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Week Dec 21, 1912

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Array L. McLeod Gould
Public Stenographer
Copying, Mailing, Editing, Expert
Journalistic Work and Adv't
Writing
Accuracy, Despatch, Privacy
1208 Government Street .       Phone 1283
*¥
The Week
A British Columbia Newspaper aad Review.
Pabllahad at Victoria. B. 6.
HALL Qf WALKER
Agents
Wellington Colliery
Company's Coal
1232 Gov't St.
Telephone 83
Vox,. X.  No. 4, f
Tenth Year
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1912
Tenth Year
One Doiaar Per Annum
NAVAL DEFENCE
"No policy will be satisfactory to the
people of British Columbia which does
not include a substantial and prompt
contribution and THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A FLEET UNIT ON THE
PACIFIC COAST."
THE NAVAL POLICY-The feature
of the current week has been the
brilliant contribution of the Hon.
Geo. E. Foster to the Naval Debate. Mr.
Foster is by common consent the ablest debater in the Canadian Parliament and for
sheer cleverness he has no superior, even
in the British House of Commons. It is
true that he is deficient in other qualities,
and this deficiency alone has operated, as
in case of one or two other Canadians
who might be mentioned, to prevent him
from attaining the highest position in
the Dominion. No one who leads Mr. Foster's speech can doubt that he is the only
man in the House who can stand against
Sir Wilfrid Laurier as a debater. His
equipment is complete. He has not only
had a life-long experience of the Canadian
Parliament, but a life-long acquaintance
with Sir Wilfrid Laurier, whose character
and methods he thoroughly understands.
Whatever one may think of Mr. Borden's
policy as a whole, no unbiassed person can
doubt after reading Mr. Foster's speech,
that Sir Wilfrid Laurier's present proposals
would be a very weak substitute for it. This
conclusion is not based on the inconsistency
of the late Premier, because, unfortunately,
the -. record of most leading Canadian politicians in connection with the subject of a
naval policy is not immune from this criticism. It may therefore be as well to eliminate from the argument any conclusions
based upon a change of attitude. It must
also be remembered in this connection that
there is some excuse for a little uncertainty
and indecision, because the country has been
feeling its way towards action on a matter
which, while vital to the Empire, was a new
one to the Colonies. Then Canada has had.
difficulties to contend with which have not
presented themselves to any of the other
Colonies. The greatest difficulty has been
that of reconciling the French-Canadian
population, which represents more than one-
third of our people, to any kind of contribution to the Imperial Navy, or even to the
establishment of a Canadian Navy. Then
there is little doubt that the class of immigrants which has flooded the Western
Provinces is none too favourable to an
active policy and however the Liberal Press
may scoff at the suggestion of the London
"Standard" that there is something in common between the attitude of these people on
Reciprocity and on the Naval question, the
fact remains that in the West the same
people who were in favour of the former
are very largely opposed to the latter. However, Mr. Borden has effected what Sir Wilfrid failed to do, and that is to reconcile
at any rate a large number of the people of
Quebec to some form of contribution. The
strength of Mr. Foster's speech lies in the
fact that he demonstrates fully two essential
features of the Naval policy; the first is
that Mr. Borden is in a far better position
than Sir Wilfrid Laurier to know what the
necessities of the case require and what in
the judgment of the British Government
will best meet them.   Mr. Fosters development of this part of his address is most admirable and conclusive.   The other point
which he established is that in spite of the
perfervid professions of loyalty which run
through the ex-Premier's brilliant oration,
the fact remains that his present proposals,
whilst committing Canada to the principle
of support, would delay and indefinitely
postpone any practical assistance.   A Canadian Navy, built in Canada and manned by
Canadians, to say nothing about its control, must be the dream of every man who
loves his country and is desirous to see it
attain to that standard of nationhood on
which Mr. Rudyard Kipling dilated so eloquently and forcefully on his last visit to
Canada.   But such a dream is shattered so
far as its practical utility is concerned when
it is pointed out that it would take many
years before the first battle-ship could be
built in Canada, and as far as we are able
to judge many years before it could be
manned by Canadians.   That such a policy
will be developed in the future cannot be
doubted; its most optimistic advocates assign ten years as the shortest period which
must elapse for the building of the battleships and can offer no suggestion as to when
Canadian seamen will be available to man
the vessels of a Canadian Navy.   Mr. Borden, who perhaps is as well able to judge
' of this as any man, says it will take fifty
years.   In opposition to such a-policy, Mr.
Foster quotes figures to show that after the
lapse of four   years our two Canadian
cruisers, the "Rainbow" and the "Niobe,"
have not a single sailor of Canadian origin
and that during the comparatively short
time that has elapsed since they were acquired, there have been nearly three hundred desertions.  Without being in any way
enamoured of many of the details of Mr.
Borden's  proposals, and whilst adhering
strictly to its original views when that
policy was announced that the present contribution, being designed to meet an emergency, should have been an unconditional
gift, The Week cannot refrain from pointing out that in all its essentials it is far
preferable to the policy of further delay
which Sir Wilfrid Laurier advocates.  It at
least permits Canada to do something at
once; the other would simply be a renewal
of the policy of procrastination and delay
which characterized all the dealings of the
Laurier   Administration  with   this   great
question.    In justice to itself The Week
must call attention to a very important
statement made in the House of Commons
this week by the Hon. Mr. Pelletier.   It
must be remembered that this is the French-
Canadian Minister, who accompanied Mr.
Borden to London, who assisted him in his
negotiations with the British Government
and who was privy to all the details of the
Memorandum ultimately agreed upon.   In
his speech to the House, in seeking to make
the Government proposals as palatable as
possible to his Quebec friends, he stated
that the three Dreadnaughts proposed to
be built were not to be regarded as a "gift"
but as a "loan," since they could be recalled
whenever desired to form a part of the Canadian Navy.   These are the very terms in
which The Week first characterized the
proposals and the endorsement of Mr. Pelletier must surely carry conviction that that
is the nature of the arrangement and the
true light in which it must be regarded.
THE Y. W. C. A.—A contemporary
has taken The Week to task for certain remarks which it made about
the loss of a young woman's luggage at
the Y. W. C. A. The matter would not
have been referred to again but that the
paper in question undertook to state what it
calls the facts of the case, which it summarises as follows: "A young lady arrived
with a valise which she left by the outer
door while she followed the matron upstairs
to look at a room; when they came down
again the valise had disappeared." It is a
puzzle where these "facts" could have been
learnt; they are entirely wrong and in
some respects purposely misleading, as our
contemporary will see when it learns the
truth. What really happened was this: On
a Friday the young lady in question sent a
friend to engage a room for her; the room
was engaged and reserved by arrangement.
On Monday the girl's father took her trunk,
valise and hat-box to the Y. W. C. A. at
4.30 in the afternoon. He offered to take
them upstairs into his daughter's room, but
the matron said: "No, leave them in the
hall; they will be all right." He did so.
At 6.30 the girl arrived and went to her
room. There she found her trunk and hat-
box, but the valise was missing. She was
told that it must have been placed in- some
other room by mistake and that a search
would be made for it. As a matter of fact,
it was never found, and the next day she
was told that it must have been stolen.
Now all the interest that The Week has in
the matter is this: Here was a poor girl
who had engaged a room days before; the
custody of her baggage was accepted by the
matron of the Y. W. C. A.; it was placed
where she designated and left there on her
instructions; it was stolen and the girl had
no chance whatever to protect herself.
Surely there can be no question of liability
in such a case, and however poor the
Y. W. C. A. may be it ill accords with the
principle of a semi-religious institution to
dispute such an obviously just claim.
WITHOUT DELICACY—The Canadian Collection Agency is aggrieved
because The Week criticised their
methods of doing business, and, according
to their own admission, their methods are,
to say the least of it, peculiar and unreliable. In a long letter written to the Times
(they neither had the business instinct or
the courtesy to lay their complaint where
they considered that it originated) they admit that they made a peremptory demand
with the threat of legal proceedings against
a gentleman who has lived in Victoria for
many years, who is well off, who occupies a
high position and a public office in the community and who will never require to be
asked twice for any amount due, still less
for a paltry $8.50. They admit that they
did this without first rendering the account
or making the usual polite application. The
threat of proceedings was the first notification the gentleman received and his account
had never been rendered either by the Collecting-Company or the creditor. The Company excuses its action on three grounds,
which are even more flimsy than its business
methods. First, that the gentleman lived at
an hotel. Second, that they did not know
his standing until after they had made application, and further that they had been
instructed to make this, with a number of
other collections, promptly and without delicacy. Undoubtedly they carried out their
instructions to the letter, but if they or their
client think that such methods will benefit
the business men of Victoria, then they
are entitled to their opinion which will,
however, not be shared by many people.
Their conduct in this case shows that the
managers of the Canadian Collection Company have no right to be engaged in such a
business. They will lose their clients many
good customers without in any way advancing their own reputation. How little acquaintance they have with the very business
they have entered is shown by the fact that
they refer The Week to "Dunn's Collecting
Agency." There is no such agency in existence. The Week wonders whether this
is a case calling for an apology; it would
be too much to expect it from the Collecting Company, but it might be due from
the tradesman employing them.
THE NIDGE—The wrecking of the
"Nidge" off Macaulay Point has
furnished another opportunity to
brave men to show how little they think
of themselves in the face of danger and how
willing they are to take risks of every kind
hdiere there is a chance of saving human
life. The Week will not undertake to
apportion the credit among those who distinguished themselves in saving eleven lives
from the wreck of the "Nidge," but by
common consent members of the Victoria
Police Force and men from the Work Point
Barracks vied with each other in running
risks of the most dangerous kind to rescue
human life. They plunged into the surf
when one of the worst storms we have ever
had was rolling the waves in like mountains.
They were battered and bruised and at
every moment worked with their own lives
in peril,. That not one person on the
"Nidge" was lost is the highest possible
tribute to the bravery and efficiency of their
rescuers and their gallant conduct will long
be remembered and recognized by the
people of Victoria.
VICTORIA'S WANTS-A leading
citizen writes The Week making a
few practical suggestions on "Victoria's Wants." He suggests that they
should be tabulated for the New Year's
Programme and that the Press should undertake a campaign of education to familiarize the public with the proposals and to
ensure their acceptance whenever By-laws
might be submitted. As The Week is in
entire-accord with all the proposals, it has
pleasure in giving publicity to them and in
commending them to the serious attention
of all who desire to improve the conditions
of living in our city: A public market for
Vancouver Island produce. A public fish-
market, the fishing industry to be bonused
by the municipality, and the free hawking
of fresh fish allowed by tenants of the
market. A People's Palace, to include a
public hall with organ, swimming baths,
gymnasium and an aquarium. Seats on our
boulevarded streets for the aged and infirm.
Here is a good, sensible, practical New
Year's Programme, the carrying out of
which will benefit all and injure none.
THE FUSILIER REGIMENT —
Victoria is to be congratulated on
the successful establishment of the
Fusilier Regiment. This has not been accomplished without an immense amount of
careful thought and hard work. Many local
gentlemen have shared in this and the
naming of Lieut.-Colonel Hall, Major
Beale and Capt. C. F. de Salis is not intentionally to ignore many others who have
assisted them, but upon these men has fallen
the brunt of the work, and they have done
it well. The new Regiment starts under
the brightest auspices; it is well officered;
there is no doubt that it will be well manned.
Its establishment synchronizes with the
most important crisis that has ever arisen
not only in the Dominion but in Imperial
affairs, and its enthusiasm will not be
dampened by the consideration that it first
saw light' in the year when the eyes of
Canadians were opened to their responsibilities in the matter of Imperial Defence.
WELL DONE, FIFTH-Hearty
congratulations to Major Harris
and his men who have contributed
a third honour to the Fifth Regiment by
beating all Canada in the moving target
competition. Victoria is proud of the
young major, who has been such a devoted
artilleryman and has attained such efficiency and honour. Victoria is also proud of
the Fifth Regiment which seems to be doing better than ever and is establishing a
mark which will certainly stimulate the
newer regiments. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1912
I feel like the clown in the circus,
possibly I look like him. Christmas
is here once more and I know that
it is up to me to say the same old
thing, with the same old ending. But
When one has written a column of
this nature for some years, such oft-
expressed sentiments as are expected,
become monotonous and* though
Christmas comes but once a year, it
comes so quickly in this busy country that before my type-writer ribbon
has had time to recover from the
shock of one Yuletide salutation it
has to receive the imprint of another.
It is this very fact, however, of
Christmas coming round so soon
again which proves better than anything else what a prosperous time
we have all had since it was here in
iqii. If the Roman who called attention to the fact that Time "fugits"
lived in our day he would have to
coin a new word to enter the Latin
dictionary, for assuredly the vocabulary of his day could find no single
word to describe the tempestuous
hurry which characterizes the march
of Time today. Christmas once more,
and 'tis but the other day that I wrote
about the glad show which our Victoria stores were making in their
windows to celebrate the happy
events twelve months ago.
* *   *
I am inclined to think that most
people are in the same quandary.
Though December 25th is less than
a week distant but one person has so
far wished me the compliments of
the season, and he had only just returned to the city. My proud spirit
refuses to believe that good wishes
have been purposely withheld from
me, but I remember that in bygone
years these greetings were bestowed
well ahead of this. I fancy that
others have been caught napping and
that the weather we have been experiencing has been responsible for
their failure to realize that we have
reached that season of the year when
good wishes are cheap. So, lest I
forget, I will get my greetings off my
chest, to use a homely colloquialism,
and wish you all, dear readers, a very
happy Christmas. May the goose
hang high and the plum-pdding sit
low; may the stockings bulge and
the bank account take on a new complexion, and may there be no headache in the morning.
* *   *
The one question which seems to
be agitating people who take their
leisure on the street corners dttring
the current week has been that of the
By-law proposed by the Mayor, which
will enable the city to erect swimming baths behind the Empress hotel.
So far I have heard no one suggest
that we do not want swimming-
bahts, but I have heard many who
whole-heartedly support Mr. Justice
Martin's view, that now is the time
to "go the whole hog" and to expropriate the whole of the area in question, including the gore formed by
Douglas and Blanchard streets, so
that Victoria would have the space
she needs for a public resort which
would be bounded on the south only
by the Pacific Ocean. It is a fine
idea and opens up a vista of possibilities which, if carried out, wil! make
the Victoria of a few years hence a
more perfect Paradise than it is at
present.
* *   *
Imagine that uninteresting space
laid out with Winter Gardens; with
swimming-baths; with band-stands;
with colonnaded walks. Picture the
shrubs which might be collected
within this area to add beauty to the
scene! .What more charming pleasure ground could be found in the
length and breadth of this vast continent than that contemplated by the
letter read before the Council? It is
no good doing things by halves; here
a little and there a little. What is
wanted is to take advantage of the
opportunity before it is lost for ever,
and to give Victoria a fairy-land right
in the centre of the town such as no
other city in the world possesses.
Where else could' a visitor walk from
the waterfront to within a few yards
of the Post-office of a busy commercial city, surrounded on all hands by
the beauties of Nature and knowing
that the whole of the ground* he
traverses was public .property, to remain for ever and a day the playground
of the citizens who had had the farsightedness to reserve it for themselves and their successors? It is a
glorious possibility, and I for one
sincerely trust that the possibility
will soon pass into the list of those
things which are accomplished.
