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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Feb 16, 1907

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 STrnvrmnsTSt
Kingsford Smith & Co.
Stock and General
AUCTIONEERS
Commission and Real Estate Agents.
860 Granville, Vancouver.
UJ*-*UULSJUUUUUUUUl^^
The Week
TL British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vancouver B. ©.
srrir-nr-tfriririri^^
Stewart Williams R. C. Janion
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION AND
REAL ESTATE AGENTS
Si FORT ST. VICTORIA, B. C.
rOL. IV.   No. 3
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY i6, 1907
One Dollar Per Annum
The Editor's Review
Of Current Topics.
Premier  McBride   is   already
MUNET   confronting the first difficulty
Iaking.   whicli  besots  the  head  of  a
Government who has success-
lily emerged from an electoral campaign
the endeavor to construct from the ma-
i-ial at his disposal the best possible Cablet.    The public   press—more   particu-
irly the Liberal press—has been profuse
its offers of assistance, and has also
len about as wide of the mark in its
lesses as when it was trying to fix the
Ite of the elections.   The Week has no
Iggestions to make to Premier McBride,
whicli respect it differs widely from
any of its   contemporaries.     But  The
leek has studied the situation, has some
Iry positive ideas as to the interests which
111 weigh in the selection of ministers for
vacant portfolios, and has no hesita-
|)n in stating for the benefit of its readers
lat those views are.    In the first place
rentier McBride will put aside his per-
Inal reluctance to sever his connection
|ith the constituency of Dewdney in order
serve the higher interests of the party,
is true that Dewdney has stood by him
Ir years and has sustained him both in
le House and in office, when he needed
lip.   But  the   loyal   Conservatives  of
lewdney, however anxious they may be to
Itain the Premier of the Province as
leir representative, will realize that at
le present important crisis in public af-
[irs some sacrifices will have to be made
the interests of the party and that it
[ their obvious duty to acquiesce in an
rangement whereby the Premier will re-
esent the Capital.    There is the further
isideration that Victoria has treated Mr.
cBride handsomely in returning him at
head of a solid ticket' and replacing
iv  Liberals  with  four   Conservatives,
liis solidarity should not be broken. Mr.
pBride has reached an important stage in
1 career, he has rescued the Capital from
grip of Liberalism and has placed it
i the fortfront of the Conservative bathe must lead it to further victory.   His
Jisenting to do so at once solves the pro-
Im of Cabinet representation for the
land and makes it easy to construct his
|binet with due regard to all tlie import-
sections of the Province.    The Pre-
er would represent Victoria and the
land.    Mr.   Tatlow,   as   Minister   of
Inister of Finance, would represent Van-
liver, with its splendid victory.    Mr.
|lton, who rendered yeoman service dur-
the campaign and greatly enhanced his
lutation   as   a   cogent   and   sagacious
faker, can have no possible competitor
the post of Attorney-General.   For the
Jiition of Provincial Secretary tliere can
Ino question that Mr. T. Taylor of Bcv-
loke, who has done so well as Party
lip, has greater claims than any other
Ididate, and if he desires the post he
luld have it.    It must not, however, be
gotten that Kootenay, the largest rev-
le-producing section of the Province, is
titled to representation, and if Mr. Tay-
Tdoes not desire the Provincial Secret-ship it should go to Mr. Boss, the
Itnber for Fernie.   This leaves unfilled
I most, important and responsible port-
Jo at the disposal of the Premier—that
■Chief   Commissioner   of   Lands   and
Irks.    For this position Tlie Week boles that the claims of Mr. Price Elli-
K the respected and capable Member for
!>non, are paramount.    There is, how-
one matter in connection with this
appointment which Would have to be considered at an early date, although it cannot
be dealt with before Parliament meets, and
that is the growing necessity for a division
of "Lands" from "Works" and the appointment of two Ministers. When this
is done it will be possible to do justice to
the claims of Mr. Taylor and Mr. Boss and
The Week has little doubt that the solution of the problem of constructing the
Cabinet will be found along the lines indicated above. It must not be forgotten
that through the regrettable defeat of Mr.
E. C. Pooley, there is a vacancy in the
Speakership which will probably go to
Mr. D. M. Eberts unless it should be
decided to offer the Commissionership to
Mr. H. B. Thomson, the able Junior Member for Victoria, in which case Mr.
Ellison will be slated for the Speakership.
In connection with this important matter
The Week advocates an increase in the
salaries of Ministers, raising their stipends
to $5,000.00 each and an increase in the
sessional indemnity of members from
$800.00 to $1,200".00. In view of the
vastly increased amount of work for the
Ministers and the certainty that with the
rapid development of the Province their
duties will become still more onerous it
would be the wisest of policies to attract
the best men in the Province to these responsible positions by offering something
like adequate remuneration. The increased
sessional indemnity is justified by the same
causes and by the financial prosperity of
British Columbia. In outlining these
probabilities The Week is not unmindful
of the claims of Mr. Bowser, who, more
than any man of non-ministerial rank,
contributed to the success of the Party,
but it is understood tliat he is not prepared to relinquish a private practice more
lucrative than the financial value of all the
portfolios combined, which is another argument in favor of increasing the stipends.
It must encourage the
Dis Dat City   Council    to    vote
Qui Cito Dat.   $7,500.00 to the Tourist
Association to find that
the subject has received so much attention
in the public press, and especially in the
correspondence columns. It is far better
that a proposal of this kind should bo fully
discussed and criticised than that the public should manifest any degree of indifference. Apathy has been the bane of
Victoria in the past and the interest now
being taken in public affairs is one of the
most hopeful features for future prosperity. On the merits of the work of the
Tourist Association there is but one opinion, and tliat favorable. On the desirability of financing an institution which exists solely for the benefit of the City and
District directly, instead of by the unsatisfactory and objectionable method of personal solicitation, there is also only one
opinion. Divergence appears when side
issues are introduced and when the question is asked, Could nnt the City spend
$7,500.00 to greater advantage in some
oilier way? The Week does not think so,
and moreover urges that if ever there was
a case in which to bo effective action
should be prompt, this is such a one. The
amount asked is comparatively small and
altogether trifling in comparison with tho
benefits which will accrue from its judicious expenditure. That it will be wisely
expended is guaranteed by the representative character of the committees who will
handle it. There should be no delay in
voting the money and in passing it over
to the Treasurer in order that the work
which to be successful must be done in the
early spring, may proceed at once. The
administration of the affairs of the Tourist
Association may have justified some little
criticism in the past, but the re-organization of last year has placed it on a substantial basis and has constituted it a
practical advertising agency for Victoria
and District.
There are a number of
Demanding Companies subsidiary to
Investigation, the Grand Trunk Pacific in which relatives
and friends of the General Manager of
that Corporation figure largely, whose
policy is inimical to the best interests of
British Columbia. Their object is to
corral every industry and every business
which might be established within the
zone of influence exercised by the G. T. P.
Already a head tax of $3.00 is exacted
from every person entering their territory. Tradesmen are boycotted, and extortionate sums are levied for the privilege of establishing any kind of business.
No one wants to hinder the legitimate development and settlement of the northern
part of the Province, but some of these
Companies are contravening the laws of
equity, are at variance with public interest,
and it is more than doubtful if their actions
are not ultra vires. The first business of
Parliament at the forthcoming session
should be to investigate this important
matter and to see that the hold-up game
attempted to be practiced in connection
with a land grant is not successfully carried out in other directions.
Now that the battle is
Seeking over the Liberal press is
Explanations, busy seeking explanations for the defeat of
some of its favorites. It is also taking up
considerable space iu discussing why some
prominent Conservatives lost their seats.
The paper whicli prints "the facts only"
springs a very pretty yarn about Mr.
Pooley's defeat in Esquimalt. Needless
to say it is a barrack-room story, told after
hours, and relates how Mr. Pooley's agent
carefully registered the Canadian militia
in his constituency, numbering eighty-
seven, and figured 011 a solid vote, when lo!
a Liberal orator conies along (presumably
Higgins, Junior) and explains to thc sons
of Mars how the Government had denied
the right to the South African heroes to
file scrip on Kaien Island lands until the
friends of the Department had secured nil
the available sites. So great was the indignation aroused by tho utterances of this
fervent orator that the militia to a man
voted against the Government candidate
and, to quote the only paper which knows
the facts, ' Mr. Pooley was ousted from
a seat which ho has occupied for twenty-
five years. Mr. Pooley is a good enough
man, but ho was found in bad company."
It is doubtful if as much can he said for
the editor of the Vancouver World, but,
in any event, he could hardly have invented a yarn more distant from the fact,
which is that Mr. Pooley lost his seat because he neglected his constituency. Tf
he had evinced the same interest in his
constituents as he did twenty, or even ten
years ago, his position would have been
impregnable: hut of late years, like many
other successful politicians, ho has traded
on his reputation and meanwhile the complexion of the constituency lias changed
and there are scores of voters in Esquimalt
division to whom Mr. Pooley has never
spoken or extended   a  hand   of welcome.
This explanation is much simpler than
that offered by the Vancouver World, and
possesses the merit of truthfulness.
It is greatly to be regretted
The House that the Western editors
Of Bonos,      have become so engrossed in
thc affairs of the little circle
in which they live and move and have their
being that they have not found time to
establish even a modest acquaintance with
the history aud trend of public opinion in
the Mother Country. No greater ignorance has over been displayed by responsible
writers in the public press than that shown
by the gentlemen who have undertaken to
discuss the present relations of the House
of Lords and the House of Commons. The
only possible explanation of thc ignorance
of the subject displayed both by the editor
of the Colonist and the Times is that they
graduated in the ultra radical school and
imbibed their anti-British sentiment from
the Toronto Globe. That once veracious
but now voracious journal has for ten
years waged a campaign at irregular intervals against the House of Lords. In
an unguarded moment thc directors of the
Globe sent Mr. J. W. Willison, the then
editor, to England. He returned with the
most distorted conception of English
ideas which ever entered a Canadian mind.
These ideas naturally found their way
into the Colonist and the Globe, and the
smaller men who never think for themselves, shut their eyes and opened their
mouths and swallowed whatever Willison
sent them. This was ten years ago, but
ever since then these meu have been seeing
visions and dreaming dreams, and in their
nightmare they have always witnessed the
historic fabric of the House of Lords tottering to its fall. At times they have
pictured the English nation like a Parisian
mob of communards pulling down the Bastille. This week the editors of the Colonist
and Times have had an attack of this kind
in its worst form and we are told in the
columns of the journal which boasts that
it has eschews the sensational, that thc situation is more strained than appears upon
the face of it. That the British press
seems to be preparing itself for something
of a radical nature in respect to the House
of Lords. In short, the suggestion is that
a hereditary chamber might well become a
thing of the past. No one in Victoria, and
very few people in British Columbia will
bc influenced hy these ridiculous suggestions because their own knowledge of the
situation will enable them to make the
necessary correction. But it is surely deplorable that any educated person should
not he heller acquainted with the real sit ti—
Hide of the English people towards their
institutions and should not know that
whilst John Bull is the most merciless of
critics not one drop of Iconoclastic blood
ilows in his veins. The simple fact of the
mat ler is that the House of Lords has
gouged public opinion, both on the Irish
and the Education question, und will be
sustained on both if au appeal should lie
made to the country. No Government has
ever yet had lhe courage of its convictions
sufficiently to appeal to the country against
the Lords. There has been much froth
uud much desultory talk, but, like the sensational attacks of the Colonist and the
Times, it hns all ended in smoke.
On February 2nd the Vanvoucer Guardian was doing business on a large scale
at the corner of Granville, and Hastings.
Bunting and appeals to "down the Revolutionists" were much in evidence. On
Monday, February 4th, the Guardian was
out of business, and lhe would-be Bevolu-
tionists were downed. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY i6, 1907.
Prospecting in
The Nicola Valley.
By the Editor.
The Pass into Nicola Valley is at
Spence's Bridge, from which base on
the main line J. E. Macdonell &
Co. have built forty-seven miles of
railway into one of the most fert:le
and promising sections of the Province. The fame of the Nicola has
spread far and wide by reason of the
fact that for more than forty years,
in spite of its isolation, a few white
men have been living in the country.
They staked pre-emptions, fenced
their holdings, purchased stock, and
thus formed the nucleus of the vast
herds of cattle which today range the
valleys and mountain slopes within a
radius of fifty miles.
Graves of Douglas Lake.
These men may almost be counted
upon one's lingers, so extensive are
their ranches. The largest and
widest known is Mr. Graves, of
Douglas Lake, who. although residing and ranching outside the valley
proper, sends down herds of several
thousand during the winter months
to be fed by the resident farmers. To
write the history of Mr. Grave's connection with ranching would require
much time and space. He and his
partners. Messrs. Thompson & Ward,
of Victoria, own about no.ooo acres
of land and rather more than 10,000
head of cattle. The management is
entirely in the hands of Mr. Graves,
who is in every sense the king of
that country, fearless, independent,
strictly honourable, genial and kind-
hearted to a degree, he is thc sworn
foe of every idler and crook, and the
sworn friend and helper of every man
who tries to help himself, lt is said
that no resident ever appealed to him
in vain, and when he gives he gives
lavishly, not letting his right hand
know what his left hand does. Recently misfortune having overtaken
a small farmer some forty miles from
Douglas Lake, the cheriff put in an
appearance and the household goods
were brought under the hammer. The
rancher's wife had a few heirlooms
and family treasures which she had
brought from the Old Country, and
was heart-broken at the prospect of
parting with them. Mr. Graves
heard of this through a mutual
friend and anonymously sent $300 in
order that they might be bought in,
and this is only one of many instances
which go to show the type of man
he is.       Two Tenderfeet.
There is another side to his character which displays him in a different aspect. Being a tremendous
worker, it is not to bc wondered at
that his pet aversion is a -'remittance" man. Many are the stories
related of his encounter with gentlemen of this type, in which they were
invariably discomfited, but on one
occasion the tables were turned and
the innocent ones scored heavily over
Mr. Graves in a manner which he
will never forget, but thc relation of
which he thoroughly enjoys. A few
years ago two English remittance men
wearing the usual riding breeches and
leggings, with cloth caps and cigarettes, rode into his ranch upon two
sorry cayuses and declared their desire to purchase a couple of good
horses. Mr. Graves could scarcely
conceal his contempt. Their la-di-da
style of expression and nonchalant
air deceived the veteran rancher, who
could scarcely conceal his contempt
and did not attempt to conceal his
impatience at having lo bargain with
two such tenderfeet. After looking
through the stalls they pitched on a
beautiful colt rising three years, and
asked the price. Mr. Graves was
greatly disgusted, for it happened
that thc colt was one he had bred
and reared himself and was intending to break for his own use when it
was a year nlder.,lt had never felt
a bit or saddle, lie thought he saw
a chance to put an end to all negotiations and get rid of the tenderfeet
very easily. So in the most patronizing manner lie said: "Oh, that's
your fancy, is it? Well, there's the
colt, there's a new buggy, and there's
a new set of harness. If you can
harness the colt and drive him out
of the yard hitched to the buggy, you
can take him and welcome, and any
other horse you can find in the
stables.' And with a disgusted look
Mr. Graves walked away to smoke
his pipe on the verandah and to leave
the tenderfeet to congitate. Judge
of his surprise and discomfiture when
in less than fifteen minutes the two
tenderfeet drove gaily past the house
waving their caps with the salutation
"By-by, old hayseed!" and with a
$300 horse tied behind the buggy.
Mr. Graves was too astonished to
speak, but he was too much of a
man to protest and he often takes a
ride to a ranch some ten miles away,
where the tenderfeet are making
money hand over fist and he has
been heard to declare that while most
remittance men are no good, "Demme,
there are exceptions."
lt must not be supposed that every
rancher in the district makes $100,000
a year, but all are prosperous and
lead an ideal life in one of the most
fertile and sunshiny valleys of Canada.
A Grazing Country.
Nicola Valley proper extends from
lower Nicola to Nicola Lake, a distance of twelve miles, with a wide
valley running due north up Ten-
Mile Creek for six miles. The valley
varies from one to three miles in
width and contains about 40.000 acres
of land between the volcanic ranges
which delimit it. Except for vegetables and a little grain for feeding
horses and chickens, there is no cultivation of the soil. The valley is,
essentially a hay and clover section
for stock raising. No cultivation is
possible without irrigation, but tliere
is abundant water if properly handled,
to irrigate the whole. At present the
water is taken by means of small
ditches from Mill Creek. Hamilton
Creek, Godey Creek Lindley Creek,
and the Nicola and Cold Water
Rivers. As, however, the needs of
the valley are rapidly growing and
water will be required, for power purposes, it is highly desirable that some
extensive scheme should be devised.
The engineering difficulties are slight,
and from Mill Creek and Nicola Lake
in thc north and the Cold Water in
the south an abundant supply can be
procured for all purposes.
Fruit Growing.
On all sides of the Valley are fertile benches which will ultimately be
utilized for fruit growing on an extensive scale. Already a little fruit
is produced, and it is of excellent
quality, apples and plums being equal
to any grown in the Okanagan.
It is probable that the nights are a
little too cold to suit the more delicate kinds of fruit, such as peaches,
but those I have mentioned, and all
kinds of small fruit, can be grown
to perfection.
Champion Potatoes.
I wish, however, to arouse interest
in the potato crop, about which I
have become quite enthusiastic. This
may bc because we have to put up
with such rubbish in Victoria. Be
that as it may, I am prepared to say
that no finer potatoes are produced
in Canada than in the Nicola Valley.
Until my recent visit I thought the
Ashcroft potato was the best, and
I well remember that last year Captain Fick, of Nicola, ventured to
challenge my statement to that effect
and promised to send out 100 pounds
of tubers to compete with a sample
from Ashcroft. T accepted his challenge, but the tubers never arrived.
After seeing and tasting thc Nicola
potato I accepted the generous offer
of Mr. R, I.. Clark, a well known
rancher of the Valley, to bring out
a 50-pound sampl.e Specimens arc
now mi view at the office of "The
Week," and will be shown to anyone who cares to call. I venture to
say thnt until my readers have seen
the Nicola product they do not know
what a potato is.
BRITISH AMERICAN TRUST CO., Limited
tNCTORIA OFFICES
Cor. Broad and View  Sts.
)
A. C. McCALLUM,
Mgr. Real Estate Department.
FOR SALE—5 acres beautiful land, on Oak Bay car line, at, per
acre, $2,000.
FOR SALE—6 acres on Linden Avenue; a good buy at, per acre,
$1,800.
FOR SALE—Nearly 7 acres, Fowl Bay; extensive sea frontage; well
sheltered; best of soil; magnificent view; per acre, $2,000.
FOR SALE—Some of the best improved business property in the
city, on Government Street, Douglas, Fort and Yates Streets.
FOR SALE—Several desirable islands; per acre, $20.
FOR SALE—A limited number of choice farms, with sea frontage.
FOR SALE—-Well situated waterfront  lot,   suitable   for  wharfage,
•James Bay, a bargain at $6,300.
FOR SALE—Macaulay Point, 2 acres, excellent land, fine view, well
sheltered, 350 feet sea frontage, 7 minutes from car line, $4,000.
NOTICE is hereby given that, sixty-
days after date, I intend to apply to j
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands,
and Works for permission to purchase!
the following described land on Porcheri
Island, about five miles east of Refuga
Bay, commencing at a post marked Eu-j
gene Wacker, northwest corner: thencel
east 80 chains; thence south 20 chalna
to McKay's northeast corner; thencs
west 80 chains; thence north 20 chains]
to point of commencement, containing
one hundred and sixty acres.
EUGENE WACKER, Locater.
P. A. HUDSON, Agent.
Located Nov. 17, 1906. Deo.22|
NOTICE ls hereby given that, sixty I
days after date, I intend to apply to thel
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands andl
Works for permission to purchase thel
following described land on Porcheri
Island, about five miles east of Refuge!
Bay, commencing at a post marked Ar-I
thur McKay, southwest corner; thencel
running north 20 chains; thence east 80l
chains; thence south 20 chains; thencel
west 80 chains to point of commence-l
ment, and containing one hundred andl
sixty acres.
ARTHUR McKAT, Loeater.
P. A. HUDSON, Agent.
Located Nov. 17, 1906. Dec.22|
Sweet Peas
The up-to-date selection.
7 Varieties, separate, from bulk, 25c
15 Varieties, 50c
Johnston's Seed Store
City Market.
We Want Mines
Lecve Your Baggage Checks at the
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.      A. E, KENT, Proprietor
WANTED—Position as lumber
salesman; capable of giving estimates on all classes of work; good
references. Alberta trade preferred.
Apply The Week, MacKinnon Bldg.,
Vancouver, B. C.
JOHN COOPER
Taxidermist and Fur Dresser
Mounting Large Game Heads
a Specialty.
826 PENDER STREET,
VANCOUVER.
HOLLY TREES
Prices from 25 cents to $5.00, according
to size. Write for seed and tree catalog.
JAY & CO. VICTORIA, B. C.
or Prospects.
Copper Preferred
In forwarding; us particulars
stick to facts.
We will send our expert anywhere.
A. ERSKINE SMITH & CO.
GRAND FORKS,   B. C.
Reference : Eastern Townships Bank.
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Governmen St., Victoria
SPRING TONICS
GIVE TONE, VIM AND VITALITY TO LIFE
Blue Ribbon Malt Extract, per bottle    25c.
Pabst Malt Extract, three bottles for  $1.00
Vin Mariani, per bottle   •  1.25
Guinness' Stout, per dozen pints   2.25
Guinness' Stout, per dozen half pints   1.50
Carnegie's Swedish Stout, per dozen pints  2.25
Silver Spring Stout, per dozen pints   85c.
Silver Spring Stout, per dozen quarts   $1.50
Bass' Ale, per dozen pints    2.25
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
Independent Grocers.      ::      ::      in Government St., Victoria.
MAIL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO.
THEATREGOERS!!
The Victoria Theatre season
is just becoming ripe. Remember that extra hands on at the
Carlton Lounge
The old Vernon. Opp. Theatre.
Strictly First Class.
Theatre Call Bell.
The Man With a GUNN Is Satisfied
Gunn Sectional Bookcases are tlie best made, for reusons which
we will be pleased to show you if you will call upon us
YOO   DONT   GET     DONE     WHEN    YOU     BUY    A    GUNN
BAXTER' & JOHNSON, Metropolitan Building, &*'v-So*}
COAL.
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
I'ictoria Agents for the Nanaimo Collieries.
New Wellington Coal.
Tlie best household conl lu the tnarke   nr
current rates.   Anthracite conl for sale.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA
DOES NOT WIN ELECTIONS, BUT
FOR     COOKING     ARE     WINNERS     EVERY     TIME
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, LIMITED. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY i6, 1907
NEW ARRIVALS IN WEDGWOOD CHINA
DINNER SERVICES AND TEA SETS.
THERE IS TO BE SEEN ON THE FIRST FLOOR SOME OF THE MOST MAGNIFICENT AND BEST WEDGWOOD CHINA DINNER SERVICES AND TEA
SETS THAT WE HAVE EVER HAD ON SHOW. DIRECT FROM THEIR CELEBRATED WORKS AT ETRURIA STAFF, ENG., THESE LOVELY
CREATIONS HAVE JUST BEEN RECEIVED, AND YOU WILL  BE SURPRISED IN THE EXTREME WHEN YOU SEE THEM.
Wedgwood China Dinner Services.
137-piece Wedgwood China Dinner Service, has
dark blue scroll border around edge with beautiful plain gold scroll work on top; is indeed a
most beautiful service.   Price, $185.00.
137-piece Wedgwood Dinner Service, has beautiful pink floral spray, with wide light blue band
around edge, bordered with plain gold lines on
each side of band.   Price, $180.00.
91-piece Wedgwood Semi-Porcelain Dinner
Service has plain gold band around edge with
green spray on top, and has lovely gold spray
inside of band.   Price, $75.00.
