never    easily
played until he began to lose pace.
Speaking of bowlers brings me to
one who is pronounced to be the
greatest bowler of all time, Sydney
Barnes, the Staffordshire man who is
playing havoc with the best batsmen
of the day. He has no equal and indeed no compeer. On a bowler's
wicket he is unplayable, breaking fast
both from leg and off. He recently
took eight first-class wickets for
twenty-eight runs and was easily the
hero of the last Australian tour, and
yet he plays for a second-class county,
which has never had any pretensions
in the cricket world. All honour to
a man who sticks to his own team
and has proved himself to be such a
thorough sport.
Miracles and Psychical Research
Written Specially for The Week by ARTHUR J. HILL
author of'New Evidences in Psychical
Research"
In his famous Essay on Miracles,
the most influential English-speaking
philosopher of the eighteenth century
permitted himself to say that "a
miracle is a violation of the laws of
nature," whicii laws a "firm and unalterable experience has established."
A century later, the most eminent
literary critic (and, as Mr. Andrew
Lang thinks, the best poet) announced in his usual Olympian manner that miracles "do not happen."
The pronouncement may be found, in
italics for sake of emphasis, iu the
preface  to "Literature  and  Dogma."
These utterances were unfortunate.
It is no doubt true that the kind of
thing usually called miraculous did
not enter into the experience of David Hume and Matthew Arnold; but
this does not prove that such events
have not entered into t'he experience
of anybody else. If I must disbelieve
all assertions concerning phenomena
which I have not personally observed,
I must deny that the sun can ever
appear in the north; as indeed the
Greeks did, when the circumnavigators of Africa came back with their
story (Herodotus, book iv.). But if
1 do, I shall be wrong.
The nineteenth century, elated with
its magnificent scientific achievements, and impatient of anything that
could not be exhibited in a test-tube
or made to pay dividends, erred in
this same Greek direction of over-
incredulity, with regard to certain
phenomena which cannot be produced
to order, and which consequently
may never be witnessed even by an
investigator* who hunts for them.
Like earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, they are out of our control, and
we have to wait until they turn •<"
But when they do turn up, uiey can
be investigated as scientifically as
any other phenomena. The twentieth-
century mind now realises this, ami
the study of spiritistic and psi chical
happenings is beginning to receive
the attention it deserves. The improved attitude of the present generation—an attitude of suspension of
judgment instead of negative dogma
tism—is largely due to the admirable
work of the Society for Psychical
Research, which investigates these
puzzling things in a careful and genuinely scientific and cautious fashion.
Telepathy, or communication between mind and mind through channels other than the known sensory
ones, is now regarded as proved, by
all those who have investigated with
any thoroughness. It is proved partly by spontaneous phenomena, as
when somebody becomes aware of
what is happening elsewhere—say by
a hallucinatory vision of a friend or
relative who is dying, though not
known'by the percipient to be ill—
and partly by experiments such as
those carried out by Sir Oliver Lodge,
and described by him in his book
"The Survival of Man." Similar spon-
toneous experiences are still being recorded, and similar experiments are
being made; for a continual drip of
evidence is required to wear away the
popular prejudice which still remains.
Passing to trance phenomena, few
of us now doubt that mediums in this
abnormal state do often give evidence
which cannot be explained away by
reference to normal causes. I have
experimented for six years with one
of these sensitives; and though 1
was entirely sceptical at first, I am
now sure that some supernormal faculty is concerned. Probably it is
partly telepathy, but some of the phenomena certainly suggest the agency
of discarnate minds.
Another interesting phase is that of
"normal clairvoyance." A medium
well known to me often sees and describes "spirit forms" which are unmistakably good representations of
the sitter's deceased relatives or
friends. And very often the correct
names of these forms are given, with
dates of death, age, and so forth.
This of course suggests fraud; but
in our investigations we have continually been on our guard against
this, and have disproved it by introducing unknown sitters from distant
towns, and by various other devices.
These sittings are fully described in
my book "New Evidences in Psychical
Research," and the religious aspect is
discussed in my "Religion and
Modern Psychology" (both published
by Rider, 164 Aldersgate St., London). I admit that though 1 do
not accept the label of Spiritualist,
I find it difficult or impossible to explain the phenomena without supposing the agency of discarnate minds,
at least as a provisional hypothesis.
But I warn intending investigators
to go slowly. We want no return of
superstition. Let all possible precautions be taken, and only the most
conservative inferences made. We
must have solid ground of fact under
:s as we go on. Only so shall we
achieve result' of lastine value.
And—be it observed,—these results,
though valuable, can have no particular certainty or sanctity attached to
ti'em. They consist of sense-perceptions and inferences therefrom, like
all other scientific material; and they
suffer from a like uncertainty. Perceptions depend on sense-organs and
on "apperceptive mass," and no two
persons are identically equipped—no,
nor the same person at different
times. Inferences are plausible
guesses, and are sure to be replaced
by other more plausible ones, but
there is no finality or certainty. Always there is another guess possible
—perhaps many—besides the one
which is fashionable at the moment.
The science of psychical research,
then, being a science and not a philosophy, can furnish no satisfactory
basis for world-schemes or religions.
It is too narrow in scope for the former; it has not the emotion-quality
necessary in the latter. It may bring
knowledge—sectional knowledge of
various parts of the universe—but it
cannot * make men good. It is not
knowledge or intellectual power that
will bring to pass the Kingdom of
God on earth. For that, an inner
change is needed. "A dogma learned"—theological or scientific-—"is only
a new error—the old one was perhaps
as good; but a spirit communicated
is a perpetual possession."* What
we want, to' reform the world, is the |
Westholme
Grill
The Cosiest and Coolest Grill on the Pacific Coast. Guests arl
assured of a hearty welcome—the best of cooking—quick anl
pleasant service. An assortment of Wines and Liquors unequallecj
SUNDAY, AUGUST 11TH, 1912
Orchestra 6.15 to 7.30—9 to 11
MENU
A LA CARTE
Celery 25 Olives 20 Almonds 20 Green Onions 10
Scotch Relish 25
CANAPE
Caviar 25        Pate de Foie Gras 25       Tuni Fish 25        Anchovy
Canape Lorenzo 50
SHELL FISH
Olympia Oyster Cocktail 35 Eastern Oysters on Shell 40 j
Little Neck Clams on Shell 40    Crab Cocktail 25
Dungess Crab: Half 25, Whole 40
SOUPS READY
Consomme Mozart 20 Chicken Broth with Rice IS
Boston Clam Chowder 15 Puree of Tomato Florida,
SOUPS TO ORDER—s minutes
Eastern Stew Double Cream 50 Barszcz a la Cracoviennej
Tomato Bouillon 20    Clam Broth with Whipped Cream 25
Cream of Tomato 20
FISH
Supreme of Flounder Marguery 50        Tenderloin of Sole Colber|
Boiled Smoked Halibut Drawn Butter 40    Finan Haddie Grille i
Smelts Saute Doria 45 Filet of Red Snapper Orly 40
Broiled   King   Salmon   on   Steak   Mirabeau 45
Norwegian Mackerel Steamed Potatoes 40
ENTREES
Poached Eggs Benedictine 45        Hungarian Goulash with Spatsei|
Braised Shoulder of Lamb Potatoes Delmonico 45
Sweetbreads with  Green  Peppers a la Wiegel 75
Breaded  Lamb   Chops  Stuffed  Tomatoes  45
Eminence of Chicken a la Chaffing Dish 75I
Crab Meat Cutlets Victoria!
ENTREES TO ORDER—From 5 to 15 minutes
Chicken Livers Brochette 50   Planchet Sirloin Steak Westholme $1
Rack of Lamb Casserole Bouchere:  For one 75;  for two $1.25)
Whole Squab Chicken Casserole with Vegetables $1.25
Stuffed Tomatoes au Duxelle 25
Stuffed Green Peppers 25
ROASTS
Half Roast Milk Fed Chicken Stewed Plums:   Half 65; Whole $1
Prime   Ribs  au  Jus  Yorkshire  Pudding 45;   Extra   Cut  7S|
Roast Young Island Goose German Apple Dressing 75
VEGETABLES
French Artichokes Hot or Cold 35   New Peas 25   Haricot PanashJ
New Wax Beans 15     Fresh Corn on Cob 25
Fresh Spinach au Naturelle 15
SALADS
Head Lettuce 30    Tomato 35    Cucumber 25
Lettuce ancl Tomato 35
DESSERT
Vanilla Parfait 25 Peach Melba 25
Chocolate Eclair 10     Nuts and Raisins 25
Tapioca Custard 10      Vanilla Sago Ice Cream 20
Parfait d'Annanas 35    Cabinet Pudding 10
Iced Canteloupe: Half 15, Whole 25
PIES
Mince 10     Green Apple 10     Lemon Cream 10
Raspberry 15     Banana 10
CHEESE (Per Person)
Camenbert Elite 25 Roquefort 25
Coffee per Pot 20 Tea per Pot 20
Combination 5q
Assorted FruitJ
Cup Custard 10
Gorgonzola 25
DemitasseJ
apl 20
new spirit; new ideals of unselfishness and brotherly feeling towards
our fellows. Psychical research is
doing useful work in breaking down
materialism and extending the horizon
of a shortsighted generation, but
that is the extent 01' its usefulness.
Like Moses, it may lead us within
sight ot the Fro.r.i.cd Land, but it
cannot take us therein. The heart,
not the head, must be the final leader.
Love struggling—under Mammon's
heel—must become Love Triumphant,
as in Watts' great prophetic pictures.
* Stevenson's Essays, p. 85.
[With refst.-r.ee to the above extremely
interest:.., article, The Week is in receipt of
th*. lollowing from Sir Oliver Lodge—undoubtedly the greatest living authority on
Psychic Phenomena. The Week hopes to be
favoured with other articles from the pen
of Mr. Hill:
"University of Birmingham.
"Sir,—I find it impossible to deal personally
with my correspondence on psychical matters.
At the same time I recognise that information
of value is likely to be found amongst it,
besides requests for advice which I should
regret to leave unnoticed.
"Accordingly I have approached an experienced, judicious, and sympathetic friend, Mr.
J. Arthur Hill, of Wensley Bank, Thornton,
Bradford, and requested him to take charge of
this correspondence and to reply on my behalf—in the full assurance that everything will
thus be treated promptly, confidentially, and
wisely.
"This will explain to you the receipt of an
answer from Mr. Hill, on whose discretion
you may fully rely.
"Yours faithfully,
OLIVER LODGE"]
A man who recently set sail on the sea of
matrimony has just applied to the Birmingham magistrate for a separation order on the
ground that he took his wife for a mate and
she proved a skipper.
OWED TO MUSIC
Music   hath   charms   to   soothe   thej
breast,
E'en of the bird within its peaceful
Oft have I heard in the long years tl
The dreadful sweetness of the fife an|
The owl, that in its gilded cage dol
Pines for the autumn sadness of thef
And all who listen to its music kno-*^
That it shall yet be happy long ago.
The babe asleep upon its mother's kn
Though age r.ath robb'd it of its infi
Shall   ne'er   lorget   how   through   th|
there rang,
'I.   songs   whicii   that   same   inothij
sang.
And in the stilly night as poets say.L
When we are burden'd with the heatl
There conies like thunder to the list'nl
The sweet, discordant music of the spl
Merc must I cheek my song, but ml
I praise the creaking of the kitchen [
Or turn thc morbid mangle's handle
That I may catch its dreamy note prd
O music, music: breathe thy magic I
Ring, ring melodious as an auction bel
On varied instruments bclov'd of mal
The nutmeg grater and thc frying paT
BOOK NOTES
At the Victoria Book andl
tionery Co., 1004 Govermf
St., Victoria, B.C.:
"Saddle and Camp ini
Rockies," by Dcllon Wallaj
"The House of Pride,'!
Jack London,
"My Actor Husband," a I
story of American stage lil
At Fullbrook-Sayers Stal
ery Co., 1220 Government!
"Grit   Lawless,"   by   F.|
Mills Yound.
"A Diana of Quebec," by |
N. Mcllwraith.
"Elsie   Lindtner,"   by
Michaelis. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 17, 1912
TRUST!
C^i8__p^e^i'
5sS?8>rat
BUILDING PERMITS
August 7 to August 13
list 7—
|lrs. McKenzie—Fifth St.—Dwelling  $    400
M. Johnson—Burdette Ave.—Alt  1,950
|lrs. Geo. Mars—Seaview Ave.—Dwelling  350
Jones—Dallas Road—Dwelling   3,000
trs. F. Landsberg—Rockland Ave.—Dwelling  18,000
Ut 8—
Anderson—Moss and Point—Garage   250
Bogart—Oxford St.—Dwelling  2,500
[ictoria School Board—Turner and John—Annex  1,500
ictoria School Board—Yates—Annex   1,500
jiss Mary Crossan—Hulton St.—Dwelling  2,700
Irs. Lucas—Denman St.—Dwelling  3,600
fet;9—
ftysmith & Lowe—-Mears St.—Warehouse and Offices  750
Margaret's School—Fort St.—Alt  750
Perkins—Fairfield—Garage   50
IG. Hamilton—Jessie St.—Garage  100
] H. Riddell—Blanchard St.—Dwelling   750
It 10-
H. Parsons—Dunedin St.—Garage   100
|E. Wooten—Richardson St.—Office  150
E. McKinty—Victor St.—Dwelling  1,500
tt 12—J. B| Parker—Slater St.—Dwelling  1,950
fos. English—Bank St.—Dwelling  1,800
Im. Bartlett—Burton Ave.—Dwelling  1,600
|s. Porter—Battery St.—Dwelling   2,500
rs. K. W. Sorenson—Delta St.—Dwelling  8,250
I Rutter—Pine and Belton Sts.—Dwelling  1,850
k 13-
J. Knott—Woodstock and Chester Sts.—Dwelling  7,000
is. Leigh & Sons—Dunedin St.—Dwelling   4,000
lest & Kinfall—McKenzie St.—Dwelling  4,200
W. Whitley—Howe St.—Garage  150
|j. Card—Joseph St.—Dwelling  500
|. J. McKay—Pembroke St.—Dwelling  2,500
Atkins—Simcoe St.—Dwelling  3,500
CANADA AND THE PANAMA CANAL
(By Fred. W. Field)
Tolls and Their Relation to Commerce
Admitting the broad principle of equal rights for all nations, in
ct of the Canal, the question arises as to the establishment of a
|canal or the charging of moderate tolls. The consensus of
an is everywhere largely in favour of the latter course. One of
bading advocates for a free canal is Mr. John Barrett, directorial of the Pan-American Union, who recently contributed an inter-
article to The Monetary Times on "Canada and the Canal."
aid:—
|'If the United States would experience the largest benefits possible
foreign commerce from the Panama Canal, it will make this
bceanic waterway as free to the ships of all nations as are the two
(is which it will connect. The only valid reasons for charging tolls
irst, to pay the cost of operation, maintenance and interest on
|tment; and, second, to protect the transcontinental railways from
Dinpetition of a free canal.
