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Week Mar 5, 1910

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The Week
fl British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria,  B. C
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Vol. VII.   No. 5
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 1910
One Dollar Pbr Annum
THE McBRIDE RAILWAY POLICY
By universal consent Premier McBride
lias made good every one of his pre-election pledges with references to the Canadian Northern contract, and has gone one
hotter. So satisfactory are the agreements
which he has executed and the Bill which
he has submitted, that on the second reading the Opposition has been divided, and
the Liberal party is now represented in the
House by "the voice of one, crying in the
wilderness." As the Colonist has already
patted Mr. Jardine on the back for his
honest and fearless declaration in favour
of the Bill, anything which The Week
might say on this subject would be superfluous. It may, however, fairly.be conceded that the member.for Esquimalt has
increased public respect for the man who
has shown himself to be more broadminded
and independent than the titular leaders of
hig party. It is not necessary to recapitulate Mr. McBride's pledges or to show how
each one is implemented by a clause in the
Bill. The general satisfaction is so great
that interest already centres upon the approaching work of construction, rather
than on discussion or criticism. The popular provisions are well understood; completion within four years, construction
simultaneously at many points, a minimum
mileage each year, a car-ferry service between the main land and Vancouver
Island, work-shops within three miles of
Victoria, the purchase of supplies in British Columbia, a white man's wage, and
by a separate agreement the exclusion of
Oriental labour. These undertakings are
provided for to the letter in the Bill which
has already passed its second reading without a protect except from the respected hut
deluded member for Alberni. The clauses
in which the greatest interest has been
excited are thoso dealing with the control
of rates, and in this respect the Premier
has been able to secure far more than the
most sanguine expected. Any appeal
against rates by the public will be dealt
with in the first instance by tho Government, who will adjust them. If the alteration is not considered fair by the Railway Company the matter will go to arbitration, but cannot be carried beyond the
Supreme Court of the Province. The
Company agrees.not to appeal to any extra-
provincial court and not to apply at any
time for the system in this Province to
be "a work of general advantage to Canada." It is the last.step to ensure, absolute, control by the . Government, and
Courts of the Province. The only new
provision of the Bill is one by which, in
addition to guaranteeing the bonds of the
Company to the extent of $35,000 a mile,
tho Government will provisionally make
a loan limited to $4,200 a mile, to be a
first charge and to carry 4 per cent, interest. No doubt this arrangement was
necessitated by other concessions which the
Government secured, especially that with
respect to the control of rates. In any
event, as the Premier so well stated in his
masterly address, it was better to make
such a concession as the last word on
financial arrangements and to incorporate it in the Bill, than to have the Canadian Northern coming to the Legislature at a later stage for further help as
has been the case with all other transcontinental companies. The exact relations
between the Canadian Northern and the
Pacific Company are not perfectly clear
to the lay mind, but it may be gathered
that the purpose of this arrangement is to
I facilitate the handling of the Britisli Columbia end of the Canadian Northern system, and to leave the Company and the
I Government unhampered in all their deal
ings. No other explanation is consistent
with the public declaration of Premier
McBride, and it is not necessary to look
further. With respect to the Premier's
speech in the House ancl his lucid exposition of the provisions of the Bill it is
impossible to speak too highly. Everybody was convinced except the representative of a local rag, who, having left his
manners in London, curled up in his seat,
turned his back on the House, and took
no further interest in the proceedings, but
objected later on in the columns of the
Times that the Premier's remarks were
misrepresented because they were not
heard. The Times has suffered from
chronic deafness for some years if this
is a true explanation.
VICTORIA AND OAK BAY
There has been a hard contest, which
might almost be called a battle royal, in
the Private Bills Committee of the House
between the legal forces and other representatives of the Victoria and Oak Bay
Municipalities. In the end Oak Bay has
forced Victoria to enter into a guarantee
to supply water at the end of the pipe
line at ten cents per thousand gallons for
two years, subject to a rectification of
charge thereafter on the basis of two and
one-half cents per gallon above the actual
cost, but in no event to exceed ten cents.
It cannot be said that Oak Bay is any too
well pleased with this settlement, in view
of the fact that the Esquimalt Waterworks
Company was ready to enter into a contract at six cents per thousand gallons;
but there are wheels within wheels, and
more is involved in the settlement than appears on the surface. Probably the Committee was influenced in its decision
mainly by the fact that in 1873 a charter
was granted to the City of Victoria which
constituted Oak Bay a part of its territory, and that in a sense this charter established a vested interest, which would have
been confiscated if the Municipality of
Oak Bay had been liberated from its provisions. The decision' of the Committee
is only effective in so far as it eliminates
from the Private Bill being promoted by
Oak Bay the clauses which would have
enabled that. Municipality to lay pipes
through the Victoria Municipality to bring
in the water of the Esquimalt Waterworks
Co. It still leaves them free to bring in
that water by any other route which may
be found feasible, ancl in any event it assures them a maximum charge of ten cents
if they take their supply from Victoria.
The dilatoriness of the Victoria City
Council is responsible for the attitude
which Oak Bay was forced to assume towards the last, ancl even now, unless a
move is made promptly, Victoria will not
be in a position to carry out any such contract as it contemplates. The anomaly of
the situation is further accentuated by the
fact that Saanich pays thirty cents for its
water, certain users in Victoria fourteen
cents and the Esquimalt AVaterworks Co.
has at different times offered to contract
with Victoria and Oak Bay at a price
ranging from four cents to six cents per
thousand. While the proposed contract
may serve the purposes of Oak Bay temporarily, it is certain that thc residents
of that enterprising district will be up in
arms in a few years' time, if the developments of a permanent water supply for
Victoria do not very materially reduce the
price now specified.
THE NAVY LEAGUE
Clive Phillips AVolley, the indefatigable president of the local branch of the
Navy League, neither slumbers nor sleeps,
where Imperial interests are concerned.
AVhen he dies, if he ever docs, there will
be found engraved on his heart, if not on
his tombstone, "England." Not that there
are not thousands of loyal subjects of
King Edward in this Province, who vie
with him in keeping green the memory of
the Motherland, but that he is the most
intrepid and irrepressible son of them all.
The scoffs ancl sneers of a partisan press
are lost on Mr. AVolley, in spite of their
misrepresentation and abuse he keeps his
eye fixed on the goal, which is practical,
material contribution to the British Navy.
The sop which Laurier has offered is to
him as nauseous as it is indigestible, and
so he keeps up his missionary campaign,
and in spite of the predictions of the
A^ictoria Times that nothing more would
be heard of the cause, *he bobs up serenely
with the announcement of a public meeting in the Victoria Theatre next week,
when Premier McBride, as well as several
other prominent men representing all
classes of society, will endorse the propaganda of the Navy League in a well-
worded resolution. It is a matter for
congratulation that British Columbia is
bigger than any party programme or any
party sheet, ancl when the din of political
battle has subsided the Imperial stalwarts are ready to renew their campaign.
More power to their elbow.
THE PUBLIC SERVICE ACT
In so far as the Public Service Act
works out for the betterment of the Service, for the exclusion of incompetents,
for the submission of political nominees
to the same tests as outsiders, for the
promotion of the deserving, for a steadily
increasing pay, and for a pension, it must
commend itself to every right-minded
man. This programme constituted the
"raison d'etre" of the Act, which was
based upon the best English practice, ancl
to ensure the success of which the Government imported a civil Service expert
from London. So far so good. But there
are not a few, who, having carefully
watched the practical application of the
Act, and especially' the performances of
the imported expert, question the wisdom
of allowing a stranger, with no previous
experience of conditions in Canada, to
assume the control of a department, which
required to be handled with skill ancl
delicacy. It is an open secret that the
imported expert has handled many situations without skill or delicacy; without
any regard for the personal feelings of the
men with whom he has had to deal, and
in the high-handed manner of an autocrat
rather than of a public servant. Allowance was made for him on the grounds
of his inexperience in this country, ancl
tlie considei'ateness of ministers smoothed
over some of the acute difficulties which
his lack of tact created. Undoubtedly
there are some advantages in employing
a stranger to supervise the important work
of "grading." He will not have personal
predilections, and may be counted on to do
his duty "as he sees it." But these advantages may easily be outweighed by the
ill-effects of an arbitrary, uncompromising and unsympathetic disposition. Tt is
currently reported that the service of the
imported expert for the past year aro to be
remunerated at a rate considerably in excess of the emoluments of any of the ministers, and if this is so one cannot but,
wonder what would be a fitting salary for
a grading commissioner who performed
his duties both with skill ancl tact.
