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Week Jul 16, 1910

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Array 18 S A B'dT fl 8 8 S 61'tt 6 6 6"4"6"tt 151
Just a Little Better
Terry's
Fountain
ALWAYS IN THE LEAD    °
It» » g g« BJUUUt ftJUUUUUUUUUL*J
The Week
ft British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria,  B. 6.
■>r»Tnnnnnnr»»»mir»ni»Y>rF
HALL & WALKER
Agents
WELLINGTON   COLLIERY
COMPANY'S COAL
ment St Telephone 83
To... VII.   No.
51
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 16, 1910
Dollae Pee Annum
fE LIQUOR BY-LAW
The City Fathers in their wisdom
jised a new Liquor License By-law,
lich, while less objectionable from the
■Midpoint of British fair-play than the
h which the Mayor attempted to foist
thc community, is, nevertheless, unjust
lthe trade and a nuisance to the public.
Iloon licenses are raised from $400 to
150 per annum, while bottle licenses re-
lin at $400. Under this provision a
leer can sell whiskey by the bottle at
Irty cents less than a saloon and pay
150 a year less for his license. The By-
ignores the fact that the bottle license
lat the bottom of the growing evil of
Inily drinking, and that a grocery is the
ly place Avhere a proscribed drunkard
|i get "booze." The By-law also ignores
fact that the best class of saloon men
I'our high license. If the license had
|.n raised to $1,000 it might have had
effect of freezing out the "dives," to
great gain of the decent liquor sellers
ll of the public. As it is, the 'dives"
ll stand for the raise of $250 and stay
jthe business, so tliat no good purpose
been served. The tinkering reformers
■jiarently lost sight of the fact that the
By-law would work its greatest hard-
|p on the working man, for most, if not
of the five-cent saloons will raise the
Ice of drinks.   Five-cent beer will soon
I a thing of the past in Victoria; a rentable circumstance which is certain to
Id to the consumption of less beer and
Ire whiskey. But, there is worse be-
lid. The prohibition imposed upon res-
lirant keepers against selling drinks with
lals after eleven o'clock at night and on
Inday will deprive them of their most
lofitable source of income, and will com-
|l an immediate increase in the price in
Already the 25-cent meal is prae-
lally a thing of the past, and by charging
lerything a la carte the figure is raised
35 cents. This means a heavy addi-
In to the cost of living for hundreds of
lople who feed in Victoria restaurants,
lie logical result of thc By-law is that
liges will have to be raised and that thc
Ity will have to initiate the movement.
then this takes place the real test of the
layor's Reform Movement will be made,
li his first moving of thc By-law the
|ayor distinctly said that it was not a
loney-making scheme, but was aimed at
Je extinction of the "dives." If so, it
lis utterly failed of its purpose. It has
Ixed the most reputable class of saloon
lepers; it has restricted a necessary pub-
service; it has raised the price of
leals, ancl will raise wages.    The public
II li? apt to cry: "From such a species
reform, Good Lord deliver us."
IE BUTTER-IN
The Rev. Arthur O'Meara has granted
interview to the Colonist, in which he
|tempts to defend his conduct iii butting-
on the Indian question.    First of all
disclaims tho intention of stirring up
l-ife, which was quite unnecessary on his
Irt as no one claimed that he had that
tention; but to show just how little he
jis able to comprehend the effect of what
said upon the Indian mind The AVeek
fcs to inform him that the very Indians
whom "he most earnestly appealed to
■rid all resort to force and violence in tlie
lertion of their rights," have, on at least
occasions recently, offered violence to
Iceable white settlers, and have forced
them to leave the country under positive
threat of taking their lives. So much for
the moral influence of the exhorter! Mr.
O'Meara claims that in November last,.
when there was trouble with the Indians
in the Skeena, he went to Ottawa for the
purpose of discussing the matter with a
view to averting the trouble. It is a pity
that he did not stay in Ottawa, for with
all respect be it said, that the chances of
a peaceable settlement would be greatly
increased if the Rev. Arthur O'Meara
could be muzzled. It is to be regretted
that he did not receive the same treatment from the Dominion as from the Provincial Government.    It is all very well
role for which he is fitted neither by natural endowment or training, but in which,
unfortunately, he can make a good deal
of trouble for the Government by playing
to the gallery; although in the process he
will bring little "kudos" to the Church to
whicii he owes his first duty.
STEWART GOLD
All is not gold that glitters, even
though it glitters at Stewart, and by this
time the Portland Canal Miner ought to
be heartily ashamed of itself for having
so grossly exaggerated the character and
value of the reef recently discovered in
MOSES II.—A MoDEitx Lawgiver
for Mr. O'Meara to attempt to justify his
butting-in on thc ground that "the present
situation involved a missionary problem
of great and far-reaching importance."
Such a claim ignores altogether the constitutional method of dealing with all such
matters through the constituted authorities. Unfortunately, the closing paragraph of Mr. O'Meara's interview affords
little comfort to those who believe that
the Government should bc unhampered by
the Church in its administration of public
affairs. It will be time enough for Mr.
O'Meara to take up the role of negotiator
when he has been invited. As it is he
poses as a  self-constituted  arbitrator;  a
that country. Now that the Dominion
Government has declared that it is simply
"a pyrrhotite vein in slate with some gold
showing at the surface only," no condemnation can be too loud for the statement
that there was a gold reef running for
twenty miles through the country, free
milling, and standing out like a "white"
bluff. The London press, which has not
a little to do in influencing British investments abroad, will be apt to regard
it as a very "black" bluff. It is to bc
hoped that the camp will not permanently suffer from such ill-advised boosting. Meanwhile the Colonist quotes the
exaggerated reports which have appeared
in the London papers and blames them
for not making ' local enquiries" before
publishing them. Is the Colonist aware
that these reports emanated from the
"local" paper—the Portland Canal Miner
—ancl from the office of a well known
Victoria correspondent? Is not this
"local" enough?
THE COMPANIES' ACT
Tlie last word whicli need be said at
present on the Companies' Act is contained in the excellent letter of Mr. H.
W. R. Moore, whicli is to be found in the
correspondence columns of tlie current
issue, and in the statement of the Deputy
Attorney-General, published in Thursday's
Colonist. Mr. McLean says that the
critics of the Act are labouring under a
misconception. It is not a fact that every
extra-provincial company, doing business
in the Province will have to pay taxes
based on the amount of capital, because
all companies which have fifty per cent,
of tlieir capital at* the home office are exempt except for a payment of 250, ancl
this fee is not an annual tax, but covers
their business operations in British Columbia for all time to come. There is
little doubt that the most strenuous opposition springs, not from the bona-fide
merchants of the Victoria and Vancouver
Boards of Trade, but from tlie army of
wild-cat promoters, whose operations will
be practically killed by this measure.
A MIRACLE PICTURE
A remarkable picture is being exhibited in a vacant store on Fort Street.   It
is entitled "The Shadow of the Cross."
On entering tlie room the visitor sees an
ordinary picture of the Christ, standing
up against the sand of the desert and the
blue and pink of an eastern sky.    The
lights are turned out, whereupon the picture glows with a luminous light, sufficiently powerful to enable anyone to see
the person sitting on the next chair.   Nor
does the marvel cease here; directly behind the Christ is the distinct shadow of
a Cross; the cross-piece is behind the left
shoulder ancl the continuation is clearly
seen below the right thigh.   There appears
to be no explanation to the puzzle.    The
visitors are invited to walk behind the
screen, to touch the canvas ancl to satisfy
themselves that there is no trickery.   The
story is that the painter, Henry Hammond Ault, went back to his studio late
one night to get some music, and tliat on
his entrance he was startled lo see his picture lighted up.    No satisfactory cause
was found for this phenomenon, and he
sold it, as it stood, to Mr. David Wright,
a New York millionaire art collector.   Mr.
Wright  has  allowed   the  picture   to  be
shown in the principal cities of the North
American continent, on the understanding
that 25 per cent, of the profits were paid
to some deserving local charity.    In the
case of no deserving charity appearing,
the net profits go to Mr. Wright.    The
Anti-Tuberculosis Society is to receive the
25 per cent, bonus in Victoria, and The
Week has no hesitation in urging all its
readers to see the picture next week, when
it will be on exhibition.    Tn the  first
place every visitor will come away filled
with amazement and feeling sure that he
has received good value for liis money,
and in addition, he will know that he has
contributed to tlie funds of an Association
which is doing its best to rid mankind of
one of its greatest scourges. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 10, 1910
:
i   : i
At The Street
Corner
By THE LOUNQER
My remarks with regard to the correct spelling of "Foul" Bay have
given rise to considerable comment.
Last week a letter was printed from
a correspondent on the subject, and
many people have stopped me on the
street with respect to the same matter. So to settle the question once
and for all to my own satisfaction, I
consulted thc best authority, Capt.
Walbran, and he tells me that the
correct spelling is with a "u". Foul
Bay was known by this name to the
officers of the Hudson's Bay Company as early as 1846 on account of
the rocky and shallow bottom and
this name, for thc seaman's reason
was adopted on the Admiralty chart
of the neighbourhood by Captain
Richards of H, M. S. "Plumper" in
1858, when making a second survey
of Victoria harbour, the first one having been made by Captain Kellett
of H.M.S. "Herald" in 1846. To
show the dangerous nature of this
little bay the yacht "Templar," which
was brought out to Victoria on the
deck of the ship "Athelstan," and
then the property of Mr. Barrett-
Lennard (lience Lennard Island and
Templar Channel, Clayoquot) and at
the time of her loss on a trading voyage, was driven on shore from her
anchorage in Foul Bay, 22nd January,
1862, during a heavy south-east gale,
and was totally lost. Hence Templar
rock in Foul  Bay, named in  1862.
* *     *
Mr. Ian St. Clair has started the
good work again ancl is devoting his
mornings, and no inconsiderable part
of his afternoons for the benefit of
Victoria's children. Probably there is
no man in the whole of the city, I
might say in the whole of the Province, and I don't think that I should
not be far wrong if I included the
Dominion, who has so whole-heart
edly set himself to develop those
clean, manly qualities which are to be
found in the best of our girls as well
as in the best of our boys. Every
child living near water ought to bc
able to swim, and it is no fault of
Mr. St. Clair's if they cannot. Day
after day he spends his time teaching
this all-important accomplishment
and it is satisfactory to bc able to
say that his efforts are not in vain.
Crowds of children are availing themselves of his tuition and every day
sees some pupil emerge into the ranks
of competent water-babies. And the
kids love their lessons and seem to
idolise their teacher; which things are
entirely right. Would that there were
more men like Ian St. Clair! Beginners' classes arc held at the Gorge
Park for boys at 9.30 a.m.; girls of
the same class arc taken an hour
later. At 11.30 pupils from the various private schools receive instruction, whilst in the afternoons the
more advanced swimmers get the
benefit of Mr. St. Clair's hints. It is
a curious thing that with the exception of thc common or garden pig.
man should be the only member of
the creation which cannot swim naturally. Even the pig above-mentioned can swim, but he is apt to cut his
throat in so doing. But man, the
master of the world, is helpless in
the water unless hc has had thc
benefit of such instruction as Mr. St.
Clair has been in thc habit of giving for many years. I do hope that
there are no parents in Victoria who
are afraid to let little Willie go into
the water before he has learnt how
to swim. There have been such in
the past, and there may be some in
the future; let's hope that there arc
none in the present.
* *     *
"O tempora, O mores"! In other
words, what's thc matter with the
character of the man who is responsible for the head-lines on the front
sheet of the Victoria Times? The
letter press in this most estimable
paper informed its eager readers on
Monday, July nth, that the Duke of
Westminster had had a narrow escape
from drowning, owing to an accident
to his "hydroplane." Incidentally the
Times spelt it "hyproplane," but that,
I take it, was merely a typographi
cal error, to which we are all subject. But the head-lines informed the
public that the accident was due to
the Duke's new "air-ship" capsizing
Does the Times seriously think that
there is any connection between a
hydroplane and an aeroplane? If so,
such ignorance should not long go un
checked, and I will therefore take it
upon myself to inform the Times that
a "hydroplane" is a species of water
boat. Being practically flat-bottomed,
for the keel tapers to the stern and
the angle formed by it is so oblique
as to be hardly existent, the "hydro
plane," driven by a powerful engine,
is the fastest boat yet invented. It
docs not rise into the air from the
water in the same manner in which
an "aeroplane" soars aloft after running along dry land on wheels. After
all, the word "plane" only means
"flat" and can be applied to things
which remain on land or water, but
the Times has apparently run away
with the idea that anything with this
termination must necessarily have reference to substances which have
their habitat in the air.
* *     *
I have often wondered why it is
that in Victoria the street cars stop
on the further side of a crossing instead of on the near. In the business
areas of big cities it is the invariable
rule that cars should stop before the
crossing is reached, and this course of
procedure obviates any possibility of
an accident owing to cross traffic. In
Victoria the reverse appears to bc
the rule, and though there may be
some very good reason, it has not
yet penetrated my somewhat dense
head. And while talking of cars I
might say that it will be an occasion
of great up-lifting of heart amongst
the fair sex when the new cars are
put on the schedule, as it is announced
that the steps are low enough to accommodate those who have had so
much difficulty in this connection in
the past.
* *     *
I heard a pretty little compliment
paid to the Victoria Fire Department
the other day. I was talking to one
of the Victoria contingent who had
been down to Reno, and after discussing the fight and other details of
the trip the conversation came round
to the subject of fire. I was com
menting on the smart turn-out by our
local men on Monday when the B. C.
Fur Company's store was in peril,
and the man I was talking to told
me that he had watched a turn-out
by the San Francisco brigade, who,
from his account, were 'way behind
our boys in point of time. I love to
watch the Chief speeding down Government Street and my heart is filled
with envy each time I see him. What
a fascination fire has for the public!
We have all seen hundreds of fires;
we have all seen the brigade come
rattling down the street thousands of
times, and yet, like children, we all
run to the curb to watch it again,
once more, and a sort of thrill runs
up our spine, because, when all is said
and clone, it is warfare, or the preliminaries of warfare whicii we are
watching: Man versus Nature. Man
taking as his ally one of Nature's
forces, Water,  to defeat the  fiercest
of Nature's champions, Fire.
* *     *
It seems to me that I am moralizing again, a bad habit in a Lounger, so I had better come back to the
old routine of complaints. In a recent
issue of the Colonist attention was
opportunely called in thc columns devoted to "Woman's Realm" to the
fact that thc public arc being largely
defrauded in the matter of fruit
bought by the basket. After reading
the paragraph in question I took a
stroll round town and gazed long and
hungrily at the various baskets of
fruit exposed for sale; and thc indictment holds good. In most cases
the baskets arc by no means full,
which means that, roughly speaking,
for every half-dozen baskets sold,
enough berries are left over to fill a
seventh. And these things ought not
so to be. It is merely another instance of "graft" on a small scale,
and the individual "kick" is so slight
that no one cares about registering
it. A fact which also explains the
reason   for   my   existence   on   this
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THE PIANO THAT ALWAYS RETAINS THE CHARM OF YOUTH
KRANICH & BACH, "NEW ART" BELL, BROADWOOD, CHICKERING, HAINES BROS.
MONTELIUS PIANO HOUSE, LIMITED
SOLE B. C. REPRESENTATIVES
1104 GOVERNMENT STREET
-COR. FORT STREE1
planet. And whilst talking about fruit
I might point out that the fight has
found its echo here. You can't buy
a melon in town, because they havc
all been "cornered" by the niggers,
and they cost $7.50 per case.
-*<     *     %
My attention has been called to
the fact that the local druggists have
no night-bells, and that in cases of
emergency it is impossible to obtain
simple remedies. My informant was
a lady with a large family, and twice
within the past few months her eldest
son has wandered vainly round the
town seeking help from a druggist
where no druggist was. I do not
speak from personal experience, and
I have no intention of staying up all
night for the purpose of trotting
round to all our local drug stores
just to see whether I can get in or
not. If the statement is false I
shall have the greatest pleasure in
contradicting myself next week. If it
is true, and I have no reasonable
doubt but that it is, there is something radically wrong vvith thc State
of Denmark. On Sundays, these same
drug stores open at 9 a.m. and close
at 12 noon, not to re-open till 6 p.m.
Now people cannot get ill to order.
If a man, woman or child is going
to bc taken seriously ill, he, she or
it. is just as likely to be overcome at
three o'clock in the afternoon as at
my other time. But Heaven help any
such unfortunate, because it is a sure
thing that thc Victoria druggists
won't. Now, it would not work a
hardship on anybody if some arrangement could be arrived at amongst the
local druggists. They all employ a
certain number of clerks, and if they
were to enter into an agreement
whereby one store was to remain open
during the night hours and during
Sundays, the public would have a
feeling of confidence which they certainly have not at present, and the
drug store clerks would be mulcted
in a very small amount as regards
their hours off. What guarantee have
I got that I shall not be taken ill in
thc night, and owing to the closing
of the drug stores breathe my last.
Think of the horror which would be
occasioned amongst the readers of
The Week if on opening their paper
they discovered that they had lost
their
LOUNGER
King Edward Mines
LIMITED
NON-PERSONAL LIABILITY
PORTLAND CANAL,  B.C.
We are offering the balance
of the first issue of shares
in this Company at ioc per
share. For Prospectus and
full particulars apply to	
KING EDWARD MINES, Limited
Room 8, Mahon Building      P. O. Box 772
Victoria, B.C.
The name on the Label should be SCHMIDT'S, if you
want the best in genuine imported Clarets and Burgundies. They have been on this market for the past
fifteen years and stand for the Popular Choice.
