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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Dec 11, 1909

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The Week
A British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria,  B. 6.
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HALL & WALKER   2
Agents Jj
WELLINGTON   COLLIERY 3
COMPANY'S COAL 3
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Vol. VI.   No. 4/^
THE WEEK., SATURDAY, DECEMBER ti.   1909
One Dollar Per Annum
The attitude taken by Tlie Week on
the subject of Civic Affairs has received
very wide endorsation, and is likely to bear
fruit in an overwhelmning vote in favour
of a Board of Control. The Week does
not believe that a Board of Control will bias satisfactory as a Board of Commissioners appointed by the Council. The
reason for this is not far to seek. In appointing a Board of Control the choice is
necessarily confined to residents of the
City, and while it may or may not be the
case that there are local men possessing
all the necessary qualifications the system
at least restricts the area from which
choice can be made. There is the further
consideration that if Commissioners could
have been appointed at a substantial salary
it would have been possible to engage men
who have had similar experience in some
of the largest Canadian cities, and whose
value would therefore of necessity be
higher. There is the final consideration
that they would have had no local affiliations, and would have come here with an
absolutely open mind. Tt seems to The
Week that such a Board of Commissioners
would have been more likely to initiate
new methods, and carry out fearlessly the
policy of the Council, than any local men,
who may be elected to a Board of Control.
But, the present Municipal Act does not
provide for this, and therefore The Week
gladly accepts the Board of Control as an
instalment of improved Civic management,
it may turn out better than expected, or
it may lead to the developement outlined
above. It must not, however, be forgotten
that election by popular vote is apt to
introduce an element in which the personal popularity of the candidate is a factor, and in which his absolute fitness for
the position ceases to be the only criterion.
The Week urges every voter to go to the
polls and make the vote in favour of the
new system so overwhelmning that there
can be no doubt that it carries the support
of practically the whole community. Such
a vote would greatly strengthen the hands
of the Controllers and the Council. In
this connection The Week expresses regret
that the Aldermen cling with such pertinacity to the few paltry dollars which
they receive for their services. Their willingness to accept payment at all is evidence of a lack of public spirit, to say
nothing of self respect. At no time could
such a payment be justified, but now that
the Council is to be relieved of probably
fifty per cent, of its detail work, there is
the less excuse for retaining the custom
which has become obsolete in self-respecting communities. There could be no better test of the calibre of the Council than
that its members should cling to such a
"douceur." It determines the measure of
their capacity and the value of their work,
and accounts for the general botch they
have made of things; but men who would
cling to $30 for rendering public service
which in advanced communities is voluntary, and a matter of pride would cling
with equal avidity to a dollar or "two-bits"
and in doing so mark themselves down below "thirty cents."
THE MAYORALTY
Three Mayoral candidates are in the
field, but only two need be taken seriously,
Mr. W. E. Oliver and Mr. J. A. Turner.
The Week has declared itself in favour of
the former, in spite of the fact that it
entertains a very high opinion of Alderman Turner, and has always admired his
CIVIC AFFAIRS
energy and progressiveness. With Mr.
Oliver out of the field he would receive
the unqualified support of this journal, but
with Mr. Oliver in the field it is entirely a
different matter. Either would make a
good mayor. Mr. Turner is a man of substance, of enterprise and of untiring industry. He is a competent man of affairs,
essentially of the business type. He has
had a good training, and if he reaches the
Mayoral Chair, and can have his way, Victoria will certainly be progressive. On
the other hand -Mr. Turner would not be
any the worse for a little more experience
of the city, its people and its requirements.
He has only been in the Council one year,
and resident in the City less than three.
The Week welcomes newcomers and never
ceases to urge their value to the community, and the advantage of their taking a
prominent part in public affairs, but a
jump from the outside to the Mayoralty
of Victoria in so short a time would partake of the nature of an experiment, although an experiment which it might be
wise to try if there were not a man in
the field against whom these objections
cannot be urged. As to Mr. W. E. Oliver
the only objection that can be raised
against him is that he is not well enough
known. That, however, is a matter which
can be remedied during the next month or
so. Mr. Oliver has been a resident of Victoria for many years; he is a modest, retiring man, and in the opinion of The
AVeek has too long hcliden his light under
a bushel. With the exception of the few
people Avho have enjoyed the pleasure of
his acquaintance Victorians know him
only as the Reeve of Oak Bay, and it is
upon his reputation in that office that he
appeals foi' the suffrages of the ratepayers.
Oak Bay is admitted to be a model municipality, and by common consent this is
mainly due to the diplomacy and skill of
Mr. Oliver, who showed himself to be a
man of great capacity, well able to hold
his own with the representatives of Victoria, ancl to get none the worse of the
bargain. Mr. Oliver is a man in the prime
of life, of unblemished reputation, of education, of energy, and of knowledge. His
means have enabled him to travel all over
the world ancl he has acquired a fund of
information which would be invaluable to
a City just starting on a career of expansion. Moreover, Mr. Oliver is a man who
would not be swayed by any party or
clique for he has not been an active politician. Indeed, his politics are not even
known to his personal friends; he would
therefore bring to the Mayoral Chair an
absolutely independent mind, ancl would
be able to discharge the duties of his office
.with dignity. The Week is aware that
rumours have been circulated with respect
to Mr. Oliver's investments, and his possible bias in connection with the Water
ancl other schemes. This is unworthy of
a moment's credence. Mr. Oliver is not
the type of man who could be swayed by
any improper motives, ancl it is indeed a
desperate resort to make use of such weapons to fight him. It is to be hoped that
the parochial spirit which delights in such
malicious tittle-tattle will never take root
in Victoria.    The Week believes that by
the time Mr. Oliver has completed his
programme, which will bring him in touch
with every ward in the municipality, and
the people have had an opportunity of
hearing his exposition of Civic affairs,
they will realize that he is a man of exceptional capacity and character and that
it would be a wise move to elect him to the
position of chief magistrate rather than to
lake anyone, however capable, from the
ranks of a Council which has brought such
discredit on the City, and which has
shown such general incapacity for handling
its business.
SMITH'S HILL RESERVOIR
The remarks of The Week on the subject of Smith's Hill Reservoir have received a more speedy and emphatic endorsation than was anticipated. Mr. Icke,
the acting superintendent under W. L.
Adams, has returned to the City, and the
story he tells is certainly an entertaining
one. He is an engineer of wide experience, with at least some regard for his
reputation, and it now appears that he
deliberately threw up his job because he
knew that bad workmanship and bad material were going into the work of construction. It also turns out that he made
a statement to this effect to the Water Commissioner when he resigned, and he claims
that the Mayor was also informed. This
puts both the Water Commissioner and
the Mayor in a tight place, although, as
the Colonist sagely points out, it does not
fix any responsibility, because under our
present delightful system of municipal
management nobody is responsible for anything. Since it is admitted that through
somebody's neglect the City is involved in
a loss of $40,000, is it too much to ask for
an independent investigation, which will
cover not only the character of the workmanship but the quality of the cement and
other material used ?
THE CITY ENGINEER
Whatever capacity the City Engineer
may or may not possess for executing public works, he shares with the Mayor a very
evident capacity for evading a direct question. Half a dozen complaints have been
formulated against his department in the
public press. He adroitly selects one,
ignores all the others, and shifts the blame
to the shoulders of the Council. This
might have been expected, but the evasion
is unworthy of the smallest intellect. The
only point whicli the City Engineer takes
up is that of flooding during the recent
rainstorm, ancl he claims that it was due
to insufficiency of funds to put in lateral
drains to connect with the main drain.
This may be perfectly true, and if so, is
only another illustration of the incompetency of the Council. But what shall be
thought of an engineer who is willing to
go ahead with an appropriation insufficient
to complete the work, ancl certain to leave
it in such a condition that it would bc a
discredit to all concerned. It would have
been very much more to the purpose if the
engineer had explained why material was
left to clog manholes, and the mouth of
drains, when construction work was completed and inspected. Why it has taken
four times  as  long  to  do  the  work on
James Bay Causeway as it should have
taken, with no prospect whatever of completion in sight. Why it has already taken
twice as long as is necessary to do the work
at the West end of Rockland Avenue
Why thc dangerous portion of Cook Street
between Fort and Rockland is allowed to
remain in its present condition month
after month, a condition which will undoubtedly lead to a serious accident. Why
lie allows large sharp rocks to be clumped
on a main thoroughfare, without any top
dressing or covering. Why street work is
costing in some instances twice the amount
foi' wliieh it could be let by contract to
a substantial contractor. These are only
a few of the questions about which the
ratepayers would like to have a little information. So far they have been sidestepped.
r
W. E. OLIVER FOR MAYOR
%
THE HOUSE OF LORDS
The fight is on, but not the fight which
our worthy contemporary, the Colonist, and
a few hundred other Canadian papers have
been anticipating with such unholy glee.
If has been dinned into our ears for the
hist year or so that the Lords were marching to their doom, that the populace had
been roused to a sense of indignation, and
would sweep them out of existence. That
all other political issues would bc sunk in
face of a demand that the Lords should
no longer be allowed to over-ride the popular chamber and to thwart the will of the
people. The astonishing part of it is that
if one takes up the English papers as
they arrive day after day there is no evidence of all these threatened calamities; it
is true there is a strenuous fight, but it is
political, and there is not behind it one-
half the excitement and enthusiasm as
characterized the great Home Rule battle
of 188C. At tbat time the Unionists
claimed that the Empire was in danger,
ancl the constituencies endorsed their
claim. No one now claims that the Empire, or even the country, is in danger, and
in spite of the fact that there has been a
sharp split between the Lords and tho
Commons on the Budget Bill, the fact remains that even the most fiery orators of
the Government platform have not ventured to make 'Down with the Lords" the
issue of the campaign. This is precisely
what The Week has always said. The
Radicals, who now wag the great Liberal
Party, will bluster ancl brag, but when it
comes to a "show clown" they will never
dare to make the abolition of the Lords a
test question; if they did and stood on
that alone they would not return fifty
members to Parliament outside of the
Irish Nationalists. They know perfectly
well that behind all this sensational denunciation the real issue is that of Tariff Reform. Mr. Balfour, ancl the other leaders
of the Conservative Party have very
adroitly succeeded in forcing this issue to
the front because whilst refusing to endorse the Budget Bill, until it has received the inprimatur of the electorate.
They pointed out that Tariff Reform furnished the only means of relief for the conditions with which thc drastic provisions
of the Budget Bill sought to deal with.
This renders thc issue less certain, but it
is more honest ancl whatever the result it
brings to the front the one topic most deserving of public consideration, and upon
which it would be most satisfactory to have
a verdict. Whatever the result, there will
he no interference with the Lords, who,
however they may havc exasperated Mr.
Lloyd-George ancl Mr. Winston Churchill,
have pursued a perfectly logical and constitutional course. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER u, 1909
* Social and        *
* Personal. J
__m__m__m_M_______m _____________ ^Mm _m_ __________»_________________________________________ __________»
fV '*' '*' '*' 1' 'J.1 W *V™W™ ™
Mr. N. A. Graham from New York
is a guest at the Empress Hotel.
* *   *
Miss Pooley paid a visit to Seattle
during the week
* *   *
Miss Howell of this city is staying
with friends in Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. George Barclay, from
Kamloops are paying a visit to Victoria.
* *   *
Miss Foster is visiting friends in
Vancouver.
Miss Ethel Lawson, from Vancouver, who has been thc guest of Mrs.
