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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Sep 8, 1906

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 troTToTnroToTo'roTroTJTcTJTo^
Bank of Hamilton
Capital $2,500,000
Reserve $2,500,000
Total Assets, $29,000,000 }
Interest paid half-yearly on deposits of
$1 and upwards in Savings Department.
Drafts and Money Orders on all parts of
the world. Vancouver Branches, cor.
of Hasting and Hamilton Sts., Powell St,
Cedar Grove. .
SULSLSUiSLSiiSjiliSniSU
The
TL Provincial Review and Magazine.
^ToTroTToTnroTro-vinrsTrrox»o>'Q
Pacific Coast Realty Co. Ld
Telephone 1086
Offices, 12 MacGregor Block.
Lands, City Lots, Timber.
P. 0. Drawer762, Victoria, B.C.
ULSLSULSLjLajLJLjLAJL^^
BE
)VoL. III.   No.
VICTORIA AND   VANCOUVER    B. C, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1906.
One Dollar Per Annum
he Editor's Review
Of Current Topics.
Jro Bono
lublico.
The Week is requested
by Mr.    Muskett,   the
Secretary of the Lieut-
lovernor, to announce that the re-
iption to be held in the Parliament
uildings on the 17th inst. by the
overnor-General  will be    open to
e public without  any restriction,
ind that every citizen of Victoria
be welcome.   Those who do not
iort a dress suit will be equally
elcome with those who   do.     No
isonal invitations will be issued,
nd His ExcelSncy and the Lieut.-
overnor hope that   the    ceremony
ill develop upon the    lines of a
opular democratic   assembly.   The
eek has the greatest possible plea-
,ure in making this announcement,
ind in recognizing the broad spirit
n which the celebration has been
onceived.   It is only a few years
ince a reception of Earl and Coun-
ess Minto, announced to be held in
he City Hall, Montreal, had to be
bandoned because of the ridiculaus
nsistence of Col. Maude that a'dmis-
iion should be by   invitation, and
|hat  evening dress should be "en
eglr."   Earl Grey has shown him-
lelf to be a thoroughly democratic
Ifovernor, and has  been  singularly
t.appy in dealing with Canadian sen-
[Jment.   We bespeak for him a loyal
welcome to the city of Victoria and
Is hearty a hand-shake from its citi-
[ens as he could desire.
|t Belated    On    Wednesday,    the
lianifesto.    29th   of   August,   the
Vancouver World pub-
'ished an editorial directly charging
hat the Victoria Colonist was own-
id and    controlled    by    influential
fhinese capitalists.   Thursday passed, Friday passed,    and    Saturday
assed without comment on the part
f the Colonist.    On Saturday the
iVeek, while refraining from any expression of opinion, asked a simple
uestion   in    Chinese     characters,
Who finances the Colonist?"   No
oubt it was purely a matter of ac-
ident that on Sunday morning it
iias deemed necessary by the man-
ceuienf to publish a   two   column
xplanation, which explains nothing
xcept that the Colonist is neither
iwned nor   controlled    by Chinese
apital, but that the  actual owner
a loyal British subject, sax not
ated.   Probably the    public were
itended and assisted to draw their
wn conclusion   from   the   circum-
ance that in   immediate conjunction with the editorial manifesto ap-
Wed a large advertisement head-
| "The Woman in the Case."   If
is juxtaposition has    any signifi-
lce it would have   tended some-
at to allay public anxiety as to
e future of so important a paper
The Colonist had Mr. Galletly and
r. Gibb mentioned the purchaser's
me in their letter.    It is not a
tter of unimportance for it to be
own who owns the oldest and most
fiuential journal in the Province),
d  that  the  management thought
to allay public apprehension on
t subject by dissolving one doubt
sufficient justification for e.?pect-
: that it would resolve the other.
<wever, it would appear that   for
sons which   are   perfectly legiti
mate, and which should not be inquired into too closely, the actual
ownership is not to be disclosed, and
the public must be satisfied with
the announcement that for twenty-
five years at least the policy of the
Colonist is to be dictated and con-
ti oiled by Mr. J. S. H. Matson. By
that time we opine that the present
owner will not be much concerned
about the matter. Apart from this
belated declaration, which will inspire confidence wherever it is read,
it is interesting to learn that  the
maintenance of a high standard in
the public life of the Dominion the
largest hall in the city would hau-
been too small to accommodate tha
crowds which itfould have flocked
to hear him. Because Mr. Shearer
is a minister of the Gospel, and has
been largely identified in the work
of the Alliance with other minister*,
it has been erroneously assumed by
hostile critics that he was simply
leading a church movement. Even
his critics are beginning to realise
that this is a narrow view to talo.:,
both of the man and his work. Tb".
fact is that Mr. Shearer has beeti
working upon a broader platfuin,
and his propaganda has attracted
many willing workers who would
have held aloof from a purely relig-
the fore-front of the battle for Sun-
day Observance, and all the higher j
moralities dependent upon it. Not
the least gratifying circumstance of
Mr. Shearer's successful campaign
is the fact that while he has been
waging the fight at Ottawa two
European nations, hitherto notorious
for laxity in this regard, have passed
somewhat similar measures, and it
is not too much to hope that we
are upon the eve of a universal movement  in  the same direction.
Quack The Week is in receipt
Remedies, of an important comi-
munication from Dr. E.
F. Bashford, General Superintendent of the Imperial Cancer Research
Fund, which  in the public interest
FARMING IN THB OKANAGAN-The Home Farm, Vernon.
I
Office of the firm:
Examination Hall, Victoria Embankment, London W.C., Aug. 2nd, 1906.
Sir:
Your letter of tre 7th July has
been handed to me. I enclose a
copy of our last annual report: on
pages 4 and 11 you will see that all
the reputed and quack remedies
which have been sent to the labora--
tory to be tested have absolutely
failed to fulfill the claims made for
them. We have had a large number
of these so-called "remedies" analysed and tested, and the claims are
based, without exception, on ignorance
or credulity, or both. Judging from
my extensive experience of those
who advertise cancer remedies in
the manner commented on by yon, I
would anticipate that if this alleged
remedy were examined by me, it
would likewise fail to fulfil the
claims which the advertiser makes.
I have every sympathy with you in
your fight, and I am afraid that so
long as the public are credulous, so
long will quacks of this dangerous
type continue to flourish.
I am, sir, yours faithfully,
E. F. BASHFORD.
W. Blakemore, Esq.
Colonist will continue to support the
Conservative party and the McBride administration. The latter assurance is especially gratifying as it
effectually disposes of many rumors
to the contrary which have been
floating around ever since the Victoria bye-election. The promises
made that the paper will maintain
the high moral tone which has always characterized it are only what
were expected. The whole two col
nmn article might be boiled down lo
the following prief paragraph, "Wc
are as we always were, loyal, conservative, deadly dull, and highly
moral; we guarantee to remain so
for twenty-five years."
A Notable One of the worthiest
Reformer, of Canadian citizens
has this week paid a
visit to Victoria, in the person of
the Rev. J, G. Shearer, general secretary of the Lord's Day Alliance.
The comparatively small meetings
which he held afford no criterion of
the importance of his work. If pen-
pie realized just how much he has
done  for the  up-building and   the
ious movement. Mr. Shearer's aim
has been to secure for every Canadian the privilege of one day's rest
a week, and the right to spend that
day in any way that did not infringe
a similar right for others. That as
a minister he would like to see
everyone go to church may be accepted as a fact. But it is merely
an incident, and not a condition of
the policy he advocated, and the
legislalion he recured. In spite of
the determined opposition of vested
interests, Mr. Shearer succeeded in
carrying with him the approbation
of the Dominion and the final en-
dorsation of both legislative bodies.
The Sunday Observance Bill would
not have become law, but for his intelligence, sagacity and courage. It
will be for ever known aB "Shearer's Bill." Whatever future legislation may effect along the same
lines nothing can deprive him of the
honor of having secured for Cannda
a measure which, with all its defects,
is the best upon the statute books
of any country, and which has determined that Canada will stand in
we publish. The communication was
sent in reply to a letter asking the
opinion of Dr. Bashford upon the
advertisement of the Western Medicine Company, claiming that they
possessed a "Never-Fail" Cure for
Cancer. As the action initiated
against the editor of Ihis paper is
sub judice we refrain from making
any comment, but feel that we should
not be justified in withholding from
the public his severe strictures upon
"Reputed and Quack Remedies."
IMPERIAL CANCER   RESEARCH
FUND.
Patron. His Majesty the King.
President, H. R. H. the Prince of
Wales. Vice-presidents, Lord Lister,
Lord Strathcona & Mount Royal, G.
C. M. G., Right Hon. A. ,T. Balfour.
M.P.. Sir William Broadhent, Bart..
K.C.V.O., Sir Julius Wernher, Bart..
Mr. H. Bischoftsheiin, Mr. Waldorf
Astor. Honorary treasurer. Mr.
Henry Morris. Secretary, Mr. Fre-
General Superintendent of Research
nnd Director of the Central Labora-1
torv. Dr. E. F. Bashford.
Profane Who is responsible for
Language, the profane language
which is so prevalent
on the streets of Victorin, nnd especially from the lips of boys? It
is an undoubted fact thnt the Cnpital
City can give pointers to any other
in the Dominion in this horrible
competition of blasphemy and profanity. It assails one's ears at
every turn, and even invades the precincts of our churches. A few
weeks ago the writer was waiting on
the steps of the Roman Catholic
church when he was forced to listen
to the most depraved language from\
half a dozen boys between the ages
of twelve and sixteen, who were ac-
tnallv waiting for relatives to come
out of church. It is a mystery that
boys should be able to pick up the
words and phrases that they use.
They are not to be heard even in
the saloons, and it is impossible to
believe that boys of this tender age
are permitted to visit dens of infamy,,
and vice. Equally impossible is it
for them to acquire the habit at
school; yet they must learn somewhere. One is regretfully driven to
the conclusion that in many instances
the fathers are responsible, and if
this is so it will account for the
bravado and persistency of the offenders. Surely it is not too much
to ask that some effort be made,
both by parents and teachers, to put
a stop to this deplorable condition
of affairs.
The Goodness of Society.
Wc arc convinced that society has
never shown so high a level of good
conduct, intelligence, and public spirit
as it shows today. For one young man
who remains at home to go to the devil
there are a dozen performing the task
of the Stale under difficult conditions
in far countries. For one fashionable
lady who lives only for pleasure tliere
are twenty who spend much of their
time in serious and intelligent public
work. Let any one compare the life of
a "smart" woman ns he will find it in
Pope or Horace Walpole with the life
of her sister today, and lie will grant
the reality of the change. It is not only
more innocent, but infinitely more useful.—Spectator. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1906.
VANCOUVER 1
On The Trail.
By the Traveller.
The Chehalis Finding.
The report of the Commission on the
Chehalis disaster came as a surprise to
the general public, if not to the nau-
ticial experts who had followed thel
technicalities of the evidence. Even
now, with a suspended certificate and
the prospect of prosecution for manslaughter staring him in the face, no-
one who knows Captain Griffin will ac-
cus him of intentional recklessness or
callous indifference in handling his
boat. The most that can be said is
that in his eagerness to make up lost
time lie failed to observe the rule of
the road, and the result was singularly
fatal. For this mistake both he and
his company will have to pay. He is
already paying dearly in that sense of
humiliation that comes to every honest
man when, even temporarily, he rest
under a cloud. Captain Griffin is a
man with a first-rate reputation both
as a inan and a captain. The latter is
now tarnished, and that in itself is
heavy punishment. The lesson is obvious, tliat both the law and public
opinion regard the sacredness of human life as the first responsibility of
those who have it at their mercy and
no-one may violate the restrictions
which have been imposed for its protection without paying the penalty.
Even record trips and schedule times
are subordinate to this consideration.
Now that the blame has been placed
by a properly constituted tribunal there
is little doubt that the question of
compensation to the relatives of those
who were lost will be voluntarily dealt
with by the C.P.R. iu the generous
manner which the circumstances undoubtedly call for.
Still They Come.
Hindus continue to arrive at Vancouver, some 250 on board the Empress of China this week being the
latest contribution. The Immigration
Inspector, Dr. A. S. Monro, reports
favorably on the Hindus, and on sanitary grounds does not regrad them in
any sense undesirable immigrants. The
whole question is an economic one and
need not be considered from any other
standpoint. Some of the earlier comers have already gravitated to various
centres of industry throughout the
Province. At Nelson they are doing
good work and giving satisfaction in
the lumber mills and on fruit ranches.
Altogether the Hindu as a peaceable,
law-abiding British subject is at least
entitled to fair play and just treatment.
Percy F. Godenrath.
Bush Fires.
It seems almost hopeless to effect
any radical change in the matter of
bush fires, but if the public only realized what the annual loss due to this
cause is in this Province it is certain
that a revolution would be effected.
That bush fires could be altogether
avoided is highly improbable, as some
are due to accidents which are non-
preventable, but eliminating these it is
safe to say that nine fires out of every
ten should never occur, or at any rate
should not get beyond control. There
is no excuse for the match of a smoker
being carelessly flung aside, nor for the
hunter, prospector, or picnicker leaving a smouldering fire In the dry season, when once a fire gets started it is
next to impossible to stop it. The Government has wisely increased the number of fire wardens, but a still further
expenditure under this head would be
more than justified. One of the worst
points of the whole case, however, is
that offenders, even when caught red-
handed, do not receive adequate punishment. When one reads that near
Nanaimo over one thousand acres of
fine timber lands, a saw-mill, a large
quantity of lumber, and eight houses
were destroyed by one fire, it certainly
looks as if the time to adopt drastic
measures had arrived.