For sale by all liquor dealers.
<RADIGER & JANION
1318 Wharf Street
'British Columbia Agents]
S. L. Wilson
J. Kennedy
VICTORIA GARAGE
S. L. WILSON, Manager
REPAIRING OF ALL  MAKES  OF CARS A SPECIALTY
AUTOMOBILES STORED, CLEANED AND FOR
HIRE DAY AND NIGHT
943 FORT STREET (Opp. Skating Rink)
Telephone 2326 VICTORIA, B.C.
"How   on   earth   did   you   ever   cultivate such a beautiful black eye?" asked   Brown's   friend.     "Oh,"   illustrating
the   fall   of   man   on   roller   skates,   "I, had some sons?"
raised lt from a slip." "Sons?    No;   sons-in-law.
A Father Wile
" So      you      have      five      unmarrl
daughters,   eh?     Don't   you   wish   J THE AVEEK,  SATURDAY, JULY IG,  1910
MUSIC
AND  THE   STAGE
The Victoria Theatre
I'he Empress Stock Company of
Iicouver have scored another big
rcess this week in their presenta-
|i of "Thc Lion ancl the Mouse."
vas a well balanced show through-
Miss Fletcher as Shirley Ross-
|e was excellent, particularly so in
climax at the close of the third
T. B. Loftus depicted the arro-
It man of wealth, John Burkctt
ller well. Chauncey Southern as
J elude, aristocratic secretary play-
Ihis part faultlessly. D. M. Dtin-
as ex-Senator Stott had a some-
It stilted role to play, but he made
| most of it. Several people havc
to me that they wished this
lpany could see its way to come
|r here again during the winter
liths, when they would find better
|ses and a more enthusiastic audi-
The New Grand
|he Great Albini has been the fea-
at the New Grand this week, and
I Word "Great" is no idle compli-*
|t.    Albini is the star of the cir-
and as a modern magician has
I equals.   Guy Rawson and Frances
re  have  been   presenting  a  very
|ty   little   sketch   entitled    "Just
'' in "Yesterday."   It is essential-
"pretty" little piece, ancl the only
Icism I have to ofTer is that the
|es of the two characters are hard-
Dud enough to reach thc end of
|theatre, especially when inconsid-
persons come in late and shuffle
feet along the floor.
Pantages Theatre
livo   of   the   celebrated   Pantages
frdities have held the boards this
at the Johnson Street theatre.
Maid and    the    Mummy"  and
$10,000 Beauty" are both  ridi-
lus  farces,  but  they  make a  fel-
I laugh, and that is thc main thing.
lhe first mentioned there is an ex-
lingly    pretty    scene    when    the
Ises Lake and Morris, assisted by
chorus,    sing    the    "Twinkling
|-" duet. Thos. J. Mack as the Irish
pedian has been as funny as ever,
he is very ably assisted by  the
|>raic humorists,    Messrs.    Asther
Meyer.
Momano's Theatre
is hard to say anything about the
|ving Picture  Houses,  because  by
time  that this  paper appears  a
set of pictures are being shown.
Ifice it to say that Romano's is still
lping  up   that   excellence   of   film
Iduction which causes the house to
|filled nightly.
The Majestic Theatre
/hat always strikes me most about
Yates  Street  entertainment  hall
ie delightful coolness which strikes
as one enters from thc blazing
|;et.   The walls are green in color;
lights arc green-shaded, and thc
|eral effect is that of an oasis in
desert.    The   pictures   which   I
wcre well up to the high stand-
which   the   Majestic  has  always
lintained, and the manager inform-
|me that he had   some extra-spc-
picturcs  coming for thc  end of
week.
The Empress Theatre
through the courtesy of the man-
Ir of the Empress Theatre  I was
lilcged this week to scc the oper-
kg room.   I had never seen one of
se places before, and I was much
frested.   The films, which are only
lut as big as a couple of postage
Inps, are wound round a reel.  Six-
Ii  .pictures   go   to   the   foot,   and
re are 1,000 feet to the reel. Three
Is go to a performance, so it does
take   a   great  mathematician   to
Julate  that  the  audience  actually
48,000 pictures at a sitting.    An
limatic    contrivance    makes    the
rating room entirely fire-proof;  if
lany  chance  a  certain  wire   gets
[•-heated it breaks, and closes all
I'tures.    The new front which an
Irprising management has erected
J an excellent electric piano make
(Empress Theatre one of the best
l>inted in the Province.
MOMUS.
"The Man on the Box"
Patrons of the Victoria Theatre
who have been enjoying the splendid work of the Empress Stock Company during the last two weeks will
be pleased to hear that the management have succeeded in getting thc
company to remain for a further period. Next week, Monday and Tuesday, they present what is probably
the most popular drama of the present time, "The Man on the Box," as
played by Max Figman throughout
the Coast circuit. This production
will undoubtedly prove one of the
greatest dramatic treats of the theatrical year.
In preparing the stage version of
"The Man on the Box" the dramatist
followed the incidents of the book
closely, but injected much that is
new in thc way of characters and dialogue.
New Grand Theatre
Dorsch & Russell, thc Musical
Railroaders, who come to the Grand
next week, make music with things
connected with transportation. These
artists are deserving of a vast amount
of credit for the manner in which
their act is staged. It is seldom a
vaudeville act of this particular calibre is detailed in such an artistic
manner. They have given their careful attention to .the electrical and
scenic effects which marks the improvement over the old style musical number so vividly that one imagines he was witnessing a production of something of far greater proportions. The curtain rises showing
a railroad tower house in the mountains with natural effects, which later
turn out to be productive of tuneful
melodies. The musical numbers are
beautifully rendered combined with
excellent comedy, and true to nature
scenic and artistic electrical effects,
make it one of vaudeville's most distinct features.
Miss Alice Mortlock, the talented
little player, is too well known to
Grand patrons to need a very wordy
introduction. Miss Mortlock will be
seen in an emotional role, "The Other
Woman," a powerful and vivid drama,
which is a furor of New York City.
Thc little dramatic playlet is from the
pen of Chas. W. Doty, and is startling and gripping from the start.
Alfarretta Symonds, assisted by
Ryan & Adams, offer one of the
sprightliest dancing and singing numbers in vaudeville.
Lew Hoffman is a skillful juggler
and an extremely amusing funster.
His slightest movements always convulses an audience with laughter and
his juggling antics are distinctly novel
and marvelous.
The fifth act is Will Davis, the
premier monologist of the vaudeville
stage, who will bring a monologue
constructed on an entirely new idea.
Victoria this coming week will see
sets of moving pictures that have
never been seen in the world before.
The first is that of the Victoria Fire
Department rushing headlong down
Government street to a fire, headed
by Chief Davis in his automobile. The
other film is a special picture of the
King's funeral which has never been
shown before. It was sent out from
England shortly after the King's funeral but was never exhibited for
some unknown reason, and will be
shown for the very first time Monday
afternoon at the Grand.
Frohman Persuades Hare not to
Retire
Sir John Hare, one of the most
brilliant actors in England, has decided not to retire from the stage
this year as he had planned. Instead, having found what he considers
ideal acting conditions, he intends to
retain his place behind the footlights
indefinitely. Hc has long wanted to
remain the entire season in London,
to appear in repertoire and to select
his own plays. Learning of this,
Charles Frohman invited Sir John to
head his repertoire company at the
Duke of York's Theatre, immediately
after the holiday revival of "Peter
Pan." The actor was also given the
privilege of appearing in such plays
as he himself chose. Shortly before
sailing for America Mr. Frohman received a note from Sir John accepting the offer and thanking him for
the opportunity of playing under such
favorable conditions.
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July 18th and 19th
The Man on the Box
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July 20th and 21st
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ed," said Mr. Frohman, "that the next
Repertory season will be one of great
interest. 1 shall havc many new features, both plays and engagements, to
meet the special occasion of a Coronation year." There is a possibility
of Sir John's making another visit
to America next year, after thc Repertory season. In 1902 he created
a profound sensation in this country
with his "The Gay Lord Qucx." The
celebrated actor is now in his sixty-
sixth year, having been on the stage
continuously since twenty years of
age. His selection as head of the
Repertory company is particularly
fortunate because of his executive
abilities. A dozen years ago he won
quite as much fame as a manager as
I feci convinc-' an actor.
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THEATRE
Yates Street, Just Below Qovernment
WHERE EVERYBODY GOES
If you are dull and get the blues,
And do not know the place to choose
Come to the Majestic on Yates Street
Bring the friends you are apt to meet
And if on pleasure you are bent,
You won't regret the Dime you spent.
WE CATER TO LADIES AND CHILDREN
CHANGE OF PROGRAMME
Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday
1
THE
New Grand
Week of July 18
A Stupendous Scenic Novelty
DORSCH and RUSSELL
The Musical Railroaders
A Star Forever Twinkling
ALICE MORTLOCK & CO.
Tn the Tabloid Drama
"The Other Woman"
A Sprightly Trio
ALFARRETTA  SYMONDS
With Ryan & Adams Songs and
Dances
WILL DAVIS
Vaudeville's  Premier
Monologist
LEW HOFFMAN
Juggling Eccentrique Extraordinary
THOS J. PRICE
NEW MOVING PICTURES
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
PANTAQES
THEATRE
Week of July 18
See the
BIG SHOW
at the Johnson Street
House
Fun, Fast and Furious
Interesting
Instructive
ROMANO
THEATRE
CHANGE OF PROGRAMME THREE TIMES A WEEK
COOLEST AND MOST POPULAR THEATRE IN THE CITY
ADMISSION—TEN CENTS
Open afternoons 2 to 5.30, evenings 7 to 11
EMPRESS
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GOVERNMENT ST., NORTH OF JOHNSON
GEO. A. LEVELLE, Mgr.
ONLY FIRST CLASS
Motion Pictures and Illustrated Songs
Matinee every day from 2 to 5 p.m.   Evenings from 7 to 11 p.m.
Admission
10 Cents THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 16, 1910
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
•THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
120S Government Street, Victoria, B. C.
W. BLAKEMORE, Editor
Modern Woman And
How to Manage Her
BY BOHEMIAM
I cannot too quickly acquaint my
readers with the fact that the above
title is not my own, and that I have
not thc slightest intention of writing
a treatise on thc subject. My sole
object in calling attention to it is to
point a moral, for I can hardly hope
in this case to adorn a tale; and thc
moral is that Walter M. Gallichan
has never looked into the eyes of
Mona Lisa. The gentleman in question has written a book which bears
the title at the head of this article.
Thc book is a serious attempt to
fathom the unfathomable, and the
conclusion is that, while the author
apparently knows something about
the modern woman, he is, in spite of
his erudition, a mere tyro in the
art of managing her.
His table of contents is an ambitious one, covering all the moods and
tenses of the ineffable creature, who
was never intended by an omniscient
Creator to be managed by anyone.
The piquancy of the book may be
gathered from such sub-headings as:
Love and the Desire to Inflict Pain
—Why Women Torture their Lovers
—Are Women Gentle?—Woman as a
Tormenting Joy—The Tyranny of
Women—The Difference between the
Love of Men and Women—Man-
hating Women, Real and Professed—
Militant Spinsters—Why Conjugality
is frequently a State of Warfare—
Modern Woman's View of Wedlock
—Is the Free Union a Greater Success than Marriage?—Thc British
Father—The Advanced Daughter—
Women in the Professions and Trades
—The Social Evil—Portents of the
Sex War—Sex War as a Cause of
Social Dissolution —Supremacy or
Equality—Can there be Peace?
From the above it will be seen
that Mr. Walter M. Gallichan is a
courageous man, but after reading his
book I am reluctantly compelled to
come to the conclusion that he is one
of those mortals who has rushed in
where wise men, to say nothing of
angels, fear to tread.
He starts out with a declaration
that there are two universal theories
concerning woman; that she is gentle
and that she is cruel. Hc declares
that both are correct. Gentle by nature, cruel by inherited instinct and
force of circumstances. He says that
in its minor forms unkindness to a
lover is a very common trait among
women, but it is often employed to
stimulate ardour and to test a man's
devotion. "Women, who in love first
blow hot and then cold by turn, are
obeying a primitive instinct, although
in thc highest types of cultured women thc impulse shrinks almost to thc
vanishing point. Thc thoughtful woman who is as frank about her passions as she is concerning her intellectual opinions has no use for this
artifice, and condemns it as a device
that no longer appeals to the best
types of men." One would like to
know where the author found his type
of cultured women, who were frank
about their passions.
Rut thc author probes a little
deeper when he urges that "perfect
love is never without fear on thc woman's side" and that "fear is a stimulant." The clement of fear, which
is a part of modesty, has a physiological use—which, however, thc
author fails to explain.
Speaking of the gentleness of woman, thc author frankly admits that
hc has never been quite able to decide whether a gentle woman is more
gentle than a gentle man, but hc
thinks that a woman perceives more
quickly than a man when she is causing pain, and that this accounts for
her   frequent   superiority   both   as   a
healer and as one who wounds. "If
she wishes to plunge him into hell,
she will do it ruthlessly, if she wishes
to lift you into the seventh heaven
she will raise you by a sweet exercise of her intuition and gentleness.
A woman can be more like an angel
than a man; she can also prove more
like a fiend."
The author then passes to a consideration of the sex relations, a subject which has been very extensively
dealt with in certain text books common on our book-stalls during the last
few years. He adds nothing to the
fund of information which all experienced persons possess, but he puts
in the usual plea of would-be reformers for more plain speaking on the
part of parents and teachers; a plea
which I have never yet been able to
support. Perhaps it is only fair to
let the author speak for himself in
one paragraph, which, at least, possesses the merit of lucidity. "In regard to sex we are in a most unwholesome and diseased state of mind,
and until our minds are purged from
the twin evils of prudery and coarseness, moral reform is impossible in
that great field of thought and action
controlled by the sex-impulse. We
need to substitute clean plain-speaking for the sly whisper, the unclean
joke and the indecent snigger."
This modern man, who so thoroughly understands modern women,
undertakes to deal with the emotional
element and while he declares that
women are the strong supporters of
the clerical system and thc best
friends of the priest, goes on to say
that from St. Paul downwards the
teaching of the Church has not tended
to uplift the status of women, and in
many directions that teaching has
very seriously hindered the idea of
sex-quality, and a sane association of
the sexes. His view is that a realization of sex-quality is of more importance than the salvation of the
soul; or perhaps, it would be more
correct to say that he considers the
latter to be contingent upon the former, a conclusion on which there is
still very considerable difference of
opinion.
Tt is possible that the author has
no intention of being cynical when
he declares that "Women cheated of
the chance of love turn naturally to
religion as a solace and an outlet."
It is impossible to suppose that an
intelligent, educated man knows so
little of his subject as to be ignorant
of the fact that religion is a necessary part of every woman's life, and
that no such characterisation as he
suggests is possible.
The book then passes to a consideration of the duel in love, based
upon sex differentiation, and strange
to say, that, while throughout his
book the author too obviously accords to woman an inferior position,
he admits that "woman is not incapable of a noble, fervent and constant
affection, and that sometimes she is as
romantic and reckless in her love as
man."
The chapters which deal with conjugal relations are unsuitable for comment, except that the author falls in
line with modern writers, who, in
increasing numbers, proclaim that the
coldness of women is one of the principal causes of conjugal unhappiness,
and that its increase lies at thc root
of race suicide:
Then thc practical purpose of thc
thc book begins to dawn upon tht:
reader. It is a plea for sex-equality
in legislation; the opening of every
avenue which the professions and
business afford to woman; the abolition of the social and legal disabilities under which she labours. Hc declares that the present is thc era
of man-contemning, man-hating woman. In most cases it takes the form
of a protest against life in genera!
with man as thc scape-goat for all
that is amiss in the status of women. Hc puts in a pica for a very
wide relaxation of the marriage law,
with greater facility for divorce. His
own words are: "Marriage in thc future will be more attractive to celibates than it is today. The contract
will not be cruel in compelling people
who havc ceased to love to live together. There will be facilities for
complete and honourable separation,
with no hindrance to a second union."
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This opinion is in line with that
of many eminent men who have been,
and still are, giving evidence before
the Divorce Commission, and the
latest to endorse the proposition is
Canon Henson. But, the author
frankly admits that the question is
largely an economic and not a sentimental one, and, whether intentionally or not, he supports the view of
those who contend that added independence on the part of women will
inevitably lead to a slackening of the
marriage bond and to greater freedom in forming and dissolving alliances.
Whilst on one hand the book proceeds to argue logically what will happen under certain conditions, just as
if it were dealing with a known quantity, it contradicts itself on the opposite page by illustrating the well-recognized fact that you can never
count on what a woman will do under
any given circumstances. "Woman
with her tendency to variability often
changes from day to day, and what
pleases her in the morning may offend her at night. If she care for
you she will change her mood and
come to her senses, even though at
first she make a display of sheer indifference."
There is an illuminating chapter
on the economic aspect of woman's
future under the heading, "The Strife
in Bread-winning," and it is is reasonably argued that the Social Evil
is a question of bread-winning, and
that the ranks of its votaries would
not be replenished to any considerable extent but for the dependent
position of women. The author believes that "this evil will be greatly
lessened when the monetary dependence of women is removed, and one
of the soundest methods of establishing greater purity is not preaching
chastity, nor suppression, nor police
intervention, nor rescue work, but thc
insistence on opening out employment
for women at wages that will lift
them above want."
The final chapter of the book is an
attempt to answer the question, "Can
there be Peace?" By this is meant,
is the great sex war interminable?