Raymur for the last week, returned
home on Friday last.
•t*   *    *
Mrs. Arthur Spalding from South
Pender Island is the guest of her
mother, Mrs. James MacKay, Carberry Gardens.
Mrs. H. Curtis from Vancouver,
who has been staying in Victoria for
the last fortnight, returned home last
Sunday evening.
* *   *
A marriage took place last Wednesday week between Mr. Joseph Leslie Evans (youngest son of Mr. and
Mrs. Evans of this city), and Miss
Myrta M. Wallace of Pocahontas.
Idaho, second daughter of the late
William Wallace. The wedding was
celebrated at the residence of the
parents of the groom, 115 Croft St.
The Rev. Dr. Campbell officiated at
the ceremony. Miss Marguerite
Evans played the wedding march.
The young couple left the same evening for Vancouver where they will
make their home for the future.
* *   *
The marriage of Miss Gertrude
Hickey and Mr. A, W. Harvey will
take place in Vancouver on Wednesday, December the 15th.
* *   *
Mr. Clifford Brown and Mr. H.
Pooley were passengers to Vancouver last Wednesday.
* *   *
A marriage of interest to Victorians
was that of Miss Sybil Frances Bagshawe, eldest daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. E. C. B. Bagshawe of this city
to Mr. Francis Vaughan Penrose
Cowley, member of the Dominion
Hydrographic Survey Department.
The ceremony which was performed
by the Rev. Canon Cowley, father of
thc bridegroom, took place at St.
Mark's on Tuesday morning. The
-wedding was only a quiet one, only
relatives and a few intimate friends
of the young couple being present.
Upon their return from their honeymoon which is being spent in the
Sound cities, Mr. and Mrs. Cowley
will take up tlieir residence on Dunsmuir street, Esquimalt.
Clean white sheepskin rugs by
scrubbing with castile soap and water,
drying thoroughly in the sun.
Make a pad about two feet long, of
old bed comforts, to stand on when
ironing.   It will save much fatigue.
Feathers uncurled by damp weather
are quickly dried by shaking over fire
in which salt has been thrown.
Bent whalebones can be restored
and used again by simply soaking in
water a few hours, then drying them.
Newspapers cut into very thin
strips, or torn into tiny shreds, make
a good pillow, which must be kept
shaken up.
LOWEST
PRICES
are given here in
SEA GRASS AND RATTAN
CHAIRS
They make a nice addition to
the drawing or sitting room. All
are priced very low for Christmas trade.
Chinaware and
Novelties
of every description.   Come in.
LEE DYE & CO.
Next Fire Hall
Cormorant St. --Victoria
A WEALTHY LAWYER
Recently spent two days and a night over one case and
at the end of that time could not tell which side he was on.
He kept silent about it, but some of his fellow citizens
did not.
Some went so far as to say it was a case of silence-
that "Mumm" was the word.
However, if it was a case of champagne, as some
inferred, doubtless it was "Selected Brut" or "Extra Dry,"
because G. H. Mumm & Co.'s champagnes are always to
be found where connoisseurs and wealthy people gather
together.
Whenever courtesy and good taste prevail you will
find a universal demand for these best of all wines.
G. H. Mumm & Co.'s champagnes are absolutely unequalled,—unrivalled.
They are used exclusively at all the highest class banquets and best functions throughout the civilized world
because they are the only champagnes that satisfy the
cultivated taste in their purity and quality.
At first class wine merchants, hotels, cafes, grocers.
PITHER   &   LEISER
Sole Agents for B.C.
Cor. Fort and Wharf Streets, Victoria.
Something: New
We are now able to offer to our patrons
A   GUARANTEE
on our splendid line of PLATED KNIVES, FORKS and SPOONS.
This line which is specially made for us is guaranteed to have
MORE SILVER than any other standard make and we GUARANTEE to replace
Free of Charge
any of these goods which, a er use, do not prove satisfactory. This
condition we believe accompanies no other flatware made.
Prices as follows:—
COFFEE SPOONS  P-» doz. $8.70
TEASPOONS  " 3-15
DESSERTSPOONS   " 4-95
TABLESPOONS  " 5-85
DESSERT FORKS   " 4-95
TABLE FORKS   '' S*S
DESSERT KNIVES     " 4-95
TABLE KNIVES    " 5-4°
Challoner & Mitchell
Diamond Merchants and Silversmiths
1017 Qovernment Street Victoria, B. C.
Headquarters for choice nursery stock
Apple, pear, cherry, plum and peach trees
and small fruits, also ornamental trees,
shrubs, roses, evergreens, etc. Largest and
best assorted stock in British Columbia.
Ten per cent, cash discount on all orders
above $10.00.
PRICE LIST AND CATALOGUE ON
APPLICATION.
Good Skates
Good Instructors
SKATING
Assembly Rink, Fort St.
Morning   10.00 to 12.00
Afternoon     2.00 to 4-3°
Evening     7.45 to 10.00
Good Music Good Time
Build Up a Reserve Now
Now, while your earning power is good, why not convert part of
it into a Cash Reserve that will, later on, yield a competence for
old age? You can easily do it by regularly depositing a part of your
income in
The Dominion Bank
One dollar and upwards opens an account, and with systematic
saving and Compound Interest, the fund will rapidly accumulate.
Begin today.
VICTORIA, B.C., BRANCH
Temporary Offices Broad and Fort Streets
C. E. THOMAS, Manager.
IB. C. Funeral Furnishing Co'y
1016 Government Street, Victoria, B. C.
Chas. Hayward, Pres
R. Hayward, Sec.
P, Caselton, Manager
Oldest and most up-to-date
Undertaking Establishment
in B. 0.
Established 1867 §§
_
I
Telephones—48,   594,   1905,   305,   or   404. !|
zA Machine That Has No Equal
The Underwood Typewriter
Sold by Baxter & Johnson
809 Government Street       ....       Office Supplies
Christmas Cheer and New Year Gladness is
augmented by filling the cup of Friendship tbith
Buchanans 'RED SEAL or HOUSE  OF
COMNONS Scotch Whisky. Sold everywhere.
%ADIGER & JANION
1318 Wharf Street
_ritish Columbia Agents
An Attractive Window
Is your best advertisement. Let us install a few TUNGSTEN
LAMPS for the Christmas Season. They will draw trade your
way.
'Phone 1609, when our representative will be pleased to call
and explain the merits of this Lamp.
B. C. ELECTRIC RY. CO. Limited
Light and Power Department
Box 560 Phone 1609
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Queen Charlotte.
118
TAKE NOTICE that William Ellis, of
Vancouver, B.C., intends to apply for
permission to prospect for coal on the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
two miles south and two miles east of
the outlet of the Yakoun River, Graham
Island, post marked W.E., S.W. Cor.;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated October 13, 1909.
WILLIAM ELLIS,
oct 13 Matthew Yomans, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Queen Charlotte.
119
TAKE NOTICE that William Ellis, of
Vancouver, B.C., intends to apply for
permission to prospect for coal on the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
two miles south and two miles east of
the mouth of the Yakoun River, post
marked W.E., N.W. Cor.; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commeneement, containing
640 acres, more or less.
Dated October 13, 1909.
WILLIAM ELLIS,
oct 13 Matthew Yomans, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Queen Charlotte.
120
TAKE NOTICE that William Ellis, of
Vancouver, B.C., intends to apply for
permission to prospect for coal on the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
two miles south and two miles east of
the outlet of the Yakoun River, post
marked W.E., N.E. Cor.; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated October 13, 1909.
WILLIAM ELLIS,
oct 13 Matthew Yomans, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Queen Charlotte.
TAKE NOTICE that William Ellis, of
Vancouver, B.C., intends to apply for
permission to prospect for coal on the
following described lands:
l_
Commencing at a post planted about
two miles south of the mouth of the
Yakoun River and on the east bank,
post marked W. E., N.W. Cor.; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains to point of commencement; and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated October 13, 1909.
WILLIAM ELLIS,
oct 13 Matthew Yomans, Agent. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER n, 1909
Last Thursday week Miss Glady.*-
Perry was hostess of a small tea
given at the home of her aunt, Mrs.
E. G. Prior, in honour of Miss Johnson from Vancouver who is visiting
her. Some of those present were:
Mrs. Alexis Martin, Miss Mason, Miss
Lorna Eberts, Miss Langley, Miss
Gillespie, Miss Eleanore MacDowell,
Miss Gladys Pitts, Miss Geraldine
Cambie. Miss B. Monteith, Miss Wilmot, Miss Fell and others.
* *   *
Mr. Blanchard Bell of this city left
during the week for Prince upert,
where he will reside for the future.
* *   *
Mrs. McCallum, Lampson street,
has issued invitations for a bridge
party for ioth and nth.
* *   *
Mrs. and Miss Heisterman are
guests at the Aberdeen House on
Blanchard street, where they will
spend the winter months. They will
receive on the first and third Mondays
of the month.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Ford from Nanaimo passed through the city last
Sunday en route to Los Angeles.
* *   *
A wedding which took place recently was that of Miss Elsie Scrope
Shrapnel and Mr. William H. G.
Phipps. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Mr. Miller at St. Barnabas Church. Miss Shrapnel was
gowned in a very smart white tailor-
made suit, and wore a large white
beaver hat. Her sister, Miss Eva
Shrapnel made a very charming
bridesmaid, wearing a white serge suit
and black panne hat. The bridegroom was supporred by Mr. Dewdney. After the ceremony the young
couple left for Portland to spend their
honeymoon.
* *   it-
Mr. Bcresford-Webb from London,
Eng., is a guest in the city.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Barnard will
leave shortly for an extended trip
to the Old Country.
* *   *
Miss Lawson of this city is visiting friends in Vancouver.
Mr. A. G. Potts spent a few days
of the  week in  Seattle  on  business.
Last Monday evening Government
. House was the scene of a small but
very charming fancy dress dance. The
supper table was very artistically decorated with pink carnations, and asparagus fern. Sonic of those present
were: Miss Mason in a pretty Carmen
costume, Miss Marion Dunsmuir,
Miss Bryden, Mrs. Guy Warner, Miss
Savage and Mrs. H. Pooley all in
Merry Widow costumes, Miss Doris
Mason, Miss Paula Irving, Miss Lorna Eberts, Miss Helen Peters, Miss
Pooley, Miss Violet Pooley, Miss Garrett, Miss Gillespie, Miss Gladys Perry, Mrs. Victor Elliot, Miss Langley,
Mrs. Jack Rithet and Messrs. Roger
Monteith, John Arbuckle, Jack Cambie, Lowry, Young, Brotherton, Marshall, H. Pooley, Warner, Rithets,
Capt. MacDonald, Gore, Langton, Dr.
Taylor, J. Mason, Foote, D, Gillespie, G. Johnson, James, Bruce Irving,
Cane, Dewdney, C. Brown and others.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Carmichael,
who have been visiting the Old Country are again in town.
Dr. Fagan is out of town on a short
business trip.
* *   *
Mrs. Luckwood left last Friday for
an extended visit to the west coast.
* *   *
Mrs. Walter Langley spent a few
days of the week visiting friends in
Seattle.
* *   *
Captain R. G. Tatlow was a visitor
to Vancouver during the week.
* *   *
Mr. D. Mark Carley from Ladysmith is a guest in the city.
* *   *
Miss Garret, from Seattle, is the
guest of Mrs. C. E. Pooley, Lamp-
son street.