* *   *
One would think that the first requirement of a modern hackman
would be a thorough and complete
knowledge of the city in which he
plies for hire. By this I do not mean
that in a rapidly growing community,
such as Victoria, every hackman
should have an intimate acquaintance
with each new street as it passes
through the various processes of naming (which always comes first), grading, paving and side-walking, but I
do mean that he should know where
every hotel, important boarding-
house and apartment flat is situate.
And yet a man this very week hired
a hack to drive him to one of the
best known apartment flats in the
city and the hackman had but a nodding acquaintance with it. He had to
ask in one of those interrogatively
negative sentences, you know the kind
I mean, where you tell a lie first and
then ask a question, what street it
was on. Such ignorance leads one to
ask whence it is that we draw our
hackmen. There are men driving
hacks in the city today who were
driving them years and years ago,
and they will be aware that my remarks are not directed at them, but
there are others who would seem to
"blow into" town from any old city
and get a job as hack-drivers whether
they are capable or otherwise. The
By-law requires that the chief of police has to be satisfied as to the status
of any applicant for a hackman's
license, but he is not required to put
the said applicant through the gruelling tests such as are imposed by
Scotland Yard on intending drivers in
London. Perhaps it is a pity that the
regulations are not more stringent
here.
* *   *
But there is one sure test by which
the black sheep may be distinguished
from the white, and that is by the
condition in which they keep their
hacks. I do not find in the By-law
that there is any rule governing the
sanitary condition of hacks, other
than the section which requires the
driver who "carries any passenger
whom he knows or has reasonable
cause to suspect to be suffering from
cholera, small-pox or any other disease of a malignant character dangerous to public health" to notify
that Health Officer or Sanitary Inspector and disinfect his vehicle. But
it seems to me that the Sanitary
Inspector might be empowered to take
an affectionate interest in the condition of some of the hacks plying for
hire. They are dirty and look it. I
have seen hackmen sitting four strong
in a hack with closed windows, every
member of the party smoking, what
time they amused themselves playing
cards outside a saloon. Surely a hack
which has been subjected to these
heterogeneous parties is apt to be
somewhat offensive to the public
taste, if not to the public morals.
These things matter but little to residents in the city, because we choose
our hacks from men we know; but
the stranger is oftentimes surprised
to see that we allow hacks which are
the reverse of smart to stand waiting
for fares.
On Tuesday night the lights went
out about 8.4s p.m. I was just walking over the Bay when the accident
occurred, and I walked on and on,
wondering what the slight difference
which was observable might be.
Really, you know, we waste an awful
lot of time talking about our lighting
system, and I am^afraid that I have
taken up a deal of space in the same
connection to no purpose, because I
saw quite well enough how to find
my way home, and it was a dark, wet
night at that. But an accident such
as took place on Tuesday makes one
pause and consider how terribly dependent we have become on modern
luxuries. I beg leave to say that not
one household in a hundred could
find candles enough to see the night
through if the electric light was cut
off for that length of time. Offices
would not be able to work overtime;
amusement houses would have to disgorge their door-takings, and our
evening occupations would be paralyzed in such an event. Truly each
city is in the hands of its lighting
company and it is a good thing for
the community that in Victoria's case
the man at the head of our lighting
department is no
(frl
m*-e&r.
NOT QUITE THE SAME THING
Niece—Uncle, will whisky dye my  dolly's
dress red?
Uncle—Of course not, you silly child.   Why
do you think so?
Niece—Well,   I   heard  mother   say  it  was
whisky that made your nose so red.
PACIFIC     COAST     HOCKEY
ASSOCIATION
nason 1912-1913
The   following   Official League
Games   will   be   played in   the
"Arena,"     Victoria,    B. C,     as
scheduled below:
Dec. 13—Westminster vs. Victoria.
Dec. »7—Vancouver vs. Victoria.
Jan. 9—Westminster vs. Victoria.
Jan. 17—Vancouver vs. Victoria.
Jan. 31—Westminster vs. Victoria.
Feb. 11—Vancouver vs. Victoria.
Feb. si—Westminster vs. Victoria.
March 4—Vancouver vs. Victoria.
Matches start at 8.30 p.m.
•*-*9&*-*ti«$fS(!^^
j-->?-j>H+*H,*M*4*i-*^-w-M-H^
.
Of Importance
At this season, is the selection of wines. The height
of hospitality can be shown by selecting for your
guests, the purest and best obtainable, represented by
G. Preller & Co's
Clarets     Sauternes
Burgundies
These wines are a delicious vintage, of delicate
bouquet, making a winsome appeal to the palate,
wholesomely rich, yet moderate in effect.
To be obtained from all reliable dealers, and at
all the leading hotels and restaurants.
PITHER Si  LEISER
Wholesale Agents for B. C.
Victoria        Vancouver        Nelson
VICTORIA'S-IDEAL  STORE
Get That Gift at
Gordons
IF you did so last year, you'll do it again
—of course; but to those who don't
know, let us hint some reasons for
doing Christmas Shopping at the beautiful
Yates Street Store. Of course we have
considered the children first. A whole big
department has been reserved for the
display of things they love and it is indeed
a "Wonderland." Some of the useful
appropriate and low-priced gifts that await
your choice in other sections are Pine
Linens, Fancy Work, Neckwear, Gloves,
Perfumery, Slippers, Evening Wraps,
Laces, Jewelry and Furs. Choose at Gordons
739 Yates Street
Telephone 1391 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1912
"The Rose of Panama"
On Friday and Saturday, December
13th and 14th, the Victoria Theatre
was well filled with an audience assembled to hear one of the latest
Viennese musical comedies, "The
Rose of Panama." This is a play
which has but little to recommend it.
The music has none of the sparkling
fascination which has made other operettas live; the plot is as non-existent
as in any other production of the
kind, and there is nothing in the setting of the piece which calls for admiration. That the performance was
not dull and tedious was due to the
appearance of Chapine in the leading
role, a dainty singer with bewitching
mannerisms, and the delightful humour of Mr. Roger Gray, the ubiquitous reporter. As is so usual in companies of this class which appear in
Victoria, the singing was for the most
part mediocre. With the exception of
Chapine no member of the cast proved the possessor of a good voice and
the music helped them but little.
Doubtless it was the mere fact that
"The Rose of Panama" was a musical
comedy that accounted for the good
houses present.
Princess Theatre
"The Runaway Match" is playing
to excellent business this week, in
spite of the fact that it is the week
before Christmas. The comedy is
one of the funniest yet put on by the
company, and is giving immense satisfaction, which accounts for the
good business. j
The Williams management take
great pleasure in announcing for
Christmas week, Rex Beach's grand
melodrama, "The Barrier." It is being produced this week in Seattle,
and the press is unanimous in its
praise. The plot is set in the region
of the great white silence, but differs
from "The Spoilers," in that it takes
place in summer. Miss Page will be
seen at her best in the part of Necia,
and the leading character, Capt. Burrell, will be played by a new member
of the company, Mr. Val Howland,
who conies most highly recommended from the east.     .
The idea of the Princess Theatre
Christmas Present has. become very
popular, and many names are handed
in every evening. The first name
taken out of the box will receive $25,
the second $5, and the third $5.
The Empress Theatre
flu bill of fare provided this week
at the Empress is back at the standard of a few weeks ago and the
vaudeville lovers of the city have been
assured of an entertainment which is
good throughout. Opening with the
"Three Hedders," a balancing troupe
who introduce novelty into their
perilous performance and • make a
oreat success of it, the programme
brings us to Jack Ranahan, a boy
comedian of great talent. Perhaps
his Harry Lauder imitations are a
little far-fetched, but they are very
amusing and the remainder of his
repertoire is good. Fox & Ward are
known the continent over as minstrels of a high type and their appearance this week at the Empress
Theatre has been immensely popular.
One of the best singing acts put on
for some months is contributed by
Wallace & Mack, who sing ballads
and allow themselves to ridicule the
modern rage for rag-time, for which,
may they be blessed. The concluding
item of a first-rate bill is furnished
by the Five Musical Lunds, who
prove their ability on trumpets, cornet*; and xylophones.
The Crystal Theatre
The management of the Crystal
Theatre might well have had signs
out over the town, "The Campbells
Are Coming," for the big turn at
the Broad Street house during the
latter part of 'the week has been that
of the Campbells, a man and woman,
who excel in talking, singing and
trick playing.   Their turn is a great
one and should be seen by all who
like their pictures interspersed with
good vaudeville. Harriet & Dad are
also in the vaudeville line and put a
really good black-face act on. The
pictures have been well up to the
mark, "The Adventures of Smelling
Salts" being a Vitagraph attraction
which won many favourable critic
isms.
The Majestic Theatre
"Brutality" was the title of a strong
film at the Majestic  this week and
showed in no uncertain guise the fatal
results of allowing a surly and un-
Valeska buiatt, who will appear at the
Victoria Theatre Thursday, Dec. 26,
in "The Kiss Waltz"
governable temper to get the better
of its victim. Picture plays of this
nature may do an immense amount
of good, as is evidenced in the course
of the film, the man in question seeing the error of his way through witnessing a vaudeville picture.
Romano's Theatre
The writer of these paragraphs has
seen many thousand moving-pictures,
but till this week he has never seen
a picture which has included a view
of golf links and players in action.
All other forms of sport seem to have
come in for the attention of the
ubiquitous cinematographer, and this
week a photo-play entitled "Two Women," showed that even the royal and
ancient game is not secure from the
invasion of the man with the machine. It was a good picture too, and
the man in the case made a splendid
opening drive from the tee.
The Kiss Waltz
"The Kiss Waltz," fresh from its
year-and-a-half engagement at the
New York Casino, where it was pronounced   the   dancingest   show   ever
seen in New York, will be the attraction at the Victoria Theatre,
Thursday, December 26, the cast
headed by the reigning queen of art
models, Valeska Suratt. "The Kiss
Waltz" comes to America by way of
Vienna, where it was known as "The
Love Waltz," the composer being
Ziehrer, who also wrote the score of
"Mlle. Mischief," Fritzi Scheff's
musical success. His new score is
proclaimed the equal in ringing
melody to the best scores of Gilbert
and Sullivan. The American adaptation was made by Edgar Smith and
the new lyrics are by Matthew Woodward. The staging was done by William J. Wilson and J. C. Huffman, and
Melville Ellis designed the celebrated
gownings that have made the operetta more famous than any other de
tail, save the composer's delightful
music and Miss Suratt's personal
charms.
"The Kiss Waltz" was the first new
musical play of last season in New
York and it landed in fine shape. By
and by numerous other musical pieces
were introduced to Broadway, but
"The Kiss Waltz" held its own
against all new-comers, which is remarkable in view of the surfeit of
musical comedies produced in New
York.
The basis of the play is an abundance of tuneful music and bright ensembles. The story, funny and full
of interest, takes good care of itself.
There are a dozen politely sensational dancing numbers, any one of
which, it is said, would be considered
a feature of the average musical
show.
The beautiful star is on tour supported by what is claimed to be the
largest company of associate players
ever seen in an operetta. The usual
elaborate scenic and costume detail
that obtains in the best of Casino productions is promised, and of course
lovely Valeska is to wear her famous ten-thousand-dollar diamond
dress as well as her dozen other
fashion gowns that are a sensational
vogue in the social world.
"The Quaker Girl"
The most popular musical play of
many seasons, "The Quaker Girl,"
comes to the Victoria Theatre, January 7th and 8th. It is an English
conception with all the best attributes of English opera. Its music
is dainty and delightful with the
charm of delicacy and plenty of the
swing and go which an American
audience appreciates. The great wait.*
song, "Come to thc Ball,'" is typical
of the lyrics of the play, which wer."
written by Adrian Ross of "Merry
Widow" fame, and Percy Greenbank.
The score of the production was
written by Lionel Monckton, well
known to both continents. It is told
as a good joke on the author of "The
Quaker Girl" that notwithstanding
the generous royalties he has been
accustomed to receiving from his
other successes, he was so surprised
by the size of the first cheque he received from the producer of "Thc
Quaker Girl" that he held it until hc
had sent a telegram to Henry B.
Harris asking if some mistake had not
been made in the figures. Mr. Harris' reply was more than reassuring.
"Go ahead and spend the money.
There's more on the way," it read.
By this time the large cheques have
come to be regarded as a matter of
course, for "The Quaker Girl" played
to crowded houses for two years at
George Edwardes' Royal Adelphi
Theatre in London and was the big
hit of the coronation year. It ran all
last year at the Park Theatre, New
York, with tremendous success and is
carfying on this first tour of thc
United States a company of nearly
one hundred, and three carloads of
scenery antl electrical paraphernalia,
so that it is regarded as the most important theatrical attraction of the
season and is drawing great crowds
The Crystal Theatre
Broad Street
The Largest, Best Furnished and Most Comfortable Vaudeville and
Picture Theatre in the City.
Two Acts of Vaudeville, changing Mondays and Thursdays.   Four
Reels of First Run Pictures, changing Monday, Wednesday
and  Friday.   The   Best  Music-—three-piece
Orchestra—in the City.
The biggest Fan on the Coast, removing 37,000 cubic feet of air every
five minutes, insuring you fresh and cool air.
Hours:  Pictures from 1.30 to 5.30 and 6.30 to 11.00.
Vaudeville, 3.00 to 4.00 and 7.00 to 11.00.
VICTORIA THEATRE
The Victoria Amateur
Dramatic Society
Will Present
The Original Pantomime
uThe House that Jack Built
in Vantoria, B. C"
Friday and Saturday, December 20th and 21st 1912
Saturday Matinee at 2.30
Prices, $1.00, 75c, 50c
Seat Sale Commences Wednesday, December 18th
everywhere it is presented. The company is headed by Victor Morley,
with Natalie Alt in tlie title role.
There is a chorus of fifty fresh young
voices and an orchestra of twenty
pieces.
"Naughty Marietta"
Oscar Hammerstein will present
Florence Webber and the full
strength of his comic opera company
when his elaborate production of
"Naughty Marietta" appears in this
city. During the six months that
"Naughty Marietta" packed the Manhattan Opera House, New York City,
the general opinion seemed to be that
it was the most melodious and satisfying opera ever written by Victor
Herbert and the story of the opera,
written in Rida Johnson Young's happiest vein, possesses a tale of romance, adventure and humour seldom
found in an operatic offering. Miss
Webber, because of her splendid
voice and histrionic abilities, gives a
marvelous performance of Marietta,
and her associates were chosen from
hundreds as best suited for their respective characterizations. "Naughty
Marietta" as outlined above and with
its own special orchestra comes to
thc Victoria Theatre on January 13th.
Victoria Theatre
PrincessTheatre
Fomerlr A.O.U.W. Hall
Cor. Yates & Blanchard Sts.
WEEK   COMMENCING   MONDAY
DECEMBER 23
The Williams Stock Co.
will present lh* Great Melodrama
'THE BARRIER"
(Ily Rex Itcacli)
Prices ioc, 20c and 30c
Matineei Wednesday and Saturday
10c and 20c
Curtain, 8.311 p.m. Matineei, 2.4s
Reserved   Scats   on   sale  at   Dean   &
Hiscnck's, cor.  Broad and Yates Sts.
The Original New York Casino
Production
'The Kiss Waltz"
Starring
Valeska Suratt
With  Compnny of 80, will  be performed on Thursday, Dec. 26th
Prices—$2 $1.50, 75c and 50c.
Seat Sale opens Monday, December 23
impress
WEEK DECEMBER 23
Three Times Daily—3.00 p.m.,
7.30 p.m., 9.00 p.m.