THE PASSING OF HOUSTON
By the death of John Houston, British
Columbia loses her ablest pioneer journalist, and one of the most brilliant men who
has figured in the public life of the
AVestern Province. This characterization
may be objected to by many who were
more familiar with his failings and foibles
than with his splendid intellectual endowment, and his true nobility of character.
There is no more pathetic page in our
history than that which will tell succeeding
generations of the man who fought his
life's battle with a thorn ever in the flesh,
who was the pioneer press-man of many
a frontier town ancl mining camp, who
flouted, .governors ajid governments, who
feared neither jnai^pov devil—nor Opel
much—and yet who, in spite of many falls
by the way, ever fell to rise again, ancl
on stepping-stones of his dead self to rise
to higher things. The last years of John
Houston's life were devoted to a consistent advocacy of temperance, and to a
strenuous endeavour to secure the suppression of vice ancl crime. His last militant
foe was one of the wealthiest, and most
influential corporations in the Dominion,
his expiring effort was to raise the banner of Progress on a new frontier, where
he continued to advocate the same principles which distinguished his sojourn in
Prince Rupert. At Fort George he met
the foe which he could not overcome.
Living under conditions to whicli ninety-
nine men out of a hundred would have
succumbed, weakened by approaching age
and the effects of a strenuous life, spent
under aggravating conditions, he was smitten clown when his vital force was spent,
ancl on that frozen trail, whicli leads to
the South he never reached, a courageous
heart ceased to be. Among the most prized
possessions of the Editor of The Week is
a complete file of all the newspapers conducted by John Houston in British Columbia. In next issue an attempt will be
made to do some measure of justice to the
memory of a man Avho was greatly misunderstood because of his vagaries, and
who, beneath the roughest, exterior, concealed a heart of gold. Of few men, since
the days of Burns, could it be more aptly
said:—
"A man's a man for a' that."
THE WATER REPORT
The Water Committee deserves the
thank^ 9^ the community for having published the various data and reports which
have from time to time been prepared in
connection with Victoria AVaterworks. It
would be well if the ratepayers could be
induced to read the publication, and even
to study it. It comprises all that has been
ascertained to date, and while there is still
much more to be learnt by way of fuller
investigation, especially into the Sooke
proposition, sufficient has been ascertained
to show that the sooner Victoria ceases to
use Elk Lake water the better. This contention of The AVeek is emphasized by the
analyses of the water, which appear in the
printed report. These analyses show a
large excess of albuminoid ammonia,
which is the chief provocative of typhoid,
ancl although the deaths from typhoid in
Victoria are not unfavourable in comparison with the death rates in other cities,
that is scarcely an argument in favour of
water which contains the dangerous element in excess, and might become a potent
instrument for evil if typhoid were epidemic. There are other reasons for this
view, which may he set forth more fully
after careful perusal of the report. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 1910
The Week is the Best Advertising Medium in
British Columbia, Exchanges with Every Paper in
the Province, and with a good many in the
Dominion.   The Week circulates to Paid
Subscribers in the following places:
VICTORIA
VANCOUVER
ESQUIMALT
ALDERMERE
ARMSTRONG
ALBERNI
ASHCROFT
ARROWHEAD
BEAVER POINT
SALT SPRING ISLAND
BEATON
BANFF,  Alta.
CAMP McKINNEY
CRANBROOK
COWICHAN STATION
COWICHAN  LAKE
CAMBORNE
CHEMAINUS
CROFTON
PETERBOROUGH, Ont.
MONTREAL, Que.
CARIBOO, B.C.
CLAYOQUOT, B.C.
SECHART, B.C.
WINNIPEG, Man.
CARSON, B.C.
SAVANOS, B.C.
COLQUITZ, B.C.
CHILLIWACK, B.C.
OTTAWA, ONT.
ISO-MILE HOUSE, B.C.
KIMBERLEY, B.C.
METCHOSIN, B.C.
TULAMUN CITY, B.C.
MILNES  LANDING
MILNES' LAND'G, B.C.
HOSMER, B.C.
PRESTON, Ont.
TOD INLET, B.C.
WILMER, B.C.
SASKATOON, Sask.
PORT SIMPSON, B.C.
COUTLEE, B.C.
FOUR-MILE HOUSE,
V.I., B.C.
KERRISDALE, B.C.
GLACIER, B.C.
LOWER NICOLA, B.C.
BRANDON, Man.
DAWSON, Y.T.
MT. SICKER, B.C.
REGINA, Sask.
HAMILTON, Ont.
COMAPLIX
CALGARY, Alta.
CUMBERLAND
DUNCANS
ENDERBY
EHOLT
GRANITE CREEK
GRAND FORKS
GOLDEN
GREENWOOD
GANGES HARBOUR
Salt Spring Island
GALIANO ISLAND
HEDLEY
HAGANS
HAZELTON
KELOWNA
KEATINGS
KEREMEOS
COWICHAN BAY, B.C.
EDMONTON, Alta.
QUESNEL FORKS, B.C.
FIFE, B.C.
EHOLT, B.C.
HALCYON, B.C.
BULLION, B.C.
COMOX, B.C.
AGASSIZ, B.C.
PRINCE ALBERT, Sask.
ATLIN, B.C.
QUEEN CHARLOTTE
ISLANDS, B.C.
QUATSINO, B.C.
ROCK CREEK, B.C.
GATEWAY, B.C.
PENDER ISLAND, B.C.
KIMBERLEY, B.C.
NAHUM, B.C.
NORTHPORT ,B.C.
GABRIOLA  ISL,  B.C.
TULFORD   HARBOUR,
B.C.
SAVANOS, B.C.
CORFIELD, B.C.
FRENCH CREEK, B.C.
SLOCAN JCT., B.C.
COBBLE HILL, B.C.
KISPIOX VALLEY, B.C.
FERGUSON, B.C.
CRESTON, B.C.
PEACHLAND, B.C.
HALIFAX, N.S.
BELLA COOLA, B.C.
TORONTO, Ont.
KAMLOOPS
KITSALAS
KASLO
LORNE CREEK
MIDWAY
MAYNE ISLAND
MARYSVILLE
MOYIE
NICOLA
NICOLA LAKE
NORTH VANCOUVER
NANAIMO
NELSON
NEW DENVER
NORTH SAANICH
ARLINGTON P.O.
NEW ALBERNI
NEW  WESTMINSTER
PENTICTON
LADYSMITH, B.C.
DELTA, B.C.
BANFIELD, B.C.
NANTON, Alta.
BEAUMONT, B.C.
SOOKE, B.C.
MISSION CITY, B.C.
KITLUMGAR, B.C.
OKANAGAN, B.C.
STETTLER, Alta.
EPWORTH, B.C.
SODA CREEK, B.C.
KENORA, Ont.
MITLAKATLA, B.C.
HARRISON HOT
SPRINGS, B.C.
HORNBY ISLAND, B.C.
LYTTON, B.C.
BANFIELD, B.C.
CLINTON, B.C.
SHAWNIGAN LAKE,
B.C.
PARRY SOUND, Ont.
ST. JOHN'S, P.Q.
ALMONTE, Ont.
WESTHOLME, B.C.
EBURNE, B.C.
GOLDSTREAM, B.C.
SARDIS, B.C.
SANDON, B.C.
MINSKUISH, B.C.
FOREMAN, Alta.
GABRIOLA ISL, B.C.
WHITEMORSE, Y.T.
MONTE CREEK, B.C.
PHOENIX
PRINCEON
PORT ESSINGTON
PRINCE RUPERT
PARKSVILLE
ROCK CREEK
REVELSTOKE
ROSSLAND
SLUGGETT
SLOCAN CITY
SIDNEY
STEWART CITY
TURGOOSE
TRAIL
VERNON
WARDNER
YMIR
PIER ISLAND, B.C.
WHITEWATER, B.C.
WILLIAM HEAD, B.C.
SOMENOS, B.C.
MOUNT TOLMIE, B.C.
COBOURG SIDING, B.C
NORTHSIDNEY, B.C.
FIELD,  B.C.
PINE ISLAND, B.C.
SILVERTON, B.C.
