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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Sep 29, 1906

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Array i^oToTTeTnr&To'oTroTnro^^
i Bank of Hamilton %
Capital $1,500,000
Reserve $1,500,000
Total Assets, $19,000,0001
Interest paid half-yearly on deposits of
$1 and upwards in Savings Department.
Drafts and Money Orders on all parts of
theworld. Vancouver Branches, cor.
of Hasting and Hamilton Sts., Powell St.
Cedar Grove.
3
JUL9JLSL0JUUUUUUU
The Week
TL Provincial Review and Magazine.
fi Pacific Coast Realty Co. Ld \
% Telephone 1086
Offices, 12 MacQregor Block.
Lands City Lots, Timber.
P. 0. Drawer 762, Victoria, B.C.
ULAJUJUUJUUuUjUUUt
a, B.C.      a
ftJUUUUUL
>VOL. III.    No.
m
VICTORIA AND   VANCOUVER,   B. C, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1906.
One Dollar Per Annum
*     /   ' -     •	
The Editor's Review
Of Current Topics.
r
ie for On the Northern B.
impleman. C. Coast there is a
small steamer called
e "Tillicum," owned by an Amer-
jtn. named Turner, unregistered and
(inspected, carrying passengers
'ht under the nose and with the con-
nt   of   the   customs   authorities.
ie is also another called the
Vesta," unlicensed to carry pas-
, regularly plying between
irt Simpson and Portland Canal in
e passenger trade, and entering and
earing every week at the Custom
louse. Further than this she has an
iilicensed Siwash engineer and her
tiler is defective. There are also a
imber of others similarly engaged,
id sooner or later, if this thing is
lowed by the authorities, there will
a serious accident.. These illegal
aerations are constantly going on
th the knowledge of the Customs
ithorities, not only the local ones,
it with the knowledge and consent
the   Inspector who  was up   the
ast last month on his annual inaction.   Besides this, there is an
erican steamer plying from Ketch-
an and carrying passengers from
rapson to Portland Canal points,
ae ahove facts are well-known to
hers besides the Customs authori-
;s; if the latter have done their
ity they are also known to the Fed-
fil Government. If the informa-
jin has not previously reached the
n. William Templeman the fault
ts with the Department. The con-
tion of affairs outlined is prejudi-
I in the highest degree to the ship-
ng  interests of  the  Province,  as
II as a menace to life. The wreck-
of the "Tillicum" or the "Ves-
would not send the thrill of hor-
throughout  the Province   which
ompanied the loss of the ill-fated
|Valencia,"  but it  would mean a
edless   sacrifice of valuable   lives
d the desolation of many homes. It
no excuse to urge that travel by
)se sea coffins is optional.   People
many things under stress of cir-
stances, and especially in the pur-
it of their daily avocations, whicli
|j neither safe nor discreet, but the
ral   responsibility for  the conse-
nees   cannot   be   disclaimed   by
se who furnish the medium of dis-
ter,   and   especially   is   this   true
en the prescribed duty of a Gov-
Lment is neglected.
Iiool The Week supports Mr.
pstees. Angus M'Keown for the
position on the Board of
fool Trustees rendered vacant by
resignation of Miss Agnes Deans
lieron. Mr. M'Keown possesses
lthe qualifications to make a suc-
Jiful public servant. He has lived
Victoria many years; he is widely
hvn and respected; is a man of
Iwoi'd; pays his debts; and lias the
le of education at heart. If elect-
lie has undertaken to devote the
tssary time to the discharge of
(duties, and as he does not enjoy
I distinction of having been a
le-defeated candidate we venture
Ircdict that his friends will have
difficulty in cnvrviirg him to
try-
Possible In view of the fiasco
Mayors, over the water question it
is not surprising that at a
distance of nearly four months from
the date of the next municipal election speculation is rife in Victoria as
to the probable occupant of the mayoral chair in 1907. Under ordinary
circumstances the subject might well
be left alone for another two months
at least, but the circumstances are
not ordinary, and the muddle into
which civic affairs have drifted under
the present control is a sufficient explanation of the anxiety of the citizens to ascertain at the earliest possible moment what good men and
true are available for the office of
Chief Magistrate. The year 1907
promises to be an important one in
our history. Men who have carefully
studied the business outlook are of
opinion that we are just on the eve
of that era of commercial and industrial prosperity for which we have
been waiting for more than twenty
years. The evidences of this are to
be found in the increased trade and
customs returns, in an unprecedented
activity in real estate, in the continual enlargement of our industrial enterprises and in the culmination of
some of the more-important projects
affecting the development of the Island. Those who believe that the
purchase of the E. & N. Railway by
the C. P. R. was of good augury for
the future already have their opinion
justified by the extensive improvements under way on that system, and
tin large appropriation recently announced for further improvements.
The opening of the Empress Hotel
next summer will be the most important event *vhich has occurred in Victoria since the inauguration ceremony
at the opening of the Parliament
Buildings. Its significance as a public function lies in the fact that it
sets the seal of permanence and prosperity upon the work of the C. P. R.
at the Capital. But even more important than this, as affecting the
future, will be the final settlement of
the water question. Our prediction
that Mayor Morley and the Council
which presides over him would fail to
do anything with this vital matter
has been amply justified by the result. After clogging the wheels of
progress for six months with a
scheme which was condemned by expert Adams and finally turned down
by an overwhelming vote of the
Council the Mayor has wisely subsided and left the water committee fo
appeal to the rate-payers on their
own proposal. This proposal, however, is at the best but a temporary
expedient for treating a chronic disease, and we have yet to discover the
Mayor and Council broad-gauge
enough to handle the subject on a
popular basis. The trouble with lhe
present officials is that they have no
faith in thc future of Victoria.
Mayor Morley still cherishes tho notions which he acquired in a somnolent English village thirty years ago.
Other members of the Council have
waited so long for the day of prosperity to dawn on Victoria tliat they
have become confirmed pessimists;
ond whenever one talks of increased
population and expansion they ask,
with a sigh and a look of wonder
ment,' ' Can there any good thing come
out of Nazareth?" No wonder that
under the influence of men of such
little faith, even Victorians themselves
have begun to doubt. What we want
is a Mayor who believes in Victoria
and its future; a Mayor who can lead
and not follow; a mayor who has
ideas instead of notions; and above
all a Mayor who did not cease to
learn when he left school. If the
right .leader is found there will be
no difficulty about the following, and
under such leadership Victoria will
get out of the rut in which she has
been crawling all too long. Four
months is not too long a time in
which to look round and make a judicious selction for this important office, and while, it may not be necessary at the moment to canvass the
claims of prospective candidates,
these gentlemen cannot know too
soon that Victoria has had a surfeit
of cranks, freaks and fancies.
Come Up The elevation of Mr.
Higher. Jusice Duff to the Supreme Court of Canada is
an event of note in two capitals. Victoria loses one of the most brilliant
judges who has ever sat in her courts,
Ottawa gains a distinguished jurist,
a bright intellect and a young and
vigorous man. This combination of
qualities is not always, or indeed often, found in men who are selected
for the highest judicial positions, because it is rarely that they are deemed fitted by experience until their
physical vigour at any rate has abated. Mr. Justice Duff is an exception;
in addition to all the other essential
qualifications of a judge he is still
young, and in making this selection
the government has acted wisely.
Even in England, where in such matters conservatism has from time immemorial dominated these appointments, tliere has of late years been
a recognition of the fact that a man
need not be a worse judge because
he illustrates the old adage of "Mens
sana in corpore sano." To Mr. Justice Duff we tender our heartiest congratulations. The appointment confers an honour upon him, which is
shared by Victoria and by the Province of British Columbia. We are
satisfied that the honour will be ultimately shared by the highest tribunal
in which he will hereafter exercise his
gifts.
months, that we pointed out in a
manner which many of our friends
were kind enough to appreciate, that
whoever else may have been to
blame for that terrible disaster, the
Government which had neglected to
provide adequate coast defences,
means of communication and rescue,
even a life-boat or a Salvor with any
appliances for saving could hardly
claim the right to be let off scot-free.
It is hardly necessary to speak of the
public meetings that were held, of the
indignation expressed, of the recommendations made both by independent marine experts and by the Government Commission, and last, but
by no means least, speaking quantitatively, of the promises of the Hon.
William Templeman. Up to date the
only one of those promises which has
materialized is a second-hand lifeboat, discarded from the service of
the Great Lakes. We are still looking for the additional lighthouses,
telegraphic service, fog signals and
shore roads so urgently recommended. When we may expect to get them
deponent knoweth not, but a little
bird has whispered to The Week that
the material for all these will arrive
by tho first freight train over the
G. T. P. in 1911. Meanwhile the summer season is fast waning, and we
shall be face to face with six months
of more or less stormy weather on a
pitiless coast which may possibly
claim another great sacrifice before
the Hon. William Templeman is able
to arouse the Dominion oGvernment
to a sense of their responsibility to
those who, taking their lives in their
hands, go down to the sea in ships
and see great dangers.
A Free- We wish to direct the at-
For-All. ten tion of our readers to an
advertisement which appears on the sixth page of this issue.
By arrangement with the Sprott-
Shaw College we are offering a free
scholarship at that excellent institution, open to all boys and girls in
British Columbia. The Sprott-Shaw
College has a wide reputation for the
soundness and success of its methods.
As a business training institution it
is unsurpassed in the West, and the
boy or girl who is lucky enough to
secure its course is well on the way
to a successful business career.
There is no time to lose, as the number of endeavourers will be large.
Boys and girls, all you have to do is
to read our advertisement and set to
work-. We shall hope to hear from at
least a hundred of you before next
week.
Valencia      Some of onr readers may
Wreck.      remember    the    Valencia
wreck,   and   a   few   muy
even remember, after thp lapse of six
Soccer When    the   Corinthian
Football, team had wound up their
victorious tour by winning
twelve out of thirteen matches, Wre-
ford Brown, the veteran captain, gave
an interview to the representative of
a New York sporting paper, in which
he discussed, with the skill of an expert, the present position of the game
in Canada and the United States. No
man is better qualified to speak of
Soccer football. He has for nearly
twenty years been one of the stars
of the finest amateur football aggregation the world has ever seen. His
stated conclusions, therefore, are
weighty and authoritative. He declares that Canadian and American
players are shaping well to acquire
a thorough knowledge of the game,
and that while they are still far behind Old Country exponents in finesse and all those scientific touches,
which only come as the result of experience, he has only one radii'nl
fault to find with the manner in
which the game is played. In finding
this fault he places his finger on the
weak spot which lias been apparent
to every honest critic, viz., individual
instead of combined play, and he
wisely remarks that until the members of a team are willing to rni.'i-
fice individual applause nnd kudos tn
the glory which comes tn a victorious
team they will fail tn roach the
standard of English teams. All this
is so true and so gond that we make
nn apology for repeating it. hut add
onr plea to that of nne of the greatest exponents nf the gamp in favour
of less individualism and mnre collectivism.
Reporting Dr. Fagan, Provincial
Progress, medical health officer, is
making notable progress
with the work of the
Anti-Tuberculosis League, and is able
to report that he has secured a site
for the Sanitarium on the shores of
Kamloops Lake. He is now hunting
for a site for a summer house for
the patients at a higher elevation.
Dr. Fagan is organizing special committees in the Coast cities for thie
purpose of raising the sum of $40,000
to enable him to claim the Lieutenant-
Governor's munificent offer of $10,-.
000. In order to do this the larger
sum must be raised within a month.
Having regard to the urgency of the
work and the many advantages, not
only to the patients, but to the community of carrying out this
philanthropic project, it is to be
hoped that the amount will be subscribed promptly. Every dollar helps,
and it is a work in which all have an
interest, and should have a Stake in,
however small.
Ballad of Agava.
By  Clinton  Scollard.
In the fair month of Nisan,
(Month  of thc  heart's desire),
Adown  the  paths  of  twilight
Sped Agava of Tyre.
Tinkled like moonlit fountains
Her golden anklet hells,
And nightingales made answer
With rythmic ritornelles.
Before her fleeting footsteps
The almond flung its snow;
The asphodel and poppy
Were fain to sec her go;
Were fain to catch the glinting
Of those celestial eyes,
As bright as shines Astartc
From out thc midnight skies.
Behind her in the  sunset,
A flood of rosy fire,
Uplifted tower and temple,
The diadem of Tyre.
Before her reached the twilight,
Its  magic  of perfume,
Its  mysteries  of purple,
Its hyancinthine bloom.
In all the sunset pageant
Her longing had no part;
It was the vast of twilight
That held her yearning heart;
The attarcd lanes of twilight,
With leaves that wnocd  above,
And a sequestered altar
Unto the God of Love!
Within a copse of myrtle
That  flawless  altar  rnsc;
Gleamed in the dusk its marble
As white as Hcrmon snows;
While ever doves about it
Made   iterative   moan,
And  unseen  lips  cried  "Thammuz!"
In passionate undertone.
Into   the sacred   presence
C;mic Agava of Tyre,
A lily in the gloaming.
And breathed her soul's desire.
'I seek  for Love I" she whispered,
And even as she spake
The deepest dells  of twilight
With  raplnre seemed to shake.
A spirit from  the shadows
With brow divinely bright
Touched  her sweet  lips.    Together
They passed into the night. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1906.
VANCOUVER I
Umamsmmmtmmmamammmmm
Vancouver was not one whit behind
Victoria in its welcome to Earl Grey
and the Vice-Regal party which honoured the Terminal City this week. Interest, enthusiasm and the evidences of
loyalty were everywhere apparent.
Whilst at present Vancouver can boast
no such magnificent pile as the Parliament Buildings, it makes up in population, business activity and the signs of
commercial prosperity. The splendid
illuminations outlining noble architecture and picturesque arches were the
feature of the Victoria welcome to the
Governor-General. People were the feature of Vancouver's greeting. There
was no discordant note; even the Socialists, for once, held their peace, and
all went merry as a marriage bell. But
the most signal feature of an impressive patriotic display was Earl Grey's
speech at the Canadian Club luncheon.
