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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Aug 25, 1906

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 SYsinmnnntisYtrsvTnrinnrsTisTr
Bank of Hamilton
Capital $3,500,000
Reserve (3,500,000
Total Assets, $29,000,0001
Interest paid half-yearly on deposits of
$1 and upwards in Savings Department.
Drafts and Money Orders on all parts oi
the world. Vancouver Branches, cor.
of Hasting and Hamilton Sts., Powell St.
Cedar Grove.
ULxJUajLPJUUUULPJUL^^
The Week
TL Provincial Review and Magazine.
nsvwTnmvsv»«Kxyinnnnfwr
CLUrE & MURRAY
REAL ESTATE and
INVESTMENT BROKERS.
INSURANCE AGENTS.
List your properties with us. •
46 Port Street, Corner Broad.
JUJUUJUUL9JUUUUUUUL
Vol. III.   No.
M
VICTORIA AND   VANCOUVER    B. C, SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 1906.
One Dollar Per Annum
'bete
he Editor's Review
Of Current Topics.
Icialistic     Socialism of the blatant must smile and sigh, labour and rest,
anings.      type which is    usually scheme and plan, to order; and never
purveyed by uneducated to advance his own individuality, but
only in obedience to altruistic principles. Altruism is a fine theory and
up to a certain point excellent in
practice but once it becomes a substitute for the cultivation of the Ego
it not advances but retards the progress of the race. This is the inherent weakness of socialism as taught
but not practised today. Few of its
most prominent advocates' have the
courage or the consistency to make
any serious attempt  to live up to
[f-seeking demagogues is the
■ir" of    every    thinking   serious
Inded man.   Socialism which aims
■ly to improve the condition of the
asses and which indeed and not in
fird  subordinates  the  interests  of
|e individual to those of the corn-
unity has the sympathy of every
ue reformer.   Socialism as applied
mere reform may be a misnomer,
|it as far as we have been able to
ake out it is the only form of social-
that will ultimately prevail  in
vilized communities.   The anarchis-
vapouriiigs which are so common
(th mere stump orators, the waving
the red flag, the wholesale denun-
ation of all institutions and organiz-1
|ions which have grown up with or j
en evolved from advancing civiliz-1
lion meet with no response from the !
I'ne man.   Every thinker knows that;
le keynote of progress is evolution I
lit iconoclasm.-   A fool can with a i
limmer   ^mash the   statue   that   a
faster has spent a lifetime to create, <
It even if it    were an    imperfect j
lecimen of art that act of demoli-;
pn would  not  advance  the  sacred j
fuse.    Similarly   a   vandal, if su- i
lemely    powerful,  might    expunge ■
fery law from the statute book and :
olish every institution which today :
filiates human relationships, if this 1
rre done the socialistic demagogue |
puld throw up his cap, but what j
iiuld result but chaos?    With  the j
lolition of marriage laws, the in- j
oduction of universal free-love, the j
Ifliction of  the death  penalty  for j
Inor   offences,   the confiscation of
property of the rich, the abolition
j class distinction, the initiation of a
l-ealled common weal would  come
liat but chao?   and common woe?
Jet these are in reality the tenets of
le faith whbd men have the hardi-
lod to pre iii for the uplifting of
le race.   The truth is that in formu-
fcing such a programme the authors
kve out two prime factors, God and
Im.    Tennyson was   uttering   the
yssmal truth of no blind faith when
sang:
ret I doubt not through the ages
|pne unceasing purpose runs,
shoulders of the city officials. They
could hardly avoid this course in
view of the hostile attitude of the
ratepayers and the failure, until the
eleventh hour, to procure even sufficient signatures to the petitions to
enable them to submit a by-law. The
last few signatures were only obtained by hard canvassing, which
would have been creditable in a political campaign. People are not
merely hostile; they are "disgusted at
the waste of time, the geeing and
hawing, and the apparent incompetence of the Mayor and Council to
realize that what is wanted is not
mud but water. Their fatuous persistency in going to the place where
pure water is in any event impossible
of acquirement betokens an utter dis-
abnormal extent of a fatal disease.
This is not a question of filter beds,
. or purification, it is  a question of
; the bacteriological constituents which
j could not be affected by any artificial
treatment.   W:e forbear to say more
because we are unwilling to pose as
j alarmists  and we  are  further most
j reluctant to    publish a fact    which
1 would have a detrimental effect on
; the  prospects of Victoria;  but  the
j fact, is so serious and its consideration is so pertinent to the solution
of the water problem that after this
second  warning we shall hold  ourselves free to make further use of
the  information placed  at our  disposal through a channel which constitutes it the opinion of the leading
members  of  the  medical  fraternity
the  comment is fair nd honest  in
those premises.
Municipal Although Janury is yet
Politics. a long way off the Week
hears that the Liberal
party is already setting its house in
order for the next municipal election.
It has been determined to make the
contest a straight political fight and
with the view of getting the strongest possible candidate it is intended
to invite Mr. Joshua Kingham, the
popular President of the Pacific Club,
to stand for Mayor. In addition to
securing the undivided suppbrt of
the party, Mr. Kingham's success as
a business man will be an additional
recommendation to the ratepayers.
If the Conservatives can find a man
of similar status to stand it will be
a pretty fight.
Ashcroft, 8. 6.
their own ereed. Men of like pas- regard of the wishes of the citizens
sions with ourselves they wreck a and the requirements of the case. The
cause or an empire for a moment of prediction of the Week that both by-
self gratification, .and by so doing laws would be turned down by an
bespeak themselves human, and at overwhelming majority is more than
the same time disrupt the socialist, justified by the foreshadowing of de-
theory.    No,  the  true   advancement i feat  in  the  difficulty   in  procuring
signatures to the petition. Our motto is generally accepted "Water, pure
water, plenty of water." If Mayor
and Aldermen think the ratepayers
of the race lies along the road blazed
ages ago by the pioneers of enlight-
d the thoughts of men are widened j enea thought and human sympathy.
[With the process of the suns." 1 The nineteenth century has no great-
is factor finds no place in the er gl°r.V *'lan t° have given birth to' will be content with anything less
ialist's creed. Man must do ev- i their successors in the same line, they nre greatly mistaken. If they
thing for himself. He must him-! Fry, Howard, (Livingstone, Gordon, do not know that Elk Lake cannot
if cure all the ills that flesh is heir' Peabody, Booth are worthy success- comply with any one of these condi-
He cries with Hamlet: ors °^ ^he philanthropists of the cen- '■ tions they are the only ones in that
turies that are gone, and the world state    of blissful   ignorance.    They
has yet to find their betters. j may secure the  endorsation  of the
  I city officials for one Elk Lake scheme
set it ■Wedded to   The Mayor and Council i ns af,ajnst the oti,er) but wnen both
I Their Idol,   of Victoria   have   this are bad this does not advance   mat-
Jhe world is out of joint
0 wretched spite
at ever    I was born    to
right."
Jm man is left out of the count.
In with complexity of nature, with
ersity of gifts, with alternating
lires, with uncontrollable impulses,
lh mysterious moods so that—
lot e'en the dearest heart and next
our own
|nows   half   the reasons why we
smile or sing."
of Victoria. If the tacts have to be
made public it will not be the fault of
The Week, but of those who whilst
responsible for the public health refuse to take cognizance of a repeated
warning and investigate the matter
for themselves.
week capped all their
previous performances by executing
a complete "volte face" so far as
their method of dealing with Elk
Lake is concerned. They turned
down, for the nonce, both reports, although at the last meeting they had
supported one of them, and in place
thereof decided to go out and smell
being of infinite complexity is the water for themselves, and shift
shed into one common mould, he the responsibility of a decision to the
ters. Victoria is not in the predicament of having to make a choice of
evils. With abundance of pure water
available why should the city be
compelled to draw its supply from a
tainted source? A source so tainted
that the Mayor dare not order an official analysis, nor dare he accept the
challenge of The Week to seek the
opinion of the medical fraternity on
a still more serious matter relating to
the existence in our midst of to an
Judgment As we are going to press
Reserved. this week we receive a
request from n number
of reputable citizens who are members of the Baptist church that wc
would publish a signed document
which they forwarded, denying the
accuracy of the statements on which
we based some criticism of Rev.
Tapscott several weeks ago. The
document did not reach us until it
was too late to make the necessary
enquiries and publish any reply in
this week's issue. The criticism was
based on specific statements made to
our representative by a veteran member of the Baptist church and a committee man who vouched for their
accuracy . Before next issue wc will
personally investigate the matter
and, if we were misinformed will
make the amende honorable; if on
the other hand onr informant is prepared to substantiate his statements
we shall not withdraw one word as
Worth Some months ago when
Knowing. the editor of the Week
came to Victoria he was
subjected to a vicious and entirely
unprovoked attack at the hands of
E. E. Jacobs, the editor of the B. C.
Mining Record. Just why a man to
whom he had never done any harm
or spoken a single miss-word and who
paid him a complimentary call, should
have gone out of his way to make
such an attack was not at all obvious,
and in commenting on it we ventured to remark that the voice was the
voice of Jacob but the hand was the
hand of Esau. If the public did not
understand the full import of the reference the hireling did us the sequel
shows. We are now authorized to
announce that "in consideration of
his going after Blakemore" the
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd.,
through their general manager, 0. G.
S. Lindsay, have entered into an
agreement with E. E, Jacobs to finance the B. C. Mining Record. But
for this timely assistance the publication of the Record would have ceased last month. The negotiations
were conducted by W. Fleet Robinson, provincial mineralogist, who represented thc Government in Fernie
at the time of the explosion, and who.
is therefore acquainted with Lindsay. Hereafter its few remaining
readers will know how to discount
the utterances of the Record. We
bespeak their sympathy for E. E.
Jacobs, who is more to be pitied than
blamed. It was the only way to save
his paper and his job nnd he did as
many another has done before hiin,
sacrificed principle for bread.
Truly this is a hard world.
A Base Scandal.
The Okanagan in a late number,
probably for want of reliable news, has
been indulging its basest sentiments in
the most damnable brand of yellow
journalism. Why that paper should
publish such a malicious scandal on
the citizens of Kelowna is hard to conceive unless it be to give vent to some
petty jealousy or spite. On making
enquiry it has been shown that there
was not a shadow of foundation for.
the alleRed outrage; and whether Thc
Okanagan obtained its information
from an unreliable source or manufactured it itself, thc malignity remains the
same. The article referred to has been
extensively copied, and cannot fail to
damage the reputation, not only of Kelowna, but of the entire Okanagan Valley. The citizens of Kelowna have always proved themselves moral and law-
abiding, and there is certainly no room
for a Vernon newspaper to throw
stones.—The Penticton Press. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 1906.
VANCOUVER
Tempting Providence.
The Beaver accident again calls attention to a matter which is probably
more neglected than any other having a
direct bearing on the protection of human life. We refer to the provision of
proper life-saving appliances on vessels.
On nearly every occasion on which there
is either a wreck or a mishap with
Sound vessel ii developes that boats and
life bells, one or the other, sometimes
both, arc defective. The evidence given by those on board the Beaver when
she struck ihe pier of the Fraser river
bridge is that there were only two boats
and that the life-belts were so rotten
that they broke in two when handled.
The whole question turns on inspection.
The law makes provision for a competent inspector and for a specified
equipment. Why is it not enforced?
The fact that lhe captain may or may
not have been erratic in his course has
nothing lo do with, the equipment. Un
til an example is made of inspectors
and owners of vessels equipped as the
Beaver was wc shall go on paying the
toll of precious lives as the penalty of
neglect. ■        ■
He has never played better than during
.lie lest few weeks and he and Miss E.
.cyan have been almost invincible in
lixed doubles. Altogether tennis has
id a good lime this year even if some
of   the   stars   are   missing,   whilst  the
PEOM LONDON TO MONTREAL
By L. Segars.
Many   thousands   are    making  their
way from the Old Country to Canada.
_-   ...-   „—   __.   ...      „, Each   week   the   steamers   are   packed
arge number of young players showing; with people anxious to set foot on this
good form augurs well for the future.
land of promise—a land where none
need really want. Few, however, I
think, experience such a long and certainly interesting voyage as I and my
family.
We left London on April 21st of last
year, and did not reach Montreal till
May 1 ith. The weather all through
was very stormy, with contrary winds,
iCing Cricket.
Every lover of the king of games
will rejoice at the splendid rally of enthusiasts who have figured on Victoria
pitches during the present week. Six
teams, Victoria, Vancouver, Nelson,
Portland, New Westminster and Washington have tried conclusions and al- alld fogs innumerable. Then one morn-
though none have been found strong j lng everyone hurried on deck at the
enough lo lower the colours of the Vic-j cry 0f "jce Dergs j» Tt was bitterly
toria team lhe game has had a fine ad- j coid; and _n around dull grey, with
vertiscmenl and lovers of cricket have the exception of the great white mon-
had a week's enjoyment. That it should sterS] wlljch w.ere truly wonderful, not
have been possible to induce so many t0 say awe-inspiring. It was our first
xickelers  to   leave  their  business  and  g|impse of an icebergj and one felt the
grim   terror   that   these   sea   monsters
might inspire, when close   to   a vessel,
Made in Vancouver.
The committee of thc Hundred Thousand Club has made a good move in arranging for a "Made in Vancouver" ex
hibition for September ist. A similar
one held in the store windows of Victoria a month ago was a great success
in attracting attention to lhe wide range
of local products. In addition thc permanent exhibition is a splendid advertisement and tlie Vancouver Committee
might do worse than follow suit in the
same direction.
d, , . , HH_BH ! U10t\C llllUUl^Ll ,11V MVJ, ...... ... .., 
cncies have by degrees relegated it to ' ° ., , , ,
., , • , , . , the ice like silver, witu here and there
llic gum-chewing, peanut-cracking crowd, 1 , , , ,..
, • , .. ■ , T .. , . . ■ dashes of red, caused (we were told)
to which it belongs. In its place crick- ,.-,..■«.-.
et is slowly but surely establishing it- P* stf"iers rubBin* the.rpaint off. Our
self in the affections of players and | «Mel> beln* ^ strongly bmlt m,the
spectators. Baseball was akin to the ; bows> mam«eA t0 move- thou*h slow"
rush and bustle and noise of pioneering; '^ breakm§ the ,ce as she went' and
cricket comes naturally as the comple-
iient  of  prosperity  with  its  increased
SPORTING COMMENT
• • SON'PASSINQ {EVENTS'.;
VICTORIA.
devote a whole week to the game is one
of the most hopeful signs of the times.