SEATTLE, Wash.
STRAITS SETTLEM'TS
BALLARD, Wash.
CHICAKO, ILL.
PORTLAND, Ore.
LODI, Cal.
GRANGEVILLE, Idaho.
TACOMA, Wash.
SPOKANE, Wash.
SANTA CRUZ, Cal.
DULUTH, Minn.
SAN ANGEL, Mex.
STEPHEN, Minn.
NEW YORK, N.Y.
CHICAPOO FALLS,
Mass.
LONDON, Eng.
BIRMINGHAM, Eng.
BROXBURNE,
Herts., Eng.
BRIDGEWORTH,
Salop, Eng.
CAMBRIDGE, Eng.
GLASTONBURY, Eng.
Fully forty people in every hundred in British Columbiai
at this saeson of the year positively need either good
bottled porter or a doctor's prescription for a "builder up."
It is a fact that every thirty-eight of these people will find
Carnegie's Porter as good for them as any tonic a physician may prescribe. Their own doctor will probably
tell them so because Carnegie's Porter with all its rich
nutriment and with all its tonic, nerve-steadying value
makes the stomach do its work better, helps digestion,
puts into the blood the kind of nourishment it can use
best and helps supply the lack that makes folks anemic.
Carnegie's Porter, you see, is not only a sparkling, fine-
flavored beverage fit for a king's table—it's a food-drink
and nerve-drink as well. You can't do better than use it
in your household every day of your life—drink it at
dinner—have your wife drink it, too. Get it from your
dealer (only in bottles, but "splits" if preferred). If he
won't supply "Carnegie's Swedish Porter," shun substitutes, and ask him to procure it for you from the wholesale
distributors, Pither & Leiser, corner Fort and Wharf
Streets, Victoria, Water St., Vancouver. Carnegie's
Swedish Porter may be procured at any hotel, restaurant
or club.
Headquarters for choice nursery stock.
Apple, pear, cherry, plum and peach trees
and small fruits, also ornamental trees,
shrubs, roses, evergreens, etc. Largest and
best assorted stock in British  Columbia.
Ten per cent, cash discount on all orders
above $10.00.
PRICE LIST AND CATALOGUE ON
APPLICATION. *
__ machine That Has No Equal
The Underwood Typewriter
Sold by Baxter & Johnson
809 Government Street
Office Supplies
At The Street   f
Corner \
p By THB LOUNOER /»
Are Canadians loyal? I suppose
that more has been written and said
on this subject than on the historic
question as to whether the Englishman is a welcome member of society
on this side of the herring-pond. Personally, I believe that the Canadian
is loyal; he proved that in the late
Boer War, but at the same time he
has a constitutional objection to evidencing this same loyalty by conforming to those little courtesies, which
every Englishman looks on as his
Sovereign's rights. Of course, I am
referring to the matter of standing
up and uncovering when the National
Anthem is being played. That citizens from the States should display
their bad manners in this respect is
not so much a matter for wonder.
True, wc respect their institutions
when we are in their land, and, doubtless, when the country is a little older,
it will learn that common courtesy
demands an observance of any little
customs which are in vogue in the
land which its citizens are visiting.
But there is room for great wonder
when Canadians, loyal Canadians, can
Good Skates     Good Instructors     Good Music     Good Time
SKATING
Morning    10.00 to 12.00
Afternoon     2.00 to 4.30
Evening    7.4s to 10.00
LADIES  FREE  AT ALL  SESSIONS
Assembly Rink
Fort St.
sit through the playing of the National Anthem, and sit with their hats
on too. I'm not making a mountain
out of a mole-hill; I have seen it
so often, and I have heard so many
people refer to the same thing. It
is a little thing, this mark of respect.
It cannot weigh in thc balance with
the blood which was shed by Canadians in the Empire's cause. But still,
seeing that we live under a constitution of which the King is the figure
head (and at the present time, no
mere figure-head either) sheer politeness should ordain that we stand uncovered when "God Save the King"
is being played. If anyone thinks
that these remarks are out of place
and entirely unnecessary, let him or
her go to the Victoria Theatre, and
watch the attitude of the audience
when thc band strikes up.
I admire the pluck of the Victoria
amateurs. There is a diamond ring
offered by the enterprising manager
of the Victoria Theatre, Mr. Denham, and the amateurs are after it,
hot and strong. It would be invidious
to make distinctions, it might even
be libellous, but I am certainly going
to attend the closing performance on
Saturday evening. I enjoyed myself
too much on Monday to forego the
pleasure of the crucial night. I only
wish that I had sufficient nerve myself  to  get  up,  and—well,  do  what
some of them are doing.
*     *     *
I have been asked to make a note
on the fact that the Victoria City
Kennel Club will hold its annual show
on March 9, 10, and 11, at the Assembly Hall, Fort Street, Victoria. I
take pleasure in doing this because
every decent man is a lover of dogs,
(Continued on Page 6)
What can be more enjoyable than a glass
of sparkling Burgundy or genuine imported,
high grade, Claret? If you ivant the best
ask for SCHMIDT'S.
"RADIGER & JANION
1318 Wharf Street
'British Columbia Agents
1
DID YOU REMEMBER
To Order Some of These
Perrier, the finest Mineral Water, per dozen $1.75
Gilbey's Invalid Port, per bottle  $1.25
Penfold's Doctors' Port, per bottle  $1.25
Ranier Beer, quarts, per dozen  $2.00
Blue Funnel Scotch, per bottle  $1.25
3-Star Glenlivet Scotch, per bottle   85c
Imperial quart bottle  $1.25
Maple Leaf Rye, Imperial quart  $1.00
Burke's Irish Whiskey, Imperial quart bottle  $1.25
Mitchell's Heather Dew Scotch, per bottle  $1.25
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
Independent Grocers and Wine Merchants
Tels.: 50, 51, 52 and 1590 1317 Government Street
RENFREW  LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Samuel Douglas,
of Victoria, gentleman, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 42 chains west from
the north-east corner of lot 117, T. L.
36,048; thence north 70 chains; thence
east 20 chains; thence south 70 chains;
thence west 20 chains to place of commencement, and containing 140 acres,
more or less.
Dated January 26th, 1910.
SAMUEL  DOUGLAS,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that S. J. Millikln
of Midland, Ont., merchant, intends b
apply for permission to purchase th
following described lands:—Commenc
ing at a post planted about 30 chain
south of Sec. 31, Tp. 12, at the north
east corner of S. Thrasher's claim
thence north 30 ehains to the south lin
of Sec. 31, Tp. 12; east 80 chains; sout
30 chains, west 80 chains.
Dated February 4th, 1910.
SAMUEL JOHN MILLIKIN.
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agen THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 1910
Captain Parry, who is leaving shortly for the Old Country, gave a farewell dinner on March ist, to his intimate friends in Victoria and to the
officers of his ship. Those present
were Lieutenant and Mrs. Nares, Mrs.
Harry Pooley, Mr. and Mrs. Phillips,
the Misses Eberts, Misses Irving,
Miss Peters, Lieut. Hodgson, Hon.
E. A. Gore-Langton, Mr. A. F. S.
Grant, Mr. J. S. G. Fraser, Mr. Benson, Mr. A. C. Bell, Dr. Taylor, Mr.
H. Baird iand Mr. George Johnston.
The dinner was held in the rooms
of Captain Parry's office in the dockyard, which were very prettily decorated with flags, palms and flowers.
* *   *
A marriage which took place recently in Vancouver was that of Miss
Myrtle Temple, daughter of C. H.
Temple of Winnipeg, and Mrs. P. S.
Wright of Vancouver. The marriage
took place, in St. Mark's Church at
Kitsilano, the Rev. A. Sovereign of-
|      ficiating at the ceremony.
Mr. E. E. Blackwood has returned
from a brief business trip to Seattle.
* *   *
Mr. H. Wake of this city was a
visitor    to    Vancouver    during    the
week.
'-» *   *   *
Mr. W. K. Houston has returned
from a short visit to Vancouver.
* *   *
Miss B. Howard and Mrs. Howard
from Chemainus are guests in the city.
* *   **•
Mrs. W. S. Drewry from Nelson is
making a short stay in the city, and
while here will reside at the Roccabella boarding house.
* *   *
A quiet wedding was celebrated
at St. Paul's Church, Esquimalt, on
February 24th, at 3 p.m., when Miss
Josephine E. Ellison, daughter of
the Rev. W. E. H. Ellison and Mrs.