* *   *
Miss Gaudin left last Thursday eve-1
ning for Southern California where!
she   intends   to   spend   the   winter j
months.
* *   *
Mr. G.  E. Powell, who has been!
paying the city a short visit, returned
to his  home last Thursday evening.
* *   »
Last Thursday week a marriage
took place between Mr. G, W. New
ton of London, Eng., and Miss Nora
J. Yorke of Upper Sumas. The Rev.
Mr. Heneage performed the ceremony
at Christ Church Cathedral. Only
intimate friends and relatives attend-
* *   *
ed the wedding. On their return
from their honeymoon Mr. and Mrs.
Newton will take up their residence
at the Vernon Chambers.
* *   *
Mrs. Croft has issued invitations
for a Children's Fancy Dress party
on December 17th.
* *   *
Mr. Brakespeare from Duncans paid
Victoria a short visit.
* *   *
Mr. Hugh Ashby from Kamloops
is the guest of Mr. Henry Croft,
Dunsmuir Road.
* »   *
Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Garrard, who
have been visiting in Alberni, are
again in the city.
* * *
Mr. J. A. Kirkpatrick, from Prince
Rupert, is registered at the King Edward Hotel.
* *   *
Dr. Darrel Hannington, from
Queen's Hospital, Rock Bay, passed
through Victoria on his way to Wilmer, B.C., during the week.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. W. Grey from Vancouver, who have been guests in the
city for the last week, returned home
last Tuesday evening.
* *   *
Mr. P. West from London, Eng.,
is a guest in the city.
* +      *
Mrs. John D. Hamberly, from Vancouver, is the guest of Mrs. J. T. Cottar of this city.
ns
NOTICE
PROVINCIAL LEGISLATIVE
ASSEMBLY
PRIVATE BILLS
Copies of Bills, Petitions, and notices
as published must be deposited with,
and all fees paid to, the Clerk of the
House, not later than 12th January,
1910.
Petitions for Bills will not be received by the House after 31st January,
1910.
Bills must be presented to the House
not   later   than   10th  February,   1910.
Reports from  Standing Committee on
Bills will not be received by the House
after  17th  February,   1910.
THORNTON  FELL,
Clerk, Legislative Assembly.
Victoria, lst November, 1909.
nov 20
PANTAGES
THEATRE
Excellent Program
NEXT WEEK
Don't Pail to Visit Us
JOHNSQN-KETCHEL
Championship Contest
Illustrated    in    film    showing    the
original motion pictures of the
Saturday, Dec. 11th
UP=TO=DATE BILL
WEEK DECEMBER 13
The New Grand
Telephone 618
SULLIVAN 4 CONSIDINE,    Prap.latora.
Manactment af RONT. JAMIESON
BROTHERS WHITMAN
In  a  Thrilling  Scenic  Centortion
Novelty
GERTRUDE VAN DYKE
Two Voices of Distinctly
Different Quality
Johnc Mayne
ROBISCH and CHILDRESS
In the Musical  Eccentricity
"A Strenuous Pupil"
McLINN BROS.
Horizontal   Bar   Experts
RAY FERN
Singing Comedian
THOS.  J. PRICE
"The Preacher and The Bear"
NEW MOVING PICTURES
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
TH EAT
Special Notice
-A tf S5Et «. MANA.
I
H.   H.   Frazee  presents  the  Musical '    F've. cents  car rfare  a"  this  week
,    _, will take you as far as the
Comedy Classic
A Girl at the Helm
With Mr. Billy Clifford, Harry Dicke-
son, Marguerite DeVon, John Trainor,
Blanche Warren, Chas. Wanzer and
Mabelle Palmer.
Book and Lyrics by Robert B. Smith
Music by Raymond Hubbell
A Host of Bright Comedy and
Musical Features
12  BIG SONG HITS 12
Prices—25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50.
Seat sale open 10 a.m. Wednesday,
December 15th,
Victoria
Theatre
and ten cents more will admit you
to see the London Bioscope and a
Grand Amateur Entertainment.
A whole evening's amusement for a
small price.
Special Saturday Matinee for children—Five Cents.
Silver Match Boxes $1.25 to $3.50 ,|
Flasks $1.75 to $4.00
Manicure Sets $2.00 to $25.00
Toilet Sets $5.00 to $60.00 ''■■
Children's Cups $1.00 to $10.00
Silver Candlesticks  $3.00 to
Silver Puff Boxes $1.00 to
Silver Photo Frames  50c tc
Silver and Brass Perfume Bottles 50c to
Cut Glass Bowls  $4.00 to
Fans, lovely Parisian goods  $1.25 to
$15-00
$10.00
$20.00
$ 8.00
$15-00
$10.00
FREE, DECEMBER 18th
Upon this date we will present to every lady who enters
our store a SILVER THIMBLE ABSOLUTELY FREE OF
CHARGE
W. H. Wilkerson, the Jeweler
Telephone 1606 915 GOVERNMENT STREET
Interesting
Instructive
R0MM©
THEATRE
A visit to our amusement house wil! prove that we have the best
in Moving Pictures and Illustrated Songs.
Daily from 2 p.m. to 5.30 p.m., and 7 until 11 p.m.
Saturday performances commence at 1 p.m. sharp.
Complete change every Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
ADMISSION—Ten Cents; Children at Matinee, Five Cents.
ORCHESTRA IN ATTENDANCE.
A PLACE OF ATTRACTION FOR THE
YOUNG AND OLD IS
EMPRESS
THEATRE
The strides made in the improvement of Moving Pictures are
nothing more than marvellous.
They are not only interesting to look at but instructive and
impressive and oftentimes portray a lesson worth learning.
Complete change  of programme  on  Mondays,  Wednesdays
and Fridays.
Continuous performance:  2.00 to .30—7.00 to 10.30 p.m.
Children's Matinees: Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday—Five Cents.
Admission - Ten Cents
rVUEJTIC
THEATRE
Yates Street, Just Below Government
where you can see the latest and best Motion Pictures
money and skill can produce. Illustrated songs. Continuous performance daily from 2 to 5.30—7 to 11.
Admission—10 cents;   Children to Matinee, 5 cents.
CHANGE OF PROGRAMME
Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER n, iqo9
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
* IHE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
-Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
1308 Government St., Victoria, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE, Editor.
Domestic Service
i I have been asked to run a spiel
on the subject of Service, presumably
because being both a bachelor and a
Bohemian T am supposed to know
more about it than the poor Benedict
Who is brought into contact with its
most  discomforting features  day  by
day.
T hardly know where to begin, because we are living in an age when
men are trying to persuade each other
that the badge of servitude is degrading, at any. rate this is the aim of a
very blatant clique in the New World.
The Socialist starts out with his whine
about "class-consciousness" which he
defines to be the state of mind at
which a inan has arrived when he
realizes that he is serving another instead of being his own boss. I am
not going to discuss in this article
the fallacies of Socialism.
Nothing would be easier than to
explode the theory that if all men
were "class-conscious," it would advance the interests of the race. Carlyle has written much, and effectively,
on the dignity of labour; and all the
best books of the best philosophers
exalt its worth and influence in promoting the finest traits of human
character.
The nobility of a man does not depend on whether he is a servant or a
boss, it depends on how he discharges his duty in whatever station
of life he may be called to move.
Happily the "class-conscious" clique
is not making very great progress.
There is, however, a phase of the
question which is obtruding itself on
public notice more and more every
year, and in the United States and
Canada it has assumed such serious
proportions that all students of sociology are devoting their time to
thc problem, and seeking for some
solution, it is the question of the domestic servant. It can hardly be said
that this species of "class-consciousness" began in the New World, because it is just about forty years
since the difficulty of obtaining domestic servants in England began to
be felt. It supervened on a period
of phenomenal industrial prosperity,
which followed the Franco-German
war,  and  lasted from  1870  to   1874.
During this time, or at least during
a considerable portion of it, the
armies of France and Germany withdrew hundreds of thousands of workmen from industrial pursuits, with the
result that all competing countries
had an opportunity such as had never
come to them before. In England
coal, iron and steel, reached fabulous
prices, and in the United States
.something very similar happened.
This was the first great impetus given
to the movement for shorter hours
and higher wages which has never
since been materially checked, and
which has determined for' all time
that the industrial worker shall receive a higher percentage of the profits of his industry than before.
The immediate effect was to bring
undreamt of wealth into the home
of the working man, especially if he
were a coal miner or an iron worker,
and then for the first time, at any
rate in England, the daughters of
such households began to array themselves in finery; to copy the styles
of the upper classes and to start out
on a career of semi-independence
which they have pursued ever since.
The result has been a growing disinclination to enter domestic service, a
preference for the workshop, the factory, the office, or the store. Alongside of this has grown, up a determination on the part of women to be
wage-earners on their own account,
.-> 11 < 1 as is'well known they have entered   very   largely   into   avocations
which  were previously the  sole prerogative of the male sex.
All these conditions have been reproduced in the New World, but, in
an accentuated form, because wealth
is more evenly distributed. Thc
wages of the worker are higher, the
the fashion has been set every-
lines of social demarcation are inoperative except as to a very small
class. The public school system of
Canada and the States has done much
to bring tllis about, for in spite of
the social distinctions which wealth
is apt to develope everywhere, the
fact remains that school girls form
friendships to the continuance of
which even wealth is no barrier. The
natural consequence of all tllis is that
girls for domestic service are hardly
to be found in this country; it is :i
recognized fact that, vvith very few
exceptions,  they have to be imported.
Take any large city in Canada from
Halifax to Victoria, make a house to
house canvass, wherever domestic servants are employed, and it will be
found that more than ninety per cent
are brought into Canada from different countries in Europe for the express purpose of being so engaged
and in a short time the majority of
these either marry, or drift into other
occupations.
The reasons why it is more difficult
now than years ago to obtain an adequate supply of domestic servants in
England need not be canvassed beyond the general explanation laid
down, but it may be profitable to pursue the subject a little further as far
as Canada is concerned and it is not
difficult to one who has lived in different parts of the country and studied the subject at close quarters to
assign conclusive reasons for the difficulty. I am prepared to risk the
criticism which I know will follow
when I tabulate the following statements. First, the majority of Canadian women, who would be mistresses
are little if any superior in social position or attainments to the women
whom they would employ, and are
therefore unable to appreciate the relative positions of a mistress and ;i
servant as they should be appreciated,
or to treat the servant with the same
measure of respect as she loks for in
return. This is a condition which
can only be remedied as the country
grows, and culture and consideration
become more ingrained in our people.
The next difficulty is that in Canada
a servant is expected to be literally
a "maid of all work." Outside two
or three of the larger cities there are
comparatively few people who can
afford the luxury of a cook, a housemaid and a kitchen maid, and yet
without these three no well regulated household can be properly run.
It is not too much to say that ninety-
nine per cent of Canadian mistresses,
who want domestic help, want only
one woman, and want her to do a bit
of everything.
The next difficulty is that clothing
and all the gew-gaws which girls are
so fond of are extremely dear, and
although a servant gets $20 a month
in Canada as against $10 in England,
she cannot get much more with her
money, and so in the end is not very
much better off.
Another reason is the very obvious
one that in a country where men
largely predominate, and where they
earn big wages, the girl has plenty
of chances of being married, and no
girl is going to remain in domestic
service when that opportunity comes
along.
The final and a very prevalent reason for the whole difficulty is that
with the home earnings so much
larger than in England it is less a
matter of importance for a girl to
go out to service, and if she does she
will not stay unless everything is
agreeable.