In a new country everyone is in a hurry
to get rich and few are willing lo spare,
even for healthy recreation, the few
hours that are necessary to keep in
form. But things are changing in this
respect. Already the old spirit of sport
is beginning to assert itself and during
the last few years the interior has been
following the lead which Victoria set
long ago in keeping alive the games
which every Englishman loves and every
Colonial admires. It is a hopeful sign
of the times that Canada is beginning to
"catch on" to cricket. Baseball has had
its day, its rowdyism and declasse ten- j
A night or two after this, we felt the
steamer come to a dead stop, and lis-
I tened anxiously for the cause, but
learnt nothing till the folloging morning, when going on deck we found
ice fields all around. The sea had vanished, and in its place were miles of
floating blocks of ice, and still the dull
grey sky and bitter cold. We felt like
wanderers in the Arctic regions. Seals
were sliding off and on the floes and
our stewardess told us she had even
i seen a bear on a similar occasion. To-
| wards noon of the third day the sun
broke through the grey, and lit up all
TWO CHOIOE PRODUCTS AT   POPULAR PRICES
C. & B's Celebrated Marmalade
GLASS JARS  25c.
i-LB TINS  15c
2-LB TINS  25c.
4-LB. TINS  50c.
FOR FAMILY USE, 7-LB. TINS  75c
KEILLER'S FAMOUS MARMALADE
i-LB-JARS .. :  25c.
2-LB TINS  25c.
4-LB. TINS  50c.
7-LB. TINS  75c.
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
The Grocers. _ 111 Government St., Viotoria.
Where Mall Orders are specially cared for. R. 1515
TELEPHONE 606
Johnston's Transfer
I35 Douglas St.    VICTORIA.
RATES CUT IN TWO.
HACKS FOR HIRE.
Driving Loads 75c. per hour.
G J. JOHNSTON,
Proprietor,
SPECIAL OFFER OF
SEASONABLE
GOODS.
Members of the Victoria Yacht Club
held a meeting this week at which it
was decided that a scries of races should
be arranged, thc lirst taking place on
Saturday, the ist of September. They
commence at 2.30 o'clock. The yachts
are to be divided into two classes, with
lirst and second prizes for both. It
was agreed that the races would be
started from a point opposite the club
house in James Bay, around Brolchic
Ledge buoy, returning to Outer wharf
around buoy and back to starting line.
Three hours were lixed upon as a suitable time allowance. Other mailers were
discussed, after which lhe meeting adjourned.
An effort is being made hy the Victoria team lo arrange to have the Nanaimo nine play here on Saturday and
Sunday. It is quite likely that the Coal
City representatives will come as they
owe Victoria a visit. The home nine
will be composed of a combination of
Fernwood and Hillside players. It is
the intention that the contest of Saturday shall be played in the afternoon and
that of Sunday in the morning. The
scene of both contests will be the Oak
Bay grounds.
The success of the Victoria tennis
players both at Vancouver and Seattle
is very gratifying. When we predicted
that all lhe prizes from ihe Vancouver
tournament would come to Victoria we
were very near the mark. Nothing but
the handicap enabled the Rhodes brothers to win out in the doubles. Twenty-
three prizes for local players comes
very near sweeping thc board and is a
splendid tribute to the quality of the
tennis of the Capital City. Perhaps the
most promising feature of the season's
play has been the splendid form shown
by Pooley and Rithet, with a little more
experience they will hold their own in
any company. The inability of Schwengers to go to Seattle robbed the tournament of ils interest for the Province as
at thc moment he is undoubtedly our
strongest player, especially in singles;
still the Canadian representatives have
done well. Everyone will be glad that
ll" popular secretary of our local tourney, Douglas Hunter, has done so well.
behind us came four other vessels, following the track we had made. We low- j 	
leisure and truer appreciation 01 see.,-, ered a boat a.nd sPoke t0 01le of tllem:;     _
line games.   The dogged perseverance,jwc could near,y liave walked lo her> so j     BEK   SUPPLIES.-Buckwheat,   Fall
the  tenacity,  the patience, the courage 1tblck was the lce' i ^   Clover-   Timothy,    Lawn   Grass,
and the camaraderie which are the in-!    Soon ah^ we rcached t,le Gulf of j Ensilage  Com,   Mangel,  Turnip,   Epe-
characteristics of the true Briton', St' Lawrence, and the temperature got, cia] quotations in quantity,
much higher. This lasted until we entered the river, and there we found
summer awaiting us.
I am not going to describe our stays
111 Montreal, Toronto and Winnipeg, although they were very delightful, and
liorn      . 	
are exemplified in the national game.
The strategy and campaigning skill
which ultimately land him at his goal
in imperial affairs are the very requisite
for winning at cricket. When a captain marches on to the  field  followed
tain marclies on to me  nem  i.uuncu 1
by his ten men we see in that stolid un-!our  fir!*  impressions of  Canada  were
hurried tramp the march of British arms
or British diplomacy to a siege which
may be long, and perhaps tedious, but
of which the end is certain. Cricket
is in every sense not only a national but
a patriotic game and for that reason
every loyal son of the Empire will rejoice at its increasing popularity. Nothing brings us nearer to the days that
are gone and perhaps buried far in the
past than to brush against one man who
studied cricket under George Ulyett,
another under Alec. Heame, another
under A. G. Steel, and here and there
one under Grace (for there are few
Gloucestershire men out here) and tell
again laics of their prowess and our
youthful admiration for the giants of
those days. Who helps to keep alive
these memories and revive these glories
t rendering a service to tlie Empire
and we hail the advent of the hundred
cricketers who have honored Victoria
and their mother land by raising the
standard of true sport in this faraway
country.
■Spray Pumps, Whale Oil Soap, Vegetable Plants.
Large Stock of HOME GROWN
Fruit and Ornamental Trees now matured for the fall trade.
The Taylor Mill C|
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., VictoJ
The Adventurer.
By Charlotte Becker.
For mc no quiet byway,
No peaceful little lane,
No covert, where the branches
Keep off the wind and rain.
But oh, the open highroad,
With all its dust and glare;
Its questions and its tumult,
Its call to do and dare!
I care not if men count me
A loser in the strife—
So I but drink, unhindered,
The brimming cup of life.
And so my loyal comrades
Shall whisper at the end,
'He never lost his courage,
He never failed a friend!"
altogether  most  pleasant
Anyone who has made the wonderful trip through the Rockies knows
what the magnificent scenery is. Crossing those high bridges, which, side by
side with the mighty masses around,
look not much more secure than cobwebs, one holds one's breath and wonders if the train can possibly reach the
other side in safety.
The end of our journey was Vernon, B.C., where we intended to look
about for land to buy. It is a picturesque little place and furnished the tired j
traveller with comfort, and a feeling
of home. We have now been a year
on the Okanagan Lake, and are settling
down to the easy-going existence of
the Westerner.
One can never tire of speaking of the
beautiful lake—the grand mountains
all around, some snow-capped all
the year through, the fine climate and
wonderful soil, which with a little
trouble will grow almost anything.
Then, (00, the animal life (to a lover
of animals) is most interesting; the
creatures being so tame, one can watch
their habits with ease. The chipmunks
are fascinating, and the variety of
birds, from the great fish-hawk to the
humming-bird, is a never-ending source
of wonder. Deer come close to our
house, and one meets them on the trail.
We have no made roads, but do most
of our travelling by boat. The C.P.R.
steamer Aberdeen is most useful for
taking one's stock of fruit, etc., to the
nearest towns
No expense, loss or delay of fumigation or inspection.
Let me price your list before placing
your order.
We do business on our own grounds
—no rent to pay, and am prepared to
meet all competition.
Catalogue Free.
M. J. HENRY,
3010 Westminster Foad,
Vancouver, B. '..
A girl can stand up straight and still
be bent on marriage.
A Tribute to Christianity.
The editor of one of Japan's largest
newspapers pays this tribute to Christianity: ''Look all over Japan. Our
more than forty millions have a higher
standard of morality than they have
ever known. Our ideas of loyalty and
obedience are higher than ever, and
we enquire the cause of this great
moral advance. We can find it in
nothing else than the religion of
Christ."
Special   Bargains  to
Wind Up An Estate.
6 x/2 acres in the North
End, only 20 minutes walk
to Post Office, with southern aspect, $600 per acre,
5 acres is all cleared and in
high state of cultivation.
Pure Irish
Linen Mesh
Underwear
$5.50 Sui4
The most serviceable ami
comfortable underwear made]
We have it in two weights.
E. CHAPMAN]
DAVI5 CHA/1BERS
Opposite Strand Hotel,
Vancouver.
Seaview lots from $50 to
. $100 each, chiefly cleared,
? and ready for building on.
I Easy terms if necessary.
The B. C. Land & Investment
Agency, Ltd.
Real Estate, Financial and
Insurance Agents,
VICTORIA, B. C.
Fashionable Pastime of the
ROLLER
SKATINC
AT ASSEMBLY HALL,
Afternoons 2 to 5, evenings 7.30 to
Courteous and competent instri
free for ladies. /
Boys under 16 not allowed on fi
evening sessions.
Excellent orchestra.
Only first-class patronage solicit THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 1906.
At The Street   $
Corner &
i
By THB LOUNOER
Bohemian in his analytical treatise on
itonic  friendship declares that 1  am
'indolent" fellow. That may be so,
J I notice that he is so energetic
,t he cuts down his contribution to
le more than a column whilst indo-
I am grinding out two.   As to the
jrge  of  insouicance   surely   so  pro-
fnd an observer of human nature and
.idane affairs most  have  discovered
ago, that nothing matters and that
only happy man is he who is both
gi and fancy free.
have  before    remarked    that  Bo-
liian  lounges    in  studios and    bou-
■rs whilst 1 lounge at street comers
jch  makes  all   the  difference.    The
|mer   scarcely   afford   any   diversion
this degenerate age, when their
litues have to share  with so  many
sweets of aesthetic intercourse.
ime was when there was "a favured
I," now it is a "favored many," and
st I am willing to plead guilty to
;eneracy of another kind, I still pre-
jve my preference for charms which
not as "free as air." The result is
I find the street corner congenial
iause nowhere is a man so much
he as in a crowd and from my se-
vantage ground 1 see many a
nedy, and occasionally a tragedy,
Itch had its inception in those curbed and exotic purlieus dear to the
t of Bohemian,
^tne such  attracted  my attention  on
|nday last.    From the Esquimalt car
)hted a lady and a dog.   Readers of
column will remember that I have
lenchant for dogs, and have made a
cly of their ways. The tininess and
(fulness of this little creature was
[ticularly noticeable. Where had I
it before?   It took me about half
hour to    remember,    then a whole
[pter of family history was laid bare
Meredith's    ''Comic    Tragedians"
surpassed.      But  that  is  another
the way for once, in violation of
strict   tenets  of  my   forbears   and
I ethics of my early training. I consti
d myself a Sabbath breaker last
k end and took the trip from Sidney
the Iroquois. As a trip it was de-
tful but my attention was called to
tatter which is a crying disgrace to
owners of the vessel. There are
two lifeboats — save the mark—
board, and they are in such a rot-
I condition as to be not only useless,
J if relied on in an emergency abso
Ity a menace. They are old, leaky,
J are so fitted that they could not be
Jiched. If, however,' by superhuman
|rts they were slung from the davits
could not be kept afloat five min-
as they are literally full of holes
le of which are actually stuffed with
hese  facts  can be  confirmed  by  a
Ve of the Supreme Court, and one
|he leading citizens of Victoria, who
on board.    Is there any inspector
Sessels sailing from British Colum
iorts? If so both he and the own-
hould be dealt with by the law for
a gross violation of its previsions
Shave  had   enough   accidents    and
gh  warnings  in  the  Sound  lately, j
a vessel cruising among the Island
ts no immunity from mishaps
sitors to the Gorge Park last week
hugely entertained by an enlarged
of a  drop  of Elk Lake water
|n in 2,000 diameters by the bios-
An an object lesson it was more
Iive than columns of, newspaper
spodence, but the climax was
ed when it was noticed that the
ited nature so much in evidence
ally assumed the form of Mayor
:y's visape. It was a significant
int, but whether the result of ar
conception or the concatenation
mgenial  atoms deponent knoweth
mgers in general, and this Loung-
particular,  have an intimate ac-
Iiance with free lunch counters, in
mt for that beneficent institution
oble coterie would often go "sup-
to bed."   Lounging down to thc
|t  tournament    at  Oak  Bay    on
Monday judge of my delight at receiving a pressing invitation to 'lunch with
the team." I lunched at the hotel.
Judge of my consternation at being
made to shell out seventy-five cents,
and my still greater amazement at finding that the members of the visiting
team were required to do the same.
There is, however, worse to follow;
on Wednesday I strolled to the Jubilee
grounds to see Nelson put up a brave
fight against the Victoria team. When
MS was reached the local team hurried
in to a good lunch, in the tent, for
which they also had to pay seventy-five
cents. The Nelson men, with a nicer
perception of the traditions of the
greatest of all open air games, journeyed up town and lunched at a restaurant. I have no desire to be too hard on
the Victoria committee but seeing that
Nelson is the most hospitable city in
the West and that its boat club committee recently spent $400 on entertaining visiting crews, of which Victoria's was one, it seems difficult to
acquit the Cricket Committee of the
Capital City of inexcusable lack of hos-
pitability to say nothing of an unprecedented disregard of the customs of
the game. I am sure that rather than
such a reproach should rest on the city
the nublic, if appealed to, would gladly
have subscribed the necessary amount.
Less than $200 would have lunched the
wnole of the visiting players for the
week.
I heard a good story this week from
a well known Victoria traveller who
returned from a trip to England in
ennial interest to English people who
for the lirst time cross this continent in
a Pullman. With my informant in the
train was a party of three, father,
mother and young daughter, who were
going from New York to Chicago. The
first two had a section and the latter a
lower berth not far off, the friendly
porter assuring the girl that no one was
to occupy the upper one. The party,
being good sleepers, adjourned early to
their berths, and" were soon in deep
slumber from which the daughter only
awakened once during the night and
then feeling chilly reached her hand to
the tipper berth and gently drew down
a blanket hanging somewhat over the
edge, right and early the next morning the three travellers came together
in the dining-car for breakfast, the
delicate wild-rose colour of the English
girl's complexion attracting the eyes ol
many of their jaded fellow-travellers.