A Chinese Appreciation.
When the cable system was introduced on States-street there was a story
that a Chinaman paused in wonder
and exclaimed: "No pushee. No pullee.
Melican man all hellee."—Chicago Record-Herald.
Camborne.
Camborne, in the Fish Creek Camp,
Lardeau district, is again coming to
the front. With the exception of the
Oyster-Criterion group, practically all
the large properties are working, and
most of the local prospectors are out in
the hills doing assessments or chasing
the fickle goddess—fortune.
The Eva mine by long odds still re-
tains its ordinary supremacy as a producer of the yellow metal, having to
its credit an output of $128,123 during
26 months of operation. The Eva Gold
Mining Co., Ltd., is employing 30 men
at the mine and 10-stamp mill, and is
installing a half of a 15-h.p. Rand
compressor, and the pipe line to the
mine is just about completed. It is
said to be the intention of the manage-
ment to double the capacity of the
mill, which is crushing about 35 tons
per day. It is satisfactory to learn
that values continue at depth and
splendid ore is found at the No. 7 level
—the lowest. During the summer season the bulk of the ore sent to the
mill is taken from 'iglory holes" and
surface  open  cuts.
Since last September the Beatrice
Mines, Ltd., has spent large sums in
further exploration and development
work, driving 2,500 feet of tunnel and
raises. The work proved and defined
the continuity of the ore shoots, principally on the intermediate level, with
stsotg indications of the ore continuing to greater depth. From the dump
there has been sacked ready for shipment 150 tons of picked galena, which
will be raw-hided down when the season opens. Embraced in the future
plans of the company is one for further
development to tap the ore body at a
total depth of 45. feet, when if the ore
is found to be of the same grade the
company will install a dry-process,
plant similar to that used in Walker-
ville, Montana, for the treatment of
the zinc and lead. A three-mile tramway will also be constructed.
New strikes are reported on Mc-
Dougal and Boyd Creeks, and at the
Criterion Hotel is exhibited a remarkable specimen of white and rose
quartz, weighing over 120 lbs, lousy
with the yellow metal—which brings
back memories of the good old days
at Poplar Creek. This slab comes
from the Burneire claim, located in
July by Stanley Menhinick due north
of the Gold Finch. The vein is said to
be well defined, measuring 18 inches
to two feet. Certain that if this discovery had been made anywhere else
than in the heart of British Columbia—
along what might be termed the beaten
track—it would undoubtedly produce a
stampede to the scene, so rich is it.
At the Silver Dollar, owned by the
Elwood Tinworks Gold Mining Co.,
they are building a Crawford (Nelson
B.C.) aerial tramway 7,000 feet in
length and have installed a compressor plant. The company is also erecting a Merrall's 6-stamp mill, with a
capacity of from 100 to 120 tons per
day. A good force is steadily opening up the mine preparatory to the
time when the mill wil be ready to
crush.
On the Sunset, owned by G. D.
Scott, of Vancouver, a small force is
preparing to make a test shipment of
high grade ore.
The Camborne Gold Mining Co. is
developing the Gold Finch and at the
Mammoth the Ed. Barley Syndicate)
have some 400 sacks of rich galena
and grey copper ore ready to send to
the smelter.
Considerable machinery is to be installed at the Del Rey and new buildings will be erected shortly to accomodate a large force. The property is
owned by the Northern Gold Mining
Co., of Indianapolis, and is reported
to have ample funds on hand to develop
both the Del Rey and the Colorado
group, adjoining, to the producing
stage.
Besides its mining, Camborne is the
centre of a half a dozen lumber camps
stretching from Beaton up Fish Creek
to Sable Creek, six miles beyond the
town, from which it derives a consid-
rable revenue. Lumber-jacks are in
demand, and good wages, $40 to $50,
are offered for men.    There  is  little
building going on in the. town, though
Branford   &   Co.—the   packers are
hauling in lumber for a new 30 by 96-
ft. barne.
Beaton,
Beaton—the gateway to the uppeif
end of the Lardeau, is just now experiencing quite a boom in acreage property. J. W- Thomson, for 15 years a
resident of the place, has just recently
re-subdivided a part of the 640 acres
included in the townsite into 10-acre
plots, which met a ready sale at $15
per acre. The soil here is well adapted for the cultivation of fruits, there
is plenty of water, and climatic conditions are all that can de desired by
the orchardist. Once the land—which
is lightly timbered — is cleared, apples, pars, plums and cherries are
easily cultivated,
Small fruits thrive wonderfully, and
good crops of vegetables and hay are
to be had.
Beaton will in a few years become
setled by orchardists, who should do
splendidly, having, as they will, ever
increasing markets in the nearby lumber camps and mining towns of the
Lardeau for the consumption of all
classes of fruits and vegetables that
can be raised. Billy Boyd's new hotel—the Hotel Beaton—is blossoming
out as the rendezvous of the health
seekers and sportsmen, for here splendid sport may be had with the rod
and gun.
Comaplix.
This thriving mill-town, where is located one of the big sawmill plants of
the Bowman Lumber Co., is also growing apace. The mill finds employment
for a large number of hands, and is
culling over 2,000,000 feet per month.
Returning to Arrowhead on the boat
the Traveller met A. F. Dudgeon,
manager of the Bowman Lumber Co.,
and the conversation turned upon the
employment of Hindus—of which the
company have about 30 doing the
rough work in the yards here. These
men are paid from $1.50 to $1.75 per
day, and feed themselves. Mr. Dudgeon expressed himself as well satisfied with their work, and commented
favorably upon the willingness of the
turbaned ones to work at any time
when called on. He said, "Last spring
when white labor was so scarce that
we were threatened with a shortage
of sufficient help to operate the mill,
we sent to the Coast for ten Hindus
as an experiment. The arrivals gave
good satisfaction in the yards, and
proved quick to learn what was wanted, so we increased the force to the
present number, who are proving
quite satisfactory and we have absolutely no trouble with them." Other
mills in the district and down the Arrow Lakes are also experimenting with
this class of help—and for the moment
—considering the crying need for men
in the lumber camps and in the big
mills at splendid wages, the advent' of
the Hindu gives little promise of hurting the material prosperity of either
the lumber-jack or mill-man, and is
proving a great bon to the several mill
companies employing them.
"THE DRINK FOR HOT WEATHER."
HALL'S
SPARKLING ENGLISH ALE—BOAR'S HEAD BRAND
10c. PER BOTTLE
Bottled in Bond in Liverpool.
DIXI H, ROSS & CO.
The Grocers. m Government St., Victoria.
Where Mail Orders are specially cared for.
Success at Last.
W. E. Zwickey, the manager of the
Rambler Cariboo, is one of the men in
this Province who deserves success,
and he has attained it. For two years
he has been backing his judgment with
his hard-won money and that of his
friends, in driving a tunnel nearly a
mile in length to cut a vein which had
been proved at the surface, and for
several hundred feet down. During all
this time the result has been problematical; geological developments might
have resulted in the cutting of the vein,
faulting it and removing it entirely outside the property of his company. Mr.
Zwickey did not think so, and has spent
$75,000 in a piece of work, the successful result of which depended entirely
upon the correctness of his deductions.
Success has crowned his efforts, the
ledge eight feet wide has been cut. In
quality the ore is richer than any yet
found in the mine, and the future of
the property is assured. Mr. Zwickey
and his company deserve the greatest
possible credit both for their sagacity
and pluck. It is work of this kind
which builds up a country, and although
the result is not always as satisfactory
when it turns out as well as the Rambler Cariboo, every mining man is
heartened.
TELEPHONE 600
Johnston's Transfer
135 Douglaa St.   VICTORIA.
RATES CUT IN TWO.
HACKS FOR HIRE.
Driving Loads 75c. per hour.
G j. JOHNSTON,
Proprietor.
t
THE NORTHERN BANK
1
HEAD OFFICE WINNIPEG
Authorized Capital $2,000,000.   Subscribed Capital $1,200,000
A General Banking business transacted.   Drafts issued.   Sterling and
Foreign Exchange bought and sold.
SAVINGS BANK DEPT.—Deposits of$i and upwards received and
interest allowed.
Business bv mail receives special attention.
Godfrey BooTH.^Manager Victoria Branch.
^::
The Home
Seekers
Goal.
Special   Bargains  to
i Wind Up An Estate.
6% acres in the North
End, only 20 minutes walk
to Post Office, with southern aspect, $600 per acre,
5 acres is all cleared and in
high state of cultivation.
Seaview lots from $50 to
$100 each, chiefly cleared,
and ready for building on.
Easy terms if necessary.
The B. C. Land & Investment
Agency, Ltd.
Real Estate, Financial and
Insurance Agents,
VICTORIA, B. C.
SPECIAL OFFER C
SEASONABLE
GOODS.
Old Fashioned
Furniture,
Old China,
Brass and Copper
46 Douglas Street, Victoria
Mrs. M. E. MacLeod,
OpposlU
Thos. R. Cusack
BEE  SUPPLIES.-Buckwheat,
Rye,  Clover,  Timothy,    Lawn  Gr
Ensilage  Corn,  Mangel, Turnip,  I
cial quotations in quantity.
Spray Pumps, Whale Oil Soap, V
etable Plants.
Large Stock   of   HOME   GRO^
Fruit and Ornamental Trees now
tured for the fall trade.
No expense, loss or delay of fum
tion or inspection.
Let me price your list before pla<
your order.
We do business on our own grot
—no rent to pay, and am preparec
meet all competition.
Catalogue Free.
M. J. HENRY,
3010 Westminster Foad,
Vancouver,
The Taylor Mill C
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Vict*
FOR FINE PRINTINQl
OHN  COOPE
Taxidermist and Fur Dress
Mounting Large Game Heae
a Specialty.   ,
826 PENDER STREET,
VANCOUVER «w-
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1906.
At The Street   $
Corner
* By THE LOUNOER
'. was among the amused ones at the
ctoria theatre on Wednesday night,
len William Collier and Grant Stew-
; were convulsing the house with
:ir humorous sallies at the expense
the verdant Englishman. I was peris the most amused man in the
ise, because, belonging to the unfor-
■ate race that furnishes the chop-
blocks for the witticisms of Amer-
|n writers. Just why men of the
ict type portrayed by Grant Stewart
)uld be accepted as v representative
Jglishmen I have never been able to
Ike out. As a mater of fact he is
>ut as much like the real thing as
stage Irishman is like a true son
Erin. Perhaps my inability to see
point may be taken as another evi-
ice of its correctness. All I know is
it is has never been my luck to meet
:h an Englishman off the stage. I
|nk a not unfair criticism is that the
iglish caricatures are all on the stage,
American all off. Of the two I
Ipuld certainly prefer being laughed
■j only when I was purposely making
srriment, and not when I was trying
look natural.
(Whilst referring to matters theatrical
'might just mention that it will be
fault of the people of Victoria if
|ey do not get the best theatrical fare
)tn Manager Ricketts. The list of
ikings for the coming season is far
tter than the support of last season
mid justify, did he not believe that
Is year would see a more generous
sponse on the part of the play-going
[folic. It is not reasonable to expect
»t-class companies if people do not
rn out. After all, the securing of
iding attractions is purely a matter
dollars and cents. The artists have
be paid, and what the box receipts
|jk has to be made up from the poets of the lessee. The way to get the
it that is going is to give generous
iport. The Vancouver opera house
fS "sold out" for two nights of Wil-
\m Collier. This is an object lesson
Victoria which it would be folly to
jiore. I am satisfied that Manager
jcketts will give Victoria all it pays
r, and when the public can get more
in that the Milennium will be here.
En a quiet way the young sports of
fctoria have been having a good time
several weeks, salmon fishing. Many
irnings, as I have strolled down
\/m before breakfast in search of an
(petite, and to get rid of that "bad
ste," I have met young fellows with
[o, three, and on one occasion four
•ge fish as the result of their early
timing's troll between the Outer
[harf and the revolving light. Small
have been equally successful, and
[e little fellow in particular, who
lid not have been more than ten
irs old, was dragging a fifteen-
binder along James Bay Causeway
Wednesday morning. It was so
ig that as it hung over his little back
tail swept the ground. That was a
md boy, and I could not bribe him
sell, even when I bid as high as
|o dollars. "No," said he, "I'm going
take it home to mother."
is there are as good fish in the sea
sver came out, and plenty of them, I
j} give for the benefit of beginners
following hints culled, from the
[ry of the most successful salmon
]er in Victoria. Row slowly, use a
(bamboo is as good as an expensive
ion rod) and a large reel, let the
be thin and dark, not less than a
Jidred and twenty yards long, with
fiinker. Troll with twenty yards of
until you strike. Use a single
|on. Fish between five and eight in
morning. These instructions, if
ifully carried out, will ensure a
feet every time.
fhe Rev. Thomas Barham, of im-
'tal fame as the author of the In-
lsby legends, penned a couplet in
"Little Vulgar Boy" which was
fcibly brought to my mind this week,
[erring to the boy's experiences on
tgate Pier and commenting on the
isers of sailors, he says:
"I wonder why all sailor men
Will wear those things so loose?"