1 daresay some of my readers will
say this is all very well, but what
is the remedy? My opinion remains
unchanged, 1 expressed it pretty fully
more than three years ago in this
column; it is that Canadian women
will have to be trained to do their
own work, and that they in turn will
have to train their daughters. I have
always claimed that the curiculum of
our public schools is a farce from
the standpoint of domestication, that
instead of training girls to fit them
The elections once more being over
c/lffairs again in normal state
Now's the time to get to business-
Is your printing up-to-date ?
If it isn't-Try Cusack
If it is—Try Cusack, anyhow
The telephone number is 220
for household duties we are training
them almost entirely for the office or
the store, and this training is bearing
fruit every day.
Only last week a young woman applied to me for the position of stenographer; she is about twenty-three
years of age, has been married three
years and has two babies, and yet
she actually preferred going out and
working in an office for wages to staying at home and attending to her children, as was her very obvious duty, j
and this in spite of the fact that going out meant paying someone to
mind her children during working
hours. The reason was two-fold, between what she would have to pay
for assistance and what she would
earn in an office the margin is considerable, but the reason assigned was
that she didn't like housework and
that the care of the children bothered
her, and anyhow she preferred being
out.
Now this is a typical case, and there
arc many more like it. If it means
anything it means that our girls are
being trained on false lilies, and the
only thing to bring them back to
sanity is stern necessity. With the
spread of democratic ideas it may bc
taken for granted that domestic service by women will gradually become extinct, and unless the girls of
the coming generation can be imbued
with the idea that tliere is some
nobler occupation in life than to deck
themselves with cheap finery, and
spend their evenings at vaudeville
houses, there is no hope of a solution
of the problem of domestic service.
To a Friend
Through   drenching   deeps    a   ship   is
sailing,*
A battered, broken journeyer,
And yet she keeps her course unfailing—
A harbour waits  for her.
Hope of that port her way doth order,
How far soever on  the sea;
Ah, so thy heart, beyond the Border,
Beckons and governs me!
—.George  Herbert  Clarke,  In  the
December Canadian Magazine.
To clean lace baste it nicely on a
piece of muslin. Rub it freely with
cold starch until it forms a paste on
it. Put in the sun to dry, and when
thoroughly dry rub off. Your lace
will then be clean and need no ironing.
The Vassal
Wind of the North, O far, wild wind
Born of a far, lone sea,
Where suns are soft and breezes  kind,
Why are ye kin to  me?
Uncounted years above the sea,
Roek-fortressed from Its rage,
The Fisherman,  thy  fathers,  kept
A barren heritage—
Grim as the sea they forced to pay
The sea-toll of their wage.
And lo! The Fate which made thee hers
And gave thee of her best
And set thee In a sunny place
Down-sloping to the west
Forgot to change thy fisher's heart,
Serf to the sea's unrest!
Wind of the North!    O bitter wind,
I hear the wild seas fret—
In the dim spaces of the mind
I am its vassal yet!
—Isabel Ecclestone Mackay, in the
December Canadian Magazine.
RUPERT   DISTRICT.
170
NOTICE is hereby given that I intend
applying to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands at Alberni for a license to
prospect for Coal under the following
area North of Quatsino Sound, viz.:
Commencing at the South-east corner
of Lot 51, thence south one mile; west
one mile; north one mile and east one
mile to place of beginning.
September 30th,  1909.
CHARLY NORDSTROM,
nov 20 Chris Nordstrom, Agent
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
ISO
Faith and Feet
Tam and Sandy rushed up to Leith
West Pier as the pleasure steamer
started in which they had intended
to sail.
"Eh, min, Sandy," said Tam, "if I
could only walk on the watter, I'd
catch her yet."
"If yer faith was as great as yer
feet," replied Sandy, "ye micht."
In the matter of the Estate of Andrew
McAfee, deceased.
NOTICE Is hereby given that all persons having any claims or demand
against the Estate of Andrew McAfee,
deceased, who died on or about the 2nd
day of November, 1909, are requested
to send, by post prepaid, or to deliver
to the undersigned their names and addresses, with full particulars of their
claims, and particulars of all securities
(if any) held by them, duly verified, on
or before the 10th day of January, 1910.
Dated this 10th day of December, 1909.
BODWELL & LAWSON,
No.  918  Government  Street,  Victoria,
B.C., Solicitors for the Executor,
dec 11
No.  402 179
CERTIFICATE   OF   THE   REGISTRATION OF AN EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANY.
"Companies Act, 1897"
A Poser
Mildred, young Snooks is always
calling.    Has he any money?"
"Well, father, he gave me this for
Christmas," answered the girl, exhibiting a splendid diamond ring.
"Urn! Well, we'll put the question
another way: Has he any money
left?"
Ethel (finding the sermon tedious and
thinking it high time for the collection)
—Oh, mother, do pay the man and let's
go home.
Elegant mock roast chicken is
made by cutting stale bread into odd
shapes like the different parts of a
fowl, then roll in beaten ,egg and
serve with gravy and dressing.
I HEREBY CERTIFY that the "Ml-
chigan-Puget Sound Lumber Company,"
an Extra-Provincial Company, has this
day been registered as a company under the "Companies' Act, 1S97," to carry
out or effect all or any of the objects
of the Company to which the legislative
authority of the Legislature of British
Columbia  extends.
The head office of the Company is
situate at the City of Detroit in the
State  of  Michigan.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is fifty thousand dollars, divided into five thousand shares of ten
dollars each.
The head office of the company in this
Province Is situate at No. 1114 Langley
street, Victoria, and William John Taylor, Barrlster-at-law, whose address is
Victoria, B.C., Is the attorney for the
Company not empowered to issue and
transfer stock.
The time of the existence of the Company is thirty years from the 22nd day
of November, A.D.  1909.
Given   under   my   hand   and   seal   of
office  at   Victoria,   Province  of  British
Columbia,  this third day  of December,
one thousand nine hundred and nine.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which  this Company
has been established and registered are:
Buying, selling, manufacturing and dealing in forest products,
dec 11
A couple of pounds of flour, one-
half for sponge, four eggs, quarter
pound of sugar and one-half teaspoonful of mace makes a nice german fruit
cake. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER u, 1909
A GRAND HOIDAY EXPOSITION
AWAITS YOUR EARLY INSPECTION HERE
We know that there is a holiday exposition of holiday worthiness ready for you here, thc equal of which you
have never before seen in this city, and unless you have lived in much larger centres, better than you have yet seen.
Extensive preparations have been made to present for your consideration an unusually magnificent assortment, preparations that have extended over many months, and the result is excellent testimony of unusual care and expert choosing.
A hearty invitation to inspect is extended to you and we trust you will find it convenient to visit us soon—we want
you to see a complete display.
Dainty Gifts For Women
HUNDREDS OF SUGGESTIONS IN THIS STOCK
The question of "What to give a lady friend" need puzzle you no
longer. This store's offerings display a choice that few stores can offer—
certainly a superior choice of sensible gift things. And among the "grownups" of today the trend of favour is each year more strongly toward the
sensible in the interchange of Christmas gifts.
Articles of apparel are not "good form" presents—outside the family
circle. So here comes this store with its wealth of suggestions that are
"correct." And the prices will work no hardship. We offer a few suggestions below—
Reed Chairs
Easy Willow Chairs
Kitchen Cabinets
Reed Rockers
Ottomans
Wicker Work Baskets
Wicker Cake Baskets
Sectional Bookcases
Jardiniere Stands
Medicine Cabinets
Cheval Mirrors
Ladies' Desks
Morris Chairs
Easy Chairs
Couches
Music Cabinets
Magazine Racks
Library Tables
Tea Tables
China Cabinets
Bridge Tables
Framed Pictures
Handsome Mirrors
Dressing Tables
Down Quilts
Sofa Cushions
Hearth Rugs
Table Covers
Bureau Scarfs
Tea Cloths
Tray Cloths
Pillow Slips
Table Linen
Hemstitched Sheets
Art Table Covers
Mexican Drawnwork
D'Oylies
Satin Marsielles Quilts
Oriental Rugs
Lace Curtains
China Ornaments
China Vases
China Tea Sets
China Dinner Sets
China Chocolate Sets
Fancy Plates
Silverware
Silver and Oak Ware
Manicure Sets
Salad Sets
Reading Lamps
Electric Lamps
Brass Goods
Photo Frames
Stationery Holders
Writing Sets
Jardinieres
Book Racks
Fern Pots
Kettles and Stands
GIFTS FOR MEN
CHOOSING IS EASY HERE
To get Mr. Man something that he really wants—that's
the problem. Of course he is pleased to know friends
"remember" him at Christmas, but he certainly prefers
something he can use to some useless article, no matter
how attractive it may be. Give HIM something he can use
often and your gift will be the more appreciated.
Worry no more about this question, but come in here
and choose from what we have to offer. Dozens of suitable
gift things await your choosing, and a price range that'll
surprise you in its latitude. No better time to make the
choice.
Smokers' Cabinets
Smokers' Sets
Shaving Mirrors
Shaving Brushes
Shaving Mugs
Office Desks
Medicine Cabinets
Morris Chairs
Easy Chairs
Couches
Steins
Corkscrews
Sectional Bookcases Manicure Pieces
Card Tables Liqueur Sets
Willow Easy Chairs Students' Lamps
Foot Rests Electric Lamps
Photo Frames
Writing Sets
Stationery Holders
Book Racks
Ink Stands
Tie Racks
Cut Glass Decanters
Fireplace Furniture
Cellarettes
Magazine Stands
COUNTRY ORDERS
Packed and Shipped
Your only shipping charge I* freight
WEILER BROS.
Home Furnishers Since 1862, at Victoria, B.C.
SHOP TODAY
SHOP EARLY
SHOP HERE
SHOP AGAIN
I
The Dear Old Dad!
A frugal and industrious shoemaker
has two daughters, of whom he is
very proud. Hc provides a good
home for them, dresses them well,
and is giving them a good education..
Not long ago hc drew on his
modest bank account for a sum sufficient to purchase a new piano for
them. What followed may be described in his own words:
"Oh, yes," he confided to a neighbour, "they wcre grateful enough for
it, of course, and it's a great comfort
to hear 'em play and sing, but what
do you suppose was the first thing the
girls learned on it?"
"I'm sure I don't know," said the
neighbour.
" 'Everybody Works but Father."
Very Cutting
The budding playwright sat in the
front row of the stalls on the first
night of his new piece. It was failing, failing miserably. In fact, in the
middle of the third act the entire
company was hissed on the stage.
As the young playwright sat, pale
and sad, amid the uproar, a lady behind him leaned forward and said:
"Excuse me, sir, but, knowing you
to be the author of this play, I took
the liberty at thc beginning of the
performance of snipping off a lock of
your hair. Allow me now to return
it to you."
John Bright used to tell how a barber who was cutting his hair once
said to him: "You 'ave a large 'ead,
sir; it is a good thing to 'ave a large
'ead, for a large 'ead means a large
brain, and a large brain is the most
useful thing a man can 'ave, as it
nourishes the roots of the 'air."
A Good Thing
"You called me a thief."
"And you called mc a liar."
"Well?"
"Well?"
"I've been thinking."
"What about?"
Pause.
"I've been thinking that it might be
a good thing for us to form a partnership and open a life insurance and
trust company."
Strange
Mrs. Broke—I don't see why they
call money "dough."
Broke—Neither do I. Dough sticks
to your fingers and money never does.