"For woman, always a tormenting
joy, has become one of the chief problems of the age." It is conceded
by the author that in spite of her
ambitions woman is still thc consoler,
the healer and the inspirer. He emphasizes the fact that there are mysterious physiological laws which affect the variableness of woman, and
that sufficient allowance is not made
for this; and he seems to admit that,
while her natural temperament will
always impose a handicap, the handicap can, and should bc, lightened by
the removal of many restrictions
which now exist.
His conclusion is that the way of
Peace is through the annihilation of
the prejudices and pre-conccptions
dealt with in his book, and that
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"Never shall peace and human nature
meet
Till free and equal, man and woman
greet
Domestic peace."
With so much to criticise I am glad
to be able to endorse to thc full the
concluding paragraph of this somewhat remarkable book, and I am satisfied that every reader of this column,
whether he be in favour of FerJ
Suffragism or not, will agree with,
"May  the fates  in  their mercy
leave us Woman, the essential
man, with at least some trace of thj
gifts and attractions that we, as
of Adam,  rejoice  in.    May  Des|
shape her and us in such fashion
we learn to love more and to torn
one another less." <:l
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 16, 1910
EDITORIAL NOTES
NEW LIGHT
The Colonist was not very haply in its reference to the introduction of electric lighting in the an-
lient city of Tarsus, surmising
Ihat, i'f Sanl ever revisits his
lirthplace he will see a new light."
fhe writer appears to forget that
f anl had an experience with a
light which makes electricity clul-
?r than "a farthing clip."
lUNDAY'S HEAT
It is all very well to make fun
|f Mr. Napier Dcnison's "apex"
Ir "peak" of high temperature,
Jut there is no doubt that in his
Icmark he hit the nail exactly on
lhe head. It was the duration of
lie heat whicii made it so unbear-
|ble. It is a rare thing for Vic-
pria to experience a hot night, but
■Sunday night was hot, right up to
If onday morning, ancl in all pro-
lability established a record for
Ihin night-wear.
[HE FIRE CHIEF
The Fire Chief may be a little
Jheatrieal in his methods but that
Is permissible in an officer who
lenders such effective ancl successful service. After all, it is the
Ind which justifies the means, ancl
It is far better that the public
Ihould be temporarily inconveni-
Inced by the stoppage of traffic
Ind the clearance of thoroughfares
Jhan that there should be a mo-
lient's delay in reaching the scene
If a conflagration.
KN ICONQCLAST
The Mayor of Victoria is cul-
jvating his destructive faculty.
If liis penchant took the harmless
Ioitti of Mr. Gladstone's hobby,
lhe chopping down of trees, no
Ine would complain. But, to at-
lack a clock with an axe, as de-
liicted in the Times' cartoon of
|rhursday, is carrying matters a
ittle too far—even for a reformer.
Jft was rather a subtle touch of the
lirtist to introduce an axe as the
Iveapon of destruction. If there
liad been a "grindstone" near by
rhe idea would have been perfect.
peg crew at Henley, especially as
their style had been so severely
criticised by probably the greatest
living authority, Guy J. Nickalls,
the winner of the Diamond Sculls,
and for many years the best amateur oarsman in England. It will
set the English oarsmen thinking.
In connection with sport it is not
out of place to mention the brilliant shooting at Bisley of Mc-
Harg and Richardson, the B. C.
champions, who have literally
covered themselves with glory. It
is interesting to note that they
both made "possibles" and also
tied at several distances.
MILK INSPECTION
It is several years since The
Week exposed the defective system of milk inspection in Victoria,
or rather the defective by-laws
whicii prevented the inspection
from being effective. The report
of Mr. Thomas Lancaster, Sanitary Inspector, should receive immediate attention, as there is little
doubt that the bulk of the milk
sold here is first of all deprived
of its best elements, ancl then adulterated with more or less harmful
substitutes. This is a serious matter, affecting the public health,
ancl the City Solicitor cannot get
busy on a new by-law too soon.
VULNERABLE
The Times has very well pointed out that when ex-President
Roosevelt undertook to lecture the
English Government, he was laying himself wide-open to an easy
and obvious retort. His remarks
at tlie Guildhall were in very bad
taste, but the proverbial courtesy
of Englishmen to their guests prevented that outspoken criticism
which was well deserved. It has
remained, however, for a judge of
one of the United States Courts
to collate and publish statistics
whicli clearly prove the assertion
that "unpunished crime is the
greatest, menace to American society." Another case of the mote
and the beam.
SIR WILFRID'S ERRAND
It is amusing to read the per-
Isistent charge of the Conservative
lpress tliat Sir Wilfrid's AVestern
Jpilgrimagc is a political one, ancl
■the equally strenuous asseveration
lof the Liberal press that he is
■simply taking a trip for the bene-
lfit of his health. In this connection The AVeek is reminded of the
■eminent colleague of Sir AVilfrid
■who once ventured the opinion
[that "elections arc not won by
Jprayers." Sir AVilfrid, no doubt,
[believes that they arc to a great.
|extent won by "smiles," sunny and
■otherwise.
Ithe dust problem
The report of the City Engineer
Jon the Dust Problem shows that
lhe has spared no pains in collect-
ling all tlie information available.
|lf the experiments he suggests are
carefully carried out the nuisance
Iwill at least bo abated.    In this
connection the thanks of the public
lire due to the Engineer for the
Jalleviation afforded to residents at
■the lower end of Rockland Avenue.   The AVeek would point out
that unless the paved streets are
Constantly watered and swept, the
midden   gusts   of   wind,   whicii
Ipring up, especially in the afternoon, will find plenty of dust to
llistributc.
■vTHLETIC PROWRESS
Every    Canadian    should    be
liroud of the success of thc Winni-
A FINE BOOKLET
To much praise cannot be given
to all concerned in the production
of the latest booklet issued by the
A^ancouvor Island Development
League. The compiler has produced by far the most exhaustive
treatise on the subject whicii has
yet appeared. The book deals with
A^ancouver Island, mainly from
the standpoint of the tourist and
pleasure seeker, but incidentally
manages to throw a strong sidelight, on the profitable industries
of the Tsland. The illustrations
are excellent and the topography
equal to anything which has yet
conic from the Colonist presses.
Presumably, 'Air. McGaffey, the indefatigable secretary of thc
League, has had a finger in the
pie, although his modesty prevents him from saying so.
per, and the copies are not those
given in the book. AVith all respect to the authorities this would
seem to impose a useless and unnecessary expense on the parents.
AN ICE CROP
The manager of the Golden Star
has called the attention of The
AVeek to an article whicii is furnished by the American Type-
Foundry Company through its
AArestern agents, the Toronto Type-
Foundry Company of AVinnipeg.
This article appears in the "patent
inside" supplied to numerous up-
country papers. The title is
"Storing the Ice Crop," and premises that it is calculated to convey the impression that after all
Canada is "Our Lady of the
Snows," and ice is the principal
crop. The AVeek sympathises
with its contemporary. These
"patent inside" are an abomination, even if in some cases they
are a necessary evil, ancl it must
be admitted that the American
Type-Foundry Company has
adopted a very subtle method of
chilling the enthusiasm of would-
be American emigrants to AVestern
Canada in the case under consideration.
A COMPLAINT
The parents of several children
attending the Central School have
complained to The AVeek that a
certain teacher is in the habit of
purchasing books at the secondhand book exchange on Fort,
Street, and re-selling them to the
children in her class. In the opinion of The AVeek this should not be
icrmittod. Whilst registering complaints wc may mention another.
The children at the Central School
are compelled to purchase a drawing-book, "Blair's Canadian Drawing Scries," but the book is only
used as a folder; all the drawing
being done on loose sheets of pa-
SOME SCHOOL TEACHERS
A few months ago The AVeek
called attention to very improper
proceedings on the part of two
teachers in Victoria Schools. In
the one case an impertinent remark was addressed to a parent
in a badly written, ungrammatical
letter, written on a filthy piece of
paper. As the teacher 'in question has been a constant offender,
she has since been dropped from
the staff. In another case complaint was made of an improper
remark written by a teacher on
one of the term reports. In consequence of thc publicity given to
this in The AVeek, the teacher retained the original ancl issued a
substituted report; surely au improper proceeding in any event,
the object, obviously being to conceal the original observation. This
substituted report is imperfect, as
it contains no entry for March or
tTune, ancl incomplete entries for
January and May. The parent returned it with a polite enquiry:
"AVhat is the reason for "Willie
having a new report?" But this
enquiry elicited no reply. The report in question now lies before
The AATeek. It, is headed "Victoria
Boys' Central Public School, Intermediate Grade," and it is signed by two teachers, the explanation being that one was a substitute during the temporary absence
of the other. The AVeek forbears
to publish the names of the teachers lest any injustice should be
done, but the matter certainly calls
for some attention, and the report
has been forwarded to the Chairman of the Board of Trustees.
An Enterprising Firm
The enterprising Real Estate (inn
of Alvo von Alvensleben, Ltd.. of
Vancouver, have opened a branch office at Xo. im Government street,
Victoria, and will bc conducting business on a large scale in a few days.
This well known linn control large
holdings in the Portland Canal District and it looks well for Victoria
from a business point of view that a
firm of such well known standing arc
recognizing thc future possibilities of
the city by opening a branch office
here. The staff consists nf Messrs.
VV. M. Spalding and R. P. Wilmot.
Mr. Spalding has been associated with
Messrs. J. II. Todd & Sons for the
past four years. Mr. Wilmot was
connected with Messrs. Radiger &
Janion, Ltd., of Victoria ancl Vancouver. They are both well-known
A;ictorians, enterprising and energetic
men. The intention of thc linn is to
specialize in outside island properties,
of which thc linn is a large holder,
lust the Cool Drink Campers
Appreciate
Armour's Grape Juice, per bottle, soc and  30c
E. D. Smith's Grape   Juice, bottle 30c
Monteserrat Lime Juice Cordial, bottle, 75c and 40c
Rowat's Lime Juice Cordial, bottle 40c and 25c, per decanter. ..35c
Ross' Royal Lime Juice, bottle  50c
Stower's Lime Juice, bottle  35c
Fruit Syrups, bottle, 50c, 25c and 15c
Raspberry Vinegar, bottle, 35c and  20c
Hire's Root Beer, bottle   _c
Globe Root Beer, bottle  ioc
Persian Sherbet, per tin   25c
Eiffel Tower Lemonade, tin  25c
DIXI H. ROSS 4, CO.
Independent Grocers and Wine Merchants
Tels.: 50, 51. 5-» and 1590 1317 GoYernment Street
AEROPLANE AGAIN
Who says that Victorians will never have the power
to fly? A successful friend of ours has so far solved the
problem as to be able, with the greatest ease, to "skim
over" "The Week" to look for the Pither and Leiser
ads.
Tllis Aeroplane friend of ours is particularly interested in our 'Mumm" ads. Lest he forgets wc
would again call his attention to the fact that the
alcohol in G. H. Mumm & Co.'s Selected Brut is not
added as in other so-called "brut" wines,—it is the
natural alcohol of the selected grapes from which it
is produced, therefore Selected Brut is a brut champagne of the very highest quality. The most critical
palates ancl delicate digestions can use G. II. Mumm's
Selected Brut and Extra Dry without fear of any
unpleasant after effects; they are absolutely pure
champagnes without heaviness. Pither ancl Leiser,
Sole Agents for B.C., \Tictoria, Vancouver, Kelson.
GIGANTIC   SALE   OF
Pongee Silks
IN ALL GRADES AND COLORS
Owing to the fact that we have the largest stock of Silks in
the Dominion and buy direct ourselves, we can give Special Sale
Prices never before heard of.   Here they are—
 25c
 35c
Regular price per yard, 50c
JULY SALE PRICE
Regular price per yard, 65c
JULY SALE PRICE
Other Grades are Reduced Proportionately
Open 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Oriental Importing Co.
510 CORMORANT STREET   -
-   OPP. E. & N. DEPOT
possessing valuable acreage in Sooke,
Esquimalt, Saanich, Alberni Districts
and Islands in the Gulf. Being closely in touch with mining and town-
site affairs in the Portland Canal District, they will he enabled to offer
their Victoria clients splendid purchases in this locality.
She la very liberal In ber charities,"
snld 0110 woman.
"Yes," answered tlio other; "liberal,
but not always practical. For instance,
slie wanted to send alarm clocks to
Africa to aid sufferers from the sleeping sickness. THE WEEK,  SATUEDAY, JULY 16, 1910
Dominion and Provincial News
Licenses Cancelled
It is reported on good authority
that all three liquor licenses at Marysville, the one at Wattsburg and the
one at Jaffray have been cancelled.
To Restore Horse Racing
A bill is to be presented to thc
next legislature for the restoration of
horse racing in Missouri according to
John D. Knapp of St. Louis, in a communication to the secretary of state.
G. T. P. Progress
Two thousand people cheered thc
arrival at Edmonton of the first train
of the regular daily service on the
Grand Trunk Pacific when it pulled
into the C. N. R. station sharp on
time at 8.15 o'clock. Mayor Lee delivered an address from the top of
a bus, but there was no formal celebration.
from thc junctional point at the
head of the Coldwater. Over two
thousand men are now at work in
the vicinity of Tulameen pushing construction of the road across the Hope
mountains. They are making splendid progress and the V. V. & E. will
be in operation into Vancouver before many months have passed.
Albany  Does  Not Prohibit
Corporation Counsel Arthur L. Andrews today advised Mayor James B.
McEwan that moving picture exhibitions cannot be prohibited in Albany
unless in his opinion they were of a
"lewd or immoral nature." The
opinion followed the filings of protests with the mayor against the exhibition in Albany of the moving pictures of the Jeffries-Johnson fight.
Doukhobors Trekking
Fifty covered wagons, containing
400 Doukhobors, passed through
Yorkton, Sask., last Monday, en route
from the villages forty miles north
for British Columbia. Peter Vere-
gin, seer of the community, led the
procession with a four-horse team,
and in his wagon were two harpists
playing and singing hymns. The
party took the C. P. R- at Broadview for their destination.
Another Big Fish
A gentleman fishing at Lake Min-
newanka last Monday hooked a very
large trout which gave him lots of
sport. He played it for an hour and
a half, but as he had no gaff he could
not land it. The fish towed him more
than a mile down the lake into the
bay at the far end, and in thc shallow water its career was ended with
a club. The weight of the fish could
not be ascertained as it greatly exceeded the capacity of the scale
(25-lb.j at the lake.
Big Excursion to England
Over 500 men, women and children
of British birth or descent left the
Union station on July 6 on a ten-
coach Canadian Pacific Railway excursion train this morning en route
to England and 200 more will join
them at Montreal.
It is said to be the biggest excursion party ever taken out of Canada
to cross the Atlantic. Each member
of the party has pledged himself or
herself to induce at least one Briton
to come to Canada. Mayor Geary
bade them bon voyage, for the trip
is under the auspices of the Sons of
England, and the Mayor is one of the
most prominent members of the order
in Toronto.
Line From Boundary to Pincher
Creek
A deputation of New York capitalists waited upon Premier Sifton at
the Government offices, Edmonton,
last week, to ask assistance to a line
north from the international boundary
to Pincher Creek.
The Premier, while he discussed the
project, stated that owing to the unsettled condition of the province at
the present time, politically, he did
not wish to give any promises nor
was he in a position to discuss assistance to any railway project.
Capitalists behind the road are understood to have large connections,
and stated that their project is bigger than at present outlined to the
public.
Action by Tex Rickard
Tex Rickards announces that he
will start suit against Governor Gil-
let next week in an attempt to recover $30,000 which he claims he lost banking laws
on preparations to hold the Jeffries-
Johnson fight in California. Rickard
will base his rights on the claim that
thc governor told him at one time
there would be 110 interference with
the proposed fight, and later, after
work had been started on the arena
and other preparations made, called
out the militia to prevent it.
Mr. Arthur P. Heinze
Mr. Arthur P. Heinze, brother of
Fritz Augustus Heinze, the noted
financier and copper man, who was
associated with Fritz in his famous
banking and brokerage exploits in
New York a year or two ago, must
go to gaol for ten days.
The United States Circuit Court of
Appeals has affirmed the sentence
passed by Judge Ray on Heinze after his conviction in June, 1909, on
an indicement, charging him with obstructing the progress of justice by
the mutilation and removal of books.
United States Distriot Attorney Wise
said he was unable to complete thc
Government's case against Fritz Augustus Heinze, who was acquitted on
charges    of violating    the    National
The Salmon Run
The  run   of  salmon   seems
getting better  every
to be
clay ancl consequently there arc more fishermen
daily getting into thc business. When
the six o'clock gun was fired last
evening there were dozens of nets
thrown into the river and the Fraser
below the bridge presented thc busiest
scene it has done this year. The
catch of most of the fishermen was
very fair. Some spring salmon are
caught and some sockeyes, and an
unusually large number of sturgeon
are finding their way into the nets
for this time of the year.
Railway Activity in Nicola Valley
Jim Hill and thc V. V. & E. will
be in Merrit within twelve months,
according to thc News. It is understood on the  best of authority that
The Prize Fight
Along with the New York American, thc Winnipeg Tribune notes approvingly with regard to the prizefight a sentiment of "Disgust that so
base an interest should havc pre-oc-
cupied the thoughts of multitudes ancl
monopolized the organs of publicity,
to the exclusion of thc things that
arc fit to concern a nation."
In the same issue the Tribune deplores the silence and indifference of
a great section of the electorate in
thc present campaign.