The Only Act of Its Kind
Fred-MOZARTS—Eva
Original Snow Shoe Dancers, present
"Snowed In"
Two Pretty Little Playmates
THE QUAKER MAIDS
In Songs ancl Dances that are
Different
A Comic and Original Couple
THE BIMBOS
The Brainstorm Comedian
JOHN NEFF
ED AND MINNIE FOSTER
Comedy Musicians
TWILIGHT PICTURES THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1912
The Week
A Provincial Newspaper' and, Review
published every Saturday by
"The Week" Publishing
Company, Limited
Published  at  1208  Government  St.,
Victoria, B.C., Canada
WILLIAM BLAKEMORE, Editor
PUBLISHERS' ANNOUNCEMENT
The Week Publishing Company
wishes to announce that in lieu of
its usual Christmas Number a special
New Year's Number is in course of
preparation, and will be published the
■ first week in January. It is on the
lines of the many special editions
which The Week has published to set
forth the advantages of Victoria and
Vancouver Island, and deals chiefly
with the future prospects due to. the
rapid development which is now
taking place. It will also include a
literary Supplement, to which there
will be signed contributions by many
of the leading public men of the
Province.
Yuletidt
By Bohemian
At no season of the year does
: struggling humanity resolve itself so
1 naturally into various types as at
Christmas time. From the sky in higK
heaven above to the cellar floor of
the foulest slumbelow will* be found
I conditions which either -are, or at-e
', not, typical of the glad festival ro*.*]i.'i
which there still cling the customs
and habits that have survived the centuries.
There is a tendency among a certain class of people to eschew the
Christmas spirit; to affect an air of
disdainful contempt for the time-honoured practices, but this class, fortunately, is still in the minority and the
prediction that Christmas will wane
in popularity and be observed merely
as a holiday and nothing more is still
as far from fulfilment as in the days
when it first was made. The very
presence of the modern "Scrooge" but
serves to perpetuate the Christmas
spirit, for "Scrooge" is a type which
most of us know and in our en*d*eavor
to be as unlike him as possible we
carry on the good work of rejoicing
with those that do rejoice.
I have often wondered whether
Christmas would be kept as it is, if by
some sad chance the world were deprived of children for a brief space.
We are so accustomed in our "Olympian" majesty to pretend that we celebrate the day with customary honours
because it pleases the children, and
that Christmas is essentially a children's day, that one might be pardoned for believing that a world of bachelors and old maids would agree to
refrain from the customary observances. And yet there are more pathetic sights to be seen among such at
the present day than even among
those children who have no Chr'stmas
joy.
The bachelor in a strange country
on Christmas Day; the spinster unknown and unbeloved in a city where
her friends are not, both feel that on
this day above all others they are especially alone and objects of pity in
an otherwise merry world. They are
the ones who really feel the loss of
Christmas, for to their loneliness is
added the sharper pain of memory's
tooth.
Apart from such sad consideration,
however, I am inclined to believe tliat
the average man and woman, but
more particularly the man, enjoys the
frolic of Christmas every whit as
much as do his children. It is fine to
feel young again and at this time of
year man is permitted to throw his
dignity to the winds without losing it
and play the old, old games with as
much zest as when he too was a
youngster.
But there is a far more serious aspect of the case than the attitude o'
the modern "Olympian"; and that is
the viewpoint of the modern child. It
is a question whether children of today appreciate Christmas as much as
do their elders. : Is it possible to
arouse the same interest in Santa
Claus as a real individual as it was
twenty years ago? The illustrated
papers nobly come to the rescue each
year and recall the same old jokes and
supply the same old pictures, but I
doubt if the child of the twentieth
century can be persuaded to do more
than give a half-hearted consent to
the illusions that are practised for his
benefit. The children are growing too
wise and though they hang up their
stockings, they do so because it is the
recognized method by whicii to obtain
the Christmas present, and not because they believe that the master of
the Reindeer team will really come
down the chimney to fill them.
How can we expect children who
play with model aeroplanes and disdain the stories of fairies and captive
princesses, sating their ripened intellects with treatises on elementary
mechanics, to do more than help us
out in the game of pretence by a
graceful acquiescence in the established rules of the celebration? For
they are most considerate in this
matter. No grown-up is half as sensitive as a child, be he boy, or be
she girl; and when they see the
"Olympians" striving so gallantly to
do the correct thing, straining every
nerve to maintain the traditions of
the past, the children are too polite
and too considerate to evince their
superiority. For well they know that
the said "Olympians" enjoy the
Christmas fun and they are well content to play their part.     i
So be it. Whether the elders play
for the children, or the children play
for the elders, what matters it, so
long as the play goes' bh? The man
or woman, the boy or girl, who would
with a sour look endeavor to correct
the spirit of the season would be better if he or she had never been born,
for Christmas should be to one and
all the time* for joy and love; the
time for meetings and reconciliations
and the time to which we can continue to look forward as long as
Christmas itself shall last.
So a Merry Christmas, my readers,
to you all from
THE MORAL  REFORMER.
Rev. Mr. St. Clair has declared that the
classic statues in the Normal School are a
menace to public morals.
"I've seen some fences that I fear
Will have to be pulled down,"
The M.R. said, "their influence
Would soon corrupt the town."
"Why?" cried their owners, much distressed.
'Because the lumber is undressed."
"I would not let a child of mine
The restaurants frequent;
They shock me when I go to dine."
Some asked "To what extent?"
The M.R. said, "Well, I declare,
I've seen the salad dressing there."
"The City Hall has got to go—
You citizens may stare."
"It cost so much,"' they all protest.
"Why did you put it there?"
The M.R. cried, "My reason's rough—
Southern exposure, that's enough.
"Tlie maple trees all shock me too,
You should not let them prow."
"What's wrong with them," the people  ask,
"You see we did not know."
"Blind, blind," the M.R. cried again.
"They have no fig-leaves—that is plain."
—Toronto Saturday Night.
CHRISTMAS SONG
[Copyright applied for. Music rights reserved.]
Wreath the Laurel,
Twine the Ivy,
Oh! bring the Holly here.
Por on this day a King was born
So let us give him welcome,
With song and hearty cheer.
Laurel for the conqueror over Death and dismal Sin.
Ivy for the kind, kind love, that to all hearts
doth cling.
Let Holly berries bright and red
Signal His blood for sinners shed.
No costly litter borne by slaves
Conveyed Him on His road.
But the humble ass so gently
Carried the sacred load.
No regal couch of gilded wood,
Received the precious babe.
But he was in a stable born,
And in a manger laid.
He lived a life of penury.
He lived a life of scorn.
And for us the bitterness
Of death on cross was borne.
For us was shed the sacred blood
To us tbeboon is given;
To lave us in the sacred flood,
And rise to Him in heaven.
The King did come to conquer Death,
And tane our sins away;
So let us all right joyfully,
Carol this Christmas Day.
Oliver Wendell Holmes—An Appreciation
Written Specially for The Week by
J. Arthur Hill
The year 1809 was, in Homeric
phrase, "a goodly nurse of heroes."
On both sides of the Atlantic, great
souls "descended into generation"—
most notable among them, Darwin,
Tennyson, Gladstone, Fitzgerald, Lincoln and Holmes. The last-named of
this band of heroes is not the least
among them, though far enough from
being the greatest. Tennyson ancl
Darwin are among the Immortals in
their historic influence on thought.
Carlyle's "Old Fitz" is the smallest
of the group, as producer or as active
force, though lovable in his eccentricities, and to be thanked for his one
small masterpiece, ("Omar Khayyam"). Holmes, though a considerable producer, was no genius; yet he
was a significant man, a man whose
influence was quietly great, who has
no enemies and many friends, a man
of unfailing geniality and wit, yet
capable of much serious meditation
on the deep things of life.
The incidents of Dr. Holmes' life
are not of striking character, and can
be sketched in few words. Born at
Cambridge   (Mass.)   on  August 29,
hurt. But, much to his surprise, a rereading of the books in question resulted in a re-adjustment of opinion.
Mr. Lang is right; Holmes is mostly
—not entirely, but mostly—for young
folks. We who first read him, say, a
quarter of a century ago, in the days
of our callow youth, now find him
almost dull. How is this? Where is
now the visionary gleam? Where is
it fled, the glory and the dream?
The cause of the disenchantment
may not be the same in all cases; but
it may be doubted if the cause suggested by Mr. Lang is the true one
for the majority of readers. He attributes the popularity of the Breakfast Table series to "the description
of the other boarders, and to the kind
of novel which connects the fortunes
of these personages," plus the "wit,
wisdom and learning." It may be
partly true, but I venture to suggest
that Mr. Lang misses the main reason.
First, as to the "kind of novel." It
is improbable that many readers are
interested in the characters. They are
too   puppet-like;   the   voice   which
CHRISTMAS EVE AT SEA.
Yonder are the lads and lasses at their dancing—
Ah the Yuletide dances and the whispers in between!
Yonder goes the music, and the firelight glancing
On the red holly-berries and the leaves glossy green.
Good cheer, and comfort, and happy folk together,
Warm while blows the storm there by lonely moor and tree;
All the windy night time, all the wintry weather,
Far away my heart is, with my lad at sea!
Here be lights and laughter, and the fiddles' thrumming;
There maybe the starless night, the roaring gale,
All the Christmas tune they hear, the wild wind humming
Shrilly through the frozen shrouds and stiffened sail.
When in sheltered houses all the folk are sleeping,
When the music's silent and the dancers' glee,
Cold and wet and wakir.g maybe he'll be keeping
On the wide dark writers Christmas eve at sea.
And it's oh, if he were here with the lads and lasses dancing,
Standing up to dance there so gallant to be seen;
And it's oh to see his face now, wliere the fire is glancing
On the red holly-berries and the leaves glossy green!
Here are lights and laughter, and friends all together,
And it's I that wish him here now a-sitting down by me.
In the stormy night time, in the wintry weather,
Christ, that stilled the waters, be with lads at sea!
C. FOX SMITH.
[Repeat]
Wreath the Laurel, etc.
—SENIAB.
1809, he was educated at local schools
and at Harvard. For some time he
read law, but eventually turned to
medicine; and from 1833 to 1835 he
studied in Paris under Louis, the famous pathologist. Returning home,
he began general practice. In 1838-9
he was Professor of Anatomy at
Dartmouth College, and in 1847 he
became Professor of Anatomy and
Physiology at Harvard. He was relieved of the Physiology in 1871, but
continued to lecture on Anatomy until 1882. His medical practice was
never large, and he made no special
effort to cultivate it. He had almost
too much sympathy with his suffering
patients; and this humanity made
some of the work very painful to
him. His domestic life was happy,
and he had the joy of living to see
his son attain distinction as a judge.
He died in his chair, "painlessly, as
so humane a man well deserved to
make his escape out of life," on Oct.
7, 1894. (Life and Letters, by J. T.
Morse, vol. ii, p. 92).
Mr. Andrew Lang, in his "Adventures Among Books," makes an interesting confession. After remarking that some books improve as we
grow older (Shakespeare, Scott), that
some remain the same (Homer,
Thackeray, Moliere) and that others
lose their charm as the years pass,
he goes on to say;
"In the case of Dr. Holmes' books,
T am very sensible of this disenchanting effect of time and experience. The
'Professor at the Breakfast Table' and
the novels came into my hands when
I was very young, in 'green, unknowing youth.' They seemed extraordinary, new, fantasies of wisdom and
wit; the reflections were such as surprised me by their depth, the illustrations dazzled by their novelty and
brilliance. Probably they will still
be as fortunate with young readers,
and I am to be pitied, I hope, rather
than blamed, if 1 cannot, like the
blackbird—
" 'Recapture
The first  fine careless rapture'."
On first reading this criticism, the
present writer—being an admirer of
Holmes—was disposed to feel rather
comes from them is too obviously
that of Holmes himself, in variously
disguised tones. The Autocrat is
Holmes the literary man, almost undisguised. The Professor is Dr.
Holmes—in Sunday clothes, and in
theological vein. The Poet is the
Professor, in a rhyming mood. The
other characters are stage properties;
even the best of them—Little Boston
—is not alive. Holmes was not a
creator. We are interested in his
characters, not for what they are, but
for the quite impersonal things they
say.
Then, as to the "wit, wisdom and
learning." Inasmuch as the books appeal to the rather serious young man,
the wit can hardly be the chief attraction. The wisdom—a vague term
—cannot be supposed to possess much
charm for the male adolescent, who,
serious though he may be, does not
usually over-estimate the wisdom of
his elders. And, finally, the "learning" must frequently miss him by going over his head.
If, then, Holmes' popularity is not
due to the features alleged, to what
shall we attribute it. I suggest that
it is largely due to his attitude towards Religion.
Mr. Lang, as a joyous Hellene,
happily free from the excessive religiosity and "conviction of sin"
which hung over New England a hundred years ago*, will naturally have
a practically blind eye for Holmes' religious idiosyncracies, which, if perceived at all, will appear as rather
uninteresting symptoms of the disease of Puritanism in course of convalescence. But it is precisely this
characteristic that has had the chief
part in making him popular. He was
a son of Calvinistic parents, but grew
up—after the beginning of his university days—in an atmosphere of liberal thought. The blending of the
two influences accounts for his character. He was a Puritan who had
renounced the Puritan's beliefs.
Though repudiating the rigid Calvinism in which he had been  nurtured,
he did not rebound—as so many do—
into extremes of cynical or irrational
denial. His sweet and genial tolerance, and his genuinely religious
spirit, make him lovable to all; while
to those young men who* find themselves struggling with doubt, unable
to wear the "Hebrew old clothes," yet
longing for raiment of some kind
wherewith to cover their spiritual
nakedness—to these he comes as companion and helper, friend and inspirer.
The young reader sees at once that
here is a man wh has felt as he feels;
a man who knows the pain of parting with the old faiths, but who,
though suffering, can keep a kindly
mind and can refrain from the Brad-
laugh kind of violence and frenzy.
The terrible preaching of Jonathan
Edwards, who reckoned the contemplation of the lost as forming part of
the elect souls' bliss, and the similar
though rather less lurid preaching of
the eighteenth century revivalists in
England, had left men's minds—as
Holmes said—branded with the blinding white cautery of Gehenna (Pro-
fesor, p. 238)* and the scorch was
long in healing. Holmes himself once
said that he "could never quite
emerge from under the shadow of the
old orthodox Hell," (Life and Letters, vol. i, p. 282), in spite of the
fact that his intellect rejected the idea.
We remember that he was too sympathetic to make a good doctor; and
it was natural enough that so kind-
hearted a man could not believe in
eternal torment, however deeply-dyed
the sinner. Evidently he found a
grateful saying in the epitaph which
he partially quotes in the "Poet" (p.
217) from Macdonald's "David Elgin-
brod":
"Here lie I, Martin Elginbrodde;
Hae mercy o' my soul, Lord God;
As I wad do, were I Lord God,
And ye were Martin Elginbrodde."
He frequently tells us what he believes. "I have a creed . . . none
better, and none shorter. It is told
in two words—the two first of the
Paternoster" (Autocrat, p. 74. It is
curious that such a good writer
should commit the "two first" solecism; but it is a small matter). And, as
to the meaning of life, and the question of a future state: "I, like you,
am an optimist—not quite so confident, perhaps, but still living in the
habitual trust that this life is a school,
the seemingly harsh discipline of
which will be explained when we get
into one of the upper classes. I dare
not say that we are sure of this; but
it is the only belief which makes life
worth living." (Letter to Mr. Kimball, in "Life and Letters," vol. ii, p.
149).