Two canny Scotsmen went out one
Christinas morning upon the golf-
links to get up an appetite for dinner
by playing a round. A bitterly cold
east wind was blowing, and Donald,
seeing his friend light a pipe, thought
it would warm him a bit if he did
likewise, but found that he had left
h's matchbox back at the house. However, in response to a request for a
light, Jock carefully extracted a single
wax vesta from his box and handed
it to him. But, alas! having got his
match, Donald could not find his tobacco pouch. Jock, after considerable hesitation, consented to give him
a fill, but before hc had time to do
this Donald had searched in vain for
his pipe.
"Aye, mon," said he, "it is a maist
unfortunate circumstance. I canna
ask ye for the wee bit tobacco until
we gang back hame. for I've left my
pipe in my ither pocket."
"Is that sac, my frcend?" replied
Jock, with a look of relief. "Gie us
back my match, then."
Satisfaction
We guarantee quality and satisfaction with every purchase of
Groceries.
Phone    orders    carefully    at
tended to.
A. POOL
623 Yates St. Phone 448
Watson's Old Stand
FAST  IV
'WATER  CLAUSES   CONSOLIDATION
ACT, 1897"
"Of course. Jack, you know you'll
have to ask papa?"
"I've already asked him, dear."
"You mean, conceited thing!     Did
you think you were so sure of mc?"
When your tablecloths arc worn out
beyond mending, cut square pieces
from the best parts of them and hem
neatly. They will make nice napkins
for the children's school lunches, or
for the little ones to use at the tabic.
I. Tills is to certify that the "Vancouver Island Power Compnny, Limited"
(specially Incorporated pursuant to Part
IV. of tlle above mentioned Act. on tlie
16tli day of January, 11(07), for the purpose of exercising tlie rights, powers,
privileges and priorities in and by Part
IV. of the snld Act created, granted and
conferred, bus applied under section 87
of the above mentioned Act, to the Lieutenant-Governor In Council, for approval
of tbe proposed undertakings and
works of tbe said Company; and tliat
the said Company lias (lied with the
Clerk of the Executive Council the documents as required by section So of the
said Act, and also the plans showing the
situation of the proposed undertakings
and works; ancl that the said undertakings and works, as shown by tbe said
documents and plans, have been approved, nnd tbat the same are as follows :
la) Tbe construction of a dam and
storage reservoir on, respectively, Bear
Creek nnd Alligator Creek, tributaries
of tbe Jordan River; tbe construction of
main diverting works ut a point on the
Jordan River about 2 1-4 miles northeast from tbe southwesterly boundary
of tbe Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway
Land Grant; tbe construction of a storage reservoir nt the headquarters of tbe
Jordan River, known as the Jordan
Meadows; tbe construction of a storage
reservoir on Y Creek, a tributary of the
snid Jordan River, and tbe construction
of diverting works on tbe snid "V" creek
as also tbe construction of a flume or
ditch from the snid diverting works on
Y Creek to the main diverting works
hereinbefore mentioned; the construction of a regulating reservoir at some,
point upon  tbe  land   held   under timber I
license number 38,639, and to be known
as Forebay Reservoir; the construction
of a flume and ditch from said main diverting works to tbe said Forebay Reservoir; the construction in and upon
some portion of Lot 9, Renfrew District,
of a power-house and the installation
therein of electrical machinery for tbe
generation of power; the construction
of a pipe-line from the snld Forebay
Reservoir to the said power-house; the
construction of a transmission line
about thirty miles in length to the City
of Victoria, and the erection of suitable
sub-stations and apparatus to carry out
all things necessary for the proper
transmission of power to the said City
of Victoria, and throughout the sur-
1 rounding districts, and in and throughout the area as defined iu the Memorandum of Association of the Company;
the construction of roads, trails and
bridges, and all other works necessary
for the undertakings and works of the
* said Company as hereinbefore set out;
I the erection of poles for the transmls-
j sion of power, as also telephone pole
lines and telephones when and where
deemed necessary, including the right to
erect such poles along the sides of public highways, and to cross and re-cross
said public highways and bridges, and
the stringing of wires along the snld
poles not less than twenty feet from
the ground; and, generally, tbe construction of such further and other
works as may be necessary for the
complete carrying on of the aforesaid
i undertakings.
(b) Tbe water power so to be genor-
i nted, nnd tbe electricity and power so
generated will be utilized to supply
bower chiefly to the British Columbia
Electric Railway Compnny. Limited,
Which operates tbe street railway system of tbe City of Victoria and adjoining and surrounding municipalities and
districts, nud also supplies public and
private lighting, and nil necessary and
contemplated extensions to tbis system;
It Is also proposed to furnish power,
beat und light for manufacturing, Industrial and traction purposes throughout Saanich Peninsula, nnd throughout
the area authorized in the Memorandum
of Association of the Company. Tbe
power will he developed by the use of
I'elton Wnter Wheels, or by the best
and most modern machinery, and converted Into electrical energy, and transmitted by copper or other wires to the
required points of user.
2. Provided, however that the Company shall not proceed to construct the
dams and reservoirs for the retention of
water until the plans and specifications
for the said works shall have been first
filed In tbe oflice of tbe Chief Engineer
nf tbe Public Works Department, ami
tbe said plans and specifications hnve
received the approval of tbe said Chief
Engineer.
3. And this Is further to certify thai
the "Vancouver Island Power Company,
Limited," shnll nt least have duly subscribed, before It commences the construction of Its undertaking and works
or exercises any of tbe powers in tbat
behalf conferred by the "Wuter Clauses
Consolidation Act. 1S97.' Part IV., ten
thousand shares of one dollar ench. The
further amount of capital required to
fully complete the undertaking and
works to be provided by the issue of
first  mortgage  bonds or debentures  of
the "Vancouver Island Power Company,
Limited,'' up to the amount of three
hundred thousand pounds sterling (£300,-
0001, tiie principal and interest thereof
to be guaranteed hy tlie "British Columbia Electric Railway Company, Limited," or be otherwise guaranteed and
floated.
4. And this Is further to certify that
thc time within which the said capital,
namely, to the extent of at least ten
thousand dollars is to he subscribed, Is
before tbe expiration of thirty days
from the date hereof, and the time within which the said undertaking and works
are to be commenced Is before the expiration of sixty days from the date
hereof, and the date by which the said
proposed works shall be In operation Is
fixed at three years from the date hereof.
Dated this 4th day of November, 1909
A. CAMPBELL REDDIE,
Deputy Clerk of the Executive Council.
177
'4i*2&___
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Sealed Tenders, superscribed "Tender
for Sewerage Works, Prince Rupert,"
will be received by the Honorable the
Minister of Public Works up to noon
of Wednesday, the 19th of January,
1910, for the construction and completion nf a portion of the permanent system of sewerage at Prince Rupert, B.C.
Plans, specifications, contract and
forms of tender may be seen on and
nfter tbe 7th dny of December, 1909, at
the oflice of the undersigned, Public
Works Department, Victoria, B.C., at the
offices of the Government Agent, and
of Mr, James II. Bacon, Harbor Engineer. Prince Rupert, B.C.; at the office of tbe Government Agent, New
Westminster, B.C., and nt the office of
the Provincial Timber Inspector, Vancouver, B.C.
Each proposal must be accompanied
by an accepted hank cheque or certificate of deposit on n chartered hank of
Canada, made payable to the Honorable
the Minister of Public Works, in the
sum of five hundred dollars, which shall
be forfeited If the party tendering decline to enter Into contract when called
upon to do so, or If he fall to complete
the work contracted for. The cheques
or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will he returned to them
upon tbe execution of the contract.
A guarantee bond in the sum of fifteen thousand dollars will be required
ns security for the faithful performance and completion of the work.
Tenders will not he considered unless
mnde out on the forms supplied, signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed ln the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or nny tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Public Wnrks  Department,
Victoria, B.C., 2nd December, 1909.
dec 4 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER ir, 1909
One Touch of Christmas Makes the
Whole World Kin
The crowded streets, the brilliantly decorated stores, the glowing Xmas Tree, the interchange of gifts and greetings and the services
in the churches are the chief features of Christmas observance. One might aver that the giving of presents is really the chief
feature, for this has become a source of great delight to kind-hearted people who love this great festival because it gives them an
opportunity to contribute to the happiness of others—the true joy of giving. To paraphrase Shakespeare, "This one touch of
Christmas makes the whole world kin"—makes one almost clairvoyant in knowing the desire of another. Almost instinctively this
season we turn our attention to the serviceable offering.
A Gas Radiator, or a Gas Grate, either of which are delightfully cheery and a charming addition to any residence,
will prove one of the most thoughtful and acceptable presents for either lady or man who "batches," even if only
one room forms "home." A furnace may be baulky, or
out altogether, steam heat may become obstreperous,
wood or coal fire entail labor in re-lighting; but a Gas
Heater is always ready with the turn of the tap and
scratch of a match. It is a most economical apparatus;
the expense stops the minute the gas is turned off. It can
be brought into service in a second without work, so
different from fire-building. It will not only give the required warmth, but will at once dispense a genial air of
hospitality. As a little heat is required almost every day
of the year in British Columbia, a Gas Radiator, or a Gas
Grate will form a most appropriate Christmas offering.
For every housewife there is a "Merry Xmas" in a Gas
Range. She will revel in the possession of such a present,
appreciating the saving in time, strength and worry, the
cleanliness, accuracy and healthfulness of gas for cooking
purposes. Henceforth she will have no kindlings to buy,
no coal to carry in, no ashes to take out, no blinding,
choking smoke in starting wood or coal stove, no blistering heat while cooking and no fear of fire from overheated flues. Early breakfast will have no terrors for her;
just as easy will she be able to get up a late supper for
unexpected guests. If she has. a dinner to cook which
takes hours, she will set the Range right and she will find
it hours later just exactly as she left it. Nothing uncertain
about a Gas Range; it is as hot at the beginning as it
ever gets.   What could be better for a Christmas Gift?
A  VISIT  TO   OUR  SHOWROOMS   WILL  SUGGEST   MANY   SPLENDID   IDEAS   FOR   PRACTICAL   CHRISTMAS
PRESENTS.     VOU  ARE  MOST CORDIALLY WELCOME,   WHETHER  TO   PURCHASE   OR   MERELY   TO   LOOK.
The Victoria Gas Company Limited
Telephone 123
COR. FORT AND LANGLEY STS
QS^f_J%f*+hrm+**f\r>*f&Qk
>
At The Street
Corner
By THB LOUNOBK
LOUNGER—
The writer of a permanent column
on a newspaper is very much like a
king—in one essential at least: he
never dies. "Le roi est mort; vive le
roi," applies equally to him and to
the author of this column. It is well
over two years since I left Victoria;
the column went on just the same,
but now that I have returned it has
been turned over to me. Possibly a
few reflections on changes which have
taken place in the city, may not be
without interest to my readers.
In the first place I have noticed an
immense improvement in the city sidewalks. There still remains much to
be done, but that much has already
been done during thc past two years,
nobody can deny. The amount of
building done during the past two,
years, nobody can deny. The amount
of building which is at present go-1
ing on in Victoria has filled me with j
astonishment and admiration. The
Empress Hotel had not opened when
I left, and though I had understood
that we were to have a really first-
class hostclrie, I had not expected
anything quite so fine as what wc
possess. Two years ago there were
no Moving Picture shows; today there
arc three; all first class and well
worth the ioc admission, lt would
bc invidious to make a selection as
to which gives the greatest satisfaction. In all of them the pictures are
good, but it may be fairly said that
the pianist at "The Empress" is far
and away ahead of the average performer at these houses.