To their surprise, however, the delicate
Hush deepened suddenly to a violent
crimson as the words of a later comer
aB shivering young man, breakfasting
with some friends, resounded through
the car. "Hang it all, I can't get warm!
Some rascally fellow in the berth below
mine reached up in the night when 1
was asleep and swiped my blanket! 1
nearly froze! Ugh, I'd like to get even
with him!"
A sudden faint feeling would have
helped the exit of a less sturdy person,
but the robust constitution of the English girl made this impossible, so the
father's substantial meal had to be
watched to its finish with burning cheeks
and inward wrath against a mode of
travelling which made such an episode
possible. The porter was wrong for
once. LOUNGER.
Love and Gold.
By Frank L. Stanton.
I.
Gold  is  the  dream  forever—so  is  the
story told.
With a strong man's arm to necklace
you, what do you want with gold?
Would your heart beat more in music
neath  silken raiment fine?
Let me lack gold long  if I  sing this
song, "Tlle woman 1 love is mine!"
II.
I make no doubt, my dearie, Life's joys
seem wind-blown dust
When the gleam o' gold comes glitterin'
to a cabin an' a crust;
Would there be more stars in heaven-
more blossoms on the vine?—
Death to the dream forever if the woman I love is mine!
III.
All the wealth I'm a-wantin' is here, to
have an' to hold—
This arm that circles the waist of you,
swept by your tresses of gold;
An' this be my song forever in shad-
owland an' shine:
"The woman I love is mine for aye—
the woman I love is mine I"
Real Hair
Switches
Pompadours, Curls
all of the latest
style, at
MADAME
KOSCHE'S
Hair Dressing
Parlors
58 Douglas
Street
VICTORIA.
A Gift For Our Customers.
In Every Package ol Colgate's Dental Powder
We Give a Present of a cake ol
Cashmere Bouquet Soap
FREE,        (Guest Room Size)       FREE
A Wonderful Bargain.
CYRUS H. BOWES,
CHEMIST
98Government St., near Yates Street,
FOR SUMMER WEAR.
Soft French
Flannel Shirts
With Collars to Match
Sizes from 14 to 11%
In all seasonable colors.
SEA&
GOWEN
HATTERS & HABERDASHERS
64 Government St.
Victoria.
iwmmmm
The latest method of
Entertaining this season is
To iuvite your friends to a
Tally-Ho Picnic
on the' famous
White Tally-Ho
The cover protects from'raln and sun
RINdUP PHONE 293
AND MAKE ARRANGEMENTS
STEVE WHITE
Yates Street Victoria
"See that man? Ha! hat ha! Ho!
ho! ho!" laughed Love.
"What's the matter with him?" asked  Envy.
"Nothing," answered Love "only he's
a locksmith. Ha! ha! ha!"—Philadelphia Record.
If you love your wife
BUY  HER  A  GAS  STOVE
It will save her a lot of extra work and
give her time for other things
besides cooking.
Cook Tour Roast, Do Not Roast Your Cook,
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, LIMITED.
I       JAMES BUCHANAN & CO.
f LONDON AND GLASGOW
m purveyors to;the Royal Family,
I   DISTILLERS OF HIGH GRADE  SCOTCH WHISKIES'
j| Buchanan's Royal Household at >i.5°;per bottle
Buchanan's Black and White at $1.35 per bottle
Buchanan's Red Seal at $ 1.00 per^bottle
ARE LEADERS AMONG THE BEST
For sale by all dealers, VICTORIA, I. C.
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OF
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt  and  Hops Used in Manufacture.
PHONE 893. VICTORIA
Tzouhalem Hotel
Duncan Station.
Lakeside Hotel
Cowichan Lake"
PRICE BROS., Pioprletor*.
LAKESIDE HOTEL, COWICHAN LAKE
The Popular Tonrist Resort of Vancouver Island.   Excellent Ply Fishing,
Boating, Lawn Tennis.
Special Return Tickets Issued by the C, P. R., $2—Qood for  15 Daya.
I/pACT'C CTAflPQ meei' rain daily at Duncan's for the above
I\G/\0 I O ul /\vlI_JO popular resort. Return tickets for sale a
L. & N. Railway Office good for 15 days, |5.00. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 1906
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Offices:
88ft Government Street .... Victoria B. C.
Empire Block   Vancouver, B. C.
W. BLAKEMORE...Manager and Editor
Annual Subscription $1 in Advance
Transient rates, per inch  60c.
Legal notices (60 days), from  $5.00
Theatrical, per inch  (1.00
Readers, per line   6c. to 10c.
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Lost and
Found and other small advertisements, per insertion, from...26c. to $1.00
NOTICE.
Contributors are hereby notified
that all copy for The Week should be
deliveied to the office, 88y2 Government
Street, not later than Thursday morn-
of packed stones, and the immeasure-
able veldt."
Now, will you be good and stay at
home, Canadian girls? This is a picture of African glory. Surely "le jeu
ne vaux pas la chandelle." Yet even
under such conditions life has some
compensations for she has her babe and
by and bye her husband-lover will come
back from the war and there will be
the bliss of re-union. The grey stone
cottage will be transformed into a palace under the blue canopy and blinking
stars; and the limitless grass will become a silver sea on which the golden
Argosy will be launched anew.
"I launched my Golden Argosy upon a
summer sea,
And fondly hoped its precious  freight
would come against me."
I noticed that in Thursday's issue the
Colonist proposed a conundrum in the
headlines of a letter signed "Victorian."
The conundrum  had  reference  to  the
failure of Mayor Morley  to recognize
the presence in Victoria of the Mayor
of Nelson, Mr. W. G. Gillett. The writer
is evidently not a well informed person
or he would have furnished a different
heading.    Fancy his asking "Does the
Mayor know?"    Of course the Mayot
knows.   It would be much more to the
point  to  ask   "What  does  the  Mayor
not know?"   Victorian is unreasonable,
tne Mayor is a busy man, far too busy
to  waste his time on entertaining the
chief magistrates  of provincial  towns;
English princes and American millionaires arc more in his line, even if he
sometimes   keeps   them   waiting.     Let
Victorian  put  on  his  considering  cap
and try to evolve something more reasonable  before putting  any  more questions affecting subjects on which he is
obviously ill informed.
On Saturday last the Times announced the engagement of one of the
most beautiful and popular of Victoria's
young ladies. Congratulations poured
in and everyone was feeling happy. On
Thursday The Week was particularly
requested not to repeat the announcement as it was "unauthorized." Our
informant, one of the principals, did
not offer any explanation, nor did he
say that, like most of the yarns of the
Times, it was made out of whole cloth,
so perhaps it is a reasonable conclusion
that the news is merely to be taken
"cum grano salis."
There are some people, even in Victoria, who are not contented, and who
think that the lines might have fallen
to them in plcasanter places. To such
I would commend the following brief
■extract'froni a letter I have just received from a young lady, once a darling of fortune and a society favorite,
who is now brooding—as Olive Schrei-
ncr did twenty years ago—on the illimitable veldt.
No one who reads her remarkable
book can ever forget the hopeless monotony and deadly oppressiveness of the
outlook, nor can they wonder at the
rebellious spirit which refused to be
bound by the shackles of conventionality. My correspondent is hardly less
brilliant and accomplished than the one
literary genius South Africa has produced, and the iron litis entered into her
soul too. She says "My husband has
been given a command and sent to garrison an outpost called Krantzkop, near
Greytown, Natal. He thinks the Zulu
outbreak will become more serious than
tbe authorities care to have known.
Meanwhile T am staying on the reserve
It is inconceivably dull and lonely.
con form no idea of the bleak, desolate
barrenness of an Orange River Colony
farm. There is not a tree, nor a hill,
nor water visible for miles around.
Even tbe grass is grey, and there is
nothing but grass, a sea of grass. This
niuch-bclaudcd African veldt, how I
hate it! A small cottage is the rule,
built of grey limestone,  a  few kraals
Longer ago than I can remember I
read the story of the immortal dreamer
of Bedford and I fear read it for the
story and not for the allegory. The
chapter which pleased my juvenile fancy
most was the one in which Giant Despair was made a prisoner in his own
castle. I confess to a feeling of satisfaction at what I always considered a
unique example of poetic justice. Three
similarly satisfactory incidents occur
to me at the moment, the one when
Nicholas Nickleby turns on his tormentor, the other where in "The Lady
of Lyons" Colonel Dumas has the luxury of turning the tables on Beauseant
and Glavis and pointing out that "curses
like chickens come home to roost." The
third is aptly illustrated in the present
impotent gnashings and foamings of
the champion slanderer of the Province,
if not of the Dominion, who has no
apology, no explanation and no extenuation for his slanders. He can no longer do anything but emulate the example
of Bunyan's giant, the only difference
being that he is not in a dungeon, behind the bars.
The death of Mrs. Craigie (John Oliver Hobbes) leaves the literary world
distinctly poorer; indeed it is doubtful
if there are among the women writers
of to-day more than two, certainly not
more than three, who have done better
work, or who are entitled to rank
higher.
Mrs. Humphrey Ward and "Lucas
Malet" are probably entitled to that
distinction, although "Robert Orange"
and "The School for Saints" are for
breadth of treatment and dramatic construction superior to any of their books.
In grappling at close quarters with
the problems of life Mrs. Craigie had
no superior and few equals. You could
feel the hot breath and the palpitating
heart. At times she "pierced the
white." Mrs. Ward is more philosophical, "Lucas Malet" were lucid and cogent, but Mrs. Craigie stirred the blood
and fluttered the pulses as she handled
the intricate situations of her plot. She
was par excellence the defender of the
feminine attitude on all matters affecting life and conduct and of late years
ber judgment has ripened wonderfully,
and she has illuminated all she has
touched, among the many who will
cast a flower to her memory not the
least appreciative is
BOHEMIAN.
* Social and        *
* ^Personal. *
VIOTORIA.
Miss Loewen is visiting Mrs. Prior at
Duncans.
»   *   *
Miss Violet Hickey is visiting friends
in Seattle.
*   *   *
The   Misses
Seattle.
Mrs. Fagan entertained a few friends
at dinner on Wednesday evening, covers being laid for eight.
* *   *
Mrs. McPhillips was hostess at a dinner party given on Monday evening at
her home on Rockland avenue.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Lawford Richardson
are spending a few days in town, and
return to Ledner the first of the week.
* *
Mrs. Tilton has returned from Vancouver, the Misses Tilton remaining
there for a longer visit.
* *   *
Miss Doris Clute who has been visiting Miss Viva Blackwood is now the
guest of her sister, Mrs. Beauchamp
Tye.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. T. S. Gore and Miss
Arbuckle are spending a few days out
camping.
* *  *
Mrs. Butchart entertained a number
of friends informally at the tea hour
on Thrusday afternoon of last week.
* *  *
Miss Wark has returned from Shawnigan Lake after spending several
weeks at the Strathcona Hotel.
* *  *
Mrs. Oliver entertained at the tea
tour on Monday afternoon last at her
charming home at Oak Bay, quite a
number of her friends being present.
* *  *
Mrs. Dudley, Mrs. Tilton and Miss
Edith Maitland Dougal left on Wednesday evening for Seattle and Portland.
* *  *
The Misses Blackwood entertained a
few of their young friends on Thursday evening last in honor of Miss Doris
Clute of New Westminster.
■ *  *  *
Mr. Alexis Martin entertained a
number of visiting cricketers at dinner
on Wednesday evening last at his residence, on Rockland avenue.
* *   *
Mr. Justice and Mrs. Martin have returned from abroad and will take up
their residence at "Ballinahinch" on the
first of September.
* *   *
Governor and Mrs. Dunsmuir and
party returned on Mondav from a cruise
on the Thistle, having enjoyed fine sport
and perfect weather. The party include
several members of the Governor's
family, Mrs. Little, Miss Flumerfelt,
and Miss Peters.
* *   *
The  cricket  tournament    which  has
been going on for the past week both
at Oak Bay and the Jubilee Hospital,
has been most enjoyable, tea being served at the latter place each afternoon by
different ladies.
* *  »
Mr. and Mrs. Hebden Gillespie (Nelson) are expected on Monday to spend
a fortnight's holdiay here. During their
visit they will be the guests of Mrs. J.
H. Todd, "The Leasowes," St. Charles
street.
*. *  *
Mr. and Mrs. Lester and Miss Dorothy are leaving the beginningof September for Vancouver, where they will
take up their residence in handsome
apartments of the new "Lester Hall,"
which has been erected for them, to
be used as a select dancing academy, on
the corner of Granville and Davie
streets in that city. Mrs. Lester will
continue to hold classes in Victoria as
usual, spending the fore part of each
week here. Miss Heater will act as
pianist both in Victoria and Vancouver.
Mrs. Lester has taken as partner in
private class work in this city Mrs.
Beatrice Norton.
SHOPPING BAGS
The Ladies' Shopping Bags we sell are NOT the ordinary
kind made by the thousand, to one pattern. Every Shopping Bag in our showrooms is distinct and individual in
style. They were personally selected and imported direct
from Paris. If you were in the Rue des Capucins you
could not purchase anything more distinct in style or fashionable in color at prices ranging from $i to $20.
THE   MATERIALS used in their construction are Alligator, Crocodile, Walrus, Antelope, Morocco   and    Monkey
hides.   Also rich silks and beautiful bead work.
THE  MOUNTINGS are in Roman gold, oxidized silver,
copper, gun metal and leather.
INTERIOR FITTINGS consist in many cases of coin
purse, card case, mirror, comb, memo tablet and pencil, puff
box, opera glasses and smelling salts.
REMEMBER
If you cannot get to Victoria our Mail Order Department will]
attend to your wants.   Select your price, enclose posta 1 r<
and state style of material, mounting and fittings; naturally the]
largest number of fittings are in the more expensive bags.
CHALLONER & MITCHELL
JEWELERS AND SILVERSMITHS
47 and 49 Qovernment Street, Victoria, B. C.
CM.1511I
AT THE GORGE.-The London Bioscope is delighting thousands at tbe
Gorge Park nightly and the best orches-
-ra in the province discources sweet
music.
Pooley  are   visiting   in
Mrs. Bartlett of England is the guest
of her brother, Hon. W. W. Walkem.