If we mistake not it was an epoch-making address, the deliberate utterance of
a man of mature thought, of wide experience, of scholarly attainments and
of responsibility. Not for more than
twenty years has a Governor-General
visited the Coast, and what was there to
see then? In place of the small scattered hamlet of those days, the Terminal City now rears its head a populous, progressive seaport. The terminus
of the greatest transcontinental railway
in the world; the harbour of a great
Pacific steamship service; the capital of
the lumbering industry; the objective
point of at least three other important
railway system. Vancouver has doubled
in population, and at the present rate of
development there is no reasonable
doubt that before the next census in
1911 thc 100,000 mark will have been
passed. Seattle is setting the pace for
Western growth, and Vancouver is the
Seattle of British Columbia. In view
of these facts it was peculiarly fitting
that Earl Grey should have chosen the
commercial metropolis of the Pacific
Coast in which to deliver his weighty
message. And what was that message?
Take a few sentences:
"Real ancestors are not only an asset, but a liability. I like a man who
makes his own ancestry."
What sentiment could be more appropriate or more stimulating in the pioneer stage of a new country?
"I have often had a dream that while
former schemes of federation have been
the result of the pressure of necessity,
the imperial federation of the British
Empire may yet be founded on a basis
of self-respect to which your chairman
has given expression may be the impelling motive toward the realization of
the dream.
This is surely the wider, broader basis of federation overlooked by narrow-
minded politicians.
'It requires no inspired prophet to
foretell the greatness of Vancouver
now. Vancouver is now the recognized
gateway between the East and the
West, lhe gateway through which the
double streams of commerce between
the Occident and th Orient, and between
Britain and the self-governing nations
of New Zealand and Australia will flow
in ever-increasing volume, until Vancouver shall become, perhaps, the first
and most important port of all the
world
With prophetic vision Earl Grey
sketches thc fair vision of Vancouver's
future.
"Nature, the C. P. R. and thc British
fleet have together given and secured to
Canada the shortest and best trade
route between Europe and Asia."
Here he discriminates with accuracy
as to the contributant causes of our
potential greatness.
"A club such as ihis which exists for
the purpose of obtaining addresses from
men, no matter to what party they
may belong, who are conspicuous for
llicir disinterested zeal in thc public
service, secures two results. One result is Ihat your horizon is widened;
that your touch with the great world
outside is strengthened; that your life
is removed out of the narrow and muddy rut of selfish provincialism, which is
the chief curse and weakness of nearly
every portion of the British Empire.
Situated as you are on the tides that
flow around the world, your thoughts
and lalk will naturally lake a wide and
comprehensive range.   Tt lias ever been
the case that towns situated as the commanding point of the great trade routes
of the world, as Venice was before the
Cape of Good Hope route to India was
discovered, enjoyed a civic life ennobled by a rich and varied culture, by
a high idealism and by a splendid spirit.
And so it may be with you. Use your
club as a window through which the
best and purest light of the United
States, of the old world and of the new,
can shine in upon the life of your town,
and by the warmth and brightness of
their rays contribute to the enlightenment of your city."
Drawing on the history and traditions of the great ties of the past which
have been world ports, he institutes a
just comparison. Then, carried away
by the enthusiasm of his audience and
the inspiration of the subject, he widens
his view and concludes with a fine peroration on the possibilities of fhe whole
province which has so captivated his
fancy. It will be a long time, maybe
twenty years again ere as notable, as
weighty and as significant an address is
heard in Vancouver, or at the gateway
of the West. Listent to its dosing sentences :
"Some people are afraid that a community which has received so much as
you have at so slight a cost will be
wanting in that character which, as a
rule, only results from the hard discipline of toil and suffering and from the
grace of tears. Your Canadian Club,
by holding the highest ideals to the
community, can do much to remedy that
want of discipline. There is a blissful
law of nature which has decreed that
little is unattainable to the individual
who earnestly devotes himself to the
unselfish attainment of the public good.
If your club, under the guidance of the
most patriotic among you, resolves that
its influence shall be on the side of all
that is calculated to make a strenuous,
cultured and righteous people, there will
be no limit to the degree of your influence."
The cattle sale advertised in our last
two issues was conducted by Mr. Stewart Williams on Stevenson's Farm, Cadboro Bay, on the 21st inst. There was
a large attendance and a very successful sale. Cows realized as high as
$36; sows, $21; geese, $1.75. Other
prices were in the same proportion.
Girl Ordered from Church.
A girl was ordered out of the Menai
Bridge church last Sunday because she
was not wearing a hat.
The seryice was being conducted by
the curate, who saw that the girl's head
was uncovered when he went into the
pulpit to preach. He called a choir boy
to him, and sent him to the girl with
the request that she would leave the
church, and not return until she was
properly dressed. The girl at once
walked out.
A Popular Partnership.
Stewart Williams has taken into partnership in his newly established commission businss one of Victoria's most
popular young men in the person of
"Dick" Janion, who has been for
twelve years with the Hudson's Bay
Co. Experience and popularity should
make a strong team, and ensure prosperity for the firm of Williams & Janion.
Too Early For Him.
In a Western town not long ago the
superintendent of a railroad was seated
in his office, when in walked a big,
burly negro, according to the Buffalo
Times. The superintendent looked up
and said:
"How did you get in here past my
office-boy and clerks? You have a lot
of assurance, coming in here without
lirst sending in your name."
Thc negro replied that there was no
one in the outer office when he entered.
"I am looking for work," he said, "and
want it bad; am willing to go switching,
or do anything."
The superintendent said: "Do you
drink?'
The negro replied: "It is a little early,
isn't it?"
The new floor of the skating rink is
completed, thc contractor, T. Lewis,
having rushed the work through well
within thc specified lime. Mr. Painter
ran now offer his patrons thc finest
floor on the Coast, and thc popularity
of the now pastime will be proportionately increased.
Week September 24
The New
Grand
SULLIVAN ft CONSIDINE,    Proprietor*.
Manaiemcnt of HOST. JAMIESON.
Wm. Cartright and Jennie Lee
Comedy Sketch.
JohnW. Byrnes
Nor a liar, just a story teller.
Murrison and Roma
Dramatic Playlet, "Leah's Violin."
Mr. and Mrs. Milo Vagge
Novelty Bag Punchers.
Frederic Roberts,
Illustsated song,
" They'll All Be Glad to See You."
New Moving Pictures,
"Dogs m Smugglers."
MONDAY, OCT. ist.
HI. Henry's Greatest
Minstrels
Prices, 25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00
Mail orders accompanied by cheque
will receive their usual attention.
I
Come
and
Examine
Quality and
Prices
Before Buying
Elsewhere.
We Guarantee riood
Value In Footwear
WATSON'S
SHOE STORE
65 Yates Stree
Collectors!
I carry an assortment of 400
subjects of
Genuine
Photographic
Post Cards
of Banff and the Canadian National
Park, also of Northwest Indians,
Mountain and Game Scenes.
PRICE 60c. PER DOZEN.
FOR THE TRADE ONLY.
My quotations by the hundred are
the lowest in Canada. Pbotopost
cards made from any subject you
may send me.
Write for particulars.
Byron Harmon
Photographic Artist,
Banff, Alberta.
|S                    We have been appointed Sole Agents in Vancouver for
W. &. A. G "  JEY
Distillers, Bottleas and Distributors of the Finest Pure Malt
Whiskies.   Purveyors of Wines and Spirits to
His Majesty the King.
Strathmill Whiskey, Oyeatsold, per bottle , .
1100
125
125
100
125
100
Spey Royal Whiskey, 10 years old, per bottle	
SOLE AGENTS
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
The Grocers.                                           Ill Government St.
, Viotoria.
R. 16S5
TELEPHONE 606
Johnston's Transfer
I35 Douglaa St.   VICTORIA.
RATES CUT IN TWO.
HACKS FOR HIRE.
Driving Loads 75c. per hour.
G j. JOHNSTON,
Proprietor,
.71
V
i
Tho Sanitarium Hotel, which is beautifully situated, overlooking the How Ulver and its lovely and
romantic yalloy, is a large 5-story building elegantly
fitted with every appointment calculated to bring
ploHsure and comfort to tho tourist or invalid.
A private hospital, which, though isolated, IsTi
close proximity to the Sanitarium, is presided over by
skilfully trained nurses and is also fitted out with
eyery, appliance necessary to a first class Institution
of its kind.
A very commodious bath-liouso adjoins tho hotel,
whoro lurklsh, Russian, plunge, shower and douche
baths aro given under modical supervision, with
water direct from tho colobrated hot sulphur springs.
A first class llvory in connection so that rides and
drives through tho nmgnlflcant sconory may bo en-
loyed.
Terms: $2.0) a day upwards. Special rates by week
or month. Opon all tlio year.
W. H. SCARTH, Manager.
Medical Staff:
It. G. Brktt, m.d 1   G. M. Atkin, m.d.;
It. H. BllETT, B.A.. M D.
; 1
JAMES BUCHANAN & CO.
LONDON AND GLASGOW
purveyors to.the Royal Family,
DISTILLERS OF HIGH GRADE SCOTCH WHISKIES
Buchanan's Royal Household at )i.so)per bottle
Buchanan's Black nnd White at $1.25 per bottle
Buchanan's Red Seal at $1.00 per^bottle
ARE LEADERS AMONG THE BEST
For sale by all dealers, VICTORIA, I.
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd]
BREWERS OF
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops tJsed in Manufacture.
PHONE 803.; VICTOt THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1906.
■ - i,  . ;    	
At The Street   $
Corner
By THE LOUNQER
*
NM^H«^/I|)
^rMy readers, I am going to take you
to my confidence.   I was born of poor
it honest parents.; I have inherited all
jeir poverty and a small particle (very
jjiall)   of their  honesty.    Anyhow, I
as conscientious as the next man is,
British  Columbia, or  I might say
the continent of America.   Owing
this unfortunate habit of   conscien-
usness  as a Lounger,  I feel it my
y on occasions to visit the saloons
the city in order to pick   up frag-
nts which may  interest you.   This
Imore particularly liable to occur in
t weather, as I can only afford one
m (another   man   who   works   at
ht occupies it during the day) and
the churches have nothing interest-
going on on most week days, there
nowhere else to sit.
Well, to come to the point, it wasn't
very long ago that I had occasion to
into a saloon; I won't specify which,
it it   wasn't a hundred miles  away
m  Yates  street,   and  there  was a
Miard table  there.    It  was  raining;
[was cold and wet; and I stayed and
ayed a game of bottle-pool.     I won.
Tifle we were sharing tbe rewards of
:ory  four Chinese  gentlemen came
for the same game.    The red ball
ith which we had been playing was
t red enough for them, so we gave
em another, rather redder.    (I don't
lieve that that word is in the diction-
y).   Unfortunately   the   day befpre,
properitor had thrown this parti-
lar ball down on the ground, and his
x-terrier, under the impression that it
is a bone, had bitten about one quar-
out of it.   Of course three quarters
a ball are better than no quarters at
, but still it doesn't help a ball to
'1 any better to be a quarter short,
wever, the Chinks   started playing,
d I tell you straight, readers, that if
u want to laugh don't go and pay for
: theatre, but just engage four Chi-
se to come and perform on your bil-
rd table.   But the cream of the joke
ne  later.    There was another man
:re;   an Englishman, who was also
liven in by the wet weather which we
;ve not been having.   He thought he
!uld play bottle-pool,    and so in the
ridness of his heart, and also because
was beginning to feel rather thirsty,
offered to take one of their cues and
ow them how the game   was played.
[ell, he started, and I am sorry to say,
the honor of the flag, that he had
furnish the moisteners. Which proves,
Buster Brown would say, that when
want a drink it is safer to buy it;
d in any case don't try and stick Ce-
tials.
[Talking about Celestials brings me to
[other subject.   I'm no politician, but
*uess that I know as much as most
the men who set up to work for their
hstituents.     Why  is   there   all  this
lick."    (I  always  put  "kick"  in in-
ted commas, because  I  don't want
be accused of not knowing the dif-
|ence between English and slang). By
way, what do you all think of Pre-
ent Ruselvet's new idea of   reform-
the English language?   I spell him
t way because if be is going to rein he might just as well start on his
n name.   But just fancy an Ameri-
reforming a language!   Well, to reft to  our muttons,  as they say in
pi, why is there all this trouble about
ndus coming  in?      I   don't    know
ther my editor will pass this, as I
>w that he holds rather strong views
this question, but I can't remember
ch side he is on.
he Hindus is a good worker; he is
|3ritish subject;   the  Sikhs and the
rkhas after we had conquered them,
[lized that we were  good people to
k for; during thc mutiny the Sikhs
ained loyal; the woman make good
ses,  and  we   are   short  of  woman
ur here;  the  men make  excellent
tse servants; but no; British Cohtm-
prefers to take in Chinese labour.
that I am saying anything against
Chinese I have met; they have all
1 good straight men.   But still, the
\Au   is   a   British   subject   and   the
is  not.      That's   all, but   dear
readers, you might think about it.
I turned into one of my favorite bars
yesterday for a Johnny Walker and
White Rock, but that bar is no longer
recognized amongst my favorites; it is
dethroned and ignominiously cast out.
The beautifully dressed male angel behind the bar gently murmured:
"What will you take, sir?"
There was no hesitation in my reply,
''Kilmarnock and White Rock."
He repeated my order in dulcet tones,
but there was something unfamiliar
about the Christian name of the Rock.
Now, I may be a lounger, and, as some
people assert, a fool, but I hate being
done, so I asked 'him to repeat the
Christian name of tbe Rock. Needless
to say, it was not "White," but some
base imitation, and I am absolutely convinced that the proprietor of any respectable saloon who foists on his customers spurious imitations, will with,
equal facility swindle his customers in
other directions.
Last week I offered some criticism on
lack of courtesy among the attendants
at the Carnegie Library. I wish to
make it quite clear that I referred to
the offenders and not to any bigher official.
CORRESPONDENCE.
Sympathy for Bohemian.
Editor Week: Another chestnut!