Strange to say, the Tribune's feelings of disgust did not prevent the
monopolizing of its own columns by
detailed reports of the fight, and by
floods of comment by every Tom,
Dick and Harry that ever stepped into
the ring, to the exclusion of the things
that are fit to concern a nation. And
neither at thc time of the prize-fight
nor now do wc seem to discern any
effort to combat that wonderful silence and indifference to one of the
most interesting and important election campaigns ever waged in Manitoba which envelops the Tribune's
editorial columns. But perhaps the
election of a government is not, in
the   Tribune's   eyes,   one   of   those
Popular "Corpses"
Great excitement prevailed in Cambridge when six undergraduates of
Emmanuel College were given a mock
funeral,, consequent on their being
sent down for misbehaviour in connection with a "bump" supper. Some
hundreds of undergraduates and
townspeople took part in the demonstration, the undergraduates being
decked out in every variety of grotesque funeral garb. Some, wearing
evening dress and tall hats, rode in
crape-draped cabs, and others were
mounted on horseback, whilst a great
crowd followed afoot, including a detachment of Territorials, with arms
reversed. The "corpses" were loudly
cheered as their train departed.
Cabinet Change
The King has approved the ap-
po'ntment of Earl Beauchamp, K. C.
M. G., to be Lord President of the
Council in the place of Viscount Wolverhampton, who has resigned on the
ground of ill-health. It has been
known for some time past that Lord
Wolverhampton desired, owing to increasing infirmity and ill-health, • to
be relieved of the position, and his
resignation therefore created no surprise in political and Parliamentary
circles.
Lord Wolverhampton received the
honour of a peerage in 1908; before
that he was known to a very large
public as Sir Hy. Fowler. He was
under-secretary for the Home Department from 1884-1885, and in the following year Secretary to the Treasury. From 1892-1894 he was President of the Local Government Board,
and from 1894-1895 Secretary of State
for India. He was Chancellor of the
Duchy of Lancaster from 1905-1908,
in which year he was appointed Lord
President of the Council. For 28
years, 1880 to 1908, he was M. P. for
East Wolverhampton. |
"Absolute Fictions."
Dr. Moule, Bishop of Durham, who
for two years was honorary chaplain
to Queen Victoria, and in 1901 became a chaplain-in-ordinary to King
Edward VII, spoke also upon the
character of King George at a meeting of past and present students of
St. Hilda's training College for
Schoolmistresses. Dr. Moule said if
he wished to single out one of thc
characteristics of King George V., it
would be that he was a tremendously
conscientious doer of daily work.
Very often they heard the breath of
slander against people who occupied
prominent positions, and there were
two respects in which King George
had been slandered. One statement
made was that he was not always
temperate in his drinking, and the
other was that he was secretly married to a lady not of Royal rank,
and that his marriage with Queen
Mary was therefore not legal. He
wished to say with absolute confidence from an absolute knowledge
that both these slanders were absolute fictions. King George was severely and strictly temperate in his
habits. To say otherwise was a lie,
and a lie that ought to be nailed to
the counter. The slander as to his
supposed marriage was also unfounded.
P. Leonard James, A.R, A,LCI
Architect
1006 GOVERNMENT STREET
Phone No. 269
the  railway  magnate  has  made  up
his  mind  to  get  in  touch  with  the I things that are fit to concern a news
coal fields of Nicola and run a spur  paper or a  nation.
Refuses to Accept Malta Command.
As exclusively announced in "Thc
People" last Sunday, Lord Kitchener
has declined the Malta Command.
The admission was made in the
House of Commons by the Minister
for War in reply to a question. Mr.
Haldane said: "To my great regret,
Lord Kitchener has informed me that
he does not now desire to take up
his appointment to the Mediterranean Command. The Government,
however, consider the appointment of
much importance in connection with
recent and prospective developments,
and they propose to continue it. The
appointment would, however, even in
the hands of Lord Kitchener, have
been the subject of modification and
additions, which I shall be prepared
to state a little later on. I may, however, mention that the duty of inspecting the military forces overseas, except in India, will attach to
this post, the holder of which will
not always be in residence in Malta.
As thc post will be of an exclusively
military character, it will not now
be necessary to retain the title of
High Commissioner in connection
with it."
Links With the Past
Another of London's old taverns is
about to lose its separate existence
ancl be levelled with the dust.
This is the Old Bell Inn, which
stands at the corner of Pall Mall and
St. James's-square, in the very heart
of clubland. The date of erection is
not quite clear, but it is possibly one
of the most ancient hostelries in
London.
It is stated that Nell Gwynne was
in the habit of entertaining her
friends at this house, and that in the
reign of Queen Anne it was one of
the favourite haunts for the wits of
the day.
We know that around thc square
and past this tavern Dr. Johnson
and his young friend Savage wandered a whole night through being
unable to afford a lodging. We know,
further, that close by, at the shop of
Dodsley, the bookseller, Dr. Johnson,
Garrick, and Goldsmith met to discuss the new periodical about to bc
started, which afterwards became
known as "The Rambler."
From the same place was issued
the first volume of the "Annual Register," planned, and for the most
part written, by Burke—a publication
wlv'ch survives to this day. And who
shall say that these, with Pope,
Chesterfield, Horace Walpole, and the
rest of that famous band, did not
make use of this hostelry?
Near to the Old Bell lived Reynolds; in a house opposite died
Gainsborough; and close at hand, in
one of the fine old dwellings, whicii
are now for ever gone, Gay, assisted
by Swift, drafted the first plot of his
"Thc Beggar's Opera."
6000 an Hour
That's how many letters the
MULTIGRAPH can turn out.
Think what that saves you in
printing, and remember that
you cannot detect a letter
written by the Multigraph from
that   written   by  a  typewriter.
Baxter & Johnson
COMPANY, LIMITED
721 Yates St. Phone 730
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
Read the Week
SWEDISH MASSAGE
MEDICAL GYMNASTICS
VIBRATORY TREATMENT
Q. Bjornfelt, S.M.
Phone 1856
821 Fort St.
LICENCE    TO    AN    EXTRA-PROVINl
CIAL COMPANY
"Companies Act,  1897"
Canada:
Provinee of British Columbia,
No. 593
THIS IS TO CERTIFY tliat "Boulterl
Waugii & Co., Limited," is authorised
and licensed to carry on business wl thill
the Province of British Columbia, anf
to carry out or effect all or any of till
objects of the Company to which tin]
Legislative authority of the LeglslaturJ
of  British  Columbia  extends.
The head ofllce of the Company i.J
situate at the City of Montreal, in till
Province of Quebec.
The amount of the capital of till
Company is live hundred thousand doll
lars, divided into flve thousand share*!
of one hundred dollars each.
The head ofllce of the Company ill
tills Province Is situate at 514 Forf
Street, Victoria, and Harold Brucd
Robertson, Solicitor, whose address la
Victoria, B.C., is the attorney for th*
Company.
Given   under   by   Hand   and   Seal   _
Offlce  at  Victoria,   Province  of  Britisli
Columbia,   this   eleventh   day   of   Jun
one thousand nine hundred and ten.
(L.S.) J. P. McLEOD,
Acting Registrar of
Joint Stock Companies!
The objects for whicii this CompanjI
has  been  established  and  licensed  are!
To carry on throughout the Domlnloil
of Canada the business of Importers!
exporters, manufacturers, and dealer]
in Hats, Caps, Garments, Furs and
Wearing Apparel, and as General Furl
rlers, Clothiers and Outfitters, and a.l
dressers and dyers of furs, with powea
to do all business of a like nature oi|
incidental thereto.
jy!6
LICENCE    TO    AN    EXTRA-PROVINl
CIAL   COMPANY
"Companies Act, 1897."
Canada:
Province of British Columbia,
No.   603
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that "Thi
Campbell Manufacturing Company," (Lil
mlted), is authorized and licensed tq
carry on business within the ProvlncJ
of British Columbia, and to carry oui
or effect all or any of tht objects ol
the Company to which the legislative!
authority of the Legislature of Biitlslj
Columbia  extends.
Tlie head office of the Company il
situate at the City of Montreal In th<T
Province  of Quebec.
Tlie amount of the capital of tli<|
Company is seventy-five thousand dolT
iars, divided into seven hundred ana
fifty shares of one hundred dollar^
each.
The head ofllce of the Company in thl.1
Province Is situate at 514 Fort Street!
Victoria, and Harold Bruce Robertson]
Barrlster-at-law, whose address Is 514
Fort Street, Victoria, is the attornej
for   the. Company.
Given under my Hand and Seal ofl
Office at Victoria, Province of Britlshl
Columbia, this twenty-fourth day off
June, one thousand nine hundred and|
ten.
(L.S.) J. P. McLEOD,
Acting Registrar of
Joint Stock  Companies.!
The objects for which this companyl
has been established and licensed are:"
The manufacture and sale of clothing|
and clothing supplies. .
.1y Ifi
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that A.  G.  O'Farrell,
of   London,   England,   occupation   Stock I
Broker, intends to apply for permission I
to    purchase   the   following   described]
lands:—Commencing  at  a  post  planted I
about 9 miles south of the Salmon River I
ford   on   the   Bella   Coola   Ootsa   Lake [
Summer   trall   and   marked   the   N.   W. I
eorner;   thence   east   40   cliains;   thencel
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of commencement.
Located June  21st,  1910.
A. G. O'FARRELI..
jy 16 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE  NOTICE    that    Mrs.   Dorothy 1
O'Farrell, of Dublin, Ireland, occupation
Married   Woman,  intends  to  apply  for J
permission   to   purchase   the   following |
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south end of Takla Lake I
on   the   Bella   Coola   and   Ootsa   Lake
trail   and   marked   the   N.   E.   corner;
thence west 40 chains: thence south 40
chains;  thence  east  40  chains  more or
less   to   Lake;   thence   northerly   along
lake   to   point   of   commencement   and
containing 160 acres more or less.
Located  June  21st.   1910.
MRS. DOROTHY O'FARRELL.
Jy Ifi J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Mrs. Rose O'Far-
rell,  of  London,    England,    occupation
Married  Woman,   Intends   to   apply  for'
permission   to   purchase   the   following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted   about   8   miles   south   of   the I
Salmon  River  ford  on  the  Bella Coola J
and Ootsa Lake summer trail and marked   the   N.  W.   corner;   tiience   east   SO'
chains:  thence south  40  chains;  thencel
west 80 chains; thence north 40 chains |
to point of commencement.
Located June 21st.  1910.
MRS.  ROSE  O'FARRELL,
Jy 16 J. R. Morrison, Agent. I
CANCELLATION   OF   BESERVE
NOTICE ls hereby given that the reserve existing upon the lands embraced]
in   special  Timber  Licences   No.   20289,
situated near Sechelt Inlet,  New Westminster District, is cancelled,  and  thatl
the said lands will be open for location.)
under the provisions  of the  Land Act, T
at midnight on October Uth, 1910.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands|
Lands Department,
Victoria, July  14,  1910.
Jy ie THE WEEK, SATUKDAY, JULY 16, 1910
3NCE    TO    AN    EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANY
"Companies Act,  1897"
)
Canada:
ince of British Columbia,
No.  590
fIS IS TO CERTIFY that "Prince
irt Coal Fields, Limited," is auth-
d and licensed to carry on business
n the Province of British Colum-
and to carry out or effect all or
of the objects of the Company to
h the legislative authority of the
Iature of British Columbia extends,
e head offlce of the Company is
te at the City of Montreal in the
ince of Quebec.
e amount of the capital of the
mny is flve million dollars, divided
fifty thousand shares of one hun-
dollars  each.
e head office of the Company in
Province is situate at the City of
ria,   and   Henry  G.   Lawson,   Soll-
whose address is 908 Government
t, Victoria aforesaid,  is the attor-
for the Company.
fen   under   my   hand   and   seal   of
at   Victoria,   Province   of  British
nbia,  this  sixth  day  of June,  one
land nine hundred and ten.
J. P. McLEOD,
Acting Registrar of
Joint Stock Companies.
_ objects  for which  this Company-
been established and licenced are:
earry on the businesses of colliery
ietors,   mine   owners,   coke   manu-
rers,   coal   dealers,   smelters,   iron
_rs, steel converters, tin plate mak-
iron  founders,  miners, prospectors,
lurgists,  refiners and  manufactur-
)f  oil  and  other  substances   from
minerals   and  other  natural   pro-
i,   powder   manufacturers,   electri-
engineers,    shipbuilders,     ship-
its,  brick  makers,  pulp and paper
facturers,  loggers,   lumber  merch-
manufacturers  of  timber,  timber
_rs,  saw mill owners, cannerymen,
ymen, ship owners, carriers, ware-
imen, merchants, builders, contrae-
farmers,    hotel    and    restaurant
rs  and store keepers,  or  any  one
ore   of  the  said   businesses   from
to   time,   and   to   buy,   sell,   ex-
manipulate, prepare for the market
leal  in  merchandise  of  all  kinds;
search for, prospect, explore, mine,
open, develop and  work  collieries,
i, minerals, quarries, coal, coal oil,
ores, minerals and other deposits',
acquire  by  purchase,   lease,   hire,
very,   license,   location   or   other-
and hold lands, estates, coal lands,
and licenses, deposits of oil and
eum, quartz and placer mines, and
al claims, leases or prospects, min-
mds and mineral rights, collieries,
les,   clay,   timber  lands  or  leases,
r claims or licenses to cut timber,
leases,  surface  rights  and   rights
ay,   water   rights   and   privileges,
lore rights, mills, factories, eleva.-
coke ovens, furnaces for smelting,
ng ores and refining metals, ships,
boats and other vessels, tramways
ailway sidings on property owned
ntrolled  by  the  Company,  or  ad-
:   thereto,   roads,   wharves,   docks,
ial facilities, buildings, machinery,
stock-in-trade   or   other   real   or
ial   pvoperty,   as   may  be  deemed
ible,   and   to   equip,   operate   and
the same, to account, nnd  to  sell,
or otherwise dispose of the snme,
y of them, or any Interest there-
construct, carry out, repair, maln-
mprove,   manage,   work,   control
upei-lnteud any roads, ways, adits,
shafts,   tunnels,   tramways   and
\y   sidings  on  property  owned  or
liled by the Company, nr adjacent
o,  brides,  coaling stations,  reser-
water courses,  aqueducts,  docks,
yes,   terminal   facilities,   furnaces,
ovens,   plant,   engines,   machinery,
factories,   elevators,   warehouses,
steam  vessels  and  bouts,  dweli-
ouses,  buildings, and other works
onveniences  whicii  may  seem  di-
or indirectly conducive to any of
ijects of the Company, and to con-
te to or otherwise aid or take part
y such operations, and to purchase,
or build, and repair,  navigate and
with   ships,   steam   vessels   and
for tlie purposes of the company,
also railway waggons or trucks or
ther rolling stock, and also steam
ther  locomotive  or  motive  power;
treat,  make  merchantable,  trans-*
and   trade    in    coal,     coke,   ores,
ls,   metallic   substances   and   mln-
of every description, and the pro-
thereof,   and   to   trade   In   sullies used In getting, reducing, treat-
>r making merchantable, conl, coke,
metais,  metallic  substances,   mln-
and precious stones or  in manuring  products   therefrom;
lear, manage, farm, cultivate, ir-
:e,   plant,   build   on   or   otherwise
use or  Improve any  land  which,
y  Interest  In  which,   may belong
e company,  and  to deal  with  any
or   other   products   thereof,   and
to  lay  out   into   town   sites,   said
or any parts thereof;
establish,   operate   nnd   maintain,
s,   trading   posts   and   supply   sta*
for the purposes of the company,
the supplying goods  to any of its
oyees  or  tlie  occupiers  of any  of
lands,   or   any   other   persons,   and
bartering  and   dealing  In   tlie  proof mine and forest, nnd tlie ear-
on   of   tlie   general   business   of
rs and merchants!
construct dams, and improve
, streams and lakes, and to divert
hole or part of the water of such
ns and rivers as the purposes of
ompany may require, subject, how-
to the provisions of any Statute
g reference thereto;
construct, equip, maintain, com-
and operate, tram-ways, upon
owned or controlled by the corn-
to use any motive power In Ihe
ition of tlie snme; to take, trans-
and enrry passengers nnd freight
jch tramways, and for tlie purposes
:of, to use, construct nnd equip all
sary works, telephones, telegraphs,
Ings, appliances and conveniences;
rect. construct, operate, nnd main-
compressed air nnd electric works,
• houses, generating plant, and
other appliances and conveniences
re necessary and proper for the
ating of compressed air and elec-
y, and for transmitting the same
used as a motive power for tram-
or other works of the company,
.o be supplied hy tlie company as
tive power for hauling, propelling,
Ing, lighting, hentlng, smelting, r"-
g. milling or drilling or any oilier
tions of nny nature or kind whal-
for which compressed air or
iclty may lie used, supplied, np-
or required, and to produce, use.