115-piece Wedgwood Semi-Porcelain Dinner
Service, lovely shape, has decoration of strawberries and leaves entwined around edge, which
is indeed beautiful.   Price, $60.00.
115-piece Wedgwood Semi-Porcelain Dinner
Service bas lovely decoration of fruits and flowers
and has small green band around edge; is of
beautiful shape.   Price, $75.00.
We also have some very nice China Tea Sets,
ranging in price from $5.00 up.
When writing you will confer a favor by mentioning this paper.
Send for our large and beautiful Catalogue. It
shows, tells and explains everything. Free on
request.
Wedgwood China Tea Sets.
Wedgwood China Tea Set, consisting of 18
pieces, on large revolving tray, handsome shape;
has light green floral and green decoration, with
plain gold edge; tray is of very heavy semi-
porcelain.   Price, $18.00.
40-piece Wedgwood China Tea Set, pure white;
has beautiful plain gold border, handsome shape.
Price, $30.00.
40-piece Wedgwood China Tea Set has beautiful pink floral spray with wide light blue band
around edge, bordered on each side with plain
gold lines.   Price, $35.00.
40-piece Wedgwood China Tea Set, has wide
red band around edge with small gold dots in
centre, and is bordered on each side with plain
gold lines.   Price, $36.00.
40-piece Wedgwood China Tea Set, beautiful
shape; has lovely decorations of green leaves and
spray, with magnificent encrusted gold border.
Price, $50.00.
40-piece Wedgwood China Tea Set has beautiful wide dark blue band around edge; has lovely
encrusted gold border, and encrusted gold spray
around edge.   Price, $50.00.
WEILER BROS.,
Complete Home, Hotel and Club Furnishers, Victoria
SEND FOR CATALOGUE.
MAIL ORDERS RECEIVE OUR BEST ATTENTION.
Climate.
It would be unfair to pass without
emarking on the climate of this gor-
leous    valley.      When    I    reached
(pence's Bridge on my ingoing jour-
ley thc temperature was 30 degrees
|elow zero, with a howling blizzard,
took a strong team half a day to
aul us over the snow to Twenty-one
jlile,  which  is  the  half-way  house,
took us another half day to reach
loutlee, the center of the valley. But
Ihat a metamorphosis!   Brilliant sun-
liine, blue sky and a mid-day tem-
~pature of 60 degrees in the shade.
luring the five days which  I spent
rospecting the valley and mountains
lese conditions did not change dur-
Ig the daytime, although at night we
Id as much as 20 degrees of frost.
Iiere was no wind and even wheu
le temperature falls below zero, as
I occasionally does, the cold is not
ft if one is warmly clothed.    The
is pure and very exhilarating, and
le  climate  to all  intents  and  pur-
Ises the same as that which prevails
trough out the dry belt.   The average
|ecipitation is about  10 inches.    At
Coutlee  Hotel  I  found a  genial
1st and attentive hostess in Mr. and
|rs. Joseph  Richards, the former a
other  of Sheriff Richards  of Vic-
J-ia.   The advent of the iron horse,
|iich  has  been awaited for  twenty
ars, will alter the whole aspect of
Is  beautiful  country.    Already the
JFerence is being felt, although the
llway will not be opened for traffic
ltil  March  ist.    But the difference
J well   illustrated  by  the   fact  that
|ving Coutlee at 8 o'clock on Mon-
night I reached Spcncc's Bridge
lo.io the same night and Vancouver
]6 o'clock thc following morning,
I'l distance of 200 miles in the same
le  as   it  had  taken  me  to  travel
fey miles    down   the   valley from
fcnee's   Bridge.
Products.
Everything is ready for the advent
frailway transportation. Huge hay
finds will be shipped out a $15 a
F. O. B. Several hundred tons of
I'iito'es are awaiting shipment at $20
[in.   Millions of feet of lumber will
be produced inside of a year, and
millions of tons of coal inside of five
years, and this latter brings me to
the principal object of my visit.
Coal Galore.
Nicola coal has been talked of for
several decades, and for many years
small quantities have been mined for
local consumption. Thirty years ago
Dr. G. M. Dawson reported on the
coal producing possibilities of the
Nicola, and two years ago Dr. Ells
spent the whole season in the valley
and made a detailed report. One
company has commenced operations
on an extensive scale, under the direction of an experienced mining engineer, well known at the Coast—Mr.
Alexander Faulds — who extended
many courtesies during my visit. Another, under Vancouver direction, is
erecting buildings and just about commencing operations, whilst a third is
under way. Much exploratory work
is required to bc done before the
last word can be said as to the extent
and exact quality of Uie Nicola coals,
and that work will hc done within
thc next two or three years. But
sufficient is known to justify me in
saying that there are millions of
tons of good domestic steam and
smithy coal, and an unascertained
though considerable quantity of coking coal. What coal production in
the Nicola will mean for British Columbia is not easy to foretell. The
scarcity of fuel throughout the west
emphasises the importance and value
of every known deposit; but when
one finds in .1 single valley a variety
of seams suitable for so many purposes and remembers also that these
arc thc most extensive, as well as the
nearest coal deposits to the Coast—
that is upon thc mainland—it is easy
to see how they will dominate the
market and how they will contribute
to the development of the mining
and smelting industries as well as
to thc upbuilding of thc country. Not
only will this coal supply the needs
of the Province from the Rockies to
the Coast, but it will find a ready
market as far south as San Francisco
and at thc  smelters  of  Everett  and
Tacoma.
Impressions.
There were many incidents on my
first visit to this delightful section
which I should like to recount, and
much valuable information from the
courteous Government Agent, Mr.
Murray, and the industrious editor
of the Nicola Herald, Mr. Fraser,
which would interest my readers. I
may deal with this in a future sketch.
Meanwhile I must conclude by chronicling my impression that the Nicola
Valley may fearlessly challenge comparison with any valley in the west,
that its people are extremely hospitable and genial; that its climate is
unsurpassed and that the wealth which
it has yielded in the line of agriculture and grazing to the early settlers
is but an earnest of the greater
wealth which will flow from the development of its mineral resources.
THE  WAT TO  WOO.
She dallied  with a deep-red rose
Just In the selfsame way
As she has dallied with  my love
For many a day.
She plucked the tender petals off
And  dropped  them  one  by one,
Nor knew the havoc that she wrought
Till it was done.
Then, with a little cry of pain,
"Oh,  my poor rose!"  she said;
But her remorse was all  too late—■
The tlow'r was dead.
And will it be with my poor heart
As witli that faded rose?
Will she destroy each budding hope
Before  she  knows?
Tlle  thought,  unbidden,  came  to  me.
I lifted longing eyes,
To meet within her own the dawn
Of sweet surprise.
She shrang beneath my ardent gaze
With girlish fear dismayed,
Half doubtful of her new-found joy
And  half afraid.
I took her boldly in my arms,
Tills maid so hard to woo,
And, with her throbbing heart to mine—
At last, she knew!
KI.EANORE G. NORMAN.
She—"Did you enjoy the opera
last night,  Herr Schwarz?"
Hc—"No, T couldn't hear anything."
She—"Why  not?"
He—"Thc two ladies sat in front
of me and chattered thc whole even-
in;,' about how much they loved
music."—Kleiner Witzblatt.
What Diaz Has Done For Mexico.
The present stage of the developments leading towards closer trade
relations between British Columbia
and Mexico render thc following remarks, from the New York Star, o!
peculiar interest:
For 300 years Spain ruled Mexico
in the same manner that she ruled
her other colonial possessions, for the
benefit of Spain and Spaniards.
Spain's colonies were regarded only
as tributaries to the mother country
and the conquered people became
little else than slaves to the con-
querers. Yet with it all there was
among the people an upward development which culminated in revolt
and the overthrow of Spanish authority. The flag of revolt was raised on
September 16, 1810, but independence
was not proclaimed until February 24,
1821. On September 27 of that year.
Iturbide made his triumphant entry
into the capital.
Thc next sixty years inarked a
period of almost incessant domestic
warfare, during which thc land was
drenched in blood and comparatively
little progress was made. Then came
Mexico's strong man, Porfirio Diaz.
Under the rule of this large minded
statesman, Mexico has become a new
land. Hc introduced sweeping and
practical reform measures, increasing
revenues without seriously increasing
the burden of taxation and set on foot
plans lor thc development of national
resources He maintained peace at
home and established friendly relations with foreign powers. The results of the new policy were soon
apparent.
Diaz saw that political peace and
industrial prosperity were alike dependent upon railway communication. In
1875, two years before thc first election of General Diaz, Mexico had
only about 360 miles of railway.
Twenty years later she had nearly
7.000 miles, and she has today approximately 10,000 miles. Much of this
work has been done by a costly system of subsidies, but there can bc no
question   of  the   wisdom  of  thc   in
vestment. Aside from the effect of
thc railways on thc industrial growth
of Mexico, without them it would
have been practically impossible 'or
President Diaz to put into elfect
those political reforms which have
converted the country from a hind
of almost uninterrupted domestic war
into a land of peace and law and
order.
A quarter of a century of go^d
government has effected an almost
incredible change in Mexico. There
arc 700,000 scholars enrolled in the
public schools and 125,000 more enrolled in private schools. Education
is compulsory, although thc law cannot bc rigidly enforced. There were
in 1903, thirty-seven museum.,, 125
libraries and 477 newspapers. Telegraph lines run to al! parts of the
country. Waterworks ami sewer systems are in operation and in process
of installation. "A quarter of a century ago," says Frederic R. Guernsey in the Atlantic Monthly of February last, "Mexico was a congeries
of jealous and isolated provinces. The
work of Porfirio Diaz has been thc
creation of a strong, solvent and efficient nation." Truly a great man in
a country of great possibilities.
In Spite of Investigation.
It is noteworthy that notwithstanding all of thc investigations and suits
that have been brought under thc
Roosevelt policy of enforcement of
law against corporations, thc corporations havc apparently not suffered in
business, however much they may
have suffered in reputation. The railroad men declared that thc railroad
rate law would spell disaster to them,
hut the earnings of the railroads were
never so great as they havc been during thc past year. Thc packing house
investigation and thc legislation which
followed it were declared to be certain of injuring American trade, and
yet Swift and Company's recent report shows an increase of $2,500,000
in its surplus for the year ended September 30, 1006 — Wall Street Journal. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1907.
if ^iSHH^^^^^^^^
* A Lady's Letter *
% By  BABETTE. y
Dear Madge:
It is unceasingly surprising, not to
say wonderful, what powers of recuperation lie in the well of human nature. Given a gleam of thin sunshine
even, and the winter of our discontent
is forgotten, our thoughts turn lightly to spring millinery and the sorrows
of the immediate past arc gilded with
the few stray sunbeams that filter
down and arc duly registered by the
meterologist. If only wc were vouchsafed a more liberal measure of those
same cheering rays that are showered
so bountifully upon the happy and
lucky children of thc South, what a
different planet this might seem to
the sober islander. The silm and
good-looking woman can hold her
own and defy the modes ol" the modiste. Those extravagances in millinery perpetrated last year, when
every creation was worn tilted up at
an angle of forty-five degrees, were
distinctly becoming, notwithstanding
their rakish altitudes, but this year
little inverted saucers are pinned flat
on the head, with ostrich or "coque"
plumes streaming behind, and the
effect, when not pathetic, is ludicrous.
1 suppose wc shall soon all wear
those eccentric revivals of days when
Marat kept the guillotine busy, and
Robespierre, discontent; and doubtless, in his way, the fur-covered
hunter of thc frozen north is as happy
as the dark-eyed gatherer of grapes
in a sun-soaked California vineyard
—only he must not go there. Why
thc sartorial powers that be should
have chosen a period of such undoubted ugliness as the Directoire for the
exploitation of this season's wearables is only known to their own
inner consciousness. It is not so
much the gowns and cloaks that recall an excruciating era; one is confronted with graceless outlines in
these, bill in millinery the case of the
incrnyabre becomes acute. -The.pre-.
sent hats arc trying to the last degree, and only the very arrows of outrageous fortune must surely lose both
point and poison in the flood of dazzling warmth and light that overlaps
the flower-filled fields of Southern
clime. Thc school-boy whose geographical studies led him to remark
that lie couldn't understand "why
silly fools shivered in Labrador when
they could live in Victoria," expresses
my sentiments exactly, only one
would go farther and say, "Why not
try Mexico if moving house at all?"
Fortunately, perhaps, they of Labrador know not what delights lie
"perdu" within a short time's sledging and sailing. It is only the
knowledge of better things that implants in one what the poet calls a
divine rule the toast of quaking
France; but it will not bc because,
but in spite of, the traditions of the
time that we shall present a passable
appearance and the sooner Directoire
styles give way to more picturesque
" properties "—to borrow a stage
pharse—the better.
Some ingenious person has discovered that certain scents have a remarkable effect upon the senses and
proceeds in all seriousness to detail
extraordinary results of their use.
Those of us, we are told, who wish to
train as highly successful business
men and women are advised to see
that their handkerchiefs are properly
saturated with essence of peppermint
during business hours. Essence of
magnolia moves the user to warlike
passions. The scent of the violet
produces the spirit of placid devotion,
while strangely enough that of the
lily causes obstinacy. Scent sachets
are now worn in thc hair and are
made very narrow, not wider than a
finger, to allow them to be pinned
beneath the coils before the hair is
dressed. They arc covered with lace
net, so that the hairpins may go
through them. In the centre of each
a tiny roll of cotton is placed with
thc favourite sachet powder.
Sleeves, sad to relate, show a distinct tendency to droop and to widen
below the shoulder, and this departure marks the difference between
sleeves of the week and sleeves of
even eight weeks ago. So it behooves
the purchaser of new gowns to make
a note of this arriving arrangement.
Clever needlewomen may find inspiration in the fact that silk-netted
effects are being exploited just now
for the trimming of gowns. A
pretty grey voile visiting dress for
instance, possesses a rest of coarse
linen canvas embroidered in pink silk,
a second vest being formed of overlapping motifs of grey silk netting
bordered with a loop fringe. Buttons
covered with a bright contrasting
shade of silk, covered with a silk
network exactly matching the colour
of a dark gown are also good as they
apply a hint of colour without being
too obvious.
BABETTE.
Social and
Personal.
VICTOBIA
The lirst annual ball under the auspices of the Central Rugby Club and
the Victoria College Athletic Association, was held on Friday, the 8th, at
the Victoria Hall, Blanchard street.
The hall was decorated tastefully with
Hags, greenery, footballs and the colors
of the two clubs, in long streamers of
black and yellow, and blue and white.
The supper table was done in the
club colors, with tall vases of yellow
daffodils  and  trailing  asparagus  fern.
Miss Thain's orchestra supplied the
music, which was in excellent form.
Mrs. Simpson acted as hostess of the
evening.
Among those present were: The
Misses Simpson, N. Hull, Schwengers,
C. Green, Elsie Joule, Hewartson, Roberts, Hastings, Fischer, Flora Macdonald, Frank, Florence Macdowell, G.
Grant, Sylvester, May Moss, Patterson,
Katie Roberts, Irene Mason, Ethel Stevens, Laura Cameron, Neil, Pineo, Olive
Grant, Munroe, Maclnnes, Daisy Bayne,
M. Carne, G. Bebington, F. Webster, G.
Switzer, Spencer; the Messrs. Danlells,
Kent, Sweeney, Sparrow, Gowen, Roberts, Loat, Peden. Sedger, Cambell,
Langley, Pennock, Robson, Erb. Mason,
Green,' Laurie, Nelson, Mclntyre, Moresby, Ellis, etc.
* *    *
Mrs. B. Norton gave the last of bet*
subscription (lances on the 8th at the
A. O. U. W. Hall. The supper table was
prettily arranged with a yellow gar,
centre piece, yellow and white daffodils
and handsome sliver candlesticks, with
shades of yellow.
Amongst those present were: Mrs. R.
Janion, In mauve brocade; Miss Brae,
in pink organdy; Miss Mutter, in white
with pink roses; Miss Browne, In white
with bouquet of carnations; Miss McQuade, pale blue; Miss Prevost, white
silk; Jliss Moresby, pink spotted muslin; Miss Dupont, pale blue with lace;
Miss G. Blakemore, white silk embroidered: Miss Johnstone, blue (lowered organdy; Mrs. Norton, pink; Mrs. Herchmer, 'pink crepe de chene; Miss B. Gaudin. pale blue chiffon with corsage of
violets; Miss Foot, in pink muslin; Miss
Monteith, vellow (lowered organdy; Miss
Savage,    black    net;    Miss    Arbuthnot,
white.
* *    *
The last most enjoyable dance before
Lent was "The Men's Invitation Dance,"
given at the A. 0. U. AV. Hall on the
evening of the 11 th. The Moor was in
perfect condition and the music provided by Miss Heater's orchestra most
excellent. Flags partitioned the gal-
lory off into sitting-out places, giving
the ball-room an artistic and cosy appearance. The supper table, which was
most tastefully arranged by Miss Newling, was done ill two shades of pink
carnations, pink electric lights and bows
of pink ribbon with streamers held long
garlands of smilax along the outer edge
of the table. A very dainty supper was
served at midnight. Some of those in
dainty costumes were: Mrs. Eberts,
handsome black and white gown; Mrs.
Gordon Hunter, sequin robe over black;
Miss Cameron (Winnipeg), white silk
with violets; Mrs. Robin Dunsmuir, rose
spangled gown; Miss Schubert, white
filmy princess costume; Miss Newling,
flowered silk delaine; Miss Hickey, lace
over pale blue; Miss Savage, white;
Miss Arbuthnot, white; Miss Little,
white crepe de chene; Miss Perry, soft
white; Miss McQuade, pale blue and
pink roses; Miss V. •Mason, flowered organdy; Mrs. Dunn, black with real
lace; Miss C. Roberts, chic black net;
Miss Bulwor, white satin; Mrs. K. Roberts, lace Empire, with pale blue; Miss
G. Irving, white silk; Miss M. Dunsmuir, pink Empire gown; Miss Pemberton, handsome white silk; Miss Orley,
pastel shade of blue with white; Miss
Lucas, cream chiffon; Mrs. Langton,
black with crimson roses; Miss Blakemore, white silk; Miss Cobbett, blue
silk; Mrs. Walter Langley, pink chiffon;
Miss T. Monteith, flowered organdy and
nianv others too numerous to mention.
* *    *
On Tuesday last a few of the members of the Alexandra Club entertained
their friends at the tea hour. Mrs.
Moresby rendered several charming
solos, and a guessing contest which was
won hy Miss G. Drake, made the afternoon ii most pleasing event.
The tea table was arranged with pink
cherry blossoms, huiristinus, silver tinsel and pretty candlesticks with pink
slindGS
Among those present were: Canon
und Mrs. Beanlands, Mr. and Miss Hen-
age, Mrs. Griffiths, Mrs. Carmichael,
Miss Thorpe-Double, Mrs. Berkeley, Mrs.
Monteith, Mrs Good, Miss Beal, Mrs
Shallcross. Mrs. Taylor, Miss Drake.
Mrs. Hart, Miss Foster, Miss Powell,
Mrs. Haswell, Miss Green, Mrs. Walker,
Mrs. Bartlett, Miss Harvey, Miss Lugrin. Mrs. McBride, Mrs. Tilton. Mrs.
McMicking, Mrs. Shore. Miss Tilton,
Miss Bucket*, Miss Little, Miss Perry,
Miss Angus, Miss Mason, Miss T. Angus, Mrs. Hall, Miss M. Dunsmuir, Mrs.
Jones. Mrs. Beaven, rs. Solly, Miss McKay, Miss P. Hunt.
.        .        .
Mr. and Mrs. de Noie Walker are
spending a few weeks at Grand Prairie.
* *    *
Tho numerous friends of Miss Co-
bauld of New Westminster will be glad
to hear of her recovery from a very
serious attack of grivpe.
* *    *
Mr. J. F. Foulkes Is paying his old
friends a brief visit on his way to
Arizona, where he goes to join Mrs.
Foulkes.
<r
February nth, 1907.
Dear Sir or Madam:
Two years ago we received from a number of the leading poultry farmers a request
for a really good food for young chicks; as a result we placed on the market what
is now known as " B. & K. CHICK FOOD." This food has had a most remarkable
run, and, we are safe in saying, exceeds the combined sales of all other similar foods.
The cause of this success is doubtless due to the facilities we have of providing—
through our mills—the finest kiln dried Oat Groats to the extent of 25 per cent, which,
with 25 per cent of Cracked Wheat, 25 per cent of Chit Rice, 12 per cent Corn Meal,
8 per cent Grit, and 5 per cent of Millet Seed, makes up the celebrated " B. & K.
CHICK FOOD."
Our facilities this spring are greater than ever; we can turn out the largest
quantities on very short notice, as, in addition to superior quality, the price in one hundred-lb. sacks, fifty-lb. sacks, and twenty-five-lb. sacks is less than the imported foods;
we hope to have the pleasure of supplying not only your requirements, but also those
of your friends who may be engaged in the chicken business.
Yours very truly,
125 Government Street,
Victoria, B. C.
THE  BRACKMAN-KER MILLING CO., LTD.
36 Hastings Street,
Vancouver, B. C.
Front Street,
New Westminster, B. C.
Coats, Suits
and Waists
CAMPBELL'S
Everything
Ready to Wear
Smart Whitewear at Small Prices
OUR FEBRUARY SHOWING of Beautiful Lingerie at Sale Prices.    No trouble nor expense
has been spared in order to secure the very finest creations in White Skirts, Night Dresses
and White Underwear.   In durability, the very latest and most   recherche   trimmings, the
Exquisite Goods we are now offering will be found away ahead of anything ever offered in this
Province heretofore.   The prices are cut so low as to easily compete with the London and Paris
Sale Prices.   We fear no comparison nor competition.
Latest Creations in Spring Coats, Spring Costumes, White Blouses and Children's Spring Frocks
Anqus Campbell & Qo.
THE LHDIES' STORE
Promts Block, Government Street
vieTOHia, b. e.
The members of the Ladies' Musical Club, under whose auspices the
Frieda Stender, Otie Chew and Thilo
Becker concert is to be given at the
Victoria Theatre on the evening of
the 25th, are much encouraged by the
success which thus early in the day
has attended their circulation of subscription lists. At the same time the
disposition of Victorians to support
good art consistently is shown in the
fact that almost every subscription
is for both this concert and the subsequent one in April, under the same
management and the auspices of the
Arion Club, to be given by the Dutch
violoncellist, Hekking, with supporting artists. Among the box-takers
for both events are the Lieutenant-
Governor and Mrs. Dunsmuir, and all
the leaders in local musical affairs are
represented or will be in the lists.
The Stender-Becker-Chew tour opens
at the Vancouver Opera House on th .
evening of Friday next, the concert
at the Terminal City being under thc
auspices of the Vancouver Choral
Society; and thc company comes next
to Victoria on the subsequent Monday.   It is unquestionably one of the
strongest concert groupings offer<
on the Coast in years, and fully d,
serving of generous patronage for i
sterling quality.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 da
after date, I intend to apply to t
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands a:
Works for a special license to cut ai
carry away timber from the followli
described land, situated on the sou
shore of Baker Inlet, about one mi
from the mouth of the Inlet: Begi
nlng at a post marked " C. T. N A
Post"; thence south 40 chains; then
east 160 chains; thence north 40 chain
thence west 1G0 chains; following tl
shore to point of commencement, c»
taining 010 acres, more or less.
Dated 19th December, 1906.
Feb.  16. c. TAKADA. THE WEEK, SATURDAY FEBRUARY 16, 1907
British Columbia
THE FRUIT GROWING RESOURCES
OF THE PROVINCE.
Fruit Growing.
British Columbia fruit is preferred
above all others in the markets of
the Middle West, where it commands
profitable prices. In 1904 a small
exhibit sent to England was awarded the gold medal of the Royal Horticultural Society, and last year
(1805) a car lot, exhibited in London, won the first prize from all competitors, while no less than eight
medals were awarded the individual
exhibits which made up the collection. This goes to prove that despite
the great distance British Oolumbia
fruit has secured a prominent place
in the British market, in which Oregon and California applies have heretofore sold at the highest prices.