Alas, poor "Bohemian," and this is the
reward for daring to even try to cause
a smile in this "vale of tears." Never
mind, old chap, one of your stories was
keenly appreciated by the writer, heard
long ago, but entirely forgotten, and as
the scene was laid in our old home
town, the recollection brought back
many pleasant memories. Let us have
more, say I. Here is another, not by
any means young, but very "apropos:"
A certain '-Oman -about town" was returning home from a spelling bee, and
dropping into the "Grotto" for a lemonade, met' several' of his old pal's,
amongst them Seagram, Walker, Gooderham, and others. He tarried late (or,
ratber, early), arriving home at 3 a. m.
His wifey met him at the door, with a
scowl on her face and a poker in her
hand, greeting him thusly: "Brute!"
Hubby (with hazy memories of the
spelling contest): Ah, tha'sh easy—
B-r-u-t; giv'sh another." "Drunk," she
replied. "D-r-u-n-c, wheel" "You
idiot!" she exclaimed. "I-d-i-o-t, now
let's have a stunner," and she raised
the poker and let him have—a stunner.
Now that tli» "Roosevelt Spelling reform" is on deck we anticipate a revival of the old-time "spelling bees."
Why not begin at the creature itself?
why "phonetic" when "fonetic" will
do? Just a few words to give an idea
what's doin'.
Through—will be tbru, but you won't
quit work any earlier.
Board—will be bord, but it costs just
as much.
Knocks—will be nox, and they're just
as hard.
Programme—will be program, but it's
still "two bits" for "sweet charity's
sake."
Whiskey—will be wisky, tho your
head is just as big in the morning.
Mumm's—will be Mum's (nothin' do-
in').
Love—will be luv, and just as
"mushy."
Kissed—will be kist, if opportunities
are favorable.
Death—will be deth, but you're just
as "dead" and premiums on insurance
just as high.
Broke—will be brok, and you all
know what that means.
Dollar—will be dolar, and just as few
and far between.
Missed—will be mist, but if it happens to be the business end of a Winchester or the tax man we don't object.
Smoke—will be smok, both here and
hereafter.
So after all, Teddy, what's the use?
SUBSCRIBER.
Canadian Wheat Flakes differ from
all imported cereals, not only in being
more carefully manufactured from finer
wheat, but also in the fact that thev are
absolutely fresh. Your grocer is in
touch with our mills, which are situated
in all thc leading centres in Western
Canada. There is no need for storage
nor risk of musty flavor. Tn every
picket vou will find a most useful gift.
B. & K. Milling Co., Ltd.
British American
Trust Company,
Limited
!   OFFICES : Vancouver, I. C.
Grand Forks, B. C.
Vietoria, B. C.
:
Tbe Pacific Coast
Realty Go, Ltd.
Have an exclusive list of specially selected ACREAGE, ESTATE and FARM
PROPERTIES for sale at prices which
will attract purchasers.
NOW IS THE TIME TO BUT
Victoria Property is the safest and best
investment to be found in Real Estate on
the Pacific Coast.  There will be a
50 PER CENT. INCREASE
IN VALUES IN 1907.
You cannot make a mistake In buying
Business,
Residence, or
Acreage
Property.
Write or call on us for particulars.  We
can show you how to make money.
The Pacific Coast
Realty Co., Ltd.
12 MacQregor Bl'k, Victoria, B.C.
(Opposite Driard Hotel)
Transacts a General Financial and
Fiduciary Business. Acts as Executor, Administrator, Trustee, etc.
Buys and Sells High Grade Investment Seeurities. Manages, buys,
sells, rents and appraises real estate. Collects Rents and Places
Insurance. Negotiates Loans on
Real E»tate. Makes Loans on
High Grade Securities.
Correspond*nee Solicited.
HAROLD M. DALY, Manager
VICTORIA,   B. C.
JOHN  COOPER
Taxidermist and Pur Dresser
Mounting Large Game Heads
a  Specialty.
826 PENDER STREET,
VANCOUVER
PRELIMINARY NOTICE.
Williams & Janion
AUCTIONEERS
Having been duly Instructed by Capt.
A. T.Hunt, R. N„ will tell by
PUBLIC AUCTION
Without reserve, early in November, a'
thc
NAVAL YARD
ESQUIMALT
The whole of the NAVAL STORES belonging 10
H. M. S.
SHEARWATER
Particulars nnd date later.
Thc Auctioneer, S. WILLIAMS
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
G. H. MUMM & CO. have an unchangeable rule
to use only grapes of the finest vineyards, and
thereby give fullest value for the cost of their champagnes ; hence their superior quality, as can readily
be proven by making comparisons.
G. H. MUMM & CO. make immense purchases
of fine vintages, in order to tide over poorer ones,
and do not confine themselves to the product of a
limited number of vineyards; and carrying a tremendous stock are enabled to maintain the same high
standard of quality and supply all demands.
G. H. MUMM'S Extra Dry now in the market
is conceded to be the finest produced this decade. It
is made from selected grapes of the choicest vineyards in the Champagne District and is noted for
its superb quality, natural dryness and purity.
The Selected Brut is a brut champagne of the
very highest quality, made of selected cuvees of vintage years spcially adaptd for brut wines. Connoisseurs pronounce it the finest brut imported. It
is a very dry and genuine brut champagne of exceeding purity without being heavy, and their 1895s,
1898s, 1899s, and 1900s are unsurpassage. P. L.
1634.
P. L. 1634
r
If you love your wife
BUY  HER  A  GAS STOVE
It will save her a lot of extra work and
give her time for other things
besides cooking.
Cook Your Boast, Do Not Boast Your Cook,
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, LIMITED.
The Home
Seekers
Goal.
Special   Bargains  to
Wind Up An Estate.
6}4 acres in the North
End, only 20 minutes walk
to Post Oifice, with southern aspect, $600 per acre,
5 acres is all cleared and in
high state of cultivation.
Seaview lots from $50 to
$100 each, chiefly cleared,
and ready for building on.
Easy terms if necessary.
The B. C. Land & Investment
Agency, Ltd.
Real Estate, Financial and
Insurance Agents,
VICTORIA, B. C.
Old Fashioned
Furniture,
Old China,
Brass and Copper
46 Douglas Street, Victoria
Mrs. M. E. MacLeod,
Opposite nalmoral Hotel
SPECIAL OFFER OF
SEASONABLE
GOODS.
BEE SUPPLIES.-Buckwheat, Fall
Rye, Clover, Timothy, Lawn Grass,
Ensilage Corn, Mangel, Turnip, Epe-
cial quotations in quantity.
Spray Pumps, Whale Oil Soap, Vegetable Plants.
Large Stock of HOME GROWN
Fruit and Ornamental Trees now matured for the fall trade.
No expense, loss or delay of fumigation or inspection.
Let me price your list before placing
your order.
We do business on our own grounds
—no rent to pay, and am prepared to
meet all competition.
Catalogue Free.
M. J. HENRY,
3010 Westminster Foad,
Vancouver, B.C
Real Hair
Switches
Pompadours, Curia
all of the latest
style, at
MADAME
KOSCHE'S
Hair Dressing
Parlors
58 Douglas
Street
VICTORIA. THE WEEK, SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER ah'. t9o*
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Offices:
88H Government Street .... Victoria B. C.
Empire Block   Vancouver, B. C.
W. BLAKEMORE...Manager and Editor
Annual Subscription Jl In Advance
Transient rates, per Inch  60c.
Legal notices (60 days), from  (5.00
Theatrical, per Inch  $1.00
Readers, per line   6c. to 10c.
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Lost and
Found and other small advertisements, per Insertion, from...26c. to (1.00
NOTICE
Contributors are hereby notified
that all copy for The Week should be
delivered to the office, 88i/2 Government
Street, not later than Thursday morning.
BADINAGE
By BOHEMIAN
saiiaiiaaiiaaiiHi",~'™'"'~'"="=""'"
A reputedly wise man has said "Of
making of books there is no end?" I
say reputedly wise advisedly, because
he had his moments of weakness if not
of folly. Seven hundred of them.
Now a twentieth century wise man,
with all the wisdom of the ages on his
brow has said: "Of making of sermons
there is no end," and the result is
weariness of the flesh and vexation of
the spirit'. In short, this critic is of
opinion that the Church is not giving
a "quid pro quo" in exchange for the
labor and capital expended. This is
surely superficial crticism. Every thinking man deplores the increasing worldi-
ncss of the Church. The simplicity of
life and apparel which characterized its
early days has given way to the luxury
and indulgence which are characteristic
of this age. Even Demos is getting rich
and now sports his pew and a begowned
and be-millinered family to adorn it.
All this, however, is a phase, and
should be only a passing phase of life.
The "pomp and vanities" of this wicked
world found their way into the Church
centuries ago, but they did not weaken
its influence or shake its foundations.
The power of thc Church is in its message. Even though messengers may be
unworthy, they may carry a treasure
in   earthern   vessels.
It therefore behoves our critic to examine closely before he undertakes to
dogmatize on "the waning influence of
the Church." The fact, as I see it is
that the power of man millinery, of the
white choker and the black gown, of
the unctuous tone and the falsetto
voice, are decidedly waning. This is a
prosaic age, for the nonce sentiment is
having a hard time, and is about "winded," but the man who without frills
delivers the old message with simplicity,
sincerity and earnestness is as influential for good as the apostles of old.
The weakness of the Church today is
not so much in the pew as in the pulpit.
The latter is too professional. It
smacks of the "hireling" and not of the
shepherd. Petulance and even self-
seeking are not unknown to stationing
committees. "Calls" are top often the
result of wire pulling. Even this week
has seen thc chief light of the Methodist Church exhibit temper and contumacy because in its wisdom it saw
fit to turn down his pet project. Of
course parsons are human and may be
excused the possession of many of the
foibles which characterize ordinary
mortals, but in all kindness let it be said
that actions like that of Dr. Sutherland
set back the clock of progress for his
Church more than he can put it forward
during the rest of his natural life. Another regrettable feature of twentieth
century church life is its costliness.
Church going has become an expensive
luxury, and as such can only be indulged in by the few. Thc Salvation Army
is the only organization that maintains
popular prices, and it is easily the most
successful religious institution of the
last century. Not ten per cent of the
population attend church with any re
gularity, and probably not more than
twenty per cent ever go. Among many
reasons for this not the least important
is the fact that people cannot afford $30
to $50 a year for a pew and nearly as
much for collections. The Free
churches are anything but free. All
this may be a little wide of my usual
mark, but I am following a good example in Toronto "Saturday Night," which
has recently been ventilating the subject thoroughly, and has made some
scathing remarks which I should hesitate to reproduce.
I had an interesting interview on
Wednesday with a youthful journalist
who has some intention of starting a
new weekly. He has little or no capital, but plenty of energy and ambition.
He can see his way to a first subscription list of 200 in a district with a
population of 700. He opines that he
can get the paper printed by a good
Samaritan who would be paid when the
subscriptions came in. The produce of
his district is purely agricultural, and
finally he thinks it is not "hard" to run
a weekly if it is on glazed paper and
well illustrated. To all of which I
say, "Go ahead, young man, experience
at any rate is cheap where no capital is
at stake and more impossible projects
have succeeded, but the advice to 'look
before you leap" is time honored and
sapient, albeit not originated by
BOHEMIAN.
Advertising Kelowna.
Kelowna is at once one of the most
beautiful and prosperous of Okanagan
towns. Its fruit-growing industry has
brought well deserved popularity, and
there are other considerable possibilities for agricultural development. The
proposal is on foot to subscribe a sum
of money to pay an outside newspaper
for writing up the district. The Kelowna Courier, with which we have had
several disagreements on other matters, points out with perfect justice and
truthfulness that the advertising of this
class can be best done by the local press.
It also points out what every newspaper
man knows full well, that the difficulty
of financing a paper in a small township
is so great as to be oftentimes insurmountable, and only by securing every
dollar available for advertising can it
be kept going. A local paper in a
small town may not be a very pretentious affair. It may not be able to afford the luxury of red type and scare
head-lines. It may-not even be able to
pay for fake dispatches, or otherwise to
disport the more sensational features of
so-called up-to-date journalism; but the
only axe it has to grind is the building
up of its own territory, and as its very
existence depends upon doing this there
could be no better guarantee that it
will be done well. To divert money
to an outside paper is to reduce the efficiency of the local organ, which is
bad business, viewed from any standpoint. We cannot too strongly endorse
the appeal that all the money available
for advertising through the medium of
the press shall be spent on the Kelowna
Courier, which so admirably sums up
thc situation in these words:
"Why, then, do people stay in the
newspaper business? The answer is,
either because they are of the damphool
order of intellect, or because it is an
absorbing hobby to which they cling in
preference to a more profitable occupation."
The Packers Potted It.
Mary had a little lamb,
And when she saw it sicken,
She shipped it off to Packingtown,
And now it's labelled chicken.
—New York "Evening Post."
•NEW BOOKS ON SALE AT T. N.
HIBBEN & CO.'S:
"Under a Mysterious Spell," by E.
Roosevelt, L. L. D.
"Other People's Money," by Paul O.
Stensiand.
"Chips That Pass in the Night," by
John W. Gates.
"Thc Origin of Speeches," by W. J.
Bryan.
"How Happy Could I Be with Either,
Were T'other Dear Charmer Away," by
the Managing Director.
"Dam It," an expert treatise on water, by A. J. Morley.
"Thc Vanishing Seat," an essay on
trusteeships, by A. B. McNeil.
"Did You Ever Catch a Weasel
Asleep," by J. S. H. M.
Our recent heavy importations of personally selected Art Wares, including choice selections of Amphora Ware, Imperial Vienna China, beautiful
French Bronzes and French works of art. Silver Deposit Ware and brilliant
Cut Glass make this section of our show rooms intensely interesting. Mail
order customers should bear in mind these are not the common goods made
in factories by t'he thousand for houses selling by catalogue. The are individual art creations that will increase in value as the years roll by. At present
they cost very little more than the common type.
CHALLONER & MITCHELL, JEWELERS AND SILVERSMITH,
47 and 40 GOVERNMENT STREET, VICTORIA, B. C.