A vision of sartorial skill, if not elegance, brought all this to mind, although it is many years since I read
the familiar incident. The vision was
of a man who floated down Government street with everything loose. His
tie waved around his neck, for it was
long and flowing. His coat flapped
around his body like a sheet on a
scarecrow, and as for his pants, they
were decidedly roomy, and would have
made two pairs for any ordinary mortal; and withal they widened towards
the bottom to display green openwork
stockings and low tan shoes (mind
you, it is a man's wear I am describing, so do not fall into the error of
supposing that it is a woman's). The
whole outfit was new, and a friend
who is an authority on "gentlemen's
furnishings" informed me that the
whole was strictly up-to-date; if so,
then there is at least one reason for
rejoicing that Victoria is "behind the
times," as some of her envious critics
declare.
Sporting Comment
VICTORIA.
The skating rink recently established at the Assembly hall continues to
attract attention. Crowds gather at
that place of amusement every afternoon and evening, and the sport is
thoroughly enjoyed. Excellent musical programmes are rendered by a
well-known local orchestra, enlivening
the proceedings to a material ertent.
The efforts of Manager Painter in the
direction of popularizing the recreation are meeting with every success,
and many Victorians are looking forward to the installation of a new hardwood floor.
Before the close of the cricket season it is intended to arrange a game
of a somewhat unique character. It
will be between an eleven selected from
the membership of the Victoria Ladies'
Hockey Club and the Victoria team.
The former have accepted the challenge of the gentlemen, it is understood, and will commence training at
ar. early date. The conditions of the
match will be unusual, the men handicapping themselves in. various waysi
For instance, they will bat with broom
handles or something of that nature,
bowl left-handed, and, in fact, play in
a style just oposite to that to which
ti.ey are accustomed. The result
should be an even, and, needless to
say, interesting competition.
It has been suggested that members
of the Victoria Lacrosse Club should
organize a Rugby club this fall. Nothing definite has yet been decided, in
fact, the possibility of such a thing
has just been whispered among the
players in order to ascertain whether
it would meet with favor. It is not
improbable, however, that something
will be done along that line in the near
future.
VANCOUVER.
Referring to the match between the
Maple Leafs, of Vancouver, and New
Westminster, on Monday, at the Terminal City, the News-Advertiser says:
"Beaten at their own game, played to
a standstill, and with the biggest score
rung up against them that has been
tallied in years, the Royal Reds were
forced to take off their hats to the boys
from Mount Pleasant Monday, when
the Vancouver Maple Leaf lacrosse
team trimmed New Westminster at
Brockton Point 10 goals to 4 in the
presence of one of the largest crowds
tnat has witnessed the games this season. Ten! did we say? Well, it was
so near eleven that there is very little
satisfaction to the Westminster team
in the fact that the gong sounded just
about the same moment that the net
bulged out behind Gifford for the extra tally, which was beautifully earned.
The game was a hot one from the start
to finish, and be it said to the credit of
the defeated team that they never let
up even when the score was hopelessly
against them and the game all over
but the shouting. They died game, and
had not the score been so well in hand
their last ten minutes of gladiotorial
work would have caused the gray and
maroons many anxious spasms.   That
the result came as a surprise to the
boosters of the mountaineers can
scarcely be said, as they have been going a great gait lately and are just the
hard checking, hard working sort of
an aggregation needed to give the Reds
a rude awakening, but that the penalty
should be so emphatically inflicted and
a score of that magnitude made against
the invincible defence of the Fraser
river heroes, was scarcely dreamed of
by the most sanguine rooter the Hill
possesses. And it was good lacrosse.
It is true that many brilliant bits of
play did not come off, and many passes
were made and taken in a manner that
would lead one to groan, but be it remembered that a defence is not on the
field to watch the opposing home do
spectacular work for the sake of allowing the' crowds to see pretty stick
handling, but is there to break up
these very pretty tactics which look so
pretty from ihe side lines, and that is
what was done Monday by both teams,
albeit the Leafs performed their duty
in this respect more effectivly than
their opponents, and the sensational
rushes for which the New Westminster
boys are famed were conspicuously absent Monday.*'
British American
Trust Company,
Limited
OFFICES : Vancouver, B. C.
Grand Forks, B. C.
Victoria, B. C.
Transacts a General Financial and
Fiduciary Business. Acts as Executor, Administrator, Trustee, etc.
Buys and Sells High Grade Invest-
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sells, rents and appraises real estate. Collects Rents and Places
Insurance.    Negotiates Loans on
i Real Estate. Makes Loans on
High Grade Securities.
Correspondence Solicited.
I HAROLD M. DALY, Manager
VICTORIA,   B. C.
!
The Pacific Coast
Realty Co., Ltd.
Hive an exclusive list of specially selected ACREAGE, ESTATE and FARM
PROPERTIES for sale at prices which
vill attract purchasers.
MOW IS THE TIME TO BUT
Victoria Property is the salest and best
investment to be found in Real Estate on
the Pacific Coast.  There will be a
50 PER CENT. INCREASE
IN VALUES IN 1907.   ■
You cannot make a mistake in buying
Business,
Residence, or
Acreage
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Write or call on us for particulars.  We
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The Pacific Coast
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(Opposite Driard Hotel)
If you love your wife
BUY  HER  A GAS STOVE
It will save her a lot of extra work and
give her time for other things
besides cooking.
Cook Your Boast, Do Not Boast Tour Cook,
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, LIMITED.
JAMES BUCHANAN & CO.
LONDON AND GLASGOW
purveyors tojthe Royal Family,
DISTILLERS OF HIGH GRADE  SCOTCH WHISKIES'
Buchanan's Royal Household at li.jofrer bottle
Buchanan's Black and White at $1.25 per bottle
Buchanan's Red Seal at $1.00 pei^bottle
ARE LEADERS AMONG THE BEST
For sale by all dealers, VICTOR!*, ■. C.
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BBEWERS OP
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
phone 893. VICTORIA
Tzouhalem Hotel
Duncan Station.
Lakeside Hotel
Cowichan Lake*
PR16B BROS.. Proprietors.
LAKESIDE HOTEL, COWICHAN LAKE
The Popular Tourist Resort of Vancouver Island.   Excellent Ply Pishing,
Boating, Lawn .Tennis.
Special Return Tickets Issued by the C, P. R„ $2—Good for 15 Days.
I/CACT'Q ^TAfiPC meet rain daily at Duncan's forthe above
Mj/lOl O Ol/\VJlwO popular resort, Return tickets for sale a
h. & N. Railway Office' good for 15 days, $5.00. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1966
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Offices:
t&ii Government Street .... Victoria B. C.
Empire Block   Vancouver, B. C.
W. BLAKEMORE...Manager and Editor
Annual Subscription   $1 in Advance
Transient rates, per inch  60c.
Legal notices (60 days), from  $5.00
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Readers, per line   6c. to 10c.
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Lost and
Found and other small advertisements, per insertion, from...26c. to $1.00
NOTICE.
Contributors are hereby notified
that all copy for The Week should be
delivered to the office, 88i/2 Government
Street, not later than Thursday morn,
ing.
AN.NOUNCeriENT.
The Week Publishing Company has
pleasure in announcing that Mr. Percy
F. Godenrath, who for a year has been
employed on the Colonist staff, has been
retained by The Week, and started out
last Saturday on a three months' tour
of the Province in the interests of this
publication. Whilst on tlle journey Mr.
Godenrath will not only attend to the
financial business of the paper, but wil
contribute sketches and articles on matters of interest to every locality which
he visits. The Week Publishing Company will be glad to hear of an experienced energetic man who is prepared
to take a similar trip through the
Island.
¥
!»*$*'
BADINAGE
By BOHEMIAN
Of    _ . , _   ,_   .r.       _      _
TiaiaiiiiiiiiiigiaiiliaHir     —
Marriage is an institution the respectability of which cannot be questioned, and the utility of which has
been amply demonstrated, President
Roosevelt notwithstanding. Of late
years it has fallen on evil times, especially in the great Republic to the
South; many substitutes have been suggested, and several tested. They have
not been a success. Now comes along
a learned Professor (all learned men
are professors) and declares that the
true salvation of all the ills that flesh
is heir to is not to make divorce easier,
but marriage harder. Shades of Benedict! Marriage harder! Its hardships
have already resulted in keeping millions of hardy Bohemians like myself
in the cold shades of celibacy. "We
linger shivering on the brink, and fear
to"—take the plunge. Strange tales of
the miseries, discords, bondages of
that Elysian state have reached our
ears, and so "we rather bear the ills
we have than fly to others that we
know not of." Now tlie learned Professor would make it still harder to
marry. He proposes medical examination lo determine the question of physical fitness. Pathological examination
as to the physiological adaptability of
the parties, and goodness knows what
other examinations on the score of
mental and spiritual endowment to determine the question of affinity. The
latter is by far the most interesting
point. It might be expressed, 'Have
you found your affinity?" How many
have? How few have! This is a subject on which I do not claim to have
any personal knowledge, but thc determination of affinities is a strong point
with most Bohemians, and their knowledge is by no means to be despised.
It occurs to me that the Professor is
beginning at the wrong end. Let him
invent some method of directing natural affinities towards each other, and
all these things will be added. For one
woman who turns to the noble and self-
sacrificing army of Bohemians for sympathy because she is the victim of
some physical or physiological, mental
or spiritual disorder, one thousand seek
the affinity they have failed to discover,
in the fold of matrimony. For an
American philosopher the Professor is
decidedly not up-to-date.
Superstition is inherent in the race,
but women are undoubtedly its readiest
victims. Twice in one week have I
been brought into contact with ladies
who derive considerable entertainment
from "reading the tea cups." One in
Victoria beguiled half an hour by discoursing in the most serious manner
on the "fates" as disclosed by the position of the tea-leaves in a cup from
whicli the tea had just been emptied.
Slie saw a large important looking letter, containing an official document,
coining to me by an early mail. I had
not the heart to tell her that I get
just such documents by every mail, but
when I showed her one the next day
of course she said, "I told you so."
Later in the week I got a letter from
the wise East telling me of a similar
performance there, and the confident
statement to a lady of the party, "Although your body is here (about a
hundred and seventy pounds of it),
your thoughts are far away." How
prescient and touching! I wonder
whether this kind of intellectual conversation is best described by the old-
fashioned "poppycock" or the new-
fashioned "piffle."
All of which leads to the asking
again of the question, "Is the art of
conversation lost?" One cannot always
be serious, even when ladies are present, but in how many homes is the
talking circle still an institution? Dinner—bridge; dinner—billiards; dinner
—dance. There you have rung all the
changes in average modern society. Yet
what form of entertaining can equal or
approach the exchange of intelligent
well-informed conversation? The
sallies of wit, the jest, the badinage,
the philosophy of experience. How
many young people of the present day
are well informed? How many even
o: adult age can sustain an argument
or quote an authority? Is there any
substitute for the trained mind? Why
do our lads and girls tire of sober talk
or conversation above the level of
cards, races, motoring or golf? The
fact must be admitted that the greatest
charm of home life, the fireside, has
been relegated to the past, and the
modern substitutes are ephemeral and
all but meritless. Yet life and character are the poorer. There is no possible substitute for high class conversation, and it need not be all serious.
The interchange of thought, opinion,
impression, is the charm of social intercourse, and no wonder that when
it lacks this fragrance it leads to ennui.
$ MUSIC AND     |
|     THE STAGE }
The patrons of the Victoria theatre
will have an opportunity of seeing the
clever Juvenile Bostonians, when they
will present Cellier's beautiful comedy-
opera, "Dorothy'' for two nights on
September io-l l; this opera is in three
acts and is weil known to music lovers;
the costumes, Icing of ye olden times,
will add to tiie attractiveness of these
fascinating little artists. The company has been reorganized, and many
new members have been added, while
all the old favorites, such as Babe Mason, tiny little Halcyon Martin, Doris
Pipe, Louie Mason and Ruby Lang are
still with the company. Critics have
made comparisons with the only other
juvenile opera company on the road,
and state that the Bostonians excel in
real merit. The charming personality
of these clever little children have
made them favorites wherever they
have appeared, and their many admirers in this city will no doubt give them
a warm welcome. "Dorothy" will be
rendered in a manner that would do
credit to a company of years of road
experience, and the title role will be
handled in a captivating way by Rose
Cole.
A Contradiction.
(The following was inadvertently
omitted from our last issue.)
From  the  Executive  Committee
of Calvary Baptist Church.
Our attention has been drawn to an
editorial in The Week of August nth,
reflecting upon  our  Pastor,  the  Rev.
F.  T. Tapscott.
From our personal knowledge of the
affairs of our church, we hereby characterize the statements in the article
referred to, touching the pastor's relation to the church, in whole or in
part, as utterly void of truth in every
particular. And, inasmuch as the
statements are calculated to do grave
injury both to pastor and people, we
demand the full and immediate retraction of the same, and that this retraction be given the same publicity
through the columns of The Week
that the original article obtained.