Ellison, well known in this city, was
united in marriage with Mr. F. F.
Godman of London, Eng. Thf ceremony was conducted by the Ven.
Archdeacon Scriven. Only the bride's
parents, and intimate friends were
present. The bridegroom's brother,
Mr. T. R. Godman, acted as best man.
The bride who looked charming in a
dress of white silk, with lace trimmings, was given away by her father.
Mr. and Mrs. Godman left in the
evening by the S. S. Makura for an
extended tour to Australia and back
to England, where the young couple
will reside in future.
* *   *
Mr. Herbert Carmichael has returned to Victoria after paying a short
visit to Alberni.
* *   *
The ladies of the Victoria Hockey
Club have arranged to hold a dance
on March 5th in the Broad Street
hall, in honour of the members of the
Vancouver Hockey Club. The following ladies will act as chaperones—
Mrs. Lubbe, Mrs. Vincent and Mrs.
W. H. Bone.
* *     He «
Captain Troup and Mrs. Troup and
Miss Troup, who are travelling on the
Continent, are expected to arrive in
Victoria some time this month.
* **   *
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Ray, from
Vancouver, have left for an extended
trip to Mexico.
* *   *
Mrs. John Hirsch, from Duncan, is
the guest of Mrs. D. M. Eberts, Gorge
Road.
Mrs. Herbert Carmichael was hostess last Wednesday afternoon of a
very charming bridge party.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Harvey, who
have been paying an extended trip to
Southern  California, arrived  in Victoria on Wednesday evening's  boat.
* *   *
Mr. Cecil Good from Vancouver,
was a visitor to the city during the
week.
Miss Cordelia Grylls, who has been
visiting in Southern California, returned to Victoria during the week.
* *   *
Miss Lorna Eberts is the guest of
Mrs. Harry Pooley, Esquimalt Road.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. E. Bartlett and Mr.
W. J.  Hogan    from    Cowichan, are
staying in the city.
* ■-.    *
On Thursday last Mrs. Rattenbury was hostess at a dinner given
at her residence at Oak Bay.
* *   *
A quiet but very pretty wedding
took place recently in Vancouver,
when Miss Florence Pierce of Portage la Prairie, and Mr. J. A. Madill
of the same place, were united in marriage, the ceremony being performed
by the Rev. R. Milliken. The bride,
who looked very charming in heT
wedding gown, was attended by Miss
Lillian Lloyd of Vancouver, and the
groom was supported by the bride's
brother, Mr. P. E. Pierce. After the
ceremony the party drove to the home
of the bride, Burrard street, where a
dainty luncheon was served.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Wentworth from Calgary arc guests in the city.
* *   *
Last Friday afternoon Mrs. Spratt
was hostess at her home of the Friday Bridge Club, the usual members
of the Club being present. The house
was very prettily decorated for the
occasion. Some of those who won
prizes were Mrs. Flumerfelt, 1st prize;
and Miss May Newcombe, 2nd prize.
* *   #
Miss Powell of this city, is visiting
friends in Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. A. E. Monteith is on a business
trip in Seattle.
Mr. A. J. S. Holt, from Vancouver,
spent a few days of the week in Victoria on business.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. T. Johnson, from
Somenos, spent a few days in town
visiting friends.
Mr. G. W. Barker crossed over to
Seattle on the Princess Royal on
Tuesday evening.
* *   *
Mr. A. B. McNeill is out of town
on business.
* *   *
Dr. Jones crossed over to Vancouver on Thursday evening's boat.
* *   *
Mr. C. H. Revercomb has left on
a business trip to Portland, Ore.
A Lounger Postscript
It is hardly to be expected that a
worthy Scotsman, whose ancestors
distinguished themselves by wielding
the claymore and doubtless figured
prominently in the pages of Gaelic
history, would appreciate the honour,
though according to Carlyle not less
honourable occupation of wielding a
broom. My innocent remarks of last
week, intended to discourage the reprehensible habit of strewing papers
and refuse on the floor of the Post-
office have vexed the soul of one,
Thomas Campbell, assistant caretaker
of thc Post-office building, and of illustrious descent. Indeed, so deep is
the aggravation that Mr. Campbell
has written an ungrammatical and ill-
spelt letter to the Editor of The
Week, in which he charged me with
DIAMONDS
are a symbol of prosperity—a
sign of success; the gems with
which a lover plights his troth,
or an appreciative partner remembers the companion and
stay of his life; they are the
best gifts for any occasion.
FROM AN INVESTMENT
STANDPOINT
Diamonds possess great merit;
the longer you wear them thc
more valuable they become;
they're worth twice as much today as they were 10 years ago.
We are offering some especially fine values just now in
first-quality stones.
W. H. WILKERSON
The Jeweler
915 Government Street
Tel 1606
Mouday, March 7
The Supremely Successful Stage Production  of Owen  Weistes'
Romance
The Virginian
Prices—25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50.
Seats on sale Friday, March 4th.
Mail orders will receive their usual
attention.
having made a "lying statement," and
in phraseology which hardly bears
out his claim to respectable parentage, demands that I retract a statement which I never made. I much
fear that Mr. Campbell's education
has been much neglected, and that not
only his writing and spelling, but also
his reading have been much neglected.
I stated that I had seen an Oriental
sweeping up the refuse which the
public so thoughtlessly strewed round
the Post-office. Mr. Campbell construes this to mean that I charged
him with being an Oriental. Nothing
was further from my thoughts. I
think I know an Oriental when I see
one, and on more than one occasion
have seen an undoubted Chinaman
performing the sweeping act, and that
Chinaman was not Thomas Campbell.
But from enquiries instituted I gather
that at times, when Mr. Campbell recalls the claymore, his proud stomach
rebels at the broom handle, and until
the fit passes away he procures a substitute in the person of the despised
Oriental. And it was the substitute
and not the original Campbell whom
I saw. There is one statement in
Mr. Campbell's letter, which furnishes such a unique specimen of wit,
not to say, "bull," that I begin to
have my doubts whether he is not an
Irishman instead of a Scotchman. I
will quote thc sentence verbatim, and
leave my readers to judge for themselves, merely premising that there
is an old adage which runs, "It's a
wise child that knows its own father."
"Neither my parents or their parents
were Orientals, and I think I was
well acquainted with all of them."
LOUNGER.
Interesting
Instructive
ROMAN©
THEATRE
A visit to our amusement house will prove that we have the best
in Moving Pictures and Illustrated Songs.
Daily from 2 p.m. to 5-3° p.m., and 7 until 11 p.m.
Saturday performances commence at 1 p.m. sharp.
Complete change every Monday, Wednesday and  Friday.
ADMISSION—Ten Cents; Children at Matinee, Five Cents.
ORCHESTRA IN ATTENDANCE.
A PLACE OF ATTRACTION FOR THE
YOUNG AND OLD IS
EMPRESS
THEATRE
The strides made in the improvement of Moving Pictures are
nothing more tha"n marvellous.
They are not only interesting to look at but instructive and
impressive and oftentimes portray a lesson worth learning.
Complete  change  of programme on  Mondays, Wednesdays
and Fridays.
Continuous performance:  2.00 to .30—7.00 to 10.30 p.m.
Children's Matinees: Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday—Five Cents.
Admission - Ten Cents
ridJEJTK
THEATRE
Yates Street, Just Below Government
where you can see the latest and best Motion Pictures
money and skill can produce. Illustrated songs. Continuous performance daily from 2 to 5.30—7 to II,
Admission—10 cents;  Children to Matinee, 5 cents.
CHANGE OF PROGRAMME
Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday
PANTAGES
THEATRE
Week of March 5
MIRTH AND MUSIC
PRETTY GIRLS
CLASSY DANCING
SWEET SINGING
ELEGANT COSTUMES
A CREATION
ARMSTRONG
MUSICAL COMEDY
COMPANY
THE
New Grand
Week of March 5
MAZUS and MAZETTE
"The   Lady  and   The   Tramp"
Acrobatic   Humorists   Extraordinary
"A Hit With the Kidlets"
LOUISE STICKNEY'S
Dog and Pony Novelty
"That Dainty Duo"
CARLTON SISTERS
In Songs and Dances
GEORGIA NELSON
Charming Vocalist and
Comedienne
THOS. J. PRICE
NEW MOVING PICTURES
OUR  OWN   ORCHESTRA THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 1910
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
•THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
1208   Government St.,   Victoria, B.C,
W. BLAKEMORE, Editor
The Cost of Living
BY BOHEMIAN
Thc papers have been very full
lately of articles written on the subject of thc high cost of living at the
present day, and of the steady advance
in prices of common necessities. It
might be interesting to examine this
question, and by comparing modern
standards of living with those which
prevailed in earlier times, to see whether this is an actual fact or whether
there is not a great confusion between what are necessaries and what
are luxuries.