* *   *
Judge and Mrs. Lampman  returned
on Thursday from Seattle, having been
You ' over  for the  tennis tournament.
* *   *
Mrs. Genge returned this week from
Seattle where she took part in the tennis tournament.
* *   *
The flannel and calico dance given by
the Cricket Club last night in the A.
O. U. W. hall was a great success,,
quite a large number being present.
Further particulars of tbe affair will
appear in our next week's issue.
Week August 27th.
The New
Grand
SULLIVAN;* CONSIDIHE,    Proprietor*.
Management of ROBT. JAMIESON.
Robt. P. Skilling's Original Tourist
Quintette in "A Trip to Mexico."
Armstrong and Holly,
"The Y.A.C.T.
The Aerial Martins.
Lew Palmer,
Comedian, Monologist and Imitator.
Frederic Roberts,
Illustrated Song.
New Moving Pictures.
NO CHARGE
We shall be glad to forward, ENTIRELY
FREE, our sample book containing samples
of the largest and most fashionable stock
of wall papers and wall coverings in Western Canada. We can also offer you many
great bargains in this season's wall papers.
We give a special discount of 10 per cent,
to all those who cut out this ad. and use it
as an introduction to
MELROSE CO.M.
40 Fort St., Next to Five Sisters Block, Viotoria, B. C.
"IF IT'S CORRECT WE HAVE IT." ,     i
M. 1497
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THE MELOTTE
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IS THE BEST BY TEST.
PRIVATE TEST.
Grand Valley, Ont.,
Dec. 26.
Dear Sirs:
The size i "MEL-
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entire satisfaction. I
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for one year and
works better, if anything, than when I
first got it. I had
a trial of the "Alpha
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months, but consider the MELOTTE
much superior in
every way.
Samuel Etevenson.
PUBLIC TEST.
In public competil
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The Week.
BOLE AGENTS FOB B. C.
E. G. PRIOR & ee.. Ld.j
.    (THE BIRMINGHAM OF B. C.)
Who carry a large stock at their various depots.   Write fori
price list and bedrock prices to
123 Government Street, Victoria, B. @.
Also at Vancouver, Kami- ops and Vernon.
p.R. 13d THE WEEK, SATURDAY. AUGUST -_5   ioc6.
British Columbia
THE AGRICULTURAL RESOURCES
OF THE PROVINCE.
AGRICULTURE.
To form a just estimate of the ex-
lent and importance of the agricultural areas of British Columbia one
must make many excursions to the
north and south of the main line of
the Canadian Pacific Railway—over
its branches and steamboat connections—and even then, if he trusts to
what he may be able to see from the
car window or the deck of a lake
steamer, his knowledge will be far
from complete. In the Shuswap and
Okanagan Valleys, for instance, for
every acre of arable land within sight
of tbe railway or lake there are
thousands hidden away behind the
beautiful grass covered bills which
border the highway of travel, and the
same may be said of Kootenay,
Boundary, Arrow Lakes, Similkameen
and other districts. The agricultural
capabilities of the many sections of
Southern British Columbia are, as a
matter of fact, only beginning to be
realized. So far they have been
practically ignored for the mineral
seeking prospectors who first invaded the country had no eye for aught
save the object of their quest. Now,
however, branch lines of railway and
lake steamers are enabling a new
class of men to enter and explore this
land of promise and many have embarked in fruit growing, mixed farming and dairying.
The agricultural and pastoral lands
are not restricted to a small proportion of the total acreage, for Professor Macoun, after personal investigation on the ground, says: "The
whole of British Columbia, south of
52 degrees and east of the Coast
Range, is a gazing country up to
3,500 feet, and a farming country up
to 2,500 feet, where irrigation is possible." This is a most important
statement and its truth is being confirmed by the practical experience of
settlers who have established themselves in the country. Within the
boundaries thus roughly defined by
Professor Macoun the capabilities
of the soil are practically unlimited.
All of it that is not too elevated to
serve only for grazing purposes will
produce all the ordinary vegetables
and roots, much of it will grow cereals to perfection, while everywhere
the hardier varieties of fruits can be
successfully cultivated. As far north
as the 52nd degree it has been practically demonstrated that apples will
flourish, while in the southern belt
the more delicate fruits, peaches,
grapes, apricots, etc., are an assured
crop. Roughly estimated, the extent
of these fertile lands may be set
down at one million acres, but this
figure will probably be found far below the actual quantity capable of
cultivation when the country has
been thoroughly explored. The anticipation of such a result is justified
from the fact that at several points
I in the mountains even in the most
unpromising looking localities, where
clearing   and   cultivation has   been
' attempted it has proved successful.
;-rr-..-,,    K^s £, t<.^h   •;  , j
fl Sheep Ranch Near Kamloops.
In several instances also, bench land,
pronounced only fit for pasturage by
"old timers," has been broken and
cropped with very satisfactory results. The agricultural lands just
mentioned are located as follows:
Acres.
Okanagan    250,000
North and   South Thompson
Valleys     75,000
Nieola,     Similkameen    and
Kettle River Valleys ....   350,000
Lillooet and Cariboo ......   200,000
East and West Kootenay ..   125,000
West of the Coast Range are several extensive tracts of arable land
of the richest quality, notably  the
@attle Grazing on Vancouver Island.
Lower Fraser Valley, Wesminster
District, Vancouver Island and adjacent islands in the Gulf of
Georgia. These sections of the province are recognized as agricultural
districts and are fairly well settled,
but much of the land is still wild and
unfilled. North of the main line of
the Canadian Pacific Railway, on the
Pacific slope, and but partially explored, are vast areas of agricultural
and grazing lands, which will be turned to profitable account when the
country is a few years older. Much
of this northern region is fit for
wheat growing, and all of it will produce  crops of  the  coarser  cereals,
roots and vegetables, except tbe
higher plateaux, which will afford
pasturage to countless herds of cattle, horses and sheep. Some of these
districts, best known and in which
settlements have heen established, are
Chilcotin, Necehaco, Blackwater,
Bulkley, Oosta, Kispyox, Skeena and
Peace River Valleys, and they are
estimated to include some 6,500,000
acres. That this is n consewative
estimate is clear from the fact that
the late Dr. Dawson and Professor
Macoun credited that portion of
Peace River Valley lying within British Columbia with 10,000,000 acres of
wheat land. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 1966.
Patent
Medicines.
Dr. Pagan's Report.
Copy.
Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., Feb. 5, 1006.
The Honourable the Attorney General:
Sir—In pursuance of instructions received from he Honourable Mr. Fulton
I have made, in so far as the time at
my disposal would permit, an enquiry
into the sale, use and abuse of patent I
and proprietary medicines in British
Columbia.
SALE.
The sale of patent medicines is general throughout the Province. Every
drug-store, as well as many general
al stores in cities, and all stores in
country places keep and sell most of
the patent medicines. It is impossible,
except by instituting a costly system of
collection of statistics, to ascertain the
money value of the annual sales, but I
have read accounts of calculcations obtained from United States official returns, in which it stated that over one
hundred million dollars are paid out
every year in the purchase om patent
medicines. Canditions in British Columbia are practically similar to those in
the United States, and it would not be
unfair to assume that the amount of
sales is in about the same proportion,
which means that British Columbia
contributes over two hundred and sixty
thousand  dollars  a    year   for  patent
medicines.
USE.
There is no doubt but that many of
the patent and proprietary medicines at
present on the market are very beneficial, if used at the right time and in
the  proper  doses;  pain,  sleeplessness,
nervousness and ailments generally are
often relieved by them, indicating the
presence of potent drugs in their composition.     .Mixtures,    ointments,    and
pills are sold as being useful for certain maladies, and are found so under
certain conditions.     Again,    mixtures
such as Lydia Pinkhani or Peruna are
no doubt good stimulants and probably
often justify the claims made in some
of the advertisements.   In one of her
advertisements, before me as I write, I
see that Lydia Pinkhani claims that, on
taking her medicine,   it makes   "your
eyes  sparkle,  your complexion  to  resume its brilliancy and your whole body
to thrill with the glow of renewed vitality."    No doubt this is true, but as
this particular mixture contains about
28 per cent of absolute alcohol, and as
whisky up to "proof" contains 49 per
cent, and ordinary hampaguc and port
wine ontaiii respectively  about  12 and
16 per cent alcohol, it is not surprising
that the ''whole body thrills  with  lhe
glow   of   renewed   vitality";   doubtless
many of us will recognize the sensation.
ABUSES.
Rational Therapuetics means the use
of  remedies   for  reasons  based  on  a
knowledge  of  the  pathological  conditions present  in  the subject    and the
physiological action of the agent employed.    This definition  simply  means
that, to treat and prescribe for sickness
reasonably and intelligently, it is necessary to know  what are the conditions
within the body which are causing certain symptoms,  such  as    pain, cough,
nervousness, etc., etc.; and  further to
know  the  immediate or  remote  effect
of the medicine administered, not only
on the symptoms, but on either a part
or thc entire human organism.      The
need of applying  this definition  is  so
impressed on all students of medicine
that I am satisfied no well-trained, conscientious  physician ever lets  it  from
before his mind.
Yet there are sold extensively in this
disastrous   results,   especially  to chil-!    There is upon the market a mixture
dren. | called "Liquozone," for which a dollar
I hape before me Potter's Materia! a sixteen ounce bottle is charged. 1
Medica. This book is regarded as one i have analysed it and find it to contain
of the authorities on medicines and j sulphuric acid and sulphurous acids, su-
their administration. Treating of opium j gar, and water. The intrinsic value of
it says: "Probably no drug in the ma- j this article is not five cents, yet persons
teria medica is so useful as opium or 1 innumerable are found innocent enough
has so wide a range of application. At. to pay a dollar for it. This is tinques-
the same time no other drug requires tionably a fraud on the public, and
such areful handling, by reason of the 1 should not be permitted,
moity influences which modify its action j Another evil is the subject matter of
and uses. j the patent medicine advertisements as
"As before pointed out, children are ] they  appear  in  the  newspapers.    The
extremely susceptible to its narcotic action, and women are more easily af-
ected by it than men
evil is three-fold. First, claims are
made which are impossible to be carried out, and thus ignorant persons are
This, I think, should convince any deceived and their money taken without
reasonable mind that opium or its pre-! the possiblty of any return. Second,
parations should not be prescribed un-1 many lives are sacrificed because "sure
less the condition of the patient is well:
if $
* Short Story *
if if
ififif&ifipififitifififip
WATCHITA.
(A Tale of the Prairies.)
By W. B. 1
SPECIALLY  WRITTEN  FOR  THE  WEEK.
Accordingly I sent for Lebau and despatched him to Qu'Appelle. He was
only away two days, returning with information that resolved my doubts, if
any remained, on both points. He had
learned that Watchita and Harry Ross
understood.
I have heard it advanced that, after
all, patent medicines containing opium
have now been used for a long time
without any startling results. Personally, I believe the results have always
been with us, but that it is only lately
we have begun to get startled.
In the authority above quoted, referring to opium, occurs the following: "Common Sources of Danger—
Overdosing with cough mixtures or
paregoric, or the soothing syrups so
much used for quieting children, all of
which contain opium. The American
Journal of Pharmacy estimates the loss
of life from the latter cause at 150,000
yearly."
This certainly is a startling statement, and, while I am not absolutely in
a position to confirm or deny it, yet
the fact remains that the statement, so
far as I know, is uncontradicted
cures"   naturally  appeal    to    ignorant  ^ ^ ^^ fo_ near,y g year) a,_
minds, and thus persons in the incip- h ^ ^ Qnly me{ olande8tinelyj
lent  stages  of certain malignant dis-1 ^ ^ ^ ^^ succeeded ir
eases are prevented from obtaining ra- ^ attachment a secret
tional and scientific treatment.   In the,    . . _ t   .
third place, advertisements appear from
time to time which are not fit for young
persons of either sex to read. They are
often indecent and treat of subjects not
usually spoken of publicly. They
should not be permitted in a morally
healthy community, and it is a matter
of astonishment that otherwise respectable newspapers publish them.
A concoction lately put upon the
market is "Si iloh\i Consumption Cure."
I Understand it ir, made up of prussic
acid and chloroform. This can be of
no possible use to consumptives, but,
on the contrary, may be injurious.
and had, as they thought, succeeded in
.   „ But
who can keep a secret from a jealous
woman's eyes? And how did Lebau
discover that Kate Ross han conceived
for her half brther a mad passion such
as her nature was only capable of?
Having discoyered her secret, he had
no difficulty, by working on her feelings and inflaming her jealousy, in
drawing from her all he wanted to
know; that both brothers had committed the murder, and that Harry had
actually struck the first blow; that the
motive was robbery, in which, however,
they were disappointed, for, failing to
find any money except a  few dollars,
I love him, and I want to see him once
more.' _„^^^^^^^__
I  was moved, but yet thought    my
duty  was clear,  for although I  could
have waived the regulations in her favor would  it  be  kind?    Ought  I  to
keep  from  her  the  dreadful  truth  of
which I had been assured?   I felt constrained to take her hand and try to
soothe the grief that was rending her
as with eager eye she scanned my face]
for a ray of hope, but there was some-'
tiling about her noble nature that seemed to forbid even that familiarity froml
one who was not bound to her by the'J
ties of close affection, so I said:
"Watchita, I have something to tellj
you I would rather cut out my tongue]
1 than do it, but in justice, and as I be-|
lieve in kindness, to yourself, I must.!
If you still wish to see Ross after learn-"
ing what I have to say you shall. Itt
is this: He has just confessed to mel
that he is guilty of Quinn's murder andl
that his sentence is just, and even if™
he had not confessed, I have other evidence, not produced at the trial, which
places his guilt beyond a doubt." Long
before I had finished Watchita gave a
moan, like that of a poor stricken fawn,
and I approached to support her, for I
thought she was going to fall, as for a
moment her body swayed, but with
marvellous control she rallied, and,
waving me aside, passed from the room
without a word, sustained in the most
exacting crisis of a woman's life, when
he loses love, and her heart's idol is
shattered, by the true nobility of her
character.
edy for consumption and cancer, nn
fortunately, so far, without results.
  iYet, impudent and ignorant charla-
There are many other powerful and I taM come forwar_ and, hy dellber-
poisonous drugs contained in certain ately falfle 8tatementS, wth profit to
patent medicines, all of which should | y^-^^ piay on the hopes and
, the contrary, may be injury      j ^   ^.^  off   Qg^t  jacket  ^^ mus.