Holmes' interest and influence,
then, were chiefly due to his religious
gospel, which exalted character over
creed, love over logic. He helped his
thoughful young readers to get rid of
the old fetters, helping them at the
same time to retain the essentials of
religion. But, once having got free-
having grown up, so to say, and attained self-reliance—having fixed up
their individual Scheme of Things—
they find that he is no longer a hero.
They have outgrown the need of his
help; and that is why the glory has
departed. That is why we, who as
young men so reverenced our Autocrat, now turn his pages so languidly.
We confess that we feel a meanness,
almost an apostacy. But it cannot be
helped. "The man has not lived who
can feed us ever."
•The references to the Breakfast Table
series are to the three-volume edition published by Walter Scott, Ltd.
(To be Concluded Next Week)
BOOK NOTES
At the Victoria Book and Stationery Co., 1004 Government
St., Victoria, B.C.:
"A Cry in the Wilderness,"
by Mary E. Waller.  $1.25.
"Scientific Sprague," by Francis Lynde.   $1.25.    ,
"The    Mountain    Girl,"    by
Payne Erskine.   $1.25. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1912
BUILDING PERMITS
December 11 to 17
December 11—
Wightman & Tabbernon—Dallas Rd.—Store and Dwelling.$ 3,500
D. A. Wallace—Action St.—Dwelling   2,500
B. Ansith—Cowichan St.—Dwelling  1,800
Capt. Crawford—Dallas Rd.—Garage  200
A. Burbridge—Belmont Ave.—Alterations  1,800
Godfrey Bros.—Gov't & Johnson—Cigar Store  160
December 12—
G. T. Phipps—Richardson St.—Dwelling   3,000
W. B. Revercomb—Lee Ave.—Dwelling  3,000
R. W. Whaley—Harbinger Ave—Dwelling  2,800
Dr. H. A. Whillans—Gorge Road—Dwelling  6,000
F. Middleton—Prior St.—Alt  200
J. A. McQuay—King St.—Dwelling  3,300
J. R. Barker—Slater St.—Dwelling  1,950
December 13—
G. A. Fodensko—Pandora St.—Garage   300
Jos. Renouf—Stanley Ave.—Garage  2,500
G. B. Simon—Cormorant St.—Store  225
H. T. Knott—Ridge St.—Dwelling  2,750
C. Boniface—Wildwood Ave.—Dwelling  2,200
Dr. R. L. Fraser—St. Charles and Rockland-—Dwelling.. 17,000
L. L,a Lond—Summit Ave.—Dwelling  3,800
December 14—
E. Miles—First St.—Dwelling  1,900
D. McTavish—Blanchard St.—Alt  150
John Raymond—Broad St.—Store  300
T. J. Bryant—Acton St.—Dwelling  2,800
December 16—
Mrs. J. James—Green Block—Alt.  150
C. F. Wharton—Dwelling  1,500
A. M. Caswell—Bushby St.—Dwelling  2,500
John Greenwood—Washington St.—Alt  500
December 17—
Eric Anderson—Moss St.—Dwelling  2,500
D. J. Johnson—Foul Bay Road—Dwelling  2,500
Mrs. E. Maynard—Shakespeare St.—Dwelling  700
Smith & Adams—Graham St.—Dwelling  1,500
W. A. V. Robertson—Pembroke St.—Stable  300
H. Thomsuld—Rugby & Myrtle Sts.—Dwelling  1,500
GOVERNMENTAL SUPERVISION OF BANKS
By H. M. P. Eckardt
I—England and France
In view of the general expectation that the new Bank Act, to be
submitted to the Canadian Parliament by Hon. W. T. White, will
contain provisions for external supervision of the banks, it will be
interesting to take note of some of the methods by which the banking
institutions operating in the principal European countries are supervised
and controlled.
Owing to the predominating position held by British banking, one
naturally turns first to the United Kingdom in making this examination.
There is, however, very little supervision exercised by the British
Government over the banks within its direct jurisdiction. Perhaps that
is one reason why British banking occupies its pre-eminent place.
We may consider the Bank of England on the one side, and the
joint stock banks on the other.
No Actual Supervision by Government—The Bank of England is
controlled altogether by its proprietors or shareholders through the
medium of the governor and court of directors. The proprietors elect
annually a governor, deputy governor, and a court of 24 directors; and
the supreme control rests with the body thus elected. Over the actions
and business of the bank the government exercises no actual supervision; the only stipulation referring to the matter being that under
which the bank is required to furnish weekly statements of position to
the Chancellor of the Exchequer and to the Commissioners of Stamps
and Taxes. And the court of directors may make what by-laws they
please for governing the bank's business, provided the by-laws be not
repugnant to the laws of the kingdom.
The British joint stock banks, too, are controlled altogether by the
owners of their stock. Also they are free from governmental supervision or inspection. In the United Kingdom it is customary for the
banks to have their annual balance sheets audited by chartered
accountants; and the certificate of the auditing house is published
with the balance sheet in the annual report. But the action of the
banks in calling in the accountants is purely voluntary; each bank
selects the firm which shall audit its affairs.
Continental Systems Are Different—Upon turning to the continent
of Europe we find a different state of affairs.   It should be remem-
Blue Printing
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Surveyors' Instrument* and
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Electric Blue Print & Map
Company
214 Central Bldg., View Street
Phone 1534        Victoria, B. C.
Fire Insurance, Employers'
Liability & Contractors'
Bonds Written
See us about Real Estate
Investments
Green & Burdick Bros.
Limited
Cor. Broughton and Langley Streets
Telephone 4169                               Telephone 4170
17he
Taylor Mill Co.
Limited
All kinds of Building Material
Lumber   ,'   Sash   .'   Dooi
Telephone 564
North Government Street, Victoria
Royal Bank Chambers
Vuftoria, B. C.
Thomas Hooper
Jrchtted
522 Winch Building
Vancouver, B. C.
The Rent Makes Payments
on this Positive House
Snap
We can deliver for only $500 cash, a practically new,  modern, 5
roomed cottage, modern in every way, with cement floor in basement,
furnace pipes, fireplace, built-in bookcases, etc.    The lot is within
half a block of the Oak Bay Car Line.     Garage built six months
ago.   There are several fine Oak trees on the property.   The owner
has a client who will take lease for six months at $35.00 per month.
The payments are only $35.00 per month.
Will you let us show you this at once
Price $4500
With $500 cash and $35 per month
PEMBERTON & SON
CORNER FORT AND BROAD STREETS
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Contains 252,800,000 acrei of rich (arm
and  fruit  lands,   timtcr,  mineral  and
coal lands.  Railroads now building will
open up to settlers and investors.   We
specialize on British Columbia Investments and can tell you about opportunities to GET  IN  AT  THE  BEGINNING in town lota, townsite subdivisions or farm, timber, mineral, coal
lands and water powers, wholesale or
retail.    Your name and address on a
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information FREE!
WRITE OR CALL
Natural Resources
Security Co., Ltd
Paid-up Capital $250,000
Joint  Owners  and  Sole Agents   Fort
George Townsite
Sis Bower Building, Vancouver, B.C.
may 18                                         aug 17
A. W. Bridgman
Real Estate, Financial and Insurance Agent
Conveyancer and Notary Public
Established 1858 .
yi          . Commercial  Union  Assurance Co.,   Ltd.
Agent of London. England
Canada Accident Insurance Company
Imperial Underwriters' Corporation
Northern  Counties  Investment  Trust,  Limited
of Bradford, England.
1007 Government Street                     Victoria, B. C.
What Shall I
Give Her?
Why not send her a box of Our
Chocolates?   A more appropriate and suitable gift could not
be found.
The Palace of Sweets
747 Fort Street
Victoria, B. C.
Chas. Hayward                            Reginald Hayward                            p. Caselton
President                                          Sec'y-Treas.                                 Manager
The B. C. Funeral Co.
(Successors to Charles Hayward)
Late of 1016 Government Street, have removed to their new building,
734 Broughton Street, above Douglas.
Phonea s»35.  "36,  "37.  "3>,                                                         Established 1867
Mrs. D. B. McLaren
Teacher of Singing and
Voice Production
Terms on Application    Phone X2308
P. O. Box 44Q THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1912
bered, while considering the various systems, that the continental
peoples appear to be strongly disposed toward bureaucratic systems. If
anything goes wrong with a business there is a marked tendency to
establish a new government office and to appoint parties to supervise
or control the business—at good salaries, of course.
Naturally the Bank of France comes first in view when one undertakes to look over continental banking. The bank is privately owned
—all the shares are owned by private parties. There are about 30,000
stockholders, one-third of whom have not more than one share. Only
the 200 largest shareholders are allowed to vote for the general council
of the bank. The affairs of the bank are managed by the governor,
two sub-governors, and the general council of the bank.
Named by President of France—The governor and two sub-
governors are named by the President of the French Republic on the
proposal of the minister of finance. The general council is composed
of 15 regents and three censors. The censors would perform the duties
of auditors or inspectors. Five of the regents and the three censors
must be selected from the commercial and industrial classes. So,
through its appointment of the governor and sub-governors, whom wc
may compare with the general manager and his lieutenants in Canada,
the government exercises a measure of control over the bank. Then
the President of the Republic also names the managers of the branches.
He does so upon the report of the minister of finance in each case upon
three names submitted by the governor of the bank. Each branch has
a local board of directors "selected from the best qualified commercial,
industrial and agricultural representatives in the region."
Special Privileges Were Granted—The right of the French government to exercise a special measure of control over the Bank of France
arose through the granting by the state of special privileges to the bank.
Thus the bank was given the monopoly of note issue and sole custody
of the government funds. Outside of the Bank of France there are
only a few great joint stock banks.
The monopoly of note issue and the extraordinary powers conferred upon the central bank tended to prevent the development of a
system under which a considerable number of large, strong institutions
would be found ir competition for the business of the country.
The French credit banks, as they are called, were formed under
the general law for joint stock companies. Under this law industrial
companies as well as banks are organized. It is required that at least
one-fourth of the capital stock shall be paid in cash, and the government takes strict measures to see that this is done. However, beyond
requiring the publication of an annual report, the government does not
undertake to supervise or control the operations of the banks.—The
Monetary Times.
(To be continued)
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE  NOTICE that  I, Archibald  Pater
son,  of Vancouver,  B.C.,  occupation  Gentleman, intends to apply for permission to pur
chase, the   following   described   lands:—Com*
mencing at  a post  planted about  two miles
west from the western extremity of Nahlouza
Lake, marked S. E. Corner, thence north 80
chains; west 80 chains; south 80 chains; east
80, chains;   to  point  of commencement,  containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated 13th October, 1912.
ARCHIBALD PATERSON.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 Jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, John Friers, of Vancouver,   B.C.,   occupation   Baker,   intends   to
apply   for   permission   to   purchase   the   following   described   lands:—Conimencing   at   a
post planted about  5 miles distant  and in a
north-westerly  direction from  the  north-western extremity of Sigutla Lake, marked S. W.
corner, thence north 80 chains, east 80 chains,
south 80 chains, west 80 chains, to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres, more or
less.
Dated 21st August,  1912.
JOHN FRIERS.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, Albert Boyce, of Nanaimo, B.C., occupation Rancher, intends to
apply for permission t" purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about six miles in a westerly direction
from the western extremity of Kwalcho Lake,
marked N. E. corner, thence south 40 chains,
west 80 chains, north 40 chains, east 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing 320
acres, more or less.
Dated 25th August, 1912.
ALBERT BOYCE,
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 11
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Thomas Bone of Luton,
England,   occupation   Postmaster,   intends   to
apply   for   permission   to   purchase   the   following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post  planted   about  one  mile   east   from   the
north-western    extremity    of    Sigutla    Lake,
marked S. W. Corner, thence north 80 chains,
east 40 chains,    south    80 chains,    west 40
chains to point of commencement, containing
320 acres, more or less.
Dated uth October, 1912.
THOMAS BONE,
Percy Gadsden, Agent.
ijov. 9 ' jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, Alfred Hills, of Vancouver,  B.C., occupation Laborer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted  about  one  mile   west   and  one   mile
north from the western extremity of Nahlouza
Lake, marked S. W. corner, thence north 80
chains, east 80 chains, south 80 chains, west
80  chains  to   point   of  commencement,   containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated 13th October,  1912.
ALFRED HILLS,
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Hubert Lee Harris, of
Bella Coola, B.C., occupation prospector, intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about three miles distant
and in a north-westerly direction from the
north-western extremity of Sigutla Lake,
mariced South-west Corner, thence north 80
chains, east 80 chains, south 80 chains, west
80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated 20th August,   1912.
HUBERT LEE HARRIS,
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, Manley E. Marsh, of
Vancouver, B. C., occupation Mason, intends
to apply for permission  to purchase the following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post planted about two miles distant and in
a   westerly   direction   from   the   Western   extremity of Kwalcho Lake, marked N. W. Corner,  thence south  80  chains, east 80 chains,
north  80 chains, west  80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres, more or
less.
Dated 25th August, 1912.
MANLEY E. MARSH.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE  notice  that, Charley  Don,  of  Vancouver, B.C., occupation Labourer, intends to
apply   for   permission   to   purchase   the   following   described   lands:—Comemncing   at   a
post planted about 7 miles in a westerly direction from the western extremity of Kwalcho
Lake, marked N. E. Corner, thence south 80
chains, west 80 chains, north 80 chains, east
80  chains,   to  point  of  commencement,  containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated 27th August,  1912.
CHARLEY  DON,
Percy Gadsden, Agent.
nov. 9
jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Annie Charlotte Gadsden,
of Bella Coola, B.C., occupation Housewife,
intends to appiy for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted one mile distant and in a
north-westerly direction from the northwestern extremity of Sigutla Lake, marked S.
W. corner, thence north 80 chains, east 80
chains, south 80 chains, west 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated 20th August, 1912.
ANNIE CHARLOTTE GADSDEN.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 Jan.4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE   notice   that   I,   Robert   Boyce,   of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Rancher, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post planted about 6 miles distant and in a
north-westerly    direction    from    the    northwestern   extremity   of   Sigutla   Lake,t marked
S.  W.  Corner, tnence north 80 chains, east
80  chains,   south   80   chains,  west  80  chains
to   point   of   commencement,   containing   640
acres, more or less.
Dated 21st August,  1912.
ROBERT BOYCE.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I,  George Brinkley,  of
Vancouver,   B.C.,   occupation   Bricklayer,   intends   to   apply   for   permission   to   purchase
the   following  described   lands:—Commencing
at  a post planted  at  the western  extremity
of Nahlouza    Lake,    marked    N. E. Corner,
thence south 80 chains, west 80 chains, north
80  chains,  east  80  chains  to  point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated 12th October, 1912.
GEORGE BRINKLEY,
Percy Gadsden, Agent.
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE   notice   that   Robert   Beveridge,   of
Vancouver,   B.C.,   occupation   Miner,   intends
to apply tor permission to purchase the following   described   lands:—Commencing, at   a
post   planted   at   the   western   extremity   of
Nahlouza Lake, marked S. E. Corner, tnence
north   80   chains,   west   80   chains,   south   80
chains, east 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated 12th October, 1912.
ROBERT BEVERIDGE,
Percy Gadsden, Agent.
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE   notice   that   I,   Edward   Smjth,   of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Laborer, intends
to  apply for permission to purchase the following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post planted on the north shore of Nahlouza
Lake, marked S. E. Corner, thence north 80
chains, west 80 chains, south 80 chains, east
80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated 12th October, 1912.