Doubtless the prehistoric man lived
cheaper than do his descendants. We
have it on the authority of Mr.
George Roby that he lived on rocks.
If his piece of rock was bigger than
his landlord's his board and lodging
cost him nothing; if it were not, he
had no further cause for worrying
about ways and means. And the undertaking fees were not high; a few
stones piled on his corpse to keep
off, the beasts of prey, or a bit of
old raft to earry him to the fishes, or
maybe a convenient furnace furnished
al requirements.
Now-a-days it costs nearly as much
to be dead as to be alive. Consider
the absurd extravagance committed by
even the very poor when it conies
to burying time. Thc man who never
has a full meal, and who has lived
in a state of chronic starvation all
his life has more money spent on his
funeral than he ever saw at one time
together. But this is considered a
necessity. Why it should bc I can't
imagine. Living stomachs are really
more valuable than dead bones, but it
is a fact that the lower in the social
scale, thc more extravagance in proportion is observed in undertaking expenses.
Then again we are always being
told that the price of food is on the
increase. This is doubtless perfectly
true, but then we must take into consideration the fact that food in the
twentieth century and food in the
tenth arc two* very different things.
Most of us cat meat three times a
day; we require bread made from the
very finest flour; with every meal we
drink tea, coffee or some form of alcoholic liquor. Porridge, potatoes,
and spring water are out of fashion;
instead of the former we have expensive breakfast foods, which we dignify by the name of "cereals" and for
which wc pay in proportion. We still
cat potatoes, but as an adjunct and
not as a food. If we drink water at
all it is to quench our thirst, and
some other liquid must be on the
table to aid the process of mastication.
Our clothes cost more, but merely
because we require more of them. A
red coat must bc purchased by the
golfer; knickerbockers by the sportsman and cyclist; dust coats by thc
motorist, to say nothing of every kind
of overcoat so that the wind may be
tempered to the shorn lamb. Men are
inclined to disparage women on the
subject of dress, and make them thc
subject for jests in thc comic papers,
but the average well-dressed man has
a tailor's bill as long as his frock
coat and is just as loth to pay it as
his wife's millinery account. In thc
matter of dress the rivalry which is
inherent in every human being is
most conspicuous. Anything to keep
up with Jones, and then, when after
some little economics have resulted
in our getting a more stylish coat,
Jones, who has a longer purse, goes
one better. It really is most annoying, and does make one think that
the cost of living is higher.
Thc extravagances of Roman Em
perors and of Eastern courts inspires
us with disgust. Slave-fed lampreys,
nightingale's tongues and other luxuries for which the world was scoured,
made Imperial banquets expensive;
but after all these were reserved for
the few, and these few were the decadent descendants of men who had
been great. But the common people
lived plainly. The Hebrew boys at
the Court of Nebuchadnezzar were
of very little cost to their master,
and yet we are told that they looked
better fed and in better condition than
any of the pampered minions, who
ate rich food three times a day.
Scotchmen have always been happy in a reputation for brawn and
muscle. Thc Gaelic chieftains were
men of gigantic physique, as were
their followers, and yet "parritch"
formed their staple diet. Everybody
knows that an Irishman is a scrapper, and yet the national food of the
Irish is the potato.
And what can we show to justify
our present day habits Are we bigger than our ancestors? Are we
stronger? Are we healthier? The
James Bay Athletic Club are arranging a boxing competition; entries for
the featherweight Class and for the
light aad welter weights have come
in fast enough, but for the heavyweights they are relyjng on the men
from the "barracks"~before they can
issue a complete list. No, there can
be little doubt but that the cost of
living, or perhaps one should say the
increase of luxuries is slowly but
surely sapping our blood, and that as
luxuries more and more become necessities, we are following in the path
of Greece and Rome, and must have
the  same  finish.
We none of us take the daily exercise which our forefathers were
obliged to take. The advent of the
street car saw the beginning of our
downfall in this respect; the telephone
is completing it. It was inevitable
that this should be so, but it has
been a bad thing for us. The craze
for speed has been at the root of our
laziness. Of course we do more
work, but we do it by the aid of
electricity and then wonder why it is
that we are getting dyspeptic.
Consider the thousand and one
things which have begun to be looked
on upon as necessities. The rich
man's cigar, the poor man's pipe and
the Bohemian's cigarette. A penc'l
for the waistcoat pocket and a knife
to sharpen it. The ten-cent daily
shine and thc fifteen-cent shave. The
starched shirt and the laundry bill
which it necessitates. The typewriter
and the girl to handle it. The list
might be prolonged indefinitely and
would not include what are now
styled luxuries. Decidedly the cost
of living has increased, but only because we insist on having things
which were never dreamt of a hundred years ago.
A Side Path
"I suppose," said the facetious
stranger, watching a workman spread
a carpet from the church door to the
curb, "that's the high road to heaven
you're fixing there."
"No," replied thc man. "This is
merely a bridal path."
MUSIC
AND   THE   STAGE
There was a very fair attendance at
thc Victoria Theatre on Monday last
when Mr. Chas. B. Hanford appeared
in "The American Lord." The common verdict was that thc play was a
success, Mr. Hanford playing the
leading part with conspicuous ability,
and being most ably assisted by Miss
Drofnah. Thc other members of the
company were well up to the mark,
and the play itself, which abounds in
comedy and striking climaxes, was
well received,
The Virginian
"The  Virginian,"   which   comes  to
the Victoria Theatre next Monday
night, is a production with a strong
heart appeal and free from anything
at which the most fastidious could
take offense, as an example: The
curtain of the third act rises on a
moonlit gorge in the Rockies, where
Steven, Trampas—Steve's evil genius
and the Virginian's enemy—a Mexican and another are playing poker
and cooking supper at a fire. They're
a reckless, dare-devil quartet ancl they
plan what they shall do with their
money, all the while aware that if
they are captured it means rope for
four necks. Trampas and another, going away to take a look out, leave
Steve and the Mexican. The Mexican is scared; Steve, who is not
bad at heart, assumes a bold front.
A few minutes before he has threatened to fight Trampas for saying
vile things of the Virginian, ancl, as
he sits here he knows that if the Virginian, whom he loves, is at the head
New Grand Theatre
An unusually clever acrobatic turn
is the feature of the week at the New
Grand Theatre; I have no hesitation
in saying that the Schiavony Troupe
of six is far and away the best that
I have seen in this popular vaudeville
house. A very pleasing turn has been
that contributed by the Misses Wales,
Meredith and Ellison, who are fair
and harmonious songsters. R. C.
Whitehead, also a songster, and one
of merit, and Harry Bachelor, a musical Rube, whose selections on different instruments have been really
good, fill a bill which is as good a
one as I have seen for some time.
There have been various kinds of
comedies come here but something
new is promised at the Grand next
week where Mazuz and Mazette will
play a comedy in action. All thc
regular movements of the comedy
will bc done in acrobatic fashion, the
dialogue going on continually and un-
RENFREW  LAND  DISTRICT
of the searching expedition it means
discovery and death. There is heard
the cracking of a twig and the men
start. The Mexican is weak with
alarm, Steve cheers him up. "It's
nothing, he says. He urges the Mexican to play the game like a man, and
if he loses to take his medicine gracefully." Suddenly the two men are
surrounded by the Virginian and his
men. There follow incidents of grim
humor when Steve meets his old acquaintances and of intense pathos
when he and the Virginian look at
each other in silence. Not a word
speaks the Virginian until he steps
forward to shake hands and say farewell to his doomed friend. But the
latter turns his back. A moment later
he writes on a piece of newspaper
an affectionate note of farewell to the
Virginian and tells him he did not
speak to him, he could not have endured the agony of it. As other men
lead the courageous Steve and the
craven Mexican away to die, the Virginian, his heart aching, reads this
note. This is said to be the strongest
scene in the play, and is well worth
the price of admission. William L.