^Carrying Trade of Free Canal.—A free canal, at a conservative
|ate, based on the data of trade experts, will carry in the first year
00,000 more of the products of the United States than a toll canal,
Inount equal to receipts of tolls required to cover operation and
:st for five years. At this rate for ten years, without even count-
le natural growth from year to year, the increase for that period
>ay for the entire original cost of the Canal and liberal interest
ie investment, or $750,000,000. Stated another way, will the
d States deliberately throw away an opportunity to increase the
)f its products $750,000,000 in ten years in order to save
X),000 in tolls?
Would Destroy Monopoly.^-An annual appropriation of $3,000,-
d operate and maintain the Canal and the assumption of its own
st are a small burden to the United States Government compared
. entire annual budget of $1,000,000,000 for the maintenance of
overnment, but a direct annual tax of $15,000,000 on ships and
ge is not only a heavy burden to traffic, but means a loss of
X),000 and more, each year, in the commerce of the United
A free canal, in addition to increasing the commerce of the
d States in ten years to fifty times the cost of operation, mainten-
and interest, will accomplish other results. It will absolutely
)y all possibility, in any shape or manner, of monopoly in inter-
ic traffic."
Ates Canada's Example.—Citing the canal policy of Canada, the
York World, advocating a free Panama Canal, drew attention to
Give Your
Typist Good
Stationery
and She'll Give
You Better
Work
Baxter & Johnson Co
Limited
618 Fort St. Phone 730
Zhe
Taylor Mill Co.
Limited
All kinds of Building Material
Lumber   .'   Sash   .'   Dooi
Telephone 564
North Government Street, Victoria
Royal Bank Chambers
Victoria, B. C.
Thomas Hooper
Jlrchittci
522 Winch Building
Vancouver, B. C.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Contains 252,800,000 acres of rich farm
and fruit lands, timber, mineral and
coal lands. Railroads now building will
open up to settlers and investors. We
specialize on British Columbia Investments and can tell you about opportunities to GET IN AT THE BEGINNING in town lots, townsite subdivisions or farm, timber, mineral, coal
lands and water powers, wholesale or
retail. Vour name and address on a
postcard will bring you valuable
information FREE I
WRITE OR CALL
Natural Resources
Security Co., Ltd
Paid-up Capital $250,000
Joint   Owners  and   Sole  Agents   Fort
George Townsite
612 Bower Building, Vancouver, B.C.
may 18 aug 17
Waterfront for Sale Cheap
Why pay $250 to $1,000 per
acre when you can buy the
most beautiful waterfront for
$150 per acre. This is situated
at extreme south end of Salt
Spring Island, overlooking Pier
Island and handy to Sidney and
terminus of B. C. E. Riv.—63
acres, 14 acres cleared, small
orchard, good spring, and road
to gate, sheltered bay for
launch on next lot; most magnificent view of Mount Baker,
Olympic Range and all Islands
of Gulf intervening. Terms to
suit.   For full particulars apply
JOHN C. MOLLET
South Salt Spring
G.K. McLEAN, CE.
Landscape Architect
& Engineer
Phone 5931 Fairfield Building
Vancouver, B. C.
Mar ■»      9 Am. 4
Telephone 1518
Telephone 3453
FOR RENT
Large Store on Government Street, Opposite P. O.
Two Large New Stores on Johnson St. near Douglas
Two New Stores, Cor. Oak Bay Ave. and Fell Street
Store on Douglas Street near Pembroke Street
Nice Bright Office on Langley Street
Green & Burdick Bros.
Limited
Cor. Broughton and Langley Streets
All Kinds of Insurance Written Rents Collected
Rockland Avenue
Homesite
Corner St. Charles Street—132x140 jt.
Beautiful trees planted around edge of lot, entirely free from
rock; one block from cars and situated in one of the very best
residential districts in the city.
Price $10,500
One-third cash, balance 1 and 2 years.
Pemberton & Son
CORNER PORT AND BROAD STREETS
HOSE & BROOKS CO., LIMITED
Vancouver, Distributors for B. C.
EYE STRAIN
In straining your eyes you are abusing your
best friends. Correctly fitted glasses will
give you permanent relief and pleasureable
use of your eyesight. Your glasses must be
correctly fitted, however.   Consult
A. P. BLYTH
Optometrist and Optician
645 Fort Street Telephone 2259
apl 20 S oct 26 6
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST  17, 1912
J
the fact that this country has expended more than $100,000,000 lo
provide ship canals from the Atlantic to the Great Lakes, a larger
expenditure relative to population or resources than the United Stages
will make at Panama, the cost of maintenance and improvements also
being relatively larger. Nevertheless, United States vessels are
allowed to go toll-free through these costly Canadian waterways. The
United States tonnage through the Welland Canal is larger than the
Canadian. The tonnage of both countries through the United States
and Canadian canals at the Soo is larger than that of the Suez, and
probably larger than that will be at Panama. "But Canada rejects
the policy of cost tolls or profit tolls where they could be so easily
collected," said the New York paper, "and it adopts the policy of
making its artificial waterways as free as the high seas. The United
States does the same with its canal at the Soo. Can the United States
afford to adopt a Panama Canal policy less generous to Canada or the
nations than this Canadian canal policy is to the United States?"
Competition of Suez Canal.—The general answer has been in the
affirmative. The Panama Canal bill, introduced in the United States
House, allows the President to fix the tolls, but prohibits him from
putting them higher than $1.25 per net registered ton. This rate was
selected because it was six or seven cents lower than the charge in the
Suez Canal. The expectation is that the President will fix the rates
at about $1 per net registered ton, American measurement. This will
be expected to give the Canal a marked advantage over the Suez
route, so far as the cost of passage is concerned. In addition to this
the bill gives the President the right to establish coal and supply depots
along the Canal. By that means the United States Government will
sell coal and supplies to passing vessels probably at about cost.
Favour Lozv Tolls—The common feeling, both in the United
States and abroad, is in favour of comparatively low tolls. The low
rates and reductions in rates on the operations of the Suez Canal, since
the opening of that waterway in 1869, has helped to increase the tonnage from year to year, with only eleven exceptions. In 1906, the tolls
were reduced to 7.75 francs per ton; in 1911, to 7.25 francs a ton;
and in 1912, to 6.75 francs a ton. Vessels in ballast pay 2.50 francs
less than vessels with cargoes. That this reduction in 1906 stimulated
traffic may be inferred from the increase in the number of vessels using
the Suez Canal, the increase in gross tonnage transported, and the
increase in revenue in 1910 in comparison with the respective figures
for 1905, the year preceding the reduction stated. The number of
vessels increased from 4,116 to 4,533; the gross tonnage from 18,310,-
400 to 23,054,900 tons; and the revenues from 110,656,400 francs to
127,251,200 francs in 1910.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice that Violet Warr, of Victoria,
H.C, occupation Spinster, intends to apply for
prrniission to purchase the following deserihed
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about
jo chains north and 20 chains west of the
north-wist comer of Lot 381, Coast District,
Range 2, thence south 40 chains; thence west
So chains; thence north 40 chains; thence east
?o chains and containing 320 acres, more or
Uss.
Dated May 25th,  1912.
VIOLET WARR.
aug. 3 sept. 28
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE) notice that Reginald D. Serjeant-
son, of Kidderminster, England, occupation
Merchant, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted 180 chains
west and 20 chains nortli of the north-west
corner of Lot 381, Coast District, Range 2;
tl.ence south 40 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence east
■0 chains and containing 320 acres, more or
Uss.
Lated May 25th,  1912.
REGINALD D. SERJEANTSON.
aug. 3 sept. 28
VICTORIA LAND  DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice that Amy.  % Serjeantson, of
Kidderminster,   England,  occupation  Spinster,
intends  to apply  for permission  to purchase
die  following  deserihed   lands: -Commencing
at a post punted about   160 chains east and
jo  chains  south  of  thc   south-cast  corner  of
l.ot   382,   Coast   District,   Range   2,   thence
south   40   chains;    thence   wesl   80   chains;
ihence north 40 chains; thence east 80 chains
..nd containing 320 acres, more or less.
Dated May 25th, 1912.
AMY.   E.   SERJEANTSON.
aug. 3
sept. 28
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice that Frank Ingram, of Victoria, B.C., occupation Gardener, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following descrii ed lands:—Commencing at a post
planted one mile west, of the south-west corner of Lot 379, Coast District, Range 2,
thence south 80 ehains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains and containing 640 acres, more or
less.
Dated May 27th, 1912.
FRANK INGRAM.
aug. 3 sept. 28
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice that Lucy Gower Serjeantson,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation Married Woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted one mile west of
the south-west corner of Lot 37g, Coast
District, Range 2, thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
west 80 chains and containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated May 27th,  1912.
LUCY GOWER SERJEANTSON.
aug. 3 sept. 28
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice that John M. Slater, of Hamilton, Ont, occupation Accountant, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the south-west corner of
Lot 379, Coast District, Range IT, thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thenee
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains and
containing 640 acrer. more or less.
Dated   May   27th,   1912.
JOHN   M.   SLATER,
aug. 3 sept. 28
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice that Michael Coppinger, of
Victoria, B. C, occupation Cricket Professional, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the shore of
Tatla Lake, about one mile east of the
north-east corner of Lot 327, Coast District, Range 2; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north to the shore
of Tatla Lake; thence following the shore
of the Lake to point of commencement and
containing 640  acres,  more or  less.
Dated  May 27th,   1912.
MICHAEL  COPPINGER.
aug. 3 sept. 28
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice that Lilian Coppinger, of
Victoria, B. C, occupation Married Woman,
intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted one mile west of the southwest corner of Lot 379, Coast District, Range
2, thence west 80 chains, more or less, to
shore of Tatla Lake; thence following shore
of lake in a north-easterly direction 80 chains,
more or less; thence south to point of commencement and containing 400 acres, more or
less.
Dated May 27th,  1912.
LILLIAN COPPINGER-
aug. 3 sept. 28
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice that Thomas Henry Slater,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Capitalist, intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about one mile north of
the north-west corner of Lot 327, Coast District, Range 2, thence east 80 chains; thence
soutl' ,-,o chains, more or less, to the shore
of Tatla Lake; thence following the shore
of tlie Lake in a south-westerly direction,
and the northern boundary of Lot 327 about
90 chains more or less; thence to point of
commencement, and containing s°° acres,
more or less.
Dated   May   26th,   1912.
THOMAS HENRY SLATER,
aug. 3 sept. 28
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice that May Bland, of Ipswich,
England, occupation Spinster, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 90 chains north of the north
shore of Tatla Lake and about 90 chains west
of the south-west corner of Lot 560, Coast
District, Range 2, thence east 80 chains;
thence south to the shore of Tatla Lake 80
chains, more or less; thence following the
shore of the Lake in a south-westerly direction 80 chains, more Gr less; thence to point
of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated May 26th,  1012.
MAY BLAND.
aug. 3 sept. 28
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice that Charlotte Ingram, of
Victoria, B.C., occupation Married Woman,
intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted one mile west of the southwest corner of Lot 379, Range 2, Coast District; thence east 80 ehains; thence north 80
chains, more or less, to shore of Tatla Lake;
thence following the Lake shore in a westerly
direction 80 chains, more or less; thence to
point of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated  May  27th,   1912.
CHARLOTTE   INGRAM.
aug. 3 sept. 28
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice that Henry Bertram Dicks
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Farmer, inte
to apply for permission to purchase
following described lands:—-Commencing i
post planted about sixty chains south-eas
the south-east corner of Lot 381, Rangt
Coast District; thence west 80 chains; thi
north 40 chains; thence east So chains; tin
south 40 chains, and containing 320 ai
more  or  less.
HENRY  BERTRAM  DICKSOI
Dated May 25th,  1912.
aug. 3 .    seP
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice that Arthur Fellows, of
toria, B. C, occupation Retired, intend
apply for permission to purchase the folio
described lands:—Commencing at a
planted about sixty chains south-east of
south-east corner of Lot 381, Range 2, C
District, thence east 80 chains; thence s
40 chains; thence west 80 chains; th
north 40 chains and containing 320
more or less.
Dated May 25th,   1912.
ARTHUR   FELLOE
aug. 3 sel
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice that Randolph Stuai
Victoria, B. C, occupation Estate Agen
tends to apply for permission to pur
the following described lands:—Comme
at a post planted eighty chains east 0
south-east corner of Lot 558, Coast Dil
Range 3, thence south 80 chains; thenc*
80 chains; thence north 80 chains; t
west 80 chains and containing 640 acres,
or less.
Dateel May 22nd,  1912.
RANDOLPH   STUA
aug. 3
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II and II
TAKE notice that Frederick Reev
Victoria, B. C, occupation Real Estate ,
intends to apply for permission to pu
the following described lands:—Comm
at a post planted forty chains north
south-east corner of Lot 558, Range 3,
District; thence east 80 chains; thence
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
north 80 chains, and containing 640,
more  or  less.
Dated   May   22nd,   1912.
FREDERICK REE
aug. 3
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range III
TAKE notice that Lewis Carey, of \
B.C., occupation Broker, intends to ap
permission to purchase the following (
ed   lands:—Commencing   at   a   post
at the north-east corner  of post of L<
Range   3,   Coast   District;   thence   80
north;   thence   80   chains   west;   then
chains south; thence 80 chains east an
taining 640 acres, more or less.
Dated  May 21st,   1912.
LEWIS CAR
aug. 3
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice that William M. L
of Winnipeg, Man., occupation Store-1
intends to apply for permission to pu
the following described lands:—Comm
at a post planted 80 chains east of the
east corner of Lot 382, Coast District,
2, thence south 40 chains; thence w<
chains; thence north 40 chains; thenc
80 chains and containing 320 acres, m
less.
Dated May 25th, 1912.
WILLIAM  M.  LePA
aug. 3
A Gas Range
Makes summer cooking bearable.
Yes, more than that, enjoyable.
It means—A daily half holiday for
the cook, a cool kitchen, a comfortable house and a big saving in
your fuel bill. Can you afford to
be without all of this?   Seethe
Victoria Gas Co.
652 Yates Street
Telephone 2479
Victoria, B. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 17, 1912
Correspondence
The Week accept! no responsibility for
the views expressed by itl correspondents.
Communications will be inserted whether
signed by the real name of the writer
_ j nom de plume, but the writer's
name and address must be given to the
Editor as an evidence of bona fides. In no
case will it be divulged without consent.
|To the Editor of The Week:
Dear  Sir,—I   enclose  a  letter  re-
Iceived by me which might be of in-
['terest to some of your readers.
Yours truly,
H. H. N.
IFRONTIER     DAYS'    CELEBRATION
The "Stampede"
September 2, 3, 4 and 5
Calgary, July 21st, 1912.
H. Nash,
Battery St., Victoria, B. C.
)ear Sir:—
1 beg to advise that upon the above
kientioned dates is the presentation
if the "Stampede," which the man-
Igement hope to make the greatest
frontier Days' celebration ever be-
bre attempted. Realizing the import-
jnt part in the history of the North-
Jest Mounted Police held in the mak-
jg of the prosperity and progres-
Iveness of the Northwest, the man-
jernent take this opportunity to ex-
\w_ to you who came here with the
Diitingent in 1874 a sincere and cor-
Jial invitation to be present in Cal-
lary upon the above mentioned dates
|s the guest of the four gentlemen
vho are behind this. What they hope
|o make is a reunion of the old timers,
vhom the present generation like to
lonour so much, who were of the old
|orce when it took a man who was
man  to belong to the  Northwest
lounted Police.