The fruit industry of British Columbia is in its infancy, but the results so far secred are convincing as
to its future importance.  The actual
extent of fruit growing land has not
yet been ascertained, but by a conservative estimate at least one million acres south of the 52nd degree
will produce all the fruits of the temperate zone.    The recognized fruit
districts include the southern part
of Vancouver Island and the Gulf
Islands, Lower Fraser River Valley,
Thompson   River  Valley,   Shuswap
Lake, Okanagan, Spallumcheen, Oso-
yoos, Similkameen, Upper Columbia
Valley, Kootenay Lake, Arrow Lake,
Lower Oolumbia River   and Grand
Forks, which are all suited to the
best grades of fruit, and which contain extensive areas of fruit lands.
Other good fruit districts are: West
Coast of Vancouver Island,    West
Coast of Mainland (where patches of
fruit lands are found at the heads of
the numerous inlets), Lower Fraser
Valley, Nicola, Grand Prairie, and
many other localities.    In some of
these sections irrigation is necessary,
and, as mentioned elsewhere, water is
being supplied where the influx of
population   warrants the   necessary
expenditure.   Many localities, which
are now proved to be suitable for
fruit culture, were but recently "discovered," for a few years ago fruit
was only raised in the settlements
along the coast and along the rivers,
and in quantity that failed to supply
even the limited local demand.   In
1891 the total orchard area of the
province was 6,500 acres.    In ten
years it only increased 1,000 acres,
but from 1901 to 1905 it jumped to
22,000 acres, and it is safe to say
that that acreage will be more than
doubled again before the close of
1906.   Ten years ago British Columbia did not produce enough fruit to
supply her own population. The fol-
following table of fruit shipments is
interesting in showing   the steady
growth of the industry:
By freight.    By Express. Total. Increase.
1902    1,469 tons      . 487 tons 1,956 tons
1903    1,868 tons        676 tons 2,544 tons , 588 tons
1904    2,161  tons        864 tons 3,025 tons , 481 tons
1905    3,181 tons      1,176 tons 4,357 tons 1,332 tons
An increase of over 50 per cent in four years. THE WEEK, SATURDAY FEBRUARY  16,  1907.
THE GREAT SEMI-READY
Stoek-Taking Sale
IS NOW ON
3000 Semi-Ready Suits, Raincoats and Overcoats to be run off at this
sale.   An immense stock of Boys two and three piece Suits
at  LESS THAN HALF  PRICE.
B. WILLIAMS & CO. s-m-fsar™..-*.
VICTORIA
* if if i?ififi?ifi?ififif&
if Short Story  i
if if
•J* ifififi'ifififififiiifif
WAS HE A FAILURE ?
By E. 11. Cornock.
The snow beat with a soft thud
against the uncurtained windows of
lhe Vicarage study. It was a bitterly cold January night, and the silent
world outside of bill and moorland
lay bidden under an icy mantle. Inside the Vicarage was still and peaceful; only in the study some one was
stirring. Up and down the narrow
limits of the little room walked thc
Vicar, pacing to and fro, his head
bent, liis hands clasped behind his
back. The light from the dying lire
Was low-turned lamp showed his face
worn with some inward struggle, his
eye.-, sombre with thought. It was
not often that Giles Langton allowed
himself to be conquered by sadness,
. but such a wave as that which had
swept over him on this winter night
was exceptional, lie bad made his
bed and so he must lie on it, but a
chance paragraph in a paper brought
all the old pain back again, and he
fought against it in vain. What
could it profit him now lo remember
that a few years ago the ball of fortune and triumph lay at his feet?
What could il profit him to remember that be might havc made a brilliant mark in the world—that be
might have followed Up his splendid
University career by something better and greater than the quiet, uneventful life of an obscure country
parson? Something—'better? lie
smiled grimly to himself as he paced
up and down, seeing 111 mental vision
what might have been if	
lie had been the man of his year
at thc University, and no one was
gfcatly surprised when Giles Langton came out ai the top of the list
as Senior Wrangler. There were
many prophecies for his brilliant future, and nun looked to him with
confidence as cue who was bound to
make liis mark and to "go far." as
the phrase goes. But they had reckoned without the idealistic qualities
lying dormant in the man. They
-poke of him sometimfis as an enthusiast and a would-be reformer, but
bc was the cleverest man of his year,
and as such commanded their wholehearted admiration. Yet one or two
were barely astonished when they
heard of lhe act which put an end In
al! his ambitious hopes and plans
fo'r the future,
Giles Langton wa.- an orphan, and
his education and childhood bad been
carefully watched by bis guardian,
who, himself a clergyman iu ibe
North of England, ardently desired
that his ward should follow in his
footsteps and eventually take bis place
in an old and not over-rich family
living.
Canon Rawson was intensely proud
of  thc   boy's   success,  and   this   final
crowning triumph was as dear to the
old man as it was to Agatha, the
Canon's only child, who spoke of
Giles's achievements with a glow of
pride in ber soft cheeks.
"I always said you'd do well," she
wrote in her pretty impulsive fashion; "it's so nice to bc able to say
T told you so!' in a complimentary
way, isn't it? And we're awfully proud
of you, Giles."
All this sounded the dominant note
of happiness and joy on the day of
Giles Langton's triumph; another
chord was struck when he received a
telegram urging his immediate presence at the North-country viearage.
Canon Rawson was lying dangerously
ill, and there was-no time to bc lost.
So Langton set forth from tbe University, arriving in time to receive his
guardian's dying request.
"You'll—see tliat my Agatha—
comes no harm?" whispered the
Canon witli difficulty, "and, Giles—
if you can keep the old—home and
take   my   place—I'd   die   happy—yet
His voice failed him, and with a
lump in his throat of which he was
not a bit ashamed Giles promised in
that moment of loving impulse to
guard the old home—and Agatha.
It perhaps hardly occurred to him
in think what he had done till the
funeral was over, and he was confronted by the necessity of making
seme arrangements not only for his
own future but also for the fatherless girl. Se was alone in tbe world;
(inly distant relatives were left In
her, and she regarded witli extreme
reluctance the obligation which lay
upon her to live at least for a time
with one of her father's cousins.
"I must come back here some day
—when you arc here, Giles," she said
tearfully, but with a confidence which
she had always placed in her old playmate.
"Of course you must come back.
Agatha," be said. And then—well, it
was only lhe beginning of tlie end,
alter all. lie took orders, succeeded
lo Canon Rawson's living, and married Agatha,
lie loved her certainly, but he was
also sorry for her with the tenderness
nf memories with which thc past was
laden. To Agatha he was all and
everything, and he settled down to
his new and not perhaps altogether
congenial life happily enough—for a
time. Then came the awful longing
for what might have been; the mental thirst and hunger afier Ibe attractions of that literary life lo which
he had looked forward with such
eagerness; lhe stilled feeling which
at times .-wept over him, and the longing tn shake off the shackles which
bound him and to bc able to go back
-   ten years or so,
\'ow mi ibis wintry night il swept
upon him like a resistless wave. He
thought be had hurried those lnst
dream- nf his in so deep a grave
thai they could never rise to confront
him again, but they did. Meu called
him :>. failure, lie knew Ihat. and
tbe knowledge only added another
pang    of    bitterness    In    his    pain.
Where he had won—and then failed
—others had stepped in and made
for themselves a niche in the temple
of  fame  and  fortune,  whilst  he	
Ah!
. Into his miserable reflections came
an interruption. The door opened
quietly and his wife looked in. The
light from thc lamp shone on her
sweet face. Agatha Rawson had lost
none of her charm, and the years
which were rolling by only served
to mature her loveliness, which lay
not so much in feature as in expression.
"You are not going to work much
longer, Giles dear, are you," she asked anxiously, "because it is very late,
and midnight oil is not good for
you"*?"
Hc met her with a smile. She at
least must never know those thoughts
of his concerning the past.
"I have only a letter to finish," he
said cheerfully. "What a night,
Agatha! 1 never remember such a
severe storm as this. We shall hear
of disasters, I am afraid."
She nodded, and the Vicar, when
she had gone, finished liis letter and
locked up for the night.
He remembered with a pang of
remorse those hostages to fortune, his
wife and child upstairs. After all.
as long as they were happy, could he
be  accounted as  a  total  failure?
"No possibility of getting on to-
day?"
"No, sir. The guard sees no prospect of such a thing. We're hopelessly snowed up and the nearest town
is nearly five miles distant."
Sir Philip Maynard muttered something beneath his breath and looked
about him irritably. Any frustration
of his plans was most distasteful to
a man who was one of Fortune's favourites. Everything he touched turned to gold; all liis schemes were successful; he was a man of the hour.
From the day when hc had stepped
into a place of honour at the University, left vacant by what he called
the idiotic fully nf another man,
things had gone brilliantly with him,
and lie was resting on his oars now,
almost a millionaire, thanks to a rich
inheritance, and a man whose word
was law in matters relating to literature and thc line arts. Now, when
he was nn his way to join a house-
party, he found himself stopped by
the snow and hopelessly weatherbound.
lie turned petulantly to his servant, who stood in an attitude of respect fid attention at his side.
"What is the village over tliere?
1   see a  church spire."
"1   will  inquire, sir."
Sir Philip waited impatiently.
"The village is Chalford Major,
-ir." said the servant respectfully
when he returned; "a small village,
I am told, but it has an inn and a
post-office."
"H'm! It's not far to walk. I suppose? Anything is better than waiting here in the cold. You can sec
about thc baggage, Symes, and follow
me  there.    1   shall  stay the night at
the inn. Pray Heaven, it may have
decent beds!" he finished resignedly.
The afternoon was rapidly closing
in, and tlie snow-bound road was
neither pleasant nor easy to walk on,
but Sir Philip kept on his way towards
the church spire.
It was just before he reached the
village that a dog-cart overtook him
and I'ulled up at his side. The driver
uttered his name, and he glanced up
to see a tall man in clerical clothing
holding tlie reins.
"Langton, by all that's wonderful!"
be exclaimed. "Why, man, who'd
have thought of meeting you here at
tlie back of beyond?"
Langton smiled a little bitterly.
"1 live here—at the back of beyond,
as you justly name it," he said. "There
is something far more surprising in
meeting you here, Maynard. Let me
give you a lift to your destination,
wherever it is."
Sir Philip laughed and accepted thc
offer.
"My destination at present is your
village inn," lie said, with a whimsical
smile. "I suppose it's passably decent, ch?"
"Oh. quite! But you arc not serious?"
"Quite. My train is snowed up, and
1 am told there is not the least likli-
hood of my being able to get on to
Cliffminster today—or perhaps tomorrow either. Hence my anxiety to
sample your village inn."
"Try the Vicarage instead, then.
I cannot offer you accommodation
much better than the inn, but at least
you'll be quiet, and we—my wife and
I—will bc only too glad to see you."
"You're very good. I shall be delighted; but are you sure I shall not
be in the way?"
"Not a bit! It will be a treat lo
have a visitor. Let me just stop at
the inn and tell them to send on your
things when they come. This is a
lonely place, Maynard. but perhaps
as a change "
"1 shall find it perfect," averred the
other. "My doctor has particularly
ordered me rest and quiet."
"Of that you can gel plenty here,"
said thc Vicar, touching up thc pony.
Maynard glanced sharply at him, noting the hint of bitterness in his voice.
"Havc T ever envied any man?" repeated Maynard slowly, taking his
pipe from his mouth and examining
it with minute attention. "Well, yes,
I havc; only one man though."
"I wonder at that," said the yield*,
"seeing that you havc made a success of your life all along the line,
while others havc only found failure."
'Act success and failure are comparative terms, after all," said Maynard. "They say that one man's meat
is another man's poison, you know,
and 1 believe the same applies to sttc-
cesS and failure. One man's success
may be another man's failure and vice
versa.   The man I envy "
He paused, and the Vicar looked
at him with interest. They were sitting together over the study (ire;
outside the wind moaned gently, and
within thc  lirst leaped and crackled.
its bright flames flickering over the
pleasant homely scene. Agatha had
but lately quitted them to finish some
letters and to glance at the sleeping
child upstairs; an atmosphere of calm
contentment seeme.I to enwrap the
house.
"The man I envy," resumed Maynard slowly, "is—yourself, Langton."
There was a moment's dead silence.
"You—you envy mc!" echoed the
Vicar in pure amazement; then with
an unwonted outburst of bitterness
he exclaimed, "The last man on cartli
you need envy, Maynard—a failure
all along where you havc been a success !"
"I don't agree with you. The facts
have become distorted in your own
eyes, Langton; but in no one else's.
Listen. I've succeeded, you say; well
and good; as far as the outward appearance of things go, so I have.
I've become rich, and, to a certain
degree, celebrated. I took all the
chances offered mc, but this 1 say of
my inner life, Langton, it has been
like so much dust nnd ashes. You
ask why. I will tell you. I've never
spoken of these things to a living being, but it has struck me that my life
story may bc of some interest and
help you. Isn't it a bit of the irony
of fate that the things I've longed for
most—happiness, peace, and love—
have all been denied me? I thought
I had found the latter once, but it
turned out to be a base counterfeit;
thc two first I've not found yet, except tinder this roof, and here I'm
only the one who looks on. I could
have bought that counterfeit for gold,
Langton, but I found out in time that
it was only the imitation I was buying, and my madness was cured. Do
you wonder that I look at you with
your peaceful home life, your atmosphere of love and affection, not only
lure in your own home but in the
entire village, ymir wife and child,
with the bitterest envy? You call
yourself a failure! You're wrong,
man, utterly wrong. No man whose
record is as yours is, whose home life
is what yours is, can he accounted a
failure. Ask your own wife, man, and
she'll tell you tlie same thing. Would
she lie to you? Of course not. Oh,
I know what I'm talking about! Don't
think me suddenly mad, as people
might if they could hear mc. 1 believe it is only of late years T'vc become sane."
Silence ensued for a little while.
To Giles Langton it was as if a veil
had been rudely torn from his eyes,
for Maynard's words, burning with
truth, instinct with feeling, had gone
home.
So that was what success was. Only
disillusion, disappointment. Looking
back over his own past life, he saw
how years enfolded in happiness and
peace—two things not to bc bought
with gold—had brought to him just
the blessings which were absent from
Maynard, It was suddenly given to
him to see and understand what those
years would have been to him with- '
out that love, tbat happiness, and that
peace, and he drew a long breath,
flow blind he had been!    How	 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY i6, 1907.
The door opened and Agatha entered the room.
"I had such a time with Angela,"
she said, with a merry smile. "She
would think I was a New Year fairy,
as a sort of second Santa Claus, to
fill her stockings!"
Maynard laughed and glanced
across at Langton, who had called
himself a rank failure!
At The Street   *}
Corner
*
*
By THE LOUNQER
At the lime of writing Victoria is
suffering from a severe attack of
"Chinee New Year." It is therefore
not inopportune for me to make a
few remarks on the subject of the
impecunious Englishman or Canadian and the Chinaman.
I am sorry to have to say that it is
a fact that there is a class of white
men who, for fifty-one weeks in the
year  will abuse  thc  heathen  Chinee,
will kick him in that portion of the
I body which was particularly reserved
for that purpose, will cheat him out
I of his laundry bill, will speak of him
las though he were something infinite-*
I ly lower than a worm, and then for
the fifty-second week, when John is
I celebrating, will call at his house and
drink  his   health,   smoke   his   health,
land generally "cadge" all he can get,
1 After which, mind you, lie will boast
I of his performance and talk of those
 of Chinamen whom he
[has soaked for an evening's drunk.
This is a bad indictment to make
against one's own fellow-countrymen;
[but alas, it is true.    1 know the truth
jf it from my own  personal experience.   I do not mean that I have been
| guilty  of this conduct myself, but  I
I have known men who have been.    I
1 have been asked on this present occasion to mention the fact by other men
who have the decency to realise tlie
I beastliness of the practice.   For heaven's sake, for the sake of the good
name of thc white man, for your own
pocket's  sake,  let  this  custom   drop
[into oblivion.
Somehow or other there is an idea
[abroad that because a man happens
|to bc born with a yellow complexion
land almond eyes he is necessarily a
Ifool and fair game for speculation
[(that is giving a kind name to what I
[mean). Some men and women class
la Chinaman with a nigger. I sup-
Ipose that uo really sane man or wo-
liiian would make this mistake. The
■difference between the white man and
lthe nigger is that the former is "a
Kittle lower than thc angels," while
■the latter is a little (and a very little)
labove the devils.
Now, nobody can class the yellow
hnan with the nigger, that is to say
Ivith any justice. Let us discuss the
3hinaman logically. When all is said
:ind done the only thing against which
there is a kick is that he works cheaper than the white man. On the other
liand there is a counter kick that he
Is raising his prices. Do you blame
liim? lie finds ihal there is a scarcity
if labour;, he cannot be expected to
liave any deep-laid love for a country
Ivhich charges him $500 for admission,
!ind so when he gets die chance he
nuts the screw on and charges 50
rents mure for thc month's laundry
;>i!l, Can the white man kick at this?
l")o we know nothing nf Trades
iJnions in Canada?
Let us now see what the Chinaman
las in   his   favour.    In   his personal
labits he is clean,    lie is patient.    If
|e is treated well he is hard-working
ow many wh'te men work as hard
tlie average " Chink," unless they
Ire very well paid for it?     f   know
liat   I   don't,    lie   is   essentially   pope.    1 saw a small hoy at Thc Driard
|ist Saturday hitting a Chinaman with
whip, just I'm* fun.    That dues  tint
flow thc white man's training to any
Wantage,  docs  it?    Of  course   the
fhinaman gambles; well, that doesn't
flirt anyone except himself,    lie may
tnokc opium;   in that ease he must
e  classed  with  the white man  wdio
■■inks  Inn  much,  and  there  is  very
[itle  difference between  them.
The particular point which 1 have
I'u my nerves is the "sponging" which
always goes on at the Chinese New
Year. There are men in town who
have business with Chinamen throughout the year, and who have to go
round as a matter of civility; but
that constitutes no excuse for the
loose "bumming" white man who will
sacrifice any sense of dignity which
he may ever have had in order to get
a drink or a cigar from the "blooming (?) chink."
The late elections have been responsible for much, but I heard a
story connected with them the other
day which caps all. A certain gentleman, not unknown in Victoria, had
seen the wine when it was red.
Whether he was drinking tn drown
his sorrows, or to celebrate the victory, I know not. At all events he
meandered home about four or live,
in the morning, and not unnaturally
felt snmewliat sleepy. Having come
tn tlie conclusion that sleep was very
present and that bed was very distant lie made up his mind to doze on
thc sidewalk. This therefore he did,
and Hiking off his hat he propped
himself up against the side of a house
and went straight into the arms of
Morpheus. So he was discovered by
various pious and charitable persons
on the following morning on their
way to church, with thc result that
when he woke up he found in his hat
Iwo nickels and a ten-cent piece. He
promptly found thc original dog and
took a hair.
'there is one thing which has
puzzled me ever since I first heard
nf "The King Edward Dredge." That
is, whether that name was given to
it as a compliment to His Majesty,
or as ;m insult. It seems to me an
extraordinary thing that any British
subject should have taken the name
of his reigning monarch and foisted
it onto a mud-shifter. If it was
meant as a compliment it was a cur-
inns one; if it was meant as an insult there should be trouble coming
fur the man who was responsible for
it.
Allow me to keep your attention
fm* one paragraph more. There is a
subject which I have certainly mentioned once in these columns, and I
believe twice. That is the subject ol"
public lavatories. Now I am going
to speak somewhat plainly as 1 have
been asked to bring the question before the public. The city has resolved
to grant the Tourist Association a
sum of $7,500 in recognition of its
work in bringing Victoria before the
eyes of the world. The Bishop of
Columbia writes urging thc expenditure of this money ou roads and sewerage. I must say that I agree with
him. What is the good of advertising the place when we have none nf
thc advantages of modern civilization? 1 said that I was going to
speak plainly, and I intend to do so.
There are certain natural laws which
have tn bc complied with by both
man and woman. At present the
man is forced into a saloon; how the
woman manages I don't know. How
can people be expected to come into
the city to spend the day under these
circumstances? The best thing that
could happen to Victoria at the present moment would be to have an
underground lavatory built at the
junction of Yates and Government
streets, another up on Beacon Hill
and a third out in the region of Oak
Bay.
Accommodation of this kind would
do far more tn promote Temperance
than any amount of liquor laws. Many
a man goes into a saloon because of
a call "f nature and meets there a
"friend." with the result that when he
comes out he is the worse fnr liquor.
You who are reading, if you don't
believe, show this tn a male friend
and ask him if it is true or not. It
is certainly true in the estimation of
THE LOUNGER.
the §m
TRAVELLERS' GUIDE
VICTORIA
Tli Sanitarium Hotel, which is beautifully situated, overlooking iho Bow Hirer and lis lovely and
romantic valley, is n largo o-story building elegantly
fitted wilh every appointment calculated io bring
ploasuro and comfort to tlio tourist or invalid,
A private hospital, which, thougj isolated, is in
olqsp proximity to tho Sanitarium, is presided over bv
skilfully trained nurses and is also fitted mil will,
every appliance nocossary to a lirst class Institution
"I ils kind.
A very commodious bath-house adjoins Ihe hold,
where Iurkish, Russian, plunge, shower and douche
nn I lis a i-o given under medical supervision, wilh
water dirocl from the colobratod hot sulphur springs.
A tlr.s 1 class I very in connection so ihal rides and
drives through lhe magiiiflcaiufscouory may be eu-
loyeil.   Excellent cuisine.
Terms: "IO1 a day upwards. Spseiul rates by week
»<■ h.  Opon all tho year.
A, C. THOMPSON', Manager.
Medical Sin 11':
li il. Brett, m.d ;   U. JI. Aticix, m.d.;
II.  II.  llliKTT,  B.A.. 51 I).
VT
>top to Think
After you have lost money or valuables by using the old style
pocket, what a great advantage it would have been to you if you
had insisted on your  dealer procuring for ynu a—
6*
Piccadilly Brand "
Garment with the Burglar and Safety pocket.
Manufactured By
H. E. B0ND & GO., Ltd.,      --
TORONTO
STRAND HOTEL
VICTORIA
The home n| all theatrical and vaudeville
artists while in the Capital city, alto of
other kindred bohemiaus.
VVR1QHT & FALCONER, Proprietors.
CAMBORNE
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining men and
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
REVELSTOKE
Hotel Victoria
REVELSTOKE, B.C.
Headquarters lor miners and
lumbermen.
ROBT. LAUOHTON, Prop'r.
BANFF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
Banff's Most  Popular J2 a  Dav  Hotel.
Close to Station and Sulphur
Bath-'.
N. K. LUXTON, Proprietor.
PHOENIX.
Deane's Hotel
PHOENIX, B. C.
New. Modern hot water Bj stem. Klectric
lighted. Tub and shower bath's and laundry in
connection.   The miners'home.
"DAMSY" DEANE, Proprietor
GREENWOOD,
The Windsor Hotel
(IREENWOOD, B. C.
American nnd European Plan,
Cafe in Connect ion.
ERNE3T .1. CARTIER, Prop.
if Eh
^
ROSSLAND
Hoffman House
ROSSLAND, B. C.
Rates J1.00 per day aud up,    Cafe  iu
Connection.
GREEN & SrilTH. Prop's.
Electrical Appliances and Machinery
For the Mine, the Smelter, the Factory,
or the Home.
Inspect our stock or write us.    We can  supply  your needs
promptly and at a saving to yon.
The Hinton Electric Co., Ltd.
Waiter (presenting a plate before
an old man from the country)—For
the music, sir.
Old Man (gathering the cuius up
off the plate)—Thank you; the music
was pretty bad.— Lustige Blaette.