WALL PAPERS
We take stock next month. Before doing so it is our custom to
clear out all remainders in our Wallpaher Department; by remainders we mean rolls left over from wholesale shipments, sufficient to
paper one or two rooms. They represents Grand Selection of
Modern Wall Coverings, packed in bundles—walls, border and
ceilings together.   Bach bundle is marked in plain figures—
25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00, etc.
In every esse there is sufficient to paper one or more rooms. You
can easily select sufficient to paper every room in the house at
prices LESS THAN HALF what it would cost you in the usual
way.
MELROSE CO.M.
40 Fort St., Next to Five Sisters Block, Viotoria, B. C.
"IF IT'S CORRECT WE HAVE IT."
The " Favorite" Horse Brush.
This Brush has outer rows of selected Russia bristle with inner rows of
of fine, plated steel wires.
The wire bristles are plunged by p atent machinery into a specially prepared composite elastic block. This block gives as the wires vibrate, and
does away with the friction which causes the wires to break in any other leather back bristle and wire horse brush on the market.
The "Favorite" horse brush is so constructed as to prevent the ammoni-
acal solution effused from' the animal's body collecting under the wires, causing crystallization to set in and a conse quent snapping off of the wires.
SECTIONAL
CUT
FAVORITE
HOBSE
Brush
Dr.
Jaeger's
Goods
1
Jaeger's
Jaeger's
Jaeger's
Jaeger's
Jaeger's
Jaeger's
Jaeger's
Jaeger's
ets.
Jaeger's
Jaeger's
Jaeger's
Jaeger's
Jaeger's
Underwear.
Nightshirts.
Cholera Belts.
Blankets.
Rugs.
Sweaters.
Cardigan Jackets.
Cardigan Norfolk Jack-
Dressing Gowns.
Slippers for gentlemen.
Slippers for ladies.
Caps.
Putters.
E. CHAPMAN
DAVIS CHAHBERS
Opposite Strand Hotel,
Vancouver.
This Brush does away with the cu ry-comb—it cleans the horse thoroughly
without producing irritation. I
The superiorities of the "Favorite" Horse Brush over any other kind are:
It is cheaper than a good bristle br ush. It does away with t'he currycomb; cleans a horse better, easier and in half the time. The wires bring
the dirt to the surface, whence the bristles remove it—all done in one operation—no follow-up rag necessary. T lie action of the brush is not harsh, and
high-strung, nervous animals readily s ubmit to its use when they will not be
touched with a curry-comb. The "Favorite" makes a good-natured horse,
grooming a pleasure, and a well-satisfied customer. The sole agents for B.
C. are
E.G. PRIOR & SO.. Ld.
(THE BIRMINGHAM OF B. C.)
125 Government Street, Victoria, B. e.
Also at Vancouver, Kamloops and Vernon.
TRAVELLERS' GUIDE
CAMBORNE
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining men and
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
REVELSTOKE
Hotel Victoria
REVELSTOKE, B.C.
Headquarters for miners and
lumbermen.
ROBT. LAUQHTON, Prop'r.
BANFF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
Banff's Most Popular $2 a Day Hotel
Close to Station and Sulphur
Baths.
N. K. LUXTON, Proprietor.
PHOENIX.
Deane's Hotel
PHOENIX, B. C.
New. Modern hot water system. Electrii
lighted. Tub and shower baths and laundry ii
connection.  The miners' home.
« DANNY " DEANE, Proprietor
GREENWOOD, B. C.
The Windsor Hotel
OREENWOOD, B. C.
American and European Plan.
Cafe in Connection.
ERNEST J. CARTIER, Prop.
To the Municipal Voten
ot the City of Victoria
In compliance with the request of
number of the ratepayers and voters i
the city, I beg to offer myself as a can
didate for the office of School Trusts
at the forthcoming election, and re
spectfully solicit your vote and inflJ
ence. "
ANGUS ilcKEOYVN.
NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that sis
days after date after date I inter
to apply to the Chief Commission
of Lands and Works for permissii
to purchase the following deseribl
land, tarting from a post planted
the soulth line of lot 199, at the hei
of Union Bay thence forty chad
east, thence forty chains south, then
forty chains west to shore line, then
northerly along shore line of Uni
Bay to point of oemmencement, «
taining 160 acres more or less.
Staked September 4th, 1906.
JOHN G. JOHNSTON.l THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1906.
British Columbia
THE FRUIT GROWING RESOURCES
OF THE PROVINCE.
Fruit Growing.
British Columbia fruit is preferred
above all others in the markets of
the Middle West, where it commands
profitable prices. In 1904 a small
exhibit sent to England was awarded the gold medal of the Royal Horticultural Society, and last year
(1905) a car lot, exhibited in London, won the first prize from all competitors, while no less than eight
medals were awarded the individual
exhibits which made up the collection. This goes to prove that despite
the great distance British Columbia
fruit has secured a prominent place
in the British market, in which Oregon and California applies have heretofore sold at the highest prices.
The fruit industry of British Columbia is in its infancy, but the results so far secred are convincing as
to its future importance. The actual
extent of fruit growing land has not
yet been ascertained, but by a conservative estimate at least one million acres south of the 52nd degree
will produce all the fruits of the temperate zone. The recognized fruit
districts include the southern part
of Vancouver Island and the Gulf
Islands, Lower Fraser River Valley,
Thompson River Valley, Shuswap
Lake, Okanagan, Spallumcheen, Oso-
yoos, Similkameen, Upper Columbia
Valley, Kootenay Lake, Arrow Lake,
Lower Columbia River and Grand
Forks, which are all suited to the
best grades of fruit, and which contain extensive areas of fruit lands.
Other good fruit districts are: West
Coast of Vancouver Island, West
Coast of Mainland (where patches of
fruit lands are found at the heads of
the numerous inlets), Lower Fraser
Valley, Nicola, Grand Prairie, and
many other localities. In some of
these sections irrigation is necessary,
and, as mentioned elsewhere, water is
being supplied where the influx of
population warrants the necessary
expenditure. Many localities, which
are now proved to be suitable for
fruit culture, were but recently "discovered," for a few years ago fruit
was only raised in the settlements
along the coast and along the rivers,
and in quantity that failed to supply
even the limited local demand. In
1891 the total orchard area of the
province was 6,500 acres. In ten
years it only increased 1,000 acres,
but from 1901 to 1905 it jumped to
22,000 acres, and it is safe to say
that that acreage will be more than
doubled again before the close of
1906. Ten years ago British Columbia did not produce enough fruit to
supply her own population. The fol-
following table of fruit shipments is
interesting in showing the steady
growth of the industry:
a
Royal Horticultural SocietI
•ESTABLISHED A.D. 1804
INCORPORATED. A.D. 1809.
Awarded to  Jlu/ Jn
For \ h:(ihjdu)Yv;<i Mjxki .     .- .  ;,',; ..7V 'J
.")
^mf
ILVt-V
r/VfSHTlA^'   '
Awarded Exhibits of British Columbia Apples.
December 19 0 5.' •       • / V '
■J
j
Nelson Fruit Pair.
By freight.    By Express. Total. Increase.
1902    1,469  tons      , 487 tons 1,956 tons
1903    1,868 tons        676 tons 2,544 tons , 588 tons
1904    2,161  tons        864 tons 3,025 tons , 481 tons
1905    3,181  tons      1,176 tons 4,357 tons 1,332 tons
An increase of over 50 per cent in four years. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1966.
II On The Trail
;; By the Traveller. ;
J************************
I have visited Banff—the Sulphur
City—twice this season, first in niic.
summer, at the height of the IVunst
and excursion season, and second'.,- a
few days since. Its never f:.i ing
charms of lake and mountain scenery;
the wonderful curative pnpj lie.; of ils
hot' mineral springs and thi- many superb views that may be had ly oh, :bi!*g
the nearby peaks, make for it the nn-
dezvous of not only the health seeker,
the dweller on (he plains; the mountain
climber and tourist, but nlso llic
"globc-trotler," anxious to conduct new
fields so alluringly baited for him with
the excellent literature prepared by the
pubicity department of lhe C.P.R. Indeed, Banff has become not only Canada's national playground, but the
"newest resort" for the wealthy classes
of lhe hemispheres.
lis natural attractions are many, and
around Banff, and severl of the other
mountain resorts, like   Laggan,   Feild,
and Glacier,  lhe    Federal Government
has spent much money in constructing
wagon  roads anil bridal paths, so that
the  tourist  and   sightseers  may  easily
reach the most interesting places.   Pity
it is that  the nation's law-makers are
not more liberal, for lhe National Park,
it seems to me, is niggardly dealt with
in the appropriations—and I have known
Banff for some 15 years—and the wonder is that Howard Douglas, the painstaking superintendent, has accomplished
all he has on the pallry sums set aside
yearly    for   improvements    and    road
building.    The   Government  itself has
done little to advertise Banff—and beyond improving the village and building
roads and trails, has left lhe c|iiestion
entirely in the hands of thc C. P. R.,
"Crag &' Canyon,"  and   private enterprise.    There  is a  notable absence of
any musical attractions during the season, but that may come in time .However, to get back to the park.
With an area of 5,732 square 111il.es—
3,668,4809     acres—Canada's     National
Park stretches cast and west from the
backbone of lhe continent into the Province of Alberta on lhe one side, and
• westward into the Province of British
Columbia.    Unequalled in point of attractiveness and  scenic  splendor, it  is
aso the  largest national park    in   the
world.    The summit of    the    Rockies
running from  northwest (0 the southeast, forms the hypothenuse of a right
anged   triangle,   which   contains   the
greatest portion of the reservation. The
eastern side is about   eighty and    the
northern a hundred miles in cngth. A
small stony jog occurs  in the  eastern
boudary. where the Stoney Indian Reserve cuts into thc park.    Contiguous
to   this   huge  triangle,  which  contains
4,900 square  miles, or 3,130,000 acres,
and  on the   British  Columbia  side  of
the Rockies   is  (lie   Yoho    park,    thc
second and smaller section of the enclosure.     It   is    also;   roughly,   trian-
guar in shape, the longest   side   running north   and    south,    being    forty
miles  in   length.    It is about  twenty-
five miles  across  from   base to apex.
Its north-eastern boundary is the summit of the Rockies and the larger portion of thc park, already described as
being in   the  Territories.    The    Yoho
is 832 square miles in extent, and has
within   its  limits    some of    tbe most
stupendous  scenery in the world. The
Rocky  Mountain  Pork  and (he Yoho
join and  for all practical puroscs con-
stitute  one greal   national   playground.
Until the year 1902, the park was comparatively a small affair, consisting of a
block of   land  ten    miles  by   twenty-
six, Banff, as now, being the principal
centre.    The origial park is surrounded  and included  in thc  enlarged  one,
the latter  being in  area    more    than
twenty limes  larger than the first reservation.
The Sulphur City.
Banff,    "The   Sulphur   City','    is   a
picturesque hamlet situated at llic west-
Dominion Government, and under the
control of the Park( Superintendent,
the strets are well kept, there are
modern waterworks and sewerage systems, telephones and elclric light. The
residences, for the most part rustic
frame and log houses, are designed
with a view to neatness and comfort,
he stores, though not pretentious, have
from years of experience in catering
to tourists and sightseers gained a
complete knowledge of their requirements in the way of camping equipment, photopraphic supplies, fishin
tackle, curios and such like.
Ample accommodation is to be had,
where persons of all tastes and means
can be suited, at prices ranging from
$1.50 a clay, he principal of these hosieries is lhe Canadian Pacilic Railway
Co.'s Banff Springs hotel, commanding
an uninterrupted and magnificent view
of the valley of tbe Bow, where it
joints thc Spray river, he hotel has accommodation for 300 guests and is being
considerably enlarged to meet the increased travel. In the comfortable refinement of its appointments, and the
completeness of detail marking' the
whole establishment—characteristic of
thc C. P. R. service—the hotel ranks
among the finest summer caravanseries
to be found anywhere in the mountain
regions of the continent. During the
season an orchestra furishes music for
the   entertainment  of the  guests.
The Sanitarium is the next largest
institution for the accommodation of
visitors. It is situated on the banks
of the Bow River, facing the handsome
steel bridge spanning it at the head of
the rapids and overlooking the village.
Hither come not ony those in search of
rest and pleasure, but those in search
of the healing of the Banff waters, for
the hot springs gushing down from the
base of Sulphur Mountain are charged
with qualities curative of rheumatic
and kindred troubles. These waters
which issue from the mountain at a
temperature of 114.3 degrees are piped
down to thc Banff Springs Hotel and the
Sanitarium, at both of which institutions bathing is reduced to an art, regular courses being taken by those requiring them. At the Sanitarium there
are, in addition to plain baths, steam,
plunge, and Turkish baths. In connection with' this hotel is an hospital,
with a fully qualified medical staff and
trained nurses.
In addition to these hotels there are
others in the village such as the King
Edward Hotel, less pretentious and
more moderate in cost. The King Edward, besides catering to the tourist
trade, is well known for its accommodation for thc commercial traveller.
Two and a half miles from the Sanitarium, at the Hot Springs, is the
Grand View Villa, under the same
management' as the Sanitarium. This
hotel, situated directly at the medicinal
springs, is provided with baths for the
treatment of patients suffering from all
ailments  requiring hydriatic treatment.
Field.
Fifty-one miles west of Banff, and
ten miles beyond the Great Divide-
where a little stream bifurcates, one
traveling westward to the Pacific and
the other eastward to Hudson Bay—is
Field, where is located the C. P. R.'s
Mount Stephen House at the base of
Mount Stephen, which rises 10450 feet
above the sea level. This station is the
point from which is reached a great
glacier field and only, as it were a
stone's throw from all the mysteries
and wonders of an upper ice world.
Trails radiate from this point in several
directions, and Swiss guides are stationed here for those who seek to find
excitement and adventure in climbing
the neighboring peaks.
.  . Glacier.