EDWARD SMITH.
Percy Gadsden, Agent.
nov. 9   jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Frederick Dodds, of Vancouver,  B.C., occupation Laborer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
?ilanted about 8 miles in a westerly direction
rom tbe western extremity of Kwalcho Lake,
marked N. E. corner, thence south 40 chains,
west 80 chains, north 40 chains, east 80 chains
to   point of commencement,   containing   320
acres, more or less.
Dated 27th August, 1912.
FREDERICK DODDS,
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 Jan. 11
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, Robert J. Baxter, of
Vancouver,  B.  C, occupation Gentleman, intends   to   apply   for   permission   to   purchase
the  following  described   lands:—Commencing
at a  post  planted  two  miles  west  from  the
western extremity of Nahlouza Lake, marked
N.  E.   corner,  tnence  south 80 chains,  west
80 chains, north 80 chains, east 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated  13th October,  1912.
ROBERT J. BAXTER.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, Mark Smith, of Vancouver,  B.C., occupation Laborer, intends to
apply   for   permission   to   purchase   the   following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post planted on the north shore of Nahlouza
Lake,   marked   S.   W.   Corner,   thence   north
80 chains,  east 80  chains,   south  80 chains,
west  80  chains  to  point   of  commencement,
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated 12th August, 1912.
MARK SMITH.
Percy Gadsden, Agent.
nov. 9
jan. 4
F
The Most Useful Gift
of All
As well as the most acceptable in a vast majority of instances is
assuredly an-—
ELECTRIC IRON
They never wear out, and are a constant source of comfort to the
user. Besides, the initial cost is very low, while the consumption
of current is quite infinitesimal.
B. C. Electric Railway Company, Ltd.
Light and Power Department Telephone 1609
v" THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1912
ATownsite most Interesting
Map of
BRITISH COLUMBIAN
shewing Existing * Rejected Railways
ALBERTA
STAtES
D
deer.
ROPPED by nature long ages ago into the lap of the
richest and most picturesque agricultural valley in
British Columbia—the Salmon River Valley—just
north of the Fraser and.Nechaco rivers in the District of
Cariboo. Let us tell you how this wonderful valley happens
to be, and you will appreciate the Townsite of Fort Salmon
all the more. Hundreds of years ago what is now the valley
of the Salmon River was once the bottom of a huge freshwater inland sea, into which rivers and streams washed down
the rich earth from the mountain sides and spread it over the
floor of the deep. Bye-and-bye this inland sea became almost
dry, and great sea-weeds grew from its bottom and along its
shores. Then, when the waters were gone, except for a
stream or small lake here and there, the great sea-weeds died
and left a rich legacy of decayed vegetable matter that
enriched the soil. And so, rich grasses sprang up, and wild
flowers and small fruits, too. These flourished season after
season, only to die every autumn and further fatten the soil.
Huge trees grew up, but many years ago a great fire
destroyed most of them, leaving this wonderful Salmon River
Valley just as you find it today, the richest agricultural valley
in British Columbia, again covered with a luxurious growth
of succulent grasses, with flowers and small fruits, with an
odd thicket of trees to shelter the birds, the moose and the
You can buy the finest land in this valley for as little as $13 per acre.   About 300 good settlers did so this year.   Their
investment exceeds $300,000, and with buildings and equipment added, probably $700,000 will represent the total expenditure.
FORT SALMON
is the name of our townsite, which lies right in the lap of this bountiful offering of
Nature to present-day farmers, market-gardeners and stockmen. You couldn't find
another such location for a large and busy distributing centre if you combed British
Columbia from one end to the other. And right here let us tell you something of the
greatest importance to any city. The lay of the ground lends itself so admirably to
the installation of satisfactory and sanitary drainage and sewerage facilities, and the
water supply is so pure and inexhaustible that any self-respecting typhoid fever germ
would blush with shame at the mere mention of Fort Salmon.
To live and to breathe in Fort Salmon will be a pleasure.
But don't imagine that this townsite is on a steep side-hill to which you would
have to glue your buildings to keep them from falling into the Salmon River—
because it isn't.
Now let us tell you about transportation facilities. The Salmon River, which
flows through the townsite, is navigable right down to the big Fraser River, into
which it empties. But that's a mere detail. You want to know about railways. Just
look at the map. They may not all finally run right through the centre of Fort
Salmon, but they are headed that way through the Salmon River Valley, and Fort
Salmon occupies the great strategic position for a railway centre and distributing
point. One thing we do know, however, is that the B. C. & Alaska Railway survey
was completed this year right through from Fort George to Summit Lake, which lies
about four miles north of Fort Salmon, and the Pine Pass & Edmonton P-nlway is
projected past the northeast corner.
Three large blocks of lots have been reserved for railway purposes, and more
will be set aside as required. For public buildings, 198 x 120 feet are reserved, and
for school purposes 297 x 120 feet. On the banks of the Salmon River there is a full
block of 36 lots for park purposes.
A large portion of the townsite is already cleared, so that building operations
may be begun without difficulty or delay.
PRICES are from $18.00 to $23.00 per Lot
All lots have 33 feet frontage on streets 66 feet wide, and run back 120 feet to a 20-foot lane
To introduce and to advertise Fort Salmon Townsite to the public is the reason
for the remarkably low prices at which the lots are offered. Only a limited number
will be sold at $18 for inside lots and $23 for corners. The terms, of course, at such
absurdly low prices are naturally cash with every purchase. We couldn't do otherwise, as you will readily understand when we tell you that there is absolutely no
extra charge whatever for the title deeds. Every purchaser will receive an
Indefeasible Title to all his lots immediately upon payment of the purchase price.
And don't overlook the fact that every Indefeasible Title is guaranteed by the
Government of British Columbia, by whom the plan of the townsite has been duly
accepted and registered.
We might also mention incidentally that the Western Canada Townsites Limited
are the sole owners of Fort Salmon Townsite, with the exception of a quarter interest
now owned and held by the British Columbia Government, which is not placing any
of its lots on the market, owing to its policy of waiting for high values.
At the conclusion of the sale of Fort Salmon Townsite a description of every lot
sold will be put on a separate ticket. Then from all the tickets two tickets will be
drawn, the owner of the lot described on the first being entitled to a $4,500 bungalow,
and the owner of the lot described on the second to a $2,800 bungalow.   These
bungalows will be erected at Fort Salmon free of all cost to the lucky purchasers
by whom they have been drawn.
Get in now on the ground floor. You will make money without effort or without
risk by simply waiting for the onward* march of a city. The people who have made
fortunes in real estate are those who got in before land values advanced. Many of
them have been literally kicked into being millionaires over-night.
British Columbia is the great opportunity of today. British Columbia spells
success. It is going ahead at a pace to make the whole world gasp. If you cannot
grow up in this wonderful country, and grow up with it, LET YOUR MONEY
GROW UP WITH IT.   Become identified with it in some way.
BUY PROPERTY IN FORT SALMON-AS MUCH AS YOU CAN
AFFORD. Don't wait and be sorry five or six years hence, because you lacked
courage and faith today. You must surely realize that the time to invest is before
values go up. That time is today. The man who bought yesterday is a day ahead
of you already. You owe it to yourself antl to your family to lay up something while
your earning capacity is good, so that you may live at ease in your old age, ancl leave
something for your children to enjoy after you are gone. Buy Fort Salmon lots
today at the rock bottom prices.   To buy and to hold is to amass wealth.
Western Canada Townsites, hd.
Sole Owners and Selling Agents
Sales Office, Room 8, 407 Hastings St., W., Vancouver, B. C.
Open Evenings, J.30 to Q.30 O'clock Telephone, Seymour 6430
COUPON No. s
Western Canada Townsites, Ltd.
Room 8, 407 Hastings St. W.
Vancouver, B. C.
Gentlemen,—Bc goocl enough to send me
illustrated booklet and full particulars
regarding the Fort Salmon Townsite.
Name
Address THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1912
HIS HONOR the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council has been pleased to appoint Messrs.
H. G. Parson, of Golden; A. M. Harper, of
the City of Vancouver; J. A. McKelvie, of the
City of Vernon; R. A. Stoney, of the City of
New Westminster; and John Jardine, of the
City of Victoria, to be Commissioners under
the "Public Inquiries Act" to enquire generally into labour conditions in the Province,
and particularly the contracts and relations
between employers and employes, the hours
of labour, the conditions surrounding the employes during their employment, anif the time
and manner of payment of wages in mines,
smelters, canneries, shops, factories, logging
and railway construction camps, or in any
other work, and on tramways; the working
and enforcement of the "Truck Act," the
"Master and Servant Act," the "Deceived
Workmen Act," the "Woodman's Lien for
Wages Act," and any other legislation affecting labour, the precautions taken for the protection of life, the preservation of the health
and  the prevention of unsanitary  conditions.
The Commissioners will hold their first
meeting at the Parliament Buildings on Saturday, the 28th day of December instant, at
io o'clock in the forenoon, of which all persons interested are hereby to take notice and
fovern themselves accordingly,
'rovincial Secretary's Office,
12th December, 1912.
dec. 14 dec. 28
LAND REGISTRY ACT.
IN THE MATTER of an application for
a fresh Certificates of Title to Lots 1602 and
1604, Victoria City.
NOTICE is hereby given of my intention at
the expiration of one calendar month from
the first publication hereof to issue fresh Certificates of. Title in lieu of the Certificates of
Title issued to Bernard Sigismund Heisterman ahd James Forman on the 25th day of
February, 1910, and numbered 22110 C, and
to Wesley N. Mitchell and William Nelson
Mitchell on the 25th day of February, 1011,
and numbered 22547 C, which have been lost
or destroyed.
Dated   at   Land   Registry   Office,   Victoria,
B. C, this 4th day of December, A. D.  1912.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar General of Titles,
dec. 7 Jan. 4
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
North Saanich School
Cowichan School
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed "Tender
for North Saanich School," will be received by
the Honourable the Minister of Public Works
up to noon of Friday, the 27th day of December, 1912, for the erection and completion
of a large one-room frame school building on
concrete foundations at North Saanich, in the
Islands Electoral District,
Plans, specifications, contract, and forms of
tender may be seen on and after the 12th day
of Decemoer, 1912, at the office of F. W.
Anderson, Secretary of the School Board, Sidney, B.C., and the Department of Public
Works, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B. C.
Each proposal must be accompanied by an
accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit
on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable
to the Honourable the Minister of Public
Works, for a sum equal to 10 per cent, of the
tender, which shall be forfeited if the party
tendering decline to enter into contract when
called upon to do so, or if he fail to complete
the work contracted for. The cheques or
certificates of denosit of unsuccessful tenderers
will be returned to them upon the execution
of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless made
out on the forms supplied, signed with the
actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed
in the envelopes furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily
accepted.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer!
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C., December ioth, 1912.
dec. 14 dec. 21
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed "Tender
for Cowichan School," will be received by
the Honourable the Minister of Public Works
up to noon of Friday, the 27th day of December, 1912, for the erection and_ completion
of a two-room frame school building on concrete foundations at Cowichan, in the
Cowichan Electoral District, B. C.
Plans, specifications, contract, and forms of
tender may be seen on and after the 12th day
of December, 1912, at the office of F. W.
Anderson, Secretary of the School Board, Sidney, B.C., and the Department of Public
Works, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B. C.
Each proposal must he accompanied by an
accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit
on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable
to   the   F ble   the   Minister   of Public
Works, (* ial to 10 per cent, of the
tender . be forfeited  if the party
tendering * to enter into contract when
called upon tu .*o so, or if he fail to complete
the work contracted for. The cheques or
certificates of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers
will be returned to them upon the execution
of the contract.
Tenders will not bc considered unless made
out on the forms supplied, signed with the
actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed
in the envelopes furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily
accepted.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C., December ioth, 1912.
dec.14 dec. 21
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Annie Peterson, of Bella
Coola, B.C., occupation Housewife, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted  about  three  miles  distant  and  in   a
westerly direction from the western extremity
of   Kwalcho   Lake,   marked    N.    E.   Corner,
thence south 40 chains, west 80 chains, north
40 chains,  east 80 chains,  to point of commencement, containing 320 acres, more or tess.
Dated 25th August, 1912.
ANNIE PETERSON.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 Jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Margaret Harris, of Bella
Coola, B.C., occupation Housewife, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
§ lanted   at   the   north-western   extremity   of
igutla Lake,  marked S.  W.   Corner,  tnence
north   80   chains,   east   80   chains,   south   80
chains, west 80 chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated 20th August,  1912.
MARGARET HARRIS.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 4
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Motor Launches
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed "Tender for Motor Launches," will be received by
the Hon. the Minister of Public Works up
to and including 23rd day of December, 1912,
for the construction of two 55-foot and four
36-foot motor launches.
Plans, specifications, contract, and forms of
tender may be seen at the offices of the
Government Agents at Vancouver and New
Westminster, and the Department of Public
Works, Victoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied by an
accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit
on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable
to the Hon. the Minister of Public Works, for
a sum equivalent to ten per cent of the amount
of the tender, which shall be forfeited if the
party tendering decline to enter into contract
when called upon to do so, or if he fail to
complete the work contracted for. The
cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them upon
the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless made
out on the forms supplied, signed by the
actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed
in the envelopes furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily
accepted.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., 29th November, 1912.
dec. 7 dec. 21
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Motor Launches
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed "Tender for Motor Launches," will be received by
the Hon. the Minister of Public Works up
to 12 o'clock noon of Monday, 23rd day of
December, 1912, for the construction of two
25-foot motor launches.
Intending bidders will give full description
of the hull, engine, etc.
Delivery: One launch at Arrowhead; the
other at Nelson.
Each proposal must be accompanied by an
accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit
on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable
to the Hon. the Minister of Public Works, for
a sum equivalent to ten per cent of the amount
of the tender, which shall be forfeited if the
party tendering decline to enter into contract
when called upon to do so, or if he fail to
complete the work contracted for. The
cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them upon
the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless made
out on the forms supplied, signed by the
actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed
in the envelopes furnished.
Forms of tender can be obtained from the
Government Agents at Vancouver, New Westminster, Revelstoke, and Nelson, and the Department of Public Works, Victoria.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily
accepted.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., 29th November, 1912.
dec. 7 dec. 21
VICTORIA (RENFREW)  LAND
DISTRICT
TAKE NOTICE that Caroline Hemington
Muir, of Victoria, B. C, occupation Married
Woman, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the east
boundary of Lot 50, Renfrew District, about
20 chains north of the S. E. corner of the
said Lot 50; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 20 chains, more or less, to the south
boundary of T. L. 1728; thence west along the
south boundaries of T L.'s 1728 and 1727
to the east boundary of said Lot 50, a distance
of 80 chains, more or less; thence south 20
chains to point of commencement, containing
160 acres more or less.
Dated November 6th, 1912.
CAROLINE HEMINGTON MUIR.
Harold W. Duckitt, Agent,
nov. 30 jan. 25
"LAND REGISTRY ACT"
In thc Matter of an application  for a fresh
Certificate   of  Title  to   Part   m   feet   6
inches by 50 feet of Lot 33, Block 4, Map
132,    Hillside   Extension,   of   the   Work
Estate, Victoria City.
NOTICE is hereby given  of my intention
at the expiration of one calendar month from
the  first  publication  hereof  to  issue  a fresh
Certificate of Title in lieu of the Certificate of
Title issued to Charles Nelson Brown on thc
2nd May, 1910, and numbered 22991 C, which
has been  lost.
