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Week Jun 20, 1908

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Array Kingsford Smith & Co.
Stock and General
AUCTIONEERS
Commiwion and Real Estate Agents,    _
167 Cordova St.        Vaacouver.
tJUUUUUUUUUUUUUtAJUUUUUUAJ
Victoria Edition
The Week
R British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria aad Vancouver B. G.
Stewwt WUUum
l,nr85
Hilton Keith  e
5
STEWART WILLIAMS&Co
AUCTIONEERS
£ COMMISSION ABB
Gj RIAL ESTATE A6EBTS
jo   |i »ORT ST. VICTORIA, B. C.
<T« Phone 1324 I
__AJULSJLtLSUUJiiAX,9_li_lSLMXkX.
OL. V.    No
i 1
,\
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 20, 1908
'he Water
Question.
The   water   question   still
continues to be the absorbing topic of interest in Victoria.   The continuance of
ry weather accentuates the serious char-
cter of the problem.    If the scriptural
>roverb be true that "in the multitude of
lounsellors there is wisdom," then a happy
iution cannot be -far distant.    Men in
[very station and of every qualification are
aily expressing their opinions in the press
Ind giving vent to their indignation.   The
iolonist   and   the   Times   are   devoting
lumns to the subject in each issue.   For
ck 6i space, and also because many words
ake for confusion, The Week will con-
ense its comments into the smallest pos-
ble space, premising them by relating the
llowing incident:   A visitor from San
'rancisco called on the Editor on Tues-
y morning for a friendly chat.   His first
estion was, "What is new in Victoria ?"
n being told that the chief topic of in-
srest was the water supply, he laughed a
ry unholy and altogether too sarcastic
laugh, and remarked,   'You call that
w, do you.   Why when I lived in Vic-
in'ia fifteen years ago, it was the one topic
conversation."   It seems to The Week
lat this incident is in itself an explana-
on of, and the key to the whole situation,
rocrastination has kept Victoria without
adequate water supply for fifteen years,
d procrastination is still dominating the
ity Council, while the City Fathers hesi-
|ite as did all their predecessors to apply
, certain remedy.    The Mayor says that
ie criticism offered is unreasonable, illo-
cal,   and  based   upon   ignorance.   He
pints to the work of Mr. Adams, and says
|iat the City is carrying out that gentle-
an's suggestions.    lie says further that
uce no other source of supply could be
ade available before next summer, the
ity might just as well wait for thc com-
etion of Smith's Hill reservoir, as launch
[it into some bigger scheme.   This is the
lly reason, he alleges, for turning a deaf
lir to all suggestions for purchasing, or
asing  the   Goldstream   water,   or   for
[dtiating the Sooke Lake project.   There
■e two weak links in the Mayor's chain
' reasoning.   The first is that by the admission of Expert Adams, Elk Lake has
capacity sufficient to supply a population
: forty-five thousand, and if the Smith's
ill reservoir were completed today, and
ie whole of the water at Elk Lake made
/ailable for distribution, there would be
ttle, if any surplus over actual require-
|ents.   There is every probability that in
year from date the natural growth of
ictoria, based upon the experience of tho
ist two years, will have caught up to the
laximuiu capacity of Elk Lake; certainly
is will happen within two years,  in
hich event Victoria will not be appre-
ably better off, even with the completion
If Smith's Hill reservoir and the proper
istribution of Elk Lake water, than it is
day.    The  second weak link  in the
payor's argument is that the elevation of
'rnith's Hill is not sufficient to give fire
['•essure at any point in the city, and that
is too low even to feed by gravity the
hest residential districts.   By what pro-
■ss of reasoning can such a system be redded with any degree of finality.   Even
I domestic service and gardens can be
pplied for a year or two longer by its
bans, fire will still have to be fought by
mping engines without any practical as-
tance from gravity.   The question of the
pment is what ought the City to do both
the interests of health and safety.   The
eek maintains, as it has done for more
{an two years that the only practical and
onomical solution is the acquisition of
EDITORIAL
the Goldstream water. Year after year
passes, other schemes are ventilated, surveys are made, the Highland District and
Sooke Lake are examined, but the result is
always the same, that unless Victoria
wants to cut off its nose to spite its face, it
must go to Goldstream. This is the only
source from which pure water and plenty
of water can be obtained. It is true that
the same conditions might be complied
with at Sooke Lake, but only at a much
higher cost, and with a much longer pipe
line to maintain. The fact that the Esquimalt Waterworks Company has never been
willing to accept the price which the City
thought reasonable is scarcely a serious
factor if the City cannot do better elsewhere, and the proposal to spend a million
or a million and a half dollars to go to
Sooke, rather than give the Esquimalt
Waterworks Company $250,000 more than
the City thinks it ought to get, cannot be
defended on business grounds, and the
principle is not one upon which any man
would act in connection with his own
affairs. During the present year the Colonist has followed the lead of The Week
and lined up in favour of the Goldstream
proposition. This is a more charitable and
more probable explanation of its present
policy than that so ungraciously suggested
by the Times. But the Colonist goes a
step further and advocates that the City
should exercise its rights and call upon
the Esquimalt Waterworks Company to
supply the statutory quantity of three million gallons per day at six cents a gallon.
This would necessitate a five-years' contract, and it is surely not too much to suggest that a judicious and diplomatic negotiator might in connection with this
agreement arrange for an option to purchase, to be exercised at any time during
the five years. If, however, the latter
could not be arranged immediately, the
City would be no worse off in respect of a
contract for ultimate purchase, and would
within a year from date have double its
present water supply. The Week cannot
see a single reasonable objection to this
scheme. The money spent under the five
years' agreement would be spent in exactly
the same way as if the City had already
purchased the property, and would merge
into the ultimate scheme of distribution.
If the City has to wait for the thrashing
out of further legal quibbles, or if the
subject is, as the latest action of Mayor
Hall would suggest, to be tossed into the
political arena, then God help Victoria!
If we are not all poisoned our gardens and
lawns will be scorched up, and at the present rate our City will be burnt down. Is
it too much to ask in this enlightened
twentieth century that the City Fathers
should bring a little more "horse sense,"
and a little less sensitiveness to bear upon
the solution of what is viewed in every
light a most serious problem, and one
which threatens not only the good name,
but the actual safety of the City.
Women, or to be more pre-
Traducing cise, those women who are
Her Sex. banded together for reform
work, are wont to misunderstand and bitterly resent criticism of their
methods. It is impossible to comment unfavourably upon any of their proceedings
without arousing their ire, and the male
creature who condemns even their extravagancies is voted a Philistine. It must
in fairness be admitted that men reformers
also make mistakes, and are guilty of utterances for which no defence can be offered. But it is neither discourteous nor
unchivalrous to state that women are less
reliable in their public utterances than
men. It is not necessary to follow Miss
Murcutt in all her ridiculous meanderings
of the present week. She has slandered
the men who are allied with every interest
she has discussed, but why did she consider it necessary to slander her own sex ?
It is difficult to speak dispassionately of
the horrible story which she had the hardihood to relate upon the authority of some
unknown minister, and some unknown
mayor. Miss Murcutt would probably be
grievously offended if The Week suggested that she had been drawing upon her
imagination for the whole incident. And
yet this would be a more charitable conclusion than to accept her statement that
she was merely repeating what she had
been told. She does not pretend to have
investigated the story, and yet she is willing to believe and to repeat, on the authority of two men, that a certain Canadian
city contains fewer virtuous girls over fifteen than Sodom or Gomorrah. A woman
capable of believing such a statement is
either morally or mentally unfit to be
identified with any reform movement, and
as a choice of alternatives The Week sincerely hopes that the latter is the ct.se.
Tho Colonist is to be commended for summing up a most unusual amount of courage in condemning Miss Murcutt's attitude
in this matter. But the Colonist did not
go far enough. Public opinion demands
that Miss Murcutt shall promptly give her
authority for the story. If she fails to
realize her moral responsibility to do so
she must bo content to be branded as a
traducer of her sex and a slanderer of the
commonest type; and the organization
which allows her to continue to make use
of it as a vehicle for circulating prurient
stories will have to share the responsibility. The Week does not believe that there
is a mother in Victoria who will not endorse tliis conclusion, and it knows that
every parent, and every pure-minded girl,
of whom there are many more than Miss
Murcutt wots of, will repudiate her estimate of their sex with scorn. It is difficult to understand why evangelists and
professional reformers of both sexes are
so prone to bring discredit upon their
organizations by retailing the lascivious,
but it seems as if they helplessly gravitate
in that direction.
Fighting
Fire.
The Editor of The Week
was down town at 6.45 on
Friday morning. He heard
the fire-bells, and saw the
whole of the proceedings in connection
with the blaze on Government Street. The
opportunity for checking the work of the
Department and making a few careful
notes was too good to be lost, so it was
taken advantage of. The result is given
to the public and vouched for. The moral
can be drawn by the reader. The hose
wagon and one Waterous engine arrived on
(lie scene at three minutes past seven. At
this time flames were shooting out of all
tlie back windows of the top story overlooking Langley Street, where the fire had
evidently started. Tliere was no flame on
the Government Street side, but dense
volumes of smoke. The windows were not
broken. The first hose was connected to
the hydrant at the foot of Trounce Alley,
Onb Dollab. Pn Annum
was unreeled and carried upstairs. The
water flowed through it at seven minutes
past seven. Three minutes later another
hose was playing on the front of the building, but the pressure was insufficient to
force the water higher than about twenty-
five feet, which was ten or fifteen feet
lower than the upper story where the fire
was raging. At twelve minutes past seven
the upper windows cracked and the flames
burst out. By this time the whole upper
story was a raging furnace, full of flame.
It was not until eighteen minutes past
seven that the large nozzle was exchanged
for a smaller one, and the stream from the
Waterous engine reached the upper story.
Even then it was unable to play on the
roof, although it did good work through
the windows, and in fifteen minutes more
practically quenched the fire. Meanwhile
nothing effective had been done on the
Langley Street side where the fire originated, and where it could most easily have
been extinguished. There was no engine
on this side of the building, and it was
not until half past seven that the firemen
had a hose carried up the scaling ladder
to the roof of an adjoining building and
tried to play through the upper windows
of the burning block, but the gravity pressure was insufficient. The conclusions of
an impartial observer were that tho water
supply was ludicrously insufficient, that
the appliances were inadequate, and that
the best firemen in the world could do
very little with such an equipment. Until
the City has a gravity supply with a pressure of a hundred and fifty pounds as a
minimum it should have available sufficient engine power of the most modern
type to cover buildings at least seventy
feet high. As to the handling of the men
and the appliances only an expert is competent to express an opinion in view of the
woeful inadequacy of the latter.
Before the Provincial elec-
The Federal tions in Ontario and Quebec
Election. fa political quid mines had
decided that a Federal election would take place early in the Fall,
and the call to arms had actually gone
forth. After the significant victory of the
Conservative party in both provinces, the
enthusiasm for elections received a serious
check among the Liberal leaders, and now
the prophets are guessing again. All that
can safely be predicted is that tho election
may come this year, and failing that, it
must come next. Throughout the Dominion there are comparatively few constituencies that have not chosen their standard
bearers. Of these few Victoria is one.
The Week is of opinion that the selection
should have been made some time ago, and
that the party is weakened by the delay.
It still believes that the strongest candidate
available is Mr. H. G. Barnard. Those
who attended tho annual meeting of the
party last night and witnessed Mr. Barnard's enthusiastic re-election as President,
found little encouragement for differing
from the opinion of The Week, and if a
candidate is to be chosen from among the
more active and conspicuous members of
thc party, the choice will undoubtedly fall
upon Mr. Barnard. The sooner any uncertainty on this matter is removed, the
better for the party and for the prospects
of the candidate. THE WEKK, SATURDAY, JUNE 20, 1908.
An Interview With .a Distinguished Visitor.
When we were little children
We did what nursie said
And when the hour was 6 p.m.
We  had to go to bed,
And now, though we are older,
We find it's just the same:
We've got the same old nursie still-
She's merely changed her name.
When we were little children
We didn't dare to smoke
And nursie says we mustn't now—
And nursie doesn't joke.
For nursie hates tobacco;
Tobacco  makes  her  mad.
Oh, no;   we mustn't smoke at all,
Since nursie says it's bad.
When we were little children
We weren't allowed to bet
And nursie says we musn't now
Or ever "taste a wet,"
For beer is very sinful,
And whisky's even worse.
We should prefer to die of thirst—
According to our nurse.
When we were little children
We used to play at games,
But now we mustn't play at all,
Or nursie calls us names—
Unless  we play at ping-pong
Or  crokinole and  such.
*    *    *
Oh, dear, our nursie interferes
A little bit too much.
On the news being received that thc
2nd Vice-President of the W.C.T.U.,
North Kansas Branch, was in the city
on business connected with the local
convention, the interviewer hurried
with all haste (and a little flutter in
his heart) to the Empress Hotel,
where the distinguished lady was residing in a suite of rooms, especially
engaged.
Hc was ushered into a private sitting room, which had been tastefully
decorated with festoons of white ribbon twined round tinted diagrams of
enlarged miscroscopic section of the
intestinal canal before and after alcoholic intoxication, the tout ensemble
having a most charming effect. The
2nd Vice-President received the interviewer with a chilling stare. There
could be no doubt at all as to the
character of this reception. It was
icy. It was 20 below zero (with a
wind blowing), and the interviewer
instinctively buttoned up his coat as
he stood shivering under the scrutinizing glitter of a pair of spectacles.
"You have come to interview me,
I understand," said the 2nd Vice-
President in a voice that bore a
strange resemblance to her spectacles
—clear and hard.
"I hope I may have the honour," replied the interviewer with nervous
politeness.
"Take that chair," said the lady in
commanding tones. The interviewer
took the chair promptly: disobedience
in such an august presence could be
nothing else, hc felt, than a positive
sin.
The lady carefully extracted a
watch and placed it on a table beside
her. "Is this interview to last longer
than three minutes?" she asked.
"May I not have the pleasure of
conversing with you for a slightly
longer period?" enquired the interviewer humbly.
"In that case," said thc 2nd Vice-
President, "I must call my husband."
"But, madam," expostulated thc interviewer, "I have not come to interview your husband."
"No matter," she retorted, "it
would not be proper.
"Albert!   I want you."
In obedience to the summons, a
reverend gentleman instantly entered,
approached the table with his hands
clasped meekly, and awaited orders.
"You may take a chair, Albert."
Thc reverend gentleman slowly and
cautiously  stepped  across   the   room
to a chair in a far corner; there he
slowly and cautiously sat down and
kept a close watch on the stranger,
with frequent side-long glances out of
half shut eyes, beaming with love.
"This young man," said his better
half by way of introduction, "is a representative of the local press." She
paused. "He has come to interview
me."
"I hope," said the reverend gentleman in a beautiful sad voice, "that
the paper he represents is a strictly
temperance paper."
"You bet it is," exclaimed the interviewer, taken off his guard.
"Never," sighed the reverend gentleman, "1 would never do anything so
wicked! But I will excuse your language on the ground of enthusiasm.
And so your editor believes in temperance?"
"My editor," said the interviewer,
"even denies himself tea and coffee—
on occasions."
"Ah, I am so pleased to hear it,"
broke in the 2nd Vice-President, a
smile of approval lighting up her
somewhat grim features, "I have always found that a little warm water
with a dash of milk in it is quite sufficient, and so stimulating! But dear
me, how few of us are really temperate."
"What strange ideas," remarked the
interviewer,
"What strange ideas people have of
temperance nowadays!"
"Most strange," the lady agreed,
"people actually imagine that temperance means. using the things of
this world in a temperate mannerl"
"And how would you define temperance, madam," questioned the interviewer.
The august lady rose to her feet.
"In my official capacity of 2nd Vice-
President I would define temperance
as follows: Temperance is being temperate in the use of everything that
the W.C.T.U. approves of, and totally
abstaining from everything that the
W.C.T.U. does not approve of."
"How true!" murmured the reverend gentleman, "And oh, how beautiful!"   The lady resumed her seat.
"The propaganda of the W.C.T.U.
is progressing, is it not?" continued
tiie interviewer.
"By leaps and bounds. We are
putting pressure on the people in
every direction, I am happy to say,"
replied the 2nd Vice-President with an
air of intense satisfaction. "But there
is so much yet to be done, so many,
many evils to reform," she added with
a sigh.
"Indeed there are," said the interviewer sympathetically.
"For instance," continued the good
lady, "there is the wearing of pig-tails
by Chinamen,"
"What!" exclaimed the interviewer.
"Yes, it is on that very question
that I am paying my official visit to
your city. We are arranging to send
a deputation to the Premier and the
Attorney-General to induce them to
bring about legislation making the
wearing of a pig-tail by any Chinaman a penal offence."
"On what grounds, may I ask?"
"The wearing of a pig-tail," explained the lady in a cold and level
voice, "is thc prerogative of a woman,
any man wearing a pig-tail is therefore a female impersonator. This is
of course most immoral."
Why trouble yourself with
out-of-date methods, when you
can save money, time and
trouble in polishing Silver,
Musical Instruments, Metal or
Wood, Plate, Glass, Furniture,
etc., etc., with the
"SELVYT" Polishing
Cloths and Dusters
They never become greasy,
are as good as new when
washed, leave no lint and readily
absorb all oil or grease. Silver
Plate, Bright Metal Ware, Cutlery and all bright Instruments
wrapped in the Selvyt Cloth
never tarnish.
"Selvyt" Polishing Cloth
should be in every well regulated house. Call and see
them here.
GYRUS H. BOWES
CHEMIST
GOVERNMENT STREET
NEAR YATES STREET
VICTORIA, B.C.
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OF
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
MIONB «»3. VICTORIA
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Qovernment St., Victoria
Our  new   Spring  Suits  are
worth looking at.
If you want the latest style,
you'll find it right here.
| There will be just the correct
number of buttons on your Coat
—just the right length—just the
proper roll to the lapels—just
the correct curve to your
Trousers and the right cut to
the entire Suit.
Then last, but not least, the
price will be just right.
$15, $18, $25 to $35.
ALLEN & CO.
Fit-Reform Wardrobe
1S01   Government   St.,    Ylotorl*.
Y. W. C. A.
1208 Government Street
VICTORIA.
Y. M. C. A.
A home for young men away from
home. Comfortable Reading Room,
Library, Game Room, Billiards, Hot
and Cold Shower Baths, Gymnasium
and efficient instruction.
Manitoba Free Press on file for
Middle West visitors.
40 BROAD STREET.
C. H. TITE & CO.
PAINTERS, PAPER-HANGERS
Wall Paper from aj^c up.
No old stock. Estimates given.
Prices Cheaper than ever.
COR. YATES AND BROAD STS.
WHY   NOT   HAVE   THE   BEST
THE REPUTATION OF
James Buchanan & Co's SCOTCH WHISKIES
Is world-wide, and stands for the BEST that can be produced.
The following brands are for sale by all the leading dealers:
RED SEAL VERY OLD LIQUEUR SCOTCH
ROYAL HOUSEHOLD BLACK AND WHITE
RADIQER & JANION, Sols Agents fer B.C.
LAST CALL
You know the old saw about "Procrastination."
Are You the Man
Who early in the spring promised to
TREAT  THE  HOUSE
To a new coast of paint?
Said you would, soon as the weather settled.
If the sale of paints and brushes is any kind of barometer, you
can "bank" on an almost unbroken spell of fine weather. Our
tremendous sales predict it.
It's just a little bit "strenuous" to apply color later on during
the hot days of July; now it's a pleasure,
We have the PARTICULAR PAINT for the PARTICULAR
PURPOSE.
(C
S.&W." BRANDS
None other quite so good.
HOUSEPAINT,   ROOF PAINT,   FLOOR PAINT,
PORCH PAINT,   CARRIAGE PAINT,   ENAMELS.
PAINT AND VARNISH BRUSHES.    STEP LADDERS,
Everything for the Job.
E. G. PRIOR & CO..
Corner Government and Johnson Streets    -     Victoria, B.C.
LTD.
LTY.
You can always      -_      ^   It tastes different
tell an M. B. cigar jV|#    D*     than others'
Union Made. (D I fl 21 f*
Havana Filler.       Wllftll
Made by S. A. Bantly, Victoria, B. C.
Two Sizes.
Sold Everywhere.
MAPS
OF
Timber and Land.
The   kind   that   show   what's
taken  up   and   what's   vacant.
Electric Blue Print & Map Co.
Electric  Blue  Print  and  Map  Co.
1218 Langley Street
Victoria. B. C.
COAL.
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo
Vollieries
New Wellington Coal.
The  best  household  coal  in  the
market at current rates.
Anthracite Coal for sale.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA. B.C.
The -days are getting Warm.
THE
WILSON BAR
Is Comfortable.
VISIT IT.
648 Yates St., Victoria, B. C.
Leave Vour Baggage Cheeks at t
Pacific Transfer Co
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.      A. E. KENT, Proprli
LLOYD 4 CO., practical chim:
cleaners, 716 Pandora St. Ch
neys can be cleaned without m
ing an ellova mess. Try us i
be convinced.
Phone A476. NUF SE THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 20 1908
Shocking!" exclaimed the reverend
ntleman, casting his eyes heaven-
ird, "my soul positively shudders
ery time I pass a Chinaman with
ch a feminine apendage."
"I was under the impression," said
interviewer, that you confined
mr operations to the white inhabit-
its."
"Oh, dear me no," said the 2nd
ice-President. "We take a motherly
terest in the morals and conduct of
1 the inhabitants of the entire uni-
:rse, whatever their colour may be.
or instance, we are having five
lousand tracts printed in Chinook for
stribution among the various Inan reservations along the Pacific
oast dealing with the character and
indencies of the modern French
rama: these we are sure will be very
ineficial. But of course we pay par-
cular attention to our own children,
o prove it I have only to mention
ie twenty-five thousand blotters
hich we have just prepared for dis-
ibution among the school children;
ich blotter is stamped with a couple
very pretty pictures of the inside of
e human anatomy before and after
earing corsets."
"Do you think," queried the inter-
ewer somewhat doubtfully, "that
ese blotters will also have a bene-
:ial effect?"
"Most decidedly," said the 2nd Vice-
•esident, "for I showed a sample
py the other day to a little neice of
ine and she fainted on the spot.
ien as to the tons and tons of litera-
re which we are using in our light
ainst the Demon Rum—ah, that re-
inds me, how is it that your city is
it yet under total prohibition?"
Well, madam," replied the inter-
ewer, "to tell you the truth we
rdly dare risk it. It is really not
ir fault, but there is scarcely suf-
ient water sometimes to make a cup
tea. Under these circumstances wc
:1 it would bc a very dangerous step
take to cut ourselves off from every
her form of liquid refreshment."
No excuse," broke in the lady
imly. "What do you call that?" She
inted to the James Bay with a ma-
tic sweep of her arm.
'Really, madam, it is rather hard to
f. It is generally considered to bc
t water slightly adulterated, but it
lells queer."
'That," she said emphatically, "if
aperly diluted, with the addition of
little aniline dye and some brown
gar would make an excellent sub-
tute for beer."
'And far, oh far more wholesome,
. dear young friend," said the rev-
;nd gentleman.
'Have you  never  seen  our  recipe
ok?" said the 2nd Vice-President.
'Never heard of it even," said the
erviewer.
'You surprise me," said the 2nd V.
"our staff of expert analytical
cmists has been working for the
st two years concocting substitutes
pernicious drinks. Albert, hand
a recipe book. . . . Thank you!
ey have succeeded in duplicating
the favourite drinks of the saloon,
lile carefully eliminating every-
ing that might not bc considered
tirely innocent. Here, for instance,"
e continued, as she opened the prcc-
us volume and began to turn over
e pages, "right at the very begin-
ng of the book you will find recipes
r temperance cocktails. Would you
ce to hear how to make a Manhtatan
cktail a la W.C.T.U.?"
"Very much indeed," said the inter-
ewer.
'Here is the recipe then," replied
e lady. "Take a little lemon juice,
ie spoonful of sugar and a little
;iger; stir the mixture up in a little
jid water and pour into a glass;
d half a teaspoonful of siedlitz
wder to give it 'life' and serve up
fti a small onion on the end of a
Dthpick. Now wouldn't that be de-
ious on a hot day?"
But before the interviewer could
it his opinion the 2nd Vicc-Presi-
nt had jumped to her feet—all
itiglit of the recipe book had van-
fed,
'Young man," she cried, "I notice
bacco stains on your fingers. You
loke cigarettes. Do not dare to
ny it."
I have not any intention of doing
"     expostulated   the   interviewer.
Vhat about it?"
t
"Only this," she replied in tones of
intense solemnity, "only this that
smoking leads to a smoker's grave.
To say nothing of the fact that it is
most immoral."
"Really!" exclaimed the victim of
the eagle eye, "I had no idea it was
so serious."
"Ah, my dear young friend, let me
persuade you to at once sign a pledge
that you will never, never smoke tobacco any more. Albert, give our visitor a pledge card."
The reverend gentleman hastily
picked up a card from a pile on the
table and handed it to the interviewer.
"Now I am sure you are a sensible
young man," purred the 2nd Vice-
President in honied accents; "read
this little card through carefully and
then sign it."
"Madam," said the interviewer with
a puzzled look, after he had read it
through carefully, "I do not see how
I can very well sign this."
"You don't see how you can sign
it!" exclaimed the lady in a vexed
tone.
"Precisely," said the subject of
reformation. "I can't see how it applies to me at all. If I were to read
it out to you, I think you would understand."
"Read it then," commanded the 2nd
Vice-President; "read it at once."
"Very well, if you insist," said the
interviewer resignedly. "This is what
is on the card: 'I hereby pledge myself to no longer wear a peek-a-boo
waist and never '"
"Oh, Albert!" screamed the 2nd
Vice-President, "how could you be so
careless! You have given him one of
the peek-a-boo cards; get him a tobacco card instantly!"
"No, madam," declared the unfortunate interviewer, plucking up his
courage, "I really must decline to sign
any pledge until I am convinced."
"Why?" asked his torturer. Sign
the pledge first and be convinced
afterwards. You are sure to be convinced afterwards."
"I repeat, madam, I really must decline," said the interviewer with the
firmness of a martyr.
"Well then," said the 2nd Vice-
President crossly, "if you must be.
convinced I can at once convince
you."