lease and dispose of, In any man-
he company may see fit, electric
heat or power. Provided, how-
tliat any supply, distribution or
lisslon of electric, hydraulic, pneu-
or other power or force for the
ses of heat, light or power be-
the  limits  of  the  lands  of  the
company, shnll be subject to local and
municipal control in that behalf;
To contract with any person, body
corporate or politic for supplying compressed all- and electricity or water
power, to any such person, body corporate or politic, or to any streets,
ways, lanes, passages, tramways, mines,
smelters, mills, manufactories, ships,
warehouses, public or private houses,
buildings and places, and from time to
time lay down, carry, lit up, connect
and finish, any cumulative storage battery, cable, wiring, pipes, flume
switches, connections, branch, burner,
lamp, meter, transformer or other apparatus, for or In connection with any
compressed air, water or electric main,
pipe, lead or cable, which for such
purposes may be required, and to let
any such apparatus for hire for such
sum as may be agreed upon;
To acquire, operate and carry on the
business of a power company, subject
to local and municipal regulations in
that behalf;
To undertake any or carry Into effect
all such financial, trading or other operations or businesses in connection with
the objects of the company, as the
company may think fit;
To acquire and carry on all or any
part of the business or property, and
to undertake any liabilities of any person, firm or association or company,
possessed of property suitable for the
purposes of this company, or carrying
on any business which this company Is
authorized to carry on, or which can
be conveniently carried on in connection with the same, or may seem to
the company calculated directly or Indirectly to benefit the company, and,
as the consideration for the same, to
pay cash, or to Issue any shares, stocks
or obligations of this company;
To enter into partnership or Into any
arrangement for sharing profits, union
of interest, co-operation, joint adventure, reciprocal concessions or otherwise, with any person or company, carrying on or engaged in, or about to
carry on or engage in, any business or
transaction which this company is authorized to carry on or engage in, or any
business or transaction capable of being conducted so as directly or indirectly benefit this company, and to lend
money to, guarantee the contracts of,
or otherwise assist any such person or
company, and to take or otherwise acquire shares and securities of any such
company, and to sell, hold, re-issue,
with or wtihout guarantee, or otherwise deal with the same, notwithstanding the provisions of Section 44 of the
said Act;
To sell or dispose of the property of
the company, or any part thereof, for
such consideration as may be deemed
advisable, and in particular for shares,
debentures or securities of any other
company having objects altogether or
in part similar to those of this company;
To promote any eompany or companies for tlie purpose of acquiring all
or any of the property and liabilities
of this company, or for any other purpose whicii may seem directly or indirectly calculoted to benefit this eompany;
To purchase, take on lease or in exchange, hire or otherwise acquire, any
real or personal property, and any
rights and privileges which may be
necessary or convenient for the purposes  of the business  of the company;
To enter into any arrangements witli
any government or any authority, municipal, local or otherwise, that may seem
conducive to the company's objects, or
any of them, and to obtain from any
such government or authority, any
rights, privileges and concessions, which
the company may think It desirable to
obtain, and to carry out, exercise and
comply with, or. if deemed advisable,
dispose of any' such arrangements,
rights, privileges and  concessions',
To obtain any Act of Parliament or
Legislature for enabling the company
to carry any of its objects into effect,
or for any other purpose that may seem
expedient, or to oppose any proceedings or applications which may seem
calculated directly or indirectly to prejudice  the  company's  interests;
Notwithstanding the provisions of
Section 44 of the said Act, to take or
otherwise acquire, hold, vote by Its
duly appointed proxy, sell, pledge or
otherwise dispose of, and deal with the
shares, debentures and other securities
In any other company, having objects
altogether or in part similar to those
of tills company, or carrying on any
business capable of being conducted so
as directly or indirectly, to benefit this
company, and more particularly, but not
so as to limit the foregoing, the debentures and other securities of any railway company, owning or authorized to
construct and operate a railway line or
lines, connecting with any of tho company's properties whereby and over
which the company may ship Its coal
and   other  products',
To endorse, guarantee and secure tho
payment or satisfaction of the bonds,
coupons, mortgages, deeds of trust, debentures, securities, obligations, evidences of Indebtedness and shares of
the capital stock of other corporations,
nnd nlso to guarantee and secure the
payment and satisfaction of dividends
on shares of the capital stock of such
other corporations, provided such other
corporations, fall within the description
of corporations mentioned in the last
preceding section;
To apply for, purchase or otherwise
ucquire any patents of invention, licenses, concessions and the like, conferring any exclusive or non-exclusive
or limited right to use, or nny secret
or other information as to any' invention, which may seem capable of being
used for any of the purposes of tlie
company, or the acquisition of which
may seem calculated directly or Indirectly to benefit the company, and to
use, exercise, develop, or grant licenses
lu respect to, or otherwise turn tn account tlie property, rights or information so acquired;
To purchase, acquire, npply for, resistor, secure, hold, own or sell or otherwise dispose of, any and all copyrights,
trade marks, trade names and distinctive  marks;
To distribute any of the property of
the company among its members in
specie;
To pay out of the funds of the company nil expenses of, or incidental lo
the formation, registration and advertising of tlie company, and to remunerate nny person or company for services rendered or to he rendered in
placing nr assisting to plnce, or the
guaranteeing the placing of any shares
In the Company's capital, or any debentures or other securities of the compnny, nr In nr nbout the formation or
promotion of the company or the conduct of Its business;
To sell, improve, manage, develop, exchange, lease, dispose of. turn to account, or otherwise deal with the undertaking or nil or any part of thc property and rights of the company, with
power to nccept as the consideration,
nov shnres. stocks or obligations of nny
"tl">- company.
Jyi«
GOVERNMENT
AUCTION
SALE
OF
QUESNEL
TOWN LOTS
Notice is hereby given that all vacant
lots in the
Townsite of Quesnel
will be offered for sale at Quesnel by
PUBLIC AUCTION
ON
Monday, Aug. 1
Over one hundred lots will be offered at this sale, the terms of sale
being 25 per cent, cash and the balance in three equal annual instalments with interest at the rate of 6
per cent, per annum.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of  Lands
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., June 27, 1910.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Cadboro Bay School
Sealed Tenders, superscribed "Tender
for School-house," will be received by
the Honourable the Minister of Public
Works up to noon of Monday, the 18th
July, 1910, for the erection and completion of a two-room frame school-
house at Cadboro Bay, Saanich Electoral District.
Plans, specifications, contract, and
forms of tender may be seen on and
after the 8th day of July, 1910, at the
Public Works Department, Victoria,
B. C.
Each proposal must be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque or certlflcate of deposit on a chartered bank of
Canada, made payable to the Honourable the Minister of Public Works, in
a sum of $300, which shall be forfeited
If the party tendering decline to enter
into contract when called upon to do so,
or if he fall to complete the work contracted for. The cheques or certificates
of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers
will be returned to them upon the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the forms supplied, signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed in the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., 5th July, 1910.
jy!)
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Caroline B.
Barnes, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Stenographer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands;—Commencing at a post
planted about 135 chains north of the
northeast cornei* of Lot 347 on the west
bank of the Chilco River (being about
50 chains north of the N. E. corner of
R. B. Webster's application to purchase); thence west 50 chains; thence
south to the north boundary of R. B.
Webster's application to purchase, being
50 chains more or less; thence east 35
chains more or less to the river; thence
following the river bank northerly to
point of commencement and containing
200 acres more or less,
Dated June 4th,  1910.
je 25 CAROLINE B. BARNES.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Annie O'Farrell.
nf Bournemouth, Englnnd, occupntion
Spinster, intends to apply fnr permission to purchase the following described
lnnds:—Commencing at a pnst plnnted
about 5 miles south of the Snlmon
River ford on the Bella Coola nnd Ootsn Lake summer trail and marked the
N.W. corner; thence cast 80 chains;
thence south 40 ehains; thence west so
chains; thence nnrth 40 chains to pnlnt
of commencement.
Located  June   21st.   1910.
ANNIE O'FARRELL,
jy 16 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
"LAND  REGISTRY ACT"
In the matter of an application for a
Duplicate Certificate of Title to
Subdivisions Nos. 3, 53 and 54 of
Section XXV (Richmond Estate)
Victoria District.
NOTICE is hereby given that it is
my intention at the expiration of one
month from the date of the first publication hereof, to issue a Duplicate
Certificate of Title to above land issued
to Robert Paterson Rithet on the 23rd
day of August, 1882, and numbered
4016A.
Land   Registry  Offlce,   Victoria,  B.C.,
the 9th day of June, 1910.
J.  P.  McLEOD,
je 11 Deputy Registrar-General
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Duncan
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Merchant,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner of Lot 336, thence 40
chains north; thence 40 chains east;
thence 40 chains south to the north
boundary of Lot 336; thence west along
the said north boundary of Lot 336
40 chains to point of commencement and
containing 160 acres more or less.
Dated May 30th,  1910.
je25 CHARLES   DUNCAN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Gonzales,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Fisherman, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 80 chains south of the southeast corner of Lot 331; thence 80 chains
north to the south-east corner of Lot
331; thence west 80 chains along the
south boundary of Lot 331; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated  June  lst,   1910.
je25 JOSEPH GONZALES.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Gustav Bram-
well Ehrenborg, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Architect, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the south-west corner
of Lot 333; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, more or less, to
the north-east corner of Lot 333; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
along the north boundary of Lot 334
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, and being Lot 333.
Dated  June  lst,  1910.
GUSTAV BRAMWELL EHRENBORG.
je25
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Frank McGinn,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Clerk, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of Lot 342; thence
80 chains, more or less to the northwest corner of Lot 342; thence south
65.76 chains more or less to the shore
of Eagle Lake; thence following the
said shore to the south-east corner of
Lot 342; thence north 37.92 chains to
the point of commencement containing
412 acres, more or less, and being Lot
342.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je 25 FRANK MCGINN.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
waters of Shoo-wah-tlans and Wood-
worth Lakes, in Range 5, Coast District,
and the waters of all streams flowing
into said lakes, and all streams flowing
therefrom, are reserved, subject to the
rights of existing records only, for the
use of the Crown.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands
Lands Department,
Victoria, B.C., April 29th, 1910.
apr 30
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Burroug
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Burroughs Webster, of Vancouver, B.C.,
occupation Accountant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the west bank of the
Chilco River, about SO chains north of
the northeast corner of 4347; thence
west 40 chains; thence south to the
north boundary of Lot 347 (being 80
chains more or less); thence east along
the north boundary of L. 347 to the
river bank, being 35 chains more or
less; thence following the said river
bank northerly 80 chains more or less
to point of commencement and containing 300 acres more or less.
Dnted  June  4th,   1910.
ROBERT BURROUGHS WEBSTER
je25
PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS
Heating Ollice Annex
Scaled Tenders, superscribed tenders
for "Healing Ollice Annex, Parliament
Buildings," will be received by the Hon.
the Minister nf Public Wnrks up tn
nnnn nf Thursday, the 21st July, for
the Installing of a boating system In
the office annex building, sltunted In
the grounds of the Parliament Buildings,  Victoria.
Drawing, specifications, contract form,
and form nf tender may lie seen nn and
after Wednesday, the nth lnst., at tlie
offlce of the Department of Public
Works,   Parliament   Buildings,   Victoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied
by nn accepted bank cheque nr certlflcate nf deposit on a chartered bnnk
nf Cnnndn, made payable to the Hon.
the Minister nf Public Wnrks, in a sum
of $.100, which shnll be forfeited if the
party tendering decline tn enter Into
contract when called upon to do so, or
when he fulls In complete the work
contracted  for.
The cheques or certificates of deposit
of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them upon the execution of
tlie   contract.
'fenders will nnt be considered unless
made nut on the form supplied, signed
by the nctunl slgnnture nf tlie tenderer,
nnd  enclosed  In  the envelope furnished.
The  lowest  or nny  tender  nnt  neces-
snrlly accepted.
Jyii
F. C. RAMBLE.
Public Works Engineer
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., 5th July, 1910.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Katie Gibson, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Stenographer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west bank of the Chilco River,
about 55 ehains north of where the said
river flows out of Chilco Lake, and being at the north-east corner of R. H.
W. Edmond's application to purchase;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains more or
less to river bank; thence following
the west shore of the river southerly to
point of commencement and containing
640 acres more or less.
Dated June 3rd, 1910.
Je25 KATIE GIBSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that Eva Gunn, wife
of John William Gunn, of Suthwyn,
occupation Tarmer intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land:
Commencing     at     a     post     planted
about 5 chains from the north bank of
Salmon River and beside the south-east
corner   post   of   lot   392   as   surveyed,
thence south 80 chains;  thence west 80
chains;  thence north  80 cliains;  thence
east  SO chains  to this post, containing
640 acres and being lot 393 as surveyed,
which land was located by me on the
14th day of June, 1910.
Dated June 25th, 1910.
EVA GUNN.
jy 2 William Forrest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that John McBeth,
of Parkdale, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described land:—Commencing
at a post planted about 60 chains from
the north bank of the Salmon River
and beside the north-west corner post of
lot 395, as surveyed, thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thenco
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains,
containing 640 acres and being lot 395,
as surveyed, whicii land was located by
me on the llth day of June, 1910.
Dated June 25th,  1910.
JOHN  McBETH.
jy 2 William Forrest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that John William
Gunn, of Suthwyn, occupation Farmer,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about 6
chains from the north bank of the Salmon River and beside the south-east
corner post of lot 392 as surveyed;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains, containing 640 acres, and
being lot 392, as surveyed, which land
was located by me on the 14th day of
June, 1910.
Dated  June   25th,   1910.
JOHN WILLIAM GUNN.
jy 2 William Forrest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that David M. Robinson, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
School Superintendent, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the north-west corner
of Lot 340; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 65.76 chains, more or less, to the
shore of Eagle Lake; thence following
tlie said shore to the south-west corner
of Lot 340; thence north 84.60 chains,
more or less, to the point of commencement, and containing 607 acres, more
or less, and being Lot  340.
Dated  June  2nd,   1910.
je 2-5- DAVID M. ROBINSON.
BRITISH     COLUMBIA      ft     ALASKA
BAILWAY COMPANY
Notice to Stockholders
The  first   general   meeting  of   stockholders will be held at the offlce of the
Company, 514 Fort Street, Victoria, British  Columbia, on July 20th,  1910,  at  2
p.m.,   to   elect   a   permanent   Board   of
Directors   to  consider  the  acts  of   the
provisional   Board,   and   transact   such
other  business   as   may  properly  come
before the meeting.
Dated, Victoria, B.C., June 10th, 1910.
HAROLD B. ROBERTSON,
je 18 Secrptary.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that George Henry
Lawrence Hobson, of Vancouver, B.C.,
occupation Insurance Agent, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted at the south-east corner of Lot 343; thence north 40.04
chains; tiience west 80 chains; thence
south 40.04 ehains to the north-west
comer of Lot 344; thence east SO chains
to point of commencement and containing 320 acres, more or less, and being
Lot 343.
Dated  June  2nd,  1910.
je 25     George Henry Lawrence Hobson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that John Anquetct
Norman, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Gentleman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west bank of Chilco River about
16 chains north of where the Chilco
River flows out of Chilco Lake; thence
west 20 chains; thence south to the low
water mark on the shore of Chilco Lake
being 40 chains (more or less); thence
following the sinuosities of the shore
northerly to point of commencement and
containing 40 acres more or less.
Dated June 3rd,  1910.
je 25 JOHN ANQUETEL NORMAN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Alfred Gonzales,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Fisherman, Intends to npply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing nt a post planted
about SO chains south of the southenst corner of Lot 331; thence SO chains
west; thence SO chnins south; thence 80
chnins east; thence SO chains north to
point of commencement nnd containing
640 acres more or less.
Dated  June  lst,   1910.
Je 25 ALFRED  GONZALES.
.AND REGISTRY ACT
In the matter of an application for a
Duplicate certlflcate of Title to Lot
41,  Victoria West.
NOTICE Is hereby given that it is
my intention nt the expiration of one
month from the date of thc first publl-
cnllon hereof to Issue a Duplicate Certificate of Title to said land Issued to
Charles Pollock on the Sth day of May,
1S09, and numbered 4311.
Land Registry Offlce. Victoria, B.C.,
the 30th day of June.  1910.
J. P. McLEOD,
Jy 9 Deputy Registrar General "'
THE AVEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 16, 1910
CANCELLATION OP RESERVE
NOTICE Is hereby given that the Reserve existing on Crown Lands in the
vicinity of Babine Lake, situate in
Range 5, Coast District, notice of which
was published in the British Columbia
Gazette, dated December 17th, 1908, is
cancelled in so far as said Reserve relates to lots numbered 1519, 1518, 1517,
1516, 1515, 1510, 1507, 1506 1506A, 1503,
1501, 1502, 1512, 1511, 1505, 1504, 1513,
1514, 1509, 1508, 1530, 1527, 1528, 1529,
1531, 1532, 1533, 1534, 1535, 1537, 1539,
1536, 1538, 1540, 1541, 1544, 1543, 1545,
1546, 1542, 1647, 1548, 1549, 1650, 1520,
1521, 1522, 1523, 1524, 1525, 1526 and
1551.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands
Lands Department,
Victoria, B.C., June 16th, 1910.
je 25
CANCELLATION OP RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the Reserve existing on Crown Lands in the
vicinity of Babine Lake, and situate in
Cassiar District, notice of which bearing
date June 30th, 1908, was published in
the British Columbia Gazette, dated July
2nd,  1908, is cancelled.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands
Lands Department,
Victoria, B.C., June 16th, 1910.
je25
MINEBA1 AOT
Form P
Certificate of Improvements
NOTICE
"Jacob"  Mineral  Claim,  situate  in  the
Victoria Mining Division of Renfrew
District.     Where   located—Bugaboo
TAKE NOTICE that I, C. R. Carter,
acting agent for John Bentley, Free
Miner's Certificate No. 45076B, L. N. Anderson, Free Miner's Certificate No.
44913B; Carl Stromgren, Executor, and
H. M. Shore, Executrix of the estate of
Sidney Shore, deceased, Free Miner's
Certificate No. 40864B, Wm. Harrison,
Free Miner's Certificate No. 41007B,
John H. Smith, Free Miner's Certificate
No. 40823B, E. J. Smith, Free Miner's
Certificate No. 450S3B, Elizabeth Berryman, Free Miner's Certificate No. 45066B
and Oliver Snaith, Free Miner's Certificate No. 44938B., intend, sixty days from
the date hereof, to apply to the Mining
Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a
Crown Grant of the above claim.