Dated   at   Land   Registry   Office,   Victoria,
B. C, this 21st day of November, 1912.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar-General of Titles,
dec. 14 jan. 11
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that the Order-
in-Council, approved August 17th, 1895, reserving and setting apart for the sole use
of Her Majesty's Government for military
and naval purposes that portion of the Sand
Spit at the Lagoon, Esquimalt, which is the
property of the Province, is rescinded; and
that the lands described in the aforesaid
Order-in-Council are reserved for Government
purposes.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
29th October, 1912.
nov. 2 feb. 2
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, Ralph Sweet, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Carpenter, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted   about  four  miles  distant  and  in   a
north-westerly    direction    from    the    northwestern  extremity  of  Sigutla   Lake,  marked
S.  W.   Corner,  tnence north 80 chains,  east
80 chains,  south 80 chains, west 80 chains,
to point   of   commencement,   containing   640
acres, more or less.
Dated 21st August, 1912.
RALPH SWEET.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE  notice  that  George   E.   Hartshorn,
of  Vancouver,  B.C.,   occupation  Logger,  intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a
post   planted   one  mile   west   and   one   mile
north from the western extremity of Nahlouza
Lake, marked S. E.  Corner, thence north 80
chains, west 80 chains, south 80 chains, east
80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated 13th October, 1912.
GEORGE E. HARTSHORN.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 Jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, William A. Walton, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Laborer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post planted about one mile distant and  in
a westerly direction from the western extremity of Nahlouza Lake, marked S. E. Corner,
thence north 80 chains, west 80 chains, south
80 chains,  east 80 chains to point of commencement,   containing   640   acres,   more   or
less.
Dated 13th October, 1912.
WILLIAM A. WALTON.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 Jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Percy Gadsden, of Bella
Coola, B.C., occupation Farmer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about two miles distant and in a
north-westerly direction from the northwesterly extremity of Sigutla Lake, marked
S. W. Corner, thence north 80 chains, east
80 chains, south 80 chains, west 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated 20th August, 1912.
PERCY  GADSDEN,
nov. 9 Jan. 4
VICTORIA (RENFREW) LAND
DISTRICT
TAKE NOTICE that Hanna Mary Green,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Spinster, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north boundary of the
Carmanah I. R., about 15 chains east of the
N. W. corner of the Carmanah I.-R,; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated November 5th, 1012
HANNA MARY GREEN.
Harold W. Duckitt, Agent,
nov. 30 jan. 25
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Thomas J. Williams, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Laborer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about one mile distant and in a
westerly direction from the western extremity
of Nahlouza Lake, marked N. E. Corner,
thence south 80 chains, west 80 chains, north
80 chains, east 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or
less.
Dated  13th October, 1912.
THOMAS J. WILLIAMS.
Percy Gadsden, Agent.
nov. 9
jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, Edith Bone, of Luton,
England, occupation Married Woman, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post  planted   about   one  mile   east   and   two
miles north from the north-western extremity
of Sigutla Lake, marked S. W. Corner, thence
north   80   chains,  east  80   chains,   aouth   80
chains, west 80 chains to point of commencement,  containing 640  acres,  more or  less.
Dated 20th August,  1912.
EDITH BONE.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 4
WATER ACT
Notice   of   Application   for   the   Approval   of
Works
TAKE notice that the Sidney Water and
Power Company, Limited, will apply to the
Comptroller of Water Rights for the approval
of the plans of the works to be constructed
for the utilization of the water from a well
on Section _, Range 2 E., North Saanich,
which the applicant is, by Water Licence No.
30, authorized to take, store, and use for
municipal purposes.
The plans and particulars required by subsection (1) of section 70 of the "Water Act"
as amended havc been filed with the Comptroller of Water Rights at Victoria and with
the Water Recorder at Victoria,  B.C.
Objections to the application may be filed
with the Comptroller of Water Rights, Parliament  Buildings, Victoria.
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this 2nd day of
December,  1912.
BivRT 1. WHITE,
Agent of the Applicant,
dec. 7 Jan. 3
SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING REGULATIONS.
Coal mining rights of the Dominion, in
Manitoba. Saskatchewan and Alberta, the
Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories
and in a portion of the Province of British
Columbia, may be leased for a term of
twenty-one years at an annual rental of $1
an acre. Not more than 2,560 acres will be
leased to one applicant.
Applications for a lease must be made by
the applicant in person to the Agent or Sub
Agent of the district in which the rights applied fnr are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or legal sub-divisions
of sections, and in unsurveyed territory the
tract applied for shall be staked out by the
applicant himself.
Each application must be accompanied by
a fee of $5 which will be refunded if the
rights applied for are not available, but not
otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on the
merchantable output of the mine at the rate
of five cents per ton,
The person operating the mine shall furnish the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the full quantity of merchantable
coal mined and pay the royalty thereon. If
the coal mining rights are not being operated, such returns should be furnished at
least once .a year.
The lease will include the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted
to purchase whatever available surface rights
may be considered necessary for the working of the mine at the rate of $10.00 an acre.
For full information application should be
made to the Secretary of the Department of
the Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or
Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.   B.—Unauthorized   publication   of   this
advertisement will not be paid for.
sept. 21
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing upon Crown lands in the Kootenay
District, formerly held under Special Timber
Licences numbered 4481, 5255, 5256, 5832,
8534, 9081, 9082, 10259, 10260, 10261, 10262,
10499, 10500, 11249, 11347, 13824, 16727, 21907,
22661, 23116, 24432, 26737, 26926, 28182, 28183,
28184, 30358, 3"8o, 31184, 31185, 31201, 31208,
31212, 31213, 31308, 31330, 31481, 32022, 32654,
32655, 32711, 33406, 33411, 33449, 33459, 33460,
34221, 34273, 343io, 34311, 34386, 3563>i 36502,
36553, 36554, 37580, 37993, 37994, 39011, 39202.
39359, 40406, 41078, 4>344> 41426 and 43176,
by reason of the notice published in the British
Columbia Gazette on December 27th, 1907, is
cancelled for the purpose of offering the said
lands for sale at public auction.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
loth  October,  1912.
oct. 19 jan. 18
WATER NOTICE
I, Samuel McCullough of Royal Oak, South
Saanich, in the Province of British Columbia,
give notice that on the 18th day of December,
1912, I intend to apply to the Water Commissioner at his office in Victoria, for a licence
to take and use four cubic feet of water per
second from springs on Section 87, Block 1,
Lot 8, on Section 86, Block 2, Lot 20, on
Section 86, Block 3, Lot 4, all of Range I
East, Lake District, Province of British Columbia, Plan No. 1373, and to form a reservoir
for storage from said springs on that portion
of Lot II, lving within Section 86, Block 2,
Range I  East, aforesaid.
The water is to be taken from said reservoir and is to be used on Section 87, Block I,
Lot 4, Lake District aforesaid, for domestic
purposes and also to irrigate land in the
above mentioned Sections 86 and 87.
Dated and posted this 16th day of November,  1912.
SAMUEL McCULLOUGH.
nov. 23 dec. 14
DEPARTMENT OF WORKS
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Sooke School
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed "Tender
for Sooke School," will received by the Hon.
the Minister of Public Works up to noon of
Thursday, the 9th day of January, 1913, for
the erection and completion of a large one-
room school building at Sooke for the Provincial Government of British Columbia.
Flans, specifications, contract and forms of
tender may be seen on and after the 16th day
of December, 1912, at the office of Mr. .J. S.
Muir, Secretary of the Sooke School Board,
Sooke, V. I., and the Department of Public
Works, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B. C.
Each proposal must be accompanied by an
accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit
on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable
to the Hon. the Minister of Public Works, for
a sum equal to 10 per cent, of the tender,
which shall be forfeited if the party tendering
decline to enter into contract when called upon
to do so, or if he fail to complete the work
contracted for. The cheques or certificates of
deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will be re-
turned to them upon the execution of the
contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless made
out on the forms supplied, signed with the
actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed
in the envelopes furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily
accepted.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C., 13th December, 1912.
dec. 21 jan. 4
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
covering the parcel of land formerly held
under Timber Licence No. 40026, situated on
the Columbia River in the vicinity of Arrow
Park, by reason of the notice published in the
British Columbia Gazette on the 27th December, 1907, is cancelled: and that the vacant
lands formerly covered by the before men- .
tioned licence will be open to pre-emption
only on and after the 28th day of December,
1912.
R. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
24th September, 1912,
sept. 28 dec. 28
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing over the lands included in Special
Timber Licence No. 14830, situated on Upper
Rendezvous Island, Sayward District, by reason of a notice published in the British Columbia Gazetter on the 27th of December, 1907,
is cancelled, and that the said lands will be
open for entry by pre-emption on January
15th, 1913, at 9 o'clock in the forenoon.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
25th September, 1912.
oct. 5 jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, Hannah Jane Gadsden, of Luton,  England, occupation Married
Woman, intenas to apply for permission  to
purchase   the   following   described   lands:—
Commencing   at   a   post   planted   about   one
mile east and one mile north from the northwestern   extremity  of  Sigutla   Lake,   marked
S. W. Corner, thence north 80 chains, east 80
chains, south 80 chains, west 80 chains, to
point of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated 20th August,  1912.
HANNAH JANE GADSDEN.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 4
SEALED TENDERS will be received by
the Minister of Lands not later than noon
on the 3rd day of March, 1913, for the purchase of Licence No. X9 to cut 45,300,000 feet
of timber and 4,000 cedar poles standing on
Lot 671, Malaspina Strait, New Westminster
District.
Particulars of Chief Forester, Victoria, B. C.
nov. 30 mar. 1
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing on Lot 10, Group I, Kootenay District, by reason of a notice bearing date
March 26th, 1888, and published in the B. C.
Gazette under date of March 31st, 1888, is
cancelled for the purpose of offering the said
land for sale at public auction.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
nov. 30
Deputy Minister of Lands,
mar. 1
NAVAL   SERVICE   OF   CANADA
Notice    concerning    the    construction    of   a
Schooner for the Hydrographic Society
Branch  of  the  Department  of
the Naval Service.
SEALED TENDERS, addressed to the undersigned, and endorsed "Tenders for
Schooner," will be received up till noon on
Wednesday the 15th January, 1913, for the
supply to the Department of the Navn' c"--vice
of a Schooner conforming to the
dimensions:
Length of water Line 80 ft.
Length overall about 98 ft., 6 inch
Beam    J.. 20 ft.
Mean   Draft  8 ft.
Schooner to be delivered alongside Wharf at
H.M.C. Dockyard, Esquimalt, I). C. Copies of
the Design and Specification can be obtained
on application to the undersigned or to the
Naval Store Officer at H.M.C. Dockyard, Esquimalt, B. C.
Unauthorized publication of this notice will
not be paid for.
G. J. DESBARATS,
Deputy Minister of thc Naval Service.
Department of the Naval Service,
—32503.        Ottawa, December 9th, 1912.
dec. 21 Jan. 4 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1912
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THE J. M. WHITNEY CO.
YATES STREET AT BROAD
A FIGHT for EMPIRE
All Canada Opposed to the Home Rule Bill
From a London Exchange
Unquestionable confirmation of the
fact that the whole of Canada is
strongly opposed to the Home Rule
Bill was given by Mr. Walter Long,
M.P., when he addressed a meeting
at the Constitutional Club, London.
Home Rule, as we understood it in
England, he said1, was entirely hostile
to anything we understood by the
word Imperialism. He recently went
to Canadia a strong anti-Home Ruler,
and he returned a still stronger anti-
Home Ruler. He came to the conclusion that the basic principle of
all political action and thought in
Canada was, whatever they did,
whatever action they took, the object
must always be the expansion and increased solidarity of the Empire. The
effect of all the great changes that
had taken place in the conditions of
life in the Dominion was that Canada
had turned her mind to the solution
of great Imperial problems to a degree which we had not reached in the
Motherland.
The Beginning of the End
While he had found a minority in
Canada, who still held that Home
Rule in some form was desirable in
Ireland, he had found nobody prepared to defend the Bill now before
Parliament, the objection to it being
that it made against, and not for,
Imperialism; that it meant not local
self-government, such as they had in
the Dominion, but the beginning of
separation. This high principle of
the Canadians was also expressed in
their attitude towards the reciprocity
proposals between themselves and the
United States. That action laid upon
this country an almost sacred duty.
Unionists were engaged in fighting
for Tariff Reform, by which they
hoped to enter into special trading
terms between different parts of the
Empire, to give greater security to
our capitalists, and as a consequence
of that greater security of employment and better conditions of labour.
True Imperialism
He believed that experience in
Canada and other countries confirmed
the view that Tariff Reform would
strengthen the Empire. He quite
realised that in this country a difficulty had to be faced in connection
with Tariff Reform. The food taxes
were not wrong or unsound or unjustifiable in themselves, but they lent
themselves easily to gross and violent
misrepresentation by their political
opponents, and what was wanted was
something to fortify their argument
and show that these taxes were not
put on for some party purpose.
There could not be a greater Imperial
advantage than would be secured the
moment we adopted Tariff Reform
and were able to say to our people
in all parts of the Empire that the
day they came under the British flag
they entered into the enjoyment of
special provisions made for all British
citizens. (Cheers.) What bearing had
all this upon Home Rule? Parliament had been discussing the new
financial proposals of the Government. In their new form the clauses
had lost noire of their old ugliness.
Unjust and Inconsistent
Although the Government had refused to discuss questions of trade
arrangements with the colonies, had
banged ancl bolted and barred the
door against  them,  they  wcre  now
proposing to give Ireland
control over her Customs. It
was interesting to see the
pained anxiety with which
loyal and honest members of
the Radical party were trying to convince themselves
that they were now justified
in voting for something
which, when it was proposed
by Unionists in the form of
a protective system for the
Empire, they denounced.
True, the Government imposed certain limitations, but
in- his view those limitations
were not worth the paper
tbey were written on, and
he attached no importance to
them. They deluded no one.
The bare' fact was that the
Government were prepared
to concede- to Ireland the
right to establish within the
United Kingdom that form,
of protection ' which every
part of the Empire had up
to the present found to be
impossible. They were deliberately doing in Ireland in
this way that which he believed would tell more
against the federation of the
Empire than anything else
to be found in the bill.
"No Burdens, No Benefits"
This meant that Home
Rule as we knew it here was
not an Imperial proposal. It
might be quite true that
Home Rule was demanded
by a majority of the representatives of Ireland, but
how far were those representatives the free exponents of
a free people? We had got
something to think of besides
the political needs of the
Government. Home Rule
would do more to displace
the foundation upon which
our Empire rested than anything else. Therefore they
must strenuously oppose it
not only for local and prosaic reasons, but for Imperial reasons. (Ch-eers.) Col.
Whiteside McCay (Australia)
pointed out that the Empire
could; only hold what it had
got by being ready to fight
for it; and that we could
only fight if we were strong
enough to fight. There was
no proposal in the Home
Rule Bill that Ireland should
take her share in Imperial
defence. Would an Irish Parliament
offer a Dreadnought to the British
Navy? (Laughter.) We should take
care that every unit in the Empire
bore a share of the burdens as well
as of the benefits. No burdens, no
benefits, was the true Imperial cry.