Glacier House Station is a run of
about ten hours from Banff, when the
traveller nears the summit of the Scl-
kirks. the range of mountains parallel to
Ihe Rockies on the West, and is now in
lhe neighborhood of thc Great Illicille-
waet and Asulkan glaciers. No region
offers a wider lied for exploration than
cm   extremity  of    the original   rescr-   that around these glaciers; and of moun
valion,  and is    thc   natural    starting
place for all points in the park. Of
the many charming mountain resorts
on thc continent the Sulphur Cily is
without a peer, surrotidcd as it is on
all sides by towering mountains, rocky
crags, and almost inaccessible peaks.
The  village being thc property of the
tain peaks, there are plenty as yet unsealed. Near thc foot of thc Great
Glacier is Glacier House, one of the
Canadian Pacific's chalet hotels, which
affords the same comfort to the traveller
as can be found at the other mountain
hotels of this system. The hotel is
open throughout the year.
NOTICE!
To Ambitious Boys and Girls
The Week
WILL GIVE A
Free Scholarship, Value $90
Entitling the holder to a full course in Bookkeeping, Stenography, Typewriting and Business Training at tho. "" '
SPROTT-SHAW COLLEGE, VANCOUVER
To the boy or girl who procures the largest number of new subscribers between
this date and December 1, 1906.
The only condition is that each name and address of a new subscriber
sent in must be accompanied by $1, the amount of one annual subscription.
Subscriptions must be reported weekly—on Wednesday—so that list can be
published. Every boy and girl in the Province is eligible. Subscriptions
may be sent to and papers obtained from  >
' The Week' Office, Government Street, Victoria,
or to our Vancouver Agents, Messrs. Pambrun, Williams & Co,
633 Hastings St., West, Vancouver.
<"  - Hotk-StBdj Ywr Type.
•eeafcreedy Physique "Type 11 Normal.1'
One of the 535.
The splendid joy which
follows work well done is what
makes the Semi-ready tailoi ing
Store the home of sartorial
enthusiasm.
|i| Bolu
f fesBulu
fiiMu
$i* cheaper and $10 better than
tfie custom tailor knows bow- $20
k all, when you count only tho
•drwtaftofdoilui.
B. Williams & Co.
CLOTHIERS
AND
HATTERS
68-70 Yates St., Victoria THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, iqo6.
WITH WHAT SHALL WE COVER THE FLOOR ?
WITH CARPETS FROM WEILER'S OF COURSE.
The above shows only a portion of our very extensive Carpet Department. It is not the size so much as the high class quality of the goods to which
we wish to draw our readers' attention. They are the finest productions of such celebrated looms as John Crossley & Sous of Halifax, England, and other
noted makers. The designs are from the studios of the great artists who now devote their time to carpet designing. If you live in the country, our Mail
Order Department can attend to your wants and save you all trouble. Just give the size of the room and the prevailing colors of tlie rest of the furniture,
and we will send you samples, free. (
The reason why our prices for HIGH GEADE Carpets are LOWER than others is due to tlie fact that we buy in IMMENSE QUANTITIES FOE CASH. We import direct in CAR LOAD lots at MINIMUM freights. Our customers get the advantage in the LOWER prices. That
is why they get a HIGH GRADE Carpet at Weiler's for very little more than what you pay for a LOW grade Carpet elsewhere.
WAREHOUSE:
Cor. of Broad and Broughton Sts.,
Victoria, B. C.
Weiler Bros.
Complete Home, Hotel, Club and Office Furnishers,
SHOWROOMS:
To which you are cordially invited to inspect all that is best in Furnishings
from London, Paris, New York, Vienna and Berlin.
33 GOVERNMENT STREET
Corner of Broughton and Government Streets, Victoria, B. C.
FACTORY:
HUMBOLDT  STREET
Victoria, B. C.
_ THE WEEK  SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1906.
THE QUESTION OF SUITABLE LABOUR.
(Communicated.)
British Columbia is making great
strides in prosperity and is getting her
share of the advertisement which the
Dominion continues to receive since
her volunteers brought her honor on
the battlefields of South Africa. Nations have since learned of her existence, and emigration is being attracted,
but desirable labourers are not coming
fast enough to meet the demand of an
ever-increasing population. We must
have more, many more, and those who
wish to turn aside the tide of emigration
will, if they succeed, bring about a cessation of industry, failures and a halt i
in the prosperity of the country. |
We  are daily hearing of firms who I
the East or Great Britain. Further,
they have been shrewd enough to follow up the labor question, and have
profited by the Socialists—so-called—
and Labor agitators. We invite capital
with one hand and throw it back with
the other. We seek to induce, through
our Tourist Associations, families to
settle here, but cannot L.iiuply them with
domestic servants. We employ an
Agent-General in London through whom
intending settlers are supplied with information verbal and written pertaining
to our resources, our excellent firming,
mining, lumber and other industries, but
is he instructed to say that the prke of
labor is prohibitive? A change must
come if we are not to stop in our progress.    If Labor Unions want to run
cannot get sufficient employees, and | ^ CQUntry ^ caph&Ms will not stay
their businesses, which would increase, Qr continue tQ inyest Capita, Js flfiet.
and develop, are being retarded and in L but ^ SQ ^ and when once
some instances put a stop to by the capita, ;. withdrawn ,abor is no more>
scarcity of labor. Farmers are m great and ,he agitators haye ruined many of
need of hands, and to make farming and thdr followers and gamed {oT themslevs
land clearing profitable cannot pay the se,f agrandisement. British Columbia
high wages asked, and are obliged to cannQt possiWy advance without cheap.
shift the best way they can f rth men er ]abor   Let us acknowledge thiS) and
who know litle or nothing about farming.
The head tax on Chinese has practically excluded them. It was put on at a
time when the Province was far from
being in a prosperous state and there
were many white men out of work.
But all that has passed, we I are advancing steadily; the head tax has served its purpose; it should, however, continue to be imposed if we are able to
obtain cheap British labour, and surely
from some sections of Britain's broad
dominions suitable men and women can
be hired at lower wages than are now,
by compusion, paid to Chinese. If
they cannot be obtained  then admit the
having done so take steps at once to
secure picked men and women, boys
and girls, from the Mother Country,
then railways will be built, farmers
will farm, land will be cleared for settlers, businesses of every conceivable
kind will Increase, and our progress be
assured . We do not want legislation
that produces • millionaires and tramps.
The common argument in Victoria is
that it costs more to live here than in
the East, consequently everything is
higher. Is this true? You can rent a
house for $25.00 a month which in Montreal would cost you $40. Clothing is
no higher. Food is no more costly.
Several hotels will supply the enquiring
Oriental free, but protect the; working guest with food and lodging for a dol-
classes by enacting laws prohibiting him j ar a day, and he or she will for that
from working in certain branches of [ amount get better accommodation than
j can be obtained in Montreal. Hack
hire is more, but then it is a monopoly,
and it is only indulged in by those who
can afford to pay the would-be-thought
industry. Then there are plenty of people in Great Britain who would come
here and settle if they could be supplied
with domestic servants at reasonable
wages. Today the working classes say
that emigration is prejudicial; to their
interests, and are fighting hard to turn
back those who seek to enter the Dominion. How, then, is the question of
supply and demand to be settled? We
need thousands of British laborers, and
are willing to pay them fair wages,
wages far in excess of their present
earnings.
There are no positions for the loafer.
The young Britisher of education and
no ability is not' wanted. He cannot find
clerical work and the sooner the Mother
Country is fully informed of this, the
better. The remittance man, because of
his remittance, is a nuisance, and of no
use whatever to the community.   These
millionaire. Though the lowest coin is
five times as much it only affects the
sale of newspapers and a few things
dear to the heart of woman. Men find
little or no difference in prices of goods
which they require. Car fares, liquid
refreshments, tobacco, are the same. As
good a twenty-five cent meal as is sold
in Montreal or any Eastern town can be
purchased in Victoria or Vacouver. We
have, therefore, shown that while living is not any more costly yet wages
are higher and labor harder to obtain.
Railway rates should be reduced to assist us to procure labor or a portion
of the labor that by cheap fares finds
its way to Manitoba and Alberta, or if
the costly mountain grades between us
may be hard and bitter statements, yet  and Calgary are a bar to reduced rates,
why not have them reach us by ships ?
the fact remains—there are no openings
for this class of emigrant as yet. Emigrants from our Indian empire are being tried, and at one time, if rumor was
truthful, were coming in hundreds, but
they are unsuitable in many respects.
Yet they are Britishers in the broader
sense. British Columbia would be in a
position to offer more inducements to
capitalists if the lalwring class in the
province would cease to be greedy, and
laborers, mechanics, engineers and domestic servants of British stock could
be induced to come here. Wc arc informed that the British Emigration Department of a religious organization
sent out thirteen thousand persons to
Canada during the past summer, and
that they received less than fifty complaints. Many of those who reached
our shores did not proceed to British
Columbia, but it is to be hoped they will
come in hundreds, with more to follow. Wc could absorb five thousand
annually, and the labor market of Great
Britain would never miss them.
As to the Chinese, what man amongst
us after a hard day's work likes to return to his home to find his wife cooking his dinner and doing all the
"chores" of thc house. Some of ns
pay the higher wages to thc Celestial
and deny ourselves pleasures or necessities of life to keep him, but there is
a larger number who cannot afford to
employ him. The Chinese are not
asleep: they have repaid us for the imposition of the tax by demanding higher j The trouble about a bad habit that
pay. They hold us up and will continue you can quit if you want to is that when
to do so until we get white labour from   yon  want  lo you  can't.
So As By Fine.
By Curtis Hidden Page.
There are two equal loves, each passion-strong,
And one doth still desire, and one
deny.
Strange war they wage, these  twain,
their whole life long ,
For either both must live, or both
must die.
If love-denial prevail and have his will
He saves alive his brother, love-desire;
If love-desire would win, he first must
kill,
Then burn alive upon his brother's
pyre.
But
though denial be life, desire be
death,
Spendthrift of life, I yield to death-
desire.
feci thc burning of love's indrawn
breath,
And know Fate's will—yet freely
choose the fire.
CANADIAN  WHEAT FLAKES
differ from all IMPORTED Cereals, not only in being
more carefully manufactured from FINER wheat, but
also in the fact that they are ABSOLUTELY FRESH.
Your grocer is in touch with our mills, which are situated in all the leading centres in Western Canada. There
is no need for storage nor risk of musty flavor. In
every packet you will find a most useful gift.
B. & K. MILLING CO., Ltd.
Chinese- made Skirts ^Overalls
MUST GO!
B1
■jkfir?
UNION-MADE.
■fcr
RN BRAND
BUTTING AHEAD.
ROLLER
SKATING
AT ASSEMBLY HALL,
GRAND RE-OPENING
Saturday, Sept. 29th
On the new track laid hardwood floor
just completed. The finest skating
surrace on the Pacific Coast. Competent instructors free to ladies.
Excellent orchestra.
10 to 12 a.m.
p m.
2 to 5 and 7.30 to 10
Some  single perfect love, burned pure
of shame,
May rise, like Phoenix, dcathles
the flame.
from
COAL
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo Collieries.
New Wellington Coal.
Tlie best household coal in the market ar
current rates.   Anlhiacite ccal lor sale. .
Dealers mi Cord and Cut Wood.
34 Broad Street.
VICTORIA
Phone 647
t
THE NEW GROCERY STORE
74 Port Street.
Cap Flour, 100 lb. sk $2 75
"     "       50 lb. sk    1 40
Try our^Ceylon Pekoe Tea nt 30c-
per lb.
REMEMBER THE PLACE
47 FORT STREET
VICTORIA.
The Taylor Mill Co,
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
Cook With Qood
Baking
Powder
That means our Baking Powder, b<
cause it is as good as Pure Cream <
Tartar, Pure Soda and other goo
things can make.
The large sale our Baking Powde
is having shows that lots of good cool
are using it.
TRV IT F0» BISCUITS
Price 25c. Per Poun
CYRUS H. BOWES,
CHEMIST
08 Government St., nenr Yates Stre THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER    29 1906.
Notice
, Southeast Kootenay Railway Co.
I Take Notice that the first meeting of
the shareholders of the Southeast Koo-
I tenay Railway Company will be held
[ at the office of Messrs. McPhillips &
I Heisterman, Davie Chambers, Bastion
ISt., Victoria, B. C, on Thursday, the
118th day of October, 1906, at the hour of
18.80 p.m.
R. B. Punnett, Secretary.
SIXTY days after date I intend to
i apply to the Ohlef Commissioner of Lands
[ and Works for permission to purchase the
(following described land, commencing at
fa post planted <m tne left bank of tbe
rSkcent river, about three and one-
half miles above the Lakelse Tlver
and Joining John Neidhardt's N. E.
I corner and marked L. W. S.'s northwest
(corner and running south 160 chains,
[thence east 40 chains, thence north 180
J ohains, more or less, to left bank of tne
I Skeena river, thence westwardly along tbe
lSkeena river to point of commencement
land containing 640 acres, more or less.
Port Esslngton, B. C. -   •
L. W. SLOAN, Locator.
J. E. BATEMAN, Agent.
. SIXTY days after date I Intend to
■apply to the Ohlef Commissioner of Lands
[and Works for permission to purchase the
■following described land, commencing at
la post planted on tbe left bank of the
I Skeena, about four miles above the Lakelse
Iriver and adjoining L. W. S.'s northeast
(comer and marked N. M. J.'s northwest
{corner, and running south along the east-
lern boundary of L. W. S.'s application 160
■ chains, thence east 40 chains, thence north
1160 chains, more or less, to bank of the
(Skeena river, thence westerly along the
PSkeena river to point of commencement
hand containing 640 acres, more or less.
'Port Esslngton, B. C.
N. M. JOSEPH, Locator.
[SJ. E. 8 VTEMAN, Agent.
Notice is hereby given that thirty days
I; after date I Intend to apply to the Hon.
jthe  Chief    Commissioner of Lands   and
\ Works for a special license to cut and carry
'away timber from the following described
j land,  situated ln Port  Renfrew  District
on the north side of San Juan river, and
adjoining John Young on his north bound
ary:     Commencing   at   a   post   marked
i "Alexr. Young,"    thence   40 chains west,
I thence 80 chains north, thence 80 chains
I east,   thence  80  chains south,  thence  40
| chains west to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew this 20th day of
| August, 1906.