Scientists throughout thejmtaed        ^ k ^ afterwards finJlmg     Long t
world are working hard to find a rem-■
lie placed in the same category as those
containing opium, and the indiscriminate use of which a prudent physician
would condemn for the same reason. I
have personal knowledge of the most
serious results following the use of
headache and neuralgia nostrums. I
understand that many of them contain
heart depressants, and it is plan to be
seen what is liable to occur and no
doubt often docs occur when the heart
is already weak from any cause, nor
does it require any logical reasoning or
five hundred dollars concealed in tin
lining. Mary also told him that when
the brothers were arrested Harry, he-
fore being taken away, had whispered
to the old woman to go to the Cree
encampment and tell Watchita what
had happened and to say that he was
innocent and that Taoni was the mur-
fears of unfortunate sufferers,  robbing them of the little which might, ^"^ was the poor Indian maid
these doomed ones some, last, ^ ^ appea, t0 me fully
Active means should nei
give
comforts
adopted to prevent this.
RECOMMENDATIONS.
From what I havesaid above, I trust
1  have been able to show that patent
medicines  as  they  are used  in  ritish
Columbia are nol  only a menace, but
explained	
So great was Mary Ross' fury against
both Watchita and her unworthy lover
that  she  actually offered  to  give evi-
, dence against the prisoners at the trial,
j but I felt such an aversion to this that
nnhlic' ^ reso'ved uot to make use of her evi-
are    positively    injurious,    to    piiDiic 1 ^^ except as a ,ast resort
health.   I, therefore, beg to recommend j    ^^ days )ater (he trial came off,
-— •-■ -     - „  ..   I that the Government adopt some means ^ evi(lcnce was s0 conclusive that
scientific  explanation  to point out tlie j  _   _mi1ofo   thpir  saie,      Tn  the   first;
danger of "blind" prescribing of such
articles
The medicine most frequently used in
these headache powders is acetanilide.
This is an excellent, but powerful,
drug. It decomposes in the system
with the formation of aniline, which is
very oisonous. Wynter Blyth, an authority with a world-wide reputation,
speaking of aniline, says: "Aniline is a
blood poison. It lessens the power to
convey oxygen to the tissues, and also
acts on the central nervous system, first
stimulating,  then paralysing."
Perhaps we can now explain why the
present age is cursed by such an increase in the number of sudden deaths.
Another drug frequently contained in
patent medicines is cocaine. This, like
many other good things, becomes dangerous when used out of place. It is
frequently contained in patent catarrh
remedies, and the results of its use are
immediate and apparently beneficial. The
continued use of cocaine is highly injurious lo the system, does no permanent good to the affected parts, and
engenders a habit which too frequently
renders the user a fit subject for the
lunatic asylum. I have personal knowledge of two persons who became cocaine fiends from the use of patent ca-
to regulate their sale!
place, I would recommend that all patent or proprietary medicines containing
drugs, such as opium, morphine cocaine,
styrchnine, or, indeed, any actively
poisonous drug, should be conspicuously labelled as containing such drug,
together with its quantity. Further, I
would have the sale of a patent medicine containing a poisonous drug to be
deemed to be that drug, and so be
brought under Section 16 of the Pharmacy Act.
Alcohol in excess of 5 per cent should
not be allowed, except when it is
shown to the satisfaction of the Provincial Board of Health that such excess is needed for the purpose of dissolving resins, or other legitimate reasons, in which case the actual percent-,
ge must be stated on the bottle, and
the dose must not exceed one teaspoonful.
Papers sold in British Columbia
must, on receipt of notice from the
Provincial Board of Health, cease to
publish patent medicine advertisements
making impossible or unreasonable
claims, or containing statements of an
indecent character.
I beg to append copy of a resolution
passed by the Vancouver Medical Association, also copy of Section 16 of
Province  powerful  medicines  and poi-1 COursc tbe buyer.   I have seen
tarrh remedies.
Another   injustice   imposed   on   tha! ''le Pharmacy Act
public in the sale of patent medicine is |    \ |laVe the honor to be, sir,
the   exorbitant   prices   charged.    Thd;
advertisements  in the press we know
must represent the expenditure of huge
sums of money.   Who pays this?   Of
Your obedient servant,
(Signed) C. J. FAGAN,
Secretary.
sonous drugs, for which claim is made
to cure almost all forms of disease, although the claimants arc ignorant of
the actual conditions relative to present
or past diseases, which might contra-
indicate the use of pertain drugs, and
possibly make the use of otherwise
simple doses actively fatal. r
One   of   the   most   active,   powerful
Moving On.
A  striking   tribute  to   the  progress
and prospects of the Nicola district i.
but dangerous drugs used is opium, or probable cost of one of these widely
its  alkaloid,  morphine.    Patent   medi- advertised  "remedies"  may    fairly be
cine manufacturers, recognizing its po- taken   as  illustrative  of  most  of  the
tency, use il freely, often with the most others.   "Crimine ab une disce omnes.
ed that 50 per cent of the profits arc
paid out for advertising, and it is well
known that most of the successful pa- ..,,„ ,,.„,  __
lent medicine maufacturcrs arc wealthy found in the announcement that Mr.
men. Then again, as the salesman must M. L. Grimmett, the well known and
make a profit, the first cost of the ar- highly respected barrister of Sandon,
tide to the purchaser is easily com- j has removed to Nicola, and will in fu-
puted, and Is evidently very small. \ Hire practice there. Mr. Grimmett is a
A  statement of the ingredients and man who can be trusted.
No earthly tax dodger need hope to
he handed a clear title to a mansion in
the skies.
both prisoners were found guilty, and
sentenced to be hanged. The date of,
their execution was fixed for a fortnight later, and having regard to all the
circumstances of the case I resolved
to see Harry Ross again, and by telling
him all that I knew, ascertain if he was
disposed to make a full confession, as
I was now perfectly satisfied of his
guilt. I had a long and painful interview with him, during which he com-
puletely broke down and wept bitterly.
He said he could not imagine how be
had allowed himself to be led to the
committal of such a crime—for his half
brother had instigated it, the only
thought in his mind' being that if he
got the money he could set up a house
and marry Watchita. He confessed
everything, and, with a feeling that has
never left me to this day that he was
a criminal more by accident than delight, I left him, an erring, but I am
sure, a repentant man.
And now I have reached the last incident in this long story. A few days
later Watchita came to my office, and
althoughl could see from her constrained expression and haggard face,
how much she had suffered, I could not
but admire the gentleness of her manner and the proud dignity of her bearing. I hade her be seated, knowing
that our interview would not be a short
one, and then waited for her to speak.
"I came, sir, to ask if I might be permitted to see the condemned prisoner,
Harry Ross," and her voice trembled
as she uttered the name.
I felt that I was now face to face
with the hardest task I had ever undertaken, but I knew that in this, as in
most matters of the affections, the
straight way was the kindest, and so
1 said.
"Watchita, you know I would do
anything in reason for you, but you
know also that it is against thc regulations, because you are not a relative."
And then this proud but true-hearted
daughter of the prairie completely
broke down, and with quivering lips,
and heaving breast, sobbed out, "Sir!
ing, and even if it be unmanly, I mustl
admit that more than one tear  found!
its way down my cheek as I thought of
this    beautiful  maiden,  her    simplicity!
of life, her charm of manner, her honesty of purpose, and her innate refine-j
ment, going away to nurse the memory!
of a lost, and alas! an unworthy, lovfl
amid the solitudes of the prairie; andl
I reflected that I, too, was a wanderer,!
and had been this twenty years, more
than   five  thousand   miles   from   home
because my idol, loo, had been shatter-!
ed.   And so the child of the savage ane
the son of civilization had been over-l
taken  by  the  same   fate,  and   had  tc
learn by bitter experience the  sadnessj
of a desolate heart.
There was another heart, too, whicli
came not scathless out of this  affair!
for when I had an opportunity and exl
plained everything to Shirley Paget
learned for the first time how deep and
sincere  an affection  he  had conceive^
for this peerless maiden.    But I knev
that we should never see her again, and
so it proved.   I understood, too, wha|
my lad's application shortly after for
month's leave  of absence  meant,  and
I knew what his dejected look and listj
less manner indicated when he return
ed from a fruitless search;  for Wat
chita had disappeared on the trackles
prairie and would never more be heart
of.   Time restored my favorite's energy
and no  doubt  somewhat  lessened  hil
keen disappointment, but it never dim!
med the lustre of   his   first and lasj
day-dream." ^^^^^^^^^
As thc Major finished, my eye fell ol
an open book which lay on the tablJ
It was well thumbed at the page hcadej
"To the True Romance," and the lasj
verse underlined:
"Yet may I look with heart unshook
On blow brought home or missed—I
"Yet may 1 hear with equal ear
The clarions down the list;
Yet set my lance above mischance
And ride the barriere—
Oh, hit or miss, how little 'tis
My lady is not here I"
Congratulations.
Everyone who knows Pat Burns, ai
who in the Kootenay does not? wJ
wish to tender him the heartiest col
gratulations on the birth of a son aT
heir. Long life to the genial fathl
and health and prosperity to his sonjj
A Moral Plague Spot.
The Vancouver World deplores
existence of "a moral plague spot at
mouth of the Fraser."   Why need
contemporary go even as far as StevJ
ton?   There are not a few who thi
the order could be filled much near
home.
Slander  is  the  tribute  failure  p:|
to success. THK WKKK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, tyu6.
THE DINING ROOM
Simplicity is the keynote to success in any scheme of dining room decoration or furnishing; that is why great care should be used in selecting dining
room furniture which must depend entirely on the perfection of design and workmanship for making a proper framing for the dinner table decorations
which, after all, is the main object of any room used exclusively for dining purposes; in cases where the dining room is used also as a living room the more
ornate style may be safely adopted. Our very extensive stock of dinin-room furniture and furnishings is selected by trained experts to suit either of the
above requirements; our large free catalogue which we invite you to send for, will give you an idea of the beauty and great range of our stock; the mail
provides an easy means of bringing you into touch with that stock. Our mail order department will carry out your orders and instructions just the same
as if you were living in Victoria.
DINING  ROOM   ROCKERS.
We always have hundreds of rockers
in stock in every class of material at
prices ranging from $1 up, but for dining room purposes we draw your special attention to our Weathered Oak and
Early English, Tudor Period, Oak
Rockers upholstered in beautiful soft
Spanish leather, etc., at $10, $15, and
$20. Golden Oak Rockers from $3.50
upwards.
EXTENSION TABLES.
Our stock of Extension Tables for
dining rooms is large and varied, in
Golden Oak, Weathered Oak, Antwerp
Oak, Mahogany and other woods; both
square and circular shapes, all sizes and
at prices ranging from $6 up. For full
particulars see our free catalogue.
MAGAZINE RACKS.
A most useful piece of furniture in
any dining room. Holds magazines,
newspapers, periodicals, etc. Keeps
the room neat and is a handsome addition to the furnishing. We have three
different designs in Mission and Early
English styles at $10, $12 and $14. You
should write for all particulars of
cheaper kinds.
OCCASIONAL TABLES.
These tables form a most useful adjunct to dining room furnishing. When
not in use they help to decorate a corner ; and in cases where the dining room
is used as a sitting room in the evening they are extremely handy for cards
or to hold trays of refreshments. We
have a splendid selection in all styles,
but for dining room purposes we draw
attention to those in Weathered and
Golden Oak at $5.50, $6, $7.50, $9, $10.
WAREHOUSE:
Cor. of Broad and Broughton Sts.,
Victoria, B. C.
AN IDEAL DINING ROOM SUITE.
The above cut shows an ideal dining room suite consisting of extension
table, buffet, dinner wagon, china cabinet, chairs, etc., in finest selected W
eathered Oak built to one of the most beautiful Mission designs. This is only
one out of a very large quantity of exclusive designs in Mission, Early English and Early Dutch, three styles which are acknowledged to be most correct
and fashionable for dining-room furnishing. In addition we have a large qu
antity of suites in Golden Oak, rich Mahogany, and other woods built to
individual designs from the most famous studios. In every case the wood is
selected for the perfection of its natural grain; the workmanship and finish
are of the very best. On the question of price we are absolutely certain no
other firm can sell you goods of equal value at the low rates we charge. For
full particulars we refer you to our free catalogue and mail order department.
IMPORTANT
We want you to see our Catalogue. It is the largest work on Furniture and Furnishing ever published in Western Canada, containing very
valuable information for furnishing every room in the home, with oyer
1700 illustrations of furniture, furnishings, accessories and beautiful
homes in B. C. It is mailed to you FREE. Just write our mail order
department enclosing this coupon.
E
A FREE GIFT
E
In order to trace the results of each of our advertisements, we present
a free gift to every lady who writes for our free catalogue. This week
we are giving a complete set of dainty White Toilet Table Mats, five in
1 1, providing you cut this out and enclose it vim writing for our free
catalogue address Mail Order Department, Weiler Bros., Victoria, B.C.
DINING BOOM
Furnished in Antique Oak by Weiler Bros.
The table, sideboard and other woodwork were built to special designs at
our factory.
Weiler Bros.
Complete Home, Hotel, ©lub and Office Furnishers,
SHOWROOMS:
To which you are cordially invited to inspect all that is best in Furnishings
from London, Paris, New York, Vienna and Berlin.
33 GOVERNMENT STREET
Corner of Broughton and Government Streets, Victoria, B. C.
ARM CHAIRS.
Visitors to our store are astonished
at the quantity of different designs we
carry. A lady recently remarked we
had Arm Chairs to suit all tastes and
fit all forms. She overlooked the fact
that we have to cater for the whole of
Western Canada. We can sell you Arm
Chairs from $2.50 up, but our creations
in Weathered Oak and Early Dutch and
English are naturally our pride.
MORRIS CHAIRS.
A Morris Chair is almost a necessity
in every well ordered dining room.
Unfortunately many people have been
persuaded, by so-called bargains, to
purchase Morris Chairs which are entirely out of harmony with the rest of
their dining room furniture. We offer
you handsome Morris Chairs in finest
Weathered Oak, Early English, Golden
Oak, etc., upholstered, in soft Spanish
leather or any other material that will
match your furniture.
DINING ROOM CHAIRS.
Owing to our extensive business our
sale of chairs keeps a large factory in
full working order all the year round.