(Cheers.)
l.fi*.K«-}(*..T.h«bt«(_i..i«InK-.lir|«*r»n
authorlied hythe Municipal .Council of
, fiooanSLLOWSHIi?lo.lp->n,vr«f this
pbn, do hereby appro** of -une.    -
r_lkeRBlA'nmtfa^_mmto«.ciael)t1_™_W_etet_le<*j*
•ketkr talk and say tk'irm.i_eirferttee.-i mHUtmtveUsripfrimtiU
'Ike lereej rtprterntei Ir tkitple* euidtkat the survey *_ipl*n ter :
ferrtei.Tkeeet_tejm.pfe   '    ■- -     -••-■■•      *--*
.fever* be/err mt wtifa ^f-
/eett*/a-mir/
a.pifir.
WATER NOTICE
for a License to Take and Uise Water.
NOTICE is hereby given that Herbert
Cuthbert, of Victoria, B. C, will apply for
a license to take and use .,15 sec. feet of
water out of unnamed marked No. i. No. 2,
No. 3 Creek, which flows In a Northeasterly
direction through part if Section 35, Esquimau District, and empties into Esquimalt
Lagoon, near its southerly end. The water
will he diverted at its head and will be used
for domestic purposes on the land described
as part of Section 35, Esquimalt District.
Ilns notice was posted on the ground on
the ioth day of December, 1912. The application will he filed in tbe office of thc
Water Recorder at Victoria.
Objections may be filed with the said Water
Recorder  or  with   thc  Comptroller of  Water
Rights, Parliament Buildings. Victoria, B. C.
HERBERT  CUTHBERT,
Applicant.
By   R.   G.   GILCHRIST,
Agent,
dcc. _t jan  18
A NEW MAGAZINE
The Coast cities are shortly to have
a new publication in the shape of a
monthly society magazine de luxe.
The new venture, which is to be fashioned on the lines of the "Burr-
Mclntosh," will be brought out each
month regardless of cost and will be
exceptionally well illustrated. Its
pages will cater to the tastes of the
society of Victoria and Vancouver,
and will contain in addition to social
news, articles on art, music, drama,
hunting and motoring. The publisher,
Mr. A. F. Wakefield, has spared
neither trouble nor expense to make
the "De Luxe" Magazine worthy of
its title and will offer it to criticism
early in January.
A society in Berlin has been formed to
induce men to leave off wearing trousers.
Those Germans are late. Scotland did the
trick  centuries   ago.
CERTIFICATE  OF   TITLE
No.
Date of Application:      B. C. 404
Name of Owner
U.  R.   Entitled
Absolute
Fees Book
To One
Scat
On
Date of Registration
December
Eighteenth
Nineteen  Twelve
Parcels, Full Description,
with Map, if Necessary
At the Real Estate
Exchange First Annual
Banquet, Empress Hotel,
Section 18, Victoria District, Province of British
Columbia
LIST   OF   INSTRUMENTS
To enjoy thc full list of entertaining Speeches and Songs and other amusements, to
say nothing of a choice portion of every Lot in "Goodfellow Sub division," from
8 o'clock to sometime next day.    .
THE  VICTORIA   REAL   ESTATE   EXCHANGE
FIRST  ANNUAL   BANQUET   COMMITTEE
T.   B,   .Monk,  Chairman.
Randolph   Stuart,   Secretary.
Fee $5.00.     Absolute Indefeasible Title.
Seal
Two Unique Features of the Real Estate Exchange Banquet—the Menu
and the Invitation Card. Designed by Mr. Randolph Stuart, Secretary of
the Victoria Real Estate Exchange.
_, 10
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1912
Society
Mrs. Knight of Nanoose Bay, registered at the Dominion Hotel during
the week.
* *   *
■ Mr. J. H. Poff of Vancouver, has
been paying a short visit to Victoria
and was registered at the  Empress
Hotel.
* *   *
Mr. Harry Chrimes, Vancouver, is
staying at the Empress Hotel for a
few days;
* *   *
Mrs. L. H. Hogan of Duncan, B. C,
is spending the holidays at the Empress Hotel.
* *   *
Mr. Jos. Vipond, from Nanaimo, B.
C, has been a guest recently at the
Dominion .Hotel.
* *   *
Mr. G. W. Mason of Dog Creek, is
spending a few days in the city.   He
is  staying at  the   Dominion   Hotel.
* *   *
Miss Naomi Holmes of this city
has been spending a couple of weeks'
in Vancouver, the guest of her sister,
Mrs.  Studd.
* *   *
Mr. P. Venables, of New Westminster, has been making a short stay
in Victoria, a guest at the Dominion
Hotel.
* *   *
Mr. D. Burns, of Vancouver, has
been staying at the Empress for a
few days.     ,
* *   *
Mr. R. Mills, of Kamloops, has been
enjoying a short visit in Victoria,
* *   *
Miss Stella Cullingham, a recent
arrival from England, is a guest at
the Empress.
* .*.-  ■*,       *   *   *
Mr. Al*SfcShaw from Kamloops is
among the gutsts -at the Empress.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. A. H.■Holland; from
Vancouver, are guests in town and
are staying at the Empress Hotel.
* *   *
Mrs. Pascal de Noe Walker, has returned to town after making an extended visit to friends in Chilliwack
and Vancouver.
* *   ♦
Mr. R.' B. Ferguson and Mrs. Ferguson have registered at the Empress
ftom Edmonton.
* *   *
Mrs. Langley and Mrs. Victor Elliot are visiting in Vancouver, where
they are the guests of Mrs. Charles
Gore.
* *   *
The Misses Dunsmuir are the
guests of Mrs. John Hope, Shaughnessy Heights, Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. Robert Powell is staying with
friends in the Terminal City.
*   *   *
Edgar   Dewdney
Hon. Edgar Dewdney and Mrs.
Dewdney are the guests of friends in
Vancouver.
* t   *
Dr. and Mrs. C. J. Fagan intend returning  to   Victoria   some   time   in
February.
* *   *
Dr. and Mrs, Fisher, from Calgary,
are among the guests at the Empress
Hotel and will spend the Christmas
holidays in town.
* *   *
Mr. N. P. Searls of Chilliwack
is spent a few days in town during
the past week.
* *   *
Mrs. E. M. Lester, from Sidney, is
among the visitors to Victoria.
* *   *
Col. and Mrs. Prior, accompanied
by Miss Prior, arc leaving a few days
after Christmas for the South, where
they will spend some months touring.
* *   *
Mr. E. Ewart from Ashcroft, is registered at the Dominion liotel.
* *   *
Mr. Walter R. Pooley, of Vancouver, was a visitor to Victoria during
the past week.
* *   *
Mrs. Granville Cuppage has returned to Victoria, after spending a
number of months visiting relative?
in England and Ireland. She is at
present   staying   at   the   "Aberdeen,''
Maclure Street.
* *   *
Miss Walbran held one of her
pleasant evenings at her home on
Beacon Hill Park last Wednesday
week, the nth inst., when a number
of guests attended.   The evening was
passed in whist and music.
* *   *
The engagement is announced of
Miss Lulu M. Ashwell, of Strathroy.
Ont., a sister of Mr. A. S. Ashwell of
this city and formerly of the staff of
the Attorney-General at Edmonton,
to Mr. Fenwick A. Tripp, of Kamloops, B. C. The wedding has been
ai ranged to take place on Christmas
evening at the home of Mrs. Cecil E.
Race of Edmonton.
* *   *
Among the guests at the Ritz Hotel
are: R. H. Jones, L. W. Bailey (Vancouver); T. J. Armstrong (Calgary),
E. A. Walmsley (Duncan), Edward
Laughlin (Hartney, Man.), Mrs.
Frank Campbell, Mrs. and Miss
Walls (Nanaimo), A. S. King, C. S.
Smith (Vancouver), H. K. Robinson
(Victoria), Miss Ankelle Jones, Mrs.
Mainguy (Chemainus), Henry B.
Hicks (Victoria), V. S. Parker, Bert
Borden (Frisco).
* *   *
On last Monday evening, a very
enjoyable dance was given at the Balmoral Hotel, by a few of the guests,
some of those present were: Miss
Vera Mason, Miss Newcombe, Mr.
and Mrs. Burge, Mrs. P. de Noe
Walker, Mrs. Musgrave, Mrs. Dundas,
Mr. and Mrs. Gulier, Miss Drake,
the Misses Page, Miss Lottie Bowron, • Miss Clare Battle, Miss England, Miss Walker, Miss A. McKay,
Miss Florence Gillespie, Mr. Young,
Mr. Colbourne, Mr. Myerstein, Mr.
Miller, Mr. Ward, Mr. Wm. Cartwright, and others. A very dainty
supper was served at about 11.30 in
the cafe of the hotel and dancing
was kept up until a late hour, a very
enjoyable time being spent by all
present.
* *   *
A marriage which took place recently was that of Miss Rebecca Fel-
don, of Darlington, England, and Mr.
Newland Phillips, of this city. The
ceremony was performed' by Rev. J.
B. Warnicker, at the home of the
brjde's sister, Mrs._ Frank Stubbs, the
bridal couple standing beneath a beautiful arch made of white carnations
and roses from which was extended
a bell of white and green. The bride
who was given away by her brother
was tastefully gowned in white silk
voille over taffeta, wearing the customary veil held in place by a chaplet
of bride's roses. She was attended
by her cousin, Miss Mary Constable,
who wore a dainty gown of pale pink
and carried a bouquet of pink carnations. The groom was supported by
Mr. Harry King. The bride's gift to
the groom was a handsome watch
fob, while the bridegroom's gift to his
bride was a gold and pearl pin; to
the bridesmaid a plain gold pin and
to the best man a set of gold cuff
buttons and stick-pin. Mr. and Mrs.
Phillips will make their future home
at 2744 Prior Street.
*   *   *
A very pretty wedding took place
on Tuesday afternoon last at Christ
Church Cathedral, when Elizabeth
Blanch, youngest daughter of Mrs.
Graves Clapham, of Quebec, but now
of 834 Pemberton Road, became the
biide of the Hon. Edmund Burke-
Roche, youngest son of Baron Fer-
moy, 01 Queen'stown, Ireland, only
the intimate friends and near relatives of the couple being present at
the ceremony, which was performed
by the Very Rev. Dean Doull, assisted by Rev. H. J. Underhill. The
bride's friends had decorated the
church beautifully with holly, ivy
and white chrysanthemums. The
bride, looking very striking, wore a
smart French costume of white cloth
with a rich lace collar with which
she wore a blouse of soft white crepe
de chine over shadow lace made with
Robespierre frills of real Mechlin
lace—an heirloom presented to the
bride from her mother. With this
she wore a hat of white panne velvet
handsomely adorned with ostrich
feathers, her only ornament being the
gift of the groom, a beautiful diamond and pearl pendant set in platinum, and a diamond and emerald ring.
She carried a bouquet of white carnations and bride roses.   Her brides-
(Continued on Page iz)
The Most Popular Gift
in the World
Perhaps the most popular Christmas gift in the world for men is
the necktie or cravat. This for
the very good reason that a man
always appreciates the gift of a
handsome tie with true sincerity.
But be sure you get the tight tie.
If you ask your dealer for Reid
Cravats yr-.i are sure to get a
Cravat that has built up an enviable fame among smartly-dressed
men—a fame for strikingly beautiful patterns, handsome, durable
materials, and perfect style.
Reid's Real
Bengalene
is a special weave that won't
wrinkle, won't show pinholes, and
to show you some of the thirty-
five rich new shades of Reid's Real
Bengaline   Cravats,   priced   from
,50c to $1.50
OR WRITE
A. T. REID & CO., Limited
272 King Street West,
Toronto
JUST
OPENED
The New. Idea
Store
With a Complete New Line of Stock
Hand Made Xmas Presents our Specialty
648 JOHNSON STREET VICTORIA, B. C.
Gift Hampers
Are you going to delight your friends with a
Hamper of Assorted Wines and Dainties ?
We pack according to instructions.
A SUGGESTION
Bottle Grand Highland Scotch.
"   Bailey's Port.
"   Cherry Brandy.
"   Ginger Wine.
"   Creme   de   Violettes   or
Benedictine.
Bottle D. & H. Sherry.
"   Gold Lion Cocktails.
"   Burgundy or Champagne.
"   Claret or Chianti.
"   Angelica or White Port.
Box Cigars and Cigarettes.
w\
Or a portion of the above with a Plum Pudding and other
Toothsome Delicacies.
H. 0. Kirkham & Co., Ltd.
74ii 743 74S FORT STREET
Grocery Store Butcher Shop Liquor Store
Tels. 178,179 Tel. 2678 Tel. 2677
Raphael Tuck's Cards and Calendars
Finest in the World--AW on Sale at
Victoria Book & Stationery Co., Ltd.
1004 Government Street        Telephone 63
What you want, the way you want it
Afternoon Tea, Dainty Luncheons,
Special Teas for parties by arrangement.   Do not forget—We always
*       keep on hand guaranteed
New Laid Eggs.
The TEA KETTLE   u» douglas st.
MISS M. WOOLDRIDGE, Proprietress        Opposite the Victoria Thtatrt
_____ ^HB
Merchandise Bonds
You can save yourself the trouble of choosing that Christmas
Gift by using our Merchandise Bonds, redeemable
in goods of any description at either our
Victoria or Vancouver Stores
STORE OF
F, A. 60WEN, Managing Director
1114 Government Street
We OfiVr
A   first   class   stock   of
Apples,   Pears,  Cherries,
Prunes,  Plums,  Peaches,
        Apricots and small fruits.
Also Ornamental Trees and Shrubs, decidious and evergreen, Roses, etc.
The very finest quality and best assortment grown in B. C. Catalogue
free.     Personal   inspection   invited.    Now    is    the    time   to   order.
LAYRITZ NURSERIES
CAREY ROAD, VICTORIA BRANCH AT KELOWNA, B. C.
PHONE M1054 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1912
U
"Sotto Voce
The Week's Rumours and
Humours
(By The Hornet)
ff
That the local postal authorities
have made special provision to guard
as far as possible against a repetition
of last year's blockade.
* *   *
That with the limited accommodation at their disposal they have done
wonders.
* *   *
That the Victoria Amateur Dramatic Society is occupying the stage
at the Victoria Theatre this afternoon and tonight.
* *   *
That if one may judge by the seat
sales in advance, some local charity
will receive an acceptable Christmas-
box.
* *   *
That owing to the fact that Christmas day falls on Wednesday, the seat
sale for "The Kiss Waltz" will open
on Monday next.
* *   *
That the box-office will be closed on
Christas day.
* *   *
That -when notices are placed in a
public building with the words "No
smoking allowed," it is generally supposed that gentlemen will not smoke
there.'
* *   *
That this rule does not hold good
at the "Arena." The notices are
there, but cigars are sold and smoked
during the matches.
* *   *
That some people complain that on
this account they are unable to see
across the rink.
* *   *
That for the sake of consistency
either the notices or the cigars should
be eliminated.
* *   *
That the millionaire of to-morrow
is the holly-grower of to-day.
* *   *
That the sale of holly is proving
one of the best advertisements that
Victoria has ever had.
* *   *
That with the enforcement of the
Curfew Bell By-law, children will take
a more personal interest in the history of the Norman Conquest.
We Wish You
A Merry
Xmas and
A Happy
New Year
The
Commonwealth
Home ol Hobberlin Clothes
606-608 Yates St.
Tailoring Branch at 720 Yates SI.
That' mighty little interest is being taken in the forthcoming municipal elections.
* *   *
That if rate-payers will hot take
the trouble to be interested, they have
no right to grumble.