She took out a little tract from a
ile of papers. "This is one of our
most able tracts on the subject. Let
me read it to you."
"I have hardly time, madam," said
the interviewer desperately.
"Well then in that case I must give
you the gist of it briefly. This tract
describes how a certain well known
temperance doctor of Chicago took a
poodle clog and squirted tobacco juice
into its left eye. Now what do you
think the poodle clog did?"
"I should think he swore."
"Don't be frivolous, young man,"
said the lady angrily. "The poor dog
died."
"Well, I'm not surprised," said the
interviewer, "but I fail to see the application.
"You don't!" exclaimed the lady.
"Hc doesn't see the application!"
echoed the reverend gentleman.
"No," asserted the interviewer, "I
do not for two reasons. Firstly, I am
not a poodle dog and secondly I neve
use tobacco in that particular way."
"What particular way?" enquired
the good lady.
"Squirting it into my left eye," explained the interviewer.
The 2nd Vice-President turned in
despair to the reverend gentleman,
who shook his head despondently.
"Well," she said, fixing her eyes on
the interviewer, "this is fearful! If
the relation of a blood-curdling fact
like that does not convince you I don't
know what will—unless you are open
to an argument."
"I am willing to be convinced, if
you can produce a convincing argument," said the culprit.
The 2nd Vice-President brightened
up. "Ah, then I have hopes for you.
Here is an argument that is one of
our favourite old stand-bys. It is so
intellectual and so convincing. Listen!
If Nature intended you to smoke she
would have provided you with a natural smoke-stack on the top of your
head. She has not provided you with
a natural smoke-stack on the top of
your head, therefore she does not intend you to smoke. Ergo, it follows
that every time you smoke you are
wantonly flying in the face of Nature.
To fly in the face of Nature is most
immoral."
"Quod erat demonstrandum," added
the reverend gentleman eagerly.
"Now, my dear young friend, you
have heard an argument that is absolutely incontrovertible."
"Do you not admit it?" cried the
2nd Vice-President with a ring of
triumph in her voice.
"Madam, I admit it," said the interviewer, pushed to the very extremity of desperation. "Yes, madam,
it certainly is an absolutely incontrovertible argument."
"Ah, good! Excellent," chuckled
the 2nd Vice-President, "now you will
sign the pledge card, won't you?"
"Just one minute, please," explained
the interviewer, "I have not quite
finished. "If your argument applies
to one case it should apply to another with equal force. Do you not
admit that also?"
"Ye-es," said the 2nd Vice-President cautiously.
"Why of course, most certainly,"
blustered .the reverend gentleman, "of
course!"   .   .   .
"Then, sir," said the interviewer,
turning to the reverend gentleman, "I
notice that you are wearing a collar.
On the ground of your own incontrovertible argument I accuse you of
being guilty of a most immoral act."
"How so!" exclaimed the 2nd Vice-
President.
"Madam," replied the interviewer,
"if Nature had intended your husband
to wear a collar, Nature would have
supplied him with a collar-button in
front and a collar-button behind. Nature has not done any such thing.
Therefore to wear that collar is to
wantonly fly in the face of Nature
with all that it entails.—quod erat
demonstrandum."
"Dear, oh dear!" cried the reverend
gentleman in tones of the deepest dismay, "I never looked at it in that
light before. I must make it a matter
of prayer!" So saying he hurriedly
got up and began divesting himself of
the immoral garment. But at the
sight of her husband undressing himself in the presence of a total stranger
the 2nd Vice-President uttered a
shriek. The awful sight was too much
for her nerves, and with a gurgling
sob she fainted—thus bringing the interview to a sad but opportune conclusion. W. H. S.
Senator La Follette has picked up
$40,000 by lecturing on the wrongs of
the dear "peepul" ancl the iniquities
of the heartless corporations.
Royal Dairy
1004 Broad Street
Ice Cream & Sweet Cream
Supplied in quantity.
Try our delicious
CREAM AND STRAWBERR
from   our   own   ranch,   fresh
every day.
We also carry a fresh supply of
Butter and Eggs.
Phone 188.
$1,000 Reward
The Government of the Province of
British Columbia hereby offers a reward of One Thousand Dollars for the
arrest and conviction of a certain unknown man, who on the ninth day or
June instant, at or near Hazelmere, in
the County of New Westminster, in the
said Provinee, murdered one Mrs. Mary
Morrison by cutting her throat.
Description of murderer has been
given as follows: Height about 6 feet
8 or 9 Inches; clean shaven, fat-swarthy
face, probably negro blood; wore dark
clothing and soft dark hat, one hole in
seat of pants, black shirt with white
stripes; face and clolthing blackened, as
though he had been working in burnt
timber. This description Is the only one
obtainable, but lt may be Incorrect.
Watch all tramps and suspicious
looking characters who may have come
from the direction of the scene of the
murder.
Warrant issued. Report by wire any
Information to F. Stanley Spain, Chief
Constable, New Westminster, B.C., or
to the undersigned:
F.  S. HUSSY,
Superintendent   Provincial  Police,  Victoria, B.C.
Provincial Police Department, Victoria,
British Columbia, June 10, 1908.
ROOFING SLATE
Pacific Slate Company, Ltd.
UNFADING BLUE BLACK
Non-Oxidizing
ALL STANDARD SIZES
HEAD  OFFICE-CHANCERY CHAMBERS
YARD-HUDSON'S BAY WHARF
For Prices and Particulars apply to
J. S. FLOYD, Secretary-Treasurer
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Dermatologist
Institute
Mrs. Stanner (graduate of Mrs. Nettie Harrison, San Fran-
cosco), cordially invites the ladies of Victoria to call and investigate
her methods. Expert in Dermatology, Facial Massage, Hair
Dressing, Shampooing, Scalp Treatment, Manicuring, etc.
CLAY PACK FOR THE COMPLEXION.
ELECTRICAL FACE MASSAGE.
Room 23, Vernon Block
Hours 9 to 6.  - - Phone 1629
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Investigate the
"Cushman" flarine flotor
As good as the best.   Cheaper than the rest.
BAXTER & JOHNSON 811 Qovernment Street
Victoria, B. C.
Established 1867
B.C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
5a Uovernment St., Victoria, B. C,
Charles Hayward, President F. Caselten, Manager.
We make a specialty ot  Undertaking and Embalming.
Aa experienced certificated staff available at all times, day
and night.
Phones Nos. 48, 305, 404 or 594, Victoria.
TENTH ANNUAL DINNER
OF THE
AMERICAN ASIATIC ASSOCIATION
AT DELMONICO'S
Forty-fourth Street and Fifth Avenue, New York, Tuesday,
April 2ist, 1008.
MENU
Clams
Soup
Clear Green Turtle
Side Dishes
Radishes Celery      Olives
Fish
Brook Trout Meuniere
Duchesse Potatoes
Cucumbers
Remove
Saddle of Spring Lamb Colbert
New  Spring  Beans
Entrees
Sweetbreads Montebello
French   Peas
New  Asparagus   Hollandaise
Sherbet with Maraschino
Roast
Squab Chicken
Lettuce Salad
Sweets
Fancy Ice Cream
Assorted  Cakes
Coffee
Sherry Chablis
G.   H.   MUMM'S
SELECTED  BRUT
Chat.  Beycheville
MINERAL WATER
WHITE  ROCK
TOASTS
"The President nf the United States," response by Hon. Seth Low.
"Our Honored Guest," His Excellency Mr. Wu Ting-Fang.
"China in Regeneration," response by Hon. Edwin Denby, Representative in Congress from the First District of Michigan.
"American Influence in China," response by Hon. Lebbus Redan
Wilfley, Judge of the United States Court of China.
"The Far East by Way of the Panama Canal," response by Hon.
John Barrett, Director of thc International Bureau of American
Republics.
"The New Light of Asia," response by Right Rev. Henry C. Potter,
D.D., Bishop of New York. THB WBBK, SATURDAY JUNE 20, 1908
Subscribed
Capital . (600,000
Paid Up
Capital ,
Reserve .
$126,000
(160,000
J. >. XATXEBB, Oen. III.
nr closing vt estates
either at Executors or Assignees
the Dominion Trust Ce., Ltd., Is
never influenced by ulterler motives. Their entire ambitlen,
•Sort, and energy ls directed towards securing the best possible
returns for all concerned.
Name this company executor In
your will. Blank will forms fur-
nlshsd free tf charge and stared
ln our safety dtpeslt vaults,
when we are made your executor.
Domnoi tbubt oo.,
Limited.
338 Masting Street, West,
TaaeoUTsr, S. O.
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
tth. Government Street. ..Victoria, B.C.
(26   Hastings Street.. ..Vancouver, B.C.
V. BLAKEMORE!..Manager and Editor
Reminiscences.
The receipt of a press notice referring to the coming engagement of
Mr. R. B. Mantell in Victoria has
served to start a train of thought and
to arouse many half-forgotten memories of theatre-going in the days of
long ago.
My lirst reflection is tliat plays may
come and plays may go, but Shakespeare goes on for ever. It is not a
little interesting to recall the number
of fashions that have been set by
playwrights during the last 40 years,
and to note how each has had his
vogue and disappeared in the limbo
of unremembered would-be dramatists.
When I first found my way to the
.theatre, Tom Taylor was the hero
of the moment, and soon after Robertson, the father of Mrs. Kendal.
Amongst the most popular offerings
of those days were "Caste," "School,"
"Society," "Ours," and " 'Twixt Axe
and Crown." Then we had a spell of
of robust romantic drama with William Rignold in "Black-eyed Susan,"
and the "Girl I Left Behind Me." The
first visit of the company from the
Comedie Francais, including Sarah
Bernhardt, Got, Coquelin, Delaunay
and the incomparable Madame Croi-
sette, created a taste for the French
drama, and so we had Charles Warner in the memorable L'Assommoir.
Tiring of the too strenuous, Mr.
and Mrs. Kendal and John Hare
popularized first the serious drama,
and then the highest class comedy,
reaching the high-water mark of excellence in "Diplomacy," "The Iron
Master" and "The Pair of Spectacles,"
the latter the finest comedy seen on
the English stage for fifty years, in
fact since Charles Matthews ceased
playing "Adonis Evergreen."
The next vogue was that created by
the brilliant character actor, Mr.
Beerbohm Tree, who had a run at the
Haymarket beginning, say, twenty-
five years ago, when Miss Julia Neil-
son was a very young ingenue, and
thi whole company did brilliant work
in such melodramas as "A Man's
Shadow," and such exquisite pastoral
plays as "The Village Priest."
Meanwhile Charles Wyndham had
popularized society drama, and especially old English comedy by giving
such representations of Charles Surface, Dr. Pangloss, David Garrick and
many other classic roles as had not
been seen for years.
But another star was rising, and it
remained for a man of a younger generation to strike a note in the dramatic world which has been reverbat-
ing ever since, and which has enabled
him to retain for more than twenty
years an unchallenged position in the
front rank of London actors. I refer
to Mr. George Alexander, whose intensity, impressiveness and earnestness are as unique as they are characteristic.
In "The Idler," "Lady Windermere's Fan," "Liberty Hall," and
"The Second Mrs. Tanqueray,"
George Alexander has reached a
height of dramatic expression unexcelled, and indeed unapproached by
any of his competitors.
This sketchy-reminiscence overlooks scores of prominent actors and
actresses, to say nothing of some of
the foremost playwrights of the time.
But it is only intended to illustrate
the fact, that in plays as in dress "the
fashion of this world changeth," and
in the widest sense "each man in his
time plays many parts." But while
one rises and another falls, the popularity of Shakespeare is constant.
Through all these years there runs
a silver thread which binds together
the dramatic instinct and perception
of successive generations. Between
all the different vogues to which I
have referred, there has been not
merely a connecting link, but a continuous cable. Shakespeare has never
been oft" the boards. When he has not
been running in ,_the Metropolis, he
has been touring in the Provinces or
in the States, in Africa, in India, or
the Antipodes.
Men have refreshed themselves at
his perennial stream when they have
been satiated with the dgenerate productions of those who had the hardihood to belittle the great master, and
to force their vapid productions on
the public. During the last forty
years, Irving, Booth, Compton, Calvert, Robertson, Benson, Mansfield,
and last, but by no means least, Mantell, have kept alive the best traditions of the Shakespearean stage. And
this leaves me to finish where I began, with Mantell.
I have seen all the great Shakespearean actors just mentioned, and
many more whom I do not at the
moment recall. But with the single
exception of the immortal Salvini the
elder, in "Othello," and Barry Sullivan in "Richard the Third," I have
never seen the equal of Mantell in
certain Shakespearean roles. And
now that Salvini is no more, he is incomparably the finest living Othello.
Some day I intend to tell in this
column the story of Salvini, the great
Italian, who could not speak a word
of English, but who thrilled English
audiences in the part of the dusky
Moor as no actor has done since the
days of G. V. Brooke and Charles
Dillon.
Othello is rarely seen on the stage,
and yet it is one of the finest of
Shakespeare's acting plays. I thus
differentiate it from those which are
more suited for the study than the
stage. Properly mounted, and with a
good all-round company, a star actor
makes it a veritable "tour de force,"
and since Shakespeare is so rarely-
played in Western cities, it is a treat
of the highest order to see him interpreted by an actor of Mr. Mantell's
calibre.
I recall the first time I ever saw
him, it was just thirty-five years ago,
in the Theatre Royal, Wolverhampton. Miss Wallis (now Mrs. John
Lancaster) was starring in Shakespeare. She was a delightful actress,
although never quite in the front
rank, being petite, and dainty, but
lacking force and a stage presence.
On this particular night she was playing Rosalind in "As You Like It,"
and introduced to the public for the
first time a new Orlando. He was
tall, lanky, and perhaps a bit ungainly, but he was only a raw-boned
lad who had not done growing. I
well remember his romantic air, and
how much like a mooning love-smitten youth he looked. I do not think
I have ever seen a beter Orlando.
It is a long jump from 1872 to 1908,
and during that time I have seen
Mr. Mantell in nearly all the great
Shakcspercan roles. To-day he is a
mature, finished actor, with a fine
stage   presence,   and   has  become   1
518 Hastings St.W.
VANCOUVER.BC.
master of elocution. With Richard
Mansfield gone he has no rival, and
after the lapse of so long a time I
gladly lay this tribute at his feet.
A SONNET IN STONE.
The Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
A poet thought thee first, and wrote thee
down
In all tlie perfect rhythm of thy plan;
E'er thou wert moulded by the artizan,
He dreamed the dome that is thy lofty
crown.
As  sunset glories  in the ocean  drown,
And wake sad music in the heart of man,
So   passed   the   silent   phantoms,   that
outran
The pageantry of Thought for thy renown.
And then an  artist wrought thee,  line
on line,
And set each column in its chosen space;
Till   every   niche   was   filled,   and   the
design
Was perfected  in all its stately grace:
Graven and chiselled with precision fine,
A splendid gem, set in a splendid place.
—Blanche  E.  Holt  Murison.
The New Grand.
Next week's bill will include several
big feature acts headed by the Elton-
Polo-Aldo Four, sensational casting
artists; the Fredericka Raymond trio
in an operatic sketch entitled "The
Knights of Old," which introduces
Fredericka Raymond soprano, Paul
Fisher tenor, and Enrice Ormont baritone, and includes the sextette from
"Lucia" among other high-class selections; Selbini and Grovini, William
and Jenetta, acrobats, jugglers, tumblers and acrobatic bicyclists, special
notice being drawn to Mme. Grovini's
remarkable heavy lifting; Leo Filler,
the Russian boy violinist; Black and
Miller, novelty acrobats; Effie Pearson, singing comedienne; Thos. J.
Price, singing the illustrated song,
"The Tale the Church Bells Tolled."
New moving pictures entitled "Modern Sculptors" and "Uuncle Bill's
Bull," and the overture, "Enchantment," by the orchestra.
NOTICE TO CONTBAOTOBS
Normal School, Vanoouver.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Normal School, Vanoouver,"
will be received by the Hon. the Chief
Commissioner up to noon of Wednesday,
the lBt hJuly, 1908, for the erection
and completion of the Normal School
at Vancouver.
Drawings, specifications, and contract
form may be seen on and after the 22nd
of June, 1908, at the offlce of the Public
Works Engineer, the Lands and Works
Department, Viotoria, and at the offlce
of Messrs. Pearce & Hope, Architects,
Vancouver, B.C.
Each proposal shall be accompanloa
by an accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank of
Canada, made payable to the Hon. the
Chief Commissioner of Lands ana
Works, in the sum of one thousand
($1,000) dollars, whioh shall be forfeited if the party tendering decline to
enter Into contract when called upon to
do os. The cheques or certificates of
unsuccessful tenderers will be returned
to them upon the execution of the contract.
The cheque of the successful tenderer
will be returned upon his furnishing a
bond satisfactory to the Hon. the Chiet
Commissioner in the sum of fifteen
thousand ($15,000) dollars, for the due
fulfilment of the contract.
No tender will be considered unless
made out on the form supplied, signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed ln the envelope
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., 16th June, 1908.
June 20
TAKE NOTICE that the British Columbia Canning Company, Ltd., of London, England, and Victoria, B.C., Salmon Canners and Sawmill Owners, Intend to apply for permission to lease the
following described foreshore and submerged land fronting lots Nos. 4, 10, and
14, range 2, Coast District:
Commencing at a post marked "B.C.C.
Co. N.E. Post," planted at the Southeast corner of the Victoria Cannery,
Rivers Inlet, at high water mark,
thence due west one-half mile, thence
in a southerly direction to the N. W.
corner of Lot No. 14, thence easterly
along the shore to point of commencement.
BRITISH COLUMBIA CANNING CO..
May 2 D. McPhee. Agent.
Weddinq Day
Suggestions
Our stock is very complete and offers an almost
endless variety of choice,
also great range in price.
We offer here just a few
suggestions and invite you
to our store where your
every need in jewelry and
silverware can be supplied.
OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT
THE BRIDE
Brooch    circle    of   whole
pearls   $23.50
Pearl Sunburst $24.00
Handsome Diamond Crescent  $160.00
BRIDESMAIDS
Oriental Pearl Bar Brooch
 $7-75
Gold  Brooch  with  dainty
pearl   and   enamel   for-  ,
get-me-nots -... .$9.50
Fine Gold Bracelet....$16.50
FLOWER GIRLS
Pearl Safety Pin Brooch..
 $2.50
Solid Gold Necklet $3.50
GROOMSMAN
Pearl Scarf Pin $4.00
Pair 14k Cuff Links ...$7.00
Diamond and Pearl  Scarf
Pin    $31.00
USHERS
Pair Gold Tie-holders..$3.50
Pearl Scarf Pin $3.50
Challoner & Mitchell
Diamond Merchants and Silversmiths
1017 Qovernment Street Victoria, B. C.
The
Bank of Vancouver
Incorporated by Special Act of Parliament of the
Dominion of Canada.
Head Office, Vancouver, B. C.
Capital, $2,000,000
In 30,000 shares of $100 each with 910 Premium.
T. W.  PATTERSON,  Esq.,
Capitalist, Victoria, B.C.
J. A. MITCHELL, Esq.,
Capitalist, Viotoria, B.C.
F. W. JONES, Esq.,
Lumberman, Victoria, B.C.
H. T. CEPLERLEY, Esq.,
(Ceperly, Rounsefell & Co.,
Brokers), Vancouver, B.C.
W. H. MALKIN, Esq.,
(The W. H. Malkin Co., Ltd.,
Wholesale Grocers, Vancouver, B.C.
J. A. HARVEY, Esq., K.C.,
Cranbrook, B.C.
R. P. McLENNAN, Esq.,
(McLennan, McFeeley _. Co.,
Ltd., Wholesale Hardware),
Vancouver, B.C.
SOLICITOB
GEO.  H.   COWAN,  Esq.,  K.C.,  Vancouver, B. C.
TBUSTEEB
YORKSHIRE   GUARANTEE   &   SECURITIES    CORPORATION,    LTD.,
Vancouver, B.C.
The Bank of Vancouver ls being organized to meet in part the Increased banking accommodation required by the natural and steady
expansion of business, coincident with the great development of the
country and especially of British Columbia, and while organizing to conduct a general banking business, will give special consideration to the
Industries and commerce of the Province, and is being established primarily for this purpose, and through its connections ln Great Britain
Eastern Canada and the United States, it will be able to greatly facilitate the lvnestment of outside capital ln the various enterprises of the
Provinee.
It ls the intention to open Branch Offices at various points from
time to time as opportunity arises.
SUBSCRIPTIONS FOB STOCK.
The Stock Books of the Bank of Vancouver are now open for the
subscription of the Capital Stock at the Provisional Offices of the Bank
at the oorner of Pender and Homer Streets, Vancouver, B.C., and also
at   the   offices   of  Mitchell,   Martin & Co., 043 Fort Street, Victoria, B.C.
A. L. DEWAR, Secretary.
TIMBER! TIMBER! TIMBER!
QUATSINO   SOUND,   BEDWELL SOUND, BAOB NABBOWS.
GUARANTEED  20,000 FT. TO THE ACBE.
PBICE $3.50 TO |3.00.    ALL LICENSES ISSUED.
ARTHUR BELL
BOOMS 14 and U
XAHOK  BUILDING,   OOVEBNXENT   BTBEET, TIOTOBIA.
F. O. BOX IBS. FHONB 1388. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 20, 1908
>*>-^oo-oo<K>ooooooooO'OoooO'OoooooooO'00ooooooooooooooooooooooooo6ooooooooooooo8
*
Refined Simplicity in House Furnishing
In these days the refinement of simplicity is the key-note to success and comfort in home furnishing. The vulgarity of over-ornamentation has been relegated to the
dust-bin. Our third-floor show room is a veritable exhibition, containing the most refined creations of the master craftsmen who have taught the value of refined simplicity
in furnishing beautiful homes. Our large trade in reliable furniture combined with our cash purchase system enables us to price these goods at a considerable saving to our
customers.   The elevator will take you to the third floor where you can wander around without fear of being pestered to buy.
Economy in Carpets.
Apart from its artistic merit:
the beauty of simplicity in home
furnishing is in its economy.
Take for instance the question
of carpets, the art square will
appeal to you; it blends harmoniously into all colour
schemes, it is ready-to-use, it is
economically priced, that is
why we carry the largest stock
of art squares west of Toronto.
Quantity, however, would be
useless to you without quality,
hence we mention four of our
leading lines which are without
a peer in quality:
The Kensington Art Square, all
wool, according to size,
from   $11.00
The Krypton Art Square, all
wool, according to size,
from    $19.00
The   Algoma   Art   Square,   all
wool,     according    to    size,
from  $9-2S
The   Kanata   Art   Square,   ill
wool    weft,     cotton    warp,
from  $6.50
N.B.—Our carpet department
is on the second floor, where
you will find a tremendous assortment of Brussels, Axminster, Wilton and Oriental carpets and rugs, all priced low,
W-rfc ■■;:•>*.«'
■*   *"*.   !' *, ** ; • ,.iV>:
-Bffv-'M' '-:.' - ■fWy'-.v
-, •   .,   __   ..._:..n.
New Lace
Curtains.
These are in the new sizes,
2V2 yds. by 3 yds., for the fashionable and simple mode of
hanging, they are the finest
Swiss and French makes in applique and cauterised embroidery, also in English braided designs. It is scarcely necessary
to mention to the ladies of Victoria, these supberb materials
cannot be surpassed as summer
window draperies. We have
purposely marked the prices
low in order to encourage the
use of the latest idea in modern
curtainry. Our experts in the
curtain department will drape
these goods for your inspection
whenever you favour us with a
call.
__
a 'WEILER" LIBRARY
We have just unpacked a shipment of very dainty musiin
cushion covers in braided and
stencilled designs, trimmed with
frills;   prices 50c and $1.00.
TO DEALERS
We solicit correspondence from
dealers who are not already acquaint
ed with us and who wish to get acquainted with the largest wholesalers
of Homefurnishings in the West. Try
(furniture as a "side-line"—help you.
WEILER BROS.
Complete Home Furnishers
VICTORIA, B. C.
TO RETAILERS
Isn't it poor business to carry a
large stock in your town when
the quantities you require may be
purchased from us on short notice.
We help you. Prompt and satisfactory service guaranteed.
^oooooooooooooooooooooooooo&
-200000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000-OOOa
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wrting
Comment.
I'he defeat of the Victoria lacrosse
Im at the hands of the Vancouver
|) in the Terminal City last Satur-
has left the local boys in any-
lig but pleasant frame of mind, and
Iging from the press reports, I
lik they have a kick coming.