It is the earnest wish of these gen-
Jlemen, namely, Mr.  Geo. Lane,  Mr.
y. Burns, Mr. A. E. Cross and A. J.
IcLean to produce in correct detail
the procession of this pageant the
various stages of this country at the
proper dates, etc., and as they came
in here, and with this end in view
they are making a special effort to
secure the exact replicas of the uniform worn in 1874 and we want you
men to appear in the parade in these
uniforms.
It is needless for me to say you will
have a good time while here' as you
will meet friends and fellow comrades at this time and in our estimation an organization with the fame of
the Northwest Mounted Police should
be given such a fitting tribute as
should be given to them and welcome them and introduce them to the
present generation who have heard so
much of them and their deeds.
In this respect would say we are
going to have the guns and mortars
which were used by your gunners
and which you brought into Fort
Whoop-Up and that were of such interest to you in  the  old  days.
Kindly let us have your chest measurement, waist measure and length of
trousers at once as we are having the
uniforms made and require this information at the earliest possible
moment.
Yours very truly,
(Sgd.)   GUY WEADICK,
Manager.
I am sending Major J. H. Mcllree's
letter in your care. Kindly favour
us by seeing that he gets it.
SEALED TENDERS addressed to the undersigned, and endorsed "Tender for the Construction of a Breakwater in Victoria Harbour, B.C.," will be received at this office
until 4.00 p.m., on Thursday, September 5,
1012, for the construction of a Breakwater at
Victoria Harbour, Victoria, B. C.
Plans, specifications and form of contract
can be seen and forms of tender obtained at
this Department and at the offices of W.
Henderson, Resident Architect, Victoria,
B.C.; C. C. Worsfield, Esq., District Engineer, New Westminster, B.C.; j. G. Sing,
Esq., District Engineer, Toronto, Ont.; J. L.
Michaud,   Esq.,   District   Engineer,   Montreal,
Hue.;    A.   Dccary,   Esq.,   District   Engineer,
uebec, Que., and on application to thc Postmaster at Vancouver,  li. C.
Persons tendering are notified that tenders
will not be considered unless made on the
printed forms supplied, and signed with their
actual signatures, stating tlieir occupations
and places of residence. In the case of
firms the actual signature, the nature of the
occupation, and place of residence of each
member of the firm must be given.
Each tender must be accompanied by an
accepted cheque on a chartered bank payable
to the order of the Honourable the Ministei
of Public Works, equal to ten per cent
(10 p. c.) of the amount of thc tender, which
will be forfeited if the person tendering decline to enter into a contract when called
upon to do so, or fail to complete the work
contracted for. If the tender be not accepted the cheque will be returned.
The   Department   does   not   bind   itself   to
accept the lowest or any tender.
By order,
R.  C.  DESROCHERS,
Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, August 8, 1912.
Newspapers will not be paid for this advertisement  if  they   insert  it  without   authority
from the Department.—23963.
aug 17 aug 31
WANTED—Stenographer of experience, to
start at $15 per week, with large corporation.
Address Box 41144.—Montreal Star.
They apparently want a lot for their old
$15 per.
The latest mammal to be classed by zoologists is known as the Taurus Moosus
Theodori.
EFFECT SAME, CAUSE DIFFERENT
Gentleman (engaging groom): "Are you
married ?"
Groom: "No, sir; I was thrown agin a
barbed wire fence and got my face scratched."
CANADA'S NAVY
John  Bull—"Which   will  you  have,
pup or an interest in the old dog?"
bull
A. W. Bridgman
Real Estate, Financial and Insurance Agent
Conveyancer and Notary Public
Established 1858
Agent
Commercial Union Assurance Co.,  Ltd.
of London, England
Canada Accident Insurance Company
Imperial Underwriters' Corporation
Northern Counties  Investment Trust,  Limited
of Bradford, England.
1007 Government Street
Victoria, B. C.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Sooke
TAKE notice that Henry Reece Ella, of
Victoria, B.C., occupation Broker, intends to
apply for permission to lease the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at or near the south-west corner
of Section (19) nineteen, Sooke District;
thence south five chains; thence east sixty
chains, more or less, to the south-west corner
of Section (18) eighteen; thence following
high water mark in a northerly and westerly
direction eighty chains, more or less, to place
of  commencement.
Dated 5th August, 1912.
HENRY REECE ELLA,
aug. 10 oct. 5
Of course' it is much harder to keep a
husband than to get one, especially if you
try to keep him in the style to which he is
accustomed.
Many   people   have   excellent   morals   but
odious ways.
THE JOY OF "DRESSING"
is greatly enhanced by Kleinert's
Guaranteed Dress Shields, which
insure the daintiest gowns
against damage by perspiration.
Washing in hot water removes all
traces of odor and destroys germs
and they can be instantly restored
to store newness by simply ironing.
Every shield guaranteed. Many
shapes and sizes to choose from.
Write for our Dre» Shield Book "C "
I. B. Kleinert Rubber Co.
84-86 West Wellington St., TORONTO
If Ihe name "Kleintt" is not on Ihe shield.
it isn't a Kleinert—The Guaranteed Shield.
I
!
There are women ahout whom one feels a I I*ove, and love only, is the thing that mat-
curiosity; one does not want to kiss them so ters, and all the rest of the things in this
much as one wants to know what they would world are shadows, scarecrows, and fantasies,
do if one did.—The White Shrine. | —Trove's Pilgrimage.
In affairs of sex a schoolgirl is more wily       We   still   stone  our   Magdalenes—but   with
than a veteran roue. diamonds.
OLYMPIC VIEW
Buy A Homesite
with a View
PARK
Buy A Homesite
with a View
Highest class of waterfront property at ordinary prices. Magnificent
home lots sloping up from lovely beach, facing "Uplands."
Practically no rock. Deep, rich soil. Many lots already planted with
bearing orchard and luscious small fruits.
Every lot commands unsurpassed view. Most lots look across island-
dotted Straits to Olympic Range, with stately waterfront homes of "Uplands"
in plain view across the narrow bay.
Just beyond new Cadboro Bay hotel. Golf Kinks 15 minutes' easy
drive. Street car at "Uplands," 15 minutes' walk away. Excellent wells on
property and city water now piped to "Uplands."
Car line extension proposed right past Olympic-View Park.
Every lot very generous in size. At least 60 feet frontage with average
depth of 175 feet. Waterfront contains numerous unexpected and
picturesque indents ideal for lovely homes.
Every improvement in "Uplands" will benefit Olympic-View Park.
Wealthy "Uplands" residents will naturally work for improvement of their
home locality.
This district will be the best residential district in Victoria, and probably,
in Canada.
Such property as this will never be on the market again at like present
prices. Waterfront and scenic homesite property is becoming more rare
every day.
Now, today, this minute, is the time to act.
Our Prices $1000 and
Demand Heavy-
Up.       Easy Terms
-Reserve Today
USE THE COUPON
F. STURGESS & CO.
Telephone 2559
318 Pemberton Block
MOTORS FROM OFFICE DAILY
Evening R3167
F. Sturgess & Co.,
318 Pemberton Block,
Victoria.
Send me illustrated folder, maps
and price lists of Olympic View
Park, free and without any obligation.
Name  	
Address 	 The week, Saturday, august 17,1912
I
Society
Mr.  Beverly    Robinson,^   Toronto,
has been a guest at the Empress.
* *   *
Mrs. Robinson Dunsmuir is visiting friends in Victoria.
* *   *
Mr. Justice Martin was a visitor to
Sol Due Hot Springs during the week.
* *   *
Mrs. Carmichael, Oak Bay, was
hostess at a most enjoyable dance on
Wednesday last.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. N. B. Gresley have
returned from a fortnight at Sol Due
Hot Springs.
* *   *
Mr. W. B. Monteith and the
Misses Monteith are spending a
couple of weeks in their summer cottage at Cowichan Lake.
* *   *
Mrs. G. V. Strong left during the
week to visit Mrs. Edward Mahon in
Vancouver.
* *   *
Mrs. G. A. McTavish and Miss
Dorothy McTavish were passengers
for    the    North    on    the    "Prince
George" last Monday.
* *   *
Mr. L. J. Shanahan has returned
from a holiday at the Riverside Inn,
Cowichan Lake.
* *   *
Mr. Gordon Mason from Penticton
was in Victoria for a few days recently.
* *   *
Major Carey has arrived at Work
Point Barracks from Winnipeg to replace Major Lindsay, who has been
promoted to an eastern post.
* *   *
Mr. R. II. Sperling, General Manager of the British Columbia Electric
Railway, accompanied by his wife,
has left on a business mission to
England.
Captain W. Thompson, who has
been staying at the "Dallas" for the
past four months, has returned to
India, via  Ireland and England.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Bridgewater and son
have arrived from England, and are
staying with Dr. and Mrs. I. W.
Powell, Burdette Avenue. Mrs.
Bridgewater was formerly Miss Violet
Powell.
* *   *
Miss Geis, and Miss McMillan, of
Vancouver, are spending a two weeks'
holiday at Salt Spring Island, stop-
ning at the Misses Carmen Williamson Boarding House, South Salt
Spring Island.
* *   *
Mrs. Watts Jones, Mr. and Mrs.
Blandy and family, Mr. Blandy, Sr.,
and Mr. Butler, of Victoria, have
been spending a holiday at the
Misses Carmen Williamson Boarding
House, Fulford Harbour, Salt Spring
Island.
* *   *
Mrs. and the Misses Cross were
hostesses on Wednesday afternoon at
a handkerchief tea given for Miss
Olive Day, who is to be married next
week to Mr. Dundas. The following
were among the guests: Mrs. Chator
Payne, the Misses N. Dupont, Maud
Scott, G. Pitts, E. Hanington, Daisy
McDowell, Eleanor McDowell, Newcombe, Hilda Page, P. Mason, Blackwood, W. Johnson, Raymur, Day,
Fell,  Cotsworth.
* *   *
On Tuesday afternoon last Engineer-Commander Morgan and Mrs.
Morgan gave a jolly tea party on H.
M. C. S. "Rainbow." The weather
being warm and calm the refreshments were served on deck. Among
those invited were Captain and Mrs.
Hose, Captain Brooker, Dr. and Mrs.
Home, Major and Mrs. Mills, Miss
Mills, Mrs. P. C. Musgrave, Mrs. J.
Irving, Mrs. Weston, Mrs. Slingsby,
Mr, Bury, Miss Bury, Miss Holden,
Miss Peters, Mrs. Harris, Mr. Col-
quohoun, Mrs. Allmon, Miss Dickie,
Mr. Edwards, Dr. Smithe, the Misses
Lawson, Miss K. Devereux, Mr
Jinkin, and many others.
* *   *
Mrs. Slingsby, Oak Bay, was hostess at a bridge party on Thursday,
August 8th. Several more friends
came in to tea later. Among the
many guests were Mrs. McCallum,
Mrs. J. Irving, Mrs. Spratt, Mrs. A.
Griffiths, Mrs. Rhodes, Mrs. W. E.
Scott, Mrs. Matthews, Mrs. P. Musgrave, Mrs. C. Roberts, Mrs. Blackwood, Mrs. Bechtel, Mrs. Lennox,
Mrs. Love, Mrs. Gaudin, Mrs. Scott
Elliott, Mrs. Rea, Mrs. Nesbitt, Mrs.
Procter, Miss Blackwood, Mrs. Piggott, Mrs. Steinteig, Mrs. Soars, Mrs.
W. Holmes, Mrs. Hughes, Mrs. Morgan and Miss Battle. The prizes
were captured by Mrs. Procter, Mrs.
Bechtel, Mrs. Nesbitt and Mrs.
Rhodes. Mrs. Slingsby was assisted
in receiving by her mother, Mrs. Cutler, and the tea table was presided
over by Mrs. Garnett Hughes and
Mrs. Soars.
* *   *
One of the most fashionable teas
of the season was that given last
Friday by Mrs. W. J. Bowser, wife
of the popular Attorney-General, at
her beautiful residence on Rockland
Avenue. Mrs. Bowser was ably assisted in receiving by her husband.
She was beautifully gowned in black
satin draped with white embroidered
net with deep hem of point de Venise,
and wore a large white plumed hat.
During the afternoon an orchestra
dispensed bright music. A number of
pretty girls served the guests with
refreshments, these being Miss Bowser, Miss Maud Bowser (Vancouver),
the Misses McBride, Miss Pearce,
Miss Ross, Miss McDonald and the
Misses MacDowell. The following is
a partial list of the numerous guests
present: His Honour the Lieutenant-
Governor and Mrs. Paterson, Mr. and
Mrs. Muskett, Sir Richard and Lady
McBride, Hon. D. M. Eberts and Mrs.
Eberts, Mr. Harold Eberts, Hon. A.
E. and Mrs. McPhillips, Hon. Price
Ellison, Hon. W. R. and Mrs. Ross,
Mr. G. H. Dawson, Miss Dawson, Mr.
and Mrs. W. E. Scott, Mr. H. B.
Thompson, Mrs. and Miss Thompson,
Mr. W. H. Hayward, Mr. Neil McKay, Chief Justice and Mrs. Macdonald, Mrs. Pemberton, Mrs. Beaven, Mrs. H. Beaven, Mrs. Loewen,
Mrs. Kirkbride, Mrs. W. Holmes, Mr.
and Mrs. Luxton, Mr. and Mrs. C.
Rhodes, Mr. and Mrs. N. Burdick,
Mrs. G. Wilson, Mrs. C. Wilson, Col.
and Mrs. A. W. Jones, Mr. and Mrs.
F. Higgins, Mr. and Mrs. Flumerfelt,
Mrs. J. Irving, Mrs. Weston, Mrs.
Erb, Mrs. Thain, Mrs. Stewart, Mr.
and Mrs. Scholefield, Mrs. Pearce,
Mrs. Roper, Mrs. Wheatley, Miss Atchison, Mrs. ancl the Misses Devereux,
Mrs. A. Robertson, Mrs. McMicking,
Miss McLean, Mrs. Bradshaw, Mrs.
Beasley, Mrs. S. Hughes, Mr. and
Mrs. R. Gibson. Miss Gibson, Miss
Grace Monteith, Mr. and Mrs. Suth
erland, Col, Rogers, Dr. and Mn
Hasell, Miss Dodwell, Mrs. Nesbitj
and many others;
"PUBLIC INQUIRIES ACT.'
NOTICE is hereby $iven that the Ccl
missioners appointed to inquire generally iff
the question of the sale of milk, and the ml
agement of dairies, cowsheds, and milk-shf
in the Province will hold their meetings f
Vancouver Island at the places and on
dates mentioned hereunder, namely:—
At the City Hall, Victoria, on Tuesday, .*|
August, at 8 p.m.
At   Duncan   on   Friday,   23rd   August, |
8 p. m.