Follette (recently married—A man
is called a "Benedict" when he is married. What is a girl called under th.
same circumstances?
Anna (also recently married} —
Well, it depends altogether on what
she marries!—Life,
Vi
VICTORIA,
29 Government Street.
VANCOUVER
606 Granville Street
NELSON.
HOTEL HUME
NELSON,   B. C,
Leading Hotel of tbe I'oolennj'J.
J. FRED HUME,        -       Prop.ietor.
Silver King Hotel,
NELSON,  B. C.
The home of the fnfluslrlnl Workers
nft In- Koi-1-jm..t-.
^
W. E. HcCandlish,
Proprietor
Established I860
M. R. SMITH 6l CO.
Factory and Mead Oflice:
VICTORIA
Manufacturers of
Warehouse and Offices:
VANCOUVER
BISCUITS ■- CONFECTIONERY
Note Our Leader
SMITH'S SWISS CREAHS
Royal  Hotel
NELSON, B, C.
Tlie Him Family Holel In the Oily,
•Iii d.ij.
Mrs. Wm. Roberts, Proprietress
CRANBROOK.
Cranbrook Hotel
Cranbrook, B, C.
Rates J.2 per day.    Opposite the C.P.R,
depot,
Hogarth   & k'ollii•$, I n rliitcri*.
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OF
ENGLISH ALE AM) STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt  and   Fops *'M(' 111 Manufacture.
PHnNE 803. VICTORIA
Do you want a quiet place to
smoke and read lhe paper while
waiting   for   tliat appointment?
Try then, ray friend
The Wilson Bar
VICTORIA, ll, C
HciH'iiih (iordnn Hotel      -      Yates Street THE WEEK   SATURDAY, FEBRUARY i6, 1907.
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Office*:
88^   Government Street. .Victoria,  B.C.
Rm. 14, McKinnon Bile. .Vancouver, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE..Manager and Editor
Poetic Justice.
By Bohemian.
Just how the phrase "poetic justice" originated I do not know. Nor
am I prepared to define its exact
shade of meaning; but I take it to
represent the acme of strict justice
as deduced rather from a consideration of general principles than from
a minute analysis of the evidence
furnished in any particular case, lt
often happens that the demands of
poetic justice run counter to those
justice's justice, and yet although thc
public knows full well that the latter
is strictly correct, it insists on the
former. Indeed, so deeply rooted in
human nature is the underlying principle of poetic justice that at times
even the highest legal tribunals will
abrogate or nullify their own decision in a concession to poetic justice.
I recall an instance of this kind
which, whilst it may be open to
the charge of sensationalism, furnishes a good example of what I mean.
More than twenty years ago a gar-
diner named Lee in Hampshire, was
tried and convicted for the murder
of his master. Thc evidence was conclusive. The jury had no difficulty
in finding him guilty, the judge endorsed their verdict and he was sentenced to be hanged. Thc fateful
day arrived, the criminal mounted the
scaffold, the black cap was adjusted,
and, at a signal from the sheriff the
bolt was withdrawn, but the door refused to budge. A second time, and
indeed, a third time all these preliminaries were gone through, but each
time although there was no apparent
support, thc door would not fall. As
a result, Lee was taken back to jail.
The press of England was almost
unanimous in demanding that thc
death sentence should not again be
attempted, and thc Home Secretary
in the exercise of his prerogative,
commuted tlie sentence to imprisonment for life. There was no possible
defence for his leniency along the
lines of lawful procedure, but the public commended tlie clemency, legal
justice was defrauded of its legitimate prey and poetic justice was satisfied.
Such .1 line of meditation opens up
a long vista of possibilities, and involves the application of a principle
based upon a trait inherent in human
nature which demands that all rules
shall not be cast iron and that in the
wisest constitutional provisions of
human government some elasticity
shall be allowed as a concession to
the operation of those influences
which were present to the mind of
Shakespeare when he made Hamlet
declare "There arc more things in
heaven and earth than are dreamt of
in philosophy." In this day of scientific research it is possible that we
arc learning just a little more of those
unseen and hitherto unknown forces
many of which may properly be
classed under the modern title of
psychic phenomena) and as a more intimate acquaintance with these forces
and conditions is established, there
is little doubt that one result will bc
the modification of legal enactments
which determine thc question of moral
culpability. Thus in estimating both
punishment and responsibility more,
account will be taken than heretofore
of heredity as well as of environment. The latter has always been
recognized by the law, and every
right-minded judge has made some
allowance for the poor wretch whose
surroundings have contributed largely to the development of criminal instincts. But hitherto the law has not
taken cognizance of thc influence of
heredity upon mankind although the
data furnished by the statistics of
prisons and convict establishments
has long ago demonstrated the fact
that   criminals   beget   criminals   and
that natural tendencies to wrong-doing are born as well as developed.
In allowing such a consideration to
materially modify the severity of punishment, the law has always recognized the existence of a great danger
since the object of punishment is to
deter the criminal from committing
offences rather than to punish the individual, and the best authorities have
held that leniency is usually misplaced. For fifty years there has been
a spasmodic agitation for the abolition of the death penalty, and in not
a few of the most civilized communities the agitation has been successful,
although in the British Empire and
the United States public opinion has
not yet been convinced of the wisdom
of this couurse. The old levitical decree, "an eye for an eye and a tooth
for a tooth" still constitutes in the
main tbe Anglo-Saxon idea of poetic
justice as being in accord with the
eternal fitness of things. At the present moment a cause celebre is being
tried in the American courts which
will in all probability have to be classed with those historic cases decided
not in accordance with the law of
equity but with the law of poetic justice. It may be regrettable that this
should be attained by the expenditure
of a fabulous amount of money, the
pleading of an obviously fictitious defence, and the straining of the technicalities of the Penal Code. But as
sure as Thaw killed White, so surely
will the demands of poetic justice be
satisfied by his acquittal of the capital charge, or at any rate by his escape from the capital punishment.
Such a consummation can neither
legally nor logically be defended. Not
one sound argument can be adduced
why hc should not pay the utmost
penalty of the law. It cannot even
be urged in his favor that amid a
coterie of degenerates he was any exception. Neither, on the other hand,
can it for a moment be urged—especially when his own character and
the careers of the other parties to the
incident are taken into account—that
there was any legal or moral justification for his act. Yet he will escape.
Xot because his relatives are spending
a million of money, and not because
he poses as the injured husband, but
because an indefinable and inexplicable but at the same time irresistible
force impels public opinion to the
conclusion that in some way or other
his -execution would violate the principles upon which all human conduct
must be judged, and which in thc last
issue are classified under the elusive
but convincing title of poetic justice.
stationery to study fable of dog dropping substance to snatch shadow.
* #   *
Victoria Young Liberals Club has
invited star actors, Macdonald and
Mclnnis, to appear Watson's Theatre
April ist in Shakespeare's "Comedy
of Errors."
* *   *
Currently believed J. A. Macdonald
discovered   Cayenne   Island on  Feb.
2nd.
* *   *
Manifesto issued by Editor Colonist
excluding all correspondence on subjects of public interest. Free and unfettered expression of opinion sought
on all other matters including history New Brunswick, Psychology and
Theosophy.
* *   *
Empress Hotel expected ready for
opening in spring of 1908. New architect rushing work to completion.
Great Marine drive to be constructed from Oak Bay to Cadboro Bay,
will touch shore at several points.
* *   *
Public opinion at Coast a unit in
favor excluding fossils from Cabinet.
Anti-diluvian  specimens  not  desired.
Experts declare J. J. Hill has abandoned Hope Mountain route to Coast
to build down Skagit to Seattle. Ask
Hogeland.
* *   *
Zealous Liberal leader defeated on
Feb. 2nd. canvassing to secure nomination of an ex-Conservative leader
who recently boxed compass by occupying seat on platform at Conservative nomination convention and
public meeting of Liberals same evening. Local opinion declares that
fatal to nominee's chances even if vacancy occurred in Victoria—but it will
not.
tf
BY WIRELESS RFOM THE
COAST.
Currently reported nt Victoria that
editor Colonist with aid of his staff
was able to understand meaning of
"The Week" cartoon which depicted
Mr. McBride as future Premier of
Canada. Incredible as it may appear
within short space of three days, he
trotted out the idea as one of his
own. ln B. C. there is no penalty for
kleptomania even when chronic.
* *   *
Stern fate decrees continued decoration of legislative assembly by gargoyle    but    enforced    exclusion    of
parrot.
* *    *
Great merriment on Main land at
vagary of Colonist and Times anent
Seymour Narrows Bridge notion considered perfectly harmless if infantile.
Rumored tbat Stiggins and Bunn
are taking daily mud baths on James
Bay Flats preparatory sessional campaign.
* *   *
In recent interview W. W. B. Mclnnis intimated intention commence
practise jaw in Vancouver; Smith
Curtis probable member of firm.
* *   *
G. T. P. demanding $500 bonas
from barber commencing business
Prince Rupert, what price pea-nut
stands?
* *    *
Reported in Vancouver tbat the two
Macs always cross street and walk
on oilier side when passing gramophone store.
* *    *
Judge Henderson just purchased
copy   Aesops'   fables   at   Thomson's
The Scarlet Mysteries.
The above English Company of
artists who are visiting Canadian
shores for the first time prior to
their trip to Australia and New Zealand, and are to introduce themselves
to audiences here at the Victoria
Theatre, two night, commencing Feb.
20th, is certanly somewhat of a mystifying character, and the various
comments upon their peculiar title arc
invariably followed by such enquiries:
"Is it a Musical Comedy?" "Is it a
Concert Party?" "Is it a Melodrama?" "Is it a Burlesque?" "Arc
they Conjurors?" "What are they?"
That is the mystery. This excellent
company secured an immense success
in London and we may explain that
this celebrated musical combination
consists of two tenors, a baritone, a
bass, two very funny and first class
comedians, a lightning art-humorist
and a pitnist, who for some years
have been delighting English audiences by providing a very bright, romantic, musical and artistic entertainment, full of fun and genuine
humor and sentiment, but at the same
time quite free from vulgarity. Thc
company hold high positions both socially and in the musical world, and
in support of this it may be mentioned that they have been individually associated with thc Patti, Mel-
ba, Clara-Butt and Harrison Tours,
appeared at the Queen's Hall Symphony and Philharmonic Concerts,
performed at Covent Garden Opera,
played in the chief musical comedies,
fulfilled "star" engagements at thc
best London theatres of varieties,
given recitals at thc Sucen's and St.
James Halls, and appeared by command before His Majesty the King.
This entertainment should draw
bumper houses during their engagements in this city, as it is one of the
greatest musical and comedy treats
that ever appeared in the Victoria
Theatre.
A CASTLE  IN SPAIN.
T know a eastle in the Heart of Spain.
Bullded of stone, as if to stand for aye.
With tlle roof, red against tlie azure
sky,—
For skies are hluest in the Heart of
Spain.
So fair a eastle men build not again;
'Neath Us broad arches, in Its courtyard fair,
And through its cloisters—open everywhere—
T wander as I will, in sun or rain.
Its Inmost secrets unto me are known,
For mine the eastle is.    Nor nihio alone:
'Tis thine, dear heart, to have and hold
ahvny.
'Tis all the world's, likewise, as mine
and thine;
For whoso passes through Its gates shall
say,
"1 dwelt within this enstle: It is mine!"
DAVID STARR JORDAN.
^
DIAMONDS DEARER.
New York, Feb. 7.—A general advance in the price of diamonds was
announced yesterday in cable messages received by importers who buy
the stones in the rough from the London syndicate. All grades of stones
raised about 5 per cent.
In spite of the above—official rise—in the price of Diamonds,
we will still maintain our old prices on all Diamonds and Diamond
Jewelry from our stock purchased by us before 1907. We would
remind our customers these prices were already lower than the
market prices, and anyone meditating a purchase of Diamond
Jewelry should take advantage of this offer, which is liable to be
cancelled shortly.
Our Mail Order Department attends to country orders with
the utmost promptitude. Wedding presents and other gifts are
specially catered for, our extensive and varied stock giving unique
opportunities for selecting the very latest novelties at lower
prices than can be obtained elsewhere.
^:
CHALLONER & MITCHELL
Jewelers and Opticians,
47-49 Government Street, Victoria, B. C.
J
"CHALET"
SWEET, VANILLA
FLAVORED
BISCUITS
Are just the thing for afternoon
tea, bridge parties, or dessert;
they are also excellent for that
tasty little snack after the
theatre.   They are made by
Huntley & Palmers
Your Grocer Sells Them.
SOLD EVERYWHERE
BLACKWELL'S
MARMALADE
Now is thc time to purchase one of the celebrated Brantford
Buggies, Democrat Wagons or Carts. We have a full and complete
line of these beautiful rigs with both steel and rubber tires. The
materials used in them and the workmanship, are the very best to
be obtained. Hundreds who have bought them will testify to their
easy-riding  and   lasting   qualities.
Call and examine them at our Show Rooms in Victoria or
Vancouver,  or  write   for  Catalogues and prices.
e. g. prior & ee., ltd.
Victoria,   Vancouver,   Kamloops  and   Vernon Tilti WEEK, SATURDAY FEBRUARY 16 1907.
CITY
HAS COMB TO STAY!
THE " SPOKANE" OF NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The  point that  is   DESTINED  to  be  the HUB from which must RADIATE the
RAILWAYS that will soon develop one of Canada's richest districts.
IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR A CHANCE TO GET IN ON THE GROUND FLOOR OF A GOOD PROPOSITION, STUDY THE MAP ON
THIS PAGE AND MARK THE POSITION OF BULKLEY CITY AS THE CENTRE OF THE THREE GREAT VALLEYS OF TH BULK-
LEY, KISPIOX AND SKEENA RIVERS.   THIS IS YOUR CHANCE TO INVEST A SMALL AMOUNT OF MONEY WITH AN EXCELLENT
PROSPECT OF BIG RETURNS AT AN EARLY DATE.
Buy
Bulkley
City
Lots
and
Them
Now.
buy
Don't
Miss
This
Chance.
The
Future
Rail=
road
Center
of the
Great
North'n
Interior
The i*lap here given shows the location of the Grand Trunk Pacific exactly as it appears in the Company's own
map accompanying it'*, prospectus.
WHILE THE GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC'S MAP SHOWS SEVERAL ALTERNATE ROUTES ACROSS THE ROCKIES IT SHOWS
ONLY THE ONE DOWN THE BULKLEY VALLEY AND BY THE JUNCTION OF THE SKEENA AND BULKLEY RIVERS TO THE COAST.
AND FOR A VERY GOOD REASON, WHICH IS THAT THE JUNCTION OF THESE RIVERS IS THE NATURAL DISTRIBUTING POINT
FOR THE THREE GREAT VALLEYS OF THE NORTH, WITH THEIR GREAT AGRICULTURAL AND MINERAL WEALTH, AND FOR
THE PLACER FIELDS OF OMINECA. THE BULKLEY CITY SYNDICATE SENT A SURVEYOR NORTH LAST SUMMER TO LOCATE
THE BEST SITE FOR THE FUTURE CITY THAT MUST COME INTO BEING AT THIS POINT, AND BULKLEY CITY IS THE CHOSEN
SPOT. VANOOUVER MEN WERE THE FIRST ON THE GROUND, AND TO VANCOUVER PEOPLE IS BEING OFFERED THE FIRST
OPPORTUNITY TO BUY BULKLEY CITY LOTS.
Bulkley City Lots are Now For Sale at Prices Varying from $40 to $125,
According to Location and Size.   Terms Half Cash, Balance Easy.
WRITE AT ONCE AND GET FURTHER PARTICULARS, MAPS AND PROSPECTUS.
BULKLEY CITY SYNDICATE
VANCOUVER
NORMAN NORCROSS, General Agent 606 Hastings Street, West 10
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1907
Diplomatic.
Applicant—I have called to ask you,
madam, to use your influence on my
behalf. I am an applicant for a position in your husband's private oflice,
but I have one dangerous rival.    He
. seems to prefer—
Cause Sufficient. Madam    (illtemlplillg)_rm s0,*ry,
"What made Scribblers book take g.      ^   j  neyer  interfere   with  my
the  public  favor   at   a  bound?    Its hngbind,s buglnegSi
going into the hundred thousands. Applicant-lf I were as pretty as
"It's  all  owing to  a  mistake of a ^  .$  j might_
printer" Madam—She?
"How was that?" Applicant—Yes,  madam,  my  com-
"The  reviewer  said  thc  book was pet!tor is a most bewitching girl
'immortal,"   and   the   printer  omitted Madam_just   ca!|    tomorrow,   sir,
the 't?—Lippincott's. anil T wilJ havc the position for VOu.
—Smiles.
In The Coming Days. 	
Husband—Maria,   this  is  going  to Modern Proverbs,
be  a  closely  contested  election,  and Whcn lho cat js away ,he night is
we've got to get everybody out. You'll (|lliet
havc to hurry or you'll he too late." It ;s never too ]ate t0 |ove or g0
Wife—Gracious, John! I can't vote |10me
today.    There's no use talking about A   friend   in   nectl   is a   frien(1   t0
it.    I   haven't   a   thing   that's   fit   to stccr s-     of
wear to the polls.—Chicago Tribune. It>s a wisc son wn0 i<llow3   when
to ask his father for money.—Weekly
The   high    collar   produces  head-  Xelegraph.
aches, says an English doctor.   Usu- 	
ally the wearer of a preposterously „when ;u.c yQU goi|lg t(j f|x t,]at
high collar has nothing inside his f..ont ^^ Hiram?.* said the far.
head to ache.—Mexican Herald. mcv^ wife
"Oh, next week, when Silas comes
Proof  of  Integrity. ,]0me frQm co]lege „
Jones-I'm  sure  that  Wilson  is  a „Bn(. w]]at wi„ thc boy knQW about
very honest man. fixjng a fencej Hiram?»
Brown-How do you know that? „He Qught tQ ,.now a lieap_    He
Jones-Beeausc  he  always   carries wrotc me {hat ^ been ta,dng fcnc.
such    a    very     shabby    umbrella.- ing lcsso|ls  f(J.   a montb|»_Yonkers
Weekly Telegraph. Statesman.
Chinese- made bkirts fi!>Overalls
MUST GO!
The Usual Way.
"Does your father keep an automobile?"
"No, hc doesn't keep it; hc merely borrows it from thc repair shop
when it happens to bc in running
order."
"Do you think the flying machine
will soon be in active operation?"
"I hope not," answered the sardonic statesman. "The Interstate
Commerce Commission is having all
the trouble it can handle with the
railways."—Washington Star.
In Doubt.
"You arc quite sure her father likes      Tr«sty Henchman—Are you going
-,.*>» to  run  for  alderman  again  at   next
"Well,  I  wouldn't want to be too election?
sure about it. but he said he'd like Political Leader-Run for it?   Not
to know me belter, and then hc asked °" your life.    I'm going to sit for it
me to come a little closer." You'11 sco nl3' Picture in 20>000 Places
"Did vou"" *n   t'1's    'own   when    the    campaign
•'Well no, I think he was holding opens.—Chicago Tribune,
something that   looked   like   a  cane
behind   his   back."—Cleveland   Plain Old Lcstorich, an uncomplimentary
Dealer. husband, said to his wife:
. . "If nature had made me an ostrich,
True Chivalry. perhaps I could eat your cooking."
Elderly Lady (to workman who had "That would bc fine," answered his
given her his seat in the street car)— imperturable   wife.     "Then   I   could
"O, thank you very much," get some plumes for my hat."
Workman—"0, that's nothing at all,  .
miss.    Many men only get up when "Cooks  are awfully expensive lux-
the lady is pretty, but it never make, uries," said  Mrs.  Howe.
any difference to me."—Die Muskete. "All-fired,"  said  Mr.   Howe, as  he
  emerged    from    the    kitchen    after
Doubly Sold. dismissing    the    twenty-third.—Har-
Thc  newly  appointed  master at a ^^ Weekly.
school in Wigan had learned all about 	
"cribbing" and such little dodges as
schoolboys practice, and had not forgotten them.
One dav during a lesson in history.   ... ,. . ,    .
, .  , . -i.i      lullv  well   preserved  mv  complexion
he  observed   one   ol   his   pupils  take   , *
out his watch  every minute or two.    " ,-,,,,,.
Miss Knox—I reliably lies an agent
Miss Vane—1 don't kuow that man
very well, but I understand that he's
been   telling  everyone   how  wonder- I
BIGTH'SRN BRAND
BUTTING AHEAD.
UNION-MADE.
t?
lie grew  suspicious.
Finally he    strode    slowly between
the desks, and stopped iu front of the
for  it.—Philadelphia  Press.
i.,.y
"Here." said Casey, about to order
I,, ;  : ,     , .   v.o-.i   v.7? !"  I,,   e,.,,,.   his   lunch  in   tlle  resiaurant  one   Friday, "slime, here's a thing that's always puzzled mc."
mantled,
"Yes. sir," was the meek reply
The master opened the front of the
"What  is  it, man?" asked Cassidy.
ease    lie looked somewhat   sheepish "Is turtle soup fish whin it's made
when he read the single word. "Sold!" out o' veal. 1 dimno?"-Catholic Stall-
But he was a shrewd man.   He was dard and Times,
not to be thrown off the    scent    so
easily. Wigg   (at  a   concert)—-Don't  you
He  opened  the  back  of the   ease, think  the  orchestra  would  be better
Then he  was  satisfied  for    he    read, if   there   were   fewer   horns?
"Sold again!"—Smith's Weekly. Wagg —Certainly;     fewer    grccn-
  horns.—Boston Transcript!
Knew Both Well. 	
Simmons—John   on   wants  to  bor- Lady—"Of course you don't really
row   sonic   money   off   me.    Do    you think me very young?"
know anything about him? Ile-"1   do.   indeed!     If  I  were  a
McCoy--I   know  him as well as  I railway official I should let you travel
know you,    I  wouldn't let him havc on a child's ticket."—Figaro.
a penny.—Smith's Weekly. 	
Singleton—What have you in that Rich    Merchant—"See   here,   Herr
package, old man? .Architect, you told me you would put
Weddcrly—An ash receiver.    It's a a  ballroom  in  my  new  villa  for joo
present   for my wil?. people.    Now.  what  sort  of'a  room
Singleton—What!   You don't mean is  this?   Only  thirty  people  at  the
to tell me she smokes cigarettes? most   could  turn  round  in  it."
Weddcrly—Oh. no; but il" she   ha* Architect-  "Don't    excite   yourself,
an ash receiver for me to put my cigar In  l'ii-  room  500 people could dance
ashes in it  will  save her lhe trouble quite comfortably—of course, not at
of sweeping them up.    See?—Chicago the   same   lime."    Wiener  Salonwitz-
Xcws. Matt.
WHEN YOU HAVE THAT
"BLUE FEELING"   DROP
IN AT THE
QARRICK'S HEAD
BASTION STREET,
Nuff Sed !
SIM & JACK, Proprietors
VICTORIA, B. C.
Go to
FRASER'S
Drug Store
and see the latest
Perfumes
Phone 542
30=32 Government St.
VICTORIA.
NOTICE is hereliy given that, 30 days
after date, 1 intend tu apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for aspecial license to cut and carry
away timber from the following de-
crlbed lands:
1. Commencing at a post on tlio E.
side of Cascade Creek, Uchucklesit Harbour, and about ID chains N. ot the. N.
boundary of Green's application for timber license; thenee 40 chains 8.; thence
40 E.; thence 160 N.; thence 40 W.;
thence S. to point of commencement.
E. D. LEVERSON.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Jan. 14, 11107.
2. Commencing at S. E. corner at a
post adjoining No. 1; thenee 40 chains
W.I thenee 40 N.; thenee 10 W.; thence
00 N; thenco SO E.; thence 100 S. to
point ot commencement.