Is a rule I do not side with a team
pbjecting to the referee's decisions,
in this case I think the Victoria
is were justified in the stand they
Ik. This is the second time this
|r that the local players have re-
ved the worst of the decisions in
Iicouver, and it is up to the man-
pment of the local club to bring
matter before the executive of the
|rosse   association.    The action of
Vancouver clubs in supporting
lh action on the part of the referees
I not in harmony with the state-
tits made at the annual meeting,
en every delegate took occasion to
tr to the application of the Vic-
la club in the most friendly man-
and promised the assistance of
Ir respective clubs. If the as-
Imce they promised is to be taken
loor referees the sooner the local
lis know it the better. There is
|.lutely no reason why the Victoria
should go to Vancouver and lose
|game by the decisions of the ref-
The idea of having one of the
II players off the field for 23
(utes is something very seldom
|-d of, and judging from whit I
seen of this player there is abso-
y no reason for it.   There might
be some blame on the part of
I management of the local club in
being to these referees in their cf-
to reduce the expenses of the
club. I quite agree with the attempt mistake of not changing the Victoria Joe Grimm, the hero of 238 lights,
that is being made to keep th" ex- bowlers earlier, and not playing Sil- This should be a good go, and I
penses down by having the local team cock, whose fast balls are sorely would like to see a large crowd wit-
get the worst of the deal every time  needed in any close match. ness the mill. UMPIRE.
they   play.    On   several occasions I   	
have noticed that referees are accept*     Although I referred at some length JOSEPH    HOWE    ON    LIQUOR.
ed who arc not on  the  official  list.  t0 tile races ;„ my remarks last Satur- 	
which was agreed on at the annual ciily| 1 cannot allow the opportunity The world has come down to the
fneteing of the association. This to pass without referring to the too present period from the most remote
should not be allowed, as it leaves meagre support that was given the antiquity, with the wine cup in its
the way open for an infringement of promoters* With the exception of hand. David, thc man after God's
the constitutions which will sooner or Saturday the attendance was a big own heart, drank wine. Solomon, the
later cause trouble. I hope the local blot on the reputatjon that this city wisest of monarchs and of human be-
management will take this matter up enjoys of being one of the best sport- ings, drank wine. Our Saviour not
and deal with it in a rigid manner. jng centres on the Coast, and in fact  only drank it, but commanded Chris-
  I have almost arrived at the conclu-  tians to drink it "in remembrance of
This afternoon will witness what sjon that it is time that this city Him." In strong contrast with our
should be the hardest baseball match sliould refrain from travelling on its Divine Redeemer's life and practice
of the season. The locals will en- record. The attendance was not we hear of the Scribes and Pharisees,
deavor to wrest the victory from the WOrthy of a city half thc size of Vic- who drank it not—who reviled our
Nationals of Seattle at Oak Bay, and toria, and that Victorians who are Saviour as a "wine bibber" and the
it is hoped that there will be a big ardent admirers of good races should "companion of publicans and sin-
turnout. The line-up of the Nationals faji t0 attend the meeting is almost ners," who would have voted for the
will be practically the same as that beyond my comprehension. The races Maine liquor law as unanimously as
which represented the Seattle High wcre g0Ocl, the management did all in they cried "Crucify Him." So far as
School team, which journeyed across their power to satisfy the public, no my reading extends, I may assert that
the Continent and made a record charge of crookedness could possibly every king, every statesman, every
which has never been equalled. The be laid, the times made in the races warrior, who illustrated the page of
team is the strongest on the Sound, wcre fast, and yet the public would history, drank wine. The apostles,
outside of the league teams, and if the ,10t attend. As yet I have not ascer- who were the companions of our
locals should win it will be a big lajneci the financial ending of the nn- Saviour, drank it. The prophets
feather in their caps. The game will dertaking, but judging from ihe at- whose flights of inspiration still as-
start at 3 o'clock sharp, with Sur- tendance, I cannot figure how it tonish us, wc have every reason to
plice doing the pitching for the locals could ilave been very successful. I believe, drank it. Cicero and Demos-
and Robertson the receiving. h0pe that the next time anything of thencs,    and    all the orators of an-
  this kind is arranged the public will  tiquity and of modem times, indulged
The defeat of the Victoria cricket give it the support that it deserves, in the juice of the grape. Who can
team at the hands of the Garrison otherwise this city will soon have a say how much of the energy which
came as a big surprise to the admir- bad name with the horsemen, which gave them such power of language
ers of the local players, but it will be  will mean that it will be wiped from  was drawn from its inspiration? Have
a  lesson  to  them  not  to hold  any the map as far as horse racing is con-
team too lightly.    Nine times our of ccrned.
ten Victoria would defeat the  same  •
team which  lowered their colors  on A   boxing   contest,   which   should
Saturday, but I must give the Gar- prove very interesting,  is  being ar-
rison    credit   for   the  result  of  the ranged,   and   will   take  place   within  dans of thc British Islands, every one
match.    Three causes contributed to the cnxt few weeks.    I refer to the of whom drank wine? Let the learned
the   defeat—the   absence of Martin,, contest   between    Linton,   who  has  gentlemen glance at the noble struc-
the fine bowling of Askey, and the lately made this city his home, and tures—the architectural wonders that
these men been eclipsed by the Dows
and Kellogs of the platform? What
orators has the State of Maine sent
forth comparable with the Pitts,
Burkes,   Grattans,   Foxes  and  Sheri-
embellish Europe.   Who reared them?
Men of gigantic intellects, whose common heritage was wine.   Let his eye
range   through thc    noble    galleries
where  the  sculptors  have  left  their
statues; where the painters have hung
in  rich  profusion the noblest works
of art.   Wine, \ye are told, clouds the
faculties   and    deadens the imagination,   ct it was drunk by those benefactors of their race; and we cannot
with their masterpieces before us, believe   the  assertion  till   their  works
have been eclipsed by artists trained
up under this    rigorous    prohibition
legislation.   Has Maine turned out as
yet a statue that anybody would look
at; a picture that anybody would buy?
Look at thc deliverers  of mankind;
thc heroic defenders of nations. Was
Washington a member of the temperance    society?    Did    not    Wallace
"drink the red wine through the helmet barred"?   Who will undertake to
say  that  Bruce, on  the  morning on
which he won the battle of Bannock-
bum, that Tell on that day when he
shot the apple off his son's head, that
Nelson or Wellington on the eve of
iheir glorious victories, had not tasted
a glass of whiskey or a stoop of wine?
If then all that is valuable in the past
of heroism and architecture, and oratory, sculpture and painting, if all that
has   bulwarked   freedom  and  embellished life, has come down to us with
the juice of thc grape, if no age or
nation   has  been  long  without  it,   I
think  it  behooves  thc  advocates  of
"total  abstinence"  to show us some
country where their system has been
tried, some race of men who drank
nothing but cold water.
Mrs. Newwcd—I wish we had
something antique about the house.
Mr. Newwed—So do I. Old-fashioned pumpkin-pies, for instance.—
Exchange.
4 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 20, 1908.
____.____»___m__^o_\—Q___.—_»_^__m__^__Um_^__^_
iy 'J,1 '|l '-I1 7* ■+■ ■+■ *+' '*• ■*■ •*■ '*■ '*■
* Social and        *
J Personal. *
Miss Wake leaves on a ten months'
trip to the Old Country on the 20th.
Mrs. J. W. Laing entertained at a
small  croquet  party  on  Wednesday.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Lamb returned on Tuesday to Duncans.
* «   *
Mrs. Ramsay, of Seattle, has been a
guest at the Empress for a few clays.
* *   *
Miss Ethel Gibson is staying with
friends on the Cowichan river.
* *   *
Hon. D. M. Eberts spent a few
days in Vancouver this week.
* *   *
Mr. and the Misses Blakemore
have moved into their new home,
"Wulfruna," Belcher street.
* *   *
Miss Barbara Mainguy, of Chemainus, spent a few days in town this
week.
* *   *
Mrs. Gardulo and son came over on
Tuesday from Seattle to attend Miss
Dorothy Green's wedding.
* *   *
Mrs. George Powell was the guest
of Mrs. Carew-Gibson during the
week.
* *   *
Captain Gibson, of Chemainus, after
a short stay in town, returned home
on Tuesday. , J!
* ♦   *
Mr. Dougald Gillespie is enjoying
some excellent fishing at Cowichan
Lake.
»   »   *
Mr. Arthur Gore paid a flying visit
to Duncans on Wednesday, returning
on Thursday morning.
* *   *
The marriage of Miss Marie Gaudin
takes  place  in  the  second  week  of
July-
* *   »
Mrs. Herman Robertson went up
to Duncans on Wednesday to take
part in  Mr. Armstrong's concert.
* w    w
Mrs. E. V. Bodwell, Rockland
avenue, has issued invitations for an
At Home next Tuesday.
* *   *
Mrs. McCallum, after spending the
winter in Southern California, has returned home.
* *   *
Miss Barbara Blakemore has returned from a three months' visit to
Nelson.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Trotter Johnson, of
Chemainus, who were so unfortunate
as to loose their pretty home by fire,
came dow   to the city on Tuesday.
* *   *
The Auxiliary Anti-Tuberculosis
Society will hold a meeting on Wednesday, June 24th, at the Balmoral
Rooms.    Members  are  requested  to
attend.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Ray Green, Vancouver, came down to bc present at the
marriage of Miss Dorothy Green on
Wednesday.
* *   *
Mr. Mowat, who has been confined
to the Jubilee Hospital for the past
few weeks, is out again, and is the
guest of Mrs. McTavish.
* »   *
On Wednesday the 17th, the residence of Mr. ancl Mrs. John Freeman, Croft street, was thc scene of a
quiet but pretty wedding, when their
fourth daughter, Ruth Elizabeth, was
united in marriage to Mr. Robert J.
Herbert, eldest son of Mrs. R. Herbert, Quebec street, Rev. F. Letts
performing the ceremony.
The bride and groom left for the
Sound by the Princess, and after a
brief return visit will reside in Vancouver, where Mr. Herbert is connected with the Railway Mail Service.
* *   *
The Five Hundred Club met on
Tuesday at Mrs. Blackwood's, Linden
avenue, ami spent a very enjoyable
afternoon. The prize was won by
Mrs. Gibb. The house was very
daintily decorated wilh roses of different shades, received by the cool
green of fern frons.
Mrs. Coles, assisted by Mrs. Kerr,
presided over the refreshment table.
Miss Wark and the Misses Richardson also helped in looking after the
guests.
The competitors were: Mrs. Gibb,
Mrs. W. S. Gore, Mrs. Freeman, Mrs.
H. Tye, Mrs. Little, Mrs. Wasson,
Mrs. Spratt, Mrs. Gibb, Mrs. C. Roberts, Mrs. Rithet, Mrs. T. S. Gore,
Mrs. Jones, Mrs. J. Harvey. Mrs. Arbuthnot, Mrs. G. Courtney, Mrs. Love,
Mrs. C. Todd, Mrs. Jones, Mrs. Ray
mour,   Mrs,   Matson,   Mrs.   Wasson,
Miss Griffith and others.
The marriage of Miss Dorothy
Green and Mr. C. Norman Barclay
was solemnized at the Reformed Episcopal Church on Wednesday, June
17th, by the Rev. Bishop Cridge, in
the presence of a few friends and
relations. The bride leaning on her
brother's arm, looked very lovely ir
a soft clinging white, semi-Princ ,
gown, over the palest shade of pink,
with large hat bound with pale pink
panne, and trimmed with Valenciennes
and a aigrette.
Her bouquet was of white bridal
roses,  prettily tied with white  tulle.
The bridesmaid, Miss Phyllys
Green looked very well in a pale blue
flowered organdy relieved by a pink
girdle, and a cream baby hat, with
a pink wreath and carried a bouquet
of pink roses.
The bride's little niece, Miss Joyce-
line Gibson, and Mr. Antonio Gardulo
of Seattle, were also in attendance.
After the ceremony a few friends
and relatives proceeded to the residence of Mrs. Carew-Gibson, where a
dainty breakfast was served, the decorations were marguerites and roses.
The happy couple left by the afternoon boat for Seattle en route to
Southern California. The bride's going away costume was of Copenhagen
blue Rajah silk with a smart hat to
match.
* *   *
The residence of Mrs. H. Heisterman, Cook street, was the scene of a
most delightful tea on Wednesday
last. The house was prettily arranged with sweet peas and roses. Among
the guests were:
Mrs. Heisterman, Miss Heisterman,
Mrs. Crotty, Mrs. Love, Mrs. H.
Tye, Mrs. Spratt, Mrs. Roberts,
Misses Hickey, Mrs. Rismuller, Mrs.
Berkeley, Mrs. King, Miss King, Mrs.
Matson, Mrs. Coles, Mrs. T. R. Smith,
Miss Gaudin, Mrs. Courtney, Mrs. S.
Robertson, Mrs. B. Wilson, Mrs. Lugrin, Mrs. Shaw, Mrs. Schwengers,
Mrs. Jay, Mrs. Cross, Mrs. C. Todd,
Mrs. Blackwood, Miss Blackwood,
Messrs. Moreley, Miss Moreley, Mrs.
Cleland, Mrs. Harrison, Mrs. Rhodes,
Mrs. Ker, Mrs. Brett, Mrs. Griffiths,
Mrs. B. Heisterman, Mrs. T. S. Gore,
Mrs. W. S. Gore, Mrs. Arbuthnot,
Mrs. H. Gillespie, Miss Wiggley, Mrs.
J. Raymour, Mrs. Page, Misses
Page, Mrs. McPhillips, Miss Sehl,
Miss Newcombefi Mrs. Garache, Mrs.
Rant, Mrs. Wootton, Mrs. H. Kent,
Mrs. McTavish, Miss McTavish, Miss
Munn, Mrs. Lawson, Miss Lawson,
Miss Wood, Mrs. McClure, Mrs.
Jones, Mrs. Phipps, Mrs. Gibson and
others.
* *   *
Mrs. Baynes-Reed gave a very
charming reception on Tuesday afternoon for her daughter, Miss Alice
Reed, who is to be married on the
24th of this month. The Bishop's
Close was kindly lent for the occas-
sion by Archdeacon and Mrs.. Scriven. Mrs. Spicer-Simpson assisted
her mother during the afternoon in
receiving her guests. Among the invited guests were Mrs. Stevenson, the
Misses Mason, Mrs. Baiss, Mrs. Berkeley, Archdeacon and Mrs. Scriven,
Mr. and Mrs. Atkins, Mr. and Mrs.
Allen, Mr. and Mrs. Ambery, Mr. and
Mrs. Burton, Miss Booth, Mrs. and
Miss Browne, Mr. and Mrs. F. W.
Bullen, Miss Bullen, Mr. and Mrs.
Bulwer, Miss Bulwer, Canon and Mrs.
Beanlands, Mrs. ancl Miss Bell, Mrs.
and Miss Bolton, Mr. and Mrs. Bagshaw, Mr. and Mrs. H. Barnard, Mr.
ancl Mrs. Crowe-Baker, Mrs. and Miss
Clapham, Mr. and Mrs. Cross, Mr.
and Mrs. Todd, Mr. and Mrs. Carmichael, Mrs. Cleland, Mr. and Mrs.
Crotty, Mrs. Love, Mr. and Mrs. and
Miss Coombe, Mrs. Charles, Major
and Mrs. Dupont, Mr. and Mrs. Denison, Mr. and Mrs. R. Day, Miss Day,
Hon. ancl Mrs. and thc Misses Eberts,
Mr. ancl Mrs. Flummerfelt, Mr. ancl
Mrs. Ritchie, Dr. ancl Mrs. Lagan,
Mr. and Mrs. Foster, Miss Foster,
Mr. and Mrs. Fletcher, Mr. and Mrs.
Gresley, Mr. and Mrs. Jeffries, Capt.
and Mrs. Gaudin, and the Misses Gaudin, Col. ancl Mrs. Holmes, Dr. and
Mrs. Jones, Mr. and Mrs. Laing, Mr.
and Mrs. Luxton, Mr. and Mrs. Matthews, Misses Pooley, Mr. Loenberg,
Capt. ancl Mrs. Troupe, Mrs. Berkeley,
Admiral ancl Mrs. Eleet, Mr. and Mrs.
Rithet, Mr. and Mrs. Genge, Mr. and
Mrs. Shallcross, Miss Lawson, Mrs.
J. Raymur, Mr. ancl Mrs. Rogers,
Miss Newcombe, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Robertson, Dr. and Mrs. Herman
Robertson, Mr. ancl Mrs. Keith Wilson, Mrs. King, Miss King, Mrs. Peni
berton, Miss Pemberton, Mr. and Mrs.
Wootton, Misses Pitts, Mrs. Mackay,
Miss Mackay, Mr. and Mrs. Jacobs,
Mr. ancl Mrs. Galletly, Mr. ancl Mrs.
Moliun, Miss Newton, Dr. ancl Mrs.
Helmcken and many others.
Indications.
Willia—Pa, is that new Mr. Hanks
an ice dealer?
Pa—Yes, Willie; how did you
know?
Willie—1 didn't know, only I
thought he was, 'cause when the
teacher hoped for warm weather yes-
terady his children all grinned.—Chicago News.
BONA FIDE OFFER
To  introduce throughout  B.C.
the
Charter Oak Steel Range
Of which there are over 400 in
Victoria alone.
We make the following offer,
viz.:—On receipt of following
prices we deliver, freight prepaid, to any point in _ B. C,
reached by direct transit, lake
or rail:
1-14  in.  oven,  4 hole,   high
closet    $43
1-15  in.   oven,  6  hole,   high
closet  $46
1-18 in.  oven,  6 hole,  high
closet  $50
QUICK AND  PERFECT
BAKERS.
If not as represented return
at our expense and get your
money.
Watson &
McGregor
647 Johnson  Street,
VICTORIA, B. C.
babies      MEDICAL  •M-res
MASSAGE
Turkish Baths
TIBBATOB UEAT1IEBT
KB.     BJOBWPEIT,      BWBBIBM
KABSEUB.
Special   Massage and Hometreat-
ment by appointments.
Boom 2, Vernon Blk., Douglas St.
Body Development.
Hours 1 to 6. Phone 1629.
A Skin of Beauty lt a Joy .Forever
BB. T. PEUX OOUBAUB'B
Oriental Cream
OB HAOIOAB BEAUTIFIES
Purines as well as Beautifies tha Skin.
No other cosmetic will do It.
Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, Moth
Patches, Rash and Skin diseases, and
every blemish on beauty, and defies detection. It has stood the test of 60
years; no other has, and Is so harmless—we taste it to be sure it ls properly made. Accept no counterfeit of
similar name. The distinguished Dr. I_.
A. Sayre said to a lady of the haut-ton
(a patient). "As you ladies will use
them, I recommend 'Gourand's Cream' as
the least harmful of all the Skin preparations."
For sale by all druggists and Fancy
Goods Dealers.
OOUBAUB'B OMENTAL TOILET
POWDEB
For Infants and adults. Exquisitely per*
fumed. Relieves Skin Irritations, cures
Sunburn and renders an excellent complexion.
Price as cants, fcy mail.
OOUBAUB'B POUDBE  SUBTILE
Removes superfluous Hair.
Price $1.00, by mall.
PEBB. T. HOPmrS, Prep.,
37 Great Joaes Bt.,        Haw York City.
AT  HENDERSON  BROS.,
Wholesale Distributors.
TaacouTer aad Victoria, B.O.
A Little Psalm of Life.
Once  Jones  owned  nearly  half  the
town,
The valley rang with his renown;
Whene'er he came, whene'er he went,
'Twas  one  continuous  blandishment.
He made investments far and wide
And he was pointed out with pride
Because  with   lavish  hand   he   gave;
And yet no stone betrays his grave
Jones lost his grip.
—Chicago Journal.
Pantage's
Theatre
JOHN80N STREET
VICTORIA, B. C.
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE
Uatlntaa (any part af house)....He
Evenings, Balcony  lte
Lawar Floor He
Bote tte
Matinees
Every Afternoon
at
3 O'Clock.
Night Performances
8 and 9.15
WEEK JUNE aa, 1908
The New Grand
SULLIVAN a COmiBINE,    Proprl.tara.
Management of ROBT. JAMIISBN.
ELTON-POLO-ALDO FOUR
World's Greatest Sensational Casting Artists.
FREDERICKA RAYMOND
TRIO
High Class Singing Sketch.
WILLIAM JENETTA
SELBINI and GROVINI
Acrobats, Jugglers, Tumblers and
Acrobatic Bicyclists.
LEO FILIER
Russian Boy Violinist.
BLACK and MILLER
Novelty Acrobats.
EFFIE PEARSON
Singing Comedienne.
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrator
"The Tale the Church Bells Tolled."
NEW MOVING PICTURES
"Modern Sculptors"
"Uncle Bill's Bull."
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M. Nagel Director.
"Enchantment" Overture.
EMPRESS
THEATRE
Government and Johnson Sts.
MOVING PICTURES:
Fighting the Flames.
The Rival Sisters.
The Bargeman's Child.
The Burglar and the Old Maids.
An Uncle by Marriage.
Gay Vagabonds.
ILLUSTRATED SONGS:
Mrs. Joseph, Vocalist.
When Nandy Said Goodby.
Red Wing.
Program changed Monday and
Thursday.
Daily 2:00 to 5:30, 7:00 to 10:30 p.m.
ADMISSION, TEN CENTS.
Children's   Matinee  Wednesday  and
Saturday. Five Cents.
Most
Particular
Smokers
Experience little or no difficulty
in finding a cigar or blend of
smoking mixture that fits their
taste.
Our Manila or Havana
Cigars can't be beaten.
We carry a most complete line of smokers'
sundries.
Sfcy   Richardson
Cigar Store.
Phone 345
Key Fitting      Lock Repaid]
Telephone 1718
H. M. WILSON
Mechanical Repairs and Saw
Filing
Up-to-date Machinery for Law
Mower Grinding and To
Sharpening. Tires put on G(
Carts and Springs Replace
Prompt attention and wot
guaranteed.
1002 BROAD STREET
Opp. Transfer Stables,
VICTORIA, B.C.
STOCKS
BOND
F. W. Stevenso
Broker
1203 BROAD STREET
Railroad and Industrial Han
Books on Request.
GRAIN
COTTOl
P
Your
Tennis
Dreams
will be fully realized if yc
have one of our Racquets t
play with.
Complete lines of Racquet
Balls, Presses, Cases, Net
etc., at popular prices.
M. W. Waitt & Cd
Limited
Tennis Headquarters.
1004 Govt. St.
LATEST NUMBERS
English
Magazine
CHUMS
TIT-BITS
THE STRAND
PEARSONS
PUNCH
KNIGHT'S B00KST0I
TIOTOBIA, B. a
P
HTEIVTS  an*Trade!
obtained in all countrie
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney a
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granvill
TO SMALL
INVESTORS
(2,250 on easy terms buys
acre on car line, high and d
main road, quite clear, eminent
suitable for sub-division Into lo
neighbouring lots (760 up. Api
to owner, 12 Amelia Street,
Pandora.
It's bad enough when twins are
For men to have to carry thei
But, Oh, how thankful man s
be,
He does not have to marry the THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 20, 1908.
At The Street
Corner
By THB LOUNOBR
lungs are beginning to move a lit-
■a«ter in Victoria. Only a week
Bthe city was threatened with ex-
Biou under a cloud of dust. On
Bsday the Editor of the Colonist
■ed largely from an English ex-
■lge on the merits of "Tarvia,"
I on Thursday Alderman Gleason
lted for Europe to investigate its
■its, and presumably to introduce
■to Victoria. If the worthy Alder-
I could be induced to abandon the
Ik planks of his platform and con-
Brate his energy on the dust prob-
I he might yet become enshrined
lhe grateful memories of Victorin Wednesday evening I lounged
I the Victoria Theatre, stimulated
come curiosity as to the person-
I- and capability of the lady who
I announced to lecture under the
Bices of the W. C. T. U.
I result of an evening's cogitation
■ to confirm a few of my old-
Bioned prejudices, one of which
Balways been that an absolute cure
B'suflragitis" is a happy marriage.
Bi in the midst of a discussion of
Bmost serious social problems,
B Murcott, with a candour which
Bher infinite credit, admitted that
B respect to men with all their
Bs, she loved them still. She ad-
B further that she "wanted a man
Bipport her," and somewhat adroit-
■angled the attractive bait of a
B fruit orchard which she had
Bhased in the Okanagan. If Miss
Bcott does not change her name
■ week, it will be a reproach to the
Bble bachelors and   widowers    of
Boria.   What more could any man
Be than an accomplished lady with
■ssion an an apple orchard?   Did
By "apple"?    I am not sure that
B   Murcott  did,  perhaps   I   have
Bd it in connection with gardens
Bre.   Who said "apple"?
Bwant to congratulate all  parties
Berned    on    the decent clean-up
B has  been  made  of the  Quadra
It cemetery.   As I was one of the
■est kickers,  I think I ought to
Bcredit for a result which is highly
■tying.   Little remains to be done,
Balthough there may be differences
Bpinion  as  to  the  arrangements,
Bvone must agree that    the    re-
flch   of   a   neglected,   unsightly,
Bl's    acre"    has    been    removed.
Bst on this subject I should like to
I;, in common with many others,
I steps, if any, have been taken
Bmedy the constant encroachment
lie sea upon Ross Bay cemetery.
Be cessation of this work is due
lie absence of Alderman Meston
I the Council, the sooner he gets
I  the  better,  unless  some  other
Iman    can    be  deputed to  take
Le of his work.   It is certain that
Ic opinion will not again tolerate
I wholesale destruction of graves
I_ok place last winter.    We may
I the Chinamen enough   to  make
■trilling to shoot, poison or hang
L, and yet lack the hardihood to
I indignities to their dead,
lere is in the City of Victoria a
Iferocious coon,  he sports cheap
llry and drives a motor car.   Un-
lie mends his ways, it will not be
len of him "his end was peace."
Iday last week I saw him driving
liew street on the way to the race
I.    He was going at the rate of
less than    thirty    to    thirty-five
I an hour.   One day this week he
I: down Government street, and
lipproaching the postoffice at the
lof from twelve to fifteen miles
lur.   Half a dozen tourists were
■ing in the roadway.    Instead of
lng up and circling round them
lllcd, but did not abate his speed,
Ithey  jumped  just  clear   of  the
line.    I have received numerous
llaints about this  coloured gen-
In, and I particularly direct the
lion of the police authorities to
lisolent behaviour, and the dan-
lo the public from tbe  reckless
let in which he invariably drives.
Whilst speaking of automobiles, I
want to say a word on the subject of
speed. I have ridden in auto cars
in many parts of the world,, and while
I have never been able to afford tho
luxury of one for myself, I have got
it "on the list," and mean to have
one some day. From this my readers will gather that I think an auto
car is a good thing "per se." My
sympathies lie entirely with the owners of cars who are made to suffer
for the vagaries of a few men whos;
early training has been defective. The
motto of every automobilist should b»
"noblesse oblige." Until that becomes the key-note of driving, there
will be complaints and bad blood between the pedestrian who has to perform acrobatic feats to save his skin,
and the chaffeur who trades upon Bis
ability to run away from every
"melee." The remedy is to punish
unmercifully everyone who breaks the
law. This should be done without
fear or favour, and after the first offence the penalty should go the
limit. In cases of persons being injured through reckless driving or excessive speed, the punishment should
be imprisonment without the option
of a fine. The way would then be
open to agitate for such amendments
to the law as could be granted without imperilling the public safety. But
it is useless to press for these, and at
the same time to defend or extenuat>:
breaches of the existing law. The
first condition of amendment is compliance.   Verb sap.
About the time that these lines first
meet the public eye, I expect to read
the announcement of a discovery recently made on Vancouver Island,
which has been kept very quiet, but in
spite of every precaution has leaked
out within the last few days; I refer
to a new gold find. Having seen
some of the reports, I should be surprised at nothing in the way of values,
if as alleged, the specimen represents
the bulk. I know that this would be
something new in specimens, but as
the veracity of the agent is unquestionable, Ithink the public may fairly
expect something sensational. As
far as I know tllis is the first considerable reef of high-grade quartz
which has been found on Vancouver
Island.