And further take notice that action,
under section 37, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of  Improvements.
Dated this Sixteenth day of June, A.D.
1910.
je 25 C. R. CARTER.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Reginald Foulkes
Cottrell of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Clerk, intends to appiy for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the south-east corner of Lot 336;
thence north 80 chains; thence west SO
chains; thence south SO chains, more
or less, to the south-west corner of Lot
336; thence east SO chains to point of
commencement, and containing 606 acres
of land, more or less, and being Lot 336.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je    REGINALD  FOULKES COTTRELL
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that John Atkinson,
of St. Marks, occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 5 chains
north of the Salmon River and about
3S chains south from the north-west
corner post of lot 396 as surveyed on
the west boundary line of said lot 396;
thence south SO chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north SO chains; thence
east 80 chains; whicii land was located
by me on the llth day of June, 1910,
containing 640 acres.
Dated June 25th, 1910.
JOHN  ATKINSON,
jy 2 William Forrest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Richards
Brown, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Accountant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 6 chains south of the confluence
of Lingfield Creek and the Chilco River
on the west bank of the Chilco River,
being about one and one-half miles north
of the N. E. corner of W. R. Blind's
application to purchase: thence west 80
chains; thence north SO chains: thence
east SO chains more or less to the west
shore of the Chilco River; thence follow the snid shore southerly to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
Dated June 3rd. 1910.
je 25     CHARLES RICHARDS BROWN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that John Simons, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Accountant,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—•
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner of Lot 343; thence N. SO
chains; thence W. SO chains; thence S.
80 chains to the N. W. corner of Lot
343; thence E. along the north boun-
dary of Lot 343 eighty chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated May 30th, 1910.
je 25 JOHN SIMONS.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast. Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that Tena Blanchard,
wife of Charles Hnllburton Blanchard.
of Lydiatt, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing
nt a post planted about 70 chains north
of the Salmon River and beside the
north-west corner post of lot 391, as
surveyed: thence south SO chains; thence
east 40 chains; thence north 80 chains;
tiience west 40 chains, nnd being lot
391 ns surveyed, which lnnd was located
by me on the 14th dny of June, 1910,
aiid contains 320 acres.
Dated   June   25th,   1910.
TENA BLANCHARD.
jy 2 William Forrest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that (Mrs.) Sarah
Catherine Coles, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Married Woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at
a post planted at the south-east corner
of Lot 345 on the shore of Eagle Lake;
thence north 44.23 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 99.57 chains,
more or less, to the north shore of Eagle
Lake; thence following the said shore in
an easterly direction to point of commencement, and containing 568 acres,
more or less, and being Lot 345.
Dated June 2nd,  1910.
(MRS.) SARAH CATHERINE COLES
je 25
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that William R. Blind,
of Vancouver, B.C., Real Estate Agent,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of the Chilco River about 135
chains north from where the said river
Hows out of Chilco Lake (being at or
near the N. E. corner of Katie Gibson's
application to purchase; thence 80 chains
west; thence 80 chains north; thence 80
chains east more or less to river bank;
thence following the west shore of river
southerly to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated June 3rd, 1910.
je  25 WILLIAM R.  BLIND.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Gibson, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner of Lot 337 and the
south-east corner of Lot 334; thence
80 chains west along the south boundary of Lot 334; thence south 60 chains;
thence east to the shore of Eagle Lake;
thence following the shore of Eagle
Lake In a northerly and easterly direction to the south-west corner of Lot
337; thence north 45.49 chains, more or
less, to point of commencement, and
containing 400 acres, more or less.
Dated June 2nd,  1910.
je 25 JOSEPH   GIBSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that David Blair of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Architect,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of Lot 328; thence west
40 chains to the north-west corner of
Lot 328; thence south 40 chains to tne
south-west corner of Lot 328; thence
west 40 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 480 acres,
more or less.
Dated May 31st, 1910.
je 26 DAVID BLAIR.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Stanley Street,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner of Lot 332; thence
north 80 chains; thence west SO chains
to the north-west corner of Lot 332,
(being the north-east corner of Lot
217); thence south along the east boundary of Lot 217 eighty chains to the
south-west corner of Lot 332; thence
east SO chains, more or less, to point
of commencement, (excepting any part
of Lot 332 that may not be at present
Crown lands), and containing 600 acres,
more or less, and being Lot 332.
Dated June lst, 1910.
je 25 STANLEY STREET.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Edward Arthur
Morris, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Tobacconist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a. post
planted at the south-west corner of Lot
335; thence east 80 chains; thence north
SO chains more or less along the west
boundary of Lot 336 to the north-east
boundary of Lot 335; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 520
acres of land more or less and being
Lot 335.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je 25     EDWARD ARTHUR MORRIS.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Mary Gibson, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Stenographer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about SO chains south of the south-east
corner of Lot 331; thence 80 chains east;
tiience SO chains east; thence SO chains
south; thence SO chains west; thence 80
chains north to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated June lst, 1910.
Ie 25 MARY GIBSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Fred Gibson, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner of Lot 332. thence 40
chnins west to the north-west corner of
lot 217; thence 40 chains south', thence
10 chnins west; thence SO chains north;
thence SO chains east to point of commencement and containing 480 acres,
more or less.
Dated Jue lst,  1910.
je FRED GIBSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Maurice Gintz-
burger, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Real Estate Agent, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the north-east corner of Lot
331, thence SO chains east; thence SO
chnins south; thence SO chains west to
the south-east corner of Lot 331; thence
SO ehnlns north along the east boundary
of said Lot 331 to point of commencement, and containing 6*10 acres, more or
less.
Dated June lst.  1910.
je  25 MAURICE  GINTZBURGER.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast. Rnnge 2
TAKE NOTICE thnt John Charles
Thurston Crofts of Vancouver, occupation Cvlil Engineer, Intends to anply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted nt the south-west corner of
Lot 339; thence enst SO chains; thence
north SO chnins; tiience west SO chains;
thenoe south SO chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, being Lot  339.
Dated June 2nd. 1910.
je 25     John Charlei Thnrtton Crofts.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that James Ross, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation, Accountant,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of the Chilco River, about '_.
miles northerly from the confluence of
Lingfield Creek with the Chilco River
and about one mile northerly from the
N.E. corner of Chas. R. Brown's application to purchase; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains more or
less to the north boundary of Chas. R.
Brown's application to purchase; thence
east 80 chains more or less along the
north boundary of Brown's application
to purchase to the Chilco River; thence
following the west bank of the Chilco
River northerly to point of commencement, and containing 040 acres more or
Dated June 4th, 1910.
je 25 JAMES ROSS.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that George William
Hobson, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Insurance Agent, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the south-east corner of Lot 334,
thence north 19.53 chains to the southeast corner of Lot 343; thence east along
the south boundary of Lot 343 eighty
chains to the east boundary of Lot 341;
thence south along the eastern boundaries of Lots 341 and 342 to the shore
of Eagle Lake; thence following the said
shore northerly and easterly to point
of commencement, and containing 396
aeres, and being Lot 344.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je 25        GEORGE WILLIAM HOBSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Jonathan Rogers,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Contractor, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner of Lot 347; thence
east 61.40 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 90.91 chains to the
bank of Chilco River; thence following
the river bank southerly to point of
commencement and containing 588 acres,
more or less, and being Lot 347.
Dated June 2nd,  1910.
je25 JONATHAN   ROGERS.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE tliat George William
Coles, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the south-east corner of Lot 346;
thence north SO chains; thence west SO
chains; thence south 80 chains', thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 492 acres of land
and being Lot 346.
Dated June 2nd,  1910.
je25        GEORGE WILLIAM COLES.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Cecil Croker
Fox, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Architect, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the south-east corner of Lot 334;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south SO chains, more or
less, to the south-west corner of Lot
334; thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640 acres
and being Lot 334.
Dated June  2nd,  1910.
je25 CECIL   CROKER   FOX.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Harlow
W. Edmond, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation, Gentleman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the west bank of the Chilco
River about 55 chains north of where
the said river flows out of Chilco Lake;
thence west 20 ehains; thence south 40
chains more or less to the north boundary of John A. Norman's application
to purchase; thence following the said
north boundary in an easterly direction
to low water of the river a distance of
1.0 chains more or less; thence following the west shore of the river northerly to point of commencement and containing 40 acres more or less.
Dated June 3rd, 1910.
je5      ROBERT HARLOW W. EDMOND
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that William Ralph
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Merchant,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of Lot 348; thence
south SO chains; thence west 49.61
chains to the shore of Eagle Lake;
thence following the said shore northerly to the south boundary of Lot 346;
thence following the said boundary east
53.15 chains to point of commencement
and containing 46S acres and being Lot
34S.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je25 WILLIAM RALPH.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that George Phillip
Carr, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Postman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted nt the intersection of the N. W.
corner of L. 330 and the east boundary
of Charles Skinner's pre-emption (Lot
329); thence north 40 chains more or
less to the north-east corner of said
pre-emption; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chnins; thence east 40
chains; thence south 80 chains to the
north-east corner of L. 330; thence
west SO chains more or less along the
north boundary of said Lot 330 to point
of commencement and containing 480
acres  more or less.
Dated May 31st, 1910.
je 25 GGEORGE PHILIP CARR.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that John David
Breese, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Insurance Agent, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-west corner of Lot
330 on the shore of Cochin Lake; thence
east along the north boundary of Lot
331, 53.SS chains; thence north SO
chnins to the north-east corner of Lot
330; thence west to the east boundary
nf Chnrles Skinner's pre-emption (Lot
No. 329); thence south along the said
boundarv 27.01 chnins to the shore of
Cochin Lake; thence following the said
shore southerly and easterly to point of
commencement and containing 559 acres
nnd being Lot 330.
Dated May 31st. 1910.
je 25 JOHN  DAVID BREESE.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
'    District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Joseph
Sharp, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following describea
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 80 chains south of the southeast
corner of Lot 331 and adjoining Mary
Gibson's, Joseph Gonzales' and Alfred
Gonzales' locations; thence SO chains
north to the southeast corner of Lot
331; thence 80 chains east; thence 80
chains south; thence 80 chains west to
point of commencement, and containing
640  acres  more or less.
Dated June  lst,  1910.
je25 HENRY   JOSEPH   SHARP.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that Alexander Good,
of St. James, occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
one chain west of the trail which runs
along the east bank of the Salmon
River, known as the Ootsa Lake Trail
from Anaham Lake, said post being
about 15 chains north-west from an
oblong lake (partly meadow) on the
east side of the said trail and said post
being nearly equidistant between lots
surveyed respectively as Lots 3S7 and
38S and said post being William Setter's
north-west corner post and William
Brown's south-west corner post, which
land was located June 13th, 1910, and
contains 640 acres.
Dated   June   25th,   1910.
ALEXANDER GOOD.
jy 2 William Forrest. Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick Hems-
ley Shanks, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Secretary, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the northeast corner of Lot
345; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 40 chains
to the north-west corner of Lot 345;
thence along the north boundary of Lot
345 eighty chains to point of commencement, and containing 320 acres, more
or  less.
Dated   May   30th,- 1910.
je 25 FREDERICK HEMSLEY SHANKS
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur W. Jarvis
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Bank
Manager, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the north-west corner of Lot 337;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 78.38
chains along the north boundary of Lot
338 to the shore of Eagle Lake; thence
following the said shore in a westerly
direction to the south-west corner ot
Lot 337; thence north 45.49 chains to
the point of commencement, and containing 462  acres and being Lot 337.
Dated  June  2nd,  1910.
je25 ARTHUR   W.   JARVIS.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that Annie McBeth,
wife of John McBeth, of Parkdale, occupation Farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 65 chains north of the
Salmon River, and beside the northeast corner of lot 396 as surveyed;
thence west SO chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north SO chains, containing 640 acres,
and being lot 396 as surveyed, which
land was located by me on the 14th
day of June, 1910.
Dated  June   25th,   1910.
ANNIE McBETH.
jy2 William Forrest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Hillman
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Florist,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner of Lot 331 on the
shore of Cochin Lake; thence east 53.SS
chains along the north boundary of
Lot 331 and the south boundary of Lot
330 to the north-east corner of Lot 331;
thence south SO chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 53.91 chains, more
or less, to the shore of Cochin Lake*,
thence following the shore of Cochin
Lake in a north-easterly direction to
point of commencement and containing
5S2.S acres, and being Lot 331.
Dated  May  31st,  1910.
je25 CHARLES  HILLMAN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Alexander Mo-
gee, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Gentleman, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west bank of the Chilco River
about two and one-half miles north of
the north-east corner of Lot 347; thence
west 50 chains; thence south SO chains,
thence east to the river, being 35 chains
more or less; thence following the said
river in a northerly direction to point
of commencement and containing 300
acres more or less.
Dated June 4th. 1910.
je25 ALEXANDER  MOGEE.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that William Brown,
of Headingly, occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands: Commencing at a post planted about one
chain west of the trall which runs along
the east bank of the Salmon River,
known as the Ootsa Lake trail, from
Anaham Lnke, said post being about 15
chains north-west from an oblong lake
(partly meadow) on the east side of
the said trail and said post being nearly equidistant between lots surveyed
respectively as lots 387 and 38S, and
said post being AVIlllam Setter's northwest corner post and Alexander Good's
south-east corner post which land was
located June 13th, 1910, and contains
640 acres.
Dated   June   25th,   1910.
WILLIAM BROWN,
jy 2 WlUiam Forrest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that George Munro,
of Winnipeg, occupation Banker, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands: Commencing at a post planted about flve
chains north of the Salmon River and
beside the south-east corner post of Lot
392 as surveyed, thence north along
the east boundary line of Lot 392 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 80 chains: thence west 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains to said post,
containing 320 acres, which land was
located by me June 14th, 1910.
Dated June 25th, 1910.
GEORGE MUNRO.
jy 2 William Forrest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Prances Dul
of Vancouver, occupation Stepograjf
intends to apply for permission to I
chase the following described land
Commencing at a post planted atl
southeast corner of Lot 330; thenci
chains east; thence SO chains nol
thence 80 chains west to the northl
corner of Lot 330; thence 80 clf
south along the east boundary of 1
Lot 330 to point of commencement^
containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated   June   lst,   1910.
je25 PRANCES  DUNLC
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Colin C. Mc|
nan, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation!
tel Clerk, intends to apply for perf
sion to purchase the following]
scribed lands:—Commencing at a
planted at the south-east corner ofl
341; thence north 80 chains, morf
less, to the north-east corner off
341; thence west 80 chains; thi
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chi
to point of commencement, and con|
ing 640 acres, more or less and
Lot 341.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je26 COLIN  C.  McLENNA
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three
TAKE NOTICE that William  Si
of St. Andrews, occupation Parmer]
tends  to apply  for permission  to i
chase the following described lands: !
mencing  at  a  post  planted  about |
chain   west   of   the   Trail   which
along the east bank of the Salmon :
known  as  the  Ootsa  Lake  Trail,
Anaham Lake, said post being aboil
chains north-west from an oblong J
(partly meadow) on the east side ol
said  trail,  and  said  post  being nl
equidistant   between   lots   surveyeil
Nos.  387 and  388,  which  land waf
cated by me on the 13th day of
1910,  containing 640 acres.
Dated June 25th, 1910.
WILLIAM SETTER,
jy 2 William Forrest, Al
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT |
District of Coast, Range Three
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Haljl
ton Blanchard, of Lydiatt, oceupl
Farmer, intends to apply for pen
slon to purchase the following desL
ed lands:*—Commencing at a post pi
ed about 70 chains north of the Sal
River and beside the north-west cf
post of lot 391 as surveyed, til
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chi
thenee north SO chains; thence eaf
chains, containing 640 acres, which!
was located by me on the 14th d_T
June, 1910.
Dated  June  25th,   1910.
Charles Halyburton Blanchaj
jy2 William Forrest,
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT |
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that (Mrs.) E\\
Mary Crofts, of Vancouver, B.C.,
pation Married Woman, intends tJ
ply for permission to purchase thq
lowing described lands:—Commencil
a post planted at the north-east cl
of Lot 338; thence west 80 ell
thence south 78.38 chains to the f
of Eagle Lake; thence following tha
shore to the south-east corner ofl
33S; thence north 84.60 chains to
of commencement, containing 640 <'|
more or less, and being Lot 338.
Dated  June  2nd,  1910.
(MRS.) ELEANOR MARY CR(|
je 25   .
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT I
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that (Mrs.) Cathl
Blair, of Vancouver, B.C., occupa
Married Woman, intends to applyl
permission to purchase the folloi
described lands:—Commencing at a I
planted at the north-west cornel
Charles Skinner's pre-emption (Lot ;
thence east 80 chains; thence nortl
chains; thence west 80 chains; thr
south 40 chains to point of comma
ment and containing 320 acres, mor|
less.
Dated May 31st, 1910.
je 25        (MRS.) CATHERINE BLAII
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE  NOTICE  that  Minnie  Liv
stone   of   Vancouver,   B.C.,   occupal
Spinster,  Intends  to  apply for  perl
sion to purchase the following descrT
lands:—Commencing  at  a post  pla|
at   the   north-east   corner   of   Lot
thence west 61.40 chains;  thence sJ
SO ehains; thence east to the bank!