E. Lampshirc.    R. Bagshaw.
T. E. Reason.    Fred D. T. Hodges.
G. J. Bagshaw.   William Russell.
G. P. Kelly.      J.  Dinsmore.
Geo.W. Andrews. J. C.  McNeill.
Clarence C. Johns Wm. McNeill.
E.  Middleton.    Andrew Stewart.
H.  R.  Mclntyre.
[See our editorial comment on this
in last week's issue.—Ed. Week.]
A Popular Auctioneer.
Mr. Stewart Williams, who was so
long associated with Mr. Eaton in his
principal auction sales, is about to
open an office on Fort Street, where
he will conduct a business on his own
account as auctioneer and commission
ngent. His many old friends will be
glad of the opportunity to recognize
his well known ability by according
him their patronage. He will make a
specialty of cattle and live stock sales.
The opening event of the season at
the Victoria theatre was an unqualified
success, and augurs well for the future engagements which Manager Ricketts has booked. A full house, a
well balanced company, a genuine star,
and a funny play, "On the Quiet,"
should satisfy the most fastidious, and
that the house was satisfied was easy
see from the hilarity that prevailed
from the raising of the curtain until
the singing of the National Anthem.
William Collier is an artist, and no
higher praise can be given. True, he
had telling lines to deliver, and the
play fairly" sparkled with subtle humor,
but much of the effect was due to the
delicate touch of the actor, who in
some respects reminds one of John
Drew in his early days. In a good
all-round company, second honors
were taken by Grant Stewart in the
part of Lord Carbondale. His impersonation would not have been discreditable to Charles Hawtrey or Lawrence D'Orsay; it was never overdone,
and was so natural that while the audience were kept in roars of laughter
at the type they never laughed at the
actor. Miss Mabel Taliaferro was
specially interesting as Agnes Colt,
and Charles Poore made an excellent
stage clergyman. The play abounded
with bright witticims and sententious
utterances, of which the following are
worth quoting.
"The only thing that survives marriage is intellect."
.. iien, after marriage, one finds that
the other is a fool,   exit everything."
"Duchesses  do not mature in sixty
days."
'Every girl plays with a fellow's
heart until twenty, afterwards she
means business."
"A man must have peace of mind to
win in a fight."
One of the features of the summer
season in Victoria has been the London Bioscope, so well manipulated at
tne Gorge park by Clifford Denliam,
under the management of C. H. Gibbons. At a rough estimate not less
than 60,000 people have witnessed the
display during July and August, tinder
ideal conditions. The weather has been
perfect, and no prettier sight could be
found than the park and its surroundings an a summer evening. Canoes,
boats and launches idly rocking on the
water, throngs of happy folk sitting or
lounging in full view of the Bioscope,
the orchestra playing tuneful selections, and the voice of Denham explaining the series of pictures moving
across the sheet. Both as an amusement and an entertainment the London Bioscope has been a huge success, and all Victoria will hope that
next season has something as good in
store for open-air entertainment.
GUN  METAL
A very fine shipment of the latest
European Novelties fresh from the
leading Parisian makers.
A Few Items Out of Many:
Cigar Cutter $ .50
Nail Trimmers 1.00
Pencils 75
Scissors 1.25
Ladies' Card Cases 2.75
Cigarette cases  3.00
Watches  from 5.00
Cigar  holder $2.00
Whistles 1.00 ,
Pocket  knives 75.
Gents' card cases 1.25
1
Tobacco, cases 1.50
Puff boxes j, 1.75
Sovereign boxes 1.50
SPECIAL
Ticket Cases in Gun Metal, with spring hinges, made specially
for holding street car tickets $1.25
IMPORTANT.
Gun Metal Novelties are most attractive and useful as gifts.
Customers living in the country can order through our mail
order departmeut, enclosing postal note; we pay mail charges
CHALLONER & MITCHELL
I
JEWELERS AND SILVERSMITHS
47 and 40 Government Street, Victoria, B. C.
C M. 1555j
If a woman's credit is good at a dry
goods store she never argues about the
price.
I    NO CHARGE
1 We shall be glad to forward, ENTIRELY
m FREE, our sample book containing samples
H of the largest and most fashionable stock
P of wall papers and wall coverings in West-
M ern Canada.   We can also offer you many
H great bargains in this season's wall papers.
H We give a special discount of 10 per cont.
if to all those who cut out this ad. and use it
W as an introduction to
MELROSE CO.K
40 Fort St., Next to Five Sisters Block, Viotoria, B. C.
"IF IT'S CORRECT WE HAVE IT."
HAY PRESS
Whitman's Latest All Steel
 STRONGER	
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Who carry a large stock at their various depots.   Write for
price list and bedrock prices to
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Also at Vancouver, Kamloops aud Vernon.
P.R. 1504 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1906.
British Columbia
THE AGRICULTURAL RESOURCES
OF THE PROVINCE.
AGRICULTURE.
To form a just estimate of the extent and importance of the agricultural areas of British Columbia one
must make many excursions to the
north and south of the main line of
the Canadian Pacific Railway—over
its branches and steamboat connections—and even then, if he trusts to
what he may be able to see from the
car window or the deck of a lake
steamer, his knowledge will be far
from complete. In the Shuswap and
Okanagan Valleys, for instance, for
every acre of arable land within sight
of the railway or lake there are
thousands hidden away behind the
beautiful grass covered hills which
border the highway of travel, and the
same may be said of Kootenay,
Boundary, Arrow Lakes, Similkameen
and other districts. The agricultural
capabilities of the many sections of
Southern British Columbia are, as a
matter of fact, only beginning to be
realized. So far they have been
practically ignored for the mineral
seeking prospectors who first invaded the country had no eye for aught
save the object of their quest. Now,
however, branch lines of railway arid
lake steamers are enabling a new
class of men to enter and explore this
land of promise and many have embarked in fruit growing, mixed farming and dairying.
The agricultural and pastoral lands
are not restricted to a small proportion of the total acreage, for Professor Macoun, after personal investigation on the ground, says: "The
whole of British Columbia, south of
52 degrees and east of the Coast
Range, is a grazing country up to
3,500 feet, and a farming country up
to 2,500 feet, where irrigation is possible." This is a most important
statement and its truth is being confirmed by the practical experience of
settlers who have established themselves in the country. Within the
boundaries thus roughly defined by
Professor Macoun the capabilities
of the soil are practically unlimited.
All of it that is not too elevated to
serve only for grazing purposes will
produce all the ordinary vegetables
and roots, much of it will grow cereals to perfection, while everywhere
the hardier varieties of fruits can be
successfully cultivated. As far north
as the 52nd degree it has been practically demonstrated that apples will
flourish, while in the southern belt
the more delicate fruits, peaches,
grapes, apricots, etc., are an assured
crop. Roughly estimated, the extent
of these fertile lands may be set
down at one million acres, but this
figure will probably be found far below the actual quantity capable of
cultivation when the country has
been thoroughly explored. The anticipation of such a result is justified'
from the fact that at several points
in the mountains even in the most
unpromising looking localities, where
clearing and cultivation has been
attempted it has proved successful.
A Sheep Ranch Near Kamloops.
In several instances also, bench land,
pronounced only fit for pasturage by
"old timers," has been broken and
cropped with very satisfactory results. The agricultural lands just
mentioned are located as follows:
Acres.
Okanagan 250,000
North and  South Thompson
Valleys.     75,000
Nicola,    Similkameen    and
Kettle River Valleys ....  350,000
Lillooet and Cariboo   200,000
East and West Kootenay .. 125,000
West of the Coast Range are several extensive tracts of arable land
of the richest quality, notably  the
Cattle Grazing on Vancouver Island.
Lower Fraser Valley, Wesminster
District, Vancouver Island and adjacent islands in the Gulf of
Georgia. These sections of the province are recognized as agricultural
districts and are fairly well settled,
but much of the land is still wild and
unfilled. North of the main line of
the Canadian Pacific Railway, on the
Pacific slope, and but partially explored, are vast areas of agricultural
and grazing lands, which will be turned to profitable account when the
country is a few years older. Much
of this northern region is fit for
wheat growing, and all of it will produce  crops  of  the  coarser  cereals,
roots and vegetables, except the
higher plateaux, which will afford
pasturage to countless herds of cattle, horses and sheep. Some of these
districts, best known and in which
settlements have been established, are
Chilcotin, Neechaco, Blackwater,
Bulkley, Oosta, Kispyox, Skeena and
Peace Kiver Valleys, and they are
estimated to include some 6,500,000
acres. That this is a conservative
estimate is clear from the fact that
the late Dr. Dawson and Professor
Macoun credited that portion of
Peace River Valley lying within British Columbia with 10,000,000 acres of
wheat land. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1966.
I
OLLA P0DR1DA
Honeymoon Reading.
The house had quieted after the
wedding. Mother and Aunt Mary
were in the parlor thinking it over.
"So it's over," said Aunt Mary,
smiling  into mother's  eyes.
"Yes," said mother, bravely, although
a little cheerfully, "ti's over—and begun."
"They'll be happy, I'm sure."
"Yes. They are very well suited to
each other."
"Very. I could see that. They both
have   studious   habits."
"Yes.       But     Mary "     Mother
paused, and the gleam of mischief
evoked by Aunt Mary sooner than anybody else darted into her eyes. "Mary,
they can't have much sense of humor.
Though it's my own girl, I say it."
"Why not?"
"Do you know what they took to read
on their wedding journey? Stevenson's "Travels With a Donkey."—
"Wasp."
Like a Whale.
"You cannot keep me down," shouted
the great orator at a Nantucket meeting; "though I may be pressed below
the waves I rise again; you will find
that I come to the surface, gentlemen."
"Yes," said an old whaler in the audience, "you come to the surface to
blow."
HE GOT A REPLY.
Several years ago a farmer drove to
Buffalo to buy from a wholesale firm
a bill of goods for his country store.
After coining downstairs and while waiting for his goods to be packed he noticed several men using the speaking
tube..
After a while his curiosity got the
better of him and he asked the proprietor what that thing was. "A speaking tube," said the proprietor. "Speak
to someone upstairs and see how it
works."
"What will I say?" said the farmer,
going over to the tube.
"Oh, say anything you like," said the
proprietor.
"Hey!" shouted the farmer, "are the
goods for Mr. Parsons of Williamsville
ordered ready?"
"Yes," said the man upstairs, "the
goods are ready, but we are looking the
old skinflint up. We think he is kind of
shaky."
LEARNING FAST ENOUGH.
The proprietor of a tanyard built a
stand on one of the main streets of a
VirginiaVirginia town for the purpose
of selling leather and buying new hides.
When he had completed the building, he
considered for a long time what sort
of sign to put up to attract to the new
establishment. Finally a happy thought
struck him.
He bored an auger hole through the
door-post and stuck a salf's tail into it
it with the twisted end outside.
After a while he saw a solemn-faced
man standing near the door looking at
the sign, his eyes in a round, meditative
stare behind his secatpcles. The tanner
watched him a minute then stepped out
and addressed him.
"Good morning, sir!" he said.
"Morning!" said the other, without
taking his eyes off the sign.
"Want to buy leather?" asked the
tanner.
"No."
"Got any hides to sell?"
"No."
"Are you a farmer?"
"No."
"Merchant?"
"No."
"Lawyer?"
"No."
"Doctor?"
"No."
"What are you, then?"
"I am a philosopher. I've been standing here for an hour trying to figure
out how that calf got through that
auger hole."
JUST LIKE' EM.
About forty years ago, walking down
Market street, in this city, I heard a
darkey commenting on a sign, he had
just spelt out, stretched across the side
walk in front of a livery stable.
"Jist like 'sm After dars no moh
slabry dey sticy up signs foh me: 'Manure Free!'"
HIS USUAL LUCK.
"Now, then," said the leader of the
mob to the horsethief, "if you've got
anything to say before we swing you
off, be quick about it."
"Nothin' ter say," replied the culprit,
"except that this is me usual luck wid
horses.   I lose be a neck."
Winnipeg boasts a lady bank manager
—Heaven help the man with the overdraft."—Calgary Herald.
A
FEATURE of the
Semi-ready trousers—one found no place
else than high grade
custom tailoring—is the
high waist.
The waist is made to
fit perfectly and yet give
comfort—plenty of cloth
— as you can see for
yourself.
There are straps on
the back of each pair to
tighten—but you won't
need them; these trousers fit.
The legs are neatly
shaped — conventional
in width and "set" beautifully.
Delivered two hours after trying on.
Bo WILLI A
A    PHILOSOPHER'S   HARD
PROBLEM.
Solomon Goldberg was the proprietor
of a second hand store, which he managed with lhe assistance of his wife, and
his son "Ikey" after school. One evening he undertook to test Ikey's arithmetic, the result being as follows:
"Veil, Ikey, bow you getting along in
school?"
"Oh, velly well, fader."
"Well, Ikey, can you tell me how
many was two and two?"
"Yes, fader; two and two was five!"
"Now, Ikey, not vill nefer do, don't
you know dot two and two vas four?"
"Yes, fader, but I knowed you vould
beat me down."
A BARGAIN.
A New Worker and his wife were
recently travelling in England, In London thc wife bought a shawl in the
Quadrant, and insisted on wearing it
to her hotel across her shoulders. The
price label bad heen accidentally left on
thc garment, and as she walked along
the passers-by read thc following somewhat Delphic announcement:
"Very  Chaste—Five  Guineas!"