The  water  question  and the dust
question are still with us, and judging from appearances are likely to be
for many years.    There is, however,
another problem whicli ought not to
be so difficult to solve, and to which
it is surely permissible to direct attention.   I refer to the neglected condition of the front gardens and lawns
of  some  of  our  leading citizens.   I
could say a great deal on the subject
of gardens as an evidence of character, but probably there will be no difference of opinion as to the obligations    resting    upon prominent citizens to set a  good  example in the
proper  cultivation  and beautification
of their grounds.    When these gentlemen hold official positions the obligation is surely increased.    I do not
refer to the deterioration of gardens,
which is an inevitable consequence of
the present lack of water, but to the
habitual  neglect which  characterizes
some    of    the     most     conspicuous
grounds in the city.   I  do not wish
to particularize, but 1 recall three or
four properties belonging to gentlemen  of  social  position,    and    some
wealth, which would be discreditable
to a workingman in receipt of three
dollars a day.    The occupancy of a
good  home  carries  with   it  the  responsibility to keep the surroundings
such   as   will do credit both to the
home and to the city.    In the case of
public men the obligation goes further, and I feel sure it is only necessary  to  call  the  attention   of  these
gentlemen to the fact that the habitual neglect of their grounds is an eyesore, and a matter of general comment to ensure the remedying of a
state  of  affairs  which   is   little  less
than a nuisance.
The daily papers of Victoria are to
be congratulated, they have made a
discovery, ancl the fact that it has
taken them four years to make it only
shows how far they are behind the
times. On Monday night about half-
past six, some subscriber anxious to
pay his dues, entered the outer office
of The  Week, and  carelessly threw
an unextinguished match into the
waste-paper basket — result much
smoke, a hurry call to the fire station,
and the prompt extinguishing of a
few smouldering papers. Immediately over the waste-paper box were two
loose-leaved calendars—they are still
there unmarked. On Tuesday the
Colonist came out with a lurid paragraph telling how "the dense smoke
filled the building, and the flames
mounted to the ceiling." The daily
press is a great institution, but for
the fire, neither the Colonist nor the
Times would have known that there
was such a paper as The Weel'.
that after all, the old proverb is once
again justified, "it is an ill wind that
blows nobody good."
afa
ftt^jf,
LICENSE TO AN EXTRA-PROVINCIAL
COMPANY.
THE attention of the Lands and
Works Department having been directed
to the fact that town lots in a town-
site named Prince Rupert, being a subdivision of Lot 642, Range 5, Coast District, situated on the mainland between
the mouth of the Skeena River and
Kaien Island, are being offered for sale,
it has been deemed necessary to warn
the public that the said townsite ls not
situated at the terminus of the Grand
Trunk Pacific Railway, and is not the
townsite which is owned Jointly by the
Government of British Columbia and
the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Company.
F. J. FULTON,
Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works,
Lands and Works Department,
Viotoria, B.C., May lst, 1908.
May 9
m$
PUBLIC
HOSPITAL
INSANE.
FOR   THE
Notice   to  Architects.—Competitive
Designs.
The Government of British Columbia
invite the Architects of British Columbia to submit competitive designs of a
Public Hospital for the Insane, which
it is proposed to erect at Coquitlam,
situated near New Westminster, B.C.
The designs, accompanied by specifications, reports and estimates of cost,
and superscribed, "Design, Public Hospital for the Insane," and addressed to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works, will be received up to noon
of Tuesday, the 30th  June, 1908.
The designs, specifications, reports and
estimates of cost shall have no distinguishing mark or motto, the author's
name being enclosed ln a blank sealed
envelope securely attached to the design
submitted.
The design shall be adjudicated upon
by an Architect practising outside the
Province, to be selected by the Government, after the 30th June, 1908.
The design placed first by the Adjudicator shall receive a premium of
$700, and the one placed second, a premium of $500.
The Government is not bound to erect
the building from any of the designs
submitted.
If the design awarded first place is
accepted, the premium referred to above
shall be included in the professional fee
paid to the architect.
Printed conditions governing the competition can be obtained by bona fide
competitors upon application to the undersigned.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., 7th May, 1908.
May 9
"Companies' Act, 1897."
Canada,
Province of British Columbia,
No. 433.
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that the
"Michigan Commercial Insurance Company" ls authorised and licensed to carry on business within the Province of
British Columbia and to corry out or
affect all or any of the objects of the
Company to which the legislative authority of the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head offlce of the Company ls
situate at Lansing, Ingham County,
Michigan.
The amount of the capital of the
Company ls three hundred thousand dollars, divided Into six thousand shares
of fifty dollars each.
The head offlce of the Company ln
this Province ls situate at Victoria, and
R. P. Rithet & Company, Insurance
Agents, whose address ls Victoria, B.C.,
ls the attorney for the Company.
The time of the existence of the Company ls thirty years from the 19th day
of October, A.D., 1904.
Given  under  my  hand  and  seal  of
offlce at  Victoria,  Provinee  of  British
Columbia, this  16th day of April, one
thousand nine hundred and eight.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which the Company
has been established and licensed are:
To make insurance on dwelling
houses, stores, and all kinds of buildings and upon household furniture,
goods, wares and merchandise, and any
other property against loss or damage
by Are, and to make Insurance upon
vessels, freights, goods, wares, merchandise, and other property against the
risk of inland navigation and transportation.
May 2
LICENSE TO AN EXTRA-PROVINCIAL
COMPANY.
LAND REGISTRY  ACT.
To  T.  J.  Graham,   registered  and  assessed   owner   of   Lot   291,   Mount
Tolmie  Park,  Victoria  District.
TAKE  NOTICE  that application  has
been made to Register William Flannery
as the owner in fee simple of the above
lot   under  a  Tax   Sale   Deed   from   the
Assessor   of   the   District   of   Victoria,
dated   the   16th  of   January,   1903,   and
you  are  required  to  contest the claim
of the said William Flannery within 30
days  from  the first publication  hereof.
Dated   at   Land  Registry  Offlce,   Victoria,   British   Columbia,   this   12th  day
of May, 1908.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
May 16 Registrar General.
"Companies' Act, 1897."
■* ■ ■__________.
Canada,
Province of British Columbia.
No. 434.
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that the "Inter-provincial Land Company" is authorised and licensed to carry on business within the Province of British
Columbia and to carry out or effect all
or any of the objects of the Company
to which the legislative authority of the
Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company ls
situate at the City of Winnipeg, In the
Province of Manitoba.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is sixty thousand dollars, divided into six hundred shares of one
hundred dollars each.
The head offlce of tha Company in
this Province ls situate at the City of
Victoria, and James Fulford Fielde,
agent, whose address is Victoria, aforesaid, is the attorney for tho Company.
Given   under  my   hand  and   seal  of
offlce  at  Victoria,  Province  of  British
Columbia,  this  21st day of April,  one
thousand  nine  hundred  and   eight.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which the Company
has been established and licensed are:
(a) Acquiring, holding, leasing, renting, selling, dealing in, and disposing
of, real estate or any Interest therein,
or any mortgage or lien thereon;
(b) To improve real estate by erecting buildings thereon, or in any other
way altering or dealing with the same;
(c) To lend money on the security of
any real or personal property, and for
such purposes to take mortgages, bills
of sale, and other pledges or Hens thereon;
(d) To enter into agreements for the
erection or improvement or sale of land
or buildings;
(e) To acquire, .own, sell, or otherwise dispose of, timber, timber limits,
permits and licences, coal lands, or mining lands, or mining rights of any sort
or description;
(f) To hold agencies f«r Are, or life
Insurance, or manufacturing companies;
(g) To carry on farming or gardening operations;
(h) To buy, sell, and deal in, cattle,
horses, ond other animals and farm produce, and generally to carry on a general
real estate, loaning, renting, Insurance
agency and mercantile agency business;
(i) To acquire, purchase, sell, hold,
and deal in, tho stock-in-trade, effects,
both real and personal, business, and
good-will of any person, firm or corporation engaged in similar business;
(J) To acquire, buy, sell, and hold,
stock in other companies with similar
objects and  powers.
BRADSHAW & DAVIE,
Solicitors for the Inter-provlnclal Land
Company.
May 2
NOTICE ls hereby given that 30 days
after date we intend to apply to the
Hon. the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect
for coal and petroleum on the following
described lands, situated near Coal
Creek, Renfrew District, B. C: Commencing at a post planted at the northeast corner of section 88, and marked
John Meston and W. H. Anderson;
thence west 80 ohains to northeast corner of seotlon 87; thence north 80
chains; thence east to western boundary
of tha E. & n. Railway Company's
Lands; thence following said boundary
of Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway
Company's Lands; thence following said
boundary of Esquimalt and Nanaimo
Railway Company's lands to point of
commencement.
Staked May 18th, 1908.
JOHN MESTON.
W. A. ANDERSON.
May 23
OEBTIFIOATE   OF   THB   BEOISTBA-
TION OF AN EZTBA-FBOVINCIAL
COMPANY.
"Companies Aot, 1897."
I hereby certify that "The Ferro-Con-
crete Construction Company" has this
day been registered as an Extra-Provincial Company under the "Companies Aot,
1897," to carry out or effect all or art"
of the objects of the Company to which
the legislative authority of the Legislature ot British Columbia extends.
The head offlce of the Company ls
situate at Cincinnati in Hamilton County, Ohio.
The amount of the capital of tha
Company ls flve hundred thousand dollars, divided Into flve thousand shares
of one hundred dollars each.
The head office of the Company In this
Province   ls   situate   at   Victoria,   and
Henry Graham Lawson, Solicitor, whose
address is Victoria, B.C., is the attorney
for  the  company.    Not  empowered  to
Issue and transfer stock.
Given under my hand and Seal of Offlce
at Victoria, Province of British Columbia, this fourth day of April, one
thousand nine hundred and eight
S. Y. WOOTTON.
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this company
has been established and registered are:
Manufacturing and dealing tn fire-proofing and building material of all kinds,
and constructing, equipping and owning
buildings, bridges and structures of all
kinds,  and all  things  incident  thereto,
of  engaging  In  a  general   contracting
business; and of acquiring, holding, owning and disposing of all rights, patent
and  otherwise,  necessary and convenient for the prosecution of Its business.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Range 1, Coast Distriot.
TAKE NOTICE that we, the undersigned, Intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted on the
east side of Loughborough Inlet about
three-quarters of a mile' south of McBride Bay and about ten chains north
of old mill; thence east twenty chains;
thence south twenty chains; thence west
twenty chains more or less to the east
short of Loughborough Inlet; thence
northerly twenty chains more or less
and following the east shore of Loughborough Inlet to the point of commencement.
Dated May lst, 1908.
DAVIDSON, WARD CO., LIMITED,
May 9 G. S. Wilson, Agent
Within sixty days from date I Intend
to apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for permission to
purchase 80 acres of land at Kitsals
Canyon. The land is situated within
lines commencing at a post about half
a mile south of Chas. Durham's Southwest corner and marked: Erlck Norlln,
80 acres, Purchase Claim, S. W. Corner,
May 19th, 1908; thence north 20 chains,
thence east 40 chains; thence south 20
chains; thence west 40 chains to point
of commencement,  containing 80 acres,
May 19th, 1908.
June 13 ERICK NORLIN.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Owen
Townley, of Vancouver, barrister at law,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands: ,
Commencing at a post planted on the
southwest shore of Defence Island,
Howe Sound, thence In a northerly, easterly, southerly and westerly direction,
following high water mark to the point
of commencement, containing 30 acres,
more or less, and being the whole of
the Island known as Defence Island.
Dated   8th  April,  1908.
May 9
April,
THOMAS OWEN TOWNLEY.
CLAYOQUOT   LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Alberni.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Mary I. Williams, of Victoria, B.C., spinster, Intend
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands: Commencing
at a post planted at the south-west end
of one of the group located on the chart
as the one hundred Islands, and extending around this Island to point of
commencement; supposed to contain 20
acres, more or less.
Dated  April 3rd,   1908.
MARY ISABELLA WILLIAMS.
May 2
CLAYOQUOT  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Alberni.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Elizabeth Margaret Wallis Williams, of Victoria, B.C.,
spinster, Intend to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands: Commencing at a post planted
on the north-east side of Puzzle Island,
extending around the Island to point of
commencement, and containing S!> acres,
more or less.
Elizabeth Margaret Wallis Williams.
May 2 	
PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Regulations ror the Docking of Mooring
of All Vessels Arriving at  British
Columbia   Ports    From   Plague-Infected Ports.
(Approved by Order of His Honour the
Adminlstrator-in-CouncIl,  dated  8th
April,   1908).
1. All vessels arriving at British
Columbia ports from ports Infected or
suspocted of being infected with Bubonic Plague shall conform to the following regulations:—
(a) V ussels shall be moored or
docked at a distance not less than six
feet from wharf or land:
(b) Ropes or chains connecting a
vossol with wharf or land shall be
protected by funnels of size and shape
satisfactory to Local and Provincial
Boards of Health:
(c) All gangways shall be lifted
when not in use. Gangways when ln
use shall he guarded against the exit
of rats by a person specially detailed
for this purpose:
(d) All vessels changing route to
solely British Columbia ports shall
give satisfactory evidence of disinfection and extermination of vermin
to Provincial Board of Health.
2. Every owner, agent, or captain of
any vessel, and every other person violating or Instructing, authorising, ordering, permitting, or otherwise suffering any person to violate any of the
foregoing regulations shall be liable,
upon summary conviction before any
two Justices of the Peaco, for every
such offence to a tine not exceeding one
hundred dollars, with or without costs,
or to Imprisonment, with or without
hard labour, for a term not exceodlng
six months, or to both fine and Imprisonment in the discretion of the convicting  magistrates.
Dated  nt  Victoria,   9th  April,   1908.
(By Command).
HENRY ESSON YOUNG,
Provincial Secretary.
Charles J. Fagan. ,M.D.,
Secretary Provincial Board of Health.
May 9
LAND REGISTRY ACT.
In the matter of our application  for a
Duplicate   Certificate    of    Title   to
Subdivision  Lots   16 and  47 of Lot
08. nnd p:irt of Lot 73. Spring Ridge
(Map  SOTi)  Victoria City.
Notice Is hereby given that It ls my
Intention at tho expiration of one month
from   the  date of   the  first   publication
hereof  tn   Issue  a  Duplicate  Certificate
of  Title  tn  snld   lands   Issued   to  William   Ralph   on   the  30th   day   of  Juno,
1802,  and  numbered   1349R A.
Land   Registry   Office   Victoria,   B.C.,
this 13th day of May, 1908.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
May 23 Registrar-General.
PROVINCIAL    GAOL    AT    VICTOBIA.
Tenders endorsed "Gaol Supplies" for
tho supply of Grocerlos, Bread, Fish,
Beef, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, fnr the
said Institution, from-* tho 1st day of
July next, to the 31st of March. 1909,
wlli ho received hy the undersigned up
to Mondny, tho _5th June. Samples ot
Groceries, Clothing. Boots, etc., can be
seen  : t  thc Gaol, Topaz Avenue.
All supplies to be delivered at the
Gaol as required without extra charge.
All articles required for use in this
contract to be of Provincial manufacture ns far as practicable.
Forms of Tender will be supplied on
application tn thc undersigned.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
J. M. MUTTER,
June  2,   1908. Warden. THE WE«K, SATURDAY JUNE  20, 1908,
Correspondence.
Well,    I    hope I  don't make you
tired—I've not written this purely for
mu    —■  ,           I                       .a..,il publicity, but I  felt a kind of sym-
The Week accepts   no   responsibility ,     -       .                ,                 , _
for the views expressed by its corres- pathy for that poor boy you slate so
P0?hencolumns of The Week are open f°r   scratching   up   driftwood,   and
to everyone for the free expression of throwing rocks at the coolies, that I
their opinion on all subjects which do  .......  .       •      „       .>____._. „„_.,.
not involve religious controversy. just had to give my pen some exer-
Communioations    will    be    inserted c;se
whether  signed  by  the  real  name  of ...                ,     , .
the writer or a nom de plume, but the With best wishes for your health,
waiter's   name   and   address   must   be •         -. H   t   f    . .     ...
given to the editor as an evidence of slr* ana «iat ot your paper,
bona  fides.   In   no   case
divulged without consent.
will   it   be
Yours truly,
TEMPORA MUTANTUR.
GO  AND  LISTEN  TO  SHAKESPEARE.
Saanichton P. O.,
June 10, 1908.
Dear Lounger:—Have read with intent    and    profound   attention   your 	
story in last issue of the "Young man j0hn Bright was the greatest Eng-
who went to Mexico." I have read lish orator of his day, and was also
and re-read it all ways, but upon my 0ne of the greatest orators that ever
soul I can't find out what it is you lived. Mr. Bright was not a classi-
want the poor young fellow to do. Is cal scholar. His youth was not de-
it that he ought to seize a hoe with voted to the writing of Latin hexa-
a shout of glee, butt in among his meters or of Greek iambics. Under
gang of dusky peons, and with loud ordinary circumstances, therefore, it
cries of encouragement and the preg- might be supposed that Bright en-
nant force of example stimulate their tered public life severely handicapped
sluggish efforts among the tobacco when the fact is taken into considera-
plants? tion that he had to battle with ora-
I don't think. torical giants like Gladstone, who had
Or is it that he should forsake the been schooled from early youth in the
lotos-eating sushine and return to his  classics.   But the best judges of ora-
pitiful and precarious existence comb- tory always stated that Bright easily
ing the beach for flammable jetsam? outstripped all his competitors in the
I guess not, either. art of public speaking.
Now just what is the moral, dear When asked how he obtained so
Mr. Lounger? I've been in this de- profound a mastery over the English
lectable province likewise about six language, Mr. Bright was in the habit
months, and from the start found that 0f saying that his lucid style was due
if I wanted work I'd have to go right to the fact that from his youth up he
after it with a club, but having been had never ceased studying the Holy
two years around the prairie country Bible, the twelve books of "Paradise
I didn't get alarmed any at that; all Lost" and the works of Shakespeare,
the green's wiped off me now almost; ln this literature Bright found all the
though I was considerable verdant inspiration for those glorious oratori-
when I did hit these shores. Why cai outbursts that have made his name
some! famous from generation to generation.
Now, sir, I have worked on ranches It is admitted by all great writers
since I've been here, partly because that the Bible is one of the best and
I can and partly because there is work most simply written works that can
to be had—worked alongside and be studied by those who are anxious
with all the rattle-tongued, many to master the difficult art of expres-
breed heathen that do so much to add si0n. Totally aside from the inspira-
to the charm of your unrivalled land- tional point of view, the Bible will re-
scape (I speak as a travelled man), main forever as the greatest of liter-
and have been bossed in my work by ary possessions. Those who have
boobies that I never would have ex- studied Milton fully realize the debr
pected to find walking around alive; that this profound thinker owed to
and I want to tell you right now, sir, the Bible.
that if I saw any chance in the hori- And now for Shakespeare. How
zon approximating the job of that many of us have alowed the years to
punch and bananna artist, well, I'd roll by and at the same time have al-
pack my roll and hike for it so quick lowed our Shakespeare to grow dusty
I'd fire the atmosphere, and so, too, on the shelf? The strain and stress
in like case, I venture to suggest you 0f modern life are so great that few
would do yourself. Give us English- 0f us have either the opportunity oi
men fair and candid criticism, as the inclination to consult those great
pungent as you like, but cut out that fountains of wisdom which are found |
humbug racket. The second part of in the works of Shakespeare,
your article concerns a matter that When, therefore, the opportunity is
needs to be noticed more than it is. presented to us to see and hear the
Every mail brings me enquiries from plays of Shakespeare acted, the op-
the Old Country as to things right portunity should be greedily grasped.
here, and in answer to some I have Nothing acn be more beneficial either
sent off half a dozen copies of your to the young or to the old than to
PaPer- listen for a few hours each night tc
It is high time that people in Eng- the immortal lines of Shakespeare as
e
ductions. This is no reason why the
young people should not be taught
to listen to Shakespeare, and finally
to grasp the meaning of his poetic
philosophy. The appetite grows by
what it feeds on. And so the only
way to learn and to appreciate
Shakespeare is continually to hear
Shakespeare, and to read his works.
The thanks of the whole community
are due to Mr. Mantell and his manager for the great educational good
that they have accomplished by introducing us once more to those
grand old dramatic works which time
can never wither.
TAKE NOTICE that the British Columbia Canning Canning Company, Limited, of London, England and Victoria,
B.C., Salmon Canners and Sawmill Owners, Intend to apply for permission to
lease the following described foreshore
and submerged land adjoining lot No.
3, Range, 2, Coast District.
Commencing at a post marked "B.C.C.
Co., South Post," planted on Island,
forming part of said Lot No. 3, three
ohains S. hi W. from the Church, situate on the Wannuck Biver, Rivers Inlet, B.C., thence due west one-quarter
mile, thenoe due nort t one-half mlle to
a post marked "B. C. C. Co., N.W.
Post," on the north shore of Rivers Inlet, thenoe along the shore one-quarter
mile due east, thence due south to island
first mentioned.
25th April, 1908.
BRITISH COLUMBIA CANNING CO.,
May 2 D. McPhee, Agent.
WANTED
WANTED—Young men for Firemen and
Brakemen, instruct you at home by
mail. For free information send
stamp to National Railway Training
School, Inc., 376 Robert St. (Room 57)
St. Paul, Minn., U.S.A.
"Elijah" and "Benjamin" Mineral Claims
Situate in Port Renfrew District, Victoria Mining Division.
Where located—Immediately east of
Bugaboo Creek and Seven Miles from
San Juan Harbour.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Harrie G.
Ross, Free Miner's Certificate No.
B22830, Agent for The Bentley Iron
Mining Co., Ld., Free Miner's Certificate
No. B22821, intend CO days from the
date hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for a Certlflcate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a
Crown Grant of the above claims.
Dated this 10th day of June, A.D. 1908.
June 20 HARRIE G. ROSS.
Iron Master Mineral Group, consisting
"Ironmaster," "Iron King," "Iron
Prince," "Ironmaster's Son" and
"Grip On Iron" Mineral Claims.
Situate in Port Renfrew Distriot, Victoria Mining Division.
Where Located—Extending East and
West from Bentley Creek.
land were informed most explicitly, they are read by Mr. Mantell and th
who is and is not wanted in the Do- members of his well-educated organ-
minion. The immigration affairs ization. Shakespeare has spelt "ruin"
have eben handled in such a promis- for so many managers that a debt of
cuous manned and by so many peo- gratitude is owing to every manager,
pie,   and   with   such   conflicting   re-  who, in spite of the warnings of the
suits, that it is small wonder that people in England are getting, to put it
mildly, a little puzzled. One mau
writes me: "Apparently the 'undesirable' in Canada is the man with no
money—seems as if they want our
cash   but    not us."   A few practical
past, once more makes the hazardous
attempt to give adequate presentations of the great Shakespearean
dramas.
For a time all of us may have
strayed away from the classics and
have    worshiped    the  false  gods  of
working details placed before busi- Scandinavian lore; for a time we all
ness men by business men would have may have a tendency to banish
far better results to British Columbia thought and to take pleasure in spec-
and Canada generally than all the tacular productions that make no ap-
high falutin' stuff unloaded on credu- peal to the reason or to the poetic
lous people in Great Britain by "in- imagination; for a time we may all
terested" parties; there is a great have committed grievous literary and
class, the fringe of which has onl) dramatic sins. But in the end we are
just been touched last spring, which obliged to go back to the plays that
only needs awakening to furnish all havc stood thc test of centuries. We
the lesources of men and money that are compelled to listen to the philo-
thc Dominion has need of—the class sophy that must be implanted on the
that having few pretensions—trades at golden tablets of the memories of
the best stores and pays cash every ihose who seek the truth,
time. It is this class which is prone Mr. Mantell's organization is a most
to send its sons abroad and from capable organization, and it is able to
which have been recruited such men give an adequate interpretation of
as havc made the Argentine, and scv- the various plays that are being pre-
cral other places not under the Brit- sented this season. Young men and
ish flag. There is plenty of scope for young women whose minds have not
intelligent effort among this class in been inured to concentration, may find
the Old Country. From all signs the Shakespearean productions some-
Canada is full up with all the work- what dull after listening to the Broad-
ingmen she can want for quite a way asininities which so often have
while. taken the place of good dramatic pro-
TAKE NOTICE that I, Harrie G.
Ross, for myself, Free Miner's Certificate No. B22830, and associate Trustees
of the above Mineral Group, viz., John
Bentley, Free Miner's Certificate No.
Bi.3050; John William Fisher, Free
Miner's Certificate No. 23101; John Berryman, Free Miner's Certificate No.
B2303S; and Thomas J. Plimley, Free
Miner's Certificate No. B23040, intend
60 days from the date hereof, to apply
to the Mining Recorder for a Certificate
of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of the above
claims.
And further take notice that action
under section 37, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of  Improvements.
Dated this 10th day of June, A.D. 1908.
June 20 HARRIE G ROSS.
Certificate   of   _he   Registration   of
Extra-Provincial   Company.
an
"Companies Act, 1897."
I HEREBY CERTIFY that "The Timber Investment Company" has this day
been registered as an Extra-Provincial
Company under the "Companies Act,
1897," to carry out or effect all or any
of the objects of the Company to which
the legislative authority of the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head offlce of the Company Is
situate at the City of Seattle, King
County, State of Washington.
The amount of the capital of tho
Company is three hundred thousand
dollars, divided Into three thousand
shares of one hundred dollars each.
The head office of the Company In
this Province' ls situate at Victoria, and
Thomas Bamford, clerk, whose address
is Victoria, B.C., is the attorney for the
Company. Not empowered to issue and
transfer stock.
The time of the existence of the Company is fifty years, from the 8th day of
February, 1908.
The Company is limited.