Our dining room chairs are specially
built by talented workmen to designs
from leading furniture designers. It
is these Chairs our mail order department will give you particulars of.
WRITING DESKS
Though not an absolute necessity are a
very valuable addition to dining room
furniture, especially those built in
Weathered Oak, Golden Oak and Antwerp Oak. We draw special attention
to our desks in Mission, Dutch and
Tudor period designs, at $13, $15, $18
and $25.
—————
FACTORY:
HUMBOLDT STREET
Victoria, B. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 25   190b.
Ill
'  is
NOTES ON PROVINCIAL NEWS
Crazed China.
Several fair readers of "The Week"
have written asking for an explanation
of "Crazed China"; many of them
seem to imagine it has reference to the
decoration, which is a  blunder.
The term "crazed" is a technical one
used in the pottery industry to denote
china which is damaged either through
the faulty nature of the glazing, or inefficient firing, which results in a quantity of minute cracks appearing in the
glaze on the surface of the china,
doubtless due to expansion or contraction from the causes already mentioned. Although these small cracks only
appear on lhe surface of the glaze, the
value of the article is very materially
reduced by this fault, and is never sold
by the manufacturers as a perfect piece   urns that can well be imagined
of workmanship, but passes into a class
called "seconds," the greater portion
of which class is made up of these-
crazed pieces.
Potteries, which have a world-wide
reputation for the beauty and perfection of their goods never permit any
crazed or damaged pieces to leave their
factories; every article is examined by
three or four different experts, and the
slightest fault is sufficient to condemn
it, after which it is immediately broken
up and thrown ou to the dump heap.
There are, however, many potteries
who have no object in maintaining their
reputation only; lhey cannot afford to
destroy damaged pieces; these goods
are collected and sold as "seconds" to
wholesale houses who trade in such
goods; from thence they pass either in
to the hands of the Saturday night
street corner auctioneer, the curb stone
merchant, or the departmental store, as
they form the background of so-called
reduction price sales.
For the guidance of our fair readers
we may say that crazed china is nol lhe
only fault; close scrutiny of marked
down goods will disclose either a shortage of the pieces in the toilet, dinner or
tea set, faults in thc design, due lo
tearing of the transfers, roughness and
poor coloring of the glaze, and a variety of other evils, any one of which is
sufficient to make the real value of the
article about one-tenth the value of
the perfect article, which gives ample
reason why so many of these goods find
their way on to the market instead of
their legitimate place, the dump heap.
Railroads in North-West.
The activitiy in railroad circles
throughout the iNortli-wcst is little
known or appreciate, by those who do
not occasionally travel through that
vast territory. It is impossible to form
any reliable estimate of the number of
men actually engaged in this work.
They are so widely scattered, and at
ppints so far distant that only those
immediately in charge are able to keep
in touch with the progress. It is certain, however, that in one part or another between the Great Lakes in the
East, and lhe Rockies in the West, and
between thc Intrnalional Boundary lin
in the South and the Saskatchewan in
the North, every day is adding miles to
Enterprising.
The Wilmer Outcrop is nothing is not
enterprising, lt has admirably discharged its duly in making known to
the outsiae world the attractions and
resources of Kootenay Valley. In fact
anything that is known except to the
lew, who 'have had the privilege of
travelling through the country, must
be accredited to the good work of the
Outcrop. The latest move is thus expressed in a recent issue:
"The Outcrop has completed arrangements wilh 125 local newspapers scattered throughout Manitoba and the
Northwest to publish a scries of articles
on the resources of this valley to be
supplied by us, which will give the
valley one of the best advertising medi-
Each
article will thus have a circulation of
over 100,000 copies, and will be read
by the prairie farmers, as well as by
people in every country in the world.
"It must be admitted that there is
no medium that can give better results
than a local paper to attract the attention of people to a new country, and
for this reason it is not necessary in this
announcement to dilate on the many
advantages of our new scheme. All we
ask is for our readers to give this proposition a few minutes of serious consideration, and, we oelieve, all will admit it is the greatest boosting proposition yet submitted in this province.
"At the same time The Outcrop has
arranged to improve our own paper,
and within a few weeks will be giving
from eight to ten columns more of
reading matter than we have in the
past."
I
What the Coun'ry Thinks.
The Grand Forks Gazette thus sums
up the result of the Pendray case:
"However, no one expects the World
to do the manly thing and apologize.
Even before the verdict was rendered
the World blandly remarks: 'It matters not a fig what the report may be.
The fact stares the public in the face
that important evidence was proffered
and not admitted. That fact was sufficient to cast a cloud of suspicion over
the whole proceedings." Alas! Poor
World. Small wonder that even the
Nelson News refers to the whole episode as the 'Higgins-Anderson Fiasco.'
"One thing the investigation will do.
viz., thoroughly discredit what little influence the World may possibly have
had up to date. It will also inspire in
the minds of the public a thorough distrust of those papers whose editors
stop at nothing to blacken the character of those whom they are politically
opposed. We all know the process.
First the wish, then the thought, next
the published 'suspicion' or 'rumor,'
and finally the reckless charge."
L
What Will Happen.
R. T. Lowery, who for twelve years
has discoursed of sweetness and light
in the Kootenays, during the latter half
of that time in the pages of the Ledge,
is going to Los Angeles, where he will
continue to indite the moral maxims
which have vexed the soul of the Can-
the iron roads of the Dominion. Can-' Bd,an Postmaster-General. Even the
adian  Pacific,  tbe  Canadian   Northern,' gc,nia>1 and versati,e editor himself wl11
admit that the conjunction of paper and
place is  suggestive  of something the
I Ledge has hitherto not been.    Things
j will  shortly hum    in the    fashionable
health resort of Southern California.
and the Grand Trunk Pacific are now
all in the field, and by the end of the
present year the first named will probably have completed its parallel line
through the wheatlields to Wetaskiwin. j
Whilst the Grand Trunk people are in
no hurry to commence the actual work
of construction west of Edmonton, they
are employing all the labor available
on the Winnipeg section. The Canadian
Northern, whose policy has always been
to say nothing and saw wood, have retained all the construction outfits which
were employed on their main line for
branch work. This company will for the
first time play an important part in
transporting the wheat crop from all
points between Edmonton and the
Great Lakes. When one remarks that
less than five years ago it was considered more than doubtful in high financial circles whether William Mackenzie would be able to carry his enterprise through or not, the present
position of the Canadian Northern must
be regarded as one of thc most marvel- and pentle?
lous achievement in thc history of Bella—That's just the trouble
Canadian development. stands without hitching.
Lyric at Dawn.
By Arthur Upson.
I dreamt that out of dawn and dark
Your soul and mine were born,
And mine was like a flaming spark,
And yours was like the mom.
1 To mine your spirit from of old
Had risen with its love,
As yearns the morning to enfold
The star she glows above.
But always fails that sinking star
As dawn mounts up the sky,
For they were made to come from far,
To greet—and say good-bye.
Stella—Isn't that  Mr. Bachelor kind
he
Good
Morninq!
Have You Had
Your
NEMO?
It is made from the Finest Wheat Only. (A perfect nutrient and  as-
similant.)
It is made by machinery; on the most cleanly and hygienic principles
It is FRESH DAILY.   It is COOKED, READY TO EAT.
IMPORTANT NOTICE.
If your grocer does not slock NEMO kindly inform hint any wholesaler
in Western Cauuda will fill his orders; lhey al! stock NEMO; or write direct to us and we will see your order is filled.
BRAeKMAN'KER MILLING 60.
125 Government St.
Victoria
36 Hastings St.
Vancouver.
B-K 1 iS
Front St,
New Westminster.
Front St.
Nelson.
Chinese- made Skirts ^Overalls
MUST GO!
UNION-MADE
!RN BRAND
BUTTING AHEAD.
THE NORTHERN BANK
HEAD OFFICE WINNIPEG
Authorized Capital $2,000,000.  Subscribed Capital $1,200,000
A General Banking business transacted.   Drafts issued.   Sterling and
Foreign Exchange bought and sold.
SAVINGS BANK DEPT.—Deposits of $1 and upwards received and
interest allowed.
Business bv mail receives special attention.
Godfrey Booth, Manager Victoria Branch
J>
True wisdom lies in the policy that
would effect its aims by the influence
of opinion, and yet by the means of
existing forms.
NOTICE Is hereby given Hint (10 (liiys
lifter date I Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands nnd Works for permission to purchase tlie following lnnd,
situntod on Works Channel: Commencing
nt n post mnrked "Initial Post T. II. W.,"
thence cast 20 chnins. thenco north 20
chains, thonce west 20 chnins. thenco north
20 chnins, thenco west 40 chnins, thonce
south 40 chains, moro or loss, to shore
line; thonce following shore line to point
of commencement, containing 240 ncres
more or less.
8t T. 11. WATSON.
Port Simpson, B. C, Aug. 10, 1000.
COAL
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo;Collieries.
New Wellington Coal.
The best household coal in the market at
current rates.   Anthracite coal for sale.'.
Dealers >n Cord and Cut Wood.
34 Broad Street.
VICTORIA
Phone 647
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
ilnys nfter dnte I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands nnd
Works for a licence to prospect for conl,
nsphaltum nnd petroleum on lnnds loented
on Graham Island, Queen Chnrlotte group,
nliout seven miles from the west const
thereof and described ns follows:
Commencing nt n post plnnted nt the
northwest corner nnd mnrked "Initial Post
No. 1, C. D. Emmons's N. W. corner" nnd
running south 80 chnins; thence enst 80
ehnlns; thence nortli 80 chnins; thence west
80 ehnlns to plnce of commencement, containing 040 ncres.
Located August 1st,  1000.
C. D. EMMONS.
JOHN  COOPER
Taxidermist and Fur Dresser
Mounting Large Game Heads
a Specialty.
826 PENDER STREET,
VANCOUVER
British American
Trust Company,
Limited.
OFFICES : Vancouver, R. C.
Grand Fork*, B. C.
Victoria, B.C.
Transacts a General Financial and
Fiduciary Business. Acts as Executor, Administrator, Trustee, etc.
Buys and Sells High Grade Investment Securities. Manages, buys,
sells, rents and appraises real estate. Collects Rents and Places
Insurance. Negotiates Loans on
Heal E»tate. Makes Loans on
High Grade Securities.
Correspondence Solicited.
HAROLD M. DALY, Manager
VICTORIA,   B. C.
Old Fashioned
Furniture,
Old China,
Brass and Copper
46 Douglas Street, Victoria |
Mr*. M. E. MacLeod,
Opposlt*
Thos. R. Cusacl
FOR FINE PRINTIN THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 25 1906.
NOTICE Is hereby given tliat Tliirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
nsphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queeu Charlotte group,
about eight miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, E. S. Eskridge's N. E. corner," and
running south 80 chains; thence west SO
mains; 'thence north 80 chains; thence east
!0 chains to place of commencement, confining 610 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
R.   S.   ESK'RIDGE.
, NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
fays after date I Intend to apply to the
3ou. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
JVMks for a licence to prospect for coal,
Ispkuituni and petroleum on lands located
|n Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
|bout   ten   miles   from    the   west    coast
hereof and described as follows:
; Commencing at a post planted at the
jnituwest corner and mnrked "Initial Post
to. 1, J. D. Meeuaeh's S. W. corner," and
Tinning  north 80  chnins;   thenee  east  80
halus; thence south 80 chains; thence west
chuins to the place of commencement,
bntainliig 640 acres.
'■ Located August 1st, 1906.
J. D. MEENACH.
j NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
Jays after date I intend to apply to the
Ion.   Chief   Commissioner of   Lnnds   and
Jta'ks for a licence to prospect for ,conl,
Isphultum and petroleum on lands located
lb Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
■bout  flve   miles   from   the   west    coast
tiereof nnd described as follows:
s Commencing   nt   n post plnuted   nt   tne
outhtmst corner and marked "Initial post
Jio. 1, Walter Onkes's S. E. corner" and run-
ling north 80 chuins; thence west 80 chains;
nience   south   80   chains;   thence   east  80
huins to place of commencement, contaln-
610 acres.
I. Located August 1st, 1906.
WALTER OAKES.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
[Jays aft™ dute I Intend  to apply to the
uu.   Chief  Commissioner of   Lnnds  and
Viorts for a licence to prospect for conl,
Ksphultum and petroleum on lnnds loented
fn Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
(bout six miles from the west const
(hereof nnd described ns follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
llorthwost corner and marked "Initial Post
Ko. 1, G. A. Brown's N. W. corner" and
limning south 80 chains; thence enst 80
[huins; thence north 80 chnins; thence west
chnins to plnce of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Loented August 1st, 1906.
G.  A.  BROWN.
, NOTICE is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
Jinys after date I Intend to apply to the
Eon. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd
RVorks for u licence to prospect tor coal,
Jisphnltmn nnd petroleum on lnnds loented
Im Graham Islnnd, Queen Charlotte group,
(bout six miles from the west const
fhereof nnd described ns follows:
Commencing nt n post planted nt the
lorthwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, S. U. -Williams's X. W. corner" and
funning south 80 chains; thence east 80
Ihnlns; thence north 80 chains; thence west
BO chnins to plnce of commencement, coti-
Inlnlng 640 acres.
Loented August 1st, 1900.
S. C. WILLIAMS.
I NOTICE is hereby giveu thnt Thirty (30)
Jinys nfter dnte I intend to npply to the
pon. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd
Porks for a licence to prospect for coal,
Jsplialtum nnd petroleum on lands located
In Graham Islnnd, Queen Charlotte group,
■bout flve miles from the west const
thereof nnd described ns follows:
Commencing nt n post plnnted nt the
linrtheast corner nnd marked "Initial Post
Eo. 1, G. E. tlenrdsleo's N. E. corner" nnd
Tunning south 80 chains; thence west 80
|hnlns; thence north 80 chnins; thence east
chains to place of commencement, con-
|alniiig 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
G. E. BEARiDRLEE.
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
Bays after date I Intend to apply to the
pon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
JFiOirks for a licence to prospect for coal,
Ssphultmn nnd petroleum on lnnds loented
Ml Grnhum Islnnd. Queen Charlotte group,
about nine miles from the west const
[hereof nnd described ns follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
lonthenst corner nnd mnrked "Initial Post
J!o. 1, D. II. .Tnrvls's S. E. corner" nnd nulling north 80 enn Ins; thence west 80 chains:
Ihence south 80 chains; thence east 80
Ihnlns to plnce of commencement, contnin-
pg 640 ucres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
D.  H. .TARVIS.
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
Bays after dnte I Intend to npply to the
pou. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd
Porks for a licence to prospect for coal.