Gibson will be seen in the title role.
Mr. Gibson has earned for himself a
reputation that he may well be proud
of ancl is sure to make a good Virginian. Marshal Farnum, Mabel
Wright are with the company, and
under the management of the Kirke
La Shelle Company, a first class performance is warranted.
weaving the plot as in the ordinary
comedy. Their play is "The Lady
and the Tramp," presenting the most
laughable ancl humorous ideas. The
loss of his clothes troubles the tramp
immensely but the audience finds
huge delight in the fact that the articles cannot bc found. Grand patrons arc promised much laughing,
for the act is built just to make
laughter.
Louise Stickncy will make a hit
here with the youngsters for she is
bringing her trained pony and dog.
he dog is a beautiful collie and the
pony a Shetland. The act contains a
walk on stilts, clever acting by the
two animals ancl all kinds of things
for the children.
There will be the charming comedienne and vocalist, Georgia Nelson,
here next week. She is going to sing
"Naughty Eyes" and "Meet Me on
the Roadwalk Dearie," besides other
songs. She has a voice of much
sweetness, so say all those who have
heard her, ancl Vancouver has been
quite charmed with her act. The
Carlton Sisters in song and dance will
display their skill in dainty costumes
and tuneful voices. They have a
lot of charm and offer a very dainty
act.
The regular illustrated song will
be sung by Thomas J. Price, and the
Moving Pictures are going to beat the
best. The orchestra is now preparing new musical selections for next
week and from advance reports  the
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Elizabeth Casheir
Williams, of San Juan, married woman,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of Lot 204; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence south SO chains; thence east 40
chains to place of commencement; containing 320  acres,  more  or less
Dated January 24th, 1910.
ELIZABETH CASHIER WILLIAMS,
feb 26 J. w. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW   LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Harry Percy
Simpson, of Victoria, gentleman, Intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted 20 chains
east of L. Alexander's post; thenee north
80 chains; thenee west 20 chains; thenee
south SO chains; thence east 20 chains
to place of commencement, and containing 160 aeres, more or less.
Dated  January  24th,  11)10.
HARRY  PERCY SIMPSON,
feb 26 J. w. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that William Mostyn
Thrasher, of Mosten, Sask., farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the ofllowlng described lands:—-
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east eorner of Samuel Thrasher's;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 80 ehains; thence
west 40 chains to place of commencement, and containing 320 acres, more
or less.
Dated  January  24th,  1910.
WILLIAM MOSTYN THRASHER,
feb 26 J, w. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW   LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTilfcE that Robert Beard, of
Victoria, gentleman, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at north-east corner of
Lot 248; thence north 30 ehains; thence
east 50 chains; thence south 30 chains;
thence west 50 chains to place of commencement, and containing 150 acres,
more  or  less.
Dated  January 24th, 1910.
ROBERT BEARD,
feb 26 J. w. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Abram Thrasher,
of Vietoria, farmer, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted besides J. W. Williams'
post; thenoe nortli 80 chains; thence
east 35 chains; thence south SO chains*,
thence west 35 chains to place of commeneement and containing 2S0 acres,
more  or  less. m
Dated  January  26th,  1910.
ABRAM THRASHER,
feb 20 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW  LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Bernard Ryan, of
Victoria, gentleman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 40 chains east and about
64 chains north of the north-west corner of Lot 252, Renfrew District; thence
south 04 chains; thence west 64 chains;
thence north 64 chains; thence east 64
chains to place of commencement, and
containing 409 acres, more or less.
Dated  February  4th,  191u.
BERNARD  RYAN,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW   LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Percy Walls, of
Victoria, clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the north-west corner of Lot
200; thence north 60 chains; thence west
40 chains; thence south 60 chains;
thence east 40 chains to place of commeneement, and containing 240 acres,
more or less.
Dated January 25th, 1910.
PERCY WALLS,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW  LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that John William
Speck, of Victoria, clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at
a post planted at the south-east corner
of S. Douglas'; thence north 70 chains;
thence east 20 chains; thence south 70
chains; thence west 20 chains to place
of commencement, and containing 140
acres, more or less.
Dated  January  26th,  1910.
JOHN WILLIAM SPECK,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
show is going to be something well
worth while.
Pantages
"A Trip to Chinatown" has been
the comedy holding thc boards and a
crowded house at Pantages. There
was plenty of fun and amusement in .
it, and although it is possible that it
approached the warm spots occasionally, I do not think that there was
really anything to object to. I mention this because of remarks which
have been made to me on the subject,
ancl which I honestly think have been
uncalled for. Next week sees the
termination of the engagement of the
Armstrong Company, and Pantages
will revert to vaudeville on March 14.
It must be admitted that the present
company have scored a big success in
Victoria, having drawn full houses
for each performance.
Moving Pictures
The three regular Moving Picture
Houses, viz., Romano's, the Empress
ancl the Majestic, have all been run- THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 1910
WHAT 15 THE PRICE
TO-DAY ?
Now That the Month of Furniture Sales is Past
What Are You Going to Pay????
Now that February-the month of Furniture Sales-is past, what about your
Home Furnishings ? What prices are you going to pay now ? Back again to
the high prices that prevail all the year, except in February when they are all
"slaughtered" ????
The "sliding scale" of prices and the goods of doubtful quality are things to
be avoided by those of limited capital. The safe plan is to come to the store
that gives good quality and at a fair price, and has ONE price to ALL-and ALL
the time.    A trial will convince you of the economy of trading at this store.
Nine times out of ten quality wins regardless of price. The other time the
purchaser loses because l$i puts the question of price above that of quality.
Don't be that tenth party, bftt come here-come to the store
WHERE THE MOST FURNITURE IS SHOWN AND SOLD
FURNISHERS OF
CHURCHES
SCHOOLS
BOATS
SINCE 1862
AT VICTORIA, B.C.
Complete Home Furnishers
Victoria, B.C.
ning good films, and are still being
well  patronized  which as should be
■the case.    It seems incomprehensible
Ithat in so short a time the cinemato-
raph should have made the vast ipi-
Iprovements which are evidenced in
:vcry city on thc continent. The play-
ng of Mr. S. Gaskill on the one-
stringed   violin   at   the   Empress   is
|?ood.
At the Victoria Theatre there have
been amateur performances in addition to the usual Moving Pictures
Ivhich are always to be seen there
im off nights. Of the amateurs I
Jvould particularly commend Miss
Murray, who as a female imperson
ator and a falsetto singer is excellent.
The dancing of Miss Enid Rex is
most creditable, and she makes a very
graceful little figure when she conies
on to dance the Hornpipe and a
Scotch reel.
Next week the amateur shows,
which will be held on Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, will be
confined to the younger members .of
society, only children being eligible
to enter in the contest. These amateur performances are proving very
popular, and the manager of the Victoria Theatre is to be congratulated
pjjihis action in promoting them.
MOMUS.
ness, Hinnissy, is at th' bottom iv all
ye'er throubles. It is a gr-reat vice,
idleness. Wan iv th' gr-reatest. It
saps th' moral fiber an' is th' ambition iv all.
cMr. dooley on the Cost
of Living
What  are ye  goin'  to  put in  mc
ockin' fr    Chris'mas?"    asked  Mr.
loley.
'ff yc lave ye'r stockin' within me
:ach," said  Mr.    Hennessy,    "it's a
ris'mas prisint iv a stockin' I'll be
vin' mesilf. 'Tis a sthrange thing,
jcan't make it out, but I'm no better
If this Chris'mas thin I was last.   I
n't  complainin', mind ye.   If there's
11  man  I  hate  more thin another
wan  iv  these  here  fellows  that
mes th' wurruld f'r his own fail-
l_s.   But I can't uudherstand how it
that  though  me  salary  has  been
Ised fr'm wan siventy-five to two a
I  haven't  been  able  to  lay  by
Iiything, an' this Chris'mas sees me
t about where I was a year ago.
in't sad about it, mind yc. But I
't figure where th' leakage is."