Chilco River, being 85  chains, mor|
less;  thence northerly to point of
mencement   and   containing   640   a|
more or less, and being Lot 349.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
jo 25 MINNIW  MVINGSTON'I
CANCELATION   OF   BESERVI
NOTICE is hereby given that thel
serve existing upon the lands embrfl
in special Timber Licences Nos. 2Sl
2S963 und 28964, situated in Goldstrf
District, is cancelled, and that the
lands will be open for location ui|
the provisions of the Land Act at
night on October 14th, 1910.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Ll
Lands Department,
Victoria,  July  14,  1910.
jy 16
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert
TAKE   NOTICE   that   Frederick
Janes,   of Victoria,   B.C.,   Clerk,  intd
to   apply   for   permission   to   pure!
the   following   described   lands:—(1
mencing at a post planted on the set
shore of Georgie Lnke, nbout 60 chi
from    eastern    end;    thence    south F
cliains;   thence  west   40  chains;   thiL
north  40 chains;  thence east 40 chi
following   shore   of   lake   to   polntl
commencement,     and     containing
acres,  more or less.
FREDERICK  ROY   JANES,   ,
jy 10 F. M. Kelly, Atj
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE  NOTICE that  E.  O'Farrell
Dublin, Ireland, occupation Barrlstei|
tends  to apply  for  permission  to
chase   the   following  described   iancl
Commencing at a post planted  nboj
miles in a south-easterly direction
font of Takla Lake on  the Bella Cl
and   Ootsa  Lake  trail  nnd   markedl
S.  W.  comer;  thence  north   40  chf
thence  east  SO chains;  thence sout|
chains;  thence west  SO chains to
of commencement.
Dated June 21st. 1910.
13.  O'FARRELL,
jv 16 J. R. Morrison, A| THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 16, 1910
[Some Unusual Table Linen
DISTINCTIVE LINENS THAT'LL CHARM ANY HOMEKEEPER
Yesterday we placed in stock a shipment of some of the most interesting table linen we have ever unpacked. Distinctive linens these—linens
that'll charm any homekeeper with their unusual daintiness. Some are pure, snowy-white linens and some new colored effects. All represent the very
newest productions of the New School of Art. The display is one that no homekeeper can well afford to miss—even if only to learn what is newest in the
linen world. The shipment is not a large one—we were fortunate in securing as much as we did—so we suggest an early visit if you would see the complete range.    You'll find these on the second floor, and you are truly welcome.
The New School of Art Designs in Hemstitched Table Linens
The all-white linen table cloths and napkins are unusually pleasing. Hemstitched double satiu damask with striped centre and most artistic floral border—a happy
new school of art design. Not only will the pattern please, but also the quality and the prices. Don't attempt to compare prices until you inspect these materials—it's
the only fair way.   Comparisons of this sort prove our values the best.   Come and see these dainty linens.
Cloths—2x2 yards, at  $7.50 Cloths—2x*y2 yards, at  $10.50
Cloths—2x2i/2 yards, at $8.50 Cloths—2x3 yards, at  $12.00
We have napkins to match these cloths priced at, per dozen, $16.00, $15.00, $14.00 and $12.00.
Novelty Linen Table Cloths Charming   New   Curtains
You'll like these novelty linen table cloths.   The  centre is white  and the border colored—a pretty ______     I   €_t__\_ffi__ii\__
pattern.   Best quality linen.   Choice of colorings in border—such as blue, rose, green and gold.   There's a ctllU     L__dlllUl dJUIll
summery touch to these that makes them specially desirable for this season. I£      . wigh to gee   h t ideft ... ^^
Size 2x2% yards, at $6.00 Size 2x2 yards, at $5.00 and lambrequin come b and [ee these just opened.
■Lllcirming'    lefl  Of   I able  ClOtnS Design and color combinations are much superior to
Here are some of the daintiest linen table cloths yet.   A new art pattern—colored.   It's impossible the ordinary, and the material is one specially suited for
to describe it here, for the quaintness of pattern and the daintiness of coloring must be seen to be properly such a purpose,
appreciated.   One of these would make a most charming tea cloth.   Choice of blue and green, rose and These curtains are of quite liberal proportions meas-
green,  and gold  and green.   Size 56x56 inches,  at, each $3.00 Uring36xl  22  inches.    The  lambriquin  measures  26x71
Sideboard Scarfs, in same design and color combinations.  Size 16x56 inches.   Priced at, each $2.00 inches.   Bottoms are hemstitched.   Blue and green   and
Table Centres or Tea Cloths ™and ^7    , ,      .   ,,     *
.                                                                          .                                          133               , Come in and let us shown you these aud im illustration
A splendid selection oi new table centres or tea cloths just to hand,   these are colored and represent „ .      thpv'll lonl- on vour windows
some of the daintiest creations of the new school.   You'll like them—you cannot help it.   These are cer-
tainly worth a visit of inspection, and we shall be delighted to have an opportunity to show you. bet oi Palr ot cm'taills ancl lambrequin.
Size 32x32 in., at  $1.50          Size 53x53 in., at  $3.75 Priced at $10.50 and $8.00.
This Store is Headquarters for All Summer Furniture and Furnishings—GET YOURS HERE
FURNISHERS OF
CHURCHES
SCHOOLS
BOATS
SINCE 1862
AT VICTORIA, B.C.
Complete Home Furnishers
Victoria, B.C.
FURNISHERS OF
HOMES
HOTELS
CLUBS
SINCE 1862
AT VICTORIA, B.O.
SOCIETY
IMrs. St. George of Cowichan Stain, who has been spending the last
louth or so in Victoria, returned
|ime on Tuesday last.
* *   *
[The  Misses  Purely of  Bellingham.
|io were the guests of Mrs. Cecil
jbcrts, Burdette avenue, during the
_k, left on Wednesday's boat for
lime.
* *   *
|Mr. Monteith, accompanied by the
lisses Monteith and Miss Vera Main, left for Cowichan Lake on
fhursday last to spend the summer
lonths.
* *   *
I Dr. Newcombe, Mr. W. New-
limbc, and Mr. R. Monteith return-
II from a launch trip up the Coast,
|iring the week.
* *   *
I Major Bennett, Work Point Bar-
Icks, is visiting friends in the Koot-
|iays and Okanagan.
* *   *
I Mrs. Scriven is the guest of Mrs.
jrowc-Bakcr, Gorge Road.
* *   *
I Mrs. George Courtney was the
■test of Mrs. James Gaudin, Craig-
|iwcr Road, for a week.
* *   *
J Miss Irene Molyneux is again the
Lest of thc Misses Dunsmuir, of
|atlcy Park.
* *   *
|Mrs. James Dunsmuir lias issued in-
tations  for   a  dance  for  the  22nd
Hatley  Park.
* *   *
IMrs. Fulton of Vancouver was vising friends in the city for a few clays
|ring the week.
* *   *
|Mr. Blackwood, the Misses Black-
liod, Miss Rome, Mr. Fred. Rome
Id Miss Winona Troupe leave on the
f-d for a trip to Mt. Ranier.
* *   *
IMrs.  Berkeley is camping on Ka-
Ika Ranch, for the summer months.
Mrs. Tilton ancl family have taken
over the Ratturnbury residence at
Oak Bay for the summer months.
Mr. and Mrs. Ratturnbury havc left
on a six months trip to England.
* *   *
Mrs. Robert Craig of Phoenix,
Arizona, and daughter of Dr. J. C.
Davie, is a guest at the Empress during her stay in the city.
* *   *
Mr. A. D. Muskett of the Collegiate
School, left on a trip to the Old
Country on Tuesday last.
* *   *
Mrs. Walter Langley left on
Thursday to take part in the Tennis
tournament at Duncans.
Mr. Marshal was a passengers on
Thursday's train for Duncans.
Mr. Beaumont Boggs and son went
on a fishing trip up the line on Thursday last.
Miss Winona Troupe was hostess at
an impromptu dance at her father's
residence on the Esquimalt Road.
* *   *
Captain Crawford was another Victorian taking part in thc Tennis at
Duncans during the week.
* *   *
Mrs. Hugo Beavan was hostess at
a very enjoyable bridge tea on Wednesday afternoon.
Miss Pooley has returned from a
short visit with friends in Vancouver.
* *    *
Mr. and Mrs. Fitzherbert Bullen
and Mrs. Arthur Coles are enjoying
a motor trip to Alberni.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Guy Goddard are
guests   at    the   "Angela,"    Burdette
avenue.
* *   *
Mrs. Douglas MacDonald held her
post nuptial reception last week at
her residence on Head Street.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Lugrin and family
arc camping at Macaulay Point for
the summer months.
Miss Winona Troupe, Esquimalt
Road, was hostess at a small tea on
Wednesday afternoon. Among the invited guests were Miss Majorie
Rome, Miss Mason, Miss Doris Mason, Misses Bodwell, Miss Kate Bennett, Miss Blakemore, Miss Gladys
Blakemore, Miss Farquhar, Mrs. H.
Pooley, Miss Lorna Eberts, Miss
Monteith ,Miss Maud Monteith.
Gas For Cooking
The Victoria Gas Company has issued a new gas cookery book, which
should be in the hands of every householder in the City. Tt contains one
hundred and  forty-live pages of the
I best, up-to-date recipes for dainty
dishes, with full instructions how to
prepare and also with many useful
hints to housekeepers. Of course,
the object of the book is to illustrate the utility of gas stoves for
cooking, and no one who looks
through it will doubt that at the end
of the book might well be written
"Q. E. D." It is conceded that the
chief advantage of a gas stove is
cleanliness and economy; whereas as
(So per cent, of all coal fuel is wasted |
through the heat going up the chimney, the waste of gas in a properly
regulated stove is practically nil. At
thc commencement of the book is n
short list of testimonials from prominent Victorians, whicii The Week-
has pleasure in reproducing.
In this connection it may be mentioned that owing to the great popularity of gas for cooking and heating
purposes it has been found necessary
to open an tip-town demonstration
and sales room at 652 Yates Street,
which will be fitted up in a modern
style and will constitute one of the
I finest gas display rooms on the Pacific Coast.
It may be interesting to note that
at the present time thc Victoria Gas
Company has thirty miles of mains iu
this city, to which it is adding month
ly  in   order  to  keep  pace  with  the
growing demand.
Victoria, B.C., Jan. 19, 1910.
-Messrs. Victoria Gas Co., Ltd.,
City.
Gentlemen:
Since wc have been using gas, we
find it the greatest saving of time
and work. It is clean, economical
and always ready. Anyone not using
gas would certainly have it installed
if they only knew its value.
(Capt.) J. T. WALBRAN.
Messrs. Victoria Gas Co., Ltd.,
City.
Gentlemen'
I have 11 uch pleasure in stating
that the gas equipment installed in
my residence some few years ago has
given every satisfaction; and I can
assure you T would not be without it
for any consideration.
In my business as a Contractor and
Builder, 1 always figure on gas installations in the specifications, as I
realize that no modern house or other
building is complete without it.
Yours   faithfully,
D. H. BALE,
Contractor and Builder,
Cor. Fort St. and Stadacona Ave.
Victoria, B.C., Jan. 21, 1910.
Victoria Gas. Co., Ltd.
City.
Dear Sirs:
Having used gas for some time, it
gives me great pleasure to testify to
its comfort in thc house. It is clean,
economical ami always ready. N'o
family should be without a gas range
where it is obtainable.
Yours truly,
(Mrs.) H. F LANGTON,
714  Cook  Street.
Victoria, B.C., Jan. 22, 1910.
Messrs. Victoria Gas Co., Ltd.,
City
Gentlemen:
Wc arc pleased to bc able to report most favorably on thc appliances
you installed in our restaurant some
time ago. We arc doing all our cooking by gas. Our kitchen is as clean
and dust-free as possible; and we can
report a decrease in expense since wc
put in these modern appliances.
Yours   truly,
EMPRESS CAFE,
Harocop & Antipas,
609 Johnson St., City.
Messrs. Victoria Gas Co., Ltd.,
City.
Dear Sirs:
I would not Ik* without gas for any
consideration, It is the greatest convenience  we  have in  the house.
Yours truly,
(Sgd.)     J. FLETCHER,
Of Fletcher Bros.
Victoria, B.C., Jan. 29,  1910.
Vietoria Gas. Co., Ltd.,
Vietoria, B.C.
Gentlemen:
When cooking by gas is understood, it is the cleanest and most
economical fuel, and is not only valuable in summer, but the year round.
I recommend gas to all who have
never used it. As for myself, I would
never be without it.
Yours truly,
A. W. ELLIOTT,
1114 Pandora  Ave. 10
THE WEEK,  SATURDAY, JULY IC, 1910
THE HOT POINT
ELECTRIC IRON
Will satisfy anyone. It entirely satisfies the most critical of laimdrynien because it is constructed to meet
the exact requirements of laundry service. It has many commendable features that other electric irons
do not possess.    Its great popularity here is proven in fact that several thousand Victorian families are
using this Iron.
We Would Like to Leave One at Your
Home on Free Trial for Ten Days
Telephone, call or write us if you would like us to do this and we will make prompt delivery.    Price
complete is only $5.00 and the Iron and equipment is fully guaranteed to be as we say or money refunded.
MAKES A DAINTY GIFT
The UTILITY ELECTRIC OUTFIT HOT POINT ELECTRIC IRON does three things and does them well: IROXS, BOILS and CURLS.
Attaches to any electric light socket, heats laundry iron, boils a pint of water very quickly and heats curling tongs to curl the hair. Unrivalled
for a lady's use at home or when travelling.    See it here in handsome travelling bag.
B. C ELECTRIC RAILWAY CO., Limited
Cor, Fort and Langley Sts., Victoria, B.C*
Telephone 1609
._
A/A.
__V&2_Yj-
YACHTING NOTES
Tin* fact that the International and
the ctoiia Yacht Club Regatta held
in this city last week was a great
success in every way has given a
powerful impetus to yachting and
power boating. Though the excitement of thc regatta is over, the Victoria Yacht Club does not intend to
let tin: intereit incited wane. Arrangements are being made for a scries of local races for yachts and
motor boats which will add both zest
and enjoyment to thc boating season,
and enliven thc week-ends which always bring out a number of enthusiasts.
Last Saturday and Sunday found
the weather very warm, without
enough wind to entice the devotees
of canvas, except the cruisers equipped with auxiliary power. There
wcre, however, a large number of
motor boats panting their way to Esquimalt Lagoon, Aubert Head, Ped-
dcr Bay, and other pleasant spots in
thc vicinity of Victoria.
It is significant of the beneficial
stimulas of the International Regatta
that several Victorians havc expressed their intention to build boats of
the best design for next season, The
cruiser class is growing in popularity, for when equipped with an auxiliary gasoline engine and cabin accommodation, they are a very desirable class of boat for a pleasure trip
up thc coast, or for an afternoon sail
when time is an object. It has been
suggested that the time is approaching when the majority of pleasure
boats will be of this class, and that it
will be necessary for each club to
maintain its racer.
Mr. Foulser of Seattle paid a flying
visit to Victoria this week. It was
chiefly owing to thc efforts of Mr.
Foulser that the Long Distance
Power Boat race was inaugurated.
The old "Columbia," at one time
the Reverend T. Antle's Mission boat,
is now the property of Mr. Singleton
Wise, and is renamed the "Chaos."
Mr. and Mrs. Wise and party have
left on a trip to Alberni. The
"Chaos" is entered in the Alaskan
Long Distance race which takes place
next August.
Much of the success of the recent
Regatta was due to the efforts of
Captains James and Jarvis of the
Victoria Nautical Academy, who had
a great part of the arrangements in
hand.
The Victoria Yacht Club will make
every endeavour to obtain the privilege of a Royal Charter for their
Club. Commodore Cuppage has secured lhe support of many influential
people in (his matter and thc members of the Club have every reason
to believe that his efforts will be
successful.
CORRESPONDENCE
Capt. Birdwhistlc, secretary of thc
Dominion Rifle Association, has been
appointed general secretary for the
Domiuion of Canada branch of General Baden-Powell's boy scouts. The
work for some time has been looked
after by Lord Lanesborough, military
secretary to his excellency. Thc
movement is becoming more general
and Dominion and provincial councils arc being appointed to look after
the work.
A Safe Prediction
Editor J. S. Willison, of thc Toronto News, predicts that within
twenty-live years from 25 to 50 per
cent of all women will smoke. When
that time comes Hubby will discard
the tobacco jar and carry his tobacco
in a pouch,
The Week accepts no responsibility
for the views expressed by its correspondents. Communications will be
inserted whether signed by the real
name of the writer or a nom de
plume, but the writer's name and address must be given to the Editor as
an evidence of bona fides. In no case
will  it be divulged without  consent.
Does Farming Pay?
To the Editor of The Week.
Sir,—In your issue of last Satui-
day appears an article in which you
state that farming on Vancouver
Island does not pay. I am sorry that
you did not think it well to elaborate
this subject a little because such a
statement, bare and unqualifitd, is
liable to do much harm. I am sure
such a result is far from your sen-1
timents or intention. I beg therefore
for your permission to go a little
deeper into the matter. I
To   begin   with,   I  am  afraid  that |
the  statement  is only  too  true,  but
I fancy this lamentable fact is ensily
capable of remedy.