Chispa, The Torera.
By Marguerite Stabler.
(Written for The Week.)
A woman, clad in pink tights and
a glittering tinsel corselet, took the ring.
Boldly, and serenely unconscious of her
appearance, the dazzling creature
stood before the eyes of men of high
and low degree, her rounded proportions calling forth shouts and comments from the audience the like of
which the parson, man that he was,
blushed to hear.
But when, with a courage born of
righteous wrath anu duty to his tract,
he raised his eyes and looked at the
torera, the dusky hair crinkling and
wimpling into dancing wavelets in the
sunlight, the slope of her shoulders,
the poise of her head, the curves of her
waist, that unmistakable profile—0,
Great Jehovah! were hers.
She, whom his fond fancy had pictured praying for spiritual enlightenment according to the doctrine of John
Calvin; she, the pure-souled woman
whose fervor of supplication had rivalled that of the very president of the
Theological Seminary; she, whom he
had hoped might some day preside over
the parsonage of Knoxville, Calvin
County, Massachusetts, this—this—creature !
The tinsel corselet flashed back the
sunlight into the eyes of the admiring
multitude, the pink tights gave to every
curve and swelling line of the lissome
figure as the woman sauntered unconcernedly about the ring waiting for the
bull to be turned in.
The mob, inflamed by the streams of
pulque that had been flowing all the
afternoon out-did itself in what it considered appropriate jest and comment.
The clear, pale profile as he had first
seen it against the dingy hangings of
the shrine was turned to him. He had
found her. This woman upon whom he
had lavished the maiden passion of his
soul as she prayed so fervently in the
church, not for the saving grace of Calvinism, hut bargaining new altar-candles for bull-killing, was a—was a—a—
He could not bring himself to say thc
word. The world rose up and turned
black before him.
"Oh Josefita,  quick, quick!" the fat
one cried to the coy one, "the senor has
fainted from the heat!"
(Concluded.)
68-7© Yates Street,   SOLE AGENTS.
At $io, $12, $15, $18, $20, $22 and $25.
TROUSERS—At $3, $4, $5, and $6.
TWO THOUSAND GARMENTS CARRIED IN STOCK AT THE
SEni-REAOY WARDROBE
NOTICE
This is the advertisement which iTAYOR MORLi
REFUSED TO SANCTION after our Ad. Agent h
arranged for it, subject to the endorsation of the Exj
cutive. His excuse was that THE WEEK h
criticized his conduct as Mayor!!! We are running the Advertisement gra
hi the interests of Victoria and the Provincial Exhibition.
1906
PROVINCIAL EXHIBITION
AT VICTORIA, B. C.
SEPT. 25 TO 29
$10,000 in Premiums and Valuable Special Prizes.
3 Days' Horse Racing, $3,000 IN PRIZES
Grand Stock Parades Daily,
The Best Stock
Market 	
in the Province
BANDS,   SPORTS,   GAMES
AND NEW EXCITING ATTRACTIONS.
f)AA   <*■   D*lriAo and Champion Belt of British Columbia for
$L\)\) in rnzes    bronco busting competitions.
WRITE FOR PRIZE LISTS
A. J. MORLEY, Mayor, President. J. E. SMART, Secretary. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, igo6.
Decorative Draperies in the Home Beautiful
Last week, in this space, we gave a view of our Drapery Department, a section of our business
with which every lady in Western Canada should be familiar, as it is the only place West of Montreal
and Toronto in which FULL ranges of rich Parisian Velours, Silk Brocades, Liberty Art Fabrics, Lace
Curtains of every description, handsome Velvets and other Decorative Draperies can be obtained.
Artistic Treatment
For Casement
Window
Window Seat with antique pew ends, in
weathered oak, native cedar or native fir,
in the new finish. Any one of these supplied by our FACTORY at  a small cost.
Sash Curtains, in art muslin, special
new designs, just imported, at, per
yard 20c
Side Curtains in either art linen,, English
Chintz, French cretonne, challis cloth or
impression-de-Chine Seat in Window is
upho'itered in material to match side Curtains by our upholstering department.
Cushion is one of McLINTOCK'S Beautiful Art Cretonne Cushions atat .... $1.50
or a McLINTOCK'S "MARIE ANTOINETTE" Cusrion in rich brocade
at  $2.25
The Side Curtains are hung from the stained glass transom, over which is a
shelf for ART PLATES and Bric-a-Bracs. We supply these Plate Raclr- at 12c
per foot. Our Artware Section supplies the Wedgwood Plates, Sutherland Artware,
etc., at prices ranging from 25c up
Window Decoration
Without Blinds.
This treatment relies entirely on Curtains, and docs away with the use of
blinds; it is extremely effective, and has an artistic effect of a most distinctive
charaetw. The Casement Curtains are in
two pairs, one for each sash. This is a
decided advantage, as they en be moved
separately. The best materials to use are:
Chintz Art Linen or Muslin of a close texture; an open fabric would not be sufficient protection against the sun.
The Side Curtains Suid Valance are in
Impression-de-Chine or Cotton Taffeta.
Our Drapery Department carries a large
range of all the materials mentioned above.
Samples will be forwarded free on application.
The Panelling at foot of window is from our Factory, and can be made in Oak,
Cedar, or Native Fir.
Hrchway Decoration.
Between drawing room and hall.   Tho Archway itself is in cedar or oak, decorated
with Armorial Shield in Baronial Style.   The Handsome Velour Curtains are draped
high to give a full view of both hall and
room, especially the broad stairway, with
handsome carved newel and balustrade in
solid oak, which can be obtained from our
factory.
This treatment for Archway Decoration
is becoming popular, as our Drapery Department now carries such an extensive
range of handsome velours, rich silk brocades, and other art fabrics, entirely obviating the nepessity of seuding to Europe
for these materials. Many stores curry
these goods in crude greens and reds, hut we carry them in every shade and tint; in
addition we take the precaution tocmly import the finest Parisian Velours, etc.
* IMPORTANT »
We want you to sec our Catalogue. It is the largest work on Furniture and Furnishing ever published in Western Canada, containing very
valuable information for furnishing every room in the home, with over
1700 illustrations of furniture, furnishings, accessories and beautiful
homes in B. C. It is mailed to you FREE. Just write our mail order
department enclosing this coupon.!
Semi*French Window.
This style of Window is being very effectively used by many leading Architects
in British Columbia. Ladies who find difficulty in dealing with the decoration
should write our MAIL ORDER. DEPARTMENT for color schemes and free samples
of materials. The one illustrated has Sash
Curtains of Irish Point Lace, of which we
keep a large stock in our Drapery Department. The Overcurtains are looped
very high and draped in rich Liberty Art
Fabrics, of which we carry a very large
Stock. The Transom: is in Stained Glass.
The walls are finished in Louis XVI stripes
with very rich deep floral frieze from
our Wall t?aper Depart ment.
F A FREE GIFT »
In order to trace thc results of each of our advertisements, we present
a free gift to every lady who writes for our free catalogue. This week
we are giving a complete set of dainty While Toilet Table Mats, five in
all, providing you cut this out and enclose it when writing for our free
catalogue address Mail Order Department, Weiler Bros., Victoria, B.C.
WAREHOUSE:
Cor. of Broad and Broughton Sts.,
Victoria, B. C.
Weiler Bros.
Complete Home, Hotel, Club and Office Furnishers,
SHOWROOMS:
To which you are cordially invited to inspect all that is best in Furnishings
from London, Paris, New York, Vienna and Berlin.
33  GOVERNMENT STREET
Corner of Broughton and Government Streets, Victoria, B. C.
FACTORY:
HUMBOLDT  STREET
Victoria, B. C. THE WEEK   SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 190b.
NOTES ON PROVINCIAL NEWS
Another Bouquet.
"The Victoria Week, just to hand,
appears in materially enlarged form. It
now boasts twelve neatly printed pages.
If the Week were not so radical in
its views and would enlarge its ken a
bit, it might become a strong influence
in moulding public opinion. That
time will never come, however, until
the Week learns that no party or clique
has a monopoly of wisdom and virtue."—Nelson News.
A Big Deal.
A deal involving half a million dollars was consummated last Saturday,
at Arrowhead, when the Lamb-Watson
Lumber Co. bought out the plant and
timber holdings of the Arrowhead
Lumber Co. The transaction is the
largest of its kind yet consummated in
the district, and speaks well for the
healthy state of the lumbering industry. The new corporation is said to
have a paid up capital of $850,000, and
will spend $70,000 on the enlargement
of the mill at once. The plant has a
present capacity of over 2,000,000 feet
per month.
At present the company is treating
about 2,300 tons daily, but around Nov.
1, with the completion of new furnace
equipment, this amount will be increased to over 3,000 tons daily. Next
year's production is expected to show
a still further material increase, and
a director is of the opinion that the
production will be eventually increased
to considerably over the 50,000,000
pounds mark.
The shares of the company are now
ir. tlie hands of between 2,500 and
3.000 persons, as compared with about
900 in December, 1903, the time of the
first  dividend  payment.
Getting Busy.
The Windy Arm section is rapidly
developing into a busy section, and
Col. Conrad, the enterprising American
whose name is so intimately identified
with this section, declares that ore will
be shipped out over the summit during
the present month. This is great progress in a short time, and is at once a
testimony to the mineral wealth of the
country and to the enterprise of its exploiters.
Drawing the Color Line.
"Victoria is shocked. Owing to an
undreamed-of invasion of the fashionable quarter of the provincial capital
by well-to-do Chinese seeking homes,
Victoria may shortly find the capitalistic class as energetic in protesting
against the presence of the yellow
alien as his laborer citizens have been
for years. Lee Mongkow, Chinese interpreter in the customs service, was
the Oriental who set the ball in motion, when he purchased for something
like $17,000 the pretty residence of
J. S. H. Matson on Victoria Arm, and
became the next door neighbor of
Hon. James Dunsmuir. — Moyie
Leader.
What Grace Thinks.
Would someone kindiy inform us as
to what the oposition side of the provincial government has done during
the past term of the legislature. At
an early stage Mr. McDonald headed
a brigade against the government for
not receiving John Houston into the
cabinet. Now they complain because
Hon. R. F. Green is in. The people of the province realize that their
only real complaint is that they are
not in it. They may keep on complaining, but that never yet won a
county or a prize of any kind. They
must do something, so let them men- \
tion some good measures proposed or.
some definite work they have done, and
then the people will listen. Organizer j
Simpson may well commence early, for
he has a long road to travel to meet
with success when he carries such
timber as is found in the opposition.—
The  Prospector.
Cowichan Lake.
It is commonly suposed that fishing
is the one and only sport for which
Cowichan is famous. Judging, however, from the last issue of The Leader,
it will appear that this is only a side
issue, and that the more popular and
manly sports also have a vogue in the
capital of the agricultural district. The
Cowichan Lawn Tennis Club have just
held their annual handicap tournament,
which has been one of the attractive
events of Cowichan for upwards of
fifteen years. In reporting that matter
the Leader states that this event marks
the end of the club. Surely there must
he some mistake. There is too much
enterprise at Cowichan for a good thing
like this to drop through. If the veterans are played out let the youngsters
take the matter up.
A Good Definition.
A Golden schoolboy has given the
best definition of a friend so far on
record: "A friend is a person who
knows all about you and likes you just
the same."
Small Salmon Pack.
The total salmon pack in British
Columbia is approximately four hundred thousand cases this yehr. Of
that amount thc Fraser river has supplied a hundred and seventy thousand
cases, and lhe remaining two hundred
and thirty thousand cases will be from
thc numerous cannery points along the
northern British Columbia coast. This
is about a third the pack of last year,
and about two hundred and twenty-six
thousand cases less than the pack of
1002, the corresponding season in the
four-year cycle.
Granhy Prospects.
A late report from Boston states
that stockholders of thc Granby Consolidated Mining, Smeltintr, & Power
Co. will receive with their September
dividend checks notice of the company's annual meeting, to be held in
New York on Oct. 2.
The company's fiscal year ended
June 30, and during that period net
earnings were between $1,800,000 and
$1,000,000. Copper production was
just under 25.000,000 pounds.
Sawing Wood.
The Nicola Herald is a small paper
probably, however, it is large enough
for the district which it at present
covers. We mention it to call attention to an interesting fact, viz., that
I lie editor attends strictly to "business."
Apparently he has no time to waste on
non-essentials, and even politics do not
interest him. He writes intelligently
and persistently on the subjects of mining and agricultural development, keeping the resources of his own district
well to the fore. In this respect he
offers a creditable contrast to many of
his more ambitious rivals, and is proceeding upon lines which will not only
tend to advance the success of the Nicola Valley, but also of the Nicola
Herald.
Government Commended.
The department of education has been
commendably prompt in giving Hedley
much needed school accommodation,
and the department of public works is
also expending considerable sums for
a hospital and for a road up Twenty-
Mile. Mr. Shatford, M.P.P., should
not forget that Princeton is in his riding and that its appeal for a school
house should cause the tender chords
of his heart to vibrate in harmony with
that appeal. Come, Mr. Shatford,
loosen up, and you faith fill friends here,
as in duty bound, will ever remain so.
—Similkameen Star.
The Malliene Test.