Isphnltum nnd petroleum on lnnds located
lu Grnhnm Islnnd, Queen Charlotte group,
(bout six miles from the west coast
(hereof nnd described ns follows:
Commencing at n post planted nt the
louthwest corner nnd mnrked "Initial Post
No. 1, G. J. Hodge's S. W. corner" and
Ijlnnlng north SO chnins; thence enst 80
pains: thence south 80 chnins; thence west
ft) chuins to plnce of commencement, confining 640 ncres.
I Loented August 1st, 1900.
G. J. HODGE.
j NOTICE Is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
lays nfter dnte I Intend to npply to the
Ton. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd
r/'OiiitB for n licence to prospect for conl.
Jsphnltnni nnd petroleum on lnnds loented
li Grnhum Islnnd, Queen Charlotte group,
Ihniit six miles from the west coast
liereof nnd described ns follows:
\ Commencing nt a post planted at the
tmthwest corner nnd marked "Initial Post
lo. 1, F. M. Mtinger's S. W. corner" and
linnlng nortli 80 chnins; thence enst 80
linlns; thence south 80 chnins; thenee west
l> chnins to plnce of commencement, con-
Vnlng 640 ncres.
1 Located August 2nd, 1900.
F. M, MCNGER.
[NOTICE Is hereby given flint Thirty (30)
liys nfter dnte I Intend to apply to the
Ion. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd
forks for n licence to prospect for con'.
Jphultum and petroleum on lands located
Grnhnm Islnnd, Queen Charlotte group,
limit seven miles from the west coast
lereof nnd described ns follows:
[Commencing nt n post plnnted nt the
prthenst corner nnd mnrked "Initlnl Post
li. 1. H. P. Fogh's N. E. corner" nnd riming south 80 chnins; ithence west 80
pains; thence north 80 chnins; thence east
80 ohains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located Aogust 2nd, 1900.
H.  P. FOGH.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days nfter date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
nsphaltum and petroleum on lands located
ou Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about seven miles from the west const
thereof und described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, Edgar C. iFogh's S. E. corner" and
running north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thenee south 80 chains; thenee east
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 040 ncres.
Loented August 2nd, 1906.
EDGAR C. FOGH.
NOTICE is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
dnys nfter dnte I Intend to npply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
nsphnltuin und petroleum on lunds loented
on Grnhnm Islnnd, Queen Charlotte group,
about seven miles from the west coast
thereof and described ns follows:
Commencing nt u post plnnted nt the
southwest oorner nnd mnrked "Initial Post
No. 1, H. L. Emmons's S. W. corner" nnd
running north 80 chnins; thence east 80
chnins; thence south 80 chnins; thence west
80 chnins to place of commencement, containing  640  ncres.
Loented August 2nd,  1006.
II. L. EMMONS.
NOTICE Is hereby given thut Thirty (30)
dnys nfter date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for n licence to prospect for coal,
usphnltum and petroleum on lnnds located
on Grnhnm Islnnd, Queen Charlotte group,
nbout seven miles from the west const
thereof nnd described ns follows:
Commencing at n post plnnted nt the
northwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, Victor Vlgelius's N. W. corner" and
running south SO chains; thence enst 80
chnins; thence north 80 chuins; thence west
SO chnins to plnce of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Loented August 2nd, 1906.
VICTOR VIGELIUS.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
dnys nfter dnte I intend to apply to the
Hou. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd
Works for a licence to prospect for conl,
nsphnltuin nnd petroleum on lnnds loented
on Grnhnm Islnnd, Queen Charlotte group,
nbout flve miles from the west const
thereof nud described ns follows:
Commencing nt n post plnnted nt the
northeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, M. G. Munley'91 N. E'. corner" and
running south 80 chains; thence west 80
chnins; thence north 80 chains; thence enst
SO chnins to place of commencement, containing 640 ncres.
Loented August 1st,  1006.
M. G. M'UNLEY.
NOTICE is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
ilnvs nfter dnte I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd
Works for n licence to prospect for conl,
asphultum and petroleum on lands loented
on Grnhnm Islnnd, Queen Charlotte group,
about flve miles from the west const
thereof nnd described ns follows:
Commencing ut n post plnnted nt t'he
Bouthenst corner nnd marked "Initial Post
No. 1, E. H. Guie's S. E. corner" and running north 80 chains; thence west 80
chuins; thenee south 80 chnins; thenee cast
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 ncres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
E.   II.  GUIE.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
dnys after dute I Intend to npply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd
Works for n licence to prospect for conl,
nsphaltum and petroleum on lnnds loented
on Graham Islnnd, Queen Charlotte group,
nbout seven miles from the west const
thereof nnd described ns follows:
Commencing nt a post planted at the
southeast corner nnd mnrked "Initiul Post
No. 1, W. Lnngille's S. E. comer" nnd running north 80 chnins; thence west SO
chnins; thence south 80 chains; thence east
SO chains to place of commencement, continuing 640 ncres.
Loented August 1st, 1906.
W. LANGTLLE.
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
dnys nfter date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd
Works for n licence to prospect for conl,
nsphaltum and petroleum on lnnds located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
nbout flve miles from the west const
thereof nud described ns follows:
Commencing nt n post planted at the
northwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, W. P. Flint's N. W. corner" and
running south 80 chains; thenee east SO
chains; thence nortli 80 chains; tiience
west SO chains to place of commencement,
containing 640 acres.
Located August 2nd, 1006.
W. P.  FLINT.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
dnys nfter dnte I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd
Works for a licence to prospect for conl.
nsphnltuin nnd petroleum on binds loented
on Grnhuiii Islnnd, Queen Charlotte group,
nbout six miles from the west const
thereof nnd described ns follows:
Commencing nt n post plnnted nt the
northwest corner nnd marked "Initlnl Post
No, 1. F. W. Crury's N. W. corner" nnd
running south SO chnins; thence enst 80
chains; thence nortli SO chnins; thence west
SO chnins tn plnce of commencement, con-
tulnlng 640 ncres.
Loented August 2nd, 1906.
F. W. CRARY.
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
days nfter dnte I Intend to npply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for' n licence to prospect for coal,
usphnltum nnd petroleum on lnnds loented
on Grnhnm Islnnd. Queen Charlotte group,
nbout seven miles from the west const
thereof nnd described ns follows:
Commencing nt n post plnnted nt the
northeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, ,T. Albert Johnson's N. E. corner"
and running south 80 chains: thence east
80 ehnlns: thenee north SO chnins: thence
west 80 chnins to place of commencement,
containing 640 ncres.
Loented August 2nd,  1006.
.T.  ALBERT .TOIINSO.v
Early to bed and early to rise won't
help you a bit if you don't advertise.
Every dog has his day, the trouble
being that so many dogs chooose the
same day.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date 1 Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
usphnltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about eight miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at u post planted at the
northwest corner on the bank of a stream
running Into Yakoun river and marked
"Initial post No. 1, H. W. Treat's N. W.
corner," and running east 80 chains; thence
south SO chains; thence west 80 chains;
theuee north 80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
H. W. TREAT.
TIMBER   LICENSE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, thirty
(30) days after date, I Intend to apply to
the Hon. the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated In Port Renfrew,
Renfrew District: Commencing at a post
planted at the southeast corner of Section
Eighteen (18), Township Ten (10), marked
"Alexr. Young, S. E. Corner," thence
eighty chains west; thence eighty chains
north; thence eighty chains east; thence
eighty chains south to the place of commencement,  containing 610 acres.
Dated  at   Port   Renfrew   this  11th  duy
of August, 1006.
aul8 ALEX.  YOUNG.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I, the undersigned, will apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to lease or purchase
the following described land, namely, ln
Hesnlt Harbor, Tlupana Arm, Nootka
Sound, commencing at a post marked J.
Mortimer, Southeast Corner, running 40
chains west, thence north to shore line,
thence following the shore line to the
point of commencement, containing 80
acres, more or less.
Victoria, B.  C, July  11th, 1906.
<W18 JOHN   MORTIMER.
No. 27.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, 1
intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
ot Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber irom the
following; described land, situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,   Rupert  District:
.beginning at a post planted near the
initial post of Application No. 20, thence
east 40 chains, thence south SO chains
west 80 chains, north SO chains, east 10
chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
Kyuquot Soundj June 14, 1306.
JOHN HIKSCH.
No. 28.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,  Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted on the
west side of Union Island about 20 chains
south of a group of small islands in Blind
Entrance, thence 80 chains east, thence 60
cnains north, thence 40 chains west,
thence 40 chains north, thence west about
20 chains to the shore of Blind Entrance,
thence southerly along said shore to
point of commencement.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
Claim No. 2.
Notice is hereby given that, two months
after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Worka
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands: Commencing at a post
planted at the south end of a rocky kndU
about 20 chains south of the head of a
small bay Inside Rocky Island, Kennedy
Lake, thence east eighty (SO) chains,
thence north eighty (SO) chains, thence
west eighty (80) chains, thence south
eighty (80) chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or loss.
P. NORGAR,
Per M. J. HAUGEN, Agent.
May 29th, 1906.
Notice is hereby given that, 60 days
atter date, I intend to apply to the Hon
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a lease of the foreshore opposite Lots
45, 46 and 47, Esquimalt District.
ALBERT A. ARGYLE.
Vancouver, B. C, July 4th, 1906.
Notice is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a lease of the foreshore opposite Lots
53 and 54, Metchosln District.       •
ALBERT A. ARGYLE.
Vancouver, B. C, July 4th, 1906.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the west half
of southeast quarter and west half of
northeast quarter, all ln Section 8, Township 6, Coast Range 5, Bulkley Valley;
containing one hundred and sixty (160)
acres, more or less.
Dated July 25th, 1906.
"hH ERNEST MORIN.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the southwest
quarter section 17, Township 6, Coast
Range 5, Bulkley Valley; containing (160)
one hundred and sixty acres, more or less.
JOS.  BOURGON.
Aldermere,  July 25,  1906. aull
_, ,     ., NOTICE.
Claim No. %.
Further take notice that 30 days after
~',1!Aintend to apply to the Honorable
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
tor a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described
lands, commencing at post planted at the
N. E. corner of T. L. 7197, or on the line
at corner of said claim, thence W. 80
chains, N. 80 ohains, E. 80 chains, S. 80
chains to point of commencement.
Dated this ISth day of July, 1906.
p. Mcdonald.
Claim No. 2.
Take notice that 30 days after date 1
intend to apply lo the Honorable Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for a
special license to cut and carry away
timber from the following described
lands: Commencing at post planted 30
chalna from S, W. come, on the line of
T. L. 7197, thence N. 80 chains, thence W.
80 chains, S. 80 chains, E. 80 chains to
point of commencement.
Dated this 18th day of July, 1906.
p. Mcdonald.
No. 20.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
Intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lauds and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Tahsish Arm, Kyuquot Sound, Rupert
District:
Beginning at a post planted on the
east boundary of Application No. 13,
about 60 chains south of the northeast
corner thereof, Ihence east 160 chains,
ihence north 40 chains, thence west 160
chains, thence south along said boundary
40 chains to point of commencement.
Kyuquot Sound. June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. 21.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
Intend lo apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut nnd carry away timber from the
following described land, situate nn
Kyuquot   Sound,  Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted at the
southeast corner of No. 8 Application on
Tahsish Arm, Ihence north along the east
boundary of No. 8 40 chains, ihence easl
SO chains, Ihence north 40 chnins, tiience
cast 80 chains, thence south about 20
chains to the shore, thence following the
shore southwesterly to poinl of commencement, containing 640 acres more or
less.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. 22.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works lor a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,  Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Application No. 8 on
Kokshittle Arm, thence east 40 chains,
north 8) chains, west 60 chains, south to
the shore of Kokshittle Arm, thence
southeasterly along said shore to get one
mile of southing, thence east about 40
chains to a point north of the Initial
stake, thence south 40 chains to point of
commencement.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. 23.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
Intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
tbe Ka-o-wlncb River, Kokshittle Arm,
Kyuquot  Sound,  Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted on the
north boundary about 20 chains west of
the northeast corner of Application No.
7, on Hie east bank of the Ka-o-wlnch
Ulver, thence east 20 chain's, north 160
chains, cast 20 chnins to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or
kss.
Kyuquot Sound. June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
Notice is hereby given that, sixty days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following
described land on Skeena River, in Range
V., Coast District: Commencing at N. E.
corner of Kitsilas Indian Reserve at post
marked "H. M., S. E. corner"; ihence
north 80 chains; thence west about 40
chains to Skeena River; thence following
the meandering of the Skeena Kiver to
Intersection of Kitsilas Reserve northern
boundary line and river; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement, containing 400 acres, more or less.
. H. MORRELL.
Kitsilas, May 28th, 1906.
Notice Is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Honorable Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
south half of Section 16, i'ownship 4,
Range 5, Bulkley Valley, containing 320
acres, more or less.
JOSEPH BEAUDOIN, Locator.
Notice Is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I Intend to apply to Lie Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works tor
permission to purchase Section Seventeen,
Township four, Range live, Coast District, Bulkley Valley, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
JAMES McKINNON, Locator.
J. E. BATEMAN, Agent,
Aldermere, B. C, May 15th, 1906.
Notice is hereby given that, 00 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following
described land on the Skeena River, In
Range V., Coast District: Starling from
a post marked "N. M„ S. E.," placed
about 20 chains south of the S. W. corner of Lot 353, and thence north about
100 chains to the left bank of the Skeena
Kiver; thence following southwesterly
said bank to the north boundary of Lot
3o4; thence east and south along the norih
and east boundaries of said Lot 354 to Its
S. E. corner, and thence east 25 chains
about to point of commencement.
N. MILLER.
May 19th, 1906.
Claim No. 1.
Notice is hereby given that, two months
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands: Commencing at a post
planted at the south end or a rocky
knoll about 20 chains south of the head
of a small bay inside Rocky Island,
Kennedy Lake, thence east elghly (Hi)
chains, thence south eighty (80) chains,
thence west eighty (80) chains, ihence
north eighty (80) chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or
PAUL WOLEN,
Per M. J. HAUGEN, Agent.
May 29th, 1906.