At thc Cotirt-liouse, Nanaimo, on Tues<|
27th August, at 8 p.m.
At   Comox  on  Thursday,   29th  August,]
8 p.m.
A. CAMPBELL REDDIE,
Deputy Provincial Secretj
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, 13th August,  1912.
aug. 17
Zambrene Coat
The quality of coat made in England.   Just the thing for the
rainy season.   We have a large shipment just to hand.
Come in and inspect them.
T. B. Guthbertson & Co., Ltd
F. k. GOWEN, Managing Director
A Shipment of Unusual Art Rugs—Just Received
Artistic in finish, color and design, from the foremost makers in Britain. We have just opened up a very large consignment of these new goods, and never at
any time have we been able to submit to a discriminating public such a large and varied selection comprising all the newest ancl most charming color
combinations in various grades.   Only a personal inspection can convey any idea of their worth and beauty.   Sizes, grades and prices as follows:
GARLAND
7    x   7.6  $20.00
9x9  $25.00
9   x 10.6 $28.00
9    x 12  $32.00
12    x 10.6  $37-SO
13.6 x 10.6 $42.50
12    x 15  $55.00
MIMMOSA
12   x   8.6  $32.00
12    x 10.6  $37.50
13.6 x 10.6  $42.50
HALCYON
9   x   7.6 $20.00
9x9     $25.00
9    x 10.6 $28.00
9    x 12     $32.50
12    x 10.6 $37.50
13.6 x 10.6 $42.50
12     X  15       $55.00
BEDSIDE RUGS
4-6 x   2.3 $3.75
6    x   3     $6.00
CLAREMONT
9   x   7.6 $ 8.75
9x9     $10.00
9   x 10.6 $12.00
9    x 12     $15.00
12   x 10.6 $i7-5°
13.6 x 10.6  $20.00
ROSELEA
9    x   7.6 $13.75
9x9     $16.00
9   x 10.6 $18.50
9     X 12       $21.00
12   x 10.6 $25.00
13.6 x 10.6 $28.00
BALMORAL
9   x   7.6 $12.00
9x9  $14.00
9   x 10.6 $17.50
9   x 12 $20.00
12   x 10.6 $22.50
13.6 x 10.6 $25.00
BLOSSOM
9    x   7.6 $16.00
9x9  $i9-5°
9    x 10.6 $22.50
9    x 12  $25.00
12    x 10,6 $32.00
12    x 15  $32.50
MAYFLOWER
9   x   7.6 $18.00
9x9  $22.50
9   x 10.6 $25.00
9   x 12   $27.50
10.6 x 12  $32.50
10.6 x 13.6 $37-50
12    x 15  $42.50
Hoosiers Below the Sea
Two hundred feet below the level of the sea in the little California village of El
Centro, there are sixty-nine Hoosier Special Kitchen Cabinets. Most of thc houses
in El Centro are mere tents, for the town is fairly new. The country around is an
utter desert, once the bottom of the Saltou Sea. The hot winds of this parched
waste of land test the best furniture in the world. Most furniture shrinks and falls
to pieces there in the dry, harsh heat, but the Hoosier Kitchen Cabinet stood the
test, and this summer sixty-nine of the intelligent pioneer housekeepers of El Centro
put Hoosier Cabinets in their homes. Such a Kitchen Cabinet is a safe investment
for changing temperature in your kitchen. It saves thousands ol steps aiid hours
of time.    It saves your supplies.    Buy it now.
Inspect this Cabinet at $42.50
and Compare it with the Price
The Hoosier Kitchen Cabinet gives you more for your money than any other
Cabinet. Notice how much MORE goes with the Hoosier with NO EXTRA
CHARGE. Metal flour bin, with sliding glass panel and removable sifter—bin holds
55 pounds. Self-feeding metal sugar bin—when scoopful is taken out, same quantity
drops down. Six crystal glass Spice Cans, with aluminum lids. Hoosier patent
"clock face" want list. Great aluminum sliding work table, larger and higher than
a kitchen table, cupboard, large compartment for pots and pans, cutlery, linen
drawer, handy hooks, copper door fastener and drawer pulls.
ITS CERTAINLY GREAT VALUE
THE STORE THAT SAVES YOU MONEY
VICTORIA S
POPULAR
HOME
FURNISHERS
VICTORIA'S
POPULAR
HOME
FURNISHERS THE  WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST  17, 1912
>n Arboretum
Paper Read before the Natural History Society by Mr.
J. R. Anderson
the risk of being thought a crank
lhe subject of forestry I venture
jing before you the subject of the
|on of this paper and am encour-
to do so from the fact that in
|>ast it was only through persist-
^fforts  and repeated representa-
and   despite   the   discouraging
[y that met our efforts, year after
that at length sufficient interest
iroused;   resulting in the reser-
li of a tract of wild land as a
|nal   Park.    1   venture   to   hope
nth united efforts we may also
:d in causing the establishment
lleast the neucleus of an arbore-
py  bringing influences   to  bear
it a suitable tract of land em-
[g all  the  necessary conditions
te  successful  growth  of  plants
|e acquired ancl set aside for pur-
I of arboriculture.    The cultiva-
[nd   propogation   of  trees   and
and incidentally of other forms
it life are subjects of greater
|iic  importance,  possibly,  than
"e usually credited with;  tend-
[they do towards the preserva-
many plants liable to extinc-
|e fostering of educational sen-
in one of the most alluring
and the conservation of one
great   sources    of   national
to say nothing of the senti-
phase   of  the   question;   the
Ion  of trees and shrubs being
:ct of pleasure to people gener-
|id  instructive to the growing
tion.    In every civilized coun-
question of the preservation
[its has  engaged the attention
sons from all ranks of life and
\.r from  a  merely  sentimental
>in't  or   economic   value   it  is
lizcd as a subject deserving of
ition and support at the hands
:rnments and people.    In this
Ition I may mention the Arnold
turn at Jamaica Plains, Mass.,
nection  vvith  Harvard  Univer-
ider.the care of Prof. Sargeant,
linent  authority on  trees  and
whicii is of world-wide repu-
and  of  infinite  value   to  the
This institution has been most
jful in the propogation of many
is of plants in spite of the fact
|ie climatic conditions are  not
as favourable as ours, ancl we
therefore   reasonably   presume
\e should be able to propogate
that are impossible of success
less favoured locality.
Id the pleasure and good  for-
|uring my stay in the Old Coun-
>t year to be thrown in contact
biany   eminent   men   connected
[orestry;  amongst them Mr. H.
'es, F.R.S., of Colesborne. Cliel-
|n, who fas an extensive estate
lie 8,000 acres; Mr. F. R. S. Bal-
[who   has   an   estate   at   Stobo,
|nd; Sir Hugh R. Beevor, of At-
iugh, in Norfolk, where he has
extent of forest;   Mr. Clinton
of Hertford, who has an es-
Bayfordbury;   Prof. A.  Hen-
Cambridge;    Sir   Archibald
1 Hepburn, of Smeaton, Scot-
vhere I saw some goocl speci-
of our native trees;   Prof. Bal-
.R.S.,   Director  of  the   Royal
cal Gardens, Edinburgh;   Prof,
ville, of Oxford;   the Duke of
who has been most success-
growing our native trees at his
n Inverary.   Many of the gen-
mentioned are no strangers to
Columbia having visited it on
occasions and have for years
ixperimenting  with  trees  and
from this Province, as well as
ither parts of the world, and
y therefore take it that their
is  of such a Character that
y accept it as one on which
t reliance can be placed. These
nen said that in their opinion
of the empire is so well suited
purpose of an Arboretum, as
iver  Island, especially the  vi-
of Victoria, and  surprise  was
ied that no action had so far
aken  by the  Government to-
that  end and  I  was  assured
l>ery assistance  lying  in  their
would   be   accorded   in   case
vere taken towards the estab-
lt of an arboretum at or near
Victoria. Mr. Elwes offered to make
an address on the subject if-agreeable to us; his intention was at that
time to stop here in October on his
way to the Orient whither he was
proceeding on some forestry investigations. I undertook on behalf of the
Natural History Society to get up a
representative meeting where he
would have an opportunity of meeting our public men if he were able
to carry out his intentions. Since
my return I have received a letter
from him in which he says: "I am
leaving England on the 7th of December for Formosa where the Japanese
government foresters are going to
show me what is considered to be the
finest virgin forest in Asia, and where
they have a big timber mill now
working. I cannot be sure whether
I shall return via B. C. or via Siberia,
but in case I can manage the former
I will write to you and arrange to
carry out my promise."
Mr. Balfour also wrote under date
of December 22nd as follows; "I
would be glad to hear if my proposal
for an Arboretum for the Province
has materialized."
Mr. Elwes, as well as many of the
other gentlemen mentioned, offered
their services- in any.way that would
further the scheme and promised assistance in the shape of contributions
of such trees and shrubs as they have
to spare.
Now, Mr. President and Members,
I submit that as members of the N.
H. S. and as Victorians we would be
derelict in our duty did we not take
steps towards availing ourselves of
the spontaneous offers that have been
made and to use every effort by approaching the proper authorities and
through the press whereby the establishment of an Arboretum near Victoria may be realised. We cannot
ignore the verdict of such eminent
forest authorities as I have mentioned, confirmatory as it is of our
own opinions which we have at various times emphasized, and I particularly-wish to remind members of the
paper which was presented to the Society entitled "Evergreen Trees for
an Evergreen City," in which it was
clearly set forth that Victoria on account of its climatic conditions and
geographical position, is most favourably situated for purposes of growing plants not only of t'he temperate
regions, but many of those of a subtropical character. In England the
average temperature of the year is as
great as that of our own, but summers in the former country are comparatively moist ancl more cloudy so
that the young shoots are more
spongy and unripenecl and therefore
liable to injury by frost. This accounts for the fact that many trees
and shrubs which are comparatively
hardy, often fail in the British Isles
and from this circumstance it is
alleged by the experts alluded to, that
our climatic conditions are ideal for
the successful growth of plants generally.
I would suggest, ' Mr. President,
that some action be taken in reference to Mr. Elwes' offer so that he
may be induced to return this way
ancl give his promised address.
J. R. ANDERSON.
Victoria, B. C, 29 January, 1912.
"LAND   REGISTRY   ACT"
In the matter of an application  for a fresh
Certilicati* of Title to l.ot 84, Mock VII,
Viewlield Kami,  Esquimalt  District, Map
265.       .   ,    ',
NOI ICK is hereby given of my intention,
at the expiration of one calendar month from
the  lirst  publication  hereof,  to issue a fresh
Certificate of Title in lieu of the Certificate
of Title issued to James Graham Kair on thc
-'9th  day  of_ December,   1893,  and   numbered
17551 A,   whicii   has  been   lost.
Dated   at   Land   Registry   Ollice,   Victoria,
II. C, this 2nd day of August,  191-'.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar General of Titles,
aug. 17 sept. 14
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of  Coast
TAKE NOTICE that I, Morton S. Jones,
of Wyatt Bay, occupation farmer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands 1—Commencing at a post
planted about 20 chains south-westerly from
Moh Creek, Bute Inlet, thence west 10 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence east 40 chains
or to shore; thence meandering shore to commencement, containing about 160 acres.
Dated June 13,  1912.
MORTON S. JONES,
julv 20 sept. 21
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Cowichan
TAKE notice that Washington Grimmer of
Port  Washington,  B.  C, occupation  Farmer,
intends to apply  for  permission  to  purchase
the  following described  lands:—Commencing
at a post planted at the south-cast end of the
larger of three small  Islets situated in  Port
Washington   Hay,  and  lying  to  the  west  of
Section  2_,  the  said  small   Islets containing
one acre more or less.
Dated August  6th,   1912.
WASHINGTON   GRIMMER,
aug. 17 oct. 12
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Renfrew
TAKE  notice  that. Twossie  Robertson,  of
Chicago, 111., occupation Spinster, intends to
apply fori permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted 80 chains north and 80 chains west
from the south-west corner of T.   L.  42601;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence soutii 40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence 40 chains;  thence west 80 cliains  to
point   of  commencing,   containing  480  acres,
more or less.
Dated July 8th, 1912.
TWOSSIE ROBERTSON,
Stanley Wood, Agent,
aug. 10 " oct. 5
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Renfrew
TAKE notice that Nellie Robertson, of
Chicago, 111., occupation Married Woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—-Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains east and 20
chains south from the north-east comer of
Lot 49; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; tiience south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement,
containing 640  acres,  more or  less.
Dated July 8th,  1012.
NELLIE"'
aug. 10
ROBERTSON,
Stanley Wood, Agent,
oct. 5
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Renfrew
TAKE notice that Lily Heisterman, of Victoria, B. C, occupation Married Woman, in-
tends t0 apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains east from the
north-east corner of Lot 49 j thence north 60
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence south
60 chains; thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 480 acres, more
or less.
Dated July 8th,  1912.
ULY HEISTERMAN,
Stanley Wood, Agent,
aug. 10 oct. 5
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Renfrew
TAKE notice that Olive I. Heisterman, of
Victoria,  B.  C,  occupation  Spinster, intends
to apply for nermission to purchase the following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post  planted on  the  south boundary  of Lot
580;    80   chains   west   from   the   north-west
corner of T. L. 1746; thence south 80 chains;
thence   east   80   chains;    thence   north   80
chains;   thence  west   80   chains   to   point   of
commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated July  ioth,   1912.
OLIVE I. HEISTERMAN,
Stanley Wood, Agent,
aug. 10 oct. 5
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Renfrew ,
TAKE notice that Elize Ely, of Victoria,
B. C„ occupation Married Woman, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the south-west corner of Lot
580, being T. L. 1727; thence north 80
chains; thence west about 60 chains to the
south-east corner of Lot 56; thence south 80
chains; thence east 60 chains to point of
commencement, containing 480 acres, more or
less.
Dated July ioth, 1912.
ELIZE ELY,
Stanley Wood, Agent,
aug. 10 oct. 5
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE notice that Victoria Machinery Depot Company, Limited, of the City of Victoria,
occupation Engineers, intends to apply for
permission to lease the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted at high
water mark in the easterly boundary line of
Lot 10, Block K, Harbor Estate, in the City
of Victoria, B.C., distant 115 feet more or
less south from the northeast corner of said
Lot 10: thence southerly and following the
easterly boundary of said lot produced, a distance of 590 feet, more or less: thence at right
angles westerly a distance of 300 feet more
or less to the easterly boundary of Lot 6,
Block K, Harbor Estate produced; thence at
right angles northerly and following the
westerly boundary line of said Lot 6, produced to high water mark; thence easterly
following the sinuosities of the shore line to
point of commencement containing 4.1 acres,
more or less.
Dated May 17th, Victoria, B.C.
VICTORIA   MACHINERY
DEPOT COMPANY, LIMITED.
Charles Joseph Vancouver Spratt,
Agent,
june 1 aug 30
CANCELLATION OK RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the Reserve
existing by reason of the notice published iu
the British Columbia Gazette of the 27th oi
December, 1907, over a parcel of land situated
on Proincess Louisa Inlet, New Westminster
District, formerly covered by Timber License
30564, which has lapsed, is cancelled; and
that such lands will be thrown open to preemption, under the provisions of the Land
Act, at midnight on Tuesday, October 15th,
1912.