ALEXR. YOUNG.
TIMBER LICENSE.
Notice Is hereby given that thirty days
after date I Intend to apply to tbe Hon.
the  Chief   Commissioner of    Lands  and
Works  for  a  special  license to cut and
I carry away timber from the following de
I scribed land, situated on   the   San   Juan
a river,  Renfrew   District,    and    adjoining
| John Young east boundary:    Commencing
. at a post marked "Alexr. Young," tbence
140 chains soutb, thence 80   chains   east,
' thence SO chains north, thence 80 chains
- west, thence 40 chains south to place of
| commencement,   containing  640 acres,
Dated at Port Renfrew, Renfrew District,
this 19th day of August, 1906.
ALEXR. YOUNG.
TIMBER LICENSE.
Notice is hereby giveu that thirty days
I after date I Intend to apply to the Hon.
i the   Chief   Commissioner of Lands   and
Works for a special license to cut and
' carry away timber from the following described land, situated in Port Renfrew,
. Renfrew District: Commencing at a post
i planted 40 cbalns north of Alexr.  Young
southeast corner, maTked "John Young"
I southwest corner," thence 80 chains north,
I thence  80  ohains  east,   thence  80 chains
south, thence 80 chains west to place of
[ commencement, containing 640 acres.
'Dated at Port Renfrew this 16th day of
August, 1906.
JOHN YOUNG,
TIMBER LICENSE.
Notice Is hereby given that thirty days
I after date I Intend to apply to the Hon.
I the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following de
I scribed land, situated on the San Juan
j river, Renfrew District, and adjoining E.
IJ. Palmer on bis cast boundary: Coni-
| mencing at a post marked "John Young,"
i thence 40 chains north, thenee 80 ohains
i west, thence 80 chains south, thenee 80
I chains east, thence 40 chains north to
(place of commencement, containing 640
(acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew this 18th day of
f August,  1906.
JOHN YOUNG.
Notice is hereby given that thirty
I days after date I intend to apply to the
I Hon. the Chief Commissioner of Lands
land Works for permission to purchase
lthe following described land, situated on
[Portland Channel: STKrting from a
■post marked "C. B. F.'s northwest cor-
Iner;" thence south 40 chains; thence
least 40 chains; thence north 40 chains;
■thence west along shore line to poinjf
|of commencement, containing 160 acres
nore or less.
C. B. FLEWIN.
NOTICE  Is  hereby  given  thnt 00 dnys
after dnte I Intend to apply to the Hon.
[the Chief Commissioner of Lnnds and Works
Jfor permission to  purebnse  the  following
■described lnnd:
A smnll unnnmed Islnnd outside the S.E.
corner of Campbell bny, oft the enst const
of Mayne Island and situate nbout 30
chnins 'to the southeastward of the north-
nst corner of section nine, Mnyne Island,
land contnlnlng nbout 10 acres.
Dated this 19th dny of September, 1000.
GEORGE GEOEGESON.
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt 00 dnys
lifter dnte, I intend to npply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd Works,
for permission to purchase the following
nnd nenr Knlen Island, in Skecnt district:
' Commencing nt n stnke plnnted nt
loii'thenst corner of Hot 640, marked
Vw. Cs. corner;" thence enst 10 chains;
fheiiee south nbout ">."> chains to W. Me-
JCanzle's north boundary: thence west -'0
Ihnlns to A. G. II. Pott's enst boundary;
Thenee north about 30 ehnlns to A. G, II.
lott's northenst corner; thenee west nlong
laid boundary 20 chains to enst line of
l>t 046A; thenee north 20 chains to point
If commencement, containing 140 ncres
liore or less.
WILLIAM    COPELAND.
NOTICE la hereby given tbat Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Ohlef Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about eight miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner on the bank of a stream
running into Yakoun river and marked
"Initial post No. 1, H. W. Treat's N. W.
corner," and running east 80 cbalns; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
H. W. TREAT.
NOTICE la hereby given tbat Thirty (80)
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about ten miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, J. D. Meenach's S. W. corner," and
running north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains to the place ot commencement,
containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
J. D. MEENACH.
NOTICE la hereby given tbat Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Ohlef Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about Ave miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner and marked "Initial post
No. 1, Walter Oakes's S. B. corner" and running north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 8C
chains to place ot commencement, contain
Ing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
WALTER OAKES.
NOTICE la hereby given tbat Thirty (30)
days after date I intend to apply to tbe
Hon. Ohlef Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about six miles from tbe west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, G. A. Brown's N. W. corner" and
running south 80 chains; tbence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; tbence west
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
G. A. BROWN.
NOTICE Is hereby given tbat Thirty ( .
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Grahnm Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about six miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
nortbwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, S. U. Williams's N. W. corner" and
running south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; tbence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
S. U. WILLIAMS,
NOTICE Is hereby given tbat Thirty (30)
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about five miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, G. E. Beardslee's N. E. corner" and
running south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; tbence north 80 chains; tbence east
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
G. E. BEARDSLEE.
NOTICE Is hereby given tbat Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Ohlef Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
nsphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about nine miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing nt a post planted at the
southeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, D. H. Jarvls's S. E. corner" and running north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
D. H. JARVIS.
NOTICE Is hereby given tbat Thirty (30)
dnys after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about six miles from tbe west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post plnnted at the
southwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, G. J. Hodge's S. W. corner" and
running north SO chains; thence east 80
chains; thenee soutb 80 cbalns; thence west
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 610 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
G. J. HODGE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
dnys after dnte I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Ohlef Commissioner of Lands ond
Works for n licence to prospect for coal,
nsphaltum nnd petroleum on lnnds loented
on Grnhnm Islnnd, Queen Cbarlotte group,
about six miles from the west coast
thereof nnd described ns follows:
Commencing nt a post plnnted nt the
southwest corner nnd mnrked "Initial Post
No. 1, F. M. Manger's S. W. corner" and
running north SO chnins; thence enst 80
chains; thence south 80 chnins; thence west
SO chnins to plnce of commencement, containing 610 neres.
Loented August 2nd, 1906.
I<\ M. MUNGER.
NOTICE Is hereliy given thnt Thirty (30)
(lays atter date I Intend to npply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd
Works for n licence to prospect for con!,
nsplialtuin and petroleum on lnnds loented
on Grnhnm Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about seven miles from the west con6t
thereof nnd described ns follows:
Commencing nt n post planted nt the
northenst corner nnd marked "Initial Post
No. 1, H. P. Fogh's N. E. corner" nnd run-
nlnjr south SO chains; tiience west 80
chains; thence north 80 ehnlns; thence enst
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
H. P. FOGH.
NOTICE is hereby given tbat Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Qneen Charlotte group,
about seven miles from tbe west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, Edgar C. Fogh's S. E. corner" and
running north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
EDGAR C. FOGH.
NOTICE la hereby given tbat Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about seven miles from tbe west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner and marked "Initial Poat
No. 1, H. L. Emmons's S. W. corner" and
running north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence soutb 80 chains; tbence weat
80 chains to place ot commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
H. L. EMMONS.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about seven miles from tbe west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
nortbwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, Victor VigeUus's N. W. corner" and
running south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 cbalns; thence west
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
VICTOR VIGELIUS.
NOTICE is hereby given tbat Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Ohlef Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queeu Charlotte gronp,
about five miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, M. G. Mnnley's. N. E. corner" and
running south 80 chains; tbence west 80
chains; tbence north SO cbalns; thence east
80 cbalns to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
M. G. M'UNLEY.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after dnte I intend to apply to the
Hon. Ohlef Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Cbarlotte group,
about five miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, E. H. Gule's S. E. corner" and running north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
E.  H. GUIE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (SO)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Islnnd, Queen Charlotte group,
about seven miles from tbe west coast
thereof nnd described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southenst corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, W. Langllle's S. E. corner" and running north 80 cbalns; tbence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 cbalns to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
W. LANG1LLB.
NOTICE Is hereby given tbat Thirty (30)
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about flve miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted nt the
northwest corner nnd marked "Initial Post
No. 1, W. P. Flint's N. W. corner" and
running south 80 cbalns; thence east 80
chains; thence north 89 cbalns; thence
west 80 chains to place of commencement,
containing 640 acres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
W. P. FLINT.
NOTICE Is hereby given tbat Thirty (30)
days after dnte I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Ohlef Commissioner of Lnnds and
Works for a licence to prospect for conl,
nsphnltum and petroleum on lnnds loented
on Grnhnm Island, Queen Charlotte group,
nbout six miles from the west const
thereof nnd described ns follows:
Commencing nt n post planted ut the
northwest corner nnd mnrked "Initial Post
No. 1, F. W. Crary's N. W. corner" and
running south 80 chains; thence east 80
ehnlns; thenee north 80 chains; thenee west
SO chains to plnce of commencement, contnlnlng 640 ncres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
F. W. CRARY.
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
days after dnte I Intend to npply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd
Works for n licence to prospect for coal,
nsphnltuin nnd petroleum on lnnds loented
on Grnhnm Islnnd, Queen Cbarlotte group,
about seven miles from the west const
thereof nnd described ns follows:
Commencing nt n post plnnted nt thc
northenst corner and mnrked "Initlnl Post
No. 1, ,T. Albert Johnson's N. E. corner"
nnd running south 80 ehnlns; thenee enst
SO ehnlns; tiience north SO chnins; thenee
west 80 ehnlns to plnce of commencement,
containing 010 ncres.
Located August 2nd,  1906.
,T. ALBERT JOHNSON.
NOTICE la hereby given tbat Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Ohlef Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coat
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about eight miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at tbe
northeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, R. S. Eskrldge's N. E. corner," and
running soutb 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; tbence east
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
R.  S.   ESKRIDGE.
NOTICE ia hereby given that 60 days
after date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to purchase the following land,
situated on Works Channel: Commencing
at a post marked "Initial Post T. H. W„"
thence east 20 chains, thence north 20
chains, thence west 20 cbalns, thence nortn
20 chains, tbence west 40 chains, thence
south 40 chains, more or less, to shore
line; thence following shore line to point
of commencement, containing 240 acres
more or less.
8t T. H. WATSON.
Port Simpson, B. C, Aug. 16, 1906.
NOTICE la hereby given tbat Thirty (30)
days after date I intend to apply to tbe
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Cbarlotte group,
about seven miles from tbe west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner and marked "Initial Poat
No. 1, C. D. Emmons's N. W. corner" and
running south 80 chains; thence eaat 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence weat
so chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
C. D. EMMONS.
NOTICE la hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the west half
or southeast quarter and west half of
northeast quarter, all ln Section 8, Township 6, Coast Range 5, Bulkley Valley;
containing one hundred and sixty (160)
acres, more or less.
Dated July 25th, 1906.
anl1 ERNEST MORIN.
NOTICE is hereby given that. 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to th7 Hon
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Worka
for permission to purchase the southwest
quarter   sector,    17,   Township  6,   Coast
?„aXe 5.! ^ulkl!T VallVi containing (160)
one hundred and sixty acres, more or less
a,, . ,       -   JOS.  BOURGON.
Aldermere. July 25,  1906. auU
Claim No. 1 N0TICE'
rt»^rih?r.taJe.notloe tha' 30 days after
Chef Commit applJ\t0 the Honorable
for i «n^mif'Sner of Lands and Works
»»n .,splcial. "cense t0 cui and carry
away timber from the following described
lands, commencing at post planted at the
N. E. corner of T. L. 7197, or on the 1 ne
a' ,corner of said claim, thence W. 80
cha ns, N. 80 chains, E. 80 chains, S. 80
chains to point of commencement.
Dated this 18th day of July, 1906.
.  p. Mcdonald
Claim No. z.
Take notice that 30 days atter date I
Iniend to apply to the Honorable Chief
commissioner of Lands and Works for a
special license to cut and carry away
timber from the following described
lands: Commencing at post planted 30
chains from S. W. corner on the line of
T. L. 7197, thence N. 80 chains, thence W.
80 chains, S. SO chains, E. 80 chains to
point of commencement.
Dated this 18th day of July, 1906.
p. Mcdonald
No. 20.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lauds and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Tahsish Arm, Kyuquot Sound, Rupert
District:
Beginning at a post planted on the
east boundary of Application No. 13,
about 60 chains south of the northeast
corner thereof, thence east 160 chains,
thence north 40 chains, thence west 160
chains, thence south along said boundary
40 chains to point of commencement.
Kyuquot Sound. June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. 21.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
intend lo apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,  Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted at the
southeast corner of No. 8 Application on
Tahsish Arm, thence north along the east
boundary of No. 8 40 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence north 40 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thenee south about 20
chains to the shore, thence following the
shore southwesterly to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or
less.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. 22.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
Intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following desoribed land, situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,   Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Application No. 8 on
Kokshittle Arm, thence east 40 chains,
north 80 chains, west 60 chalna, south to
the shore of Kokshittle Arm, thence
southeasterly along said shore to get one
mile of southing, thence east about 40
chains to a point north of the Initial
stake, thence south 40 chains to point of
commencement.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 11)06.
JOHN HIRSCH.
Notice Is hereliy given that, 60 days
after dale. I Intend to apply to the Hon,
Chief Commissioner of Lnnds and Works
for a lease of the foreshore opposite Lots
43, 40 and 47, Esquimau District.
ALBERT A. ARGYLE.
Vancouver, D. C, July 4th, 1906.
No. 23.
Take notice that, 30 clays after date, I
Intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
lo cut nnd carry away timber from lhe
following described land, situate on
the Ka-o-wlnch River, Kokshittle Arm,
Kyuquot   Sound,   Rupert   District:
Beginning at a post planted on the
north boundary about 20 chains west of
the northeast corner of Application No.
7. on the east bank of tha Ka-o-wlnoh
River, ihence east 20 chains, north W0
chains, east 20 chains lo point of commencement, containing 010 acres more or
less.
Kyuquot Sound. June 14, 1000.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. il.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I'
intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Worka for a special licenaa
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot Sound,  Rupert District:
Beginning at a post planted near tha
initial post of Application No. 26, thenee
east 40 chains, thence south 80 chalna,
west 80 chains, north 80 chalna, east 40
chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. 28.