No. 24.
Take notice that, 30 days afier date, I
intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lauds and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,  Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted on the
south shore of Narrow Gut Inlet, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 40 chains,
thonce nortli 40 chains, thence east 80
Ohains, ihence about 40 chains north to
the shore of Narrow Gut Inlet, thence
following tlie shore in a westerly direction to point of commencement, containing 640 ncres more or less.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIKSCH.
No. 25.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
intend to apply to the Chiei Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away Umber from thc
following described lnnd. situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,   Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted at the
southeast corner of Applicn'lon No. 1, on
Kokshittle Arm, thence west SO chains,
thence south 80 chains, thence east SO
chains, thence norLh SO chains to point of
commencement, containing 040 acres more
or less.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. 26.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
Intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described lnnd, situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,   Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted on the
cast side of a river unnamed entering Into Clan nlnlck Harbor nbout 1% miles
from the mouth, thence ens'. 60 chains,
north 80 chains, wesl 80 chnins, south 80
chnln3, east 20 chnins to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or
less.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
Claim No. 3.
Notice is hereby given that, two months
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from tlie following described lands: Commencing at a post
planted at the head of a small bay near
the mouth of Elk River, Kennedy Lake,
thence south eighty (SO) chains, thence
east eighty (80) chains, thence north
eighty (80) chains, thence west eighty (80)
chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
M. J. HAUGEN.
July 4th, 1906.
Claim No. 4.
Notice is hereby given that, two months
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands: Commencing at post planted
20 chains east of D. W. Moore's N W
corner post, near the mouth of Elk River'
thence east eighty (80) chains, thence
n.0IL^ e'Khtytan chains, thence west
eighty (80) chains, thence south "ighty
(80) chains to point of commencement,
containing 640 acres, more or less.
W. F. TEETZEL,
Per M. J. HAUGEN, Agent.
May 29th, 1906.
Claim No. a.
Notice is hereby given that, two months
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
tor a special license to cut and carry
away limber from the following described lands: Commencing from a post planted at the northeast corner of a small
lake about one mile east of Kennedy
Lake, which appears to be the head
waters of Maggio Lake, marked A. M.'s
N. W. corner post, thence east eighty
(80) chains, thence south eighty (SO)
chains, thenco west eighty (SO) chains,
thence north eighty (SO) chains, to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
A. MACKAY,
May 30th, 1906.
Claim No  6.
Notice is hereby given that, two mouths
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands: Commencing from a post planted at the northeast corner of a small lake
about one mile easi u, xvennedy Lake,
which appears lo be lhe head waters of
Maggio Lake, S. J. F.'s S. W. corner
post, ihence east one hundred and sixty
U00) chains, Ihence north forty (40)
chains, thence west one hundred i'nd
sixly (IM) chains, ihence south forty
(40) chains lo point of commencement,
containing 040 acres, more or less.
li. J. KL	
May 2Srd, 1906.
Notice Is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for special license to cut and carry away
timber from the following described land
in Port Renfrew District, Vancouver Island, on the west side of the Gordon
River, adjoining A. Wheeler's claim on
the southeast corner. Commencing at a
post on the northeast corner marked J.
Young's northeast corner, thence south
80 chains, west 80 chains, norih 80 chains,
and east SO chains to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres. Locat-
ed June 9th. 1906. ^ ^^
Notice is hereby given thai, 30 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lauds and Works
for special license to cut and carry away
timber from the following described land
in Port Renfrew District, Vancouver Island, adjoining A. E. Mannell's claims on
the southeast corner: Commencing at a
post on the northeast miner marked A.
Wheeler's (jr.) northeast cuiner, tnence
south 80 chains, west 80 chains, norih 80
chains, and east 80 chains to lhe place
of commencement,  containing 640 acres.
Located June 9th, 1906.
A. WHEELER, Jl
Notice Is Hereby given that, 00 days
after dale, I intend to apply ' > the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lunds and works
for •permission to purchase ihe following
described land on the Skeett* Kiver,
Range V.. Coast District: Starling from a
post located at the northeast corner of
the Kltsila3 Indian Reserve, and marked
"E. J. MoGeaohle, S. W. comer"; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence west 40
chains to point of commencement, containing 100 acres, more or less.
E, J.  MoGEACllie..
Kitsilas, May 28th, 1900.
Notice is hereby given that, 00 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and works
for permission to purchase the following
described lnnd, situated on the head of
the Bulkly Kiver: Commencing at a posi
marked K. 13., N. W. corner, ihence running west 00 chains; thence south 00
chains; thence east CO chains; ihence
north 00 chains to point of commencement, and containing 4S0 acres,  more or
W. N. CLARK, Locator.
Bulkly Valley, July 3^1906^
Notice is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I Intend lo apply to tlie Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase ihe following
described land on the Skeena River,
Range V., Coast District: Commencing at
a post located at the S. W. comer of E.
J. McGcachle's land and marked "J. M.
McGeachle's N. W. corner"; thence
smith 40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence west 40
chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more or less.
J.   M.  McGEACHIE.
Kitsilas, May 28th, 1906.
Notice Is hereby given that, sixly days
after dnte, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Ccmmlssloner of Lands and Worka
for permission to purchase thc following
described land on the right bank of the
Skeena River, Range V., Coast District:
Commencing at a post marked "James
J. Trorey, Initial pnst," at the N. B. corner of the New Town Indian Reserve,
thence west, along the Indlnn Reserve
line, 40 chains: thonce north 40 chains;
thenco east 40 chnins; thence south nlong
the Skeenn River to point of commencement, containing 100 acres, more or less.
JAMES J. TROREY.
Skeena River, Mny 24th, 1906. r
imm
10
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 25. 1906.
M
* A Lady's Letter f
♦ By  BABETTE. *f
if if
_J»«-«aA»efe >_««-» oOcet»ai»0-»a<»e->oOo
Dear Madge,—
On the whole the greatest successes
scored by the corselet mode have been
in such soft and clinging fabrics as
crepe de chine and voile. A survival
which struck me as being pre-eminently
of the fittest was a corselet skirt of
black crepe de chine modelled to the
figure by some almost unperceptible
means, braces of the same material be
ing drawn through square silver buckles
and crossed at the back. Beneath it
was worn a blouse of finest band-embroidered lawn, slightly ivory in tint,
the sleeves of which consisted of three
frills, the lowest barely clearing the
elbow. This fall all shades of browns,
and the sere and yellow tones will be
very fashionable, and that some of these
soft and mellow shades are most charming no one will deny.
Lace coats remain amongst the most
popular vogues of the lawn both for
tea frocks and dinner gowns.   To accompany them shirts of soft plain fabrics such as minon, Marguerite and the
ubiquitous crepe de chine are the correct    wear, flat    graduated    tucks    or
flounces being preferred to lace insertions as a decorative detail.    Fine sick
muslin makes an  ideal tea frock, surmounted   by  a  coat   of  Irish   guipure
bordered with white moire cut on the
cross and finished with buttons of fire
old   paste   or  porcelain  colored   laces
are still very much to the fore on smart
Paris   gowns.    The   latest   idea   is   to
utilise two shades of the same color for
the long  lace garments  aforesaid.    A
very stylish three-quarter coat seen recently was of pearl-grey lace with a
deep bordering of the same several tones
deeper in hue.   This combination gives
an effect that is "chic" in the extreme.
Of late the ear-ring has become one
of the most important details  of the
toilette, as no ornament is more subservient to the changes and chances of
fashion none needs to be so frequently
renewed.    The  barbaric  gipsy  circlet
has for the moment given place to the
single pearl, large or small, and other
single stones, also clusters of stones of
graduated size set tandem so to speak.
Challoner & Mitchell, who are always a
reliable authority on matters of fashion,
are  showing some  delightful  ear-rings
at present.   The same firm has an exquisite assortment of hair combs, particularly  charming   some   for  evening
wear  with  delicate  French  designs  in
brilliants running along the backs.
Art is the visible. expression of all
that is good in human nature and of a
belief in the beautiful. "Beauty is
truth, truth beauty that is all we know
on earth, all we need to know." All
that is good in decoration is old, all
that is new is not good. The newest
English "as she is spoke" is slang; the
new art is not art but vulgarity and
banality. We have wandered too far
from Nature, too perilously near the
grotesque—L'Art Noveau—the latest
and most banal expression of our decorative art. We have borrowed from
the Japanese, but unlike the Japanese
we do not know where to stop and have
"run atntik" in our decorative madness.
Reaction, however, has set in, a tendency to hark back to the fine old
models of the past based upon "motifs"
taken from Nature and geometry, the
only two decorative bases not built on
sand. The Roman acanthus and the
fleur-de-lis came direct from the flora
of Egypt; every 'motif" in the Renaissance period goes back in its origin
4,000 years to the palm.' papyrus, and
lotus, and is the outcome of ancient
Egyptian art. Even from the animal
kingdom "motifs" were culled; the
claw-foot which we sec on Chippendale
chairs was Roman, the griffin, the dolphin, the bull, the serpent, and the
eagle have all become classical factors
in design. From the knowledge of geometry were developed the beautiful
Moorish panelled ceilings and fretwork, Gothic symmetry of design, Greek
and Roman diaper patterns. Then temperament is one of the chief influences
Puritan spirit is revealed in the Jacobean style and so on. Through all the
brilliant history of French furniture
and decorative art the mercurial temperament of the French people can be
traced.
Now it is a sad and strange fact,
in the present day, that there are comparatively speaking so few people who
have the true sense of color, and therefore so many decorative schemes are
marred and spoilt by the crudeness and
lack of harmony in their coloring. If
the room is done in white, as, as so
many rooms are nowadays, the scale of
color must be of the most delicate-pale
yellow, pink, pale green, and even a
soft shade of mauve or blue. The carpet and all the hangings in a white
room should be light in color and soft
in tone. Therefore it is obvious that
to obtain success in decorating, and.
arranging our homes it is necessary to
consult with a reliable firm who make
a specialty of furnishings and decorating, such as Weiler Bros, Apropos of
decorative art a visit to the Melrose Co.
on Fort street will soon convince one
that Victoria is far from being behind
in this matter for their display of
choice and dainty wall coverings is certainly all that can be desired in artistic
dignity and refinement.
Nemo has been highly recommended
to me as being the best food for children, so if your little ones, to use a vulgar phrase, are 'off their feed," give
them "Nemo."
Oh, Madge, have you been to the
skating rink on Fort street? Do you
know it quite recalls my giddiest days
when I get into the gay whirl and hear
the music of the skates. All the smart
people are patronizing the rink now, and
the management is excellent. Take a
turn, my dear. You will not be disappointed.
BABETTE.
MUSIC AND STAGE.
About twelve years ago a trick vy-
clist who could do a few turns with his
wheel was engaged by the Delmonico
theatre to amuse the assemblage in front
of the old Government street music
hall. The cyclist was an ordinary one,
of the class so plentiful then. But Bud
Snyder did not remain an ordinary cyclist. He left Victoria one summer
morning and the western outpost heard
of him no more until one day the name
of Bud Snyder appeared at the head
of the list of attractions at the famous
London Hippodrome, then on Hemmer-
stein's bills, and elsewhere. The cyclist
had developed into a performer who was
at the head of his class, and he is now
back in Victoria again playing at the
Grand theatre, with a salary of $350 in
his pay envelope each week. His performance is a clever one, consisting of
many tricks, which must have cost considerable practice. He plays a musical
instrument by striking pendant chimes
with the front wheel of a jumping bicycle, baults from bench to bench, and
from step to step over a ladder-way
with every other step holding a prostrate small boy, and also there are
tricks galore performed while on the
top of a platform high above the stage;
but the thrilling feature is the climax
in which he springs from a platform to
the end of a springboard, vaulting a
companion cyclist into the air to turn a
complete somersault, bicycle and all.
The Arion Club concert at Gorge
Park on Monday was a great success.
Everything conspired to make thc function enjoyable. A perfect summer night,
delightful surroundings and a band of
first rate artists. The various choruses were rendered in first class style
and Mr. A. T. Goward sang splendidly.
In the absence of Mr. Russell the baton
was wielded by Mr. Herbert Kent. It
is estimated that not less than 5,000
people were present, which goes to
prove what The Week has long contended, that Victorians will always turn
out to hear good music in the open air.
The Gorge Park is already more than
realizing the expectations of the B. C.
E. R. Co. as a popular resort.
We are indebted to Mr. Leary for
the following "true" story:—
A little Eton boy invited to dinner at
to which decorative art always has and j Windsor Castle and being asked by the
always will be  subjected.    The sturdi-' Queen what he would like, replied:
ness of the Dutch character finds its J    "One of those tuppenny tarts, if you
expression   in   Dutch   furniture.      The ■ please, ma'am."
|U/NT|^p   This  is  the  advertisement which HAYOR MORLEY
REFUSED TO SANCTION after our Ad. Agent had
arranged for It. His excuse was that The Week had
criticized his conduct as Mayor!!! We are running the Advertisement gratis
hi the interests of Victoria and the Provincial Exhibition.
1906
PROVINCIAL EXHIBITION
AT VICTORIA, B. C.
SEPT. 25 TO 29
$10,000 in Premiums and Valuable Special Prizes.
3 Days' Horse Racing, $3,000 IN PRIZES
Grand Stock Parades Daily, ih.LBtest stock in the Province
BANDS,   SPORTS,   GAMES
AND NEW EXCITING ATTRACTIONS.
§.l(\f\   in   D_*-*--o and Champion Belt of British Columbia for
•P-Vuu in rrue&    bronco busting competitions.
WRITE FOR PRIZE LISTS
A. J. MORLEY, Mayor, President. J, E. SMART, Secretary.
a FEATURE of the
**• Semi-ready trousers—one found no place
else than high grade
custom tailoring—is the
high waist.
The waist is made to
fit perfectly and yet give
comfort—plenty of cloth
— as you can see for
yourself.
There are straps on
the back of each pair to
tighten—but you won't
need them; these trousers fit.
The legs are neatly
_ shaped — conventional
in width and "set" beautifully.
Delivered two hours after trying on.
Bo WILLI A
68-7© Yates Street,   SOLE AGENTS.
At $10, $12, $15, #18, $20, $22 and $25.
TROUSERS—At $3, $4, $5, and $6.
TWO THOUSAND GARMENTS CARRIED IN STOCK AT THE
SEHI-READY wardrobe

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