Given   under   my  hand   and   seal   of
offlce  at  Victoria,   Province  of  British
Columbia,   this   13th   day  of  May,   one
thousand  nine hundred and eight.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has been established and registered are:
To manufacture, buy, and sell timber
and timber products; to buy, lease, or
otherwise acquire and to hold real estate
and timber ln the State of Washington
and elsewhere, and the same to sell,
mortgage, lease and dispose of; to erect,
operate, sell and dispose of water-works
for the supply 6Twater-power and water
for domesfic purposes, electric power
plants; to buy, build, lease and otherwise acquire and operate, if necessary
and desirable, tug-boats and freight and
passenger steamers; to carry on the
business of selling real estate on commission and doing a general real estate
and timber brokerage business; to loan
the money of the Corporation in connection with its other business If
deemed advisable and to the best Interests of the Corporation; to buy, sell
and deal in all kinds of merchandise.
June 20
"Companies Aot, 1897."
NOTICE ls hereby given that Raymond Bellenger Punnett, of Victoria,
B.C., broker, has been appointed new
attorney of "The Timber Investment
Company" In the place of Thomas Bamford.
Dated at Vietoria, B.C., this  8th  day
of  June,   1908.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
June 20.
Qood Receipt for Hushroom Sandwiches
Mince contents of a tin of Ox Tongue and boiled Mushrooms |
together, add French Mustard and spread between bread and butter.
(Canned Mushrooms may be used if preferred.)
OTHER SPECIALTIES FOR SANDWICHES
DEVILLED HAM, per tin, ioc and  iec
DAVIES' VEAL LOAF, per tin  ic
DEVILLED TONGUE, per tin  _,■_ I
UNDERWOOD'S DEVILLED HAM  «c ■
ENGLISH POTTED BREAKFAST MEATS, per tin 5c and..ioc ,
C. & B. POTTED MEATS, per glass jar  25c.!
C. &B. POTTED FISH, per glass  25c
PATE DE FOIS GRAS, 50c, 75c, and  $1.00
PUREE DE FOIS GRAS  .25c
RUSSIAN CAVIAR, per tin  65c
PEA NUT BUTTER, per bottle 20c, 35c and 65c
The Economy Jar Demonstrator is here. This new method is
unmatched for preserving Meat, Fruit, etc.   Come in and learn how.
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
Up-to-Date Grocers.
1317 Government Street. Tels. 52, 1052, 1590
Visit Victoria
No   lovelier  place   can  be  found  than   beautiful  Victoria   in j
summer, autumn, winter or spring.   The morning air is cool and
bracing; coast and woodland scenery around simply unrivalled, and
the sense of perfect rest that comes with the cool evenings is
delightful.
The Poodle Dog Hotel
for the Tourist
is the ideal stopping place;   well equipped throughout;   modern,
homelike, yet inexpensive and with a cuisine absolutely unrivalled j
in British Columbia.
The cosy Grill Room of hte Poodle Dog is praised from|
coast to coast by transient guests.
SMITH & SHAUGHNESSY
PROPRIETORS!
YATES STREET, VICTORIA, B.C.
American Steel Clad
ELECTRIC IRONl
Simplest and best on the market; costs less to operate andl
maintain than any other. Can be attached to any electric lightl
or power circuit; easy to attach, no danger. Equally valuable tol
the tourist or the housekeeper. Unrivalled for laundry purposes!
PRICE ONLY $6.00. We will give ten days' free trial if desired.|
Call here and see them in operation.
B, C. ELECTRIC RAILWAY CO., LIMITED
CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS.
Write me for 1908
Catalogue
Cockburn's Art Galler
(Successors to WILL MARSDEN)
PHONE 1933
665 Granville Street,      Vancouver, B.I reTrrevrrrerr-rarveTnr-joTn
Kingsford Smith & Co.
Stock and General
AUCTIONEERS
Commission and Real Estate Agents.
167 Cordora St.        Vancouver.
UAJUUUUUUU.8
Vancouver Edition
The Week
R British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vancouver B. 6.
> innnnnnnf TTinnnrmnr wmnw
Stewart WilUum Hilton Keith     "
STEWART WILLIAMS&Co
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION AND
REAL ESTATE AGENTS
Si FORT ST. VICTORIA, I. C.
3 Phono 1324 I
iSUUULSUJUUUULSiSUUUL_UULXXXi
[OL.  V.    No   _\_   A,
X
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 20, 1908
One Doixa* Pkx Annum
the Water
Question.
Tbe   water   question   still
continues to be tbe absorbing topic of interest in Victoria.   The continuance of
ry weather accentuates the serious char-
cter of the problem.    If tbe scriptural
■overb be true that "in the multitude of
unsellors there is wisdom," then a happy
lution cannot be far distant.    Men in
ery station and of every qualification are
aily expressing their opinions in the press
,nd giving vent to their indignation.   The
Colonist   and   the   Times   are   devoting
lumns to the subject in each issue.   For
|ick of space, and also because many words
iiake for confusion, The AVeek will con-
nse its comments into tlie smallest pos-
ble space, premising them by relating the
llowing incident:    A visitor from San
rancisco called on tbe Editor on Tues-
y morning for a friendly chat.   His first
icstioii was, "What is new in Victoria?"
■n being told that the chief topic of in-
rest was- the water supply, he laughed a
ry unholy and altogether too sarcastic
laugh, and remarked,   'You call that
bw, do you ?   Why when I lived in Vic-
liiia fifteen years ago, it was the one topic
conversation."   It seems to The Week
liat this incident is in itself an explana-
lon of, and the key to the whole situation.
Irocrastination has kept Victoria without
li adequate water supply for fifteen years,
id procrastination is still dominating the
lity Council, while the City Fathers hesi-
Ite as did all their predecessors to apply
J certain remedy.    The Mayor says that
le criticism offered is unreasonable, illo-
Ical,   and   based   upon   ignorance.   He
liints to the work of Mr. Adams, and says
lat the City is carrying out tbat gentle-
Jan's suggestions.    He says further that
ace no other source of supply could be
lade available before next summer, the
lity might just as well Avait for the coni-
letion of Smith's Hill reservoir, as launch
lit into some bigger scheme.   This is the
lily reason, he alleges, for turning a deaf
lir to all suggestions for purchasing, or
lasing   the   Goldstream   water,   or   for
litiating the Sooke Lake project.   There
|'e two weak links in the Mayor's chain
reasoning.   The first is that by the admission of Expert Adams, Elk Lake bas
I capacity sufficient to supply a population
forty-five thousand, and if the Smith's
fill reservoir were completed today, and
whole of tbe water at Elk Lake made
Mailable for distribution, there would be
Ittle, if any surplus over actual require-
lents.   There is every probability that in
year from date the.natural growth of
[ictoria, based upon the experience of the
kst two years, will have caught up to the
jtaximum capacity of Elk Lake; certainly
liis will  happen  within two  years,  in
lhich event Victoria will not be appre-
lably better off, even with tbe completion
Smith's Hill reservoir and the prop'er
istribution of Elk Lake water, than it is
[day.     The  second  weak  link  in  the
tayor's argument is that the elevation of
pith's Hill is not sufficient to give fire
lessure at any point in the city, and that
] is too low even to feed by gravity the
^hest residential districts.   By what pro-
bs of reasoning can such a system be re-
[rded with any degree of finality .   Even
domestic service and gardens can be
Ipplied for a year or two longer by its
5ans, fire will still have to be fought by
limping engines without any practical as-
ftance from gravity.   The question of the
oment is what ought the City to do both
J the interests of health and safety ?   The
Jeek maintains, as it has done for more
Ian two years that the only practical and
lonomical solution is tlie acquisition of
EDITORIAL
the Goldstream water. Year after year
passes, other schemes are ventilated, surveys are made, the Highland District and
Sooke Lake are examined, but the result is
always the same, tbat unless Victoria
wants to cut off its nose to spite its face, it
must go to Goldstream. This is the only
source from which pure water and plenty
of water can be obtained. It is true that
tbe same conditions might be complied
with at Sooke Lake, but only at a much
higher cost, and with a much longer pipe
line to maintain. The fact that the Esquimalt Waterworks Company has never been
willing to accept tbe price which the City
thought reasonable is, scarcely a serious
factor if tbe City cannot do better elsewhere, and the proposal to spend a million
or a million and a half dollars to go to
Sooke, rather than give the Esquimalt
Waterworks Company $250,000 more than
the City thinks it ought to get, cannot be
defended on business grounds, and the
principle is not one upon which any man
would act in connection with his own
affairs. During the present year the Colonist has followed the lead of The Week
and lined up in favour of tbe Goldstream
proposition. This is a more charitable and
more probable explanation of its present
policy than that so ungraciously suggested
by the Times. But the Colonist goes a
step further and advocates that the City
should exercise its rights and call upon
the Esquimalt Waterworks Company to
supply the statutory quantity of three million gallons per day at six cents a gallon.
This would necessitate a five-years' contract, and it is surely not too much to suggest that a judicious and diplomatic negotiator might in connection with this
agreement arrange for an option to purchase, to be exercised at any time during
the five years. If, however, the latter
could not be arranged immediately, the
City would be no worse off in respect of a
contract for ultimate purchase, and would
within a year from date have double its
present water supply. The Week cannot
see a single reasonable objection to tbis
scheme. The money spent under the five
years' agreement would be spent in exactly
the same way as if the City had already
purchased the property, and would merge
into the ultimate scheme of distribution.
If the City has to wait for the thrashing
out of further legal quibbles, or if the
subject is, as the latest action of Mayor
Hall would suggest, to be tossed iuto tlie
political arena, then God help Victoria!
If we are not all poisoned our gardens and
lawns will be scorched up, aud at the present rate our City will be burnt down. Is
it too much to ask in this enlightened
twentieth century that the City Fathers
should bring a little more "horse sense,"
and a little less sensitiveness to bear upon
the solution of what is viewed in every
light a most serious problem, and one
which threatens not only the good name,
but the actual safety of thc City.
Women, or to be more pre-
Traducing cise, those women who are
Her Sex. banded together for reform
work, are wont to misunderstand and bitterly resent criticism of tlieir
methods. It is impossible to comment unfavourably upon any of their proceedings
without arousing their ire, and the male
creature who condemns even their extravagancies is voted a Philistine. It must
in fairness be admitted tliat men reformers
also make mistakes, and are guilty of utterances far which no defence can be offered. But it is neither discourteous nor
unchivalrous to state that women are less
reliable in their public utterances than
men. It is not necessary to follow Miss
Murcutt in all her ridiculous meanderings
of the present week. She has slandered
the meu who are allied with every interest
she has discussed, but why did she consider it necessary to slander her own sex?
It is difficult to speak dispassionately of
the horrible story which she had the hardihood to relate upon the authority of some
unknown minister, and some unknown
mayor. Miss Murcutt would probably be
grievously offended if The Week suggested that she had been drawing upon her
imagination for the whole incident. And
yet this would be a more charitable conclusion than to accept her statement that
she was merely repeating what she had
been told. She does not pretend to have
investigated the story, and yet she is willing to believe and to repeat, on the authority of two men, that a certain Canadian
city contains fewer virtuous girls over fifteen than Sodom or Gomorrah. A woman
capable of believing such a statement is
either morally or mentally unfit to be
identified witli any reform movement, and
as a choice of alternatives The Week sincerely hopes that the latter is the case.
The Colonist is to be commended for summing up a most unusual amount of courage in condemning Miss Murcutt's attitude
in this matter. But the Colonist did noe
go far enough. Public opinion demands
tliat Miss Murcutt shall promptly give her
authority for the story. If she fails to
realize her moral responsibility to do so
she must bc content to be branded as a
traducer of her sex and a slanderer of uie
commonest type; and the organization
which allows her to continue to make use
of it as a vehicle for circulating prurient
stories will have to share the responsibility. The Week does not believe that there
is a mother in Victoria who will not endorse this conclusion, and it knows that
every parent, and every pure-minded girl,
of whom there are many more than Miss
Murcutt wots of, will repudiate her estimate of their sex with scorn. It is difficult to understand why evangelists and
professional reformers of both sexes are
so prone to bring discredit upon their
organizations by retailing the lascivious,
but it seems as if they helplessly gravitate
in that direction.
Fighting
Fire.
The Editor of The Week
was down town at G.45 on
Friday morning. He heard
the fire-bells, and saw the
whole of the proceedings in connection
with the blaze on Government Street. The
opportunity for checking the work of the
Department and making a few careful
notes was too good to be lost, so it was
taken advantage of. The result is given
to the public and vouched for. The moral
can be drawn by tbe reader. The hose
wagon and one Waterous engine arrived on
the scene at three minutes past seven. At
this time names were shooting out of all
thc back windows of the top story overlooking Lnngley Street, where the fire had
evidently started. Tliere was no flame on
the Government Street side, but dense
volumes of smoke. 'I'he windows were not
broken. The first hose was connected to
thc hydrant nt tlie foot of Trounce Alley,
was unreeled and carried upstairs. The
water flowed through it at seven minutes
past seven. Three minutes later another
hose was playing on the front of the building, but the pressure was insufficient to
force the water higher than about twenty-
five feet, whicli was ten or fifteen feet
lower than the upper story where the fire
was raging. At twelve minutes past seven
the upper windows cracked and the flames
burst out. By this time the whole upper
story was a raging furnace, full of flame.
It was not until eighteen minutes past
seven that the large nozzle was exchanged
for a smaller one, and the stream from the
Waterous engine reached the upper story.
Even then it was unable to play on the
roof, although it did good work through
the windows, and in fifteen minutes more
practically quenched the fire. Meanwhile
nothing effective had been done on the
Langley Street side where the fire originated, ancl where it could most easily have
been extinguished. There was no engine
on this side of the building, and it was
not until half past seven that the firemen
had a hose carried up the scaling ladder
to the roof of an adjoining building and
tried to play through the upper windows
of the burning block, but the gravity pressure was iusufficient. The conclusions of
an impartial observer were that the water
supply was ludicrously insufficient, that
the appliances were inadequate, and that
the best firemen in the world could do
very little with such an equipment. Until
the City has a gravity supply with a pressure of a hundred and fifty pounds as a
minimum it should have available sufficient engine power of the most modern
type to cover buildings at least seventy
feet high. As to the handling of the men
and tho appliances only an expert is competent to express an opinion in view of the
woeful inadequacy of the latter.
Before the Provincial elec-
The Federal tions in Ontario and Quebec
Election. the political quid mines had
decided that a Federal election would take place early in the Fall,
and the call to arms had actually gone
forth. After the significant victory of the
Conservative party in both provinces, the
enthusiasm for elections received a serious
check among the Liberal leaders, and now
the prophets are guessing again. All that
can safely be predicted is that the election
may come this year, and failing that, it
must come next. Throughout the Dominion tliere are comparatively few constituencies that have not chosen their standard
bearers. Of these few Victoria is one.
The Week is of opinion that the selection
should have been made some time ago, and
that the party is weakened by the delay.
It still believes that the strongest candidate
available is Mr. H. G. Barnard. Those
who attended the annual meeting of the
party last night and witnessed Mr. Barnard's enthusiastic re-election as President,
found little encouragement for differing
from the opinion of The Week, aud if a
candidate is to bc chosen from among the
more active and conspicuous members of
the party, the choice will undoubtedly fall
upon Mr. Barnard. Tho sooner any uncertainty on tliis matter is removed, the
better for the party and for the prospects
of the candidate. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 20, 1908.
An Interview With a Distinguished Visitor.
When we were little children
We did what nursie said
And when the hour was (i p.m.
We  had  to go to bed,
And now, though we are older,
We find it's just the same:
We've got the same old nursie still-
She's merely changed her name.
When we were little children
We didn't dare to smoke
And nursie says we mustn't now—
And nursie doesn't joke.
For nursie hates tobacco;
Tobacco  makes  her  mad.
Oh, no;   we mustn't smoke at all,
Since nursie says it's bad.
When we were little children
We weren't allowed to bet
And nursie says we musn't now
Or ever "taste a wet,"
For beer is very sinful,
And whisky's even worse.
We should prefer to die of thirst—
According to our nurse.
When we were little children
We used to play at games,
But now we mustn't play at all,
Or nursie calls us names—
Unless  we play  at  ping-pong
Or  oroklnole  and  sueh.
*    ♦    *
Oh, dear, our nursie Interferes
A little bit too  muoh.
On the news being received that thc
2nd Vice-President of the W.C.T.U.,
North Kansas Branch, was in the city
on business connected with the local
convention, the interviewer hurried
with all haste (and a little flutter in
.his heart) to the Empress Hotel,
where the distinguished lady was residing in a suite of rooms, especially
engaged.
He was ushered into a private sitting room, which had been tastefully
decorated with festoons of white ribbon twined round tinted diagrams of
enlarged miscroscopic section of the
intestinal canal before and after alcoholic intoxication, thc tout ensemble
having a most charming effect. Thc
2nd Vice-President received the interviewer with a chilling stare. There
could be no doubt at all as to the
character of this reception. It was
icy. It was 20 below zero (with a
wind blowing), and thc interviewer
instinctively buttoned up his coat as
he stood shivering under the scrutinizing glitter of a pair of spectacles.
"You have come to interview me,
I understand," said the 2nd Vice-
President in a voice that bore a
strange resemblance to her spectacles
—clear ancl hard.
"I hope I may have thc honour," replied thc interviewer with nervous
politeness.
"Take that chair," said thc lady in
commanding tones. The interviewer
took thc chair promptly: disobedience
in sueh an august presence could be
nothing else, hc felt, than a positive
sin.
Thc lady carefully extracted a
watch and placed it on a table beside
her. "Is this interview to last longer
than three minutes?" she asked.
"May I not have the pleasure of
conversing with you for a slightly
longer period?" enquired thc interviewer humbly,
"In that case," said the 2nd Vice-
President, "1 must call my husband."
"But, madam," expostulated the interviewer, "I havc not come to interview your husband."
"No matter," she retorted, "it
would not bc proper.
"Albert!   1 want you."
In obedience to thc summons, a
reverend gentleman instantly entered,
approached the table with 'his hands
clasped meekly, and awaited orders.
"You may take a chair, Albert."
Thc reverend gentleman slowly and
cautiously  stepped  across  the   room
to a chair in a far corner; there he
slowly and cautiously sat down and
kept a close watch on the stranger,
witli frequent side-long glances out of
half shut eyes, beaming with love.
"This young man," said his better
half by way of introduction, "is a representative of the local press." She
paused. "He has come to interview
me."
"1 hope," said the reverend gentleman in a beautiful sad voice, "that
the paper he represents is a strictly
temperance paper."
"Vou bet it is," exclaimed the interviewer, taken off his guard.
"Never," sighed the reverend gentleman, "I would never do anything so
wicked! But I will excuse your language ou the ground of enthusiasm.
And so your editor believes in temperance?"
"My editor," said the interviewer,
"even denies himself tea and coffee—
on occasions."
"Ah, I am so pleased to hear it,"
broke in . the 2nd Vice-President, a
smile of approval lighting up her
somewhat grim features, "I have always found that a little warm water
with a dash of milk in it is quite sufficient, and so stimulating! But dear
me, how few of us are really temperate."
"VV.hat strange ideas," remarked the
interviewer,
"What strange ideas people have of
temperance nowadays!"
"Most strange," the lady agreed,
"people actually imagine that temperance means using the things of
this world in a temperate manner!"
"And how would you define temperance, madam," questioned the interviewer.
The august lady rose to her feet,
"ln my official capacity of 2nd Vice-
President I would define temperance
as follows: Temperance is being temperate in the use of everything that
the W.C.T.U. approves of, and totally
abstaining from everything that the
W.C.T.U. does not approve of."
"How true!" murmured the reverend gentleman, "And oh, how beautiful!"   The lady resumed her seat.
"The propaganda of the W.C.T.U.
is progressing, is it not?" continued
,. ie interviewer.
"By leaps and bounds. We are
putting pressure on thc people in
every direction, I am happy to say,"
replied tlie and Vice-President with an
air of intense satisfaction. "But there
is so much yet to be done, so many,
many evils to reform," she added with
a sigh.
"Indeed there are," said the interviewer sympathetically.
"For instance," continued the good
lady, "there is the wearing of pig-tails
by Chinamen."
"What!" exclaimed the interviewer.
"Yes, it is on that very question
that I am paying my official visit to
your city. We are arranging to send
a deputation to thc Premier and thc
Attorney-General to induce them to
bring about legislation making the
wearing of a pig-tail by any Chinaman a penal offence."
"On what grounds, may I ask?"
"The wearing of a pig-tail," explained the lady in a cold and level
voice, "is the prerogative of a woman,
any man wearing a pig-tail is therefore a female impersonator. This is
of course most immoral."
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L««vc Vour Baggage Cheeks at
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THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 20 1908
Shocking!" exclaimed the reverend
ntleman, casting his eyes heaven-
ird, "my soul positively shudders
ery time I pass a Chinaman with
ch a feminine apendage."
T was under the impression," said
interviewer, that you confined
ur operations to the white inhabit-
ts."
Oh, dear me no," said the 2nd
ice-President. "We take a motherly
terest in the morals and conduct of
1 the inhabitants of the entire uni-
rse, whatever their colour may be.
or instance, we are having five
ousand tracts printed in Chinook for
stribution among the various Inan reservations along the Pacific
)ast dealing with the character and
ndencies of the modem French
ama: these we are sure will be very
neficial. But of course we pay par-
ular attention to our own children.
3 prove it I have only to mention
e twenty-five thousand blotters
hich we have just prepared for dis-
ibution among the school children;
ch blotter is stamped with a couple
very pretty pictures of the inside of
e human anatomy before and after
tring corsets."
'Do you think," queried the inter-
ewer, somewhat doubtfully, "that
ese blotters will also have a bene-
ial effect?"
'Most decidedly," said the 2nd Vice-
esident, "for I showed a sample
py the other day to a little neice of
ne and she fainted on the spot,
len as to the tons ancl tons of litera-
e which we are using in our fight
tinst the Demon Rum—ah, that rends me, how is it that your city is
t yet under total prohibition?"
'Well, madam," replied the inter-
wer, "to tell you the truth we
rdly dare risk it. It is really not
r fault, but there is scarcely suf-
ent water sometimes to make a cup
tea.   Under these circumstances we
I it would be a very dangerous step
take to cut ourselves off from every
ier form of liquid refreshment."
No excuse," broke in the lady
rnly. "What do you call that?" She
nted to the James Bay with a ma-
tic sweep of her arm.
Really, madam, it is rather hard to
. It is generally considered to be
• water slightly adulterated, but it
ells queer.'
That," she said emphatically, "if
perly diluted, with the additionof
ittle aniline dye and some brown
far would make an excellent sub-
:ute for beer."
And far, oh far more wholesome,
dear young friend," said the rev-
II d gentleman.
Have  you  never seen our  recipe
)k?" said the 2nd Vice-President.
Never heard of it even," said the
erviewer.
You surprise me," said the 2nd V.
"our staff of expert analytical
mists has been working for thc
t two years concocting substitutes
pernicious  drinks.    Albert, hand
a recipe book. ... . Thank you!
ey have succeeded in duplicating
the favourite drinks of the saloon,
ile carefully eliminating every-
ng that might not be considered
irely innocent. Here, for instance,"
continued, as she opened the prec-
s volume and began to turn over
pages, "right at the very begin-
g of the book you will find recipes
temperance cocktails.   Would you
to hear how to make a Manhtatan
;ktail a la W.C.T.U.?"
Very much indeed," said the inter-
wer.
Here is the recipe then," replied
lady.   "Take a little lemon juice,
1 spoonful of sugar and a little
ger; stir the mixture up in a little
id water ancl pour into a glass;
half a teaspoonful of siedlitz
vder to give it 'life' and serve up
h a small onion on the end of a
thpick. Now wouldn't that be de-
_ais on a hot day?"
ut before the    interviewer    could
2 his opinion the 2nd Vice-Prcsi-
t had jumped to her feet—all
tight of the recipe book had van-
d.
Young man," she cried, "I notice
jcco stains on your fingers. You
ike    cigarettes.    Do    not dare to
y it*"
I have not any intention of doing
' expostulated the interviewer,
hat about it?"
"Only this," she replied in tones of
intense solemnity, "only this that
smoking leads to a smoker's grave.
To say nothing of the fact that it is
most immoral."
"Really!" exclaimed the victim of
the eagle eye, "I had no idea it was
so serious."
"Ah, my dear young friend, let me
persuade you to at once sign a pledge
that you will never, never smoke tobacco any more. Albert, give our visitor a pledge card."
The reverend gentleman hastily
picked up a card from a pile on the
table and handed it to the interviewer.
"Now I am sure you are a sensible
young man," purred the 2nd Vice-
President in honied accents; "read
this little card through carefully and
then sign it."
"Madam," said the interviewer with
a puzzled look, after he had read it
through carefully, "1 do not see how
I can very well sign this."
"You don't see how you can sign
it!" exclaimed the lady in a vexed
tone.
"Precisely," said the subject of
reformation. "I can't see how it applies to me at all. If I were to read
it out to you, I think you would understand."
"Read it then," commanded the 2nd
Vice-President; "read it at once."
"Very well, if you- insist," said the
interviewer resignedly. "This is what
:s on the card: 'I hereby pledge myself to no longer wear a peek-a-boo
waist and never ' "
"Oh, Albert!" screamed the 2nd
Vice-President, "how could you be so
careless! You have given him one of
the peek-a-boo cards; get him a tobacco card instantly!"
"No, madam," declared the unfortunate interviewer, plucking up his
courage, "I really must decline to sign
any pledge until I am convinced."
"Why?" asked his torturer. Sign
the pledge first and be convinced
afterwards. You are sure to be convinced afterwards."
"1 repeat, madam, I really must decline," said the interviewer with the
firmness of a martyr.
"Well then," said the 2nd Vice-
President crossly, "if you must be.
convinced I can at once convince
you." 1
She took out a little tract from a
ile of papers.   "This is one of our
most able tracts on the subject. . Let
me read it to you."
"I have hardly time, madam," said
the interviewer desperately.
"Well then in that case I must give
you the gist of it briefly. This tract
describes how a certain well known
temperance doctor of Chicago took a
poodle dog and squirted tobacco juice
into its left eye. Now what do you
think the poodle dog did?"
"I should think hc swore."
"Don't be frivolous, young man,"
said thc lady angrily. "The poor dog
died."
"Well, I'm not surprised," said tbe
interviewer, "but I fail to see the application.
"You don't!" exclaimed the lady.
"lie doesn't see the application!"
echoed the reverend gentleman.
"No," asserted the interviewer, "1
do not for two reasons. Firstly, 1 am
not a poodle dog and secondly I neve
use tobacco in that particular way."