* *   *
That the Vancouver Island Publicity Company is responsible for a
most valuable compendium of the resources and development of Vancouver Island.
* *   *
That originality was the key-note of
the Real Estate Exchange banquet.
That Randolph Stuart is a host in
himself, and handled the function to
admiration.
* *   *
That the telegrams read by C. F.
de Salis did not find their way into
the press, which is a pity.
* *   *
That The Week Publishing Company would like to get the present
address of one A. E. Aide.
* *   *
That it is prepared to pay five dollars to the first person supplying this
address.
 ,,. - -     *   *   *
That there is no truth in the report
that the City Council has prohibited
birth on Sunday.
* *   *
That Mr. Justice Martin is a man
with ideas and his latest idea is ideal.
* *   *
That the initial hockey game at the
"Arena" was  worth going miles  to
see.
* *   *
That it is evident that Manager Patrick has been able to collect a galaxy
of real stars,
* *   *
That whether they win a pennant
or not, they will keep the best team
in the League hustling till the end of
the season.
* *   *
That Prodgers is one of the most
brilliant men yet seen on the Victoria ice.
* *   *
That the "latest assault at arms at
the Victoria Theatre was only just a
shade below the standard of its best
predecessor.
* *   *
That the promoters were badly
thrown down by the judges, and unless they can do better in future they
will have a job to retain public confidence.
* *   *
That several of the decisions were
so   rank   that   they   smelled—to   the
gods.
* *   *
That there is too much sameness in
the bouts and new talent will have
to be found, or interest will die out.
* *   *
That there is a great rush for those
summer resorts now being offered on
the West Coast of Vancouver Island
—nit.
* *   *
That at this  point the  cliffs  are
three hundred feet high and an inclined railway is to be installed by
the sub-division agents for the use
of purchasers.
* *   *
That  in  rough  weather  it  would
only be a step from the crest of the
waves to the top of the cliffs.
* *   *
That the wind never blows, the
rain never falls and the fog never
settles at this point—there are other
advantages, but this will do for the
present.
* *   *
That there are no dangerous animals in the woods round about except
wild cats.
_Y     Hi     *
That judging from a private telegram read at the banquet and the
approval with which it was received,
the above seems to reflect the general opinion of the Real Estate Exchange.
* *   *
That one of the matters which
might well receive the attention of
the authorities is the extortion of Victoria hackmen.
* *   *
That the scale of charges authorized by the new schedule is bad
enough in all conscience, but in" practice it is worse than it looks.
* *   *.
That a charge of one dollar for
driving one person a yard over half-
a-mile is outrageous.
That automobiles were on hire in
the city at four dollars an hour before the new schedule came into force.
* *   *
That the framers of the schedule
kindly raised this to five dollars—in
the public interest.
ik     *     *
That in Seattle livery rates are
about half what they are in Victoria.
* *   *
That our townsman, J. Herrick McGregor, has published a volume of
verse, which will be read far beyond
the confines of this Province.
*•*•■■*
That he is one of the few literary
men in the Province who is really
a stylist.
*.-■■*'*
That Colonel Currie drew a brilliant
picture of the Greater Victoria which
is to be, in his speech at the Real
Estate Exchange banquet.
* *   *
That it is a pity that it was not
reported verbatim in the news
columns of the daily press.
* *   *
That this oversight was corrected
in the case of the Family Journal by
lifting its main features wholesale into the  editorial  columns—of  course
without acknowledgment.
* *   *
That in this connection it goes
without saying that Mr. Justice Mar
tin's scheme was first mooted in the
columns   of  the   same   paper—long,
long ago.
* *   *
That there is room for improvement in the system on which final reports on the completion of civic works
are required before final payments are
made.
* *   *
That there is a vacancy in the City
Engineering Department, and there
will shortly be others.
* *   *
That "The House that Jack Built"
was maintained chiefly by the "Widow
Twankey."
THWARTED
Jack (aged twelve): "Come, fly with me,
my Jenny, and we will »oon be where the
words of cruel parents cannot hurt your young
heart!"
Jenny: "I cannot , Jack; I cannot! Papa
is laid up with rheumatism, I know; but we
would be surely overtaken. You forget, my
Jack, that you are a messenger boy!"
Roy*!   Art   Olau   Worta   mm)   Start
915 Pandora St,  Victoria, B. C.
Albert F. Roy
Over   thirty   yean'  experience  ia
Art  Glau
LEADED LIGHTS
Sole manufacturer of Steel-Cored Lead
for Churc-het, Schools, Public Buildings and private Dwellings. Plain and
Fancy Glass Sold. Sashes Glared by
Contract.    Estimates   free.    Phone 594
Brewed for Breakfast
Hot at Supper-Time
Do you realize the help and
comfort   of   always   having
ready a fragrant cup of tea
or coffee?
Thermos
Coffee Pot
Is the magician. Brewed in
the early morning and transferred to a Thermos your
needs are instantly supplied.
Of all nickel finish and handsome design, an ideal gift,
1-qt. size $7.50
Cyrus H. Bowes
The Old Established
Drug Store
1228 Government Street
Phones 425 and 450
Christmas
Offerings
Gold Lockets, in Bright and Roman finish; round, oval and square, at
prices ranging from  $5.00 to $15.00
English Gold Seal Charms, each $6.00, $8.00, $12.00
Eardrops, set with Amethysts, Peridots, Turquoises, Garnets, Pearls
and Olivenes.   Prices  $7.00 to $20.00
Bar Pins, in 9-carat and 14-carat gold, plain Roman gold and set with
Turquoises, Pearls, Garnets and Sapphires. Newest patterns.
Range from  $4.00
Brooches, set with Pearls in all of the standard designs, in 14-carat
gold, at prices from $8.00 to $40.00
Brooches, set with Diamonds, Onyx, Topaz, Turquoises, Opals,
Pearls, Peridots, etc.   Prices from $10.00 to $100.00
Necklets, rope and plain links, in 14-carat and 10-carat gold.
Prices, each $4.00 to $12.00
Lavallieres, exquisite patterns in Pearl Combinations, Amethysts,
Topaz, Cameos, Jacinth, Almandine gold mountings, at prices
from  $12.00 to $60.00
W. H. WILKERSON
The Gift Store
915 Government Street Victoria, B. C.
After Theatre—SUPPER AT THE
BALMORAL
■» CAFE •
ORCHESTRA EVERY
EVENING 6.30 to 12.30
MR. M. NAGEL, MUSICAL DIR.
OPPOSITE THE
OPERA HOUSE
ON DOUGLAS  STREET
Slippers Make Excellent Xmas Gifts
Men's Tan Kid Faust Slipper
Men's Tan or Black Romeos
Men's Tan or Mack Everett Slippers
Men's Tan or Black Opera Slippers
Men's Brown Columbia Slippers
Men's Brown or Black Travelling Slippers in
Neat Leather Case
Men's Plaid Felt Romeos or in Buckle Style
Women's   Blue,   Green,   Brown,   Purple   and
Black   Felt   Juliets   with   low   wood   heel
covered.
Women's   Gray,   Green,   Black   or   Red   Felt
Juliets with low  leather heels
Women's    Brown,   Gray,   Green   and   Wine
Comfy Slippers
Women's Plain Felt Juliets
Boys'  and  Little  Men's  Brown   Kid  Romeos
and Everett Slippers
Little Girls*  Red  Felt Juliets and  Plaid  Felt
Slippers
This Store will be open evenings until  Xmas
Mail Orders  Promptly Filled
W. CATHCART S# CO.
Pemberton Building 621 Fort Street
The Union Steamship Company, Ltd. of B. C.
The Boscowitz Steamship Co., Ltd.
COAST SERVICE
Sailings every Wednesday for Campbell River, Hardy Bay, Rivers
Inlet, Ocean Falls, Bella Coola.
Sailings every Saturday for Namu, Bella Bella, Skeena River,
Prince Rupert, Naas, Granby Bay, Stewart.
JOHN BARNSLEY, Agent,
Phone 1925. 1003 Government Street 12
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1912
Correspondence
The Week accepts no responsibility for
the views expressed by its correspondents.
Communications will be inserted whether
signed by the real name of the writer
or a nom de plume, but the writer'i
name and address must, be given to the
Editor as an evidence of bona fides. In no
case will it be divulged without consent.
"TO BUSY FIGHTING"
THE SANTA CLAUS FUND
Victoria, B. C, Dec. 17., '12.
Editor, The Week:
Dear     Sir,—Reference     has   been
made in "The Week" to the editorial
"stuff" published from time to time
in one of our daily papers, but nothing was said of the "stuff" published
by the other offender. I can testify
to eight years logger-heading by
those papers, and calling each other
liars, in flowery language. A Vancouver paper some time ago printed
the caption "Too busy fighting" over
a letter relative to the tension between
our two belligerent papers. One of
them accused the other of concocting
letters in their own office; the other
says (apropos to what, I cannot say)
that "wit is destruction of a parliamentary career." My experience of
many distinguished parliamentarians
is that their success was much enhanced by the brilliance of their
"wit." If all this does not take the
bun for vulgar "stuff" in this refined
and progressive year of grace 1912, I
am at a loss to know what does. As
to impropriety of language, and an
even flow of insult, it is six of one
and half a dozen of the other; as they
fight steadily from election to election (inclusive). Their "play to a tired
gallery" in the interval, palls and is
not entertaining; but honours are
even.
Upon a subject of this kind, plain
speaking is best, and I hope you will
excuse me for calling your attention
to what I believe was merely an over
sight upon your part. "K."
1922 Fernwood Road,
Victoria, Dec. 17, 1912
Editor, The Week:
Sir,—Will you kindly allow me
through the medium of "The Week"
to draw the attention, particularly of
members of churches, to the appeal
for assistance to the "Santa Claus
Fund" for the children of the miners
of Cumberland and district, where a
strike has been in force for many
weeks. As the name of the fund indicates, the object is to provide a
little Christmas cheer for the children
who are the helpless victims of the
strike and who are no party to it. At
a meeting of the Social Service Commission of this city on Monday, December 16, it was decided that ministers should be asked to receive from
their congregations any help by way
of gifts that might be offered and the
hope was expressed that as there was
but a short time between now and
Christmas members of the churches
would make early response. Those
wishing to send direct may address
letters to Mr. S. Guthrie, secretary of
the "Children's Santa Claus Fund,"
Ladysmith, V. I., B. C.
Thanking you in anticipation.
WILLIAM STEVENSON.
Hon. Secy, of the Social Service Commission.
SOCIETY
(Continued from Page 10)
maid, Miss Leonara Ross, looked
very charming in a graceful gown of
blue velvet, en princess, draped at
the side and caught back with cut-
steel buttons, the skirt being made
with a loose panel at the back. The
semi-bodice was of blue ninon over
soft white satin, with yoke and cuffs
of Irish crochet lace, a handsome long
velvet hat relieved by white ostrich
plumes completed her costume. She
also wore the gift of the bridegroom,
a gold filigree bracelet with a cameo,
and carried a bouquet of pink carnations. The bride was given away by
her mother who was handsomely
gowned in black velvet and a seal
skin coat, her bonnet being of black
and white lace trimmed with ostrich
feathers. Mr. W. P. Dickson undertook the duties of best man. After
the ceremony the guests drove to the
home of the bride's mother, 834 Pemberton Road, where a reception was
held and after receiving the congratulations of their many friends the
bridal couple left on the 4.30 boat for
Seattle. The bride travelled in a
smart travelling costume of black
velvet with handsome braid trimmings and wore a velvet toque
tiimmed' with mink and feathers.
On their return to Victoria, the Hon.
Edmund and Mrs. Burke-Roche will
take up their residence at 834 Pemberton Road. They were the recipients of a great many very handsome presents.
THE PROFESSOR BLUSHED
A young student, supposed to be deficient
in judgment, was asked by a professor, in
the course of an examination, how he would
discover a fool.
"By the questions he would ask," was the
prompt and suggestive reply.
Gosnell's Cherry
Tooth Paste
something  a  little  better   than
you have ever found before.
If yob want to learn a new
delight—a greater efficiency, try
Gosnell's Cherry Tooth Paste.
The standard of highest quality
for over ioo years. Get it at
your Druggist's today, 25c a
tuue.
Royal favor has also been
given Cherry Blossom Perfume,
which we urge you to try. If
you cannot get it at your
Druggist's, write
NERLICH ft CO.
146 Front Sreett W.,  Toronto
If you are Interested in
Victoria Carnival
Week
August 1 to 6, iqi3
Please send names and present addresses of former residents of Victoria to the Secretary of the Victoria Citizens
Committee, P. 0. Box 1311.
[&up Horn
* Chas. Pcaar, mop.
'Tiff BESTOr EVERYTHING
IN THE HEART OF THE tlTT
WATER NOTICE
For a Licence to Store or Pen Back Water
NOTICE is hereby given that Herbert
Cuthbert, of Victoria, B. C, will apply for a
licence to store or pen back two acre-feet, of
water from unnamed creek, a stream flowing
in an easterly direction and emptying into
Esquimalt Lagoon, near its head. The water
will be stored in a reservoir of 00,000 ft. capacity, built or to be built on said property, and
wifl be used for domestic purposes, under a
notice of application for a licence to take and
use water, posted herewith, on the land described as part of Section 35. Esquimalt
District.
This notice was posted on the ground on
the ioth day of December, 1912. The application will be filed in the office of the Water
Recorder at Victoria, B. C.
Objections may be filed with the said Water
Recorder or with the Comptroller of Water
Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B. C.
HERBERT CUTHBERT, Applicant.
By R. G. Gilchrist, Agent,
dec. 14 Jan. 11
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of South Saanich
TAKE notice that Henry Puckle, of Victoria, B.C., occupation Fruit Grower, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the southeast corner of Section five; Range six east, South Saanich
District, thence west 10 chains; thence north
ten chains; thence east 10 chains; thence
south 10 chains to point of commencement,
containing 40 acres, more or less.
Dated 26th November,  1912.
HENRY PUCKLE.
nov. 30 Jan.25
JAMES BUCHANAN & CO., by Royal Appointment
Purveyors to H. M. King George the V. and the Royal Household.
Distillers of the popular
"Black & White" Scotch Whisky
Unsurpassed in Purity, Age and Flavor
All Dealers
Try it when you are tired-You will find
it wonderfully refreshing
LIPTON'S TEA
Sustains and Cheers
Our Big Store Teeming with
Christmas Gift Suggestions
—the kind of things to give that add to the permanent comfort of the
recipient—that keep the giver in fond remembrance every day in
the year.
Give Him a Desk for His
Office or Studio
A Beautiful Mahogany Roll-Top (Low Roll) Desk, seven drawers,
size 37 x 60 inches, pigeon hole drawers, sanitary design.. .$150
Same style desk as above, in Golden Oak, 34 x 60 inches $85
Early English and Golden Finished Roll Top Desks, 30x52 in $50
An Excellent Value is our Roll Top Desk in Golden finish,
30 x 48 inches $37.50
Plat Top Desk in Early English, Golden and Fumed, 6 drawers $60
Typewriter Desks, drop styles, Early English and Golden... .$37.50
Stenographer's Desk, Golden and Early English finishes, up from. .$6
Handsome Mahogany Revolving Office Chair $30
A huge range of Revolving Office Chairs in Golden, Early English and
fumed finishes at prices ranging up from $6.50
VICTORIA S
POPULAR
HOME
FURNISHERS
THE STORE THAT SAVES YOU MONEY
WEILER BROS, Limited
VICTORIA'S
POPULAR
HOME
FURNISHERS

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