Although the glanders scare has subsided it will be interesting to our readers to know that Professor McCall, of
Glasgow, writing to Mr. H. S. George,
VS., of Kamloops, says: 'I regard Mal-
lien as a curative agent in the earlier
stages of glanders, and in all stages of
thc malady a most reliable diagnostic
agent."
Latest Feminine Desire.
Woman, proverbially, has the last
word, yet how often must she sigh that
convention would grant her the first.
Half the conversational difficulties of
which wc hear are due to the fact that
it is "bad form" for a woman to take
the initiative.—Lady's Pictorial.
Grass Culture
As we are now selling large and increasing quantities of
SUTTON'S FAMOUS LAWN GRASS SEEDS
for Grass Lawns, Croquet Lawns, Tennis Courts, Golf Links, and Bowling
Greens, it would seem advisable to give publicity to recent opinions of experts
on Grass Culture.
In climates where there is no liability to sharp October frost, FALL
seeding is preferable to spring seeding. The young grass roots get the fall
and winter moisture, and your lawn is ready for use in summer.
Do not seed at all unless your lawn   is   PROPERLY   prepared   and   all
weed seeds  germinated and destroyed.       Excessive watering at any time is
a mistake; in the late summer months it is a fatal blunder.   Water carries v
ery little plant food; it acts as a dis-solvent for the foods on which the p
lants feed.
$i's worth of good fertilizer is worth $5's worth of water. You save
money and save the lawn if you give it a dressing of our
B.   &   K.   NO.   1   FERTILIZER
in the spring and fall. There are many good reliable fertilizers. We are not
so foolish as to say ours is better than the best, but we do say it is tlle outcome of many years' experience and experiment on the soils of British Columbia, and that every lawn in B. C. on which this fertilizer has been used has
kept bright and green all through the present dry summer by merely watering
REASONABLY once a week. The price is $2.25 per 100-lb. sack, and the
official  analysis  is  as  follows:
ANALYSIS OF B. &    . No. 1 FERTILIZER
Extract from Bulletin No. 105 as Issued   by   the Laboratory  of  the  Inland
Revenue Department at Ottawa.
Nitrogen stated as ammonia 11.22 per cent.
Soluble Phosphoric Acid   0.8    per cent.
Citric Soluble    7.1   per cent.
Insoluble  0.2   per cent.
Total    8.1   per cent.
Potash    0.4   per cent.
Moisture    7.96 per Cent.
J. FAGAN, Analyst.
Our Expert will be glad to answer   any  inquiries on   Grass  Culture  and
Fertilizers.   Kindly address all inquiries on this subject to
SEED   AND   FERTILIZER   DEPARTMENT,
BRACKMAN-KER MILLING CO.
125 Government St. 36 Hastings St. Front St, Front St.
Victoria. Vancouver. New Westminster. Nelson.
b-k 118   	
Chinese- made okirts ^Overalls
MUST GO I
UNION-MADE
>RN BRAND
BUTTING AHEAD.
Fashionable Pastime of the Day
ROLLER
SKATING
AT ASSEMBLY HALL,
Afternoons 2 to 5, evenings 7.30 to 10.30
Saturday mornings 10 to 12.
Courteous and competent iustmctors
free for ladies.
Boys under 16 not allowed on floor at
evening sessions,
Excellent orchestra.
Only first-class patronage solicited.
THE NEW GROCERY STORE
74 Port Street.
COAL.
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo. Collieries.
New Wellington Coal.
The best household coal in the market at
current rates.  Anthracite coal for sale.
Dealers; <n Cord and Cut Wood.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA
With a stock of new and
up-to-date
STAPLE
GROCERIES
CAPITAL FLOUR A SPECIALTY
First-class goods always kept in
stock, with prices the most
reasonable.
REMEMBER THE PLACE
47 FORT STREET
VICTORIA.
VICTORIA   THEATRE
The Juvenile Bostonians
Monday and Tuesday, Sept. 10 and 11.
POPULAR  PRICES
Cook With Good
Baking
Powder
That means our Baking Powder, be
cause it is as good as Pure Cream 0
Tartar, Pure Soda and other gooi
things can make.
! The large sale our Baking Powde
is having shows that lots of good cook
are using it.
TRY IT FOR BISCUITS
Price 25c. Per Poum
CYRUS H. BOWES,
CHEMIST
I Government St., near Yates Stree THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8 1906.
TRAVELLERS' GUIDE
CAMBORNE
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining men and
commercial travellers.
|John A. Thew, Prop'r
REVELSTOKE
Hotel Victoria
REVELSTOKE, B. C.
Headquarters for miners and
lumbermen.
tobt. Laughton, Prop.
Stewart Williams
AUCTIONEER and   COMMISSION AGENT
Cattle Sales a Specialty.
STEWART WILLIAMS
The Auctioneer.      51 FORT STREET
Two Doors From Fell & Co.
Tiie September number of the Canadian Magazine is exceptionally inter-
testing and the photographs equal to
jthose of any American magazine.    In
ijthis department there is a marked improvement in recent issues. Particulars about Sir John Macdonald are al-
jways interesting, and J. E. B. Mc-
jCready's article is of unusual merit. If
ithere is room for improvement in any
[section of this now admirable publication it lies in the direction of fresher
i'and stronger fiction.
TIMBER LICENSE.
J Notice Is hereby given that thirty days
after date I Intend to apply to the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
[Works for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described
land, situated ln Port Renfrew District
on the north side of San Juan river, and
adjoining John Young on his north boundary: Commencing at a post marked
"Alexr. Young," thence 40 chains west,
tiience 80 chains north, thence 80 chains
east, thence 80 chains south, thence 40
chains west to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew this 20th day of
August, 1906.
ALEXR. YOUNG.
TIMBER LICENSE.
Notice is hereby given that thirty days
after date I Intend to apply to the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
■Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following described land, situated on the San Juan
river, Renfrew District, and adjoining
John Young east boundary: Commencing
at a post marked "Alexr. Young," thence
40 chains south, thence 80 chains east,
thence 80 chains north, thence 80 chains
west, thence 40 chains south to place of
commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew, Renfrew District,
[this 19th day of August, 1906.
ALEXR. YOUNG.
TIMBER LICENSE.
Notice Is hereby given that thirty days
after date I intend to apply to the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following described land, situated ln Port Renfrew,
Renfrew District: Commencing at a post
planted 40 chains north of Alexr. Young
southeast corner, marked "John Young"
southwest corner," thence 80 chains north,
thence 80 chains east, thence 80 chains
south, thence 80 chains west to place of
commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew this 16th day of
August, 1908.
JOHN YOUNG.
TIMBER LICENSE.
Notice Is hereby given that thirty days
after date I Intend to apply to the Hon.
lhe   Chief   Commissioner   of   Lands   and
Works for a special license   to   cut   and
carry away timber from the following described  laud,   situated on  the  Sun  Juan
river, Renfrew District, and adjoining E.
jr.   Palmer  on  .bis   east  boundary:   Commencing at a post marked "John Young,"
thence 40 chains north, tiience 80 chains
•west,  thence 80 chains  south,  thenee 80
fchnins east,  thence   40 chains north   to
place   of  commencement,   containing   640
(teres.
Dated at Port Renfrew this 18th day of
Vugust,   1906.
JOHN YOUNG
Notice is hereby given that, lit) days
ifter date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Jhief Commissioner of Lands and Works
lor permission to purchase the following
lescrlbed land, situated on the head ot
he Bulkly River: Commencing at a post
parked R. B., N. W. corner, thence run-
ling west 60 chains; thence south w
halns; thence east 60 chains; thence
orth 60 chains to point of commence-
«ent, and containing 480 aores, more or
W. N. CLARK, Locator.
| Bulkly Valley, July 3rd, 1906,
(Notice is hereby given that, .jo days
fter date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
hief Commissioner of Lands and Works
ir permission to purchase the following
escribed land on the Skeena River,
:ange V., Coast District: Commencing at
, post located at the S. W. corner of E.
,. McGeachle's land and marked "J. M.
[icGeachie's N. W. corner"; thence
huth 40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
hence north 40 chains; thence west 40
jhains to point of commencement, confining 160 acres, more or less.
J.  M.  McGEACHIE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about eight miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner on the bank of a stream
running Into Yakoun river and marked
"■Initial post No. 1, H. W. Treat's N. W.
cornet," and running east 80 cnains; thence
south SO chains; thence west 80 chains;
thenee north 80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
H. W. TREAT.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (80)
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum aud petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about ten miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner aud marked "initial Post
No. 1, J. D. Meenach's S. W. corner," and
running north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence west
81) chains to the place of commencement,
containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
J. D. MEENACH.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about five miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner and marked "Initial poet
No. 1, Walter Oakes's S. E. corner" and running north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
WALTER OAKES.
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to tlie
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
nbout six miles from the west coast
thereof and described ns follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, G. A. Brown's N. W. corner" and
running south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
Q. A. BROWN.
NOTICE Is hereby given tliat Thirty (30)
dnys after date I intend to apply to the
Hou. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for conl,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about six miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, S. U. Williams's N. W. corner" and
running south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 ohains to plnce of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
S. U. WILLIAMS.
NOTICE to hereby given that Thirty (30)
dnys after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lnnds located
on 'Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about flve miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, G. E. Beardslee's N. E. corner" and
running south 80 chnins; thenee west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
G. E. BEARDSLEE.
NOTICE to hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to npply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about nine miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, D. H. Jarvls's S. E. corner" and running north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chnins; thence east 80
chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
D. H. JARVIS.
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
dnys after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for n licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lnnds located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
nbout six miles from the west coast
thereof and described ns follows:
Commencing nt a post planted at the
southwest corner and marked "Initlnl Post
No. 1, G. J. Hodge's S. W. corner" nnd
running north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thonce south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
G. J. HODGE.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
dnys after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about six miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, F. M. Munger's S. W. corner" and
running north 80 chnins; thence enst 80
chnins; thence south 80 chnins; thence west
SO chnins to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
F. M. MUNGER.
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
H. P. FOGH.
NOTICE to hereby given that Thirty (30)
dnys after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum aud petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about seven miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, Edgar C. Fogh's S. E. corner" and
running north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
EDGAR C. FOGH.
NOTICE to hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands nnd
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about seven miles from tbe west coast
thereof and described ns follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, H. L. Emmons's S. W. corner" and
running north 80 chains; thence east SO
Chains; thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 aores.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
H. L. EMMONS.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for conl,
asphaltum and petroleum on lauds located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about seven miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, Victor Vlgelius's N. W. corner" and
running south 80 chnins; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
VICTOR VIGELIUS.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
nbout flve miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, M. G. Munley'S N. E. corner" nnd
running south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chnins to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
M. G. M'UNLESY.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for conl,
nsphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
nbout flve miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast comer and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, E. H. Gule's S. E. corner" and running north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chnins; thence east
SO chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
E.  H. GUIB.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands nnd
Works for n licence to prospect for conl,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Chnrlotte group,
nbout seven miles from the west coast
thereof and described ns follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, W. Lnngllle's S. E. corner" nnd running north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south SO chains; thence east
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
W. LANG1LLB.
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for conl,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Grahnm Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about flve miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing nt a post planted at the
northwest corner nnd marked "Initial Post
No. 1, W. P. Flint's N. W. corner" and
running south 80 chains; thence enst 80
chnins; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chnins to place of commencement,
containing 610 ncres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
W. P.  FLINT.
NOTICE to hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd
Works for a licence to prospect for conl,
nsphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Chnrlotte group,
about seven miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner nnd marked "Initial Post
No. 1, H. P. Fogh's N. E. corner" and running south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence east
NOTICE is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
days after date I intend to apply to thc
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for n licence to prospect for conl,
asphaltum and petroleum on lnnds located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about six miles from the west const
thereof and described ns follows:
Commencing at n post planted at the
northwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, F. W. Crary's N. W. corner" and
running south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence west
SO chains to plnce of commencement, containing 640 ncres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
F. W. CRARY.
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
days nfter date I Intend to apply to thc
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queeu Charlotte group,
about seven miles from the west coast
thereof and described ns follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner and mnrked "Initial Post
No. 1, J. Albert Johnson's N. E. corner"
and running south 80 chnins; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to place of commencement,
containing 640 ncres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
J. ALBERT JOHNSO.*..
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days nfter date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about eight miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner nnd marked "Initial Post
No. 1, R. S. Eskridge's N. E. corner," and
running south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
R.   S.   ESKRIDGE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that 60 days
after date I Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to purchase the following land,
situated on Works Channel: Commencing
nt a post marked "Initial Post T. H. W.,"
thence east 20 chains, thence north 20
chains, thence west 20 chains, thence north
20 ohains, thence west 40 chains, thence
south 40 chnins, more or less, to shore
line; thence following shore line to point
of commencement, containing 240 acres
more or less.
8t T. H. WATSON.
Port Simpson, B. C, Aug. 16, 1906.
NOTICE to hereby given that Thirty (30)
dnys after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
nsphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Chnrlotte group,
nbout seven miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing nt a post planted at the
northwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, C. D. Emmons's N. W. corner" and
running south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thenee west
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
 C. D. EMMONS.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the west half
of southenst quarter and west half of
northeast quarter, all ln Section 8, Township 6, Coast Range 5, Bulkley Valley;
containing one hundred and sixty (160)
acres, more or less.