"What particular way?" enquired
the good lady.
"Squirting it into my left eye," explained the interviewer.
The 2nd Vice-President turned in
despair to the reverend gentleman,
who shook his head despondently.
"Well," she said, fixing her eyes on
the interviewer, "this is fearful! If
the relation of a blood-curdling fact
like that does not convince you I don't
know what will—unless you are open
to an argument."
"I am willing to bc convinced, if
you can produce a convincing argument," said the culprit.
The 2nd Vice-President brightened
up. "Ah, then I havc hopes for you.
Here is an argument that is one of
our favourite old stand-bys. It is so
intellectual ancl so convincing. Listen!
If Nature intended you to smoke she
would havc provided you with a natural smoke-stack on the top of your
head. She has not provided you with
a natural smoke-stack on the top of
your head, therefore she does not intend you to smoke. Ergo, it follows
that every time you smoke you arc
wantonly flying in the face of Nature.
To fly in the face of Nature is most
immoral."
"Quod erat demonstrandum," added
the reverend gentleman eagerly.
"Now, my dear young friend, you
have heard an argument that is absolutely incontrovertible."
"Do you not admit it?" cried the
2nd Vice-President with a ring of
triumph in her voice.
"Madam, I admit it," said the interviewer, pushed to the very extremity of desperation. "Yes, madam,
it certainly is an absolutely incontrovertible argument."
"Ah, good! Excellent," chuckled
the 2nd Vice-President, "now you will
sign the pledge card, won't you?"
"Just one minute, please," explained
the interviewer, "I have not quite
finished. "If your argument applies
to one case it should apply to another with equal force. Do you not
admit that also?"
"Ye-es," said the 2nd Vice-President cautiously.
"Why of course, most certainly,"
blustered the reverend gentleman, "of
course!"   .   .   .
"Then, sir," said the interviewer,
turning to the reverend gentleman, "I
notice that you are wearing a collar.
On the ground of your own incontrovertible argument I accuse you of
being guilty of a most immoral act."
"How so!" exclaimed the 2nd Vice-
President.
"Madam," replied the interviewer,
"if Nature had intended your husband
to wear a collar, Nature would have
supplied him with a collar-button in
front and a collar-button behind. Nature has not done any such thing.
Therefore to wear that collar is to
wantonly fly in the face of Nature
with all that it entails.—quod erat
demonstrandum."
"Dear, oh dear!" cried the reverend
gentleman in tones of the deepest dismay, "I never looked at it in that
light before. I must make it a matter
of prayer!" So saying he hurriedly
got up and began divesting himself of
the immoral garment. But at the
sight of her husband undressing himself in the presence of a total stranger
the 2nd Vice-President uttered a
shriek. The awful sight was too much
for her nerves, and with a gurgling
sob she fainted—thus bringing the interview to a sad but opportune conclusion. W. H. S.
Senator La Follette has picked up
$40,000 by lecturing on the wrongs of
the dear "pcepul" and the iniquities
of the heartless corporations.
Royal Dairy
1004 Broad Street
Ice Cream & Sweet Cream
Supplied in quantity.
Try our delicious
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Phone 188.
$1,000 Reward
The Government of the Province of
British Columbia hereby offers a reward of One Thousand Dollars for the
arrest and conviction of a certain unknown man, who on the ninth day or
June instant, at or near Hazelmere, In
the County of New Westminster, in the
said Province, murdered one Mrs. Mary
Morrison by cutting her throat.
Description of murderer has been
given as follows: Height about 5 feet
8 or 9 inches; clean shaven, fat-swarthy
face, probably negro blood; wore dark
clothing and soft dark hat, one hole ln
seat of pants, black shirt with white
stripes; face and clolthlng blackened, as
though he had been working in burnt
timber. This description is the only one
obtainable, but It may be Incorrect.
Watch all tramps and suspicious
looking characters who mny have come
from the direction of the scene of the
murder.
Warrant issued. Report by wire any
information to F. Stanley Spain, Chief
Constable, New Westminster, B.C., or
to the undersigned:
F.  S.  HUSSY,
Superintendent   Provincial   Police,   Victoria, B.C.
Provincial  Police Department,  Victoria,
British Columbia, June 10, 1908.
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TENTH ANNUAL DINNER
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Clams
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Clear Green Turtle
Side Dishes
Radishes Celery      Olives
Fish
Brook Trout  Meuniere
Duchesse  Potatoes
Cucumbers
Remove
Saddle of Spring Lamb Colbert
New   Spring   Beans
Entrees
Sweetbreads Montebello
French   Peas
New  Asparagus   Hollandaise
Sherbet with  Maraschino
Roast
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Lettuce Salad
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Coffee
Sherry Chablis
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TOASTS
"The President of thc United States," response by lion. Seth Low.
"Our Honored Guest," His Excellency Mr. VVu Ting-Fang.
"China in Regeneration," response by Hon. Edwin Denby, Representative in Congress from lhe First District of Michigan.
"American Influence in China," response by Hon. Lebbus Redan
Wilfley, Judge of the United States Court of China.
"The Far East by Way of the Panama Canal," response by Hon.
John Barrett, Director of thc International Bureau of American
Republics.
"Thc New Light of Asia," response by Right Rev. Henry C. Potter,
D.D., Bishop of New York. THB WBEL, SATURDAY JUNE 20, 1908
Subscribed
Capital . $500.000|
Paid Up
Capital .
Reserve .
(126,000
$160,000
J. B. MATHERS, Oan. Han.
HI CLOSING UP ESTATES
either as Executors or Assignees
the Dominion Trust Ce., Ltd., Is
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when ws are made your executor.
DOMINION   TBUST CO.,
Limited.
328 Basting Street, West,
Taacouvsr, B. C.
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
tShi Government Street.. .Victoria, B.C.
526   Hastings Street.. ..Vancouver, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE..Manager and Editor
Reminiscences.
The receipt of a press notice referring to tlie coming engagement of
Mr. R. B. Mantell in Victoria has
served to start a train of thought and
to arouse many half-forgotten memories of theatre-going in the days of
long ago.
My first reflection is that plays may
come and plays may go, but Shakespeare goes on for ever. It is. not a
little interesting to recall the number
of fashions that have been set by
playwrights during the last 40 years,
and to note how each has had his
vogue and disappeared in the limbo
of unremembered would-be dramatists.
When I first found my way to the
theatre, Tom Taylor was the hero
of the moment, and soon after Robertson, the father of Mrs. Kendal.
Amongst the most popular offerings
of those days were "Caste," "School,"
"Society," "Ours," and " 'Twixt Axe
and Crown." Then we had a spell of
of robust romantic drama with William Rignold in "Black-eyed Susan,"
and the "Girl I Left Behind Me." The
first visit of the company from the
Comedie Francais, including Sarah
Bernhardt, Got, Coquelin, Delaunay
and the incomparable Madame Croi-
sette, created a taste for the French
drama, and so we had Charles Warner in the memorable LAssommoir.
Tiring of the too strenuous, Mr.
and Mrs. Kendal and John Hare
popularized first the serious drama,
ancl then the highest class comedy,
reaching the high-water mark of excellence in "Diplomacy," "The Iron
Master" and "The Pair of Spectacles,"
the latter the finest comedy seen on
the English stage for fifty years, in
fact since Charles Matthews ceased
playing "Adonis Evergreen."
The next vogue was that created by
the brilliant character actor, Mr.
Beerbohm Tree, who had a run at the
Haymarket beginning, say, twenty-
five years ago, when Miss Julia Neil-
son was a very young ingenue, and
th . whole company did brilliant work
in such melodramas as "A Man's
Shadow," and such exquisite pastoral
plays as "The Village Priest."
Meanwhile Charles Wyndham had
popularized society drama, and especially old English comedy by giving
such representations of Charles Surface, Dr. Pangloss, David Garrick and
many other classic roles as had not
been seen for years.
But another star was rising, and it
remained for a man of a younger generation to strike a note in the dramatic world which has been reverbat-
ing ever since, and which has enabled
him to retain for more than twenty
years an unchallenged position in the
front rank of London actors. I refer
to Mr. George Alexander, whose intensity, impressiveness and earnestness are as unique as they are characteristic.
In "The Idler," "Lady Windermere's Fan," "Liberty Hall," and
"The Second Mrs. Tanqueray,"
George Alexander has reached a
height of dramatic expression unexcelled, and indeed unapproached by
any of his competitors.
This sketchy reminiscence overlooks scores of prominent actors and
actresses, to say nothing of some of
the foremost playwrights of the time.
But it is only intended to illustrate
the fact, that in plays as in dress "the
fashion of this world changeth," and
in the widest sense "each man in his
time plays many parts." But while
one rises and another falls, the popularity of Shakespeare is constant.
Through all these years there runs
a silver thread which binds together
the dramatic instinct and perception
of successive generations. Between
all the different vogues to which I
have. referred, there has been not
merely a connecting link, but a continuous cable. Shakespeare has never
been off the boards. When he has not
been running in the Metropolis, he
has been touring in the Provinces or
in the States, in Africa, in India, or
the Antipodes.
Men have refreshed themselves at
his perennial stream when they have
been satiated with the dgenerate productions of those who had the hardihood to belittle the great master, and
to force their vapid productions on
thc public. During the last forty
years, Irving, Booth, Compton, Calvert, Robertson, Benson, Mansfield,
and last, but by no means least, Mantell, have kept alive the best traditions of the Shakespearean stage. And
this leaves me to finish where I began, with Mantell.
I have seen all the great Shakespearean actors just mentioned, and
many more whom I do not at the
moment recall. But with the single
exception of the immortal Salvini the
elder, in "Othello," and Barry Sullivan in "Richard the Third," I have
never seen the equal of Mantell in
certain Shakespearean roles. And
now that Salvini is no more, he is incomparably the finest living Othello.
Some day I intend to tell in this
column the story of Salvini, the great
Italian, who could not speak a word
of English, but who thrilled English
audiences in the part of the dusky
Moor as no actor has done since the
days of G. V. Brooke and Charles
Dillon.
Othello is rarely seen on the stage,
and yet it is one of the finest of
Shakespeare's acting plays. I thus
differentiate it from those which are
more suited for the study than the
stage. Properly mounted, and with a
good all-round company, a star actor
makes it a veritable "tour de force,"
and since Shakespeare is so rarely
played in Western cities, it is a treat
of the highest order to see him interpreted by an actor of Mr. Mantell's
calibre.
1 recall the first time I ever saw
him, it was just thirty-five years ago,
in the Theatre Royal, Wolverhampton. Miss Wallis (now Mrs. John
Lancaster) was starring in Shakespeare. She was a delightful actress,
although never quite in the front
rank, being petite, and dainty, but
lacking force and a stage presence.
On this particular night she was playing Rosalind in "As You Like It,"
and introduced to the public for the
first time a new Orlando. He was
tall, lanky, and perhaps a bit ungainly, but he was only a raw-boned
lad who had not done growing. I
well remember his romantic air, and
how much like a mooning love-smitten youth he looked. I do not think
I have ever seen a beter Orlando.
It is a long jump from 1872 to 1908,
and during that time I have seen
Mr. Mantell in nearly all the great
Shakesperean roles. To-day he is a
mature, finished actor, with a fine
stage   presence,   and   has   become   1
I
518 Hastings St.W.
VANCOUVER.BC.
master of elocution. With Richard
Mansfield gone he has no rival, and
after the lapse of so long a time 1
gladly lay this tribute at his feet.
A SONNET IN STONE.
The Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
A poet thought tliee first, and wrote thee
down
In all the perfect rhythm of thy plan;
E'er thou wei-t moulded by the artizan,
He dreamed tlie dome that is thy lofty
crown.
As  sunset glories in the ocean  drown,
And wake sad music in the heart of man,
So   passed   the   silent   phantoms,   that
outran
The pageantry of Thought for thy renown.
And then  an  artist wrought  thee,  line
on line,
And set each column in its chosen space;
Till   every   niche  was   filled,   and   the
design
Was perfected in all its stately grace:
Graven and chiselled with precision fine,
A splendid gem, set in a splendid place.
—Blanche E.  Holt  Murison.
The New Grand.
Next week's bill will include several
big feature acts headed by the Elton-
Polo-Aldo Four, sensational casting
artists; the Fredericka Raymond trio
in an operatic sketch entitled "The
Knights of Old," which introduces
Fredericka Raymond soprano, Paul
Fisher tenor, and Enrice Ormont baritone, and includes the sextette from
"Lucia" among other high-class selections; Selbini and Grovini, William
and Jenetta, acrobats, jugglers, tumblers and acrobatic bicyclists, special
notice being drawn to Mme. Grovini's
remarkable heavy lifting; Leo Filier,
the Russian boy violinist; Black and
Miller, novelty acrobats; Effie Pearson, singing comedienne; Thos. J.
Price, singing the illustrated song,
"The Tale the Church Bells Tolled."
New moving pictures entitled "Modern Sculptors" and "Uuncle Bill's
Bull," and the overture, "Enchantment," by the orchestra.
NOTICE TO CONTBACTOBS
Normal School, Vancouver.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Normal School, Vancouver,"
will be received by the Hon. the Chief
Commissioner up to noon of Wednesday,
the 15t hjuly, 1908, for the erection
and completion of the Normal School
at Vancouver.
Drawings, specifications, and contract
form may be seen on and after the 22nd
of June, 1908, at the offlce of the Public
Works Engineer, the Lands and Works
Department, Victoria, and at the offlce
of Messrs. Pearce & Hope, Architects,
Vancouver, B.C.
Each proposal shall be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank of
Canada, made payable to the Hon. the
Chief Commissioner of Lands ana
Works, in the sum of one thousand
($1,000) dollars, which shall be forfeited if the party tendering decline to
enter into contract when called upon to
do os. The cheques or certificates of
unsuccessful tenderers will be returned
to them upon the execution of the contract.
The cheque of the successful tenderer
will be returned upon his furnishing a
bond satisfactory to the Hon. the Chief
Commissioner ln the sum of fifteen
thousand ($15,000) dollars, for the due
fulfilment of the contract.
No tender will be considered unless
made out on the form supplied, signed
with the-actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed in the envelope
furnished.
Tlie lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Lands and Works Department,
Vietoria, B.C., 16th June, 1908.
Juno 20
TAKE NOTICE that the British Columbia Canning Company, Ltd., of London, England, and Victoria, B.C., Salmon Canners and Sawmill Owners, intend to apply for permission to lease the
following described foreshore and submerged land fronting lots Nos. 4, 10, and
14,  range  2,  Coast District:
Commencing at a post marked "B.C.C.
Co. N.E. Post," planted at the Southeast corner of the Victoria Cannery,
Rivers Inlet, at high water mark,
thence due west one-half mile, thence
In a southerly direction to the N. W.
corner of Lot No. 14, thence easterly
along the shore to point of commencement.
BRITISH COLUMBIA CANNING CO.,
May 2 D. McPhee. Agent.
Weddinq Day
Suggestions
Our stock is very complete and offers an almost
endless variety of choice,
also great range in price.
We offer here just a few
suggestions and invite you
to our store where your
every need in jewelry and
silverware can be supplied.
OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT
THE BRIDE
Brooch    circle   of   whole
pearls   $23.50
Pearl Sunburst $24.00
Handsome Diamond Crescent  $160.00
BRIDESMAIDS
Oriental Pearl Bar Brooch
 $7-75
Gold Brooch with dainty
pearl and enamel forget-me-nots  $9.50
Fine Gold Bracelet... .$16.50
FLOWER GIRLS
Pearl Safety Pin Brooch..
 $2.50
Solid Gold Necklet $3.50
GROOMSMAN
Pearl Scarf Pin $4.00
Pair 14k Cuff Links ...$7.00
Diamond and  Pearl Scarf
Pin    $31.00
USHERS
Pair Gold Tie-holders..$3.50
Pearl Scarf Pin $3.50"
Challoner & Mitchell
Diamond Merchants and Silversmiths
1017 Government Street Victoria, B. C
The
»anh of IDancouver
Incorporated by Special Act of Parliament of the
Dominion of Canada.
Head Office, Vancouver, B. C.
Capital, $2,000,000
In 20,000 snares of 9100 each witb $10 Premium.
T. W.  PATTERSON, Esq.,
Capitalist, Vietoria, B.C.
J. A MITCHELL, Esq.,
Capitalist, Viotoria, B.C.
F. W. JONES, Esq.,
Lumberman, Victoria, B.C.
T. CEPLERLEY, Esq.,
(Ceperly, Rounsefell & Co.,
Brokers), Vancouver, B.C.
H.
W. H. MALKIN, Esq.,
(The W. H. Malkin Co., Ltd.,
Wholesale Grocers, Vancouver, B.C.
J. A. HARVEY, Esq., K.C.,
Cranbrook, B.C.
R. P. McLENNAN, Esq.,
(McLennan, McFeeley & Co.,
Ltd., Wholesale Hardware),
Vanoouver, B.C.
SOLICITOR
GEO.  H.   COWAN,   Esq.,   K.C,  Vanoouver, B, C.
TRUSTEES
YORKSHIRE   GUARANTEE   &   SECURITIES    CORPORATION,    LTD.,
Vancouver, B.C.
The Bank of Vancouver is being organized to meet ln part the Increased banking accommodation required by the natural and steady
expansion of business, coincident with the great development of the
country and especially of British Columbia, and while organizing to eon-
duct a general banking business, will give special consideration to the
industries and commerce of the Province, and is being established primarily for this purpose, and through its connections in Great Britain,
Eastern Canada and the United States, It will be able to greatly facilitate the ivnestment of outside capital in the various enterprises of the
Province.
It ls the Intention to open Branch Offices at various points fron
time to time as opportunity arises.
SUBSCRIPTIONS POB STOCK.
The Stock Books of the Bank of Vancouver are now open for the
subscription of the Capital Stock at the Provisional Offices of the Bank
at the corner of Pender and Homer Streets, Vancouver, B.C., and also
at   the  offices   of  Mitchell,   Martin & Co., 643 Fort Street, Victoria, B.C.
A. L. DEWAR, Secretary.
z
TIMBER! TIMBER! TIMBER!
QUATSINO   SOUND,   BEDWELL SOUND, RACE NABBOWS.
GUARANTEED  20,000 PT. TO TKE ACBE.
PBICE $2.50 TO 93.00.    ALL LICENSES ISSUED.
ARTHUR BELL
BOOMS 14 and 16
MAHON   BUILDING,   GOVEBNMENT   STBEET, TIOTOBIA.
P. O. BOX 765. PHONE 1385. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 20, 1908
|>ooooooooooooooooooooooooo*ooo*ck>ooo*oooooooooooo-^^
pooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo-oooooooooooooooooo-ooooooooooooooo
Refined Simplicity in House Furnishing
In these days the refinement of simplicity is the key-note to success and comfort in home furnishing. The vulgarity of over-ornamentation has been relegated to the
dust-bin. Our third-floor show room is a veritable exhibition, containing the most refined creations of the master craftsmen who have taught the value of refined simplicity
in furnishing beautiful homes. Our large trade in reliable furniture combined with our cash purchase system enables us to price these goods at a considerable saving to our
customers.   The elevator will take you to the third floor where you can wander around without fear of being pestered to buy.
Economy in Carpets.
Apart from its artistic merit:
the beauty of simplicity in home
furnishing is in its economy.
Take for instance the question
of carpets, the art square will
appeal to you; it blends harmoniously into all colour
schemes, it is ready-to-use, it is
economically priced, that is
why we carry the largest stock
of art squares west of Toronto.
Quantity, however, would be
useless to you without quality,
hence we mention four of our
leading lines which are without
a peer in quality:
The Kensington Art Square, all
wool,     according     to     size,
from   $11.00
The Krypton Art Square, all
wool, according to size,
from    $19.00
The   Algoma   Art   Square,   all
wool,     according     to     size,
from  $9.25
The Kanata Art Square, ill
wool weft, cotton warp,
from   $6.50
N.B.—Our carpet department
is on the second floor, where
you will find a tremendous assortment of Brussels, Axminster, Wilton and Oriental carpets and rugs, all priced low.
New Lace
Curtains.
These are in the new sizes,
2^/2 yds. by 3 yds., for the fashionable and simple mode of
hanging, they are the finest
Swiss and French makes in applique and cauterised embroidery, also in English braided designs. It is scarcely necessary
to mention to the ladies of Victoria, these supberb materials
cannot be surpassed as summer
window .draperies. We have
purposely marked the prices
low in order to encourage the
use of the latest idea in modern
curtainry. Our experts in the
curtain department will drape
these goods for your inspection
whenever you favour us with a
call.
A  «WEILER" LIBRARY
We have just unpacked a shipment of very dainty musiin
cushion covers in braided and
stencilled designs, trimmed with
frills;   prices 50c and $1.00.
TO DEALERS
We solicit correspondence from
dealers who are not already acquainted with us and who wish to get acquainted with the largest wholesalers
of Homefurnishings in the West. Try
furniture as a "side-line"—help you.
WEILER BROS.
Complete Home Furnishers
VICTORIA, B. C.
TO RETAILERS
Isn't it poor business to carry a
large stock in your town when
the quantities you require mny be
purchased from us on short notice.
We help you. Prompt and satis'f.c-
tory service guaranteed.
.•OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO s
>oooooooooooooooooooooooooo2
-?oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo?
^000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000<H^
Iporting
Comment.
fhe defeat of the Victoria lacrosse
at the hands of the Vancouver
|b in the Terminal City last Satur-
lias left the local boys in any-
rig but pleasant frame of mind, and
Jging   from   the press  reports,  I
nk they have a kick coming.
IVs a rule I do not side with a team
objecting to the referee's decisions,
in this case I think the Victoria
ys were justified in the stand they
Ilk.    This is the second time this
ir that the local players have re-
ved the worst of the decisions in
iicouver, and it is up to the man-
ement of the local  club to bring
matter before the executive of the
trosse   association.    The action of
Vancouver clubs   in   supporting
|_h action on the part of the referees
not   in harmony with the state-
nts made at the   annual   meeting,
en every delegate took occasion to
er to the application of the Vic-
ia club in the most friendly man-
, and promised the assistance of
ir    respective    clubs.    If the as-
ance they promised is to be taken
poor referees the sooner the local
bs know it the better.    There is
|olutely no reason why the Victoria
should go to Vancouver and lose
game, by the decisions of the ref-
The idea of having one of the
al    players    off    the  field for 23
mtes is something   very    seldom
rd of, and judging from wlrit I
e seen of this player there is abso-
:ly no reason for it.   There might
be some blame on the part of
management of the local club in
Ieeing to these referees in their efts to reduce the expenses of the
club. I quite agree with the attempt
that is being made to keep th" expenses down by having the local team
get the worst of the deal every litre
they play. On several occasions I
have noticed that referees are accept
ed who are not on the official li^t.
which was agreed on at the annual
meteing of the association. This
should not be allowed, as it leaves
the way open for an infringement of
the constitutions which will sooner or
later cause trouble. I hope the local
management will take this matter up
and deal with it in a rigid manner.
mistake of not changing the Victoria Joe Grimm, the hero of 238 lights,
bowlers earlier, and not playing Sil- This should be a good go, and I
cock, whose fast balls are sorely would like to see a large crowd wit-
needed in any close match. ness thc mill. UMPIRE.
This afternoon will witness what
should bc the hardest baseball match
of the season. The locals will endeavor to wrest the victory from the
Nationals of Seattle at Oak Bay, and
it is hoped that there will be a big
turnout. The line-up of the Nationals
will be practically the same as that
which represented the Seattle High
School team, which journeyed across
the Continent and made a record
which has never been equalled. Thc
team is the strongest ou the Sound,
outside of the league teams, and if the
locals should win it will be a big
feather in their caps. The game will
start at 3 o'clock sharp, with Surplice doing the pitching for the locals
and Robertson the receiving.
The defeat of the Victoria cricket
team at the hands of the Garrison
came as a big surprise to the admirers of the local players, but it will be
a lesson to them not to hold any
team too lightly. Nine times our of
ten Victoria would defeat the same
team which lowered their colors on
Saturday, but I must give the Garrison credit for the result of the
match. Three causes contributed to
the. defeat—the absence of Martin,,
thc  fine bowling of Askey,  and thc
Although I referred at some length
to the races in my remarks last Saturday, I cannot allow the opportunity
to pass without referring to the too
meagre support that was given the
promoters. With the exception of
Saturday the attendance was a big
blot on the reputation that this city
enjoys of being one of the best sporting centres on the Coast, and in iact
I have almost arrived at the conclusion that it is time that this city
should refrain from travelling on its
record. The attendance was not
worthy of a city half the size of Victoria, and that Victorians who are
ardent admirers of good races should
fail to attend the meeting is almost
beyond my comprehension. The races
were good, the management did all in
their power to satisfy the public, no
charge of crookedness could possib'.v
be laid, the „times made in the races
were fast, and yet the public would
not attend. As yet I have not ascertained the financial ending of the undertaking, but judging from the attendance, I cannot figure how it
could havc been very successful. I
hope that thc next time anything of
this kind is arranged the public will
give it the support that it deserves,
otherwise this city will soon have a
bad name with the horsemen, which
will mean that it will bc wiped from
thc map as far as horse racing is concerned.
JOSEPH   HOWE   ON    LIQUOR.
A boxing contest, which should
prove very interesting, is being arranged, and will take place within
the enxt few weeks. I refer to the
contest between Linton, who has
lately made this city his  home, and
The world has come down to the
present period from the most remote
antiquity, with the wine cup in its
hand. David, the man after God's
own heart, drank wine. Solomon, the
wisest of monarchs and of human beings, drank wine. Our Saviour not
only drank it, but commanded Christians to drink it "in remembrance of
Hiin." In strong contrast with our
Divine Redeemer's life and practice
we hear of the Scribes and Pharisees,
who drank it not—who reviled our
Saviour as a "wine bibber" and the
"companion of publicans and sinners," who would havc voted for the
Maine liquor law as unanimously as
they cried "Crucify Him." So far as
my reading extends, I may assert that
every king, every statesman, every
warrior, who illustrated the page of
history, drank wine. The apostles,
who were the companions of our
Saviour, drank it. The prophets
whose flights of inspiration still astonish us, we have every reason to
believe, drank it. Cicero and Demosthenes, and all the orators of antiquity and of modern times, indulged
in the juice of the grape. Who can
say how much of the energy which
gave them such power of language
was drawn from its inspiration? Have
these men been eclipsed by the Dows
and Kellogs of the platform? What
orators has the State of Maine sent
forth comparable with the Pitts,
Burkes, Grattans, Foxes and Slicri-
dans of thc British Islands, every one
of whom drank wine? Let thc learned
gentlemen glance at thc noble structures—the architectural wonders that
embellish Europe. Wlo saiedthem?