E.   I J.   LEVERSON.
\V. II. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayo(|iiot District, Jan. II. 1907,    JaUO
XOTICE Is hereby given that, CO dnys
nfter date. 1 luteal to apply to the
linn. Chief Commissioner of Lands nnd
Winks for permission lo purchnse Section 33, Township S, Range 5, Coast
District.  Bulkley Valley.
S.  S.  ROGERS,  Locator.
Vancouver, B. C. Jan. 7, 1907.
Jan. 12,
NOTICE is hereby given that, (10 days
nfter date. I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase Section 2, Township 7. Range 5, Coast
District, Bulkley Vnlley.
(!. A. ROGERS, Locator.
Vancouver, B. C, Jan. 7, 11107.
Jan. II.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, thirty
days after dale. 1 Intend to apply to the
Hen. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated in Rupert Disirlet. Vancouver Island: Commencing
at a post situated at tbe south-east
tbence west SO chains; tbence north SO
chains; thence east SO chains; thence
soulh SO chains.
Jan. 5. M.  A. MACDONALD.
mt
Wine Facts
1838
Dry Imperial
'Mm. a CHAND0?.
t.u-«4...i-*-, J
ht.cJ(jlrii4i.ili'*- Jfc
9
From thc sworn tabulated
statement of champagne imports for the year 1906 one
fact stands out clear and distinct; it is the UNDENIABLE FACT that—twice as
much—G. H. Mumm & Co.'s
champagne is consumed as
any other brand, and out
of some fifteen recognized
brands — one-third—of the
whole quantity consumed is
from the house of G. II.
Mumm & Co.
No other wine in thc world
can show such strong proof
of its superlative quality and
popular appreciation.
When banquets, public
functions and connoisseurs'
tastes are taken into consideration, the indorsement is
still stronger, as practically
no other champagne but G.
II.  Mumm  &  Co.'s  is  used.
Wholesale Agents
PITHER & LEISER
Vates Street,
VICTORIA
Water Street.
VANCOUVER
V
NOTICE Is hereby given that, thirty
days after date. 1 Intend to apply In
Ihe Hon. Chief Commissioner nf Lands
nnd Works for a special lleens,' to cut
nnd carry away timber from tlie following described lands, situated in Rupert lllstrlct. Vancouver Island:
.1. Commencing nl a pnst placed al
Ihe south-pnst corner of Section 22.
Township 27: thenee north SO chains;
Ihence wesl SO ehnlns: thence south SO
chain"-! thence east SO chain"*. ■
Jan. 6. A. B. EATON.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands:
1. Commencing at tlie lower N. E.
corner, at a post situate about (10 chains
S. E. from Ritherton Creek and about
2% miles from its outlet into San Mateo
Bay, Barclay District; thenee 40 chains
N.; Ihence 100 W.; tbence SO Sd thenee
60 E.; thenee 40 N; thenee 40 E. to
point of commencement.
E. D.  LEVERSON.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Jan. 11. 1907.
2. Commencing at S. W. comer post
adjoining N. E. post I; thenee 40 cbalns
N.i Uieuce 160 chains E.; thence 40 S.;
thenee  100 W.  to point of commence-
ment' 13. D,  LEVERSON,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Barclay District, Jan. 11, 1907.
3. Commencing at N. E. corner post
adjoining N. E. No. 1; thenee 40 chains
W.'; thenee 1C0 S.; thence 40 E.; thenee
1C0 N. to point of commencement.
E,  D. LEVERSON,
W, B. GARRARD, Agent.
Barclay District, Jan. 11, 1907.
■I.  Commencing at the N. W. corner
post adjoining N.  E.  No.   1;  thence  1C0
chains S.;  Ihence 40 E.;  thenee  11)0 N.;
thence 40 W. to point of commencement.
E. D.  LEVERSON.
W. B. GARRARD. Agent.
Barclay District, Jan. 11, 1907.
5, Commencing at the lower N. W.
comer post situate on or about the E.
boundary of No. I and about 40 chains
S. of the N. E. comer of No. 4; thence
40 chains N.; thenee SO E.; thenee 120
S.; thence 40 W.; thenee SO N.; thenee
40 W. to point of commencement.
Barclay District, January, 1907.
E.   D.   LEVERSON.
W. 13. GARRARD, Agent.
C. Commencing at the N. W.
comer post, adjoining tho lower N. W.
curlier post of No. ii; thenee ICO chains
Si; thence 40 E.: thenee 1C0 N.; thence
40 W. to point of commencement.
E. D.  LEVERSON.
Ahead In
Service.
We are ahead of all competitors
our service to customers.   Ask anj
body   who   knows   and   then   co
and   experience  what  we  mean
our   drug   store   service.   We havj
the   pleasantest   store   in   town
trade  in.
" Make us prove it."
CYRUS H. B0WE.
CHEHIST
g8 Government St. Near Yatel
VICTORIA.
Jan.26.
W. B. GARRARD. Agent.
W.B.Smith
^KflerfqlUr
35 YATE5 5.
PHONE,    892 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1907
11
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
ifter date, I intend to apply to tlie Hon.
Jhief Commissioner of Lands and Works
or a special license to cut and carry
way timber from the following de-
cribed lands: Commencing at a post
ilanted about 100 yards from title-water
n Waddington Channel, about one-half
:iile north of Pendrili Sound, on east
ide of Redonda Island, New westrriin-
ter District, and running east 20
hains; thence south SO chains; thence
■est SO chains; Ihence north SO chains;
hence east 60 chains to place of cran-
lencement.
Dated Jan. 1!), 1S07.
MAX J. CAMERON.
JAS. BROWN, J. T. JENKINS,
Feb. It. Agents.
NOTICE is hereby given that, GO days
Iter date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Iliief Commissioner of Lands and Works
or permission to purchase the following described land, situated on Graham
island, commencing at a post planted
t tlio southwest corner of Lot S, Mas-
et Inlet, Graham Island, marked "W.
1. Green's N. AV. corner"; thence riming east 40 chains; soutli SO chains;
ast 20 chains, more or less, to shore;
lence following shore northerly back
) point of commencement, containing
00 acres, more or less.
W. E. GREEN.
J. GRAHAM, Loeator.
Located Jan. 3, 1007. Feb.!)
NOTICE is hereby given that, 00 days
'ter date, 1 intend lo apply to the Hon.
lief Commissioner of Lands and Works
>r permission  to  purchase  tlie follow-
described land, situated in Masset
ilet, Graham Island, commencing at a
ist [ilanted on the east bank of Anon
ver, near mouth. Shannon Bay, and
irked  "Charles  Graham's  S.  W.   cor-
. thence east 40 chains to shore;
ence following shore northeasterly 40
ains; thence 40 chains along shore
rtherly; thence southerly, following
ore to place of commencement, con-
ining 300 acres, more or less.
CHARLES GRAHAM.
Staked Feb. D, 11)07. Feb. 9
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
.er date, I intend to apply'to the Hon.
ief Commissioner of Lands and Works
• a. license to prospect for coal and
troleuin on the following lands, situ-
•d on Queen Charlotte Islands:
SO. 1.    Commencing at a post planted
tho east line of Lot C, about six miles
•t from Masset Inlet, Graham Island,
ng the S. W. corner; thence N. SO
tins; E.  SO chains;  S.  SO chains;  W.
Chains to place of commencement.
WM.  SHANNON.
S. R. MacCLlNTON, Agent.
\'ii. 2. Commencing at a post planted
the east line ol' Lot G, about six miles
from Masset Inlet, Graham Island,
ng the N. W. comer; thenee S. 80
tins; E. 80 chains; N. SO chains; AV.
chains to place of commencement.
E. J. SHANNON.
S. R. MacCLlNTON, Agent.
\o. 3. Commencing at a post planted
the N. E. corner of Wm. Shannons
cation No. 3, about seven miles E.
m Masset Inlet, Graham Island, being
i S. W. corner; tiience N. SO chains;
SO chains; S. SO ohains; W. SO chains
place of eommeneement.
GEO. MARTIN.
S. R. MacCLlNTON, Agent.
so. I. Commencing at a post planted
the N. E. corner of Wm. Shannon's
cation No. 1, being the N. AV. corner;
nee S. 80 chains; E. SO chains; N. SO
lins; AV. SO chains to place of eom-
ncement.
I. M. MARTIN.
S. R. MacCLlNTON, Agent.
'O. 5. Commencing at a post planted
the S. E. corner of Geo. Martin's
lation No. 3, about eight miles E.
m Masset Inlet, Graham Island, be-
tho S. W. corner; thenco N. SO
ins; E. SO chains; S. SO chains; W. SO
Ins to place of commencement.
S.  R.  MacCLlNTON.
S. R. MacCLlNTON, Agent,
o. 0. Commencing at a post planted
the S. AV. corner of S. R. MacClin-
s Location No. a, about eight miles
from Masset Inlet, Graham Island,
ig the N. AV. corner; thence S. SO
ins; E. SO chains; N. SO chains; W.
/.hains to place of commencement.
F.  MacCLlNTON.
S. R. MacCLlNTON, Agent.
o. 7. Commencing' at a post planted
the S. E. corner of S. R. MacClin-
Location No. 5. about nine miles
[from Masset Inlet, Graham island,
g the S. W. corner; thenee N. SO
ns; E. SO chains; S. SO chains; W.
hains to place of commencement.
A.  S.  SUTHERLAND.
S. R. MacCLlNTON, Agent.
0. S. Commencing at a post planted
' he S. E.  corner of S.  R.  MacCHn-
Location No. 5, about nine miles
from Masset Inlet, Graham Island,
g the N. AV. corner; thence S. 80
ns; E. SO cluiins; N. SO chains; AV.
hains to place of commencement.
IC. SUTHERLAND,
S. R. MacCLlNTON, Ageut,
1. !). Commencing at a post planted
be S, E. corner of A. F. Sutherland's
ition No. 7. about 10 miles E. from
(set Inlet, Graham Island, being the
' corner; tiience N. SO ohains; E. 80
is;  S.  SO  chains;   W.  SO  chains  to
|e of eommeneement,
AV. E, GREEN,
S. R. MacCLlNTON, Ageut.
10. Commencing at a post planted
lhe S. E. corner of A. F, Sutherland's
■ition No. 7. about 10 miles E. from
■set Inlet, Graham Island, being the
lv. corner; tiience S. 80 chains; E.
limine; N. SO chains; AV. SO chains
ce of commencement.
M.   GREEN.
S. R. MacCLlNTON, Agent.
|i. II.  Commencing at a post planted
N.   E.   corner  of AV.  E.   Green's
|.tion No. 1). about  11 miles K. from
let Inlet, Graham Island, being the
corner;   thence  N.   SO  chains;   E.
iiains; S. SO cluiins; AV. SO chains to
of commencement.
CHARLES GRAHAM.
S. R. .MacCLlNTON, Agent.
12.  Commencing at a post planted
lhe N.  E.  corner  of AV.  E.   Green's
laion No. 1). about 11 miles E. from
jet Inlet. Graham Island, being the
corner;   theuce S.  SO  chains;  E.
■hains;  N.   SO  chains;  AV.   SO  chains
lace of commencement.
M.  POWELL.
10.        S. R. .MacCLlNTON. Agent.
Point Grey
Lands.
Some Choice   Blocks on  4th
and 6th Avenue at
$1,500 to $1,700
an acre.
BURNETT, SON  &  CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,   B. C.
Tel.   1373,
C. S. BAKER
Assayer,
Chemist
and Ore Shippers' Agent.
GRAND FORKS, B. C.
ASSAY CHARGES.
Iron   1.50
Gold    $1.00
Silver   1.00
Copper ....'  1,25
Lead   1.25
Zinc   a.00
Gold and Silver  1.50
Gold and Copper  2.00
Gold, Silver and Copper  2.50
Gold, Silver and Lead  a.50
Other metals on application.
A discount allowed to regular customerj.
We Will
Buy
all or any part 5,000
DIAMOND VALE at 30c per share.
If you will sell at this figure please
make your offerings by wire nt our
expense.
B.B. MIGHTON & CO.
Mining and Investment Brokers.
Drawer 1082. Nelson, B. C.
Nelson Iron Works
Machinery of all kinds built,
erected nnd repaired.
Complete Mining Plants
Cammell Laird Steel, Etc.
K*. W. Hinton      NelSOfl,  B.C.
3TICE is hereby given that thirty
[after date I intend to apply to the
Commissioner    of   Lands    and
|<s for permission to cut and carry
timber   from  the following   deed lands, situated on the east bank
iMarmon    River,    Graham   Island;
Imencing at a post marked "G. A.
[No. 2  Claim;"  thence  south   160
ps;   thence  east 40 chains;  thence
160 chains; thence west 40 chains
[jirit of commencement.
GEO. A. BIGELOW.
Icember 8.
WANTED
TIMBER
LANDS
1 have connections with Eastern
capitalist? wanting timber lands, sawmills and logging outfits. I would
like to meet cruisers or others having
these properties for sale.
The Pacific Coast
Realty Co., Ltd.
Have an exclusivelistof specially selected ACRKAGK, ESTATK and FARM
PHOPKR-TIKS for sale at prices which
will attract purchasers.
NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY
Victoria Property is the safest and best
investment to be found iu Real Estate on
tlie Pacific Coast.   Tliere will be a
50 PER CENT. INCREASE
IN VALUES IN 1907,
Vou cannot make a mistake iu buying
Business,
Residence, or
Acreage
Property.
"Write or call on us for particulars.   "We
can show vou how to make monev.
The Pacific Coast
Realty Co., Ltd.
12 MacQregor Bl'k, Victoria, B.C.
(Opposite Uiiard Hotel)
IDEAL
CLIMATE
SOIL
and
LOCATION
FOR FRUIT
Plots,
That is what I can offer orchardists
on the shores of beautiful Kootenay
Lake.    Write for literature and maps
J. E   ANNABLE,
The Land Man,
NELSON, B. C.
FRUIT
LANDSJ
On Kootenay Lake and West Arm.
Lake   and   River   frontage.     We
have  large   and  small   traets   of
good land anl prices to suit all.   j
Also    several    partly    improved ▼
ranches.   Full particulars willing
ly given.
H. E. CROASDAILE &  CO.
Nelson, B. C.
BOND SIGN  CO.
VANCOUVER
Signs
The Phoenix
Land    Trust   and    Investment
Association
OFFER
For fourteen days only, after which
the price will be raised, well built 10-
room house, stone foundation, on Dallas road, facing sea, fitted with all
modern conveniences; very handsomely decorated; large garden, well laid
out and planted; very healthy situation; magnificent view.   $6,500.
For further particulars write to or
call on
The PIKENIX LAND,
TRUST and INVEST=
MENT ASSOCIATION
Rooms 11 and 9, Macgregor Block
VICTORIA, B. C
ELECTRIC
BOARD
METAL
BULLETIN
GLASS
COTTON
SHOW CARD
In up-to-date styles.   Estimates anil
designs furnished.
******************** **>),  ***
! '   REAL      j
i    ESTATE
F RE, LIFE and ACCIDENT
INSURANCE.
E. R. CHANDLER
if
Room 8, Jones Building,           ] X, ... ,   .   ,,    , ., .      .   .
J                                 1 Victoria Real Estate todnv is the
407 Hastings Street, Vancouver, B. £. I* best investment in the Province,
* Prices advancing rapidly.   I ad-
 ^ _ $
vise immediate investment.
Consult mo,
VICTORIA!!      J S* Murray
A corner lot on Wharf street, j
*
*
46 FORT STREET I
VICTORIA,   B. C. I
P, O. BOX  77 I'HONK   12711   %
adjacent to the Postoffice.
-'ct- j *************************$
M.J.HENRY'S
NURSERIES
and SEEDHOUSES
VANCOUVER,   B.   C.
NOW OPENED.
York & Mitchell's
Realty and
Investment Agency.
We arc offering a first class investment in Bulkley Cily Lots.
Send for prospectus, maps and information regarding the "Spokane"
of the northern interior of British
Columbia.
York & Mitchell
Reai Estate Brokers
606  Hastings  St.  W.,  Vancouver.
WRITE FOR
=1907=
CATALOGUE
if
M.   J    HENRY
8010 Wkstminstku Hoad
VANCOUVER,    B.   C.
The B. C. Assay &
Chemical Supply
Company, Ltd.
Importers and  Dealors in
Assayers' and
Chemists' Supplies
513 Pender St.
VANCOUVER,   B.   C
For price and terms apply tol
A. 0. P. Francis & Co
Real Estate and Investment Brokers.
510 Pender Street
VANCOUVER, B. C.
YM1U i« 11 ilirivini* mini np
town. siiuiitiMi 18 mill's
Bonth of Nelson in thp rich
mineral ilislrk'l <>( Won Kod-
tcnay it is cssintinlly 11
jree-mllllngcanni, mid tliere
are six stsinp-millsoperating
in the vlclilitv one of thorn
(the Ymir) liehn* the liir^csi
in Canada, iviih its80s'nmps
eonsianily dropping. There
are numerous mines in aetlve
operation In the cnmp, and
reliable Information is always available In Ymir.
Waldorf Hotel
Headquarters for Mining and Commercial Men.
Sample Rooms in Connection.
YMIR, B. 6.
G. S. eOLEMHN,
Proprietor.
YMili enjovsevery facility
fur minim; operations,
11mber and Water are (.bund-
nnt, Hip road* and trails nre
in good condition In the
main, nnd new ones are being opened up. 'there lit direct rnilwny communication
wilh three smelt-nrs, nil within fifty miles of ilic town.
The climate .*• congenial nnd
ever.' ncccasft-y nnd luxury
u( life can b- seen ed In the
ciiiii 1»and at pr.cofl that com-
pare fiivoiirnhly with those
of any other district. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY i6, 1907.
Notes on
Provincial News
Bringing Coals to Newcastle.
Just how great the dearth of coal
is on the Pacific Coast may be gathered from thc fact that British Columbia has already commenced the
importation of Japanese coal and
coke on an extensive scale. A few
years ago such a thing would have
appeared ridiculous. Indeed, one of
the chief factors in inducing capital
to come in for the development of
our own mines was thc growing importance of the Japanese market; but
so utterly have British Columbia producers failed to keep abreast of the
demand that already thc tables are
turned and the men of greater energy
are selling their product under our
very noses. The Tyee Smelter has
concluded a contract for 1,800 tons
of Japanese coke per month for a
a year on condition that the sample
cargo is satisfactory. Only those
who know from experience the persistence and intelligence of the little
brown men will realize how difficult
it will be to drive them out of our
markets when once they have secured
a footing. Of course it can be done
by legislation, but that would only
mean increasing thc cost of smelting and to that extent limiting the
production of ore. These facts should
be well weighed. They should stimulate owners of coal areas to de-
velope them. They should also encourage capital. They may have a
third effect in forcing Government
operation if private owners dissipate
their energies in speculation instead
of getting down to business.
accept the inevitable, a decision on
which the editor is to be congratulated. There is no reason why the
daily papers of British Columbia
should be allowed to establish a law
for themselves at variance with that
which has been decreed for the rest
of the Dominion, and on the first of
March they will all have to line up
in strict observance. The following
editorial utterance of the News may
be regarded as a not ungraceful capitulation:
In connection wilh this discussion
of the Lord's Day Act, it is opportune to make reference to a feature
of the law which directly affects The
Daily News as well as all other daily
papers in the Dominion which publish Sunday issues. If the law is to
be enforced, there can only be three
more Sunday issues of this paper—
those on the tenth, seventeenth and
twenty-fourth of this month; and
there is every reason to suppose that
the law will be enforced. At least,
there is no good reason for supposing that it will not. Arrangements
are already being made for the
change from a Sunday to a Monday
morning issue; and when these arrangements are completed, due notice will be given.
if
A Daniel Come to Judgment.
Nelson University Club is nothing
if not aggressive, and probably the
most aggressive of its members is the
Rev. F. H. Graham. What Mr. Graham does not know about politics,
as well as about theology, is not
worth knowing. This will readily bc
seen if one carefully reads the following extracts from a paper read
last Saturday evening hy the reverend gentleman, to thc members of
the University Club. Mr. Graham
said: "One great fault was the failure of the McBride ministry to take
the people into his confidence and
explain the reasons which lay behind
the resignation of two of its late
members, Messrs. Wilson and Green.
As a remedy for the existing evils
men should cease to be tied to party
allegiance. They should vote as independents. The seat of the whole
disease in the political fabric lay in
the fact that both parties had strayed
away from ethical principles and had
allowed politics-fto become a trade.
On both sides the recent journalistic
campaign was a disgrace and a reproach to those who were responsible for it." Mr. Graham is a man
of too much intelligence to bc able
to read a paper, even of thirty
minutes' duration, without saying
something worth hearing. One must
admit that there is only too much
ground fnr complaint against the
method of conducting electoral campaigns, but when he attacks party
government hc is at least 100 years
behind thc times and has evidently
forgotten that in England as well as
in Canada, until party lines were
adopted, members were impervious
to any kind of control, could not bc
held responsible for matters of policy,
and indulged in personal vagaries
which contributed nothing to the efficiency of their legislative functions.
He is also out of date with his assumption that there is any obligation, legal or moral, for the Premier
to make any fuller explanation as to
the reasons which led to the resignation of Mr. Wilson and Mr. Green.
Those reasons are thoroughly well
known, and that Mr. Graham should
be in ignorance of them can only be
explained upon thc ground that his
theological studies to do leave him
time to read the daily papers.
% MUSIC AND     „
*     THE STAGE $
VICTORIA.
The  Dresses  of the  Ladies in "At
Yale."
The dresses to be seen in the new
college play, "At Yale," to be presented by Paul Gilmore and a large
company at Victoria Theatre on
Tuesday, Feb. 19, are said to be perfections of the modiste's art. Miss
Dorothy Randall, the heroine of the
play, has just returned from an extended trip to Europe and appears
with the latest creations of Paquin
and Worth. Her mother is a leader
in New York society and consequently is robed as befits the wife of
"Millionaire Randall." Polly, the
fiancee of Jack Randall, is in the
same set and has ideas of her own
on the all absorbing topic of dress.
The list of hats alone is a bewildering one. There are hats from London, bonnets from Paris and "creations" from Vienna. As the scenes
call for morning, afternoon and evening clothes, there arc varieties of
every sort for every hour of the day.
Among the morning gowns are
whites and blues and pinks. For the
afternoons there arc laces and muslins, silks and brocades, and for evening a dazzling array of satins and
silks, chiffons and pou de soie, with
any, number of coats and wraps for
the bare shoulders of the fair ones
as they come out of the ballroom of
the  New  Griswold.
BARGAINS
-IN-
Fruit
Lands
ARROW LAKES
Now is the time to buy. We have
large and small tracts of good land
and prices to suit all.
Some snaps in Coast property.
Kincaid & Anderson
Real Estate, Insurance and Financial
Agents
First Street   ::   ::   Revelstoke, B. C.
"Thc Fast Mail," Lincoln J. Carter's greatest play, will be seen at
thc Victoria Theatre on Monday, Feb.
18th. As a scenic production it has
never been equalled, a carload of
scenery, properties, and electrical
effects, are carried by this company.
A train 295 feet long, crosses the
stage at 45 miles an hour; this is the
largest train ever seen on any stage.
The first act shows the beautiful
Southern Mansion in Tennessee; the
second act shows the explosion of
the steamboat on thc Mississippi
River, and the third act is the acme
of stagecraft, when two full-sized locomotives hauling a freight and mail
train pass each other at full speed.
The last act takes place at Niagara
Falls, at night, showing the beautiful waters at their best. A company
far above the average, interprets thc
various characters and specialties are
added at frequent intervals.
Sunday Observance.
Thc Nelson News is again harping on the subject of Sunday observance. Its antagonism to the Lord's
Day Act dies hard, but The Week is
glad to note that in spite of its
truculencc   it   is   finally   prepared   to
Pastor (just coming from church)
—"Hello, Seppl, why arc you looking
so unhappy?"
Seppl—"Because I have just lost 5
crowns at cards."