It's ye'er reckless disposition," said
Dooley. "Ye do well not to blame
Iywan but ye'ersilf, f'r 'tis ye'ersilf
ie   that's   to   blame.    I   don't   re-1
proach ye, me frind.    Ivrybody is as
th' Lord made    thim    an'    ye were
bor-rn to be an atthractive, dashin'
fellow, scatthrin' ye'er money around
ye,   with  little  care  f'r  th'  morrow,
hurrah, boys! aisy come, aisy go.   Th'
throuble with ye is that ye don't know
th' value iv money.    An'  how shud
ye whin ivry day iv ye're life excipt
Sundahs   th'   Steel   Thrust   pours a
goolden sthrcam iv two dollars in onl
yc?   If yc had to wtirruk f'r it 'twud
be  diff'rent.    But  ye're  cursed  with I
wealth   that  yc   haven't   arncd.    All I
ye've got to do is to go to ye'er office
in th' cool dawn an' practise calistlien- j
ics   with   a  shovel   ontil   th'   avenin'
whin yc return to ye'er bed.    If ye
had some useful cmploymint yc might
be happy.   Or aven if ye cud take up
some spoort to inthrest yc.    Did ye
iver  tliry goltif?    Or  polo?    I  shud
think polo wud bc a good game f'r
ye.    Yc ought to get into something
that  wud  take up  ye'er  time.    Idle-
Alas, the Extravagant Laboring Man!
"But what I'd like to know is what
ye do with ye'er money.   I'm inthrest-
ed in th' ways iv th' luvuryous classes.
Ye  say ye'er  income  has   increased
twinty-five cints a day within th' year.
That's money.   Multiply that be, we'll
say, three hundherd an' we have what?
I'm  not an  expert  accountant  so   I
won't thry to give ye th' exact result,  but  it's  a  large  sum.   An' yet
ye tell me that ye'er expinses are still
akel to ye'er income.   What d'ye do
with  it,  I ask ye, ye spindthrift.    I
can't say that I've seen any change
in ye.    Ye're th' same old Hinnissy
to ye'er  frinds that ye always  was.
I don't    see   any    ostintation in yc.
Yc'cr establishment is wan iv modest
luxury.    Th'   same   simple   but   firm
rockin'  chair  is  to be  found  befure
ye'er    cheerful    base-burnin'    stove.
Ye'er  overhalls  arc  what  anny  gin-
tleman  in  comfortable circumstances
wud  wear.    Ye  have not  become  a
slave  to th'  pleasures  iv  th'  palate.
I have obsarved that th' dejenay that
ye   carry  upon   ye'er  ar-rm,   instead
iv havin' it sint to th' mills in a taxy
cab as ye might, is still th' refreshing but modest corn beef.
Whnt DO ye do with ye'er money?
I'm anxious to know. Have yc got
a lit iv auty-mobills that ar're consilium' yc'cr fortune? Ar-re ye th'
multy-millyonaire that rumor connects with th' cable iv diamonds obsarved in th' second line iv th' chorus
iv 'Dcleryous Dolly'? Have ye been
Iniyin' pitchers? \To, I don't mean
Sundah supplements. I mean worse.
Ar-re ye th' mysterryous American
millyonaire that has just tempted an
English jook in th' most objectionable way, that is bc offrin' him money,
to part    with    wan    iv his    priceless
FURNISHERS OF
HOMES
HOTELS
CLUBS
SINCE 1862
AT VICTORIA, B.C.
thrcasures? Where has this fortune
disappeared to? With all me likin'
fr ye'er divvle-me-care disposition, I
must remind ye that wealth has its
responsibilities as well as its advantages. Ye've got to rcmimbcr that it
was such cxthravaganccs as ye'ers
that busted Rome. It was th' placin'
iv wealth in th' hands iv th' idle an'
pleasure-lovin' instead iv in th' hands
iv others an' lettin' thim be idle an'
pleasure-lovin' that bumped this
mighty Empire ontil to-day it's no
bigger thin CiVicinnaty, Ohio."
"I   don't   know  what  ye're  talkin' I
about," said Mr. Hennessy, "but I'm
thinkin' th' raison I can't put by anything is that ivrything costs more."
"Hinnissy," said Mr. Dooley, "if it
wasn't that I'm an old frind iv ye'ers
an1 wtidden't f'r wurrulds call ye out
iv ye'er name I'd say ye were a pol-
lytickal economist. I wuddent be surprised  to  know  that ye ar-re  right.
Wc ar-re now in th' mist iv a season
iv unexampled Prosperity.   Hiven an'
Bill Taft havc smiled on us.   We ar-re
blessed with a tariff that accordin' to
Bill   is   wan   iv   th'   handsomest   an' I
most becoming loads that was  iver,
says  he,  imposed  upon  th'  breakin'
back iv a  patient  people.    There  is
! wurruk  f'r  all   who   can't  afford   to
refuse it or ar-re in some other way
oncapacitated f'r   idleness.     I   don't I
think  I can iver remember th' time
whin yc were so tliurly an' completely
blessed with cmploymint as ye ar-re
to-dny.    Money, as ye say, has been
showered on ye bc yc'cr employers.
Yet   in   th'   old   race   iv   lliiinissy's
income  ngninst  th'  cost  iv food  an'
dollies   ye're   not   a   pair   iv   shoes
nr a loaf iv bread to llic good.    But
ye do right not to repine.    Ar-reil't
ye   glad  to  know   thai   yc  live  in  a
counthry  where  th'  cost  iv  livin'  is
th'  highest   in   th'   wurruld?    Cheap
clothes makes cheap men, ye know.
An'  it  is our  proud  boast  that  our
American-made   pants  nr-rc  ns  denr
to us as anny iv our other institutions.
Thoughts on Eating an Egg
"I don't  know where it's goin' to
stop.   I was Iookin' over a price list
in Grogan's th' grocer's yistcrdah an'
it looked like a score iv a siven-day
bicycle race or th' weekly report iv
th' bank clearings.    Whin I got his
bill last week I thought th' postman
had made a mistake an' sint me Judge
Landis' fine iv th' Standard Ile Comp'ny.    Ivry time I ate an egg I feci
ike that there  Egyptian queen  that
dissolved pearls in her dhrink befure
she dhrained it off.   Whin I look at
th' clothes  I    wear    I'm    afraid me
neighbors   will   tliink   I'm   a   miser.
Whin I rcmimbcr what they cost me,
I'm afraid people will think I'm on-
manly fr wearin' such orycntal ray-
mint.   I shudder to think what'i] happen to me whin these pants wear out.
I can't stay indures all th' time.    An'
if bc patient toil an' close economy
I  gather together a fortune an' enrry  it  down  to  me  frind  Solly's  nn'
nsk him to exchange n pair iv pants
f'r it I can't go home f'r there'll bc
I nawthin' left to pay th' rent.    Afther
Iookin'  over  me  bills I'm ondecided
which   I'll   do—starve  or  go   naked.
It's wan or th' other an' on rent clay
it louks like both.
Extra! Safe-Blowers Steal the Butter!
"I wudden't be surprised anny time
In pick up a pa-apcr an' read: 'Darin'
burglary! East night burglars broke
into th' joolry store iv Sonkcm nn'
Co., blew open th' safe nn' carried
off th' entire contints, consistin' iv a
pound iv butter an' a scuttle iv coal.
. . . ' At a recent sale J. Picrpont
-Morgan added to his already large
collection a pair iv boots, two lemons,
nn' n rare old lint atthributed to Ike,
th' Square Hatter, although Doctor
Bode iv Berlin questions its gentiy-
ness. It is a perfect specimen except that th' label is missing an' there
is a dent in th' top supposed to have
been caused bc a polisman.   .    .   .
(Continued on Pnffe S) THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 1910
IT IS A BURNING SHAME
To waste good money in large coal or wood fires when not required for heating purposes. It is folly to catch cold in winter building a fire or to cook the
cook on a hot summer's day. That is the beauty of a gas range,—a turn of the tap and the heat is on or off at will. A hundred other splendid points,
too.    Come in and we will explain the many merits of gas for cooking and heating purposes.
YOU SHOULD COOK WITH GAS
Then you would be spared all the worry, dirt and
inconvenience attendant on a coal or wood stove and
avoid the awful danger of alcohol or oil. Gas for
cooking is positively unsurpassed. We have some
very fine values just now in our showroom, Gas
Eanges and Gas Stoves that well illustrate tho
comfort and economy of gas for cooking purposes.