Men of gigantic intelk _ts, whose common heritage was wine. La hi rye
range through the noble galleries
where the sculptors have left tl e r
statues; where the painters have hung
in rich profusion the noblest .vorks
of art. Wine, we are told, clouds the
faculties and deadens the imagination, et it was drunk by those benefactors of their race; and we cannot
with their masterpieces before us, believe the assertion till their works
have been eclipsed by artists train I
up under this rigorous prohibition
legislation. Has Maine turned out as
yet a statue that anybody w mid lor'.-.
at; a picture that anybody would buy?
Look at the deliverers of mankind;
the heroic defenders of nations. Was
Washington a member of the temperance society? Did not Wallace
"drink the red wine through the helmet barred"? Who will undertake to
say that Bruce, on the morning on
which he won the battle of Bannock-
burn, that Tell on that day when he
shot the apple off his son's head, that
Nelson or Wellington on the eve of
their glorious victories, had not tasted
a glass of whiskey or a stoop of wine?
If then all that is valuable in thc past
of heroism and architecture, and oratory, sculpture and painting, if all that
has bulwarked freedom and embellished life, has come down to us with
thc juice of the grape, if no age or
nation has been long without it, I
think it behooves the advocates of
"total abstinence" to show us some
country where their system has been
tried, some race of men who drank
nothing but cold water.
Mrs. Ncwwcd—I wish we had
something antique about the house.
Mr. Newwed—So do I. Old-fashioned pumpkin-pies, for instance.—
Exchange. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 20, 1908.
* Social and        t
$ Personal. *
if *
if if 'i' 'i' 'i' 'i' ,l"i"i"4' v i* if
Miss Wake leaves on a ten months'
trip to the Old Country on the 20th.
* *   *
Mrs. J. W. Laing entertained at a
small  croquet  party  on  Wednesday.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Lamb returned on Tuesday to Duncans.
* *   *
Mrs. Ramsay, of Seattle, has been a
guest at the Empress for a few days.
* *   w
Miss Ethel Gibson is staying with
friends on the Cowichan river.
* *   *
Hon.   D.   M.   Eberts   spent   a   few
days in Vancouver this week.
* *   *
Mr.    ancl    the    Misses   Blakemore
have    moved    into their new home,
"Wulfrtina," Belcher street.
*****
Miss Barbara Mainguy, of' Chemainus, spent a few days in town this
week.
* *   *
Mrs. Gardulo ancl son came over on
Tuesday from Seattle to attend Miss
Dorothy Green's wedding.
* *   *
Mrs. George Powell was the guest
of Mrs. Carew-Gibson during the
week.
* *   *
Captain Gibson, of Chemainus, after
a short stay in town, returned home
on Tuesday. _]
* *   *
Mr. Dougald Gillespie is enjoying
some   excellent   fishing at Cowichan
Lake.
* *   «
Mr. Arthur Gore paid a flying visit
to Duncans on Wednesday, returning
on Thursday morning.
* *   *
The marriage of Miss Marie Gaudin
takes  place  in  the  second  week  of
July.
* *   *
Mrs. Herman Robertson went up
to  Duncans  on  Wednesday  to  take
part in  Mr. Armstrong's concert.
* *   *
Mrs. E. V. Bodwell, Rockland
avenue, has issued invitations for an
At Home next Tuesday.
* *   *
Mrs. McCallum, after spending thc
winter in Southern California, has returned home.
* *   *
Miss Barbara Blakemore has returned from a three months' visit to
Nelson.
* *   *
Mr. ancl Mrs. Trotter Johnson, of
Chemainus, who were so unfortunate
as to loose their pretty home by fire,
came down to the city on Tuesday.
* *   *
The Auxiliary Anti-Tuberculosis
Society will hold a meeting on Wednesday, June 24th, at the Balmoral
Rooms.    Members  are  requested  to
attend.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Ray Green, Vancouver, came clown to be present at the
marriage of Miss Dorothy Green on
Wednesday.
* *   *
Mr. Mowat, who has been confined
to the Jubilee Hospital for the past
few weeks, is out again, and is the
guest of Mrs. McTavish.
* *   *
On Wednesday the 17th, thc residence of Mr. and Mrs. John Freeman. Croft street, was the scene of a
quiet but pretty wedding, when their
fourth daughter, Ruth Elizabeth, was
united in marriage to Mr. Robert J.
Herbert, eldest son of Mrs. R. Herbert, Quebec street, Rev. Ir. Letts
performing the ceremony.
Thc bride ancl groom left for thc
Sound by thc Princess, and after a
brief return visit will reside in Vancouver, where Mr. Herbert is connected with thc Railway Mail Service.
* *   *
The Five Hundred Club met on
Tuesday at Mrs. Blackwood's, Linden
avenue, and spent a very enjoyable
afternoon. The prize was won by
Mrs. Gibb. The house was very
daintily decorated with roses id' different shades, received by lhe conl
green of fern frons.
Mrs. Coles, assisted by Mrs. Kerr,
presided over the refreshment table.
Miss Wark ancl the Misses Richardson also helped in looking after the
guests.
The competitors were: Mrs. Gibb.
Mrs. W. S. Gore, Mrs. Freeman, Mrs.
II. Tye, Mrs. Little, Mrs. Wasson,
Mrs. Spratt, Mrs. Gibb. Mrs. C. Roberts. Mrs. Rithet, Mrs. T. S. Gore.
Mrs. Jones, Mrs. J. Harvey. Mrs. Arbuthnot, Mrs. G. Courtney, Mrs. Love,
Mrs. C. Todd, Mrs. Jones, Mrs. Ray
mour,   Mrs.   Matson,   Mrs.   Wasson,
Miss Griffith and others.
The marriage of Miss Dorothy
Green and Mr. C. Norman Barclay
was solemnized at the Reformed Episcopal Church on Wednesday, June
17th, by the Rev. Bishop Cridge, in
the presence of a few friends and
relations. The bride leaning on her
brother's arm, looked very lovely in
a soft clinging white, semi-Princess
gown, over the palest shade of pink,
with large hat bound with pale pink
panne, and trimmed with Valenciennes
and a aigrette.
Her bouquet was of white bridal
roses, prettily tied with white  tulle.
The bridesmaid, Miss Phyllys
Green looked very well in a pale blue
flowered organdy relieved by a pink
girdle, and a cream baby hat, with
a pink wreath and carried a bouquet
of pink roses.
The bride's little niece, Miss Joyce-
line Gibson, ancl Mr. Antonio Gardulo
of Seattle, were also in attendance.
After the ceremony a few friends
ancl relatives proceeded to the residence of Mrs. Carew-Gibson, where a
dainty breakfast was served, the decorations were marguerites and roses.
The happy couple left by the afternoon boat for Seattle en route to
Southern California. The bride's going awaj costume was of Copenhagen
blue Rajah silk with a smart hat to
match.
* *   #
The residence of Mrs. H. Heisterman, Cook street, was the scene of a
most delightful tea on Wednesday
last. The house was prettily arranged with sweet peas and roses. Among
the guests were:
Mrs. Heisterman, Miss Heisterman,
Mrs. Crotty, Mrs. Love, Mrs. H.
Tye, Mrs. Spratt, Mrs. Roberts,
Misses Hickey, Mrs. Rismuller, Mrs.
Berkeley, Mrs. King, Miss King, Mrs.
Matson, Mrs. Coles, Mrs. T. R. Smith,
Miss Gaudin, Mrs. Courtney, Mrs. S.
Robertson, Mrs. B. Wilson, Mrs. Lugrin, Mrs. Shaw, Mrs. Schwengers,
Mrs. Jay, Mrs. Cross, Mrs. C. Todd,
Mrs. Blackwood, Miss Blackwood,
Messrs. Morcley, Miss Moreley, Mrs.
Cleland, Mrs. Harrison, Mrs. Rhodes,
Mrs. Ker, Mrs. Brett, Mrs. Griffiths,
Mrs. B. Heisterman, Mrs. T. S. Gore,
Mrs. W. S. Gore, Mrs. Arbuthnot,
Mrs. H. Gillespie, Miss Wiggley, Mrs.
J. Raymour, Mrs. Page, Misses
Page, Mrs. McPhillips, Miss Sehl,
Miss Newcombefi Mrs. Garache, Mrs.
Rant, Mrs. Wootton, Mrs. H. Kent,
Mrs. McTavish, Miss McTavish, Miss
Munn, Mrs. Lawson, Miss Lawson,
Miss Wood, Mrs. McClure, Mr_i.
Jones, Mrs. Phipps, Mrs. Gibson and
others.
* *   *
Mrs.    Baynes-Reed    gave   a    very
charming reception on Tuesday afternoon   for  her   daughter,   Miss   Alice
Reed, who is to  be married on the
24th   of   this   month.    The   Bishop's
Close was kindly lent for the occas-
sion  by Archdeacon  ancl  Mrs.  Scriven.     Mr".   Spicer-Simpson   assisted
her mother  during the afternoon  in
receiving her guests.   Among the invited guests were Mrs. Stevenson, the
Misses Mason, Mrs. Baiss, Mrs. Berkeley, Archdeacon and Mrs. Scriven,
Mr. and  Mrs. Atkins,  Mr. and  Mrs.
Allen, Mr. and Mrs. Ambery, Mr. and
Mrs.  Burton,  Miss  Booth,  Mrs. ancl
Miss   Browne,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  F.  W.
Bullen,   Miss   Bullen,   Mr.   and   Mrs.
Bulwer, Miss Bulwer, Canon and Mrs.
Beanlands, Mrs. ancl Miss Bell, Mrs.
ancl Miss Bolton, Mr. and Mrs.  Bagshaw, Mr. and Mrs. H. Barnard, Mr.
and Mrs. Crowe-Baker, Mrs. ancl Miss
Clapham,   Mr.  and  Mrs.   Cross,   Mr.
ancl  Mrs.  Todd,   Mr.  ancl  Mrs.  Carmichael, Mrs. Cleland, Mr. ancl Mrs.
Crotty, Mrs. Love, Mr. ancl Mrs. and
Miss   Coombe,   Mrs.   Charles,   Major
ancl Mrs. Dupont, Mr. and Mrs. Denison, Mr. ancl Mrs. R. Day, Miss Day,
Hon. ancl Mrs. and the Misses Eberts,
Mr. ancl Mrs.  Flummerfelt,  Mr. and
Mrs.   Ritchie,   Dr.   ancl   Mrs.   Lagan,
Mr.  and   Mrs.   Foster,   Miss   Foster,
Mr. ancl Mrs. Fletcher, Mr. ancl Mrs.
Gresley, Mr. and Mrs. Jeffries, Capt.
and Mrs. Gaudin, and the Misses Gaudin, Col. ancl  Mrs.  Holmes, Dr. ancl
Mrs. Jones, Mr. and Mrs. Laing, Mr.
ancl Mrs. Luxton, Mr. and Mrs. Matthews, Misses Pooley, Mr. Loenberg
Capt. and Mrs. Troupe, Mrs. Berkeley,
Admiral and Mrs. Fleet. Mr. and Mrs
Rithet. Mr. ancl Mrs. Genge, Mr. ancl
Mrs.-Shallcross,  Miss   Lawson,  Mrs.
J.   Raymur,   Mr.   and   Mrs.   Rogers,
Miss Newcombe, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Robertson, Dr.'and Mrs. Herman
Robertson, Mr. and  Mrs.  Keith Wilson, Mrs. King. Miss King, Mrs. Pern
berton, Miss Pemberton. Mr. and Mrs.
Wootton, Misses Pitts, Mrs. Mackay,
Miss  Mackay,  Mr. ancl  Mrs. Jacobs,
Mr. and Mrs. Galletly, Mr. and Mrs.
Mohun,  Miss Newton,  Dr. and  Mrs.
Helmcken ancl many others.
BONA FIDE OFFER
To  introduce  throughout  B.C.
the
Charter Oak Steel Range
Of which there are over 400 in
Victoria alone.
We make the following offer,
viz.:—On receipt of following
prices we deliver, freight prepaid, to any point in B. C,
reached by direct transit, lake
or rail:
1-14  in.  oven,  4  hole,   high
closet $42
1-15  in.  oven,  6  hole,  high
closet $46
1-18  in.  oven,  6  hole,  high
closet .$50
QUICK AND  PERFECT
BAKERS.
If not as represented return
at our expense and get your
money.
Watson &
McGregor
647  Johnson  Street,
VICTORIA, B. C.
babies       MEDICAL   UNTS
MASSAGE
Turkish Baths
TIBBATOB  TBEATKENT
HB.     BJOBNTELT,     BWBBISX
MASSEUB.
Special   Massage and Hometreat-
ment by appointments.
Room 2, Vernon Blk., Douglas St.
Body Development.
Hours 1 to 6. Phone ]«29.
A Skin of Beauty ls a Joy Forever
BB. T. FELIX GOT/BAUD'S
Oriental Cream
OB HAOIOAL BEAUTITIEB
Purifies as well as Beautifies the Bkln.
No other cosmetic will do it.
Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, Moth
Patches, Rash and Skin diseases, and
every blemish on beauty, and defies detection. It has stood the test of 60
years; no other has, and ls so harmless—we taste it to be sure it ls properly made. Accept no counterfeit of
similar name. The distinguished Dr. L.
A. Sayre said to a lady of the haut-ton
(a patient). "As you ladles will use
them, I recommend 'Gourand's Cream' as
the least harmful of all the Skin preparations."
For sale by all druggists and Fancy
Goods Dealers.
OOUBAUD'S OBIENTAL TOILET
FOWBEB
For infants and adults. Exquisitely perfumed. Relieves Skin Irritations, cures
Sunburn and renders an excellent complexion.
Frio* S5 cents, by mall.
GOVBAUB'S  FOUDBB BUBTILE
Removes superfluous Hair.
Price 91.00, by mail.
FEBB. T. HOPKINS, Prop.,
37 Groat Jones St.,        New York City,
AT   HENDERSON   BROS.,
Wholesale Distributors.
Vancouver ana Vietoria, B.O.
Indications.
Willin—Pa, is that new Mr.  Hanks
in ice dealer?
Pa—Yes. Willie:
know?
Willie—I didn't
thought    he    was,
how    did    you
know,     only     I
'cause  when  the
teacher hoped for warm weather yes-
lerady his children all grinned,—Chicago News.
A Little Psalm of Life.
Once   Jones   owned   nearly  half  thc
town,
The valley rang with his renown;
Whene'er he came, whene'er he went,
'Twas one continuous blandishment.
He made investments far and wide
And he was pointed out with pride
Because with lavish hand he gave;
And.yet no stone betrays his grave-
Jones lost his grip.
—Chicago Journal.
Pantage's
Theatre
JOHNSON STREET
 VICTORIA, B. C.
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE
Matinees (any part ef house)....Uo
Evenings, Balcony  lte
Lawer Floor  j»c
Baa«»   Mc
Matinees
Every Afternoon
at
3 O'CIock.
Night  Performances
*    8 and 9.15
WEEK JUNE 22, 1908
The New Grand
SULLIVAN a CONSIDINE,    froprlttors.
Management of ROBT. JAMIESON.
ELTON-POLO-ALDO  FOUR
World's Greatest Sensational Casting  Artists.
FREDERICKA RAYMOND
TRIO
High Class Singing Sketch.
WILLIAM JENETTA
SELBINI and GROVINI
Acrobats, Jugglers, Tumblers and
Acrobatic  Bicyclists.
LEO FILIER
Russian Boy Violinist.
BLACK and MILLER
Novelty Acrobats.
EFFIE PEARSON
Singing Comedienne.
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrator
"The Tale the Church Bells Tolled."
NEW MOVING PICTURES
"Modern Sculptors"
"Uncle Bill's Bull."
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M. Nagel Director.
"Enchantment" Overture.
EMPRESS
THEATRE
Government and Johnson Sts.
MOVING PICTURES:
Fighting the Flames.
The Rival Sisters.
The Bargeman's Child.
The Burglar and the Old Maids.
An Uncle by Marriage.
Gay Vagabonds.
ILLUSTRATED SONGS:
Mrs. Joseph, Vocalist.
When Nancly Said Goodby.
Red Wing.
Program changed Monday and
Thursday.
Daily 2:00 to 5:30, 7:00 to 10:30 p.m.
ADMISSION, TEN CENTS.
Children's   Matinee  Wednesday  and
Saturday. Five Cents.
Most
Particular
Smokers
Experience little or no difficulty
in finding a cigar or blend of
smoking mixture that fits their
taste.
Our Manila or Havana
Cigars can't be beaten.
We carry a most complete line of smokers'
sundries.
?*S*   Richardson
Cigar Store.     aw-wsaiM *»«J**ris
Phone 345
Key Fitting      Lock Repairii
Telephone 1718
H. M. WILSON
Mechanical Repairs and Saw
Piling
Up-to-date Machinery for Law
Mower Grinding and To«
Sharpening. Tires put on Gq
Carts and Springs Replacec
Prompt attention and wor
guaranteed.
1002 BROAD STREET
Opp. Transfer Stables,
VICTORIA, B.C.
8TOCKS
BOND
F. W. Stevensor
Broker
1203 BROAD STREET
Railroad  and  Industrial  Han
Books on Request.
GRAIN
COTTOl
Your
Tennis
Dreams
will   be   fully   realized   if  yo
have  one of our  Racquets
play with.
Complete lines of Racquet
Balls, Presses, Cases, Net
etc., at popular prices.
M. W. Waitt & Cd
Limited
Tennis Headquarters.
1004 Govt. St.
LATEST NUMBERS
English
Magazine
CHUMS
TIT-BITS
THE STRAND
PEARSONS
PUNCH
KNIGHT'S B00KST0I
TIOTOBIA, B. 0.
P
HTENTS  an*Trade!
obtained in all countrie
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney a
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granvill
TO SMALL
INVESTORS
(2,260 on easy terms buys 0
acre on car line, high and d
main road, quite clear, emlnen
suitable for sub-division into lo
neighbouring lots $750 up. Api
to owner, 12 Amelia Street,
Pandora.
It's bad enough when twins are
For men to have to carry thei
But,  Oh,  how  thankful  man  s
be,
He does not have to marry th< THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 20, 1908.
At The Street
Comer
By THB LOUNGER
Whilst speaking of automobiles, I
want to say a word on the subject of
speed. I have ridden in auto cars
in many parts of the world,, and while
i have never been able to afford the
luxury of one for myself, I have got
it "on the list," and mean to have
one some day. From this my readers will gather that I think an auto
car is a good thing "per se." My
sympathies lie entirely with the owners of cars who are made to suffer
for the vagaries of a few men whos:
early training has been defective. The
motto of every automobilist should b"
"noblesse oblige." Until that becomes the key-note of driving, there
will be complaints and bad blood between the pedestrian who has to perform acrobatic feats to save his skin,
ancl the chaffeur who trades upon his
ability to run away from every
"melee." The remedy is to punish
unmercifully everyone who breaks the
law. This should be done without
fear or favour, and after the first offence the penalty should go the
limit. In cases of persons being injured through reckless driving or excessive speed, the punishment should
be imprisonment without the option
of a fine. The way would then be
open to agitate for such amendments
to the law as could be granted without imperilling the public safety. But
it is useless to press for these, and at
thc same time to defend or extenuate
breaches of the existing law. Tho
first condition of amendment is compliance.   Verb sap.
About the time that these lines first
meet the public eye, I expect to read
the announcement of a discovery recently made on Vancouver island,
which has been kept very quiet, but in
spite of every precaution has leaked
out within the last few days; I refer
to a new gold find. Having seen
some of thc reports, I should bc surprised at nothing in the way of values,
if as alleged, the specimen represents
the bulk. 1 know that this would be
something new in specimens, but as
the veracity of the agent is unquestionable, Ithink the public may fairly
expect something sensational. As
far as I know this is the first considerable reef of high-grade quartz
which has been found on Vancouver
Island.
The water question and the dust
question are still with us, and judging from appearances are likely to be
for many years. There is, however,
another problem which ought not to
be so difficult to solve, and to which
it is surely permissible to direct attention. I refer to the neglected condition of the front gardens and lawns
of some of our leading citizens. 1
could say a great deal on the subject
of gardens as an evidence of character, but probably there will be no difference of opinion as to the obligations resting upon prominent citizens to set a good example in the
proper cultivation and beautification
of their grounds. When these gentlemen hold official positions thc obligation is surely increased. 1 do not
refer to the deterioration of gardens,
which is an inevitable consequence of
the present lack of water, but to the
habitual neglect which characterizes
some of the most conspicuous
grounds in the city. I do not wish
to particularize, but I recall three or
four properties belonging to gentlemen of social position, and some
wealth, which would bc discreditable
hings are beginning to move a lit-
(faster in Victoria. Only a week
the city was threatened with ex-
:ion under a cloud of dust. On
sday the Editor of the Colonist
;ed largely from an English ex-
tigc on the merits of "Tarvia,"
on Thursday Alderman Gleason
I ted for Europe to investigate its
its, and presumably to introduce
to Victoria. If the worthy Alder-
could be induced to abandon the
k planks of his platform and con-
rate his energy on the dust prob-
he might yet become enshrined
he grateful  memories of Victor-
n Wednesday evening I lounged
the Victoria Theatre, stimulated
|some curiosity as to the person-
and capability of the lady who
announced to lecture under the
|>ices    of    the    W.    C.    T.    U.
result of an evening's cogitation
to  confirm  a   few  of  my   old-
ioned    prejudices,   one of which
always been that an absolute cure
"suffragitis" is a happy marriage.
i in the midst of a discussion of
I most   serious    social   problems,
Murcott, with a candour which
|her infinite credit, admitted that
respect  to  men with  all  their
|;s, she loved them still.   She ad-
further that she "wanted a man
ipport her," and somewhat adroit-
langlcd  the  attractive  bait  of  a
fruit    orchard which  she had
hased in the Okanagan.   If Miss
cott does  not change her name
week, it will be a reproach to the
ble bachelors and   widowers   of
oria.   What more could any man
•e than an accomplished lady with
ission an an apple orchard?   Did
y "apple"?    I  am not sure that
Murcott   did,   perhaps   I   have
it in connection with gardens
re.   Who said "apple"?
■want to congratulate all  parties
lerned    on    the  decent  clean-up
has  been  made  of the  Quadra
It cemetery. As I was one of the
est kickers, I think I ought to
credit for a result which is highly
fying. Little remains to be done,
although there may be differences
|pinion as to the arrangements,
yone must agree that the re-
of a neglected, unsightly,
I's acre" has been removed.
|st on this subject 1 should like to
, in common with many others,
steps, if any, have been taken
i-medy the constant encroachment
ie sea upon Ross Bay cemetery,
ie cessation of this work is due
ie absence of Alderman Meston
thc Council, the sooner he gets
the  better,  unless  some  other
fman    can    be  deputed to take
ge of his work.   It is certain that
|ic opinion will not again tolerate
wholesale destruction of graves
ook place last winter.    We may
the Chinamen enough   to  make
villing to shoot, poison or hang
and yet lack the hardihood to
indignities to their dead,
ere is in the City of Victoria a
rocious  coon, he sports cheap  to a workingman in receipt of three
an unextinguished match into the
waste-paper basket — result much
smoke, a hurry call to the fire station,
and the prompt extinguishing of a
few smouldering papers. Immediately over the waste-paper box were two
loose-leaved calendars—they are still
there unmarked. On Tuesday the
Colonist came out with a lurid paragraph telling how "the dense smoke
filled the building, and the ffames
mounted to the ceiling." The daily
press is a great institution, but for
the fire, neither the Colonist nor the
Times would have known that there
was such a paper as The Wee1-.,
that after all, the old proverb is once
again justified, "it is an ill wind that
blows nobody good."
LICENSE TO AN EXTRA-PROVINCIAL
COMPANY.
"Companies' Act, 1897."
0(rx
*-co«^r.
THE attention of the Lands and
Works Department having been directed
to the fact that town lots in a town-
site named Prince Rupert, being a subdivision of Lot 642, Range 5, Coast District, situated on the mainland between
the mouth of the Skeena River and
Kaien Island, are being offered for sale,
it has been deemed necessary to warn
the public that the said townsite is not
situated at the terminus of the Grand
Trunk Pacific Railway, and is not the
townsite which is owned jointly by the
Government of British Columbia and
tlie Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Company.
P. J. FULTON,
Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works,
Lands and Works Department,
Viotoria, B.C., May lst, 1908.
May 9
PUBLIC
Notice   to
Architects.-
Designs.
POR   THE
-Competitive
Canada,
Provinoe of British Columbia.
No. 433.
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that the
"Michigan Commercial Insurance Company" is authorised and licensed to carry on business within the Province of
British Columbia and to corry out or
affect all or any of the objects of the
Company to whieh the legislative authority of the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company ls
situate at Lansing, Ingham County,
Michigan.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is three hundred thousand dollars, divided into six thousand shares
of fifty dollars each.
The head office of the Company ln
this Province is situate at Victoria, and
R. P. Rithet & Company, Insurance
Agents, whose address is Victoria, B.C.,
is the attorney for the Company.
The time of the existence of the Company ls thirty years from the 19th day
of October, A.D., 1904.
Given  under  my   hand  and  seal  of
offlce at Victoria,  Province of British
Columbia, this  16th day of April, one
thousand nine hundred and eight.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which the Company
has been established and licensed are:
To make Insurance on dwelling
houses, stores, and all kinds of buildings and upon household furniture,
goods, wares and merchandise, and any
other property against loss or damage
by Are, and to make insurance upon
vessels, freights, goods, wares, merchandise, and other property against the
risk of inland navigation and transportation.
May 2
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days
after date we intend to apply to the
Hon. the Chief Commissioner of Land!
and Works for a license to prospect
for coal and petroleum on the following
described lands, situated near Coal
Creek, Renfrew District, B. C: Commencing at a post planted at the northeast corner of section 88, and marked
John Meston and W. H. Anderson;
thence west 80 chains to northeast corner of section 87; thenee north 80
chains; thence east to western boundary
of the E. & N. Railway Company's
Lands; thence following said boundary
of Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway
Company's Lands; thence following said
boundary of Esquimalt and Nanaimo
Railway Company's lands to point of
commencement.