Pastor—"That's the punishment for
not coming to church."
Seppl—"Yes, but the two winners;
they weren't at church, either."—
Figaro.
Gentlemen's
Spring
Wear
Negligee Shirts, comfortable and dressy, the very
latest London designs.
Oxford and Zephyr Shirts,
full measure in skirts, no
discomfort; a splendid range,
latest London patterns.
N. B.—These shirts are
fitted with both attached and
detachable cuffs.
Soft Hats, for spring wear,
in black, beaver and pearl;
new blocks; new styles.
AT
Sea & Gowen's
THE GENTLEMEN'S
STORE
64 GOVERNMENT ST.
VICTORIA, B. C.
HAVE YOU SEEN THE
BARGAINS THAT ARE
BEING OFFERED AT
Peden* s
Tailoring     Parlors
THEY ARE EXCEPTIONAL VALUES. CALL
AND SEE US.
Victoria Theatre
TUESDAY, FEB. 19TH
Jules Murray Presents
Paul Gilmore
The Best of all College Plays at
Yale.
SPECIAL FEATURES.
The Real Boat shrdlu hsrdlu shrdlu s
The real boat race between a
YALE AND HARVARD CREW
YALE GLEE CLUB
Octette of Male Voices.
r-rices—Night, 25c to $1.50.
Established 1867
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
52 Uovernment St., Victoria, B. C.
Charles Hayward, President. F. Caselton, Manager.
We make a specialty of  Undertaking and Embalming.
An experienced certificated staff available at all times, day
and night.
Phones Nos. 48, 305, 404 or 594, Victoria.
The True Test of Merit
Is proved by the constantly increasing demand for
BUCHANAN'S Scotch Whiskies
Due entirely to their purity, old nge and flue flavor.
Ask your wine meichant for Red Seal, at tl per bottle; Black & White,
at $1.25 per bottle; Royal Household at $1.50 per bottle;
Liqueur Scotch, nt $1.75 per bottle.
JAMES BUCHANAN « CO., by Royal Warradt Purveyors to Royal family
LINCOLN xr.C4HJEKS
"$•      -A*C S^P"   ***.       ■*■
largest Train EyerSeei
• on Any stage •
TRAVELLERS' SAMPLES
—of—
IMPORTED ENGLISH
Waterproofs
AT HALF
PRICE
MAKERS:
C. Mackintosh & Co.
Curries'.
North British Rubber Co.
PRICES:
$6.00 to $12.50.
Sole Agent in British Columbia for
RICHARD ATKINSON & CO.'S
Royal Irish Poplin Ties.
E. Chapman
Davis Chambers.'
VANCOUVER.
P
ftTENTS   and Trade Marks
obtained in all countries.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville St.
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
The
Antiquary's
Books
Remains of the Prehistoric Age
in England, B. C. Windle.... $|
Old Service Books of the
English Church, Christopher
Wordsworth and Henry Little-
hales 	
Celtic Art in Pagan and Christian Times, J. Romily Allen..
Archeology and False Antiquities, Robert Munro 	
English Sclas, J. Harvey Bloom  J
This  series is edited by the wl
known   antiquary,   J.   Charles   Ci|
L. L. D., F. S. A., and each volu
is written by an expert in the selec|
subject.
A special  feature  is  made  of
illustrations,   some  of  which  are|
colors.
Like   everything   worth   while]
books,  to be  had from
THOMSON
STATIONERY CI
325 Hastings St.
VANCOUVER. B. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16 1907.
'3
MONDAY, FEB. 18TH
Lincoln J. Carter's Greatest Success
The Fast Mail
A Car-load of new Scenic Effects.
The Great Steamboat Explosion
The Two Largest Trains Ever Seen
Seen on Any Stage
NIAGAKA FtA^6 AT NIGHT
The Acme of Realism
A Production Unsurpassed in Mag-
tude.
Prices—25c, 50c, 75c.
I TWO    NIGHTS,   COMMENCING
FEB. 20TH AND 21 ST
Scarlet Mysteries
From London, England
This Celebrated Combination of
EIGHT TRTISTS
|Who  are  crossing Canada  en  route
for Australia, will appear as above
Presenting the
.ATEST  LONDON  NOVELTIES
in Refined Musical Comedy
Including
MR. ROLAND HENRY,
Musical   Sketch   Comedian.
(From Daly's Theatre, London)
MR. THOS. WALLS,
Character Artist.
MR. PERCIVAL MACKENZIE,
Lightning Cartoonist.
MR. PENDEREL PRICE,
;Of Queen's Hall and Crystal Palace)
MR. BEN CALVERT,
(Of Royal Carl Rosa Opera Co.)
MR. HENRY LUSCOMBE,
(Of Savoy and Terry's Theatres)
MR. GAVIN WOOD,
(Of Royal Opera House, Covent
Garden)
MR. DAVID NORTON, Pianist
. (Guildhall School of Music)
WEEK FEBRUARY 18
The New Grand
SULLIVAN a CONSIDINE,    Proprietor*.
Management of ROBT. JAMIESON.
COIN'S DOGS
Producing   the   Pantomlnic   Drama
IT HAPPENED IN DOGVILLE.
Direct from tiie Oxford Music Hall,
London, Eng.. where he appeared
last November,
TOM BRANTFORD
Eccentric  Comedian
THE HUMAN BAND
ONETTA,  THE   ARABIAN  QUEEN
In  her Dervish  'Whirlwind  Dances,
Wonderful and Beautiful.
THE OZAVS
Comedy and Burlesque Jugglers
GEO. F. KEANE,  Song Illustrator.
"SMILE  ON ME."
NEW MOVING PICTURES
Prof. M. Nagel's Orchestra.
I NOTICE Is hereby given that, GO days
J'ter date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
liilef Commissioner of Lands and Works
In* a special  license to cut and   carry
Ivay   timber   from   the   following   de-
Tribed  lands:    Commencing at  a post
■1 the north shore of Uchucklesit Har-
Ijur, on tho W. boundary of Lot  Cllll,
liscade Mineral  Claim;  thenee  N.  and
1 along the boundary of Cascade Min-
|al  Claim   to  tho AV.  boundary  of   L.
, thenco N. and E. along L. 7!) to tbe
m Mineral  Claim;  thence N.  and  E.
long the   boundaries   of   Fern, Wasp,
linshine No. 2, Sunshine No. 3 and Sun-
■line No. 4, to the N. E. corner of Sun-
liine No. 4; thenee N. 40 chains; thenee
lest about 1)0 chains to the enst bound-
ly of Winerals'  No.  1 Application for
Imber license;   thence south and west,
ilowing boundaries of said application
tbe shore; tbence easterly along shore
point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
bb. 10 W. B. Garrard, Agent.
'WATER   CLAUSES   CONSOLIDATION
ACT,   1897,"   AND   AMENDMENTS.
Certificate of the Canadian Industrial
Company, Limited, under the Provisions of Section 87 of Part IV. of
the said Act.
INOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
Iter date, I intend to npply to the Hon.
lief Commissioner of Lands and Works
Ir a special license to cut and carry
|-ay timber from the following de-
Iribed land, situated on tho west shore
I Kennedy Island: Beginning at a post
lirked "C. T. N. W. Cor."; thence east
I chains; thence south ICO chains;
lence west to shore line; thence along
le shore to starting post, containing
lo acres, more or less.
■Dated 25th January, 1907.
lb. IC. C. TAKADA.
WHEREAS the Pacific Coast Power
Company, Limited, was on the 24th day
of September, 1904, granted a certificate
under Section 87 of Part IV. of the
aforesaid Act for certain purposes, and
was thereby empowered to carry out
the undertaking in the said certificate
mentioned;   and
Whereas, since the date of the said
certificate, the Canadian Industrial Com-
vany, Limited, hereinafter called "the
Company," authorized and licensed on
the 17th day of March, 1900, to carry
on, in the Province of British Columbia,
the business of a Power Company within the meaning of Part IV. of the aforesaid Act, has acquired a record of 48,-
000 inches of water to be diverted from
Powell Lake, Malaspina Strait, granted
the 10th day of May, 1899, to the Pacific Coast Power Company, Limited;
and
Whereas the Company hsa acquired
certain lands known as Lots 450 and
1.901A, New Westminster District, within whicli the corporate powers of the
Company in respect of Its undertaking
and works are to be exercised; and
Whereas the Company has submitted
its undertaking to the Lieutenant-Governor in Council for approval, and has
filed with the Clerk of the Executive
Council the documents required by Section 85 of the said Act, and a plan showing, so far as may be, the intended situation of the undertaking and works of
the  Power  Company:
This Is to certify that the undertaking
has been apvroved and that the same
is as follows:—■
1. To develop the water whieh the
Company has acquired with as great a
head as shall be practicable and desirable, and to dispose of the power so
developed to other Industries which
may be established in the vicinity of
the proposed site, and especially to
works for the manufacture of pulp and
paper.
2. To erect buildings and a wharf at
some convenient point on the shore of
the Strait of Georgia; to make roads
from the wharf to the different points
of construction; to clear off timber and
to level, where necessary, the land required by the Company; to construct a
dam or dams at convenient points between the head of tlie Falls and Powell
Lake to the height not exceeding 50 feet
above the present river level, and to
raise the level of Powell River and
Powell Lake to a height not exceeding
the height of the crest of the said dam,
and to extend the area thereby of the
said river and lake to draw off the
water so stored; to erect head-gates at
the point of intake; to place a slip in
tlie said dam at least six feet deep from
the crest of the said dam and nine feet
wide, for the transportation of timber,
logs, or lumber; to make such cuttings,
flumes, conduits and tunnels as may be
necessary or advisable to convey the
water from the intake to the most convenient point from which to conduct it
to the turbines; to provide steel pipes
to convey tiie water from the conduit
pipes to and from the turbines; to provide turbines, valves, gearing, shafting,
belting, dynamos, and such other machinery as may be necessary for the purposes of the undertaking of the Company; to construct the necessary trail-
races for the discharge of the water
from   the  turbines.
And this is further to certify that the
amount of tbe capital of the Comvany
which will be duly subscribed before the
Company commences the construction of
its undertaking and works and exercises
the powers conferred by the said Act
is herebv fixed at not less than the sum
of ($60,000) fifty thousand dollars, and
i $50,000) fifty thousand dollars of such
capital shall be subscribed and fifty per
centum thereof actually paid up within
six months from the date liereof; and
the times within which the undertaking
and works are to be commenced and
completed are six months and two and
one-half years, respectively, from the
date hereof.
Dated this 12th day of December, A.D.
1900.
FREDK. .1. FULTON,
Dec. 13     Clerk of the Executive Council.
■NOTICE Is herehy given that 30 days
■im (into we Intend tn make application
lthe Chief Commissioner of Lands and
lories   for  special   license  to   cut  and
1*1*5' away  timber from  the  following
|so'rlbed lands:   Commencing nt a post
rked B. C. C. Co., S. E. post placed on
east side of the Tksslno River, situate
I Ibe head of the Oweekayno Lake, near
Ivors Inlet, thence SO chnins north, 40
ilns west, 80 chains north. 40 chains
,.st, SO chains south, 40 chains east, SO
|:ilns   south,   40  chains   east   to  point
commencement, containing in all G40
Ires.
Jintcd  13th  February.  1907.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
CANNING CO.,  LTD..
Findley, Durham & Brodie. Agents,
lb, ic, B. C. Mess, Manager.
NOTICE is hereby given that .10 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands, situated on "Narrow Gut Inlet," Kyuquot Sound, West
Coast, Vancouver Island":
No. 1. Commencing at a post marked
Roy M. Dawson's N. W. Corner Post,
tbence S. 1C0 chains, thenee E. 40 chains,
tiience N. 1C0 chains, thence following
shore line tn point of commencement,
containing C40 acres, more or less.
No. 2. Commencing nt a post marked
Hoy At. Dawson's N. E. Corner post,
thenee 100 chains S., thence SO chains
W.i thenee CO chains N, thence 40 chains
E., thenee 40 chains N., to place of commencement, containing 040 acres, moro
or less.
No. 3. Commencing nt a post marked
Hoy M. Dawson's N. W. Post, thenee E.
SO chains, thence S. SO chains, thenee W.
SO chains, thence N. SO chains, to placo
of conunencment, containing 040 acres,
more or less.
No. 4. Commencing at a post marked
Hoy M. Dawson's N. E. Corner Post,
thence SO chains S„ thenee 100 chains
\\\, thence 40 chains N„ thenee 40 chains
E„ thence 40 chains N„ and CO chains
to place of conimencmont, containing
C40 aeres, more or less.
No. 5. Commencing at a post marked
Hoy M. Dawson's N. W. Post, thenee 40
chains S„ thence 130 chains E„ thence
to South boundary of No. 4, thenco W.
and S., following S. boundnry or 1 and
C, to place of commencement, containing
G40 acres, more or less.
No. 1. Commencing at a post marked
Roy M. Dawson's N. W. Post, thence 80
chains S., tiience SO chains E., thenee
SO chains N., to shore line, following
shore line to place of commencement,
containing Old acres, more or less, and
situated on Fair Harbour, Kyuquot
.Sound, on tbe south shore line.
No. 2. Commencing at a post marked
Hoy M. Dawson's N. E. Corner Post,
tiience CO chains S„ thence 120 chains
W., thenee N. to Shore line, thonce E.
following Shore line to place of commencement, containing 040 acres, more
or less.
No. 3. Commencing nt a pnst marked
Rov M. Dawson's N. W. Post, thence S.
90 chains, thenee E. 120 chains, thenee
40 chnins N.,.thence AV. SO chains, thenee
N. to shore line, thence following Shore
line to place of commencement, containing 010 acres,  more or less.
And Located the 15th day of December,   1900.
ROY M. DAWSON,
I   Feb. 10 By Ray Williams, Locator.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special licence to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands:
(1) Starting from a post on the S.
boundary ofSec. 70 on the S. shore of
Great Central Lake; thence 40 chains S.;
thenee 230 chains E.; thence N. to lake
shore; thence following the shore line
W. to E. boundary of See. 70; thence
following the boundary S. and W. to
point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot Distriot, Dee. 3, 1900.
(2) Starting at a post on the S. shore
of Great Central Lake, about 2 miles
W. of Thunder Mountain; thence S.
to the N. boundary of See. 70; thenoe
W., following the N. boundary line of
Sec. 70, 100 chains; thence N. to lake
shore; thence to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dee. 4, 1906.
(3) Commencing at a post about 1%
miles from Great Central Lake, on the
S. shore of river, entering at the head
of lake on the W. side; thence 80
chains W.; thence 80 chains S.; thence
80 E.; thence to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 5, 1906.
(4) Commencing on the S. shore of
river entering at head of Central Lake
on the W. at a post by N. E. oorner of
No. (3); thence 100 chains E.; thence
40 N.; thence 160 W.; thence 40 S.;
thence to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD. Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 6, 1906.
(5) Commencing at post on the E.
shore of Central Lake, about 1% miles
from the head; thence 40 chains N.;
thence 40 E.; thence 80 N.; thence W.
to E. boundary of Sec. 73; thence S. to
lake shore; thenee following the shore
line to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 6, 1906.
(6) Commencing at a post about 1%
miles from the head of Central Lake,
E. shore, by the initial post of No. (5);
thence 60 chains E.; thence 40 chains
N.; thence 40 B.; thence S. to shore
line; thence following shore line to
point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot Distriot, Dec. 6, 1906.
(7) Commencing at a post on the W.
boundary of Sec. 73, on Central Lake,
Clayoquot District; thence SO chains
W.; thence SO N.; thence 80 E. to point
of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
December 6, 1906.
(8) Commencing at a post by the S.
E. corner of No. (7) on Central Lake,
Clayoquot District; thence SO chains
W.; thence 80 S.; thence E. to lake
shore; thence following shore line to
W. boundary of Sec. 73; thence N. to
point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
December 6, 1906.
(9) Commencing at a post on the E.
shore of the river entering the head of
Central Lake, Clayoquot District, about
5 miles from the head of the lake;
thence 40 chains W.; thence 80 S.;
thence 80 E.; thence SO N.; thence W.
to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
December 6, 1906.
(10) Commencing at a post on the N.
side of the E. Fork of the river entering
the head of Central Lake from the N.,
about 1% miles from the main river;
thence SO chains N; thence SO W.i
thence 80 S.; thence E. to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 7, 1900.
(11) Commencing at a post by S. E.
corner of No. (10), on the E. fork of
the river entering the head of Central
Lake; thence SO chains S.; thence SOW.;
thence 80 N.; thence E. to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 7, 1906.
(1.2) Commencing at a post by S. E.
corner of No. (10) on the E. fork of
the river entering the head of Central
Lake; thence 60 chains E.; thence 40 N.;
tbence 40 E.; thence 40 N.; thence 100
W.i thence S. to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 7, 1906.
(13) Commencing at a post by the
S. E. corner of No. (10), on the E. fork
of the river entering the head of Central Lake; thence 60 chains E.; thence
40 S.; thenco 40 E.; thence 40 S.; thence
100 W.; thence N. to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent,
Clayoquot District, Dec. 7, 1906.
(14) Situated on the E. fork of tlie
river entering the head of Central Lake,
commencing at a post about 00 chains
easterly of S. E. corner of No. (10);
thenco 100 chains E.; thenco SO N.,
thence 00 W.; thence 40 S.; thence 40
AV.; thonce S. to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
AAr. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Doc. 7, luuo.
(15) Commencing at a post by ti'e
S. AV. corner of No. (14), on tho E.
fork of the river entering the head of
Central Lake; thence 100 chains E.:
thence SO S.; thence 00 W.; thenee 40
N; thence 40 W.; tbence N. to point of
commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 7, 1906.
(16) Commencing at a post near the
N. boundary of No. (7), on the river
ontcring tho head of Central Lake, about
2 miles from the lake; thence 40 chains
N.; thence 140 E.; thence 00 S.; thence
AV. to E. boundary of Sec. 73; thenee
N. and W., following boundary of 73;
thonce W. to point of commencement.
C, T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 7, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date. I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
AVorks for permission to purchase in
the Coast District the following described land, situated on the north side
of tho Bulkley Rivor: Commencing at
a post located about 00 chains east of
the N. E. corner of Lot 9, and marked
"Geo. A. Petty, Initial post"; tbence
south SO chains; thenoe west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence SO
chains east to point of commencement;
containing 040 acres.
Jan.   5. GEO.  A.   PETTY.
(17) Commencing at a post on the S.
shore of Central Lake, about 3 miles
from the head; thence 100 chains W.;
thence 80 N.; thence E. to shore line;
thence S. following the shore line to
point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARHABD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 9, 1906.
(18) Commencing at a post on the S.
shore of Great Central Lake, and lying
S. of Lot S3, about 1% miles E. of S. E.
corner of No. (17); thence 100 ohains
S.; thence SO W.; thence 60 N.; thence
40 E.; thence N. to shore line; thence
following shore line to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 9, 1906.
(19) Commencing at a post by the N.
E. corner of No. (IS) on Great Central
Lake S. shore, and lying S. of Lot S3,
Clayoquot District; thenee 100 chains
S.; thence 40 E.; thence 40 N.; thence
40 E,i thence N. to shore line; thence
following the shore to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 9, 1906.
(20) Commencing about 1 mile W. of
Lot 82, Clayoquot District, at a post on
the S. shore of Great Central Lake,
about 2% miles E. of N. W. corner post
of No. (19); thence 40 chains S.; thence
120 chains W.; thence N. to shore line;
thence following shore line to point of
commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Aeent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 9, 1906.    Jan.12
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, situated near
Camelia Inlet about 18 miles from the
mouth of the Skeena River, commencing at a post marked G. B. Wadham's N.
W. corner adjoining C. Takada's purchase claim; thence running east *>0
chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing
160 acres, more or less.
Dated 2nd November.  1906.
GORDON B. WADHAMS. Loeator.
Jan. 6.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase tha
following described land, situated on the
south bank of Camelia Inlet, about 18
miles from the mouth of the Skeena
River, commencing at a post marked
C. Takada's N W. corner; thence running east 80 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence west 80 chains to shore;
thence north along shore to point of
commencement, containing 320 acres,
more or less.
Dated 2nd November, 1900.
C. TAKADA. Locator.
Jan. 5.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
AVorks for a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum on Graham Island, Queen
Charlotte Group, about eight miles from
west coast thereof, and described as
follows: Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner, and marked
"Initial post No. 1, Walter H. Robinson's S. AV. corner"; and running north
SO chains; thence east SO chains; thence
south 80 chains; tiience west SO chains
to place of commencement, containing
040 acres.
Located November Sth, 1900.
de20 WALTER H. ROBINSON.
NOTICE is hereby given tliat, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
AVorks for special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situate in Clayoquot
District:—
No. 17—Commencing at a post about
one mile up Anderson River, running
west SO chains; thence soutli SO chains;
thence east SO chains; thence north SO
chains to point of commencement.
Located Dec. 27th, 1900.
Feb. 1st. d. c. Mcdonald.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, 1 intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
AVorks for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from tlie following
described lands:
No. 2. Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner of Timber License No. SCG1, at the north end of
Sechelt Peninsula, New Westminster
District; thenee south SO chains; thenee
west SO chains to the shore; thenee following the shore to the point of commencement.
No. 3. Commencing at a post planted
near the shore on the east side of
Agamennon Channel, New Westminster
District, thenee E. about 00 chains:
thenee N. to the S. boundary of No. 2
claim, at tiie N. end of Sechelt Peninsula; thenee E. about 00 ehnlns to shore
of Long Lake; tbence following the
.shore southerly about 100 chains; thence
AV. to shore; thenee following the shore
to point of commencement,
No. 5. Commencing nt a post at N.W.
corner of Lot 072. N. end of Sechelt
Peninsula, New Westminster District;
thenee N. 40 chains; W. SO chains to
the shore; thenee S. following the east
boundary nf T. L. scoi to S. E. corner
thereof; thenee E. 10 ehnlns to S. W.
corner of Lot. 072; thence N, 40 chuius
to lake; thenee following tiie lake shore
easterly and northerly to point of commencement.
M. GREEN.
JOHN WEST, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that .10
days from date we Intend to make
application to the Chief Commissionei'
of Lnnds and AVorks fnr special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described hinds: Commencing
nt a post mnrked B. C. C. Co., S. E.
Pest placed (in I be east hank nf the Ash-
hulni River, North shurc of Owcokaynn
Lake, near Rivers Inlet, thence 100
Chains nortli, 40 chains west. 100 chains
south, 10 chains east to point of commencement, containing in nil 040 acres.
Dated  lath  February,  1907.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
CANNING  CO.,   LTD.,
Flndley, Durhiim ,t Brodie. Agents.
Feb. 10. B. C. Mess, Manager.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 daya
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special licence to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands, situated on Hecate Channel, adjacent to Zebalos Arm, Nootka
Sound:
(a) Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's northwest post"; thence
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chains;
south 40 chains; thence 110 chains to
shore line; thence northwest to point of
commencement; containing 640 acres,
more or less.
(b) Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's northeast post"; thenee 80
chains west; 80 chains south; 80 chains
east, and SO chains to place of commencement; containing 640 acres, more
or less.
(y) Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's northeast post"; thence
40 chains south; 40 chains west; 40
chains south; 80 chains west; 40 chalna
north; 40 chains east; 40 chains north,
and 80 chains east to place of commencement; containing 640 acres, more
or less.
(x) Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's southeast post"; thenee
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east to shore; thence south along
shore line to place of commencement;
containing 640 aeres, more or less.
(z) Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's northeast post"; thence
80 chains south; thence 80 chains west;
thence 40 chains north; thence 40 chains
east; thence 40 chains north; thence 40
chains east to place of commencement;
containing 640 acres, more or less.
(r) Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's northeast posi"; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thenee west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of commencement.