But there is another improvement,
and one which really is worth all the
others together, viz., that there seems
to be a general air of prosperity pervading the atmosphere, which was not
seen two years ago.    Men who were
171
I RUPERT   DISTRICT
NOTICE is hereby given that 1 intend applying to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Alberni for a license
to prospect for Coal under the following area North of uatslno Sound, viz.:
Section 19, Township 27, the initial post
being at the North-east corner.
September 30th,  1909.
NELLIE PLETT,
nov 20 Chris Nordstrom, Agent
perpetually "broke" have blossomed
out into money; men who used to
look as though they suffered from a
secret sorrow, walk about with a
cheery smile on their faces. Real estate has advanced, and there is a
widely-spread opinion that Victoria is
at last coming into her own. In
short, after a two years' absence I
have returned to find the city of my
adoption an even more charming spot
than ever, and that's "going some."
And talking of real estate reminds
mc that I saw the most cheering notice in this mornin's paper that I
have ever read. The Belmont Block-
has been sold. At last there is some
prospect that that eye-sore will cease
to be, and that a really handsome
block of offices of a nature fit to compete with thc other buildings bordering on the Causeway, will bc erected.
In this same connection it might be
in place to remark that there are still
many unsightly shacks on Government   street   itself,   whose   abolition
should   be   the   main   question   wit'i
every aspirant to public position.
One thing only has not changed;
the Causeway, on which 1 havc wasted so mnny sheds of valuable paper
is still behind the times. I do not
refer to the paving of it; that is progressing and will doubtless be. a
credit to the City, but the lighting.
Presumably the lights which arc
strung all along the hotel side are
expected to he sufficient. But there
is no reason for leaving standards up
with no globes on them on the water
side. It looks worse in the day tim*-?
than it does at night. Either light
the lights and keep them looking nice,
or take the standards away altogether.
The present effect is abominable.
At the junction of Government and
Douglas streets there is an object
which has often puzzled mc. It is
called a fountain, and so well-known
is it, that the said junction is known
in street-car parlance as "The Fountain."   Xow why?   I have looked up
the word in a dictionary, and I find
that a fountain is something which
spouts water. Has anyone ever seen
this particular fountain spouting
water? If so, I should be immensely
obliged if they would communicate
with me, and let me know when it
"spouteth." I've never seen it do so
yet, and I have passed by it at all
hours of the day and night. My own
idea is that the whole business is
merely a "lucus a non luccndo," a
classical quotation, which those who
understand may translate to those
who don't.
I want to know what the young
bachelor of limited means, and of not
over-pronounced religious disposition,
is supposed to do with himself in Victoria and Vancouver on Sundays. I
will treat the matter as broadly as
possible. Supposing he goes to
church twice a day, and he can't be
expected to go oftener, that will consume three hours of the dullest day
in  the  week.    Granted  that  he  eats
15S
NOTICE is hereby given that I intend
to apply to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands for a Licence to prospect for
Coal and Petroleum on and under tlio
following described  lands:
Commencing at the S. E. Corner of
Section 96, Sayward District; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains',
thence south SO chains; thence east 80
chains; to place of commencement, containing 610 acres more or less.
Dated this 14th day of October, 1909.
nov. 6 R. ROSS NAPIER.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
district of Queen Charlotte
16f>
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. T. Johnson,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Realty, intends to apply for a license to prospect
for coal on  the following lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
two and one-half miles east of Kumdis
Island and one mile nort'.i of the Myer
Lake Trail, Graham Island; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
Dated November 9,  1909.
J. T. JOHNSON,
nov   13 Matthew Yomans, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
166
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. T. Johnson,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Realty, intends to apply for a license to prospect
for coal on  the following lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
two miles east of Kumdis Island and
three miles north of the Myer Lake
Trail, Graham Island; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chatns; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated November 9, 1909.
J. T. JOHNSON,
nov   13 Matthew Yomans, Agent.
three times in the day, and few of
the class that I am thinking of do
that, a couple of hours is sufficient
time. Health requires that he should
walk at least five miles; say a couple
of hours for exercise. That is seven
hours disposed of. The average man
' can't do with more than ten hours
sleep at the outside; (I am purposely
making generous allowance all round)
and he usually doesn't go to bed till
ten o'clock at the earliest. Now what
is my bachelor going to do with him-
(Continued on next page) THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER xi,  1909
Please the Kiddies
With an Xmas Tree
Our up-to-the-minute stock of Christmas Tree Ornaments and
Table Decorations is at its best. Better come and make selection
now.   Everything required awaits you here.
Tinsel Garlands, red, green and pink, 1 doz. yds. up from 20c
Tinsel Ornaments, from 25c down to  ioc
Xmas Tree Ornaments, immense choice  25c
Xmas Candles, per box  20c
Xmas Candle Holders, per dozen  15c
Xmas Tree Fireworks, per box  ioc
Bon-Bons With Caps, from $1.00 down to  25c
Bon Bons With Music, from $1.00 down to 25c
Bon-Bons with Toys, from $1.00 down to 25c
Xmas Stockings, $2.75, $1.50, $1.00, 50c, 25c, and 15c
Paper Bells, 50c, 20c, ioc, 5c and two for 5c
Paper Garlands, two for  25c
DIXI
H. ROSS & CO.
Independent Grocers
Tels.: 50, 51, 52 and 1590
1317 Government Street
At the Street Corner
BY THE LOUNGER
(Continued from Page 6)
self in the seven hours that are left
over on Sunday. He has eaten, he
has walked and he has prayed, and
there are still seven hours.
Of course you will say one of three
things: "JJoin a club"; "Sit in the
Free Library"; "Become a member of
the Y.M.C.A." Let me deal with
these separately. My bachelor is a
man of limited means, and he can't
afford to join a club. The Free Library is only open for a limited number of hours, and when open is so
crowded that my bachelor can never
get the particular paper he desires.
My bachelor is a man of the world,
and the Y.M.C.A. does not appeal tc.
him. There is no one who more
strongly appreciates the work which
the Y.M.C.A. and the Salvation Army
have done since their first creation,
but I cannot say that I feel impelled
to join either of the bodies. What
does my bachelor do then? We all
know; he finds a blind-pig and keeps
the poor quadruped company for the
larger part of those seven hours.
Which is bad for him and bad for
the city which will allow this same
animal to exist. But it will always
happen until a building is erected for
my poor bachelor, with small admission fee should not be charged; I am
confident that in the course of time
such an institution would pay; incidentally it might make the pig a little
blinder.
I have often wondered why it is
that the Old Country has never got
into line in the barbering business. I
am not often apt to allow that the
country of my birth is behind the
times, and I have had fierce arguments, trying to prove that Old Country railways are "way ahead" of Canadian or American railroads. But
in the case of barbers, I concede the
superiority of this continent. They
don't seem to know the first thing
about making a fellow comfortable in
a barber's chair on the other side;
they haven't got a tenth part of the
"tweaks" which we possess, and for
the most part every Englishman
shaves himself, and goes to the barber for a hair-cut on the same day a-s
he pays his semi-annual visit to the
dentist; thereby combining two evils
in one. Here, a barber's shop is
rather a delight.
Now I expect a perfect howl nf
disgust to be raised at my next remark. I shall be called unpatriotic
and all kinds of other things; still
it is what I think. I do not approve
of the new theatre scheme. So fat-
as I can gather, Victoria, Sir Thomas
Shaughnessy and Mackenzie & Mann
are going to put up the money for
a new theatre, and John Cort is going to take all the profits. Are we
going to be tied up to the Northwestern Theatrical Association for
their benefit, or are we going to
break away from this theatrical trust
business. If we build the theatre, and
are successful in interesting other
capitalists to come and help to improve the City, why shouldn't we
have a voice in saying what shows we
want to see. Why should we be
treated like children, and simply be
allowed to see what John Cort thinks
is good enough for us? To my mind
the theatrical trust is the most iniquitous of all the trusts; it interferes
with the people's amusements, which
are far more important than their
appetites. We often hear laments in
the papers that Victoria will not support a first-class show, but I am inclined to think that it is very largely
due to the fact that they have no
"say-so" in the matter. What I
would like to see would be a first-
class theatre built with our money,
and a manager of our own choosing
(Mr. Denham for preference) installed, on whose judgment we could
implicitly rely, and let him engage
our season's attractions. But I sup
pose it can't be done; we, like all
the other cities on this continent, have
got to be content to be strangled by
the tentacles of the Trust, and must
try and look grateful if they give us
a good turn once in a while.
I have a word to say on a pleas-
anter subject. The indefatigable efforts of Dr. Fagan, well backed up by
a score of willing helpers, have done
much to combat the white plague in
this Province. But nothing in this
line can be done without money, and
money is now needed. My word to
you all is to buy anti-tuberculosis
stamps, which are now on sale
throughout the City. A movement is
on foot to allow the children to buy
them at the school?, and the superintendent has given his sanction. There
are, roughly speaking, 3,000 children
attending school in Victoria; if every
child bought five cents' worth of
stamps, that would mean $150, no
mean sum, and one obtained with
practically no hardship. I don't often preach, but I do feel that with
an era of prosperity setting in, the
like of which Victoria has never seen
! before, it would only be a graceful
tribute to the Providence which overshadows us, to contribute, each and
all, our mite in aid of the Society
which is making so brave and successful a fight against one of the
greatest scourges which has ever afflicted mankind. It must be remembered that these stamps are not for
use on letters; they are merely little
Xmas and New Year tokens, and if
placed on an envelope, they invalidate
the letter. I hope that the scheme-
will prove a great success; in any
case it has no more fervent supporter
than
<&l
o~tc«^i^.
Wedding Bells
At. St. Mark's, Victoria, B.C., on
the morning of the 7th instant, the
wedding took place of Francis
Vaughan Penrose Cowley to Sybil
Frances Bagshawe, eldest daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. E. C. B. Bagshawe, of
Swallowfield, Richardson street, Victoria. The ceremony was performed
by the father of the bridegroom, thc
ev. Cation Cowley of Winnipeg, who
came to the coast for the purpose.
The bride is well known in Victoria
society, having been one of last sea
son's debutantes. Mr. Cowley, who
was educated at Kingston R.M.C., is
a member of the Dominion hydro-
graphic survey on the Dominion survey ship Lilloet. The wedding was
a very quiet one, only a few relatives
and intimate friends of the contracting parties being present. The young
people left immediately after the ceremony for a short visit to the Coast
cities. On their return they will take
up their residence on Dunsmuir street,
Esquimalt.   •
Winnipeg, Kingston and Yale, B.C.,
papers please copy.
Hockey
On Wednesday next the Hockey
Club concert will be held and it promises to be one of the musical successes of the season. The hockey
boys do not ask the public to patronize this concert on account of thc
cause but because it will be a liberal
musical education for all who attend,
the people taking part being all real
artists. Mrs. (Dr.) Gibson, pianist,
will make her debut in Victoria at
this concert and as she has studied
under the best of American and
European masters a musical treat can
be expected. Mrs. Briggs, always a
favourite of Victorians, will be heard
to advantage in a soprano solo, while
Benedict Bantly, violinist, will make
his appearance for the first time since
his last recital in the Vancouver
Opera House when he filled the theatre. A baritone solo will be sung by
Frederick Waddington, the well-
known local choir leader and soloist
and needless to say his singing will
be appreciated. One of the musical
gems of the evening will be the duet
sung by Mrs. Wilson and Miss Sehl.