Staked May 18th, 1908.
JOHN MESTON.
W. A. ANDERSON.
May 23
LICENSE TO AN EXTRA-PROVINCIAL
COMPANY.
The Government of British Columbia
invite the Architects of British Columbia to submit competitive designs of a
Public Hospital for the Insane, which
it is proposed to erect at Coquitlam,
situated near New Westminster, B.C.
The designs, accompanied by specifications, reports and estimates of cost,
and superscribed, "Design, Public Hospital for the Insane." and addressed to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works, will be received up to noon
of Tuesday, the 30th  June, 1908.
The designs, specifications, reports and
estimates of cost shall have no distinguishing mark or motto, the author's
name being enclosed in a blank sealed
envelope securely attached to the design
submitted.
The design shall be adjudicated upon
by an Architect practising outside the
Province, to be selected by the Government, after the 30th June, 1908.
Tlie design placed first by the Adjudicator shall receive a premium of
$700, and the one placed second, a premium of $500.
The Government is not bound to erect
the building from any of the designs
submitted.
If the design awarded first place is
accepted, the premium referred to above
shall be included in the professional fee
paid to the architect.
Printed conditions governing the competition can be obtained by bona fide
competitors upon application to the undersigned.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Lands and Works Department,
Vietoria, B.C., 7th May, 1908.
May 9
lry and drives a motor car.   Un-
hc mends his ways, it will not be
en of him "his end was peace."
day last week I saw him driving
iew street on the way to the race
He was going at the rate of
less than thirty to thirty-live
an hour. One clay this week hc
down  Government street, and
|ipproaching the postoffice at the
3f from twelve to fifteen miles
Jiur. Half a dozen tourists were
ing in the roadway. Instead of
ng up and circling round them
lied, but did not abate his speed,
they jumped just clear of the
ine. I have received numerous
taints about  this coloured gen-
In, and I particularly direct the
:ion of the police authorities to
isolent behaviour, and the dan-
o the public from the reckless
dollars a clay. The occupancy of a
good home carries with it the responsibility to keep thc surroundings
such as will do credit both to the
home and to the city. In the case of
public men the obligation goes further, and I feel sure it is only necessary to call thc attention of these
gentlemen to the fact that the habitual neglect of their grounds is an eyesore, and a matter of general comment to ensure the remedying of a
state of affairs which is little less
than a nuisance.
The daily papers of Victoria arc to
be congratulated, they havc made a
discovery, and the fact that it has
taken them four years to make it only
shows how far they arc behind the
times. On Monday night about half-
past six, some subscriber anxious to
pay his dues, entered thc outer office
LAND REGISTRY  ACT.
To   T.   J.   Graham,   registered  and   assessed   owner   of   Lot   291,   Mount
Tolmie  Park,   Victoria  Distriot.
TAKE  NOTICE  that application  has
been made to Register William Flannery
as the owner In fee simple of the above
lot  under  a  Tax   Sale  Deed   from   the
Assessor   of   the   District   of   Victoria,
dated   the   16th   of  January,   1903,   and
you are required  to  contest the  claim
of the said William Flannery within 30
days from  the first publication  hereof.
Dated   at  Land  Registry  Offlce,  Victoria,   British  Columbia,  this  12th  day
of May,  1908.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
May 16 Registrar General.
"Companies' Act, 1897."
Canada,
Province of British Columbia.
No. 434.
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that the "Inter-provincial Land Company" is authorised and licensed to carry on business within the Province of British
Columbia and to carry out or effect all
or any of the objects of the Company
to which the legislative authority of the
Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company Is
situate at the City of Winnipeg, in the
Province of Manitoba.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is sixty thousand dollars, divided into six hundred shares of one
hundred dollars each.
The head offlce of the Company tn
this Province is situate at the City of
Viotoria, and James Fulford Fielde,
agent, whose address is Vietoria, aforesaid, is the attorney for the Company.
Given   under   my   hand  and   seal   of
office  at  Victoria,   Provinco  of  British
Columbia,  this  21st  day of April,  one
thousand  nine  hundred  and  eight.
(L.S.I S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which the Company
has been established and licensed are:
(a) Acquiring, holding, leasing, renting, selling, dealing in, and disposing
of, real estate or any interest therein,
or any mortgage or lien thereon;
(b) To improve real estate by erecting buildings thereon, or ln any other
way altering or dealing with the same;
(c) To lend money on the security of
any real or personal property, and for
such purposes to take mortgages, bills
of sale, and other pledges or liens thereon;
(d) To enter into agreements for the
erection or improvement or sale of land
or buildings;
(e) To acquire, own, sell, or otherwise dispose of, timber, timber limits,
permits and licences, coal lands, or mining lands, or mining rights of any sort
or description;
(f) To hold agencies f«r Are, or life
insurance, or manufacturing companies;
(g) To carry on farming or gardening operations;
(h) To buy, sell, "nd deal in, cattle,
horses, and other animals and farm produce, and generally to carry on a general
real estate, loaning, renting, Insurance
agency and mercantile agency business;
(i) To acquire, purchase, sell, hold,
and deal in, the stock-in-trade, effects,
both real and personal, business, and
good-will of any person, firm or corporation engaged in similar business;
(j) To acquire, buy, sell, and hold,
stock in other companies with similar
objects  and powers.
BRADSHAW & DAVIE,
Solicitors for the Inter-provincial Land
Company.
May 2
CERTIFICATE   OP   THE   BEQISTBA-
TION OP AV EXTBA-PBOVXHCXAI.
COMPANY.
"Companies Aot, 1897."
I hereby certify that "The Ferro-Con-
crete Construction Company" has this
day been registered as an Extra-Provincial Company under the "Companies Act,
1897," to carry out or effect all or ac"
of the objects of the Company to which
the legislative authority of the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head offlce of the Company ls
situate at Cincinnati in Hamilton County, Ohio.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is flve hundred thousand dollars, divided Into five thousand shares
of one hundred dollars each.
The head offlce of the Company ln this
Province   is   situate   at  Victoria,   and
Henry Graham Lawson, Solicitor, whose
address ls Victoria, B.C., ls the attorney
for  the  company.    Not  empowered to
issue and transfer stock.
Given under my hand and Seal of Offlce
at Victoria, Province of British Columbia, this fourth day of April, one
thousand nine hundred and eight.
S. Y. WOOTTON.
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The Objects for which this company
has been established and registered are:
Manufacturing and dealing in fire-proofing and building material of all kinds,
and constructing, equipping and owning
buildings, bridges and structures of all
kinds,  and all  things Incident thereto,
of   engaging   in   a   general   contracting
business; and of acquiring, holding, owning and disposing of all rights, patent
and otherwise,  necessary and convenient for the prosecution of its business.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Range 1,  Coast District.
TAKE NOTICE that we, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following desoribed
lands:
Commencing at a post planted on the
east side of Loughborough Inlet about
three-quarters of a mlle south of McBride Bay and about ten chains north
of old mill; thence east twenty chains;
thence south twenty chains; thence west
twenty chains more ci less to the east
short of Loughborough Inlet; thence
northerly twenty chains more oi less
and following the east shore of Loughborough Inlet to the point of commencement.
Dated May lst,  1908.
DAVIDSON, WARD CO., LIMITED,
May 9 G. S. Wilson, Agent
Within sixty days from date I Intend
to apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for permission to
purchase 80 acres of land at Kitsals
Canyon. The land is situated within
lines commencing at a post about half
a mile south of Chas. Durham's Southwest corner and marked: Erlck Norlin,
80 acres, Purchase Claim, S. W. Corner,
May 19th, 1908; thence north 20 chains,
thence east 40 chains; thence south 20
chains; thence west 40 ehains to point
of commencement,  containing 80 acres,
May 19th, 1908.
June 13 ERICK NORLIN.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Owen
Townley, of Vancouver, barrister at law,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands: ,
Commencing at a post planted on the
southwest shore of Defence Island,
Howe Sound, thence In a northerly, easterly, southerly and westerly direction,
following high water mark to the point
of commencement, containing 30 acres,
more or less, and being the whole of
the* Island known as Defence Island.
Dated  8th  April,  1908.
|ier in which he invariably drives. I of The  Week, and carelessly  threw | Maiy 9   ™OMAS OWEN TOWNLEY.
CLAYOQUOT  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Alberni.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Mary I. Williams, of Victoria, B.C., spinster, intend
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands: Commencing
at a post planted at the south-west end
of one of the group located on the chart
as the one hundred Islands, and extending around this island to point of
commencement; supposed to contain 20
acres, more or less.
Dated April 3rd,  1908.
MARY ISABELLA WILLIAMS.
May 2
CLAYOQUOT  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Alberni.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Elizabeth Margaret Wallis Williams, of Victoria, B.C.,
spinster, Intend to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands: Commencing at a post planted
on the north-east side of Puzzle Island,
extending around the island to point of
commencement, and containing S5 acr09,
more or less.
Elizabeth Margaret Wallis Williams.
May 2
LAND REGISTRY ACT.
In the matter of our application for a
PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Regulations ror the Docking of Mooring
of All  Vessels Arriving at  British
Columbia   Ports   From   Plague-Infected Ports.
(Approved by Order of His Honour the
Adminlstrator-ln-Councll,  dated  Sth
April,   1908).
1. All vessels arriving at British
Columbia ports from ports infected or
suspected of being infected with Bubonic Plaguo shall conform to the following regulations:—
(a) Vessels shall bo moored or
docked at a distance not less than six
feet from wharf or land:
(b) Ropes or chains connecting a
vessel with wharf or land shall be
protected by funnels of size and shape
satisfactory to Local and Provincial
Boards of Health:
(c) All gangways shall be lifted
when not In use. Gangways when in
use shall be guarded against the exit
of rats by a person specially detailed
for this purpose:
(d) All vessels changing route to
solely British Columbia ports shall
give satisfactory evidence of disinfection and extermination of vermin
to Provincial Board of Health.
2. Every owner, agent, or captain of
any vessel, and every other person violating or instructing, authorising, ordering, permitting, or otherwise suffering any person to violate any of the
foregoing regulations shall he liable,
upon summary conviction before any
two Justices of the Peace, for every
such offence to a fine not exceeding one
hundred dollars, with or without costs,
or to Imprisonment, with or without
hard labour, for a term not exceeding
six months, or to both fine and Imprisonment In the discretion of tiie convicting magistrates.
Dated  at   Victoria,   9th  April,   1908.
(By Command).
HENRY ESSON YOUNG,
Provincial Secretary.
Charles J. Fagan, M.D.,
Secretary Provincial Board of Health.
May 9
FBOVINCIAL    GAOL   AT   VICTOBIA.
Tenders endorsed "Gaol Supplies" for
the supply of Groceries, Broad, Fish,
Beef, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, for the
said   institution,   from  the   lst  day  of
 ________        Ju'y  next'   t0  the  3lst of March,   1909,
Duplicate   Certificate   of   Title   to  will be received by the undersigned up
Subdivision  Lots 46 and 47 of Lot i to Monday, the 25th  June.    Samples ot
68, and part of Lot 73, Spring Ridge   Groceries,  Clothing,  Boots,  etc.,  can be
(Map 395) Victoria City. seen at the Gaol,  Topaz Avenue.
Notice Is hereby given that It Is my |     All   supplies   to   be  delivered   at   the
Intention at the expiration of one month ', Gaol as required without extra charge.
from  the date  of  the  first  publication' All   articles   required   for   use   In   this
hereof  to  Issue  a  Duplicate Certificate   contract  to  be  of  Provincial  manufac-
of  Title  to  said  lands  Issued  to  Wil- i ture as far as practicable.
am  Ralph  on  the  30th  day  of  June,
1892, and numbered  13495 A.
Land   Registry  Offlce,   Victoria,   B.C.,
this 13th day of May, 1908.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
May 23 Registrar-General.
Forms of Tender will bo supplied on
application to the undersigned.
The lowest or nny tender not necessarily  accepted.
J. M. MUTTER,
June 2,  1908. Warden. THE WEEK, SATURDAY JUNE  aO, 1908*
Correspondence.
Well,    I    hope I  don't make you
tired—I've not written this purely for
  publicity, but I  felt a kind of sym-
The Week accepts   no   responsibility       ,,,_.. u i _
for the views expressed by its corres- pathy for that poor boy you slate so
pondents. _.____.—., for    scratching    up    driftwood,   and
The columns of The Week are open lu     "■-""•       o      1 >
to everyone for the free expression of throwing rocks at the coolies, that I
their opinion on all subjects which do .       ,    ,  .       • .„_,_, _,-,_,,.
not involve religious controversy. just had to give my pen some exer-
Communications    will    be    Inserted cjse
whether  signed  by  the  real  name  of ' ,
the writer or a nom de plume, but tho      With best wishes for your health,
waiter's   name   and   address   must   be    • , ,,   t    t vn,.r ,-.„nPr
given to the editor as an evidence of slr< ancl tlwt_ot youi paper
bona  fides.   In   no   case
divulged without consent.
will   it   be
Yours truly,
TEMPORA MUTANTUR.
GO AND  LISTEN TO SHAKESPEARE.
Saanichton P. 0.,
June 10, 1908.
Dear Lounger:—Have read with intent    and    profound   attention   your 	
story in last issue of the "Young man j0iln Bright was the greatest Eng-
who went to Mexico."    I have read i;sh orator of his day, and was also
and re-read it all ways, but upon my one of the greatest orators that ever
soul I can't find out what it is you HVed.    Mr.  Bright was not a classi-
want the poor young fellow to do.   Is cai scholar.    His youth was not dc-
it that he ought to seize a hoe with voted to the writing of Latin hexa-
a  shout of glee, butt in among his meters or of Greek iambics.    Under
gang of dusky peons, and with loud ordinary  circumstances,  therefore,  it
cries of encouragement and the preg- might be  supposed  that  Bright  en-
nant force of example stimulate their tered public life severely handicapped
sluggish   efforts   among  the  tobacco when the fact is taken into considera-
plants? tion that he had to battle with ora-
I don't think. torical giants like Gladstone, who had
Or is it that he should forsake the been schooled from early youth in the
lotos-eating sushine and return to his classics.   But the best judges of ora-
pitiful and precarious existence comb- tory always stated that Bright easily
ductions. This is no reason why the
young people should not be taught
to listen to Shakespeare, and finally
to grasp the meaning of his poetic
philosophy. The appetite grows by
what it feeds on. And so the only
way to learn and to appreciate
Shakespeare is continually to hear
Shakespeare, and to read his works.
The thanks of the whole community
are due to Mr. Mantell and his manager for the great educational good
that they have accomplished by introducing us once more to those
grai.J old dramatic works which time
can never wither.
ing the beach for flammable jetsamr
I guess not, either.
Now just what is the moral, dear
Mr. Lounger? I've been in this delectable province  likewise  about si.%
outstripped all his competitors in the
art of public speaking.
When asked how he obtained so
profound a mastery over the English
language, Mr. Bright was in the habit
months, and from the start found that 0f saying that his lucid style was due
if I wanted work I'd have to go right to the fact that from his youth up he
after it with a club, but having been had never ceased studying the Holy
two years around the prairie country Bible, the twelve books of "Paradise
I didn't get alarmed any at that; all Lost" and the works of Shakespeare.
the green's wiped off me now almost; In this literature Bright found all the
though I was considerable verdant inspiration for those glorious oratori-
when I did hit these shores. Why cal outbursts that have made his name
some! famous from generation to generation.
Now, sir, I have worked on ranches It is admitted by all great writers
since I've been here, partly because that the Bible is one of the best and
I can and partly because there is work most simply written works that can
to be had—worked alongside and be studied by those who arc anxious
with all the rattle-tongued, many to master the difficult art of expres-
breed heathen that do so much to add sion. Totally aside from the inspira-
to the charm of your unrivalled land- tional point of view, the Bible will re-
scape  (I speak as a travelled man), main forever as the greatest of liter-
and have been bossed in my work by
boobies that I never would have expected to find walking around alive;
and I want to tell you right now, sir,
that if I saw any chance in the hori-
ary   possessions.   Those   who   have
studied Milton fully realize the debt
that  this profound  thinker  owed  to
the Bible.
And now   for   Shakespeare.   How
zon   approximating  the  job  of  that many of us have alowed the years to
punch and bananna artist, well, I'd roll by and at the same time have al-
pack my roll and hike for it so quick lowed our Shakespeare to grow dusty
I'd fire the atmosphere, and so, too, on the shelf?   The strain and stress
in like case, I venture to suggest you of modern life are so great that few
would do yourself.   Give us English- of us have either the opportunity ot
men fair and   candid   criticism,    as the inclination to consult those great
pungent as you like, but cut out that fountains of wisdom which are found
humbug racket.    The second part of in the works' of Shakespeare,
your article concerns  a matter  that      When, therefore, the opportunity is
needs to be noticed more than it is. presented to us to see and hear the
Every mail brings me enquiries from plays of Shakespeare acted, the op-
thc Old Country as to things right portunity should be greedily grasped,
here, and in answer to some I have Nothing acn be more beneficial either
sent off half a dozen copies of your to the young or to the old than to
paper. listen for a few hours each night tc
It is high time that people in Eng- the immortal lines of Shakespeare as
land  were  informed  most  explicitly, they are read by Mr. Mantell and the
who is and is not wanted in the Do- members of his well-educated organ-
niinion.      Thc    immigration    affairs ization.   Shakespeare has spelt "ruin"
have eben handled in such a promis- for so many managers that a debt of
cuous manned and by so many peo- gratitude is owing to every manager,
pie,   and   with   such   conflicting   re- who, in spite of thc warnings of thc
suits, that it is small wonder that peo- past, once more makes the hazardous
pie in England are getting, to put it attempt   to    give adequate prcsenta-
mildly, a little puzzled. One man tions of the great Shakespearean
writes me: "Apparently the 'undesirable' in Canada is the man with no
money—seems as if they want our
cash but not us." A few practical
working details placed before business men hy business men would have
TAKE NOTICE that the British Columbia Canning Canning Company, Limited, of London, England and Victoria,
B.C., Salmon Canners and Sawmill Owners, intend to apply for permission to
lease the following described foreshore
and submerged land adjoining lot No.
3, Range,  2, Coast District.
Commencing at a post marked "B.C.C.
Co., South Post," planted on Island,
forming part of said Lot No. 3, three
chains S. hi W. from the Church, situate on tlie Wannuck River, Rivers Inlet, B.C., thence due west one-quarter
mile, thence due nort t one-half mile to
a post marked "B. C. C. Co., N.W.
Post," on the ni)rth shore of Rivers Inlet, thence along the shore one-quarter
mile due east, thenoe due south to Island
first mentioned.
26th April,  1908.
BRITISH COLUMBIA CANNING CO.,
May 2 D. McPhee, Agent.
WANTED
WANTED—Yo>ung men for Firemen and
Brakemen, instruct you at home by
mail. For .free information send
stamp to National Railway Training
School, Inc., 376 Robert St. (Room 57),
St. Paul, Minn., U.S.A.
"Elijah" and "Benjamin" Mineral Claims
Vic-
Situate in Port  Renfrew District,
toria Mining Division.
Where    located—Immediately    east    of
Bugaboo Creek and Seven Miles from
San Juan Harbour.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Harrie G.
Ross, Free Miner's Certificate No.
B22830, Agent for The Bentley Iron
Mining Co., Ld., Free Miner's Certificate
No. B22S21, intend 60 days from the
date hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a
Crown Grant of the above claims.
Dated this 10th day of June, A.D. 190S.
June 20 HARRIE G. ROSS.
Iron Master Mineral Group, consisting
"Ironmaster," "Iron King," "Iron
Prince," "Ironmaster's Son" and
"Grip On Iron" Mineral Claims.
Situate in Port Renfrew District, Vietoria Mining Division.
Where -.Lacate.c1*—Extending East and
West from Bentley Creek.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Harrie G.
Ross, for myself, Free Miner's Certificate No. B22830, and associate Trustees
of the above Mineral Group, viz., John
Bentley, Free Miner's Certificate No.
B23050; John William Fisher, Free
Miner's Certificate No. 23101; John Berryman, Free Miner's Certificate No.
B2303S; and Thomas J. Plimley, Free
Miner's Certificate No. B23040, intend
60 days from the date hereof, to apply
to tlie Mining Recorder for a Certificate
of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of the above
claims.
And further take notice that action
under section 37, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of  Improvements.
Dated this 10th day of June, A.D. 190S.
June 20 HARRIE G. ROSS.
Certificate   of   the  Registration  of  an
Extra-Provincial   Company,
dramas.
Fur a time all of us may have
strayed away from the classics and
have worshiped the false gods of
Scandinavian lore; for a time we all
may have a tendency to banish
far better results to British Columbia thought and to take pleasure in spec-
and Canada generally than all the tacular productions that make no ap-
high falutin' stuff unloaded on credu- peal to thc reason or to the poetic
Ions people in Great Britain by "in- imagination; for a time we may all
terested" parties; there is a great have committed grievous literary and
class, the fringe of which has onl} dramatic sins. But in the end we are
just been touched last spring, which obliged to go back to the plays that
only needs awakening to furnish all have stood thc test of centuries. We
the resources of men nnd money that are compelled to listen to the philo-
the Dominion has need of—the class sophy that must be implanted on the
that having few pretensions—trades at golden tablets of thc memories of
the best stores and pays cash every those who seek the truth,
time. It is this class which is prone Mr. Mantell's organization is a most
to send its sons abroad and from capable organization, and it is able to
which have been recruited such men give au adequate interpretation of
as have made the Argentine, and sev- thc various plays that arc being pre-
eral other places not under the Brit- sented this season. Young men and
ish flag. There is plenty of scope for young women whose minds have not
intelligent effort among this class in been inured to concentration, may find
the Old Country. From all signs the Shakespearean productions some-
Canada is full up with all the work- what dull after listening to the Broad-
ingmen she can want for quite a way asininities which so often have
while. taken the place of good dramatic pro-
"Companies Act, 1897."
I HEREBY CERTIFY that "Tiie Timber Investment Company" has this day
been registered as an Extra-Provincial
Company under the "Companies Act,
1897," to carry out or effect all or any
of the objects of the Company to which
tbe legislative authority of the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company is
situate at the City of Seattle, King
County, State of Washington.
The amount of the capital of tho
Company is three hundred thousand
dollars, divided into three thousand
shares of one hundred dollars each.
The head office of the Company in
this Province is situate at Victoria, and
Thomas Bamford, clerk, whose address
is Victoria, B.C., is the attorney for the
Company. Not empowered to issue and
transfer stock.
The time of the existence of the Company is fifty years, from the Sth day of
February, 1908.
The Company is limited.
Given under my hand and seal of
office at Viotoria. Province of British
Columbia, this 13th day of May, one
thousand  nine hundred  and eight.
(L.S.) S.  Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has been established and registered are:
To manufacture, buy, and sell timber
and timber products; to buy, lease, or
otherwise acquire and to hold real estate
and timber in the State of Washington
and elsewhere, and the same to sell,
mortgage, lease and dispose of; to erect,
operate, sell and dispose of water-works
for the supply 6Twater-power and water
for domestic purposes, electric power
plants; to buy, build, lease and otherwise acquire and operate, if necessary
and desirable, tug-boats and freight and
passenger steamers; to carry on the
business of selling real estate on commission and doing a general real estate
and timber brokerage business; to loan
the money of the Corporation in connection with its other business if
deemed advisable and to the best interests of the Corporation; to buy. sell
and deal In all kinds of merchandise.
June 20
"Companies Act, 1897."
NOTICE is hereby given that Raymond Bellenger Punnett, of Victoria.
B.C., broker, has heen appointed new
attorney of "The Timber Investment
Company" in the place of Thomas Bamford.
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this  Sth  day
of  June,   190S.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
June 20.
Good Receipt for Hushroom Sandwiches
Mince contents of a tin of Ox Tongue and boiled Mushrooms
together, add French Mustard and spread between bread and butter.
(Canned Mushrooms may be used if preferred.)
OTHER SPECIALTIES FOR SANDWICHES
DEVILLED HAM, per tin, ioc and  15c
DAVIES' VEAL LOAF, per tin  15c
DEVILLED TONGUE, per tin  15c
UNDERWOOD'S DEVILLED HAM  35c
ENGLISH POTTED BREAKFAST MEATS, per tin 5c and..ioc
C. & B. POTTED MEATS, per glass jar  25c
C. &B. POTTED FISH, per glass  25c
PATE DE FOIS GRAS  50c, 75c, and  $1.00
PUREE DE FOIS GRAS  25c
RUSSIAN CAVIAR, per tin  .65c
PEA NUT BUTTER, per bottle 20c, 35c and 65c
The Economy Jar Demonstrator is here. This new method is
unmatched for preserving Meat, Fruit, etc.   Come in and learn how.
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
Up-to-Date Grocers.
1317 Government Street. Tels. 52, 1052, 1590
Visit Victoria
No lovelier place can be found than beautiful Victoria in
summer, autumn, winter or spring. The morning air is cool and
bracing; coast and woodland scenery around simply unrivalled, and
the sense of perfect rest that comes with the cool evenings is
delightful.
The Poodle Dog Hotel
for the Tourist
is the ideal stopping place; well equipped throughout; modern,
homelike, yet inexpensive and with a cuisine absolutely unrivalled
in British Columbia.
The cosy Grill Room of hte Poodle Dog is praised from
coast to coast by transient guests.
SMITH & SHAUGHNESSY        -      -      -      PROPRIETORS
YATES STREET, VICTORIA, B.C.
American Steel Clad
ELECTRIC IRON
Simplest and best on the market; costs less to operate ane
maintain than any other. Can be attached to any electric lighl
or power circuit; easy to attach, no danger. Equally valuable tc
the tourist or the housekeeper. Unrivalled for laundry purposes
PRICE ONLY $6.00. Wc will give ten days' free trial if desired
Call here and see them in operation.
B. C. ELECTRIC RAILWAY CO., LIMITED
CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS.
Write me for 1908
Catalogue
Cockburn's Art Qaller
(Successors to WILL MARSDEN) PHONE 1933
665 Granville Street,      Vancouver,

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