Take notice that, 30 daya after date, I
Intend to upply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Worka for a special licenaa
to cut and carry away timber from tha
following described land, situate on
Kyuquoi Sound, Rupert District:
Beginning at a post planted on tha
west side of Union Island about 20 chalna
aouth of a group of small Islands in Blind
Entrance, thence 80 chains east, thenoe tt
chains north, thence 40 chalna weat,
thence 40 chains north, thence weat about
20 chalna to the shore of Blind Entrance,
thence southerly along said shore to
point of commencement.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
Notice la hereby given that, 60 daya
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Worka
for a lease of the foreshore opposite Lota
63 and 54, Metchosin Diatrlct.
ALBERT A. ARGYLE.
Vancouver, B. C, July 4th, 1006.
No. 24.
Take notice that, 30 daya after date, I
Intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Worka for a special licenaa
to cut and carry away timber from tha
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot Sound, Rupert Diatrlct:
Beginning at a post planted on tha
aouth shore of Narrow Gut Inlet, thenoe
south Ml chains, thence east 40 chalna,
thence north 40 chains, thence eaat all
chains, thence about 40 chains north to
the shore of Narrow Gut Inlet, thence
following the shore in a westerly direction 10 point of commencement, coo*
taining 640 acres more or less.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. 26.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
intend to apply to the Chlei Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special licenaa
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot Sound,  Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted at tha
southeast corner of Application No. 1, on
Kokshittle Arm, thence west 80 chalna,
thence south 80 chains, thence eaat 80
chains, thence north 80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 040 acres mora
or less.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. 26.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
Intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special licenaa
to cut und carry away timber from tha
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,   Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted on the
east side of a river unnamed entering into Clan nlnick Harbor about Hi milee
from the mouth, thence east 60 chalna,
north 8(i chains, west 80 chains, south tt
chains, east 20 chains to point ot commencement, containing 640 acres more or
less.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
TIMBER   LICENSE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, thirty
(30) days after date, I Intend to apply to
the Hou. the Chief Commissioner of Linda
uud Works for a special license to cot
and carry away timber from the following
described lauds, situated In Port Renfrew,
Renfrew District: Commencing it a poat
plnnted at tbe southeast corner of Section
Eighteen (18), Township Ten (10), marked
"Alexr. Young, S. E. Corner," thence
eighty chuins west; thence eighty chalna
north; thence eighty chains east; thence
eighty chains south to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated at  Port  Renfrew   this 11th day
of August, 1906.
aul8 ALEX.  YOUNG.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 60 day*
after date, I, the undersigned, will apply
to the Chief Commissioner ot Lauds and
Works for permission to lease or purchue
the following described land, namely, In
Hesnlt Harbor, Tlupuua Arm, Nootka
Sound, commencing at a post marked J.
Mortimer, Southeast Corner, running 40
chains west, ihence north to shore line,
thence following the shore Hue to the
point of commencement, containing 80
acres, more or less,
Victoria, li. C, July 11th, 1906.
aulS JOHN   MORTIMER.
Notice is hereby given ihat, 30 daya
ailer dale, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Worka
for special license to cm and carry away
timber from the following described land
ln Port Renfrew Districi, Vancouver Inland, on the west side of the 'Jordon
River, adjoining A. Wheeler's claim on
the soulhensl corner. Commencing at a
post on the northeast corner marked J.
Young's northeast corner, thence south
80 chuins, west 80 chains, north 80 chains,
and east SO chains to the place of commencement, containing 040 ucres. Located June 9th, 1906.
J. YOUNG.
Notice Is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lunds and Worka
for special license to cut and curry away
timber from the following described land
in Port Renfrew District, Vancouver Island, adjoining A. E. Mnnnell's claims on
tho southeast corner: Commencing at a
post on the northeast corner marked A.
Wheeler's (jr.) northeast corner, ihence
south SO chains, west SO chains, north 80
chains, and cast 80 chnins to the place
of  commencement,   containing  640 Kcres.
Located June 9th, 1906.
A. WHEELER, Ji
Notice is nereby given that, 00 dnyi
after dale, I intend to apply <i the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for •jermlSRion 10 purchase lhe following
described land on lhe Skeena Itiver,
Range V., Const District: Starling from a
post located tit the northeast oorner ot
the Kitsilas Indian Reserve, and marked
E. J. McGeaohlo, S. \V. corner"; thenee
norih 40 chains; ihence east 40 chains;
tiience soulh 40 chains; thence west +1
chains lo point of commencement, containing 100 acres, more or less.
E. J. McGEACHIE.
Kitsilas, May 28th, 1906. 10
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29. 1906.
tl? ?fi?
* A Lady's Letter *
*£ By BABETTE. **
afr»Jr^9|9»4t»if^^9jf^^9(jt?9J9
Dear Madge:
A year ago the portion of every
bridesmaid was a "Romney" gown, with,
picturesque millinery to correspond.
This year the Directoire style has been
first favorite, and is certainly better
suited to occasions such as these when
a suggestion of fancy dress does not
come amiss than to the social necessities of every day. The bridesmaid, too,
has her sorrows, for it is a physical
impossibility that one gown can suit
half a dozen wearers equally well. Latterly, 'however, the precedent has been
set of making the bridesmaids' frocks
in different colors, a concession which
a brunette and blonde destined to walk
side by side will doubtless appreciate.
Deep cross-over belts of silk or moire
are useful substitutes for the corselet
of cloth which economical folk are severing from their early spring purchases in readiness for the first snap of
real autumn. These belts are made, of
course, on the bias, and at the point
where t'he folds cross in front the belt
is drawn down slighltly to form a becoming dip, and finished sometimes with
ornamental buttons, sometimes with
bows, or with a buckle. The craze for
buckles, by the way, would seem to
have reached its height. They are
used largely on blouses of lace and net,
for the most part covered with chine
silk or soft satin ribbons to harmonize
with the general color scheme. A neat
serge gown I have lately seen bas full
sleeves, drawn in at the elbows by a
stitched band of cloth with mitred ends,
' drawn through a dull metal buckle, and
forming two ears on either side. Enamel belt buckles are also very popular.
Challoner & Mitchell have a choice assortment in stock, in all tbe newest
French enamel shades and designs.
When thc house plants have been out
of doors ail summer they are sure to
drop leaves when brought into a warm
house. A good plan is to take them in
now, while we still have warm days,
and the doors and windows may be left
open. This will gradually accustom
them to the house and they will retain
their fine coloring all winter. If bulbs
are planted at this time, they will bloom
by Christmas, if first put in a dark corner of the cellar until the roots form.
Last winter, after there had been several hard frosts, I gathered branches
from the lilac bushes and placed them
in tall vases of water, changing the
water every day. They were kept in
the coolest room in the house. In a
short time the buds began to swell,
then tiny leaves appeared, and within
six weeks there were lov'iy clusters of
blossoms, as fragrant as if grown out
of doors in season, and perfect in every
way, except the bunches of bloom were
smaller. By bringing a few branches in
every week one should have flowers all
winter.
It is curious how certain places in
Europe arc famous for certain things,
and how ail the world goes there to
buy them. It goes witfiout saying that
a man buys his clothes in London and
a woman her hats in Paris. In Brussels no one thinks of missing the lace
factories, or in Venice the glass works.
The thing to do in Geneva is to buy a
watch, in Interlaken a carved cuckoo
clock, and in Rome a little silver cross
and rosary. Take our own country:
No one thinks of furnishing a home in
B. C. without consulting the well known
firm of Weiler Bros., where one can get
the best in house furnishings from London, Paris, New York, Vienna and Berlin.
In America it is now quite an accepted part of the country house repertoire of amusements that balloon ascents shall he available for those guests
whose predilections lead them over thc
house-lops. A friend writing from a
retreat rustic but palatial, in thc Adirondack's, is full of the "new motion,"
as she phrases it, and only regrets that
no special fascinations in frocks arc required for thc purpose, as anything does,
she declares, for cloud conversation. In
old days one always heard that balloons
had a habit of bursting at thc most disconcerting moment; but this is really
impossible while the neck remains open,
as there is no pressure from the expanding gas, which escapes in ascent.
My friend, speaking of her many trips
skywards, says that it is a most curious sensation to feel the utter and intense stillness of the air all around;
even railway shrieks diminish into the
thinnest of puny whistles. Balloonists
are able to keep any required level in
the air, and to register it with scientific
instruments, which shows how far we
have advanced along the aerial highroad. There seems little doubt that tbe
heavier-than-air problem is also at last
nearly solved, so that we shall shortly be
careering about in aeroplanes, regardless alike of latitude, longitude, c'hap-
erones, cerditors, or other constraints of
a purely terra firma existence. When
this millennium is accomplished, what
about railway dividends then?
An interesting event on the tapis for
November is the naval sale, when the
whole of the naval stores belonging to
H. M. S. Shearwater will be sold by
auction by Messrs. Williams & Janion.
BABETTE.
t Social and        *
* Personal. $
Tr **f
ififififirifififififififi?
VICTORIA.
Mrs. Brignall (Vancouver), is a
guest at "Cherrybank."
* *   *
Mrs. Gore is hostess at a bridge party
to be given on Saturday afternoon.
* *   *
Mrs. and Miss G. Hickey have returned from a brief visit to Seattle.
* *   *    .
Mrs. Irving entertained a few friends
at bridge on Friday evening last.
* *   *
Miss Keefer returned this week from
Vancouver, after having spent a month
there with friends.
* *   *
Miss Olive Bryden returned this
week from a visit to Cowichan Lake.
* *   *
Miss Nellie Todd is spending a month
with her sister, Mrs. Hebden Gillespie,
at Nelson.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Monteith returned on
Wednesday from a visit to Cowichan
Lake.
* *   *
Mrs. Blackwood entertained at bridge
on Wednesday last in honour of Mrs.
Brignall  (Vancouver).
* *   *
Mrs. George L Courtney entertains
at bridge on Monday afternoon next,
in honour of Mrs. Brignall (Vancouver).
* *   *
Mrs. Fletcher entertained a number
of friends at the tea hour on Tuesday
last at her home on Rockland Avenue.
* *   *
Mrs. Max Ewart is spending a few
days in the city, but returns to the upper country on Wednesday next.
* *   *
Mrs. G. S. Holt and family left last
week for Fernie, accompanied by Miss
Violet Hickey, who will spend some
weeks there.
* *   *
Miss Winnifred McGill entertained a
number of her friends at a ''!;oo" party
on Saturday evening last at Burdette
House.
* *   *
Mr. F. J. Coulthard (New Westminster), was the guest of Dr. and Mrs.
Fagan for a few days this week, returning to the mainland on Wednesday.
* *   *
On October gth the Rev. Herman
Carson will perform the marriage ceremony for Albert Honess and Miss Jessie F. Rawlings. Mrs. Honess will be
at home to her friends after October
25, at 2 Blanchard Street.
* *   »
Mrs. Gordon and Miss Lillie Gordon
returned last Monday from an extended
Eastern trip, visiting relatives and
friends in Toronto, Montreal, Boston,
New York and other places.
* *   *
The dance to be given in thc Assembly Rooms on Friday evening in aid of
the Jubilee Hospital promises to be a
great success. A full account will apt
pear in our next week's issue.
* *   #
Mr. Justice Duff and Mrs. Duff left
for Ottawa on Wednesday morning.
During their absence their residence on
Rockland  Avenue  will be  occupied  by
Mrs. Duff's sister, Mrs. Bickncll.
* *   *
Rehearsals for "Cupid In Posterland"
arc coing on apnee and take place every
evening at the A. 0. U. W. Hall, Yates
Street. As yet very few of the principal parts have been assigned, lint tbe
chorus and team work is well under
wny. Those takini* a part arc Mr. and
Mrs.  Beauchamp Tye,   Mr.   and  Miss
Foot, Miss Dunsmuir, the Misses
Eleanor and Marion Dunsmuir, Miss
Gladys Green, Mr. Williams, Mrs. Com-
etrey, Miss Newling, Miss B. Gaudin,
Miss Arbuckle, Miss Alice Bell, Mr.
Bell, Miss Brae, Mr. Brae, Miss McQuade, Miss Dorothy Day, the Misses
Mason, Miss Hickey, Mrs. and Master
Russell, Miss Wigley, Miss Sehl, Mr.
L. Yorke, Mr. W. Yorke, Mr. Phillips,
Miss Peters, Miss Little, Mr. Colley
and others.
VANCOUVER.
Mr. George H. Webster has returned
from Victoria.
* •   •
Mr. R. Chaldecott and bride arrived
on last night's delayed train.
* •   *
The Misses Haddon have returned
from a three month's trip to England.
Mrs. J. B. Ferguson is home again,
after a holiday of two months at Chilliwack.
* *   *
Aid. D. M. Stewart and family are
about to leave on a trip to Calgary and
Edmonton.
Rev. W. W. Bolton, of Victoria, came
up from the Capital on Saturday. He
is registered at the Badminton.
* *   *
Mrs. Dr. William Stephen of 1020
Georgia Street, has gone on an extended
visit to relatives in Seattle.
* *   *
Mrs. B. W. Powell received at her
residence, 1360 Thurlow Street, on
Wednesday afternoon, the 26th inst.
* *   *
Mr. Herbert' Cuthbert, Secretary of
the Victoria Tourist Association, was
in tbe city.
* *   *
Mrs. John Shaw, wife of Principal
Shaw, of Nanaimo Public Schools, is
visiting Mr. and Mrs. F. B. LeFevre,
Comox Street.
* *   *
Mr. W. M. Dobson, of the City
Clerk's office, has returned from a holiday spent on Vancouver Island and in
the Sound cities.
* *   *
Rev. Jas. Turner, Superintendent of
Chinese Methodist Missions, has left
for the Interior. He will be away about
four weeks.
* *   *
Miss Irene Howe, daughter of Mr. G.
L. Howe, of the Hotel Metropole, has
left for Tacoma, where she will attend
Wliitworth College.
* *   *
Mrs. A. D. McKenzie and Miss
Gladys Lewis, of Nanaimo, are the
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Harry J. Rogers (druggist), Granville Street.