J. A. FERGUSON, Loeator.
November 27, 1906. Jan.19
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for special licence to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands, situated in Nootka Sound,
West Coast District of Vancouver
Island:
1. Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's southwest corner post,"
situated at the head of Zebalos Arm or
Inlet, and 1% miles from the mouth of
the river, east bank; thence east 40
chains; thence 160 chains north; thence
west 40 chains; thence south 160 chains
to place of commencement; containing
640 acres, more or less.
2. Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's southeast corner post,"
and adjoining No. 1 Section west; thence
west SO chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains to place of commencement; containing 640 acres, more or less.
3. Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's southeast corner post,"
and adjoining No. 4 on west; thence 40
chains west; thence 40 chains north;
thence 40 chains west; thence 40 chains
north; thence SO chains east; thence 80
chains south to place of commencement; containing 040 acres, more or
less.
4. Commensing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's southwest post," and adjoining No. 3 on east; thence SO chains
north; thence 80 chains east; thence SO
chains south; thence SO chains west to
place of commencement; containing 040
acres, more or less.
5. Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's southeast corner post,"
•near the northwest corner of No. 4;
thenco SO chains west; tiience SO chains
north; thence SO chains east, and 80
chains south lo place of commencement,
containing C40 acres, more or less.
0. Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's southeast post," and adjoining No. 5 on southeast; thenee
east SO chains; thenee north SO chains;
thence west SO chains; and SO chalna
south, to place of commencement, containing 040  acres,  more or  less.
7. Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's southwest post," and adjoining No. 6 on north; thence 80 chains
east; thence 40 chains north and 40
chains east, 40 chains nortli, 80 chains
west, 40 chains south, 40 chains west,
and 40 chains south to place of commencement; containing 640 acres, more
or less
J. A. FERGUSON, Locator.
December 1, 1906. Jan.19
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away timber from the following described land, situate on Hastings Arm
of Observatory Inlet; Commencing at
a post planted on east shore of Hastings Arm, marked "E. D.'s S. W. Corner," thence east 40 chains, thence north
160 chains, thence west 40 chains to
shore line, thence southerly along shore
line to point of commencement.
E. DONEHUE.
December 8.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and AVorks
for a spocial license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands:
Commencing at a post on the E. side
of Cascade Creek, Uchucklesit Harbour,
and nbout 40 chains N. of the N. boundary of Green's application for timber
license; thenee 40 chains S.; thence 100
AV.; Ihence 80 N; tbence GO E.; thence
40 S.; thenco 40 E. to point of commencement.
.1. J. REEHLING.
AV. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Jan. 14, 1907.   ja26
NOTICE Is hereby given Unit ,10 days
from dale we Iniend to rnake application
lo Ihe Chief Commissionei' of Lands nnd |
Works ini' special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands: Commencing at a post
marked H. C. C. Co.. S. AV. Post placed
on the east hank of the Tzco River, opposite Indian House, within about 15
chains of Oweekayno Lake, nenr Rivers
Inlet, thence 100 chains north, 10 chains
east, 100 chains south, 40 chains west,
to point of commencement, containing
111 all  010 aeres.
Dated  13th February,  11107.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
CANNING  CO..  LTD.,
Findley, Durham & Brodie. Agents.
Feb. IC. B. C. Mess, Manager,
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
nfter date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and AVorks
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands, situated In Clayoquot Drs-
trict, B. C:
No. 1. Commencing at a post at the
northeast corner, situated about two and
one-half 12V2) miles from head of Anderson Lake, on southwest side; thence
west one hundred and sixty (100 chains;
thenee south forty (40) chains: thence
east one hundred and sixty (100) chains;
thence north forty (40) chnins to point
of commencement.
Located December 30, 1900.
A. F. GAVIN.
Jan.20.       THOMAS ROAVLEY, Agent H
THE WEEK, SATURDAY FEBRUARY 16, 1907.
LICENSE  TO  AN   EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANY.
" Companies Act, 1897."
Canada,
Province of British Columbia.
No. 370.
THIS is to certiiy that the "National Drug and Chemical Company
of Canada, Limited," is authorised
and licensed to carry on business
within the Province of British Columbia, and to carry out or effect all
or any of the objects of the Company to which the Legislative authority of the Legislature of British
Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company is
situate in the City of Montreal, in
the Province of Quebec.
The amount of the capital of thc
Company is six million dollars, divided into sixty thousand shares of
one hundred dollars each.
The head office of the Company in
this Province is situate at Vancouver,
and William Henderson, Druggist,
whose address is Vancouver, is the
attorney for the Company.
Given under my hand and seal of
office, at Victoria, Province of British Columbia, this third day of January, one thousand nine hundred and
seven.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which the Company has been established and licensed are:
To manufacture, import, purchase,
sell and deal in drugs, chemicals,
medicines, alcohol, paints, oils, dye
stuffs, glassware, toilet articles, tobaccos, liquors, cigars, stationery,
fancy goods, perfumeries, surgical
apparatus, physicians' and hospital
supplies, bottles, jars, cans, boxes,
containers, labels and other similar or
kindred articles and druggists' and
general store sundries and supplies
and articles entering into the composition thereof; and for the said
purposes to acquire and take over as
going concerns the undertakings of
any persons, firms or corporations
engaged in any such business and all
or any portion or portions of the
assets and liabilities of said persons,
firms or corporations; and to acquire
and hold stock in any other corporations carrying on any such business
or operations and to use the funds
of this Corporation in the purchase
thereof, and to assume and pay the
whole or any portion or portions of
the liabilities of such other corporation, and if deemed advisable, to take
on assignment or assignments all or
any of such liabilities.
NOTICE ia hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum on the following lands, situate on Queen Charlotte Islands, B. C:
No. 13. Commencing at a post planted
on the S. E. corner of C. Graham's Location No. 11, about 12 miles E. from
Masset Inlet, Graham Island, being the
S. W. corner; thence N. 80 chains; E. SO
chains; S. 80 chains; W. 80 chains to
point of commencement.
A. YOUNG.
No. 14. Commencing at a post planted
on the S. E. corner of C. Graham's Location No. 11, about 12 miles E. from
Masset Inlet, Graham Island, being the
N. W. corner; thence N. SO chains; E.
80 chains; S. 80 chains; W. SO chains to
place of commencement.
J. GRAHAM.
No. 15. Commencing at a post planted
on the S. E. corner of Al. Young's Location No. 13, about 13 miles from
Masset Inlet, Graham Island, being the
S. W. corner; thence N. 80 chains; E.
SO chains; S. 80 chains; W. 80 chains to
place of commencement.
J. YOUNG.
A. YOUNG, Agent.
No. 16. Commencing at a post planted
on the S. E. corner of Al. Young's Location No. 13, about 13 miles from
Masset Inlet, Graham Island, being the
N. W. corner; thence S. SO chains, E.
SO chains; N. SO chains; W. 80 chains
to place of commencement.
W. RADLEY.
No. 17. Commencing at a post planted
on the N. E. corner of J. Young's Location No. 15, about 14 miles from
Masset Inlet, Graham Island, being the
S. W. corner; thence N. 80 chains; E.
80 chains; S. 80 chains; W. 80 chains to
place of commencement.
G. YOUNO.
AT,. YOUNG, Agent.
No. IS. Commencing at a post planted
on the N. E. corner of J. Young's Location No. 15, about 11 miles E. from
Masset Inlet, Graham Island, being the
N. W. corner; thence S. 80 chains; E.
80 chains; N. 80 chains; W. 80 chains
to place of commencement.
N. YOUNG.
AL. YOUNG, Agent.
No. 19. Commencing at a post planted
on the N. E. corner of N. Young's Location No. 16, on the HI Ellen River,
about three miles from the mouth, Mas-
set Inlet, Graham Island; thence N. SO
chains; E. 80 chains; S. 80 chains: W.
80 chains to place of commencement.
B. GRAHAM.
A. YOUNG, Agent.
No. 20. Commencing at a post planted
on the N. E. corner of N. Young's Location No. 16, on the Hi Ellen River,
about three miles from the mouth, Mas-
set Inlet, Graham Island; thence S. 80
chains; E. 80 chains; N. 80 chains; W.
80 chains to place of commencement.
D. GRAHAM.
Jan.26. A. YOUNG, Agent.
64. Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner of Hubert
Haines' land, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
ELIZABETH KNIGHT.
G. B. Watson, Agent.
Sept. 10th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away timber from the following lands;
Commencing at a stake marked "G. A.
B. No. 1," planted on the east bank of
Mammon River, thence north 16b
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
south 160 chains, thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
GEO. A. BIGELOW.
December 8,
NOTICE is hereby given that, sixty
days after date. I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase In
the Coast District the following described land, situated on the south side
of the Bulkley River: Commencing at a
post located at the N. E. corner of Geo.
A. Petty's land, and marked " D. Petty,
initial post"; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement; containing 640 acres.
Jan.  6. D.  PETTY.
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands, situated in Barclay District:
1. Commencing at a post at the S. W.
corner of Malachan No. 2 Reserve, running 80 chains east; thence 80 chains
south; thence 80 chains west; thence SO
chains north, to point of commencement.
2. Commencing at a post on the shore
west of South line of No. 1, running east
and following South line of No. 1, SO
chains east; thence 80 chains south;
thence SO chains west; thence 80 chains
north, to point of commencement.
3. Commencing at a point on Lak,,
Shore, near S. W. corner of No. 2, running SO chains east; thence SO chains
south; thence 80 chains west; thence
80 chains north, to point of commencement.
4. Commencing at a post on Homltah
Lake, situated at the N. E. corner of
Timber Limit 7757, running south „o
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement.
5. Commencing at a post at the West
side of Nit-Nat River and following the
South line of Section 8, of Township 1,
running SO chains west; thence SO chains
north; thence east to line of Timber
lease, following the said line to river;
thence following the said river south to
point of commencement.
0. Commencing at the N. E. corner
of Section 17, Township 1, running 80
chains west; thenee SO chains south;
thence east to line of Timber lease, following the said line north and east to
section line; thence north to point of
commencement.
EDWARD E. HARDWICK.
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Honourable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works, for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands, situated in
Clayoquot District.
No. 1. Commencing at post planted
near the initial post of Crown Prince
Iron claim, running west 80 chains,
thence south 80 chains; thence east „J
chains; thence north SO chains to point
of commencement.
No. 2. Commencing at a post planted
alongside No, 1 post, marked J. W. Benson, running east 80 chains; thence
south SO chains; thence west SO chains;
thence north SO chains, to point of commencement.
No. 3. Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner of Old Ireland
M. C, running west 160 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 160 chains;
thence north 40 chains, to point of commencement.
No. 4. Commencing at a post planted
about 10 chains from the southeast corner of section 19, running east 80 chains:
thence north SO chains; thence west So
chains; thence south to point of commencement.
No. 5. Commencing at post planted
on shore at Cataract Lake, running east
SO chains; south SO chains; west along
the shore of Cataract Lake, to the point
of commencement.
No. 6. Commencing at a post planted
at the N. W. corner of Cataract Lake,
running south SO chains; thence east S'J
chains; thenco north SI) chains; thence
west along the Lake shore to point of
commencement.
No. 7. Commencing at a post planted
at the Salt water, near Sellafer's cabin,
on Copper Island, running south SO
chains; thence cast along the shore line
and following the shore line to point of
commencement, 640 acres, more or less.
Located January 16th,  1907.
J. W. BENSON.
NOTICE Is hereby given that sixty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for permission to purchase
the following described land, situated In
Range 5, Skeena River District, about
one mile from Little Canyon, commencing at a post planted on the southeast
corner, marked "R. Braun"; thence running west SO chains to Turner's southeast corner; thence nortli 40 chains to
Frank's southeast corner; thence east 40
chains; thence north 40 chains to Johnson's southeast corner; thence east 40
chains; thence south SO chains to point
of commencement, containing 480 acres,
more or less.
Located September 1st, 1906.
R. BRAUN.
NOTICE is hereby given that application will be made to the Legislative .assembly of the Province of British Columbia at Its next Session by the Securities Corporation of British Columbia,
Limited, for an Act empowering any
Court of Law or Equity to appoint ttie
Company, without security, to exercise
the office of executor, or trustee, or
guardian of the estate of any minor, or
committee of the estate of any lunatic
or liquidator of any company or corporation, or Official Administrator under
the  "Official  Administrators   Act,"   for
any one or more counties in the said
Province, and conferring power on the
said company to accept and execute the
duties of any of the said offices, and
giving the company the right to be
appointed a sole trustee notwithstanding
that but for such Act it would be necessary to appoint more than one trustee,
and enabling the said Courts to direct
that moneys brought or paid into Court
shall be deposited with the Company,
and giving the Company power to
guarantee, by means of policies of insurance or otherwise, the payment of
money secured by or payable under or
in respect of debenture bonds, debenture stock, contracts, mortgages,
charges, obligations and securities of
any Company or of any authority, supreme, municipal, local or otherwise, or
of any persons whomsoever, whether
corporate or  unlncorporate.
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd day
of December, 1906.
BARNARD & ROBERTSON,
Solicitors for the said Company.
Jan.  3.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for special timber licenses to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situate in Renfrew District, in the Province of British Columbia.
1. Commencing at a post planted about
3 miles southeast of San Juan River,
marked "G. Young's southwest corner";
thenee south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement.
2. Commencing at a post planted at
the southeast corner of No. 1; thence
south SO chains; thenee east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
3. Commencing at a post planted at
the southeast corner of No. 2; thenee
south 80 chains; thenee east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west SO
chains to point of commencement.
4. Commencing at a post planted at
the southeast corner of No. 3; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
5. Commencing at a post planted at
the southeast corner of No. 4; thence
north 40 chains; thence west 169 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence east 161
chains to point of commencement.
6. Commencing at a post planted at
the northwest corner of No. 5; thence
north 40 chains; thence west 160 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence east 160
chains to point of commencement.
Each  containing  640 acres,  more  or
Dated December 10, 1906.
Jan.19 GEORGE YOUNG, Locator.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works, for special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situate in Rupert District, Quatsino Sound, Vancouver Island,
on the south shore of the West Arm:
Claim 1. Commencing at a post marked "E. J. Mathews, northeast corner
post," planted about 10 chains northwest of the northwest corner post of
Lot 203; thence south 40 chains; thence
west 160 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 160 chains to point of commencement.
Located on the 26th day of Dec, 1906.
E. J. MATHEWS,
Jan. 19 J. McNeill, Agent.
NOTICE is hereuy given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situate in Rupert District, Quatsino Sound, Vancouver Island,
on the south shore of the West Arm:
Claim 2. Commencing at a post marked "E. J. Mathews, northeast corner
post," planted on shore about 2 miles
northwest of the northeast corner post
of No. 1 Claim; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north SO
chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement.
Located on the 26th day of Dec, 1906.
E. J. MATHEWS,
Jan. 19 J. McNeill, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situate on Limestone
Island, Rupert District, Quatsino Sound,
Vancouver  Island:
Claim 3. Commencing at a post marked "E. J. Mathews, northwest corner
post," planted at the northeast point
of the entrance to Quiet Cove, Limestone Island, adjoining Fregon's Preemption, thence running south 80
chains; thence E. 80 chains; thence
north SO chains: thence west SO chains
to point of commencement.
Located on the 29th day of Dec, 1906.
E. J. MATHEWS,
Jan. 19 J. McNeill, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situate on the north
shore of the southeast Arm of Quatsino
Sound, Rupert District, Vancouver
Island:
Claim 5. Commencing at a post marked "E. J. Mathews, southwest corner
stake," planted 40 chains south of southeast corner of Pre-emption 189; thence
running north 160 chains; thence east
40 chains; thence south 160 chains;
thence west 40 chains to point of commencement.
Located on the 4th day of Jan., 1907.
E. J. MATHEWS,
Jan.19 J. McNeill, Agent.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situate on the north
shore of the southeast Arm of Quatsino Sound, Rupert District, Vancouver
island:
Claim 6. Commencing at a post marked "E. J. Mathews, southwest corner
post," planted at the northwest corner
post of Paul Cramers' Pre-emption;
thence running east SO chains; thence
north SO chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Located on the 1st day of Jan., 1907.
E. J. MATHEWS,
Jan. 19 J. McNeill, Agent.
31. Commencing at a post plnnted at
the north-east corner of Section 31,
Township 12. Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north SO chains; thence west
*!*i chains; thence south 80 chains;
Ihence east 80 chains to a point ot commencement; 610 acres.
J. J. TEETZEL,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
32, Commencing at a post planted a
lhe south-east corner of Section IS
Township 12, Range 6. Poudrier Survey
thence south  40 chains;  thonce east  8(
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence
west SO chains to point of commencement, and being the north half of Section 8, Township 12, Range 5, of said
survey.
BENJAMIN WERDEN,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 20th, 1906.
28. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 17,
Township 10, Range 6, Poudrier Survey;
thence south SO chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 cha.ns to point of commencement, and being said Section 17 of said
■uirvey.
BERTHA FISHLEIGH,
NOTICE is hereby~given that-thirty
days after date I intend to apply to tne
Honorable the Chief Comnilssloner of
Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands,
No. 23. Beginning at a post planted
on the north boundary, about 20 chains
west of the northeast corner of application No. 7, on the east bank of the
Kaowinch River; thence east 20 chains;
north 160 chains; west 40 chains; south
160 chains; east 20 chains to point of
commencement; containing 640 acres,
more or less.
JOHN HIRSCH,
Kyuquot Sound, Sept. 29, 1906.
Jan. 5
No. 289.
CEBTIFICATE   OF   THE   BEGISTBA-
TION OF AN EXTBA-FBOVIHCIAI.
COMPANY.
" Companies Aot, 1897."
I hereby certify that the " Henry
Swart Lumber Company " has this day
been registered as an Extra-Provincial
Company under the "Companies Act,
1897." to carry out or effect all or any
of the objects of the Company to which
the legislative authority of the Legis.
lature of British Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company is
situate in the City of Marinette. County
of Marinette and State of Wisconsin.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is one hundred thousand dollars, divided into one thousand shares
of one hundred dollars each.
The head office of the Company in
this Province is situate at 34 1-2 Government Street. Victoria, and James
Hill Lawson, Junior, barrister-at-law,
whose address is the same, is the attorney for the Company. Not empowered to issue and transfer stock.
Given under my hand and seal of
office at Victoria. Provinee of British
Columbia, this 20th day of December,
one thousand nine hundred and six.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
To buy. manufacture and sell logs,
timber, lumber and all kinds of forest
products and for that purpose to improve streams, obtain franchises thereon for the floating of logs, lumber and
other forest products, and owning and
maintaining logging railroads, sawmills, machine shops, docks, wharves,
tugs, boats, vessels and other plants
necessary and convenient for the purpose of carrying on the logging and
timber operations of said corporation;
to iwn, buy, sell, mortgage or lease
timber lands, mining lands, farm lands,
buildings and real estate in general;
to mine, smelt, quarry and prospect for
minerals and mineral products and to
purchase, produce, manufacture, sell
and distribute the same; to purchase
and sell and deal generally at wholesale or retail in all goods, wares and
merchandise and lumbermen's and
miners' supplies, tools, implements and
other outfits and equipments; to generally do, carry on and conduct any
and all matters and things connected
with or incidental and appurtenant to
the foregoing business and purposes,
or any part thereof.
NOTICE is hereby given that, sixty
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land on Porcher
Island, about flve miles east of Refuge
Bay, commencing at a post marked Mrs.
Mary Odgers, northwest corner; thence
running south 40 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 40 chains to McKay's southwest
corner and point of commencement, containing one hundred and sixty acres.
MRS. MARY ODGERS, Locater.
R. BRAUN, Agent.
Located Nov. 9, 1906. Dec.22
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days from date we intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for permission to purchase
the following described lands in the
Nechaco Valley, Coast District:
1. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 25,
Township 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence south SO chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains, to point of commencement, and being said section 25 of said
survey.
W. H. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August Sth, 1906.
2. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 26,
Township 1, Range 4 P.oudrler Survey;
thence east 80 chains, thence south SO
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 26 of said
survey.
EDWARD E. HARVEY,
A.  T.  Clark,  Agent.
August Sth, 1906.
TAKE NOTICE that, sixty days from
date, I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following
described land, commencing at a post
planted on tlle bank of the Skeena River
two and a half miles below Kitwangat,
at the N. W. corner of A. E. Price's
purchase claim; thence S. 22 chains,
more or less, to the S? W. corner of
A. E. Price's purchase claim; thence
W. 40 chains to the S. E. comer of
Elizabeth Price's purchase claim;
thence N. 31 chains, more or less, to
the Skeena River, containing 100 acres
more or less.
F. PRICE.
A. W.  Harvey,  Agent.
Doc.   15.
44. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section S7,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
ther.ce north 80 chains; thence weit 80
chains; thence south 80 chanii; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 27 of (aid
survey.
J. S. McEACHERN,
A. T. Clark, Agent
Srptember 17th, 1006.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date 1 intend to apply to
the Honourable the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for permission to
purchase the following described lands,
situate on the north shore of Stuart
Lake about 2% miles inland and about
half way between Pinchi and Tacher
Rivers, in the Coast District of the
Province of British Columbia, viz.:
Commencing at a post marked "R. S.
C," placed at the north-east corner of
lot 331; thence astronomically north
40 chains; thence astronomically east
80 chains; thence astronomically south
80 chains; thence astronomically west
80 chains, and thence astronomically
north 40 chains to the point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
ROBERT SENIOR,
J. A. Hickey, Agent.
August  24,   1906.
December 8.
NOTICE is hereby given that, sixty
days (60) after date, I Intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works, Victoria, B.C., for
permission to purchase the south-west
quarter of Section Twenty-three 123),
Township Eight 18), Range Five (6.,
Coast District, Bulkley Valley, containing one hundred and sixty (160)
acres,  more  or  less.
H. E.  WILDMAN.
1st December, 1906, Dec 15.
4. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 36,
Township i, Range 4, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 36
of said survey.
E. A. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August Sth, 1006.
6. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 4,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 4 of
said survey.
EMMA HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August Sth, 1006.
7. Commencing at a *ost planted at
the north-west corner of Section 34,
Township 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 34 of said
survey.
ISABEL HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent
nugust Sth, 1006.
8. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 33,
Townshpi 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thtnee south 80 chains; thence west 80-
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 33 of said
survey.
MAGGIE B. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August Sth, 1006.
20. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 36, Tf.
12, Range S. Poudrier Survey; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains,
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80*
chains' to point of commencement; 640
acres.
C. A. PORTER.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 16th, 1006.
30. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 36,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to place of commencement ; 640 acres.
G. M. BIRKETT.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 16th, 1906.
3. Commencing at apos t planted at
the north-east corner of Section 35,
Township 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence south 80 chains: thence west 80
chains, thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chnins to point of commencement, and being said Section 35 of said
survey.
C. W. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August sth, 1006.
0. Commencinpr at a nnst planted at
tht* south-east corner of Section 0,
Township 10, Range 5. Poudrier Survey, thence north 80 chain's: 'hence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains:
thence east 80 chains tn place of commencement, and being Section 0 of said
survey.
D. M. LINEHAM.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 6th, 1006.
to Commencing at a post plan-ed at
the south-west comer of Section 10,
Township 10. Ranee 5, Poudrier cnr-
vey: thence north 80 chains: thence
enst 80 chains: thence potith Po chnins;
thence west Ro chains to poi**' 0" com-
menreTient. and beino- ciid Section 10
of said survey.
LILLIAN HARV17Y,
A. T. Clark. Agent.
AUgut 6th, 1006. THE WEEK, SATURDAY FEBRUARY 16, 1907
*5
11. Commencing at a pot planted at
the outh-eat corner of Section 8, Town-
10, Range 5, Poudritr Surrey;
thence north Ho chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; tnence
east 80 chains to point of commencement ; and being said Section 8 of said
survey.
GEORGE CURRIE,
A. T. Clark, Agtat
August 6th, 1906.
12. Commencing at a post planted at
tne north-east corner of Section 5,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence roith 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 5
of said survey.