ROBT. A.  RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
16 July,  1912.
july  20
oct. 19
NOTICE
In  the  Matter of the  "Companies Act" and
in the matter of the "Esquimalt Development Company,  Limited.
NOTICE is hereby given that_ the "Esquimalt   Development   Company,   Limited,"   will
after  the expiration  of  one   month  from  the
date   of  the   first   public?' *on   of   this   notice
apply to the Registrar of Companies for the
approval of the change of name of the Company from the "Esquimalt Development Company,    Limited,"   to   the    "Canadian    Puget
Sound Sawmills Company, Limited."
Dated this 12th day of August.  1912.
H. DESPARD TWIGG,
Solicitor for the Company.
607  Sayward Block,
Victoria, B. C.
aug. 17 sept. 14
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of South Saanich
TAKE notice that Victor Alexander George
Eliot, of_ Victoria, B. C, occupation Stock
Broker, intends to apply for permission to
lease the following described lands:—Com-
mencing at a post planted on the foreshore
at the north-west corner of Lot 9 of the Subdivision of part of Section 12, Range II West,
South Saanich, thence following the shore line
of Lots 8 and 0 in an easterly direction about
three chains; thence nortl: .vesterly 20 chains;
thence westerly 3 chains; thence south-easterly 20 chains to the point of commeneement.
Dated August 9,  1912.
VICTOR ALEXANDER GEORGE ELIOT
By his Agent,  Francis Joseph O'Reilly,
aug 17 oct. 12
tPousder
The largest 25c. lin of the linent grade Talcum
Powder contains about double the quantity of
powder in usual size packages.
It's a Great Big Bargain
Highly prized by persons of refinement because
it is antiseptic as well as absorbent and cooling.
For chafing, rash, prickly heat and all hot
weather discomforts it is by (ar the most convenient of toilet requisites. Insist on getting
Royal Vinolia Talcum.
T£VERY mother ihould insist on having Royal Vinolia Talcum for
tF her baby's delicate skin. It is soothing and bland beyond words.
Does not enter the tiny pores of baby's skin to clog and irritate
them. The same qualities which bring delight and satisfaction to older
persons makes the baby a* fresh and cool and fragrant as a flower.
118
J
Price 25 cents
AT ALL DRUGGISTS AND STORES
PERFECT EASE and comfort—always the
moft popular feature of C/C a la Grace Corsets
—is more important than ever since the present
trend of fashion is toward the natural figure.
CORSETS
have never sacrificed comfort for fad \ or extremes of style. Each model
is designed to preserve the natural poise of the figure and give flexibility
and freedom—at the same time meeting fashion's requirements. Many
models—all sizes—one that just fits YOU.
The best stores sell them. 10
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 17, 1912
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice that Hugh McMillan, of Vancouver, occupation engineer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the north-west corner of Sapphi Lake, west
branch Homalko River; thence north 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence south
40 chains to lake shore; thence west along
lake shore 40 chains to point of commencement.
Dated April 20th, 1912.
fl—
June is
UGH   McMILLAN.
aug. 17
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice that Elizabeth McMillan, of
Vancouver, occupation Widow, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described iands:—Commencing at a post
planted about one and one-half miles northeast from Middle Lake, west branch Homalko River and on west side of river; thence
west 40 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated April 20th,  1012.
ELIZABETH   McMILLAN.
june 15 aug. 17
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice that John Watt, of Vancouver, occupation Mechanic, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile north from north shore of
Middle Lake, west branch Homalko River and
on west side of river; thence west 40 chajns;
tnence south 40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of commencement.
Dated April 20th,   .,.,. ^ ^
june 15 aug. 17
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice that Nettie Elizabeth McMillan,  of Vancouver,  occupation  House-keeper,
intends to apply for permission to purchase
the  following described  lands:—Commencing
at a post planted on north shore of Middle
Lake,   west  branch   Homalko  River;   thence
north 40 chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south   40  chains;   thence  west  40  chains  to
point of commencement.
Dated April 20th,  1912.
NETTIE ELIZABETH McMILLAN.
june 15 aug. 17
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice that Emma Tambouline, of
Westham Island, occupation Married Woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about two and one-
half miles north-east from Twist Lake and
on east side of west branch of Homalko
River; thence west 40 chains; thence north
40 chains; thence east 40 chains; thence south
40 chains to point of commencement.
Dated April  18th,   1912.
EMMA  TAMBOULINE.
june is        aug. 17
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
• District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice that Joseph Tambouline, of
Westham Island, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post planted about one-half miles south from
Bluff   Lake,   west   branch   Homalko   River;
thence south 40 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence east 40 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated April 20th, 1912.
JOSEPH TAMBOULINE.
june 15 aug. 17
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve,
notice of which appeared in the British Columbia Gazette of the 25th February, 1909,
being dated the 23rd February, 1909, relating to a parcel of land situated on the
Eastern shore of Masset Inlet, Graham
Island, is cancelled and that the vacant lands
included therein will be thrown open to
pre-emption at midnight on Friday, October
4th,   1912.
R. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C, 2m' July, 1912.
july 6 oct. s
SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING REGULATIONS
Coal mining rights of tne Dominion, in
Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, the
Yukon Territory, the North-west Territories
and in a portion of the Prov'nce of British
Columbia, may be leased fora term of twenty-
one years at an annual rental of $1 an acre.
Not more than 2,560 acres will be leased to
one applicant.
Application for a lease must be made by
the applicant in person to the Agent or Sub-
Agent of the district in which the rights
applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be described by sections, or legal sub-divisions of
sections, and in unsurveyed territory the tract
applied for are not available, but not other-
cant  himself.
Each application must be accompanied by a
fee of $5 which will be refunded if the rights
tpplied for are not available, but not otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of
five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall furnish
the Agent with sworn returns accounting for
the full quantity of merchantable coal mined
and pay the royalty thereon. If the coal
mining rights are not being operated, such
returns should be furnished at least once a
year.
The lease will include the coal mining rights
only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may
be considered necessary for the working of
the mine at 'he rate of $10.00 an acre.
For full information application should be
made to the Secretary 01 the Department of
the Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or
Sub-Agent of Dominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B.—Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.
mch 9 sept. 7
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range III
TAKE notice that Emma MacDonald, of
Bella Coola, occupation Married Woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted 20 chains east from the
South-west Cor,, of the North-west quarter
of Section 27. Township 6; tnence north 20
chains; thence east 20 chains; thence south
20 chains; thence west 20 chains to point
of commencement and containing 40 acres
more or less.
Dated  May  29th,   1912.
EMMA MacDONALDl
june 15 aug. 17
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice that John F. McMillan, of
Vancouver, occupation Fireman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about three and one-half miles northeast from Twist Lake and on east side of
west branch Homalko River; thence west .0
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence east
40 chains; thence south 40 chains to point
of commencement.
JOHN FITZGERALD McMILLAN.
June 15 aug. 17
CANCELLATION   OF   RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the Reserve
existing on Crown Lands in the Peace River
Land District, notice of which bearing date
April 3rd, 1911, was published in the British
Columbia Gazette of thc 6th of April, 1911,
is cancelled in so far as the same relates to
Townships III, 113 and 115, Peace River
Land  District.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria,   B.   C,
22nd July,  1912.
july 27 oct. 26
CANCELLATION   OF   RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the Reserve
existing over Crown Lands on Lasqueti
Island, formerly covered by expired Timber
Licence No. 40779, by reason of the notice
which appeared in the British Columbia
Gazette of the 27th of December, 1907, is
cancelled, and the said lands will be thrown
open to pre-emption only, on Friday, November first, at 9 o'clock a.m.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria,  B.  C,
19th July, 1912.
July .7 o0'1 a6
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice, that Fay McMillan, of Vancouver, occupation Married Woman, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about three miles north-east from
Twist Lake and on east side of west branch
of Homalko River j thence west 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains to point of commencement.
Dated April 18th, 1912.
FAY McMILLAN.
june is aug. 17
VICTORIA  LAND  DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice that Agnes Watt, of Vancouver, occupation Married Woman, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at north end of Twist Lake,
west branch Homalko River and near where
river empties into lake: thence north 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence south
40 chains; thence west 40 cnains to point
of commencement.
Dated April  18th,  1912.
AGNES  WATT,
june is aug. 17
VICTORIA  LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice that William Tambouline, of
Westham Island, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following  described  lands:—Commencing  at   a
post planted about two miles north-east from
Twist   Lake   and  east   side  of  west  branch
of  Homalko River;  thence  west  40  chains;
thence   east   40   chains;   thence   south   .0
chains;  thence south 40 chains to point of
commencement.
Dated April 18th, 1912.
WILLIAM TAMBOULINE.
june is
aug. 17
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE  notice  that   Louis   Tambouline,  of
Westham Island, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post planted about one mile south from Bluff
Lake,  west   branch  Homalko  River;   thence
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chains; thence
north  40  chains;   thence  east  40  chains  to
point of commencement.
Dated April 20th,  1912.
LOUIS TAMBOULINE.
june is aug. 17
VICTORIA  LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice that Eli Bourdon, of Vancouver, occupation Retired, intend* to apply for
fiermission to purchase the following described
ands:—Commenung   at   a   post   planted   on
south shore of  Muff Lake, west branch Homalko River, and on west side of river; thence
south 40 chain.; thence west 40 chains; thence
north  40 chains;  thence east 40 chains to
point of commencement.
Dated April 20th, 1012.
EM BOURDON.
June 15 aug. 17
VICTORIA  LAND  DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice that Donald Paul McMillan,
of Vancouver, occupation  Mechanic,  intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following  described   lands :-*-Commencing  at   a
post planted  about four and one-half iniles
north-east  from   Middle   Lake,   west   branch
Homalko River, and on west side of river;
thence west 40 chainl; thence aouth 40 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated April 20th,  10u.
DONALD PAUL i-cMILLAN.
june 15
aug. 17
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing over Lot 9874, Group I, Kootenay
District, by reason of the notice published in
the British Columbia Gazette of the 27th
of December,   1907, is cancelled.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
18th May,  1912.
may 25
aug. 24
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the Reserve
covering Fractional Sections 13, 14, 15 and
Section 24, Township 84, Lillooet District,
established by notice published in the British
Columbia Gazette of the 6th of April, 1911,
and dated 3rd of April, 1911, and also by
notice published in the British Columbia
Gazette of the 13th of April, 1911, and dated
ioth of April, 1911, is hereby cancelled for
the purpose of lease by tender.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
ioth June, 1912.
june 15 sept. 14
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing on Crown Lands in the vicinity of
Stuart River, situated in the Cariboo District,
notice of which bearing date December 17th,
1908, was published in the British Columbia
Gazette, dated December 17th, 1008, is cancelled in so far as the same relates to the
lands surveyed as Lots mi, 1114, 5415, 5379,
5433. 538o, 5381, 5382, 5383, 5384, 5385, S4I7,
5419, 539". 5390, 5389, 5388, 5387, 5386, 5432,
5437. 5438, 5431, 5392, 5393, 5394. 539S. 539*5.
5397. 5421. 5424. 5403. 5402, 5401, 5400, 5399,
5398, 5430, 5439, 5429, 5404, 5405, 5406, 5407,
5408, 5409, 5427, 5414, 5426, 5428, 5425, 5413,
and 5412, all in the Cariboo District.
ROBT. A. kENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
12th June,   1912.
June is sept. 14
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range III
TAKE notice that I, Albert McDonald, of
Eburne, occupation Chaffeur, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about three miles south-west from Finger
Mountain    on    the    Kleen-a-Kleene    River,
marked   south-east  corner;   thence  north   80
chains, west 80 chains, south 80 chains, east
80 chains to post of commencement.
Dated April  18th, 1912.
ALBERT McDONALD.
June 22 aug. 17
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range III
TAKE notice that I, Thomas McDonald, of
Eburne, B. C, occupation Contractor, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following  described   lands:—Commencing  at   a
post planted about two miles south-west from
Finger Mountain on the Kleen-a-Kleene River,
marked  south-east  corner;  thence  north  80
chains; west 80 cnains; south 80 chains; east
80 chains to post of commencement.
Dated April 18th, 1912.
THOMAS McDONALD.
june 22 aug. 17
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the Reserve
existing by reason of the notice published in
the British Columbia Gazette of the 27th of
December, 1907, over a parcel of land situated
on Texada Island, formerly covered by Timber License 22841, which has lapsed, is cancelled; and the said lands will be thrown open
to pre-emption under the provisions of the
Land Act, at midnight on Tuesday, October
15th, 1912.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
16 July, 1912.
july  20 oct. 19
WATER NOTICE
For a Licence to Take and Use Water
NOTICE is hereby given that Central
Island Power Co., Ltd.. of 413 Winch Building, Vancouver, B.C., will apply for a licence
to take and use 560 cubic feet per second of
water out of Nitinat River, which flows in a
southerly direction through Lot 51 and empties into Nitinat Lake near Clo-oose, B. C.
The water will be diverted at head of canyon
L 51 and will bc used for power purposes on
the land described as I, 51, Renfrew District.
This notice was posted on the ground on
the 4th day of August, 1912. The application
will be filed in the office of the Water Recorder at Victoria, B. C.
Objections may be filed with the said
Water Recorder or with the Comptroller of
Water Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria,
B. C.
CENTRAL ISLAND POWER
COMPANY LIMITED, Applicant.
By C. H. Walker, Agent.
CANCELLATION  OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing upon Lots 2031, 2034, 2035, 2035A,
2040 to 2046 inclusive, 2048, 2049A, 2050, 2055,
2057, 2060 to 2063 inclusive, 2067, 2068, 2069,
2075A, 2076, 2078, 2080, 2084, 2086, and 2088,
Cassiar District, notice of which, bearing date
May 18th, 1912, was published in the British
Columbia Gazette on May 23rd, 1912, is
cancelled.
R. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., 19th June, 1912.
june 22 sept. 21
CANCELLATION  OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing on vacant Crown lands in Township
iA, Range 5, Coast District, by reason of a
notice published in the British Columbia
Gazette on November ist, 1906, and bearing
date of  October 31st,   1906,  is cancelled.
R. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., 15th June, 1912.
June 22 sept. 21
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing over Crown Lands in the vicinity of
Stuart River, Cariboo, notice of which bearing date February 15th, 1910, was published in
the British Columbia Gazette, February 17th,
1910, is cancelled, in so far as the same relates
to the lands surveyed as Lots 6251, 6252, 6253,
62S4, 6255, 6256, 6257, 6258, 6265, 6272, 6298,
6297, 6296, 6289, 6271, 6266, 6264, 6259, 6273,
6280, 6281, 6279, 6274, 6260, 6263, 6267, 6270,
6290, 6295, 6291, 6269, 6268, 6262, 6261, 6275,
6278, 6284, 6277, 6276, 6285, 6286, 6287, 6288,
6292, 6293, 6294, 6295a, 6301, 6905, 6300,
6299, 6903, 6904, 6907, 6908, 6908a and 6906,
all in the Cariboo District.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
12th June,   1912.
june 15 sept. 14
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Sayward
TAKE NOTICE that Bessie Elliott of Toronto, Ont., Canada, Spinster, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described   lands:     Commencing   at    a   post
planted a mile and a half in a south-easterly
direction from the mouth of  Bear River  on
the western boundary of timber licence 37477;
thence east 20 chains; thence south 20 chains;
thence east 60 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence, west 80 chains; thence north 60 chains
to   point   of   commencement,   containing   360
acres.