These sisters have not been heard in
public for some time and their reappearance will add to the pleasures
afforded the music-loving people of
this city. Miss Sehl will also sing
a solo. The Arion Club has promised
its support and a double quartette
from that justly famous organization of men's voices should draw a
full house. Perhaps the name which
is puzzling Victorians is that of Henry
J. Davis, who has been persuaded to
sing one of the old English ballads,
thus giving the public an opportunity
to hear a great singer in a great subject. Recent arrivals from the Old
Country will recognize a famous
English professional ballad singer in
the name, "Mr. Harry Davis."
The concert can be spoken of as
the reappearance of first class talent
and is by far the best gathering of
artists ever appearing in Victoria.
The Institute Hall was chosen on account of its acoustic properties and
these will be further emphasized by
stringing wires across the hall. The
concert will be a full dress affair and
tickets can be procured from any of
the Hockey Club members or from
Redfern & Sons.
Collect all the small candle ends,
melt them, then add as much turpentine as you have candle-grease. Let
it cool and use for polishing floors,
oilcloth, etc. This makes an excellent
polish, and is much superior to bees-
**^W-rf-rf^W^wAWH-»w«Wwww*«»>
The Working |
Man Comes
Here
because he gets a good
square meal
20c.
WINES, LIQUORS AND
CIGARS.
Rooms, 25c and up.
Telephone 84:.
A. LIPSKY, Proprietor,
\\ Milne Block, 568 Johnson St
j| VICTORIA, B.C.
if
if
M
8
if
roum peb enure, o*
DEPOSIT.
We pay lour per out. later-sat
on deposit! of $1 (on* dollar)
and np, withdrawable by chaina.
Special attention givan to da-
poiitf mad* .7 malL
Paid np Capital ovar 91,000,000
Aaseta over   -       -       8,000,000
b. 0. _n.__.______n.-n x.oajt 00,
1310   Qovornnunt   StrMt,
Tlctorla, B.O.
GIFTS
For Mother, Father
and Baby
FOR A LADY see our unique
lines: Handbags, Toilet Sets,
Manicure Sets, Comb Sets,
Perfumes, Hot Water Bottles,
etc.
FOR   A   GENTLEMAN   we
have wide choice of suitable
things: Toilet Sets, Shaving
Mirrors, Shaving Sets, Safety
Razors, Razor Strops, Military Hair Brushes, etc.
FOR A BABY here you will
see many good hints: Dainty
little Hair Brushes, Perfumed Soap, Puff Boxes, Talcums, Powder Boxes, etc.
Everything priced properly for
purchasers.
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
1228 Government Street
Near Yates
I SEE BOLDEN I
THE CARPENTER AND
BUILDER.
I Fort Street I
RUPERT DISTRICT
172
NOTICE is hereby given that I intend
applying to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands at Alberni for a license to
prospect for Coal under the following
area North of Quatsino Sound, viz.:
Section 20, Township 97, the initial post
being at  the North-west corner.
September 30th,  1909.
M. MILLER,
nov 20 Chris Nordstrom, Agent
RUPERT DISTRICT.
173
NOTICE Is hereby given that I intend
applying to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands at Alberni for a License to
prospect for Coal under the following
urea North of Quatsino Sound, viz..
Section 29, Township 27, the Initial post
being at the South-west corner.
September 30th,  1909.
J.  A.  FLETT,
nov 20 Chris Nordstrom, Agent
RUPERT DISTRICT.
171
NOTICE is hereby given that I Intend
applying to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands at Alberni for a License to
prospect for Coal under the following
area North of Quatsino Sound, viz.:
Commencing at the South-east corner
of lot 51, thence south one mile; east
one mile; north one mile and west one
mile   to  place  of  beginning.
September  30th,   1909.
G. A. W. HEPBURN,
nov 20 Chris Nordstrom, Agent
NOTICE.
RECTIFICATION OF CROWN ORANT
New Westminster District.
Notice Is hereby given that in pursuance of Section 98 of the Land Act, an
application will be made to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands—three montns
after date—to have the Crown Grant or
Lot 226, Group 1, New Westminster
District, issued on the 17th day 01
April, 1875, to J. Roland Hett cancelled,
and a corrected Crown Grant of saw
lot 226 issued ln lieu thereof.
Dated at Victoria, B.C., thia 9th _j
of  October,  1909.
POOLEY, LUXTON & POOLET.
Solicitors for the Owners or
oct. 16 aald Lot.
SALE
20 to 50 per cent, off all
Music Goods
From a Mouth Organ
to a Piano
Talking Machines are sold at
fixed prices and cannot be sold
for less.
M.W. WAITT
& CO. LIMITED
The House of Highest Quality
HERBERT KENT. Manager
WING ON
Employment Agent
Wood and Coal for Sale.
Also Scavenging.
1709 Government St. Phone 13
VICTORIA, B.C.
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
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SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Queen Charlotte.
1S4
TAKE NOTICE that William Q. Ewart
of Seattle, Wash., occupation Broker,
Intends to apply for permission to prospect for coal on the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted one
mile cast of Masset Inlet and about
six miles S.E. of Delkatle; post marked
"W.Q.E. N.W. Corner"; thence eaat 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chalna
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Date of staking Sept, 24, 1909.
WILLIAM   _. EWART,
oct 2» F. H. Millard. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER n,  1909
I MUSIC AND     I
I     THE STAGE |
"The Soul Kiss"
"The Soul Kiss" will be the attraction at the Victoria Theatre on
Thursday, December 16. It is one of
those lively amusing affairs which
gives one little time for serious
thought, but at all times is entertain
ing. There is a story to be sure,
but it doesn't obtrude itself to any
marked degree during the riot of fun
and melody that prevails throughout
the entire two acts of the piece.
Heading this merry musical melange
is Mlle. Pcrtina, a premiere danseuse
who has been the rage throughout
all the principal cities of France and
Germany. The critics consider her
the only dancer in all Europe who
bids fair to outrival "Maud Allan" in
the enacting of both the classic and
modern dances. Aside from Mile.
Pcrtina, tliere will be found a notable
cast of seventy-live mirth provokers,
including a stunning beauty chorus of
forty and a "corps dc ballet" of ten.
Harry B. Smith has provided thc
book and lyrics*, while Maurice Levi
has supplied a score containing at
least  a  dozen  tuneful   numbers.     A
smss*
Billy Clifford at  the
Victoria Theatre
striking feature of the piece is the
"corps de ballet" of ten, who have
been imported from the Empire Theatre, London. Throughout the piece
they execute daintily arranged dance
numbers. The production is produced
under the direction of Julian Mitchell
and is lavish in scenery, costumes
and  electrical   effects.
"A Girl at the Helm"
The attraction at the Victoria Theatre on Friday, December 17, will be
"A Girl at the Helm" with Billey
Clifford, assisted by sixty associates.
This is one of the La Salle theatre
popular musical comedy successes,
which will be seen in Victoria for the
first time. This music is by aymond
Hubbel, the lyrics by Robert Smith,
who are also responsible for "A
Knight for a Day" and "The Midnight
Sons," now playing in New York.
"A Girl at thc Helm" is a musical
comedy just a little bit out of the
ordinary, the characters are unique
and the situations are as rigid as
those used by thc best known plots
without music. Thc play would be
most interesting if there were not a
song in it, but with a pleasant accompaniment of catchy music, sung by
what is said to bc an exceptionally
strong chorus of well-trained voices,
it has all the attractive features of
both musical and legitimate comedy.
The musical numbers have been given
credit of scoring ten song hits besides the male octette's two popular
numbers. The principals, headed by
Billy Clifford, are in keeping with the
best of the points of the production.
The motor-boat race in the last act
is a new electrical effect that is a real
novelty.
New Grand Theatre
The New Grand bill next week will
bc strengthened by the addition of an
extra act making live imported turns
for all next week. The Brothers
Whitman arc down for a scenic contortion act, one as a frog and thc
other as an aligator. The show is
built up with electric effects, fire
flics, etc., and one of the brothers is
a back bender and the other a front
bender. Thc act produces an eerie effect and is most unusual.
Gertrude Van Dyke will have a novel little tabloid musical comedy or
comic opera, and is as clever a comedienne as has come into the northwest. She makes several character
changes on the stage and will be one
of the distinct hits of the bill. She
also sings in two voices, oue a man's
voice and the other a light soprano.
"A Strenuous Pupil" is thc title of
a musical eccentricity by John C.
Robisch and Mayne Childers. He appears as a school teacher while she
is the pupil. They get off a whole
lot of eccentric work, dances and
songs and all go well with any audience as the act is first class.
Ray Fern is a singing comedian
with excellent songs and a good voice.
In Vancouver he was accorded a
hearty reception for his coon songs
and wns all round considered good.
Thc McLinn Brothers who were to
have come here this week will open
on Monday afternoon ;>t the matinee
in aline of horizontal bar work that
is claimed to cxccll most in the business. Thomas J. Price has another
good song and there will be the usual
moving pictures.
LITERARY NOTES
The Christmas number of The Canadian Magazine is a splendid example of thc excellent work that Canadian writers, illustrators and painters arc producing. From cover to
cover everything is high-class, and indeed a standard is set that is considerably in advance of anything of
the kind that has ever been turned
out by Canadian presses. The number is composed almost entirely of
short stories, sketches and poems,
and with the exception of a critical
appreciation by Louis Vauxcelles, a
Frenchman, of the work of the eminent Canadian artist J. W. Morrice,
tlie whole number is thc output of Canadian writers and artists, The lirst
contribution is a short story by Theodore Roberts, with illustrations by
Fergus Kyle. Then follow short
stories and sketches by Augustus
Bridle (illustrations by T. G. Greene),
Virna Shcard, Ward Fisher (illustrations -by J. W. Beatty), E. M. Yeoman (illustrations by Estelle M.
Kerr), Thomas Stanley Moyer, L. M.
Montgomery (illustrations by Albert
H. Robson), Rene Norcross, Madge
Macbeth, Edwin Dowsley, and poems
by Isabel Ecclestone Mackay, Duncan Campbell Scott, John Boyd, Marjorie L. C. Pickthall, Jean Blewett,
George Herbert Clarke, and Estelle
M. Kerr. There are a series of full-
page reproductions of western photographs on tinted paper by Newton
MacTavish, and the reproductions of
paintings by J. W. Morrice are unusually fine. Altogether the number
is an excellent Christmas souvenir,
with a fine cover in colours by T. M.
Marten.
Astronomy
Uncle Joe—"Yes, Tommy, it is
quite possible that there are people
in the moon."
Tommy—"Well, what becomes of
them when there isn't any moon?"
Blamed the Wrong One
Hotel Guest—What's the matter
with this chicken?
Waiter—It isn't the chicken's fault,
sir; you ouyht to have come last
week.
CORRESPONDENCE
The Week accepts no responsibility
for the views expressed by Its correspondents.
Communications will ba Inserted
whether signed by the real name of
the writer or a nom de plume, but the
writer's name and address must be
given to the Editor as an evidence of
bona (ides. In no case will It be
divulged without consent.
Better Prices for Our Fruits
The fruit growing industry in this
Province is not up-to-date, and, as a
natural consequence, there is great
danger of our being left seriously behind in the race.
That we can grow as good fruit as
can be produced anywhere in the temperate regions has been amply proved,
and yet wc do not realise for it the
price which such fruit deserves.