Dated July 25th, 1906.
aull ERNEST MORIN.
No. 27.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away limber from tbe
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot Sound,  Rupert District:
Beginning at a post planted near tbe
initial post of Application No. 26, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80 chains,
west SO chains, north 60 chains, east 40
chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1006.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. 28.
Take notice that, 30' days after date, I
intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,  Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted on tbe
west side of Union Island about 20 chains
south of a group of small islands in Blind
Entrance, thence 80 chains east, thence 60
chains north, thence 40 chains west,
thence 40 chains north, thence west about
20 chains to the shore of Blind Entrance,
thence southerly along said shore to
point of commencement.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906,
JOHN HIRSCH.
Notice Is hereby given that, 60 dayi
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Work*
for a lease of the foreshore opposite Lots
63 and 54, Metchosin District.
ALBERT A. ARGYLE.
Vancouver, B. C, July 4th, 1906.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 60 days
after dnte, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner ot Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the southwest
quarter section 17, Township 6, Coast
Range 5, Bulkley Valley; containing (160)
one hundred and sixty acres, more or less,
JOS.  BOURGON.
Aldermere. July 25,  1906. aull
NOTICE.
Claim No. 1.
Further take notice that 30 days alter
date 1 intend to apply to the Honorable
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry
awny timber from the following described
lands, commencing at post planted at the
N. E. corner of T. L. 7197, or on the line
at corner of said claim, thence W. 80
chains, N. 80 chains, E. 80 chains, S. 80
chains to point of commencement.
Dated this ISth day of July, 1906.
P. MCDONALD.
Claim No. z.
Take notice that 30 days after date I
Iniend to apply to the Honorable Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for a
special license to cut and carry away
timber from the following described
lands: Commencing at post planted 30
chains from S. W. corner on the line of
T. L. 7197, thence N. 80 chains, thence W.
80 chains, S. 80 chains, E. 80 chains to
point of commencement.
Dated this 18th day of July, 1906.
P. MCDONALD.
No. 20.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
Intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Tahsish Arm, Kyuquot Sound, Rupert
District:
Beginning at a post planted on the
east boundary of Application No. 13,
about 60 chains south of the northeast
corner thereof, thence east 160 chains,
thence north 40 chains, thence west 160
chains, thence south along said boundary
40 chains to point of commencement,
Kyuquot Sound. June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. 21.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
Intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works lor a special license
lo cut nnd carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,  Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted at the
southeast corner of No. 8 Application on
Tahsish Arm, thence north along the east
boundary of No. 8 40 chains, thence east
60 chains, thence north 40 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence south about 20
chains to the shore, thence following thc
shore southwesterly to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or
less.
Kyuquot Sound. June 14, 1900.
JOHN HIRSCH
No. 24.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
Intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot Sound,  Rupert District:
Beginning at a post planted on the
south shore of Narrow Gut Inlet, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 40 chains,
thence north 40 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence about 40 chains north to
the shore of Narrow Gut Inlet, thence
following the shore in a westerly direction lo point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. 25.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
intend to apply to the Clilei Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot Sound,  Rupert District:
Beginning at a post planted at the
southeast corner of Application No. 1, on
Kokshittle Arm, thence west SO chalna,
thence south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence nortli 80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 040 acres more
or less.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. 26.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from tbe
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot Sound,  Rupert District:
Beginning at a post planted on the
east side of a river unnamed entering Into Clan ntntck Harbor about 1% miles
from the mouth, thence east 60 chains,
north 80 chains, west SO chains, south 80
chains, east 20 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
TIMBER  LICENSE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, thirty
(30) days after date, I Intend to apply to
the Hon. the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cat
and carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated ln Port Renfrew,
Renfrew District: Commencing at a post
planted at the southeast corner of Section
Eighteen (18), Township Ten (10), marked
"Alexr. Young, S. E. Corner," thence
eighty chains west; thence eighty chains
north; thence eighty chains east; thence
eighty chains south to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated at  Port  Reufrew   this 11th  day
of August, 1906.
nul8 ALEX.  YOUNG.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 daya
after date, 1, the undersigned, will apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to lease or purchase
the following described land, namely, ln
Hcsult Harbor, Tlupana Arm, Nootkt
Sound, commencing at a post marked J.
Mortimer, Southeast Corner, running 40
chains west, thence north to shore line,
thence following the shore line to the
point of commencement, containing 80
acres, more or less.
Victoria, B.  C, July  11th, 1900.
aulS JOHN   MORTIMER.
No. 22.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
Intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
lo cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot   Sound,   Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Application No. S on
Kokshittle Arm, thence east 40 chains,
north 81 chains, west Go chains, south to
the shore of Kokshittle Arm, thence
southeasterly along said shore to get one
mile of southing, thence east about 40
chains to a point north of the Initial
stake, thence south 40 chains to point of
commencement.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
Notice is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a lease of the foreshore opposite Lots
45, 46 and 47, Esquimalt District.
ALBERT A. ARGYLE.
Vancouver, B. C, July 4th, 1906.
No. 23.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
Intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
the Ka-o-wlnch River, Kokshittle Arm,
Kyuquot  Sound,   Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted on the
north boundary about 20 chains west of
the northeast corner of Application No.
7, on the east bank of the Ka-o winch
River, ihence east 20 chains, north 160
chains, east 20 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or
Kyuquot Sound. June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
Notice Is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I iniend to upply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner ot Lands and Works
for special license lo cut and curry away
timber from lhe following described land
In Port Renfrew District, Vancouver island, on the west side of the Gordon
Itiver, adjoining A. Wheeler's claim on
the southeast corner. Commencing at a
post on the northeast corner marked J.
Young's northeast corner, ihence south
80 chains, west 80 chains, norih SO chains,
and east SO chains to thc place of commencement, containing 040 acres. Located June 9th, 1906.
J. YOUNG.
Notice is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I Intend to apply to tbe Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for special license to cut and carry away
timber from the following described land
ln Port Renfrew District, Vancouver Island, adjoining A. E. Mannell's claims on
the southeast corner: Commencing at a
post on the northeast corner marked A.
Wheeler's (jr.) northeast corner, thence
south 80 chains, west SO chains, north 80
chains, nnd east 80 chnins to the place
of commencement,  containing 640 acres.
Located June 9th, 1906.
A. WHEELER, Ji
Notice is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply 'i the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Worka
for -jennlsslon to purchase the following
described land on the Skeena River,
Range V., Coast District: Starting from a
poat located at the northeast corner of
the Kltslla3 Indian Reserve, and marked
"E. J. McGeachle, S. W. corner"; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence west 4*
chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more or less.
E. J.  McGEACHIE.
Kitsilas, May 28th, 1906. 10
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8. 1906.
if *
* A Lady's Letter *
* By  BABETTE. **
Dear Madge.
For the moment all is peace in the
sartorial folds. The momentous questions of holiday attire have long since
been setled, and worn out, and for a
brief space at all events, there will be
a lull in the arduous round of shopping
and the oft-times wearisome quest for
novel ties. The moment has arrived,
indeed, when the husbands of well-
dressed wives and the fathers whose
quivers are full of daughters, are apt
to lift up a complaining voice on the
score of the extravagance of modern
frocks and frills. To some degree the
poignancy of their feelings may be influenced by the fact that the bills have
lately come in, but there seem to be
some quite disinterested men upon
whose nerves the subject settles, causing them acute irritation.
A detail which must infallibily be
taken into account amongst the decorative fancies of tomorrow, is the jalousie
flounce or flounces, the plural form being literally correct. This form of ornamentation consists of a series of bias
frills, arranged one above the other,
not unlike the laths of a Venetian
blind. A very smart new coat for autumn wear, expressed in bottle-green
cloth, has a panel on either side composed of these small frills cut out at
the edge in inverted scallops, outlined
with a fine cord piping, a button or
simulated butonhole at every point. A
pretty skirt in somewhat similar style
is actually panelled, plain breadths of
the cloth alternating with graduated
tiers of flouncing. The general effect
is rather pleasing, and certainly "chic."
The announcement recently made by
a well known doctor that clothes, "particularly those fitting close to the body,
are a fruitful source of ill-health,"
however disconcerting from the "cou-
touriere's" point of view, recurs with
a certain fascination in hot weather,
when such exigencies of civilization as
collars, gloves, veils, not to mention
shoes and corsets, cause more than a
mere weariness of the flesh.' In reading the great man's scientific theory,
one learns, wiah something of a shock,
that to be really healthy one should
wear as little as the requirements of
twentieth century "respectability" demand. Nor does he flinch from exhorting a return to the simple life of
our ancestors in respect of skins and
woad—or their modern equivalent. This
is courageous, and the nudity theory
is an argument to be seriously considered in quite hot weather; but how
about March winds and winter frosts?
The vision of uncorseted matrons
'Sternly seeking health in sheep-skins
and saudals is too serious to trifle
with. Picture postcards, for instance,
recording types of beauty, would then
indeed require editing. It may be
noted in passing that masculine furnishings are not condemned—only
those of much whale-boned woman.
By the way, speaking of men's furnishings reminds me that B. Williams
& Co., on Yates street, are sole agents
for the "Semi-ready Tailoring," and
it is useful to know that their new fall
stock of raincoats, overcoats, suits, etc.,
has arrived.
The craze for passepartout quotations, which carries with it a more
commendable sentiment than most fads,
seems to be limitless. To see on lhe
walls of a pretty bedroom the inspiring words of a favorite writer, has an
uplifting tendency that deserves encouragement. These mottoes arc
bought unframed in plain and illuminated text; and almost any one can
passepartout them. They make appropriate gifts for all, as they mean only
two things—the thought, and thc sentiment they carry with them. I am
framing one that was sent me the other
day.   The motto reads:
"It matters not how strait thc gate,
How  charged    with    punishment  the
scroll,
I am the master nf my fate;
I am thc caplain of my soul."
—W. E. Henley.
The wonderful contrivances in the
way of furniture which the Americans
have invented lately with a view to
economising space and saving labor is
most ingenious. One of the newest is
the "hanging table," which when not in
use can be caught up to the ceiling
out of the way. It is simply a flat
piece of wood like the top of an ordinary table suspended from the ceiling rafters by means of four ornamental chains, one at each corner. It is
argued in favor of this novelty that
table legs are a nuisance in a small
apartment. But its disadavantages
would appear numerous to people not
accustomed to a seafaring life and not
relishing the idea of feeling some of its
most disagreeable sensations while still
on dry land. It would be most unpleasant, for instance, to find one's dinner making violent oscillations and
showing a tendency to precipitate itself
into one's lap every time the table was
touched. The effect upon one's appetite would not be good when the whole
performance of dinner was fraught
with so much peril. Is there not a
virtue in equilibrium which counterbalances the disadvantage of limbs?
There is something dispiriting, too, in
the fact that one's table would be more
or less of a fixture, despite all its in-
stablity, and could not be moved beyond the limits of its four hooks. The
"hanging" idea might be useful for
adaptation in small yachts, where one
must expect to "rough it" more or
less, but surely no one in his senses
who lived on "terra firtna" and valued
his peace of mind and body would elect
to take unto himself a piece of furniture which has many of the elements of
storm and earthquake combined.
There is something Gilbertian in the
idea of the droll situations which
might arise from the possession of a
"hanging table." One wonders whether the inventor was endowed with an
unusually acute sense of humor, or
with none  at all.
After a look at Weiler Bro.' splendid
selection of dining tables, one is absolutely convinced that, after all, there
is nothing like comfort, and a substantial four-legged "festive board" is
certainly the most comfortable dining
table yet invented.
Lhalloner & Mitchell continue to be
the leading gift store. I hear of people coming from neighboring cities to
invest in wedding gifts. What think
you of a lovely turquoise necklace recently shipped to a prospective bride?
Lucky bride,  say I!
BABETTE.
NOTICE
Their Excellencies the Governor-General and the Countess Grey
will hold a public reception in the
Legislative Chambers, Parliament
Buildings, on Monday, the iyth
inst. at 0:4.5 p.m.
The entrance to the buildings for
the general public will be at the
door to the left of the main gates,
(the usual public entrance.)
The dressing room for ladies
will be the Maple and Cedar committee rooms. The dressing room
\for gentlemen will be the members''
cloak room.
The dressing room for the officers of the army and navy and
militia will be the members dining
room behind ihe Legislative Chambers.
The  Speaker's room and that
adjoining it will be  reserved for
the use of Their Excellencies and
His Honour the Lieutenant-Gover
liar's party.
By command
H.J. S.MUSKETT,
Private Secretary.
Jpififififififif'fywififif
* Social and        *
f Personal. *
♦ f
Mrs. J. S. Harvey and son left this
week for Crofton to join Mr. Harvey,
and take  up their  residence there.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. McPhillips left on
Wednesday for Banff and Lake Louise,
where they will spend a week or two.
* *   *
Mrs. W. H. Finlayson has purchased
Captain Collister's residence on Dallas
Road.
Mrs. C. C. Worsefold (New Westminster) who has been visiting her
mother, Mrs. Charles, returned home
this morning.