Everyone will, I think, agree with
me in stating that the climate and
soil of \ incouver Island are suitable
to the production of all the ordinary
crops grown elsewhere in the temperate regions of the earth. We know
that the usual grasses, such as Tim-|
othy, Red Top, Rye, and Cocksfoot,
(erroneously called here "orchard
grass") do well. Thc cereals do as
well, viz., wheat, oats and rye, I havc
never seen barley so cannot speak'
about it. Potatoes, beans and roots'
cannot be beaten anywhere, where
each is grown in a suitable location
of 1 hich many abound, and even so
dclicati a crnn as hops has proved
iver) -m .ul as far as growth is
concerned. Hops were an economic
failure because they could only be
placed on the market as "Pacific Coast
Hops." This grade is the worst
known in Mark Lane and fetches the
lowest price. Its character has been
determined by thc class of hop exported from California, Oregon,
Washington, which as I havc already
mentioned are the worst produced
anywhere in the world. It was conclusively proved some 17 or 18 years
ago, notably by Mr. Breeds of Saanich
that a very much finer quality could
be and was grown on his farm at
Saanich, but until the whole district
was able to produce hops of a similar quality and to send several hundred bales every year to London,
Vancouver Island hops had to suffer
for and with those from the neighbouring Pacific Coast States.
Why then does not farming pay?
I think there are several obvious reasons.
First—Most of the land in this
neighbourhood was taken up by men
who had made money in Cariboo and
who had done their life's work there.
They came here more to settle and
live comfortably for the rest of their
lives than to engage in the strenuous
business of farming. Most of them
succeeded in their object, and one or
two almost became farmers.
Secondly—Nearly all the young
men who come to us from the Old
Country know absolutely nothing at
all about farming and commit thc
initial error of taking up a great deal
too much land. I know of a man
who took immense pains to provide
himself with brass stair rods for his
house but who was indifferent to the
insect pests on his trees, and thc
error of taking up too much land is
apparent on  all  sides.
These I think are thc chief reasons
why farming does not pay. There
are no doubt others and still others
which are extensions and ramifications of those I havc mentioned. But
surely they are not insurmountable
objections to thc prosecution of successful farming especially if my first
statement, that land and climate are
suitable, is granted. It should also
be mentioned that ordinary crops do
not, like hops, for which there is
hardly any local demand, have far to
look for a good and almost insatiable
market.       I am, etc.,
CHARLES ST. BARBE.
Victoria, 10th July, 1010.
The Companies Act
July 13,  1910.]
The Editor of Thc Week.
Sir,—I have read with interest yol
article on the Companies Act in yo|
last issue, and would like space
point out a consideration that I hal
not seen referred to in the local pre!
discussion, though it should be wc|
known.
The fact is that ever since i8(J
extra-provincial companies have hal
to be licensed or registered here bl
fore they could do business, so til
agitation would seem somewhat bJ
lated. The clause rendering agenl
liable to a penalty is a new one, bil
in all other respects the new act
far less stringent than the 1897 stil
tute so far as the disabilities of extr;]
provincial companies arc concerned
Agents can only be prosecuted witl
the consent of the attorney-general
so the whole agitation looks somc|
what factitious and political.
May I also add that our 1897 CoirJ
panics Act was largely based on thi
original English Companies Act c|
1863, and after over forty years
amendments and experience, Englisl
company law was consolidated il
1908. Later on the Imperial Govern!
ment sent out a circular suggestinl
that a uniform company law through!
out thc Empire would have benefichr
results, and I have always undei
stood that the new Act was to soivi
extent in response to that circula
The advantages of an uniform lavl
so long as London remains the ceil
tre of investment, need hardly be ill
lated upon, though it must be a<|
mitted that the new Act greatly dif
courages the gentle art of "wif
catting."
Yours, etc.,
HERBERT W. R. MOORE.
Hli Diet
Miss   Wise—He's   professor   of   cla
slcs out at the university.
Miss  Dumley—Yes.    And  he's  a  v|
getarlan, so Mr. Kidder tells me.
Miss   Wise—Did   he   really   tell   y|
that?
Miss  Dumley—Well,  he  said he sii|
ply lives on Greek roots. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 16,  1910
II
Carissima Mia
|By  Marguerite  Kinloch
It was a glorious day in the middle
|August with the sun beating down
the   never   ending   stretches   of
[id that lie along the coast of soine
Its  of  Brittany.    Fishing Smacks,
ring vessels, and boats of all kinds
[re  lying idly  in  the  Bay  of the
fall sea coast village of St. Ursule.
fcrk of all kind seemed to be sus-
|dcd,  owing  to  the  midday heat,
ire   and   there,   men'  and  women
re dozing on thc beach or blinking
fpidly at the glare of the sun on
water, as though they had nothin the world to  do but sit and
am.
|)nly one boat in  the whole har-
showed any sign of life, it was
trading vessel, , which    was being
Itily   prepared  for   a   trip  to   the
Ithern   coast   of   Italy. . Men   ran
[ier  and  thither,  loading up  bar-
containing  salt  fish,  the  staple
Id of the sea-faring people of that
It   of   France,   cheese,   oil,   water,
lir,   in   fact   everything   that   was
lessary for ,the voyage.    Only one
li  stood apart, instead of helping
[companions in their arduous task,
stood in the middle of the pier
Ji his hands shading his eyes, as
ugh he were expecting some one,
liagnificent specimen of the Bre-
peasant,  tall,  broad   shouldered,
handsome,  with  blue  eyes,  and
lid   hair,   his   face   darkly   tanned
li  constant  exposure  to sun, and
ler, for he was a trader, by pro-
lion,  and   spent   more   than   half
lyear cruising round the Southern
of  Europe.    Suddenly his  face
Itened up  with  an   expression  of
lignition as a girl appeared round
J bend of the cliff.    It was Marie
Lille coming to say  good-bye to
lover, Gaston Dufour, before he
I sail  for his long yearly voyage,
ch  meant  an  absence  of  several
Jiths.
farie was an orphan, who lived in
Jttlc cottage near the sea, with her
Icrnal aunt, a bed-ridden old cre-
•e of kindly nature, but primitive
■its.    Rheumatism  had  bent,  and
lorted her once shapely figure, her
Ids  were  almost  useless.    Occas-
ally  in  thc   summer   months  she
|ld do a little knitting, but when
long cold    Winter    set    in, her
ters became so crippled that she
jid do nothing, but lie in bed and
lam   of  the   days   when   she   was
png, and with her dear Pierre on
little farm where she had spent
few short years  of her married
. before thc good God had taken
li.  and  left   her  alone;   well   not
lte alone, for there was her sister's
le  girl,  Marie,  to  look after and
|ig up.    The mother had died in
ling birth to the child, the last of
family of five  sons,  who  had  all
In drowned, at one time or another
lie engaged in the perilous deep sea
ling during the Winter months in
lland.   Their father followed them
It   three  months   before  the  little
Irie  had  first  seen   light,  so  that
|re  was   no  one  to   take  care  of
tiny mite, but Tante Brigitte who
her   farm   after   her   husband's
Ith   put  all  her  money  in  a  bag
lund her neck, and came North to
Ik after the little orphan,
lhe was a kind woman and brought
Iher niece as best she could, she
jht  her  to  read,  and  write,  and
her prayers, to spin the yarn and
[  for  their  humble   requirements,
above all things,  she impressed
}n her, from her earliest infancy,
necessity   of   committing every-
jig to thc good God, from whose
Id she must accept all the ills of
J without repining.    It was the old
|it of fatalism inherent in the peas-
i character.    The little Marie was
(right, intelligent  child,  and  posted moreover great personal beau-
Iwhich, now she had attained her
pnteenth year,    attracted    all the
of thc village, each one of whom
J anxious to secure for his fiancee
(acknowledged belle of St. Ursule.
J Marie had favoured the stalwart
lon  Dufour,  to   whom  she  was
now affianced for over a year. His
people lived near her, and were very
well-to-do folk, and Gaston now in
his twenty-fifth year, was first mate
on the "Etoile du Nord" and would
doubtless some day be captain. They
were to be married when he returned
from his next voyage, and would reside with Tante Brigitte, in the cottage where Marie was born, and
brought up, so that she would not
be alone during the long Winter
months while Gaston was away, and
besides Tante Brigitte was quite old,
and an invalid now and for'; several
years past, Marie had taken complete
charge of her, and of all the domestic
arrangements of their humble abode, i
She rose early and worked bard all
day, both indoors and outside, on the
little patch of garden surrounding
the house. There, in the Spring, she
would sit on a rocking chair, after
her work was done, either knitting or
sewing, and thinking of her Gaston
who would soon be home, whom she
loved so devotedly, and who had
chosen her for his bride. It all seemed so wonderful to her humble mind,
she was so poor and ignorant of the
ways of the world, her own* great
beauty she never realized, so that she
marvelled all the time in her heart
at Gaston choosing her from some of
the' more showily dressed girls in the
village, who would have been only
too pleased had they been the favoured ones. And now Gaston who had
been home for over two months was
leaving that afternoon, for his last
voyage before returning to claim his
bride. Marie went down to the wharf
to wish him "bon voyage" as she had
promised to do the evening before,
when he had come over to have a
last chat with her. She was thinking
over all he had said to her, how he-
had promised to return as soon r*s
possible, how happy they would be
when they were married, and all tho
pretty things he would bring her
from the different ports they touched at during his absence. But somehow she had had a queer sinking r. f
the heart, when he rose to bid her
good-night. She had never remembered feeling like that before, a lump
had risen in her throat as she 'clung
to him sobbing, "Something tells me,"
she said, "that we shall never meet
again." He laughed at her fears as
he took her in his arms and kissed
her. "Havc I not always come back
before?" he said, "and why should
anything happen to me now. Let mc
see, this is the twenty-fifth of August.
Well, eight months from now I swear
to you I shall return to claim you,
unless I am dead," he added, "so help
me God." The solemnity of his words
had reassured her; all the same she
had cried herself to sleep, very softly, for fear Tante Brigitte would hear,
and scold her for not having more
faith in le Bon Dieu. So it was a
very red-eyed, sorrowful looking girl
that came along the beach to say a
last farewell to her lover. He went
to meet her and brought her down to
sec his boat, which was almost ready
to put to sea. She tried to appear
bright, as she chatted to the men who
would be his companions on the voyage, but it was a great effort, her
head ached, and she felt very miserable. She couldn't understand how
Gaston could love her as much as he
said he did, and look so dry eyed and
indifferent at their approaching parting. Poor girl, she didn't understand
that it is the woman who is always left,
even though she be the one to go.
A man has so much more to fill his
life, is so much more easily consoled,
that love is always a secondary consideration with him, unless passion
play a larger part in his feelings, in
which case he may be undone completely, but only for a time. No such
philosophy entered into her simple
teaching, she only felt in a dumb
sort of way that she could keep up
no longer, her heart seemed to be
breaking, so saying that she must hurry back to her aunt who was not so
well as usual, she put out her hand to
Gaston, who took her in his arms,
saying, "Remember April will be soon
here, when I shall return to claim my
bride." A sob was her only answer
as she turned away and left him. He
watched her slight girlish figure gradually disappear along the beach with
its shimmering sand, then joined his
"LIVERINE"
Bowes' Effervescent Saline
jhotild be taken during the
warm weather. It is exceedingly nice and refreshing to drink;
it arouses the stomach to action,
promotes the flow of gastric
juice, buoys up the whole
system.
Soc Bottle Only at This Store
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
1228 Government Street
Near Yates
BLUE PRINTS
Any Length in One Piece
Six Cents per foot
TIMBER AND LAND
MAPS
DRAUGHTING
Electric Blue Print &
Map Co.
1218 Langley St. - Victoria,'B.C.
mates, to whom he gave the final directions about the cargo, etc. In less
than an hour the "Etoile du Nord"
was sailing out of the harbor of St.
Ursule, while a woman was on her
knees before the sattue of the Virgin
in the little Chapel, praying for thc
safety of the man to whom she had
given her whole heart and soul.
On a hot June night'in Venice, ten
months later, a man and a woman
were slowly drifting round one of the
canals, of that famous city in a gondola. Myriads of stars lit up the sky
while the moon was shedding an unearthly radiance over the old palaces,
built by the Doges at the edge of the
water. They seemed to stand out
dark, vast, and mysterious looking
against the brilliancy of the night, one
almost expected a conspirator to bc
lurking in their many recesses.
The same pale light shone on, and
illumined the magnificent sensual
beauty of a woman lying in her lover's
arms, with a smile of triumph on her
lips. Gaily painted Gondolas kept
passing and repassing, while the wind
wafted thc sound of the mandolin and
guitar across the water, accompanied
by the rich voices of the Italian boatman. It was a night to dream—a
night to love.
The woman whose voice was tuned
to sweetest cadence, murmured softly to her lover, "Tell mc again my
Gaston, that you have never loved
any other woman before, I want to
know that your heart is all mine.
Ah; my love, I will show you what
love is. Tell mc, that you never cared
for that baby faced girl in Brittany.
What docs she know about meu and
their hearts? How could she expect
you, my Gaston, to go back to her
in the cold North, you who are so
big and handsome." The man stooped and kissed thc beautiful voluptuous lips of his companion. "Carissima mia," he said, "I havc never
loved anyone before. I never knew
what love was till 1 met you. Ah,
you have given me life and love for
evermore. I can never leave you now.
I would rather bc dead than live without you." Thc woman laughed a low
triumphant laugh, as she realized how
completely her lover was in her toils.
"Perhaps she is waiting for you now,
my Gaston," she continued, "or perhaps she is tired, this is June, and
you promised to return in April," and
she  laughed  again, and clapped  her
Vancouver Island
Cold Storage and
Ice Company
VICTORIA, B.C.
Goods received at all hours.
Expert attention given.
Consignments solicited
Phone 2282    P,0. Box 875
THE STEEL CUT BAKER-IZED COFFEE, in scaled tins.
Per lb 50c
Just try it once.
OUR PURE MOCHA AND JAVA COFFEE         has that
delicious rich flavor.   Per lb , ,... 40c
We make a Specialty of Fresh Fruits
H. 0. KIRKHAM
Phone 178
FANCY GROCERIES
Corner Fort and Douglas Street
Bevan, Gore & Eliot
LIMITED
Members Vancouver, Victoria, Spokane and
Stewart Stock Exchanges
PRIVATE WIRE TO VANOOUVER
DAILY TELEGRAPHIC QUOTATIONS
ALL ACTIVE STOCKS BOUGHT AND SOLD ON
COMMISION
LISTED STOCKS SOLD ON MARGIN
STEWART TOWNSITE LOTS FOR SALE
Room 1-4, Hibben Block
1122 Government St.       =       Victoria, B.C.
P. 0. Box 349
Phones 163 and 2124
Phone R 313 Hand Made Goods a Specialty
LADIES' SHIRT WAISTS, UNDERWEAR, ETC
THE BON TON
.-.MRS. J. E. ELLIOTT.'.
LADIES' AND CHILDRENS' OUTFITTERS
AN UP-TO-DATE PLACE TO BUY NECKWEAR, ETC.
730 YATES STREET
VICTORIA, B.C.
hands, the man joining, in her mirth,
as they thought of thc little Breton
peasant, waiting vainly her lover's
return. Perhaps their triumph would
not have been so great could they
have seen the interior of a hut in
Brittany, where there was a young
girl with white strained face, on her
knees, praying for the repose of the
soul of a man. whom she firmly believed to bc dead, while an old woman kept muttering to herself, "Thc
Good God knows best, lie always
knows best."
Satisfaction
We guarantee quality and satisfaction with every purchase of
Groceries.
Phone orders carefully attended to.
A. POOL
633 Yates St. Phone 448
Watson's Old Stand 12
THE WEEK,  SATURDAY, JULY 16,  1910
Here's the Chance You Are Looking For!
You Can't All Find Gold Mines, But You Will Find Real Bargains at
THE BIG MD-SUMMER SALE
Railway Fare
Paid to all
Purchasers of
$50 and
and Upwards
for
Distance of
Fifty Miles
■OF THE-
SEMI-READY
WARDROBE
WHICH COMMENCED
TUESDAY, JULY 12
Prices
Strictly as
Advertised,
And All
Goods Are
Marked in
Plain
Figures
THIS IMMENSE STOOK CONSISTING OF $75,000.00 WORTH OF SUITS—FLANNEL SUITS, OUTING SUITS, OVERCOATS, RAIN COATS, MACKINTOSHES,
AUTO DUSTERS, TROUSERS, DRESSING GOWNS, BATH ROBES, FLANNEL TROUSERS, DUCK TROUSERS, HATS, STRAW HATS, PANAMA HATS,
UNDERWEAR, REGATTA AND BUSINESS SHIRTS, NEGLIGE SHIRTS, NECKWEAR, GLOVES, SUIT CASES, BAGS, VALISES, AND IN FACT "EVERYTHING
FOR THE MAN" IS MARKED DOWN IN MANY INSTANCES TO "LESS THAN HALF PRICE."
Five Thousand Semi-Beady Garments are included in this Sale, and as the price is labelled in the pocket of every Garment, the reductions which will be made during
this Big Sale will be apparent to everyone.
All "Odd" and "Lonely" Suits, Overcoats, Raincoats, Trousers and Fancy Vests will be marked down to prices that will sell them, as a clean sweep must be made of
all odd lines and Summer Goods, as it is the policy of B. Williams & Co. to "clean up" the stock at the end of each season.   This being the case, all
Summer Goods Must be
Sold Regardless of Cost
And in consequence, Bargains may be looked for.
DON'T MISS THIS OPPORTUNITY TO REPLENISH YOUR WARDROBE AT PRICES NEVER BEFORE OFFERED IN THIS CITY
All Semi-ready Garments are labelled with the price in the pocket, so any deception in regard to values will be impossible during this sale.
RAILROAD FARE PAID TO ALL PURCHASERS OF $50.00 AND UPWARDS FOR DISTANCE OF FIFTY MILES.
THE SALE LASTS FOR TEN DAYS ONLY
B. WILLIAMS & CO.,
Exclusive Agents for Semi-Ready Tailoring
Clothiers and Hatters 614 YATES ST., VICTORIA, B. C.

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