I am, of course, alluding chiefly to
those varieties suitable for shipment
to considerable distances. Some of
our fruit growers need educating in
modern methods of pruning, cultivating, spraying, etc., but still more
have yet to learn modern methods of
grading and boxing the fruit properly to render it sufficiently attractive
to bring top prices, even in competition with the best productions of
Hood River. Wenatchee, and the
many other valleys in Oregon and
neighbouring States, where they have
got fruit (particularly apple) packing
and selling reduced to a fine poiiit.
But these are small and separate
districts and it appears reasonable
that if we in B.C. could only bring
all our fruit growers into line, so that
they would unite all over the Province to grade to one uniform standard, and that the very highest, the
results attained would be proportionate to the magnitude of the undertaking, provided that the selling end
of the business were properly handled.
We have a number of small co-operative associations which handle these
products, but their storage facilities
are inadequate, so they cannot hold
for high prices, but have to sell off
stock as it comes, to make room foi
more. Hence, as fruit comes to all
these associations at the same time,
they cut against each other and the
market being flooded, prices drop to
a point where profit vanishes.
Two years ago I proposed a remedy for this and The Week deserves
the credit for being the pioneer paper
to give the scheme publicity, in the
issue of January 23, 1909.
Since then fruit growers have expressed the strongest approval of my
methods, but so far nothing has been
done in the matter.
But whilst we wait wc are losing
money, and our fruit still brings tin:
same low price. Briefly here is an
outline   of   my   scheme:
(1 I The establishment of a school
to teach fruit grading and packing,
(21 The employment of graduate;
from this school as foremen packers
by the different co-operative associations. These foremen to employ
gangs of packers composed of the
children of the local fruit growers,
thereby educating the rising generation. Tllis would give the children
pocket money enough to keep them
on the farm in contentment.
(3) The erection of cold storage
warehouses at suitable points to receive the fruit when boxed, and hold
it for top prices. Also an evaporating plant should be provided at
these points, to render all the culls
available for market, instead of being
fed to stock as now.
(4) The appointment of wholesale
firms owning cold storage plants in
all the fruit markets of the world to
act as our agents, and notify us of
varieties wanted, prices, and quantities needed.
(5) The appointment of traveling
inspectors, as we have now for
schools, to see that the packers do
their work properly, and that accounts are properly kept.
(6) A department to supply spraying materials, and to do spraying by
contract, to buy boxes by the million
at a substantial reduction, and to supply all rqeuisites to members of the
co-operative associations at the lowest possible price. The Provincial
Government should take hold of this,
and handle all farm produce on these
lines as well, at little or no cost to
the grower as the spraying question
would settle itself under this scheme,
and the consequent economy, together
with the increased revenue due to
denser population ensured by the profits accruing from fruit thus handled,
would amply repay the cost and leave
a surplus.
Besides if the fruit went out with
a Government stamp guaranteeing
its quality prices would rise still
higher, and the huge advertisement
of this as the fruit-growing Province
would create an unprecedented demand. Failing Government aid, let
us fruit-growers do all this ourselves.
Co-operation is vital to us, and if
this scheme goes, all producers will
join the associations, which will bc
unified, Besides, wc can bring all
wholesale linns in line with us if we
sell to them instead of cutting against
them.
159
NOTICE is hereby given that I intend
to apply to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands for a Licence to prospect for
Coal and Petroleum on and under the
following  described  lands:
Commencing at the north-east corner
of section 95, Sayward District, thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to place of commencement, containing  640 acres  more or less.
Dated this 14th of October, 1909.
nov. 6 R. ROSS NAPIER.
162
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. T. Johnson,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Realty, intends to apply for a license to prospect
for coal on  the following lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
one   and   one-half   miles   south-east   of
Kumdis Bay and about one mile south
of the Myer Lake Trail, Graham Island;
thenee  east SO chains;  thence south  SO
chains;   thence  west   80  chains;  thence
north  SO chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or
less.
Dated November 9,  1909.
J. T.  JOHNSON,
nov   13 Matthew Yomans, Ageni
164
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. T. Johnson,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Realty, Intends to apply for a license to prospect
for  coal  on   the  f(illo'"!ng lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
two and one-half miles east of Kumdis
Island and about one mile north of the
Myer Lake Trail, Graham Island; thence
east 80 chains; thence south SO chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence nortli  SO
chains   to  point  of  commencement  and
containing 040 acres more or less.
Dated November 9,  1909.
J. T. JOHNSON,
nov   13 Matthew Yomans, Agent.
167
LICENSE    TO   AN     EXTRA-PROVINCIAL INSURANCE COMPANY.
Companies Act, 1897.
CANADA:
Province of British Columbia,
No.   644.
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that the
"Rochester German Insurance Company
of Rochester, New York," is authorized
and licensed to carry on business within
the Province of British Columbia, and
to carry out or effect all or any of the
objects of the Company to which the
legislative authority of the Legislature
of British Columbia extends.
The head offlce of the Company is
situate at the City of Rochester, in the
County of Monroe, and State of New
York.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is live hundred thousand dollars, divided into five thousand shares
of one hundred dollars  each.
The head office of the Company in
this Province is situate at Vancouver
and J. R. Waghorn, Insurance Agent,
whose address is Vancouver aforesaid,
is the attorney for the Company.
Given under my Hand and Seal of
Offlce at Victoria, Province of British
Columbia, this eighth day of November, one' thousand nine hundred and
nine.
(L.S.) S.  Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has been established and licensed are:
For the purpose of making insurance on
dwelling houses, stores and all kinds of
buildings and household furniture, and
other property against loss or damage
by flre, lightning, wind-storms, or tornadoes, and upon vessels, boats, cargoes,
goods, merchandise, freights and other
property against loss or damage by all
or any of the risks of lake, river, canal
and inland navigation and transportation and to effect reinsurance of any
risks taken by it.
160
NOTICE Is hereby given that I intend to apply to the Assistant Commissioner of lands for a Licence to prospect for Coal and Petroleum on ana under the following described lands;
Commencing at the south-west corner
of Section 98, Sayward District, thenc.
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to place of commencement and
containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated this 13th day of October, 1909.
nov. 6 R. ROSS NAPIER.
B*:-r*:^:«K:-^»*w*:-^:'':*«*:-:*«*«*
P I
P There's jj
| Nothing half j
1 So Sweet |
| In Life as f
| Love and |
| Dudleigh's |
I Mixture I
I tUSL Richardson I
§ Phone 346 §
imimimmmmmmMm_mm
RUPERT   DISTRICT
176
NOTICE is hereby given that I Intend
applying to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands at Alberni for a License to
prospect for Coal under the following
area North of Quatsino Sound, viz.:
Section 30, Township 27, the Initial
post being at the South-east corner.
September 30th, 1909.
CHARLES  MILLER,
nov 20 Chris Nordstrom, Agent
Fruit-growers! Some of you have
joined with me already to attain this
end, will you others do so also?
Yours for better prices and universal co-operation.
W. J, L. HAMILTON,
Dromore,
South Salt Spring, B.C.
161]
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. T. Johnson. I
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Realty, in-J
tends to apply for a license to prospect!
for coal on the following lands:
Commencing at a post planted aboutl
two miles east of Kumdis Island, and]
three miles north of the Myer Lake]
Trail, Graham Island; thence west 80]
chains; thence south 80 chains, thencel
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains J
to point of commencement and coontain- j
lng 640 acres more or less.
Dated November 9, 1909.
J. T. JOHNSON,
nov   13 Matthew Yomans, Agent.
163
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. T. Johnson,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Realty, intends to apply for a license to prospect I
for coal on  the  following lands: 1
Commencing  at   a   post   planted   one
and one-half miles south-east of Kumdis
Bay  and  about  one  mile  south  of  the
Myer Lake Trail, Graham Island; thencel
east SO chains; thenee north 80 chain's;'
thence west SO chains; thence south 80 I
chains  to  point  of  commencement  and/
containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated November 9,  1909.
J. T. JOHNSON,
nov   13 Matthew Yomans, Agent
1611
NOTICE is hereby given that I intend 1
to apply to the Assistant Commissioner]
of Lands, for a Licence to prospect fori
Coal and Petroleum on and under th«|
following described area:
Commencing at the north-east corner I
of Section 102, Sayward District; thencel
south  SO chains; thence west 80 chains;
thenee north  SO chains;  thence east  80 ]
chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated this 13th day of October, 1909.
A.  W.  McVITTIE,
nov 6 R. Ross Napier. Agent. |
162
NOTICE is hereby given that I Intend I
to apply to,the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands for a Licence to prospect for
Coal  and  Petroleum  on  and  under  the |
following described  lands:
Commencing at the S. E. Corner 01 1
Section 101, Sayward District; thencel
north SO chains; thenee west SO chains;*
thence south 80 chains; thence east SO '
chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated this 13th day of October, 1909.
A.  W.  McVITTIE,
nov 6 R. Ross Napier. Agent.
157
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. T. Johnson,
of Victoria, B.C.. occupation  Realty, intends to apply for a license to prospect
for coal on  the  following lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
one and one-half miles south-east of
Kumdis Bay and about one mile south
of the Myer Lake Trail, Graham Island;
thence west SO chains; thence south SO
chains; thence east SO chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or
less.
Dated November 9,  1909.
J. T. JOHNSON,
nov   13 Matthew Yomans, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
15S
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. T. Johnson,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Realty, intends to apply for a license to prospect
for coal on  the following lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
one and one-half miles south-east of
Kumdis Bay, and about one mile south
of the Myer Lake Trail, Graiiam Island,
thence west 80 chains; thence north SO
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south to point of commencement and
containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated November 9, 1909.
J. T. JOHNSON,
nov   13 Matthew Yomans, Agen*./
159
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. T. Johnson,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Realty, intends to apply for a license to prospect
for coal on  the following lands:
Commencing  at  a   post   planted   two
and one-half    mlles    east    of    Kumdis
Island and about one mile north of the
Myer Lake Trail, Graham Island; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains;  thence north  80
chains; to point of commencement and
containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated November 9, 1909.
J. T. JOHNSON,
nov   13 Matthew Yomans, Agent.
160
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. T. Johnson,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Realty, Intends to apply for a license to prospect
for coal on  the following lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile north of the Myer Lake Trail,
Graham Island; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains;  thence east  80  chains to point
of commencement    and    containing 640
ncres more or less.
Dated November 9,  1909.
J. T. JOHNSON,
nov   13 Matthew Yomans, Agent.
142-
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Queen Charlotte.
TAKE NOTICE that John Sheckels,
of Seattle, Wash., occupation Mechanic,
Intends to apply for permission to prospect for coal on the flolowing described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S.E. Corner of Frank Demers coal location and two miles east and one ami
a quarter miles south of the most westerly point on Gundas Island and on Graham Island, post marked "J. S., S.W.
corner"; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more  or  less.
Date of staking Sept. 25, 1909.
JOHN SHECKELS,
oct 23 F. H. Millard.
167
NOTICE is hereby given that I Intend
to apply to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands for a Licence to prospect for
Coal and Petroleum on and under the
following  described   land:
Commencing at the north-west corner
of Section 97, Sayward District, thence
east 80 chains; thence south SO chains;
thence west SO chains; thence north 80*
chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less,
Dated this 13th day of October. 1909.
A. W. McVITTIE,
nov 6 R. Ross Napier. Agent.

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