Dated May 9th, 1912.
BESSIE ELLIOTT.
A. G. Sivell, Agent,
june 29 aug. 24
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of South Saanich
TAKE notice that The Vancouver Island
Power Co., Ltd., of Victoria, B.C., occupation Power Company, intends to apply for
fiermission to lease the following described
ands, being three and eight-tenths (3.8) acres,
comprising three rocks, together with the bed
of the sea, within a radius of three chains and
fifty links (3.50CI1) of a post planted on the
largest rock, which is twelve chains and
twenty-seven links (12.27 ch) at a bearing of
South twenty-one degrees and forty-five
minutes west (S. 21 deg. 45 min. W. Ast)
from the north-west corner of Section Eleven
(n), Ranee Two (2) West, South Saanich
District. The said rocks and bed of the sea
being in Brentwood Bay, Saanich Inlet.
THE VANCOUVER ISLAND
POWER CO., LTD.,
Arthur 0. Noakes, Agent,
aug. 3 sept. 28
WATER   NOTICE
For a License to Take and Use Water
NOTICE is hereby given that William
Whitty of Metchosin District, B. C, Gentleman, will apply for a license to take and use
one second foot of water out of Metchosin
Creek, which flows in a westerly direction
through Section No. 1 and empties into a
Lagoon northwest of Albert flead. The
water will be used for irrigation purposes on
the land described as lo acres of Section
one, Metchosin District, and Lot 2 Subdivision of Section 45 and part of Section 44,
Esquimalt  District.
This notice was posted on the ground on
the 6th August, 1912. The application will
be filed in the office of the Water Recorder
at Victoria, B. C.
Objections may be filed with the said Water
Recorder or with  the  Comptroller of Water
Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B. C.
WILLIAM WHITTY, Applicant.
Per Edward C. Hart, Agent,
aug. 10 sept. 7
WATER NOTICE
I, A. P. Procter, of Gordon Head, Victoria, in the Province of British Columbia,
five notice that on the fourteenth day of
eptember, 1912, I intend to apply to the
Water Commissioner at his office in Victoria
for a license to take and use four cubic feet
of water per second from a spring on Lot 12,
situate on or about 100 feet south-east of
about the centre of the north-east boundary
line of said Lot 12, Section 44, Victoria District, Province of British Columbia, Plan No.
954, and to form a Reservoir for storage at
said  spring.
The water is to be taken from said spring
and reservoir and is to be used on Lots 12
and 13, Section 44, Victoria District, Flan
No. 17, Province of British Columbia, for domestic purposes and also to irrigate said lands
in the above mentioned Lots 12 and 13, Plan
No.  17.
A. P. PROCTER.
Dated and posted this third day of August,
1912.
aug. 10 sept. 7
"LAND REGISTRY ACT"
In the  Matter of an application for a fr|
Certificate of Title to Lots 4, 5, 27
28, Block "A," Map 340, Fairfield Fi|
Estate,   Victoria   City.
NOTICE   is  hereby   given   that   it   is
intention after- the expiration of one ealed
month  from  the  first  publication  hereof,|
issue  a fresh  Certificate  of Title  in  lieu
the Certificate of 'title issued to John Cha|
Smith and Henry Edward Smith on the
day of December, 1906, and numbered 1351
which   has   been   lost. J
Dated   at   the   Land   Registry   Office,l
Victoria,  B.C., this 22nd' day  of July,   il
S. Y. WOOTTON, ,    f
Registrar General of Titlq
July 27
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Sayward
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Craig of 1
treal,  Que.,  Gentleman, intends to applyL
permission to purchase the following descil
lands:    Commencing at a post planted al
a mile east of the mouth of Bear Rivef
the south boundary  of timber licence
thence west 50 chains to the east boundal
lot 315; thence south 40 chains; thencel
60   chains;   thence   north   20   chains;   til
west   10  chains;   thence  north  20  chain;
point of commencement, containing 220
more or less.
Dated May 8th, 1912.
ROBE— "
OBERT CRAIG.
A. G. Sivell, Agd
june 29
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Sayward
TAKE NOTICE that Harry W. Dil
of Toronto, Ont., Canada, Gentleman, ini
to apply for permission to purchase till
lowing described lands: Commencing I
post planted two and a half miles soutl
of the mouth of Bear River on the wl
boundary of lot 63; thence south forty cl
thence east 20 chains; thence south 40 cl
thence west 20 chains; thence norl
chains; thence west 30 chains; thencef
60 chains; thence east 30 chains to pel
commencement, containing 260 acres mj
less.
Dated May 8th,  1912.
HARRY WHITEHEAD DAWSOl
A. G. Sivell, A|
june 29
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICTS
District of Sayward f
TAKE NOTICE that.John Elliott I
ronto,   Ont.,  Merchant,  intends to apl
permission   to   purchase, the   followil
scribed lands:    Commencing at a post I
two miles south of the mouth of Bea|
on   the   eastern   boundary   of  timber
30192;    thence south  60 chains;  thenl
60   chains;   thence   north  60   chains; I
west   60   chains  to  point  of  commen<|
containing 360 acres.
Dated May 8th,   1912.
JOHN ELLIOTT.
A. G. Sivell, Aj
june 29
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICTl
District of Sayward I
TAKE  NOTICE that James  P.  Cri
Montreal, Que., broker, intends to apd
permission to purchase the following del
lands:    Commencing at  a  post  planta
and   one-half  miles  jn  an   easterly   dil
from  the  mouth  of  Bear   River  and  r
south-east   corner   of   timber   licence I
thence south 48 chains to the north bol
of   timber   licence   37477;    thence   wl
chains;, thence north  48 chains;  thenci
35  chains,   to  point 01  commencement!
taining 170 acres more or less.
Dated this 8th day of May, 1912.
JAMES PENRHYN CRAIG.
A. G. Sivell, A|
june 29
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICTl
District of Sayward f
TAKE   NOTICE  that  Jane   HerchJ
Chicago,   111.,   widow,   intends   to   appl
permission to purchase the following del
lands:    Commencing at  a  post  plante]
mile south-east of the mouth of Bearl
and   at   the   north-east   corner   of  timl
cence 30192;   thence south 50 chains; j
east 80 chains; thence north 50 chains; I
west 80 chains to point  of commenc|
containing 400 acres.
Dated May 8th, 1912.
JANE HERCHMER.
A. G. Sivell, A_|
june 29
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICTl
TAKE notice that I, James Cartmel, f
of Victoria, B.C., intend to apply to pu]
the following described lands:—Cominl
at a post planted on the shore of 1
Island, about ten chains distant fron
eastern end of Maud Island in a north-ea
direction; thence north sixty chains; I
west forty chains more or less to a po|
the shore of the Seymour Narrows; I
south and east following the coast line
point of commencement, containing 240 |
more or less.
Dated July 15th, 1912.
JAMES CARTMl
july 20 s«f
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT |
District of Sayward
TAKE NOTICE that Margaret Dawsl
Toronto,   Ont.,   Married  Woman,  intenl
apply for permission to purchase the fl
ing described lands:    Commencing at il
planted three and a half miles south-el
the   mouth   of   Bear   River   and   thencej
50  chains;   thence  north   60   chains;
west 20 chains; thence south 30 chains;
west  30  chains;  thence  south  30  chaii
point of commencement, containing 210 f
Dated this 9th day of May. 1012.
MARGARET DAWSON.
A. G. Sivell, Agj
june 29
VICTORIA LAND DIST _CT |
District  of  Coast
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. Simon Ml
of Victoria, B. C, occupation Broker, il
to apply for permission to purchase til
lowing described lands:—Commencingf
post planted on south end of a small I
in mouth of "Long Bay," Okishollo Chi
thence meandering said Island to comi|
ment, containing about 25 acres.
Dated June 23,  1012.
july 20
SIMON METTLER.
Morton S. Jones, Ail
CANCELLATION OF RUSEKVi
NOTICE Is hereby given that
established by notice dated 5th inly,I
and published in the British Co' mbia (|
of the 13th of July, 1911, '• cancelled1
far as same relates to Lo* 2911, Group ;
Westminster District, situated on G
Island, in order that thc sale of th,
Lot 2911 be made '.0 Fred. P. Murray.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minirter of
Lands Department,
-/ictoria, B. C,
18th May,  1912.
may 25 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 17, 1912
11
[ragedies of Inter-
Marriage
■ve white women who married
|inese 'have found their way from
Angeles to the insane asylum
lin the past year. The record is
Iking, but not surprising, says an
Bange. That the number of such
ledies is not greater can be due
|e to the limited number of these
litural marriages. That any of
Iwomen escape provides the one
|e for surprise.
every    essential   husband   and
J must differ in such a union. They
products of widely divergent civil-
diis.   In their ancestry there have
no points of similarity of train-
and habits.    The 'husband comes
I race that looks down upon wo-
while   the wife is of a people
have   a   deep   regard  for   the
|er  sex. *  Religion,   social   cus-
temperament, racial character-
all afford points of the widest
|ence.   The lack of sympathy be-
the    two    is    physiological,
lological and sociological in its
|h races are wont to recognize
1 facts.     And   their   recognition
I the form of deep contempt  for
pntracting  parties.    No  matter
they   make   their   home,   the
Js  destined to social ostracism.
becomes  little   better   than   an
and  the   necessity   of   human
Jithy is denied her.   Even hybrid
|en cannot make up the hiatus.
The Stress of Life
[noved from normal, or even
psome environment, denied sym-
and harmonious domestic re-
is, the stress of life sooner or
[must warp the woman's mind.
1 if she does not become a raving
ac, as in the late Los Angeles
Iher mentality is all but certain
(coming clouded and her nature
Id and soured by the mockery
■e and love that are her portion,
[must be taken in consideration,
that a woman entering such an
Ice is not sound. She lacks
J and shame, and must have other
Its of character which are assets
Ie normal human being. Such
the case, a normal environ-
and happier life are more ne-
Iry to her than to the average
|an. She is poorly equipped to
up under the stress and strain
Imust come to her out of such a
jiage.
|e husband,  of course,  does  not
I his mind.    His is a sterner na-
that  is  in  no  way  dependent
the niceties of conduct that be-
to a finer spun civilization.   No-
■his wife does can  bother him
much.   To   him she is only an
Issory, a convenience.   The Occi-
lal  solicitude   for   womankind   is
lely   missing   from   his   Oriental
Ire.
lilt of humane regard for the wel-
I of frail creatures many Western
es have provided a law to pro-
|them from such tragedies. Can-
Where these hapless unions are
[countenanced, would do well to
|w their course.
LETTER OF THE LAW
Mr. F. E. Smith, M.P., tells a story of a
County Court case lie was once engaged in,
in which the plaintiff's son, a lad of eight
years, was to appear as a witness.
When the youngster entered the box he
wore boots several sizes too large, a hat that
almost hid his face, long trousers rolled up so
that the baggy knees were at his ankles, and,
to complete the picture, a swallow-tail coat
that had to be held to keep it from sweeping
the floor. This ludicrous picture was too
mucn for the Court; but the judge, between
his spasms of laughter, managed to ask the
boy his reason for  appearing in  such  garb.
With wondering look the boy fished in an
inner pocket and hauled the summons from
it, pointing out a sentence with solemn mien
as he did so. "To appear in his father's suit,"
it read.
Popularity is when people like you. Reputation is when they ought to but really
cannot.
Mr. Prevost Battersby says, "The instant
a woman loves a man she's afraid of him and
of every other woman who comes near
him."
Moderation is fatal.    Nothing succeeds like
excess.
Be frank and explicit. This is the best
way to conceal your own mind and confuse
that  of everyone else.
For woman love is a tragedy, for man it is
a short story.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Be polite;   perhaps your family won't mind
if you practise on them.
Two girls  went  for  a  tramp.   The  tramp
liked it.
A Scotsman is a man who keeps the Sabbath and anything else' he can lay his hands
on.
Industrial School for Girls
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed "Tender
for Industrial School for Girls," will be received by the Hon. the Minister of Public
Works up to m o'clock noon of Monday, 9th
day of September^ 1912, for the erection and
completion of an industrial school for girls.
Plans, specifications, contract, and forms of
tender may he seen at the offices of the Government Agents, Vancouver and New Westminster, and the Department of Public Works,
Victoria.
Intending tenderers can, by applying to the
undersigned, obtain a set of the drawings
and specifications for the sum of twenty-five
(25) dollars.
Each proposal must be accompanied by an
accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit
on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the Hon. the Minister of Public
Works, for a sum equivalent to 10 per cent,
of the amount of the tender, which shall be
forfeited if the party tendering decline to
enter into contract when called upon to do
so, or if he fail to complete the work con-
tracted for. The cheques or certificates of
deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them upon the execution of the
contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless made
out on the forms supplied, signed with the
actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed
in the envelopes furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily
accepted.
. J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C., 14th August, 1912.
aug. 17 sept. 7
Married people get along much better than
we think they do, even though we won't see
how they possibly can.—Commoners' Rights,
by Constance Smedley.
Loose Leaf Ledgers
Loose Leaf Trial Balance Books
Loose Leaf Memo and
Price Books
♦
Everything for the Office at
Victoria Book & Stationery Co., Ltd.
1004 Government Street Telephone 63
Sale of Prince Rupert
Lots
Acting under instructions from the Government of British
Columbia,  I  will  hold  an auction  sale of  Prince  Rupert  Lots  on
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28, 1912
The sale will be held at Prince Rupert and will commence at 3 p.m.
and will be completed on Thursday, the 29th.
The lots to be offered will be in Sections 1, 5, 6, 7 and 8, about 300
in all, and the list comprises some of the choicest lots on the townsite.
Take Canadian Pacific Railway and Union Steamship Companies'
boats August 24th, or Grand Trunk Pacific boats August 26th. Fare
each way, including meals and berth, $18.00.
It will pay you to attend this sale. If you cannot go yourself
send a representative.
For further information apply to
C. D. RAND, Agent
Head Office, Vancouver, B. C.     Branch Office, Prince Rupert, B. C.
"For Tea You Can't Beat Upton's"
Our success depends upon your satisfaction.
That's why we employ the World's
greatest experts to blend
LIPTON'STEA
Goes farthest for the money
W____W9*
We Offer
A first class stock
of Apples, Pears,
Cherries, Prunes,
Plums, Peaches, Ap-
and    Small
ricots
Fruits.
Also Ornamental Trees and Shrubs, decidious
and evergreen, Roses, etc. The very finest
quality and best assortment grown in B. C.
Catalogue free. Personal inspection invited.
Now is the time to order.
Layritz Nurseries
Carey Road, Victoria Branch at Kelowna, B. C.