* *   *
Miss Wey has returned to Vancouver from Nicola and is ready to receive her pupils at her new residence,
1459 Barclay Street, corner Nicola.
* *   *
Mrs. Macgill. who has been spending
the summer with her son, Mr. J. H.
Macgill, 1123 Comox Street, has returned to her home in Oakville, Ontario.
* *   *
Mr. W. H. Hazlitt, purchasing agent
of the B. C. Electric Railway Company,
accompanied by his wife and family,
have left for Kamloops on a holiday
trip.
* *   *
Mr. Dwight A. Jones, president of
the Mississippi Valley and Bonne Terre
Railway, was in the city on Sunday
with a party of friends. His private
car was attached to t'he train 'from Seattle Tbe party left for the East via
the C. P. R.
**************************
* *
| Music and Drama |
% %
**************************
It is seldom that Victoria has
vaudeville artists as well known as is
Mr. Herbert Brooks, at any rate in English circles. This is the man who
solved the mystery of the "Sealed
Trunk," which Maskelyne & Cook, of
the Egyptian Hall of Fame in London,
England, had advertised as impossible
to solve, offering a prize to the man
who did so. "Herb.," as he is familiarly called, thought about the matter
long enough to reach the right solution. But; and it is a big "But," Maskelyne & Cook did not see it in the
same light as he did. This was in i3oo.
They went to court, and lost; they appealed and lost. They took it to the
House of Lords — and lost. And
"Herb." got thc money, In all it cost
Maskelyne & Cook over $20,000 over
the whole business. After this Mr.
Brooks went to the Palace Theatre of
Varieties in London; be has performed
before Royalty, including our present
King, no less than four times. He has
appeared before many thousands of
people in England at thc biggest shows
there. Last year he came to America,
and was so anxious to see British Columbia that he actually went to the
trouble of asking Messrs. Considine &
Sullivan to book him for one of their
tours. He wants the dramatic critic of
The Week to say that since he has been
in this country he has never met better houses, or more enthusiastic audiences than he has met in Victoria.
With regard to his Trunk Act the
critic has it on good authority that even
some of the stage hands at The Grand
went up to the flies to watch, and failed to discover how it was done. As for
Mr. Brooks' card tricks, well the critic
remembers seeing the great Hermann,
but Brooks can give a few pointers on
Hermann's performances. Mr. Brooks
is the best man who has appeared on
the vaudeville stage since the critic has
been in Victoria, a matter of two
years. Considine & Sullivan are lucky
to get him.
But Manager Jamieson is not only
to be complimented on having secured
Mr. Brooks; there arc other. Wm.
Cartwright & Lee put up a tragedy
sketch which is as amusing as it is
original. "Jennie Lee" is to be as much
congratulated on her representation of
Shakespeare after the immortal Irving,
as is her partner in the part of the
comic idiot. "Leah's- Violin" is good,
but it would be as well if all the patter
were left out, and the lady simply appeared in evening dress and played.
Mr. Byrnes as a story teller is good; he
manages to keep his face straight when
speaking the most outrageous tommy-
rot anyone can come across; and that
is his beauty. There is no joking about
the work that "The Nilo Vagges" put
up; it' is hard work throughout. Bag-
punching may seem easy to the casual
observer, but "it ain't as easy as it
seems, 'Arry." And their turn is certainly worth seeing. But Mr. Vagge
can't catch fish; if you doubt it ask
Herbert Brooks.
Everybody who has lived in or visited
the Old Country is familiar with the
name of Messrs. W.'& A. Gilhey. the
largest wine merchants in the world,
proprietors of some of the most extensive French and Spanish vineyards and
owners of several large distilleries
where the famous Strathmill and Spcv
Royal brands of whiskies are distilled.
Messrs. Gilheys have recently appointed
Dixi H. Ross & Co., of independent
grocery fame, as sole agents for Vancouver Island.
TIMBER   LICENSE.
Notice Is hereby given Hint 30 dnys lifter
date. I Intend to apply to the Hon. the
Chief Commissioner of Lands nnd Works,
for a speclnl license to cut nnd entry
nwny timber from the following described
lnnd:
No. 4. Commencing at a stake on the
west shore of the lnrge lnke on the
northern end of Sechelt Peninsula, about
four miles south of Cnptnln Islnnd, New
Westminster District; thence west 40
ehnlns, south 80 chnins, enst 40 chnins,
south 80 ehnlns, enst 40 chnins to shore
of 'nke; thence following shore line to
point of commencement.
No. 5. Commencing at a stake on the
western shore of a lake on the north end
of Sechelt Peninsula; thence west to the
enstern boundary of Timber License No.
5,888; thence 80 chnins north to the boun-
'(fnry of pre-emption No. 1,843; thenee
80 chnins east; thence south to shore of
lnke; thence following lake shore to point
of commencement.
No. 6. Commencing from the shore of
n lake nt the north end of Sechelt Penln-
suln; thence north nbout 40 ehnlns to the
southwest corner of Timber Lease No. 672;
thence enst 40 ehnlns; thence south 40
ehnlns; enst 40 chnins; south 120 chnins;
thence nbout 40 chnins west to shore of
lnke; thence following the shore to point
of commencement.
M.  GREEN.
J.  WEST.
Little Canyon, Sept. 1, 1000.
NOTICE Is hereby given that 60 dnys
from dnte I Intend to npply to the Chief
Commissioner of iLnnds nnd Works for
permission to purchnse the following described lnnd. situated In Rnnge 5, Skeenn
River District, nbout one mile from Little
Canyon:
Commencing ut a post plnnted on thc
southenst corner, mnrked R. Brnun; thenee
running west 80 chnins to Turner's S. E.
comer; thenee north 40 chnins to
Frank's southenst corner; thence enst
40 ehnlns; thence south 80 ehnlns to point
of commencement, containing 480 ncres,
more or  less.
'Loented September 1, 1006.
R.  BRATJN.
Port  Esslngton, 'B.  C.
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt thirty (30)
dnys nfter dnte I Intend to npply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd Works
for n speclnl licence to cut nnd enrry timber
from the following described lnnds, sltn-
nted  In District of New  Westminster.
1. Commencing nt n post plnnted n qnnrtor
of a mile from the beneli nt the hend of St.
Vincent Bny. Ilothnm Sound, thence west
160 ehnlns, thence north 40 ehnlns, thence
fast 160 ehnlns, and thence south 40 chnins
to the point of commencement, contnlnlng
640 ncres.
2. Commencing nt the northenst corner
of No. 1 chnln ns nbove described, thenee
north 40 elinlns, thence west 160 ehnlns,
thence south 40 ehnlns, thenee enst nlong
the northern boundary of the snid No. 1
chnln to point of commencement, continuing 040 ncres.
FRANK BURNETT.
Dated nt   Vnncouver   this  13th  dny   of
September.
NOTICE Is hereby given that tlie Lieutenant-Governor ln Council has been p'eaeed
to order as follows, namely:
That the boundaries of the Assessment
Districts of Lillooet (East and West) and
of Quesnel Forks, as described In the British Columbia Gazette dated 25th April, 1906,
in pursuance of the Order In Council No.,
232, be rescinded and cancelled, and the
following boundaries substituted therefor:
Lillooet Assessment District.
1. West Lillooet.—Commencing at the ]
junction of the Chllcotln river with the ,
IFraser river; thence southerly, following j
the course of the Fraser river to the 51st ,
parallel of latitude; thence east nlong said
parallel of latitude to Its crossing of the
.Lillooet and- Alexandria Wngon -Road at]
the 53-mile post; thence southeasterly, to-1
lowing the divide between Pavilion creek I
nnd Maiden creek to its Intersection with I
the western boundnry of the Railway Belt I
in Township 22, Range 27 west of thel
sixth initlnl meridian; thence southerly,!
following the western boundary of toe I
Rnilwny Belt to n point due west fron>l
Lytton on the boundnry of said Railway I
Belt; thence west to a point where thel
124th meridian of west longitude Inter-]
sects the north shore of Queen's Reach,!
Jervis Inlet; thence due north nlong thel
124th meridian of west longitude to thel
51st parallel of latitude; thence due westl
nlong the snid 51st parallel of latitude tol
Its Intersection with the 125th meridian of 1
west longitude (n point on the Homnlkoi
river about seven miles from Wnddlngtoui
Harbor); thence due north along the 125th,
nicridlnn of west longitude to Its Intersection with the 52nd parallel of latitude;]
thence due enst nlong the 52nd parallel of 1
Intitude to its intersection with the centre
of Tntla lnke; thence easterly following the ;
centre of Tntla lake, Chilanco river and 1
Chllcotln river to the mouth of Annham ;
creek; thence northerly np Ann-ham creek,
to the crossing of the wngon Toad; thence',
southeasterly nnd northeasterly, following
the wagon rond past Harper's lake to the
iFraser river nt the mouth of Chimney creek;
thence southerly, following the Jfrnser river
to the point of commencement.
2. Enst   Lillooet.—Commencing nt    the
Junction  of the Chllcotln  river with the
Fraser river;  thence southerly, following
the course of the Frnser river to the 51st ,
parallel of Intitude; thence enst along said
pnrnllel of Intitude to Its crossing of the |
Lillooet and Alexandria Wngon Road nt the '
53-mile -post; thence sonthensterly,  following the divide between Pnvllion creek and
Maiden ereek to Us Intersection  with the
western  boundary of thc Rnilwny Belt In
Township 22, Rnnge 27 west of the sixth
Initlnl   nicridlnn;  thence  south,  following
the western boundnry of the Rnilwny Belt
to its Intersection with the northern tooun- :
dnry of Township 21, Rnnge 27 west of the -
sixth Initial meridian; thenee enst, following the northern boundary of Township 21.
in  Rnnges 27,  26, 25, 24, 23 and 22 west
of the sixth initlnl merldlnn to the northeast coiner of snid Township 21, lu Rnnge |
22  west of    tlie  sixth initial    meridian;
thenee north, following the enst boundary ,
of Townships 22, 23 nnd 24 to the north-,
em boundary of the Rnilwny Belt in Town-'
ship 24; thenee enst along the north boun- j
dnry of the Railway Belt to Its Intersection with  the enstern boundnTy of Kamloops Assessment District at the southenst
corner of Section 27, Township 23, Range 1
18 west of the sixth initlnl merldlnn; thence
north, following the west boundnry of the j
Kamloops District to n point on the 52nd ,
pnrnllel of latitude north of Mnhood lake;
thenee west along thc said 52nd parallel of
latitude to Its Intersection with the Fraser 1
river; thence following southerly nlong the'
Frnser river to the point of commencement.
Quesnel   Forks Assessment  District-
Commencing nt a   point on  the    west
boundnry of the Kootenny  Lnnd District
on the 52nd pnrnllel of Intitude, ten miles '
west  of  the  Columbia river: thence  dne
west, following the 52nd parallel of latitude
to Its Intersection with the Fraser river; (
thenee northerly,  following the course of I
the rFrnseir river to the Intersection of the '
Wngon   Rond  at  the  month of  Chimney
creek;  thence    southwesterly and    northwesterly, following the Wagon Road pastj
Harper's lnke   to  Anaham   creek;   thence
southerly down Annhnni creek to Its mouth;
thence westerly,  following  the  course  of
thc Chllcotln river to Its junction with the
Chilnnco river; thence westerly, following
thc course of the Chilanco river and the *
centre of Tntln lnke to the Intersection of
the centre line of snid Tntln  lnke,  with '
the 52nd parallel of Intitude; thence due
west, following tlie 52nd pnrnllel of Intitude
to Its Intersection with the 125th meridian
of   west  longitude; thence  north  on the ,
height of lnnd between the watershed of 1
the Chllcotln nnd iBlnckwnter rivers to the J
west of Tsn-cha lake; theme easterly, foi- i
lowing the    northern    watershed   of the |
Blackwater   river  four   miles   below  the 1
mouth of the Nnzco river; thence ensterly ,
to the iFrnser   river,    opposite   Quesnel; 1
thence south, following the centre of the j
iFraser river four miles; thence east to the |
south end of Dragon lnke; thence southeast
to   Twenty-mile   creek;   thence   following
Twenty-Mile    creek    to   Its   headwaters; j
thenee following the height of lnnd form- 1
ing tlie watershed between Quesnel river, ]
Cnrlhoo   lnke,  nnd   Swamp   river on  the 1
south, and  Swift river nnd  Willow  river j
nnd Its tributaries on the north, crossing
Swump  river  two miles  south  of Snndy
lnke nnd following the height of lnnd forming the wntershed between the South Fork
of the Frnser river nnd Cnnoe river to the J
east boundary of the Kootenny province;J
thence  south nlong the  enst  boundary of J
the province to the northern boundary of 1
Kootenny District; thence west nnd south J
nlong the boundnry of the Kootenny District to the point of commencement.
It Is further ordered thnt the Assessors]
nnd Collectors of tlie said Lillooet andl
Quesnel Forks Assessment Districts be and]
nre hereby Invested with jurisdiction within Hie Assessment Districts hereby defined,
and that the boundaries ns now defined I
tnke effect ns from the 30th dny of June, I
1006. That the Assessment Rolls for thel
year 1006, as finally passed, shall be acted!
upon by the Assessors nnd Collectors ofl
snid Districts until the snid 30th dny ofl
.Tunc, 1006, and that all tnxes shall be col-'
leeted in accordance therewith up to nnd- In-.
eluding Hint dnte. Thnt Immediately nfter I
sulci 80th .Tune, where It may be necessary!
to transfer the names of the assessed pcr-f
sons on the rolls of the respective Assess-!
ment Districts, or to transfer the dcscrlp-l
tlons of assessed property froml
one district to the other district,!
In consequence of the change in thel
boundaries between the snid two Assess-I
ment Districts, tlle Assessors nnd Colleet-1
ors are authorized to make such transfers!
nml to collect any arrears of tnxes due atl
snid ;',nth day of June' by the persons andl
property so transferred to their respective!
Assessment Districts. f
Trensury Department, 21st August, lOOOJ

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