* *   *
The Misses Blackwood leave tomorrow for "Brunot Hall," Spokane. They
will be accompanied by Mrs. Blackwood.
* *   *
Miss Blakemore and Miss Gladys
Blakemore, late of Nelson, have taken
up their residence at Mount Pleasant,
Mears  Street.
* *   *
Mrs. Berkeley entertained at the ever
popular bridge on Tuesday afternoon
last, at her camp, Kanaka Beach. Three
tables were filled by the guests.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs, Roper, who have been
spending a few weeks here, being
guests at the Dallas, returned to their
home at Cherry Creek on Tuesday.
* *   #
Mrs. Marpole left for Vancouver on
Sunday last, being accompanied by her
sister, Miss Evelyn Holmes, who is on
her way to resume her studies at Yale.
* *   *
Miss Doris Clute left this morning
for _ her home in New Westminster.
While here she has been the guest of
her sister, Mrs. C. J. Fagan, and Mrs.
Beauchamp Tye.
* *   *
Miss Pooley and Miss Violet Pooley
intend leaving shortly for England,
the former to visit her sister, the Hon.
Mrs. Stanley, and the latter to join
her brother, Mr. Tom Pooley, in
Egypt.
»   *   *
Mrs. Henry Heisterman held her
post-nuptial reception on Tuesday last,
at her home on Cook street. The
bride loked charming, and was assisted in receiving by Mrs. D. A. Ker
and Mrs. Robert Brett.
* *   *
The launching of the new C.P.R.
steamer "Princess Royal" on Saturday afternoon last was quite a social
event of the week. Mrs. Marpole,
wife of the general superintendent of
the C.P.R., christened the steamer, after which the many guests repaired to
the sail loft, where tea was served. The
long tables were decorated in red and
white dahlias, and the loft hung with
different colored flags and ensigns,
presenting a gala apearance. Among
the guests were noticed: Mr. and Mrs.
Roper, Dr. and Mrs. Fagan, Mrs. and
Miss Phipps, Mrs. Tilton, the Misses
Tilton, Dr. and Mrs. Heinmann
Robertson, Mrs. Loewen, Miss Loewen, Mrs. Grahame, Mrs. Eberts, the
Misses Eberts, Miss Eberts, Mrs.
Little, Miss Little, the Misses Pitts,
Mr. and Miss Bryden, Mr. and Mrs.
Hallyer, Mrs. Hickman Tye, Mrip.
Beauchamp Tye, Miss Doris Clute,
Mr. and Mrs. Amberry, the Misses
Mason, Mrs. Hall, Mrs. Carmichael,
Mrs. Gibb, Mrs. Fred Pemberton, Mrs.
Pemberton, Miss Pemberton, Mrs.
Berkeley, Mrs. Tatlow, Miss Tatlow,
Mrs. Irving, the Misses Irving, Col.
Holmes, Miss Eva Holmes, Mrs.
Troup, Mrs. W, S. Gore, Mrs. T. S.
Gore, Miss Arbuckle, Mr. and Mrs.
Crease, Capt. and Mrs. Freeman, Mrs.
Bushby, Mr. and Mrs. Bridgeman, and
many others.
* •   •
A very pretty wedding took place at
Sandwick on Thursday afternoon, the
30th ult., the occasion being the marriage of Miss Josephine Willemar,
youngest daughter of Rev. J. J. and
Mrs. Willemar, of the Mission, Sandwick. and Lieutenant Harris, R.N. The
church, which was crowded, was very
prctily decorated by the bride's girl
friends. Floral arches were placed at
intervals up the aisle and two arches of
evergreens draped with flags between
the road and the church porch were
very effective. Thc ceremony was
performed by Archdcason Scriven, assisted by the bride's father. The
bridegroom, who was in dress uniform, was supported by bis brother,
Mr. J. K. Harris. Mr. Douglas Willemar gave his sister away. The bride
looked lovely in a gown of white silk-
voile, the bodice of which was made
with a transparent yoke and deep
girdle, being beautifully embroidered
in chiffon and pearl. The design was
dogwood. She wore a tulle veil fastened with spray of orange blossoms,
and carried a shower bouquet of white
roses and asparagus fern. The bridesmaids were Miss Willemar and Miss
Kathleen     Willemar.     The     former
wore white muslin in a dainty rosebud
patern, green girdle and green chiffon
hat, and carried a bouquet of white
phlox, pink sweet peas and ferns. Miss
Kathleen Willemar wore pale blue
muslin, fosebud pattern, pale blue
girdle, blue chiffon hat, and carried a
bouque lof white asters, blue phlox
and ferns. There were four litle
flower girls, Miss Marporie Smith,
Miss Mildred Moore, and the Misses
Gertrude and Gwendolyn Potts. They
looked charming in white organdie
dresses trimmed with valenciennes insertion, and large baby hats of white
silk. They carried baskets of pink and
white sweet peas and white clematis.
The groom's presents to the bridesmaids were gold Chinese brooches, and
to the flower girls gold and pearl 'safety
pin brooches. His presents to the
bride were opal and pearl brooch, sapphire ring and gold watch and chain.
After the ceremony Mrs. Willemar
held a reception at the Mission, where
the newly married couple received the
congratulations of their friends in the
garden, standing beneath a floral bed,
which was suspended fr/om a large
florol arch. A large number of gueses
were present. Later in the evening
Mr. and Mrs. Harris left on the City
of Nanaimo en route to England. The
bride's going away dress was royal
blue cloth, with vest and revers of
gold Indian embroidery and white
straw hat trimmed with chiffon.
The following is a list of the presents :
Mrs. Gibson, silver souvenir spoon;
Mr. Burnett, silver manicure set;
Archdeacon A. Scriven, silver bonbon dish; Mr. and Mrs. Abrams, cut
glass bottle; Mr. and Mrs. Galanders,
silver paper knife; Messrs. Netherby
and Ward, half dozen silver fish knives
and forks; Mr. Thwaites, silver coffee
pot; the Hockey Club, travelling case;
Mr. and Mrs. Andrews, centre piece;
Miss M. Milligan, silver bon-bon
spoon.
Victoria—Senator, Mrs., and Miss
Macdonald, silver-moUnted clock; the
Misses Devereux, gold neck chain; Mr.
and Mrs. McB. Smith, leather handbag; Mr. J. Lawson, oak and silver
butter dish; Misses Muriel and Emmie
Nicholles, silver cold meat forws; Major and Mrs. Nicholles, cheque; Mr. A.
Stewart, Wedgewood china and silver
cream and sugar set; Mr. and Mrs.
Poff, silver bon-bon dish; Mr. L. L. V.
York, silver salt • cellars; Bishop of
Columbia, cheque; Miss B. Carr, two
camisoles; Miss Cassidy, silver beet
fork; Mrs. R. Monro and daughter,
silver souvenir spoon; Mr., and Mrs.
Carew Gibson and Miss Green, silver
backed clothes brush; Mr. and Mrs.
P. Johnson, silver olive fork; Mrs. P.
T. Johnston, hand-painted bag; Mr.
Mrs., and Miss Marguerite Little, pair
of silver bon-bon dishes; Capt. and
Mrs. Freeman, silver vase; Miss Collis, lace handkerchief; Misses King,
silver and glass tooth-brush holder; Dr.
and Mrs. Jones, silver butter dish;
Commander and Mrs. Thorpe, double
silver salt cellars; the Misses Harvey,
burned leather and stationery writing
case; Miss J. Lawson, lace handkerchief.
Vancouver—Mr. and Mrs. Boultbie,
silver-mounted writing case; Mr. K.
Sharp, silver and oak butter dish.
Salt Spring—Mr. and Mrs. Keith
Wilson, silver sugar sifter; Mrs. King,
table mat; Mr. Reggie Carwithen, silver-mounted writing set; Mrs. Carwithen, silver-handled bread knife; the
Misses Carwithen, half dozen silver tea
spoons; Miss Halliday, linen hanker-
chiefs; Mr. and Mrs. Halliday, real
lace handkerchief; Mr. and Mrs. Cyril
Piercey, silver buter knife; Mr. and
Mrs. Crockett, silver spoon; Mr. and
Mrs. Chas. Williams, silver-mounted
pickle jar; Mrs. R. Duncan, cheque;
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Duncan, silver-
mounted salad fork and spoon; Miss
Bella Duncan, bottle of scent; Mr. and
Mrs. Rees, silver teapot; Mr. and Mrs.
J. Moore, silver berry server; Mr. and
Mrs. Edmund Davis, silver cheese
scoop; Miss Mildred Moore, hand bag;
Mr. and Mrs. M. H. Piercey, silver
sauce spoon; Mrs. Milligan, silvdr-
mounted marmalade jar; Misses R. and
C. Milligan, silver sardine fork; Mr.
and Mrs. Eric Duncan, cheque; Mr.
and Mrs. Wilcox, hand glass and half-
dozen handkerchiefs; Mr. and Mrs.
Nuns, silver photo frame; Mr. J. W.
Cook, silver vase; Mr. and Mrs. Horace Smith, handmade lace handkerchiefs; Mr, and Mrs. Lucas, silver
sugar spoon; Mr. and Mrsr. W. J. Mc-
Quillian, silver sugar spoon and nightgown bag; Mrs. Dingwall, silver bonbon dish; Miss Dingwall, silver cake
knife; Mrs. 0. Duncan, cheque; Mr.
and Mrs. Geo. Robinson, silver cold
meat fork; Dr. and Mrs. Millard, silver photo frame; Miss Willemar, silver
teapot; Miss K. Willemar, silver sugar
bowl; Master R. T. Piercey, silver
sugar spoon; Mr. Cecil Smith, silver
photo frame; Miss May Creech, china
sugar howl and cream jug; Mr. and
Mrs. R. Grant, silver and glass
cpergne; Mr. and Mrs. Bryden, cut
glass bowl; Mrs. and Miss Tarbel, cut
glass scent bottle; Mr. and Mrs. Gage,
check; Mr. Robert Piercy, silver sugar
sifter; Mr. J. Urquhart, silver sugar
tongs; Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Piercy, ten-
eriffe table centre; Rev. J. and Mrs.
Menzies, leather-bound book; Mr.
Charles Bardick, silver frame; Mr. and
Mrs. Cowlins, table cloth; Mr. and
Mrs.  Cairns,    half-dozen  silver coffee
spoons;  Mrs. Pidock, hand made lace
table  centre;    Miss   Pidcock,    painted
china  plate;   Pidcock   Bros.,   oak   and
silver butter dish; Mr. and Mrs. Dobson and Mrs. D. Williams, silver berry
spoon; Mr. and Mrs. J. McKenzie, silver cold meat fork; Mr. and Mrs. Jas.
Carthew, silver crumb scoop and tray;
Miss  Matthewson,    half  dozen    silver
spoons; Miss Mabel Matthewson, silver
cold  meat  fork; Mr.  Chas.  Matthewj
son,  silver  and  glass  marmalade  jar;
Mr. Douglas Willemar, cut glass dish;,
Miss Winnie Wilson and brothers, silver    tray;    the    Misses    Macdonald,
pierced    silver    scent    bottle;    Miss/
Holmes,  pair    of    mahogany  frames;
Mr. and Mrs. Potts, pierced silver scent,
bottle;   Gwenan  d  Baby  Potts,  silve|
hairpin box;  Miss  E.   Milligan,  silver!
photo frame; Miss R. Dingwall, half-1
dozen silver coffee spoons; Mr. J. Rj
Harris,  travelling clock;  Rev.  J.  and
Mrs.    Willemar,    topaz    and    pearls
brooch; Mr. A. C. Fulton, table cloth
Miss Sutton, card case; Mrs. R. Guil'
lod, photo and d'oylies; Mr. and Mrs
McPhee, silver berry spoon; Mrs. Parkin, table cloth; Mr., Mrs., and Miss
Knight,  drawn-work  tea  cloth;    Mrl
Bourne,  drawn-work tray cloth;  MrsJ
Manners,  silver and  glass  salt  cellars
and  tea cloth;  Mr.  and  Mrs.  HarryL
Smith, bronze photo frames; Mr. andl
Mrs. McKenzie and Miss Myra CliffeJ
silver and glass salt and pepper cruetl
set;  Mr.  and Mrs.  distance, Limogesf
china cups  and saucers;    Miss  Hea-
thorn,  silver and glass salt cellars.
Riding
Breeches
. A new shipment just arrived
of English Biding Breeches in
Scotch and Donegal Tweeds,
$3.50, $4.50, $5.50.
E. CHAPMAN
DAVIS CHAMBERS
Opposite Strand Hotel,
Vancouver.
Week September 10
The New
Grand
SULLIVAN ft CONSIDINE,    Proprlatora.
Management of ROBT. JAMIESON.
The Mimic Four
Comedy Playlet, "The Day After."
Charles DeVaro & Gertrude Curtis,
Comedy Ring and Bar Artists.
Harry Salmon & Ida Chester,
The only Laughing Team and
Coster Act.
Eddie Lamont
Comedy Musical Act and Drum Major
Tom and Frank Austin,
Novelty Jugglers.
Frederic Roberts,
Illustrated Song,
New Moving Pictures,
Real Hair
Switches
Pompadours, Curl J
all of the latest
style, at
MADAME
KOSCHE'S
Hair Dressing1!
Parlors
58 Douglas
Street
VICTORIA.

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