Phone M9054
JAMES BUCHANAN & CO., by Royal Appointment
Purveyors to H. M. King George the V. and the Royal Household.
Distillers of the popular
"Black & White" Scotch Whisky
Unsurpassed in Purity, Age and Flavor
All Dealers
Fullbrook-Sayers
Stationery Company
Successors to
Standard Stationery Co.
Our Prices are Right
New Stock is arriving every day
and we shall soon have the most
complete assortment of Stationery
in the city.
Your custom will be appreciated
and we will do our best to please you
1220 Government Street
VICTORIA COUNTRY CLUB, LTD.
Annual Race Meeting
At the Willows Track
Sept. 14 to Oct. 5,1912
6 Races Daily 6
Every Afternoon, 2.30
Rain or Shine
Geo. A. Fraser, Manager
R. F. Leighton, Racing Secretary 12
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 17, 1912
I
11BB
'    *  *   l!
II
STAMFORD
PARK
ii
Uplands' in Miniature
WHAT would you have?
A park residence within
two miles of the city hall on
a lot which will cost you
only $500.00.
This is a record in "value
for money"and the easy terms
make it a gift.
Stamford Park has everything in its favor. An eminence from which the whole
country can be viewed with
exquisite panoramic effects
over the Straits of Juan de
Fuca to the Olympic Mountains; beautiful woodland for
shelter; sloping ground which
assures sanitary conditions;
proximity to a proposed car
ine which will land you in the
centre of town in 10 minutes.
Stamford Park is essentially
a scenic subdivision and an
ideal residential homesite
proposition.
ITS permanent character is
determined by reasonable
building restrictions which
will render it always a delightful and picturesque suburb of
Victoria.
You cannot match the lots
in this subdivision anvwhere
else at less than double the
price and the sale has been so
successful that it will be off
the market before you know.
Prices $500 to $700 a lot,
1-5 down, balance in 6, 12,18
and 24 months, at 7 per cent.
Delays are especially dangerous where the buying of
choice residential lots near
Victoria is concerned.
Our motors are waiting to
take you out. It costs you
nothing to see the property
and only a song if you buy it.
MOORE tf JOHNSTON
Cor. Yates and Broad Sts.
Sole Agents
Victoria, B.C.   Phone 627 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 17, 1912
13
f>
"Sotto Voce
The Week's Rumours and
Humours
(By The Hornet)
Jhat the   Colonist  "cub"   reporter
Ide a bad break when he charged
|_dmaster    Rumsby   with    playing
-time" at the Empress Hotel.
*   *   *
Ihat no "round-robin" was present-
I no "rag-time" was played, and the
lidmaster has too much respect for
lself, for his colleagues and for the'
tors at the Empress to make such
lol of himself.
|hat a card was passed up asking;
to play one well-known Ameri-
Icomic song, whicii is not written
lag-time" and which was received
deathly silence, and not with the
ultuous applause which the "cub"
Irter imagined.
* *
lat imagination is fine in a poet,
lapt to be troublesome in a re-
V-
* *   *
|at when the Inspector of Lais appointed, his first visit
Id b'e to the basement of Spen-
1 store, where conditions are bad
\h to start an epidemic of diph-
lt even if Sheriff Richards is a
a "scrapper," he has stirred up
It pf hornets at the Westholme
I, and has cleared out a number
lople who were a detriment to
lusiness.
* *   *
at it is   perfectly   clear    to the
|tors why the hotel did not pay
the  old  regime;   and  if  it is
clear to the License Commis-
Irs, they will have no alternative
|o cancel the license.
* #   *
at  since  the  old  "Savoy"  was
there has not been such a hot-
\>i iniquity in Victoria.
* #   *
at   there   should   be   a   record
|fl   at   the   Arena   next   Tuesday
to  see the scrap between Joe
ly and Scott.
1 *   *   *
kt the local lad is just the pluck-
ittle fellow who has been seen in
png for a long time.
* *   *
it in courage and skill he re-
s one of "Battling Nelson" at his
and may yet have as successful
eer.
e oi   Battling iNeison   at nis
may yet have as successful
at the Directors of the B. C. E,
onounce the Attorney-General to
■V Daniel come to Judgment."
2U1ET
_:ood
TASTE
expressed in Our
ilothing. Our Gar-
lents will distinguish
ou—not advertise
ou. We carry every-
ling that is correct
in Gentlemen's
Apparel
The
ommonwealth
Home of Hobberlin Clothes
608 Yates St.
Next to Imperial Bank
That they might just as well have
anticipated his drastic regulations of
their own accord, and so made a virtue of a necessity.
That the proposed changes are admirable, and will work out not only
to the public safety, but for increased
profits to the Company.
That if there is 17% profit in operating motor buses, the city can afford
to make it.
* *   *
That the institution would be au excellent one if well managed, and if
unfair competition with the Tramway
Company is avoided.
* *   *
That there is room for both—especially in the suburbs.
* *   *
That Hillside Avenue is iu mourning at the failure of the tramway service to materialise.
* *   *
That the Cadboro Bay extension is
badly wanted and should be placed
in commission as soon as possible.
* *   *
That the Saanich extension will be
in operation by the first of next year,
—and then look for a rush to the
suburbs.
* *   *
That the City Council has certainly
turned over a new leaf when jt has reconsidered and reversed its judgment
twice within a fortnight.
* *   *
That its change of front with reference to the Mawson contract is
entirely creditable.
* *   *
That even the Victoria Times is
compelled to admit that there may
yet be a breakwater at Ogden Point.
* *   *
That if Dr. Odin has really discovered the microbe of cancer, he
may turn out to be the greatest benefactor in the history of medical
science.
H*     *     *
That it is not true that the visit of
Mr. Borden to the Vickers-Mazim
works was to place an order for a
Canadian Navy.
* *   *
That the leadership of Mr. Bonar
Law is not giving entire satisfaction
even to the Government.
* *   *
That'Winnipeg City Council voted
$50,000, Calgary $10,000 and Vancouver $10,000 for the reception of the
Duke of Connaught.
* *   #
That Victoria has appropriated all
its spare funds to entertain the "Flying Legion."
* *   *
That unless the Government comes
to the rescue there will be "nothing
doing" in the Capital City.
* *   *
That Alderman Humber knows
what he is talking about when he sug-^
gests an investigation into the expenditures on City sewers.
* *   *
That this is the one enquiry which
the Council cannot afford to burke,
and it is apt to open the eyes of the
ratepayers.
* *   *
That The Week gave a hint on this
subject   several   months   ago—which
was not taken.
* *   *
That the Times has not yet
thanked The Week for coining a
phrase which it quotes with glee
every few days; but then tHe Times
never did appreciate its blessings.
That the Times shows questionable
taste in twitting well-known members
of the Conservative Party with attempting to oust the respected Postmaster from his position.
* *   *
That it is an open secret that if the
Laurier Government had been returned Mr. Shakespeare would have
been removed shortly after the election.
* *   *
That it was freely stated by those
in the best position to know that his
successor was to be the person responsible for the paragraphs now appearing in the Times.
* f, *
That there are at least five suffragettes in Victoria and they have
started an organ to voice their
grievances.
* **   *
That their motto is "The Woman's
Cause is the Man's," but really the
last "s" is superfluous.
* *   *
That if the Suffragettes are to be
believed their motto should really be
"The Woman's Curse is Man."
* *   *
That the only remedy for "suffragitis" is the establishment of an
Adamiess Eden.
* *   *
That during the thirty years' management of the local B. C. Telephone
Company by Mr. R. B. McMicking
the Board of Trade never had to complain of the service.
* *   *
That whatever the reason may be,
there has been a marked deterioration
since he relinquished control.
* *   *
That there is a total absence of the
old-time courtesy on the part of the
operators, and politeness is at a
serious discount.
That at the present rate the Victoria service will soon lapse into the
slip-shod groove which ' has characterized the Vancouver service.
*   *   *
That Providence has been merciful
to Victoria during the past week; Mr.
J. S. Willison did not get any further
than Vancouver, or he might have
been asked to address the Canadian
Club,
BAN AND ARRIERE BAN
By Andrew Lang
"Who wins his love shall lose her,
, * Who loses her shall gain,
For  still th'e spirit woos her,
A soul without a stain
And memory still pursues h:i
With  longings not in vain.
Hc loses her who gains her,
Who watches day by day
The dust of time that stains her,
The griefs that leave her gray,
Thc flesh tliat yet enchains her
Whose grace hath passed away.
Oh!   happier he who gains not
The love some stem to gain;
The joy  that custom stains not
Shall still with him remain,
The loveliness that wanes not,
The love that ne'er can wane.
He dreams she grows not older
The land of dreams among,
Though all the world wax colder,
Though all the songs be sung.
In dreams doth he behold her
Still fair and kind and young."
A  GOOD   STORY
The following is told of Lord Mersey and
of his comment on a certain young barrister
who is now well known in Parliament. The
barrister had, when quite young, the same
patronising manner that distinguishes him
now, and, on this occasion, he patronised the
judge and the jury to his heart's content.
Lord Mersey bore it quite patiently, rather to
people's surprise, but, walking back to his
rooms—it was on circuit—arm-in-arm with a
friend, he passed a new building—one of
those colossal erections imported from America. Glancing at it he said, whimsically,
"Ah, those must be the chambers of our
young friend of this morning."
In the inner recesses of their hearts there
are a number of cold women who adore a
bold buccaneer.
One cannot be a wife and an artist at the
same time. They are two separate vocations
that lead in opposite directions.
  \
Girls do not know how to choose husbands
—but widows do—great are the compensations granted to widows for losses sustained.
It is better to make mistakes than not to
live at all.—Phrynette  Married.
When a woman says go it is a man's business and duty to stay.—The Good Girl.
Many people refrain from committing suicide because of the Morning Post.
Flirting  requires   practice.   It's   almost   as
exact a science as mathematics.
A man has no business to marry a woman
who can't make him miserable—it means that
she can't make him happy.
In love affairs more than anything else, it
is the preliminaries that are entrancing to
most women.—Daphne in the Fatherland.
Love Is a very human personage; at first
trifles content him, a glance, a smile, the
twinkle of an ankle, or the touch of a hand.
But his appetite increases with feeding till he
demands everything.—The Woman Between,
by Edward Bosanquet.
WATER NOTICE
For a Licence to Store and Pen Back Water
NOTICE is hereby given that Samuel Edmunds Field, of Victoria, B. C, will apply
for a licence to store or pen back 1/30 acre,
10 feet deep acre-feet of water from Mill-
stream Creek, a stream flowing in a northeasterly direction and emptying into Esquimalt Harbour, near Parsons Bridge. The
water will be stored in a reservoir of 18,000
cu. feet capacity, built or to be built at foot
lower falls, and will be used for domestic
purposes as authorized by Water Record No.
 ,  Water  Licence  No.    ,   or  under  a
notice of application for a licence to lake and
use water, posted herewith, on the land described as Lot 1, Sec. 98, Esquimalt District,
Map  748.
This notice was posted on the ground on
the 12th day of August, 1912. The application will be filed in the office of the Water
Recorder at Victoria,  B.  C.
Objections may be filed with the said Water
Recorder or with the Comptroller of Water
Rights, Parliament Buildings. Victoria, B.  C.
SAMUEL   E.   FIELD,  Applicant,
aug. 17 sept. 7
WATER NOTICE
Fnr a Licence to Take and Use Water
NOTICE is hereby given that Samuel Edmunds Field, of Victoria, B. C, will apply
for a licence to take and use 10 miner's inches of water out of Millstream Creek, which
flows in a north-easterly direction through
Esquimalt District, and empties into Esquimalt  Harbour,  near  Parsons  Bridge,
The water will be diverted at the foot of
the lower falls, on Eastern boundary Lot 1,
Sec. 98, Millstream, Esquimalt District, and
will be used for domestic purposes on the land
described as Lot 1, Sec. 98, Esquimalt District, Map 748.
This notice was posted on the ground on
the 12th day of August, 1912. The application will be filed in the office of the Water
Recorder at Victoria, B. C._
Objections may be filed with the said Water
Recorder or with the Comptroller of Water
Rights, Parliament Buildings. Victoria,  B. C.
SAMUEL  E.   FIELD,  Applicant,
aug. 17 sept. 7
Roy's   Art   Glass   Workl   and   Store
915 Pandora St,   Victoria, B. C,
Albert F. Roy
Over  thirty  yean'  experience   in
Art  Glass
LEADED LIGHTS
Sole manufacturer ol Steel-Cored Lead
for  Churches,   Schools,   Public   Buildings and private Dwellings,   Plain md
Fancy Glass Sold.   Sashes Glued by
Contract.   Estimates   free.    Phone 394
SPENCE, DOHERTY & CO.
HATTERS AND FURNISHERS "To Men Who Care"
What do you think
of this?
RIGHT here in our own city an exclusive
agency for real tailor-made clothes,
direct from New York and Chicago,
the fashion centres of America. The styles we
show are characteristic of the best dressed men
of today. And woolens! Why you just ought to
see them,—fancy weaves, and beautiful mixtures
of the very latest colorings. They'll give you the
greatest satisfaction you ever had in selecting a
suit for any kind of wear. We are jubilant ourselves over this unexcelled range, and we want
you to see them for yourself. Call early and let
us show you. Remember it's no trouble for us
to give you our personal attention.
SPENCE, DOHERTY & CO.
1216 DOUGLAS ST. VICTORIA, B. C.
THE Staggard Tread Tires
are the most economical you can buy
because the double thickness and quality
of the riding treads equal that of any two
ordinary tires.
Their chief value, however, lies in the protection they afford both passengers and car in
checking every tendency to slip or skid on any
kind of wet or slippery road or when making
sharp emergency turns.
Write for Our Booklet
"THE   TIRE   PERFECT"
which tells why Republic "Staggard Tread" Tires
give more service at less expense and are safer
than any other kind.
MTIDC Ofl    Distributors for B. C.
lint UUi   537 YATES STREET
mch 16
•ept 16
AT "741"
Fort street you can rid yourself of every care and worry about the
family food supply. Victoria's Pure Food Market was established to
serve the people and to serve them with nothing but the best. On
tables supplied from Kirkham's, you KNOW that each dish is pure,
fresh and wholesome, and not only that, you will find, on such tables,
many imported delicacies which could have been obtained only at 741.
Suggestions for Today
Mackerel in Tomato Sauce, packed in Scotland, 2 tins for 35c
Sardines in Tomato Sauce, 2 tins  35c
Soused Herrings, per tin ioc
Krinkle Corn Flakes, 3 packets  35c
Washington Coffee, made iu a moment, tins  35c
Stone's Pure Lime Juice, large bottle  35c
Three bottles for  $1.00
H. 0. Kirkham & Co., Ltd.
741, 743, 745 Fort Street
Grocery Store Butcher Shop Liquor Store
Tels. 178, 179 Tel. 1678 Tel. 3677
The Union Steamship Company, Ltd. of B.C.
S. S. CAMOSUN (or Prince Rupert and Granby Bay every Tuesday.
S.S. CHELOHSIN  for  Slteena River,   Prince  Rupert,   Naas,  Port Simpson,  and
Stewart, every Saturday,
f HE BOSCOWITZ STEAMSHIP COMPANY, LTD.