MARY E. LINEHAM,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 6th, 1906.
17. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 16,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 choins; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 16
of said survey.
ANDREW F. WbiR,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
18. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Section 15,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence ! DUth 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 15
of said survey.
CLARA WEIR,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 8th ,1906.
19. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 6,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey ; thence south 80 chains, thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 6 of
said survey.
MINNIE BOWDEN,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 8th, 1906.
20. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section I,
Township 11, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section I
of said survey.
E. H. BOWDEN,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
21. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Section 7,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to_ point of commencement, and being said Section 7 ol
said survey.
THOMAS SHOPLAND,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 8th, 1906.
. 22. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 12,
Township 11, Range 5, Poudrier Sur-
I vey; thence north 80 chains; thence
I west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
I tnence east 80 chains to point of com-
I mencement, and being said Section ia
I of said survey.
MABEL BOWDEN,
A T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
23. Commencing at a post planted at
lthe north-west corner of Section 11,
I Township 11, Range 5, Poudrier Sur-
[vey; thence south 80 chains; thence east
180 chains; thence north 80 chains;
Ithence west 80 chains to point of comimencement, and being said Section 11
lof said survey.
WM. STANLEY BATT,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August ioth, 1906.
.    NOTICE Is hereby given that, 30 days
latter   date,   I   intend   to   apply   to   the
.dhief Commissioner of Lands and Works
■for a  special  license to cut and carry
|awav   timber   from   the   following   described lands situated on the north side
of the Homltah Lake, Nit-i-nat District:
No. 1.    Commencing at a post marked
"Edward  E. Hardwlck's southeast corner," adjoining the Indian Reserve aud
|>ne chain north from   the   bank   of the
Homltah River: thenee west SO ehalus:
Ihence north SO chains;   thenee east 80
Jjhalns; thenee south SO ohains to point
(if eommeneement. containing 010 aeres.
No. 2. Commencing at a post situated
Im tlio north bank of the Homltah Lake
Inarked "Edward E. Hardwlck's south-
hast corner": thence north 40 chains;
Ihence west. 100 chains: thence south 40
{■hains; thence east 100 chains along
Ihore of lake to point of commencement,
I'ontainlng 010 acres.
No. 3. Commencing at the southwest
I'orner of No. 2 and thence 40 chains
porth; thence IOO chains west: thence 40
■hains south; tbence 100 chains east
jlong shore of lnke to point of com-
Inoncoment, containing (140 acres.
Dated   at  Clo-oose  this   IBtli   day  of
liecember, 1 nor,.
Ian. 26 EDWARD E. HARDWICR.
PRIVATE BILLS NOTICE.
The time limited by the Rules of
the House for receiving petitions for
Private Bills will expire on Saturday,
the 16th day of March, 1907.
Bills must be presented to the
House not later than the 28th day of
March, 1907.
Reports from Committees on Private Bills will not be received after
the 4th day of April, 1907.
Dated this 2nd day of January, 1907.
THORNTON FELL,
Clerk of the Legislative Assembly.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to make application
to the Honourable Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special licence to out and carry away timber
from the following described lands, situated on Esperanza Inlet, lying east of
the Ehatezat Indian village: Commencing at a post marked "J. A. Ferguson's
southwest post"; thenee 40 chains east;
ihence 40 chains north; thenoe 40 chains
east; thence 40 chains north; thenee 80
chains weat; thence SO chains south to
place of eommeneement; containing 640
acres, more or less.
The above is exclusive of the Indian
Reserve,
J. A. FERGUSON, Loeator.
November 25, 1906. Jan.19
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special licence to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands, situated on south side of
Tahsls Narrows, Nootka Sound: Commencing at a post marked "J. A. Ferguson's northeast corner"; thenee south
10 chains; thence west 120 chains; thence
north 40 chains to shore line; thence
east alongside shore to place of commencement.
J. A. FERGUSON, Locator.
December 15, 1906. Jan.19
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase Section 5,
Township 9, Range 5, Coast District,
Buckley Valley.
Jan.19 T. D. SHORTS.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following
described lands in Bulkley Valley, viz.:
South half of Section flve (5), Township
six (6), containing 320 acres.
Jan. 19 SYDNEY COOPER.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following described land, situated in Skeena
District: Commencing at a post on left
bank of Skeena River about 4 miles
from Port Essington, marked "J. C.'s
N. W. Cor."; thence S. 20 chains; thence
E. 20 chains; thence N. 20 chains to
bank of Skeena River; thence westerly
along the bank to point of commencement, containing 40 acres, more or less.
JOHN CUNNINGHAM.
Port Essington, B. C, Dec. 10, 1906.
Jan. 19.
NOTICE ls hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to cut and carry away
timber from the following land: Commencing at a post on W. shore of Lar-
com Islnad, Observatory Inlet, adjoining G. W. Morrow's timber claim, marked "E. D.'s N. W. Corner"; thence E.
100 chains, more or less, to E. shore of
Larcom Island; thence southerly, westerly and northerly along shore line of
said Island to point of commencement,
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Jan.19 E.  DONEHUE.
NOTICE is nereby given that, 30 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands situated in Rupert District:
1. Commencing at a stake planted at
the S. W. corner of J. A. Coates' claim
marked "W. Bulman's N. W. Corner";
thence S. SO chains; thence E. 80 chains:
thence N. 80 chains; thence W. SO chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres.   Located 1st January, 1907.
2. Commencing at a stake planted
about one-half mile in a southerly direction from Duval Point, on the west
shore of Hardy Bay and marked "W.
Bulman's N. E. Corner"; thence running
W. 40 chains; thence S. 160 chains;
thence E. 40 chains; thenee N. 160 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres.   Located 7th January, 1907.
W. BULMAN, Locator.
Jan. 19 Per J. A. Coates.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commlsslone rof Lands and Works
for a spocial license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands, situated in Rupert District:
Commencing at a post planted about
one and one-half miles from the mouth
of the Tsulquate River and about 400
yards from the north bank of said river
marked "J. A. Coates' N. E. Corner";
thence W. 80 chains; thence S. 80
chains; thence E. SO chlans; thence N.
SO chains to point of commencement,
containing 640 acres. Located 29th De-
cebmer, 1906.
J. A. COATES, Locator.
Jan.19 Per B. Blenkinsop.
43. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of the north-east
quarterof Section 22, Township 4,
Range 4, Poudrier Survey; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains, thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement, and being
the north half of Section 23 and south
half of Section 26, Townhsip 4, Range
4, of said survey.
EMMA BATEMAN,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 17th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, in Alberni District:   5.
Commencing at a post by the southeast
boundary of Lot 77, Naiimiut Bay;
tnence uj cnains west; thence 20 north;
tiience 90 west; thence 50 soutu; tueiuc
east to the waterfront thence folluwi.g
the shore line to point of commeuce-
Ineiu.
C. LUTK1N,
W. B. GARIURD, Agent
va. 2, ill, 1900.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands: 1. Starting at a post
10 chains east of the mouth of Handy
Creek, on the north shore of Alberni
Canal; thence 160 chains north; theuce
40 chains west; thence south to the
shore line; thence following the shore
line to point of commencement
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent
November 4th, 1906.
2. Starting at a post 40 chains north
of the initial post of No. 1, near Handy
Creek, Alberni Canal; thence 40 chains
east; thence 160 chains north; thence 40
chains west; thence 160 chains south to
point of commencement
W. B. GARRARD.
Clayoquot District, Nov. 4th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date we intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands: Commencing at a
post by the southeast corner poet of Lot
79, on Uchucklesit Harbour; thenee
north 40 chains; thence east 100 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west to
waterfront; thence along waterfront to
point of commencement, excepting
thereout the lands covered by existing
mineral claims.
W. E. GREEN.
W. B. GARRARD.
Clayoquot District, Oct 29th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands in Alberni District: 1.
Commencing at a post situated 80 choins
west and 20 south of southeast boundary
post of Lot 658; thence 80 chains west;
thence 80 south; thence 80 east, thence
80 north, to place of commencement.
E. CURTIT,
Per W. B. Garrard, Agent
Oct. 19th, 1906.
46. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 36,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 3o chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 36 of said
survey.
S. L. TEETZEL.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 17th, 1906.
48. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 24,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 25, Township 4,
Range 4, of said survey .
M. A. MACDONALD.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 17th, 1906.
SS. Commencing a: a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 15.
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 22, Township
4, Range 4, of said survey.
LILIAN CAMPBELL,
A. T. Clark, Agent
September 15th, 1906.
56. Commencing at a post planted on
the north-east corner of Section 15,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence west 80 chains; thenee south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 15 of said
survey.
GLEN CAMPBELL,
A. T. '.lark, Agen.t
September 15th, 1906.
57. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Lot 547;
thence south 80 chains; tiience east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement; 640 acres.
KATE CLARK,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September ioth, 1006.
60. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of J. A .uarvey's
land, thence north do chains; tiience
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of com-
meuctment
HARRIET NELSON,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September ioth, 1906.
61. Commencing at a - 1st planted at
the north-west corner of J. A. xlarvey's
land; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thtnee west 80 chains to point of commencement
CAROLINE HAINES,
G. B. Wtason, Agent
September ioth, 1906.
62. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of G. M. Birkett's
land; thence north 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement
MARGARET INGLES,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 10th, 1906.
6s. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Hubert Haines'
land; thence north 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence cast 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains to point of commencement
MAXWELL S. INGLES,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September ioth, 1906.
66. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of. Knignts leaes;
land; thence north 80 chains; thence
chains; thence souht 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement
ROSABELLA GOODWYN,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September nth, 1906.
67. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of E. Knight's
land; thence north So cl.-.ins; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement.
CHAS. KNIGHT,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September nth, 1906.
68. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Chas. Knight's
land; thence north 80 chun s; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement
W. H. GOODWIN,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September nth, 1906.
69. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Chas. Knight's
the north-east corner of Knight's land;
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains,
thence north 80 chain st'o point of commencement.
E. N. MacBETH,
A. T. Clark, Agent
September nth, 1906.
70. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 35,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier survey; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
M. WERDEN,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 17th, 1906.
71. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of the south-weet
quarter of Section 14, Townshm 12,
Range 5, Poudrier survey; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement, and being
the south half of Section 14 and north
half of Section 11, Township 12, Range
S, of said survey.
H. RENNIE,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 19th, 1906.
72. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of B. P. Cook's
lease; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence couth 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement ; 640 acres.
WILLIAM MEREDITH,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 13th, 1906.
73- Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Maxwell S.
Ingles' lease; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, r.ore or less, to
the Nechaco River; thence following
bank of said river to the south line of
Maxwell S. Ingles' lease; thence west
80 chains, more or less, to point of commencement.
MINNIE CURRIE,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 12th, 1906.
58. Commencing at a post planted at;
thc north-east corner of Lot 547; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;!
thence smith So chains; thence west 80
chains to point nf commencement
T. A. HARVEY.
A .T .Clark. Ajre-i.
September ioth, 1906.
74. Commencing at a posi planted at
a point on the west side of the Upper
Nechaco River, opposite tlie south-west
corner of Lot 545; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains, thence
east So chains, more or less, to the bank
of the Nechaco River; 'hence following
hank nf said river to point of commencement ; 640 acres, trore nr less
EDGAR L. BLAKE.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 12th, 1006.
75. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of E. L. Blake's
lease; thence west 80 chains; soutn 8b
chains; east 80 chains to bank of Nechaco River; thence following bank of
said river to point of commencement,
640 acres, more or less.
MAKY BLAKE,
A. T. CLARK, Agent
September 12th, 1906.
76. Commencing at a post planted it
the south-east corner of Mary Blake'a
lease; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence fast 80 chains,
more or less, to the Nechaco River;
thence following the bank of said river t|
to point of commencement; 640 acres,
more or less.
GEORGE BATEMAN,
A T. Clark, Agent
September 12th, 1906.
77- Commencing at the south-east cor-
near of George Bateman's lease; thenee
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, more or less, to
the Nechaco Rvier; thence following
the bank of said river to point of commencement; 640 acres, more or less.
B. P. COOK, ,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 13th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to tne
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for permission to purchase
section 24, township 8, range 5, Coast
District.
EMMA HOWE.
JOHN DORSEY, Agent
37. Commencing at a post planted al
the north-east corner of Section 16,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey- thence south 80 chains; thence eaat
So chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of com-
mencemtnt, and being Section 15, Township 12, Range 5, of said survey.
W. VAN ARSDALEN,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 20th, 1906.
Located July 12th.  1906.
27. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 18, Tp.
10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence
soutn 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
tnence north 80 chains; thence thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 18 of said
survey.
J. C. PORTER.
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 15th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land on the right
bank of the Skeena River, Range V,
Coast District: Commencing at a
post marked "James McGown, initial
post," at the N.E. corner of the New
Town Indian Reserve; thence west,
along the Indian Reserve line, 40
chains; thence north 40 cluiins; thence
east 40 chains; thence south along
the Skeena River to point of commencement, containing 150 acres,
more or less.
JAMES McGOWN.
December 13th, 1906. Dcc.15
TAKE NOTICE that, 60 days from
date, I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following described lands, situated on
the left bank of thc Skeena River,
'bout one mile below the Little
Canon and commencing at Ed. Midland's N.E. corner post on the bank
nf the Skeena. Thence S. 40 chains;
tiience E. 40 chains; thence N. 42
chains, more or less, to Sousie's S.
boundary; thence W. 3S chains, more
nr less, to the Skeena River; thence
\? 3 chains, more or less, to point of
commencement, containing 170 acres,
more or less.
N. GOWEN.
A. W. HARVEY, Agent.
Dec.15
30. Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of Section 16, Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thenct south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 21, Township
12, Range 5, of said survey.
CHAS. LEVE'ii,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 20th, 1006.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, in Alberni District;   3.
Commencing at a post by the shore of
Alberni Canal, near the southeast boundary post of Lot 658; thence west 80
chains; thence south to the north boundary line, or the same produced of Lot
I 69; thence east to Alberni Canal; thence
I following the shore line to point of cotn-
| mencement.
W. C. RALEIGH,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Oct. 20th, 1006. i6
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16 1907
The Vancouver Office of
THE WEEK
—is—
Room  14,  MacKinnon Block.
g Phone 2769.
VANCOUVER NOTES.
With the betterment of weather
conditions realty movements have
shown increased activity the past
week and many sales, especially to
people from the prairies, have been
recorded. The real estate and investment business sees new firms and
corporations continually entering the
field. Last week Messrs. York and
Mitchell opened up offices at 606 Hastings street, which has become the
centre of investors in Bulkley City
lots, for which this firm are city
agents. Mr. York is a practical hor-
ticulturalist, having been engaged in
the business for the past fifteen years
in the Fraser River valley, and 	
he and his partner intend to pay considerable attention to acreage property for prospective fruit growers.
In the same office Norman Norcross,
the genial ex-secretary of the One
Hundred Thousand Club, is to be
found, having been appointed general
agent for the Bulkley City Syndicate
in the disposal of the lots of the new
"Spokane" of the Northern Interior.
Norman Norcross as a practical newspaperman, has made good in his second publicity enterprise in placing
before investors an excellent proposition in Bulkley City property. A
vigorous advertising campaign in
the daily press, pregnant with optimistic language, has been successful
in the disposal of a large number of
lots in this latest townsite for public
favor, for Bulkley City possesses undeniable advantages in situation; potential wealth in the three great fertile valleys of the Skeena, Kespiox
and Bulkley which radiate from it;
water, coal and mineral that surround
it. Added to this is the confirmed
information that it is right on the
line of the Grand Trunk Pacific railway. The syndicate has wisely placed the price of the lots within reach
of the most modest investor, and not
only have Vancouverites purchased
liberally, but out-of-town buyers have
also been quick to take a chance. The
entrance of the National Finance Co.,
Ltd., in both the "Terminal City and
the "Capital City" will add another
corporation to the list of financial
institutions to share in the growth of
the west. The new corporation will
be managed here by H. J. Knott and
in Victoria by D. C. Reid. On good
authority it is learned that Gordon
Drysdale, who recently disposed of
his stock in the David Spencer (Vancouver) Ltd., intends to re-enter business here on his own account. He
is now considering the leasing of premises to be built on Granville street,
nearly opposite the Bank of Montreal, and if negotiations prove acceptable, will shortly leave for the east
on a purchasing trip.
Lumbermen Organize.
The same evening, in the same
building there was launched the B.
C. Timber and Forestry Association,
the primary aim of which is to unite
all interests in the preservation and
protection of the timber interest of
British Columbia. Temporary officers
were elected, till incorporation was
perfected and another meeting is called to complete the organization early
next month. Meanwhile the following officers will guide the destinies
of the new association: President, C.
S. Battle; vice-president. G. E. Davenport; secretary, A. F. Sutherland.
Vancouver Tourist Association.
The annual meeting of the Vancouver Tourist Association and election of officers resulted in the appointment of the following board of
directors: E. J. Coyle, R. H. Sperling, F. J. Proctor, W. C. Nichol, J.
J. Banfield, William Godfrey, Robert
Kelly. H. C. Clarke, W. H. Hargrave,
Aid. Heaps, Aid. Calland, C. H. Macaulay, J. R. Seymour, R. Ker Houl-
gate, W. D. Haywood. The' president's report showed that 125.000
pieces of literature had been distributed to every section of the globe
and that over 7,000 visitors had registered at the association's rooms,
and that at least 20,000 had called.
The report also estimated that o,-
000 tourists visited Vancouver the
past year. At a meeting of the new
executive, held after the regular meeting, the following were elected offi-
New Victor
Records
For All Disc Talking Machines
WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED A LARGE SHIPMENT OF
NEW VICTOR RECORDS OF WHICH THE FOLLOWING
ARE A FEW OF THE BEST NUMBERS:
4847 Bewitching    Beauty,    Bell
4418
Solo.
4844 Wiener     Burger     Waltz,
4709
Orchestra.
4841 Royal Trumpeters March.
4032
4867 Cherry Twostep, Band.
4907
4713 I Like Your Way, Song.
4786
4504 In the Valley of Yesterday,
4548
sung   by   Marry   McDon-
ough.
4735
4581 Gleaming Star Intermezzo.
4616 Where the  Morning Glor
4374
ies    Twine    Around    the
4525
Door.
Whistler   and   His   Dog,
Orchestra.
Out    in    an    Automobile,
Duet.
Garden Matinee, orchestra.
Arrah Wasma, duet.
Laurel and the Rose, duet.
My Word, comic song.
Belle of the Ball, new song
by C. K. Harris.
Dance California, bell solo.
Bazazza   Mazzaza,   march,
by Arthur Pryor.
PRICE:   10-inch Records, 65c.
7-inch Records, 35c.
Edison Records,  40c.
LATEST   CATALOGUES ON APPLICATION. WE
PAY  SPECIAL ATTENTION TO MAIL ORDERS.
FLETCHER BROS.
93 GOVERNMENT STREET
VICTORIA
cers for the ensuing year:
Hon. president—Mayor A. Bethune.
President—F. J. Proctor.
Vice-president—R. H. Sperling.
Second vice-president—W. H. Hargrave.
Hon.   treasurer—J.   J.   Banfield.
Secretary—W. E. Flumerfelt.
Literary committee—W. C. Nichol,
F. J. Proctor. W. H. Hargrave.
Gossip of the Week.
G. F. Cane, barrister and politician,
has been appointed County Court
Judge in place of Mr. Henderson, resigned.
C. D. Taprell left the end of the
week for Calgary, where he will assume the proprietorship of the Alberta Hotel. Previous to his departure he was the recipient of many
kindly tokens of regard both from his
fellow employees at the Hotel Vancouver, who gave him a set of French
Haviland china, and from personal
friends, including a farewell luncheon
at the Vancouver Club.
The British Columbia Permanent
Loan and Savings Company is having
plans prepared for a ten-story office
and store building at the corner of
Homer and Pender streets.
In the place of the defunct Guardian gossip hath it that a new morning independent paper is shortly to
be called the Morning News.
H. Cavanagh is now the pool champion of British Columbia. He secured the gold medal and title by defeating J. Latimer by a score of loo
to 72 at the tournament held at
"Con" Jones' billiard parlors.
Thursday afternoon a permanent
local centre of the St. John's Ambulance Association was formed at
the office of Dr. W. D. Brydone-
Jack.
George H. Cowan of the legal firm
of Cowan & Reid, has been appointed
city solicitor.
At the Play Houses.
The bookings at the Vancouver
Opera House to the end of the month
are as follows:
Feb. 19—The Fast Mail.
Feb. 21—Paul Gilmore in At Yale.
Feb. 22—Frieda Stenda and Ottie
Chew.
Feb. 25. 26 and 27—Scarlet Mysteries.
Feb. 28—Buster Brown.
Of all the attractions Manager
Ricketts has brought to Vancouver
this season none have been so eagerly looked forward to as "Madam
Butterfly," the Japanese operatic
masterpiece in three acts, by Giacomo
Puccini, which comes to the Opera
House on March 4th and 5th. Vancouver is the only western Canadian
city in which Henry W. Savage's
English Grand Opera Company will
be seen, and already mail orders are
flooding the booking office. An eastern dramatic critic sizes the piece up
as follows: "The performance is a
triumph for the poetic atmosphere of
the stage pictures, the witchery of
Puccini's score and the singing of the
Artists."
THE INSTRUCTION OF COXEY'S
ARMY.
(By a doggerel bard.)
With apologies to Lord Bygone.
The invaders came down like a wolf on
tlie fold,
Ami tlion* cohorts were laden with
whisky  und  gold,
And their scoffs and their jeers rang
o'er mountain und lea,
While the night settled dark on beleaguered B. C.
Like the leaves of tlie forest when summer  ls  green
That host with their banners at sunset
were seen;
Like tlie leaves of tlie forest when
autumn hath blown,
That host on tiie morrow were scattered
and strewn.
And there lay Macdonald, and Higgins,
his guide,
But with mem remained not a vestige
of pride;
And tlie foam of their raging bespattered the earth,
Where bubbles and scandals and libels
had birth.
And tliere lay Mclnnes, dishevelled and
pale,
With llic "Dim" on his brow and the
"Bust" on his tale;
Their touts were all silent, their banners  alone;
Their pibroch's all busied, their trumpets ail blown.
The .Sons of Toronto are loud in their
wall,
Coxey's Army is Hying o'er hill and o'er
dale;
And the might of the boodlors, who plotted   und  jawed,
Had no more effect tnan the crow when
he cawed.
Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Gore leave shortly for Mexico where their son, Mr. T.
S.  Gore resides.
7..
7
J
|;jP&*-
lr*MJ»'  yj-Jli
4^4^4M--aaB-N    :*3PwJ,--v°^»      1
A. Cosy Comer at tbe Poodle Dog.
The
Poodle Dog
Grill,
Yates St.,
Victoria, B. C, is
the only real
"grill" in British
Columbia—the
only place where
you can
ACTUALLY
obtain your
choice of meats
and all the delicacies of the
season.
I SMITH & SHAUGHNESSY
Prop rietors.
Your Visit
to Vancouver
WILL   BE   ALL   THE   MORE
PLEASURABLE BY DINING AT
The Bismark
CORNER ABBOTT AND HASTINGS STREETS
VANCOUVER.
Models of Inventions
DESIGNED, BUILT OR PERFECTED FOR
INVENTORS and PATENTEES
DRAWINGS      AND      BLUEPRINTS
Write for Particulars
VANCOUVER riODEL   HACHINE  AND
rvn P WOD!^   98° granville st., Vancouver.
\* I V/L.C    VV •UI\"Y*3, W. T. WATSON, Proprietor
Kodak Season
Is Approaching
Customers liviing out-of-town should write
for 1907 catalogues of Kodaks and
Photographic Supplies.    I carry
EASTMANS
CENTURY and
PREMO
Will Marsden
665 Granville Street
VANCOUVER, B.C.

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