S. S. VENTURE for Campbell River, Hardy Bay, Rivers Inlet, Namu, Ocean Falli,
Bella Coola, Bella Bella, every Wednesday.
S. S. VADSO for Skeena River, Prince Rupert, Naas, every two weeks.
JOHN   BARNSLEY,  Agent,
Phone 1925 1003 Government Street
may g (S) oct 19 14
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 17, 1912
:  *
EDITORIAL
Continued from Page I
serenity. Their approach is heralded by a
"Champion" in the shape of a journalistic
organ, which modestly declares that it is
here to' educate the people of Victoria in
the rights, or preferably the wrongs, of
women, and somewhat sententiously reminds us that "The Woman's Cause is
Man's." Having failed to settle the first
knotty question as to who is editor, a number of estimable ladies with an energetic
organizing secretary have formed themselves into a band of Associate Editors,
weighing themselves clown with the ponderous and immemorial "We, the Editorial
Staff.." About this editorial staff there is
far more modesty than one generally finds
among suffragettes, and one cannot but admire the spirit which prompts the editorial
staff of "The Champion" to say "We, the
editorial staff, are deeply conscious of its
inadequacy to do justice to the great Cause
which it is to represent." In the foreword
the editors say that "Humanity is like a
bird, which, while one wing is crippled, can
never fly a straight or upward course." The
Week assumes that this explains why the
"hatchet" has been chosen as the symbol
of the Women's Suffrage Movement, and
why it was designed by the suffragettes fo
furnish poor Mr. Asquith with one crippled
wing. "The Champion" endorses the campaign of violence indulged in by Mrs. Pankhurst, Miss Crystabel Pankhurst, Miss Sybil
Pankhurst, Miss Gladys Evans ancl other
fair ladies who have recently distinguished
themselves, some of them by smashing windows, others by hurling hatchets, others by
setting fire to public buildings, and others
by running away. The Colonist has in one
of its intelligent editorials dealt most admirably with the Suffragette Movement,
and has put the case in a nut-shell when it
says that women do not want a vote; that
those who have it do not exercise it, and
that when, if ever, they do want it, they
will get it as they get most things—without
a struggle. After many years' study of the
question and of the methods of suffragettes,
The Week has come to the conclusion that
they do want something—but it is not a
vote.
COMMISSION   GOVERNMENT—
It was rather amusing to notice-that
several gentlemen who appeared before the Municipal Commission this week
as advocates of- Government by Commission were unabie to explain the details of
the proposal, ancl, indeed, had to admit
their ignorance of the matter.   They confused   Government  by   Commission   with
Government by a Board of Control.    The
latter form of Municipal Government has
been  in operation in  Toronto  for some
years.   A Board of Control consists of two
or three men of special ability in public
affairs  appointed  ancl  paid by  the  City
Council to manage the affairs of the city
ancl to deal with all matters of detail upon
which the Council has settled the question
of policy.   The system has not been an unqualified success in Toronto, the chief difficulty being that the Council has considered
that it had the prerogative to interfere with
fhe work of the Board of Controllers to an
extent which they did not approve.    Of
Government by Commission little is known,
because there are  certain details of  the
scheme which   have  not been  elaborated.
For   instance,   it   has   not   been   decided
whether the Commission should be elected
by popular vote, and if so, for how long a
period?    Or, whether the Commissioners
would be appointed, ancl if so, by whom?
Or,   if   Commissioners   were   appointed,
would there be a City Council at all, pr
would it be entirely clone away with ?   The
system might be adopted with any one of
these variations,  and  The  Week  is con-'
vinced that when the citizens of Victoria
voted by" a majority in favour of Government by Commission, none of these points
had been elucidated.   It must not be forgotten that the proposal to rule by Commission instead of by a popular chamber is
a turning back of the clock towards absolutism, and the advocates of popular government have been trying for many years to
get away from this.    As a contemporary
recently said and said very wisely, "It may
take a thousand years for the peophj to
learn how to govern themselves to their
own best advantage, but they should keep
Pegg'ng away at it and not allow themselves to be turned back from it.   However
long it takes to perfect (he system,wt. is. -
worth   doing,   and   emperors   have   been
longer than that learning their business."
The view of The Week is that the citizens
of Victoria would make a; mistake to place
out of their own hands the direct control
of their own affairs, which, if not as well
managed as they might be, are still actually
in their hands.   The system has been found
good enough for the Old Country, where
the best possible municipal government
exists. All that is wanted in Victoria is
to select the most competent heads of Departments, pay them well and strengthen
their position, so that the city may get the
best results from men unhampered by vexing and useless interference.
DESERVED PROMOTION—There
is not in the employment of the
Provincial Government a more
painstaking ancl conscientious servant than
A*fr. Henry Cathcart, who lias been identified with the Public Lands Department for
twenty-eight years. The enormous development of the business of the Department
has entirely outgrown the machinery, and
Mr. Ross has been busy ever since he assumed the Portfolio re-organizing the Department ancl creating new branches. Forestry and Immigration have claimed much
of his attention. He has called in proved
experts ancl placed these two exceedingly
important Departments on a sound footing.
He is now turning his attention to the subject whicii has furnished more ground for
criticism to the Opposition than any other:
that of a closer acquaintance with the lands
of the Province. It has been a standing
complaint that men seeking pre-emptions,
or desiring to make purchases of land, could
not get the necessary information, and no
doubt this was, to some extent a well-
founded, complaint. But it was due chiefly
to the impossibility,of keeping pace with
the development of the Province unless the
work of the whole Department of Lands
was re-organized. This has now been done,
and Mr. Ross has. created an entirely new
branch known as the Inspection'Branch of
the Crown Land Office. At the head of
this Department he has placed Mr. Cathcart, who thus secures, w.ell-earned promotion and a: substantially increased salary.
Mr. Cathcart. thoroughly deserves ancl will
receive the congratulations of all who have
had the ..pleasure of doing business with his
Department.
FREE TRADE—There are  few  important subjects about which a,mask;
 of mi'sreprjesfintatipji ami error has'
been woven to such an extent as about Free
Trade.. To many people it has become a
fetish arid it is not at all uncommon to hear
public speakers point to the commercial
supremacy of England as due to the Free
Trade doctrines of Richard Cobden. In a
recent article in the Winnipeg Saturday
Post, referring to a controversy between
Mr. J. S. Willison, the Editor of the To
ronto News, and Mr. J. W. Scallion, tl
latter gentleman falls into this old errcf
and in rhetorical language demands to kndl
whether the immense trade ancl commercl
enterprise of Britain as a whole is not
result of Free Trade.   The Winnipeg PJ
refers Mr.  Scallion to Green's  "Shorf
History of England," where he will lea
that the industries and the great industtl
communities did not have their origin ill
Free  Trade country.    In  the  reigns
Henry VIII ancl Elizabeth the manufactl
ers of England were a negligible quantj
and the manufactured articles used by
English nation were the products of 1
French, the Flemish and the Florentiil
The manufacturing interests of EnglJ
did not Attain any prominence until II
tection was afforded, and then the mal
facturers of those foreign countries wl|
had previously supplied England under
entry of their goods, came promptly
ancl set up their establishments in Brill
Then and only then did the manufactl
of  Britain begin  to  flourish.    Theyl
creased by leaps ancl bounds, and the in|
trial future of England was laid and
tinned, uninterrupted, to gain in stre|
and volume under a Protective Tarif
hundreds of years before advocates of j
Trade changed the policy which had*!
ated those industries.   History is repel
itself in Canada, ancl no sane man, wh|
Liberal or Conservative, now question
wisdom of the National policy, which il
of; Protection, ancl with the systemati|
traduction of which in 1878 Canada
menced her era of industrial prosper.!
LABOURERS WANTED—Fronl
wheat growers of the Prairies
cry still goes up, "Come overt
help us," and according to latest despal
no fewer than 50,000 men are require
harvest the golden grain.   Yet in fad
.this tremendous fact and of the ful
fact that there is still a substantial balanl
last year's crop not moved, the railway |
panies have raised the transportation
for farm labourers.   This seems to
unjustifiable  course,  especially if  as|
(Prairie Press contends, it will have
effect tif landing the 'labourers at
peg instead of at points from 500 to
miles further West.   One would thinkl
the transportation companies had at leal
equal interest with the grain growers il
curing necessary labour.   The action ol
Canadian railway companies is in ma|
contrast with that of the American
panies, who this year are carrying this
of labour free.
Correspondence
PERSECUTION   AND   THAT
SORT OF THING
Bishop's Residence
740 View St.   Box 663.
Victoria, B.C., Aug. 15, 1912.
To the'Editor of The Week:
Dtar Sir—Kindly permit me a few
remarks on the article by "Bohemian,"
in your issue of Aug. 10. Fust of
all I wish to say that "The Orphans'
Friend" is not my personal organ in
the sense that 1 accept responsibility
for every statement made in it, but
ouly in the sense that I sometimes
write for it and use it as the vehicle
of official communications. As a matter of fact, tlie article in the number
for August, 1900, from which "Bohemian" professes to cite a statement,
was not written by me, nor am I prepared to subscribe to everything just
as it is there set down. The writer
complains that Catholic parents are
"forgetful of the grave dangers to
which faith and morals are exposed
in those [public] schools," which is
not quite the same thing, 1 take it, as
to warn them "not to expose their
children to perdition by sending them
to the public schools of this city."
This latter statement contains, at least
implicitly, a reflection upon the morality of the public schools of this city
which I should deem it my bounden
duty to apologize for if anyone for
whose words 1 can fairly be held answerable were to publish it. The position of the Catholic Church on the
question pf education is well known.
She deems it needful to have her own
schools in order to safeguard the
faith of her children, and mould their
lives on the Christian pattern. But
she is very far indeed from deeming
it needful to cast aspersions on those
who do not sec eye to eye with her in
this matter.
The three extracts which Bohemian" cites as having been made from
the encyclical of Pope Pius IX, bearing date December 8, 1864, have not
been made from that document. What
is more. I take it upon myself to
affirm that they have not been made
from any encyclical ever at any time
issued by any of the Popes.
What purports to be an extract
(1st) "from latest decree of the present Pope," is not an extract, and is
not from the latest decree of the present Pope. The Motu Proprio of the
9th October, 1911, re-affirms what has
been known of old in the Church as
the Privilegium Fori. It forbids
Catholics, under pain of being cut off
from the Church, to bring ecclesiastics
before the civil courts without, permission of the competent ecclesiastical
authority. This enactment was made
at a time when all the Christian world
was Catholic, and is still in force in
Catholic countries. But in countries
like our own it has never been enforced, and so has fallen into abeyance. The principle of it, however, is
sound, viz., that when there is question of offences committed by clerics,
since the Church has tribunals of her
own quite competent to mete out
justice, it is only fitting her own children should first have recourse to
these.
As for the "extracts" numbered 2nd
and 3rd respectively, I shall be pleased
to interpret and explain them whenever exact references are given. At
present I am unable to place them.
In conclusion, I declare on my word
of 'honour as a Catholic Bishop that
the spirit of persecution is not and
never has been the spirit of the Catholic Church, though it appears to have
been, in centuries gone by, the spirit
of some high-placed ecclesiastics, and
certainly was the spirit of the times.
But those times are gone beyond recall, and the fierce spirit that pervaded them will never more, I do hope
and believe, become live and operative again. I am sorry that our
Orange neighbours should think us
capable of harbouring a wish to revive the bitter religious feuds of days
that are dead. But if they will entertain such a thought, they should
at least credit us with elementary prudence and the faculty of learning by
experience.    History proves  but too
plainly that persecution is sure to
provoke reprisals. Why, then, should
we persecute? The situation seems
to me to be very happily hit off in a
cartoon which appeared in the Victoria "Colonist" of Sunday, August 4,
bearing this legend: '"E says to mi,
'Why don't yer 'it 'im?' "It 'im,' 1
says, 'what's the use of my 'ittin'
im? 'E'd'it me, back again'."
ALEX. MacDONALD,
Bishop of Victoria.
[The Editor of The Week has pleasure in
printing the above letter and in so far as it
refers to the article of our staff correspondent
"Bohemian" would respectfully point out that
the only portions of that article criticized hy
the llisbop are the extracts printed at. the
end "without comment" which were furnished
hy and published at the request of the local
Orange Lodge. In giving them publicity
llohcmian stated specifically that they were
published "without comment, und sininly lo
satisfy our readers that in this as in all matters, Thc Week is absolutely impartial and
prepared to voice both sides of any public
question  nf importance.!
CATCHING THE ESQUIMALT CAR
Scene—Government   Street
Time—Any Day
(Enter he of the shaved neck, "nifty to^s,"
"nobby shoes," arrayed in garments too sizes
too large, who, after expectorating, dexterously
at a passing vehicle, thus soliloquises):
I   ain't   such   a  terrible  fellow
As some of you folks seem to think,
I ain't one to rant, rave or bellow,
And  seldom  give  way to drink,
llut I must catch the live o'clock car,
And  I  guess  she's nearly  due;
If a gal's in  the way,
It's her fault,  I  say,
She ougbter skip out, skidoo 1
There's folks as II call ine a cad
When they see how  I'll push  gals aside,
llut the way that them gals crowds the car
makes me mad.
Why sure, they should have more pride I
llut it's me for the live o'clock car—
I'll make 'cm give place you bet,
As  I   quickly   rush .em,
Skilfully crush  'em,
As I struggle my seat to get.
Politeness?.   Oh h—11, come stow that,
Why this is Victoria Town,
And no one who'sc not a d—d mug or a flat,
Worries much if 0 gal's knocked down.
Say, gee, there's the fivc o'clock car,
Hi, there, me gal, out 0' tbe way,
This ain't no place for you—
Git out of it, Shoo,
Give place for the men here, I say I
(I.eft triumphantly trampling down his
victims.
—Walter  Howard.
Blue Printing
Maps
Draughting
.   Surveyors' Instruments and
Drawing  Office   Supplies
Electric Blue Print & Map
Company
214 Central Bldg., View Street
Phone 1534        Victoria, B. C.
Take Your Vacation
at the Sol DUC
Hot Springs
In the heart of the Olympics.
The great new health and
pleasure resort of the Northwest.
. Steamer Sol Due leaves
Victoria for Port Angeles
Tuesdays and Saturdays.
Round trip tickets, Victoria to
Sol Due, including boat and
auto fare, $9.50.
Mountain climbing, fishing
and varied amusements. Altitude 1,760 feet. Hotel conducted on American plan.
Rates $3.00 per clay and up.
■ For descriptive literature
address Dr. Wm. VV. Earles,
Medical Superintendent, Sol
Due, Wash.
Get it at Bowe's and
be Safe
That
Straw oi
Panama
Will last the Sej
son by the us|
today of ourstra\
hat cleaner --11
Cyrus H. Bowe
Chemist
1228 Government Strer'
Tels. 425 and 450
There is nothing stagey about a ma
is just good once he becomes your hu
The dreadful thing is that nothing eve
pens except that he comes home for his
and to sleep.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.pwv.1-0344209/manifest

Comment

Related Items