YOU SHOULD USE GAS HEAT
Every B. C. home needs heat in winter, spring,
summer and fall, but why suffer work and worry
of lighting fires when a Gas Eadiator—just a turn
of the tap and a match-scratch—will give all the
warmth you need. Euel economy lessened, as well
as wear on carpets and draperies lessened and
freedom from work soon pay small expense of gas
heating outfit.
The Victoria Gas Co., Ltd.
Corner Fort and Langley Streets
Victoria, B« C
At the Street Corner
By the lounger
(Continued from Page 2)
and there is nothing better calculated
to improve breed than regular shows.
Any information required may be obtained from Mr. F. Hodgson, 1214
Government Street, Victoria. The
Show is held under the patronage of
His Honour the Lieut.-Governor. In
this connection it might be of interest
to point out that the Vancouver Kennel Club, Ltd., will hold its ninth
Bench Show on March 25 and 26.
Communications should be addressed
to Mr. E. C. Powell, Box 1071, Vancouver, B.C. On April 5, 6, 7 and 8
the Tacoma Kennel Club will hold
its annual dog show. Mr. C. J.
Chamberlain,   Tacoma,   Wash.,   will
give desired information.
* *     *
In connection (with thc Victoria
Dog Show, above mentioned, it appears that some intending exhibitors
arc suffering from a bad attack of
"cold feet" induced by the prominence
given in the Colonist of March 2nd
to a case of rabies in Hamilton, Ont.
on that fact that the Victoria City
the news item should have arrived
just at this juncture and have been
of such length that no one could miss
it, but still, these things will happen.
In any case, a connection between
a case of rabies in Ontario and a Dog
Show on Vancouver Island is extremely far fetched, and the "would-
have-been" exhibitors are earnestly
requested to warm their pedal extremities and again become "would be's."
* *     *
Has it ever stuick the intelligent
reader what quaint ideas arc indulged
in in this Western country with regard to art? I am not referring to
the Island Arts Club, which is doing
good work in educating public taste
up to appreciating art, as it ought to
be. I refer to thc extraordinary decorations (?) on the walls of out-
of-the-way  resorts,  which have,  for
the most part, been perpetrated by
American daubers, and which, and
here's the funny part, appear to give
unbounded satisfaction to the proprietors of these places.
* *     *
We have a curious method of cleaning our streets in Victoria. An excellent example of it can be seen almost
any day opposite the Empress Hotel
and opposite the Parliament Buildings, also in Broad street. The system devised by the gentleman responsible for the job is to have a number
of men sweeping the refuse from the
middle of the road to the curb. There
it is left, either to be blown away,
or to be water-logged into a slimy
mass which is a disgrace to any city.
This item, also, came to me, free,
gratis and for nothing.
* *     *
I am no gardener an 1 possibly may
be "making a break:" when I refer to
an old and favourite spot of mine,
viz., the corner at the Parliament
Buildings end of the Causeway. I
wasn't in town last spring, and possibly this corner was not then cleared.
But I have a strong idea that it was.
Why is there no grass on it? Three
things I want to see in Victoria, ancl
then I can die happy; the demolition
of the Belmont Saloon corner, and
the erection of a respectable block
there, which is going to be done; the
total abolition of the fruit store ip-
posite the Post-office, and the erection
of a public lavatory there; and a nice
little grass plot on the corner above-
mentioned. When these three much-
needed improvements are made in
Victoria, the Lounger is perfectly
willing to die, or seek other climes.
* *     *
Last week I made some reference
to laundries. I praised the "Chink"
and damned the White man. This
week I received my reward. I gave
my Chinaman a cheque. Of course,
it was not for the full amount; just
something on account. And if I had
not been as honest as a self-respecting
Lounger ought to be, I could have
cheated him out of the balance. He
actually gave me a receipt for the
whole bill, and it took some convincing on my part to prove to him that
there was still money coming to the
firm.
*     *     *
There is a great scarcity of complaints and grievances this week and
I feel compelled to moralise. And I
think that a good subject is the youth
of Victoria. I must first of all state
that what I am going to say is not
the result of personal observation, but
the fact that two men in town have
made the same revelations to me
seems to justify a complaint. The
Pool Rooms in town are filled with
young boys, ranging from about 14
upwards. This is more especially the
case on a Saturday night. The boys
don't buy "booze," merely candy, but
they make the atmosphere lurid with
their conversation. This has been
pointed out to me by two men in
town who are by no means "purists.''
That is to say, they will take their
little drink, play their little game of
billiards, and use a little language
when occasion calls for it without
hesitation. And yet they were horrified. I am the last man to "call
down" billiards; it is one of the finest
games for training thc eye and the
temper, but when it comes to public
rooms being used regularly by mere
"kids," and when it comes to these
latter shocking old "veterans" with
their language, it is time that somebody called "halt." A curfew bell,
whose note was obeyed, would be an
excellent thing in Victoria. There
have been curfew bells in the Province before, but on many occasions
the youngsters have been able to
"bluff" the constable. It is easy
enough to prove a guardian where
no  guardian  exists.
Another thing in the same connection strikes me. Most of the street
cars have big notices telling us that
the heart of a city is its young men,
and that good, clean youth vitalises
the same city. Excellent advice. But
why is it only advice? Why doesn't
the Y.M.C.A. send its representatives
round to corral these boys? To quote
Demosthenes, "but someone might
say" that the Lounger might do this.
But the Lounger is no moral reformer.
His object in life is to point out
abuses and leave other people to reform them. Any action on his part
would be very justly resented. Now,
the above-written is well worth consideration by the Y.M.C.A,, the various Women's Societies in town and
the City Council. The folk who stop
me on the street to call my attention
to such abuses are worthy of consideration from the very fact that they
occasionally lead the "high life" themselves.
* *     *
Do we value our lives? I don't
think that I put much price on my
own, but I believe that there are a
good many people in Victoria whose
death would be a calamity. That is
why I want to point out that the
bridge leading out from the E. & N.
station is in a very rocky condition. I
was asked to make a note of this.
The piers on both sides of the middle
one, where the bridge swings, are
nearly eaten away. The teredo worm
has been busy, and while the authorities have been asleep, has been putting in some good work. Of course,
some day a train will fall down, but
it won't contain the cautious Lounger.
* *     *
Toots to a Tootle Bird
'Twas  the  voice  of  the  tootler,   I
heard him toot-toot;
Here's a couple of drunks, and a vagrant to boot.
Though the Lounger demands from
my perch that I scoot
I swear that I'll stay here, and tootle
"toot-toot."
Apologies to Lewis Carroll.
How doth the little tootle-bird
Delight to bark and bite,
To  ridicule the vagabond
A gentle, merry wight.
Apologies to Dr. Watt
Oh, tootle-bird, oh tootle-bird,
You grieve my heart right sore;
I realy think you'll have to stop
Your tootling any more.
Apologies to Nobody
And so it is
That we must countenance this feath
ered frolicking,
Which turns our law to mirth.
scandal great,
Which our great land can no mor
tolerate.
A truce to this outrageous scribblin
On men and women who are repro
bate.
LOUNGER.
A WATCH IN THE NIGHT
(Continued from last issue)
The wind had come from the rive
snarling across the park, dancing i
cold spirals around the ghostly towe
putting the city's freshman throug
the third degree of the homeless.
"After all," thought the boy with
shiver, "even if I should put it u
she'd never know. In fact, if she d
know, she'd want me to do it." I
thought of the patient little moth
who had worked so hard for the ro
to shelter his boyhood. "She mv
have had an awful time after fath
died," mused the boy; "an awi
time—yet she kept the watch!" 1
buried his hands in his pockets,
guess I can stick it out if she di<
He hugged the watch against
side, pressing it with his arm, dra
ing strength  and  comfort from
mere feel of it.   He was obeying
of the mighty little laws that bind!
to  our  traditions  and  to  ourseli|
The wind raced away down the
and   silent    streets.     The boy si]
the watch pressed against his am
Suddenly his hand shot out
grasped the fingers whose touch
waked him.
"Hey, lemmo go!" cried the fril
ened voice.
"What were you doing with THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 1910
hand in my pocket?" demanded the
country boy fiercely.
Then he regarded his captive, a
thin little urchin whose face was
adorned with wide smutches of boot-
blacking.
"I didn't git nothin'," protested the
struggling child. "Lemme go! I
didn't git nothin'," he repeated, as
though the failure excused the attempt.
The boy felt for his watch. Relieved, he turned to the urchin grimly.
"You're a fine kid!" he said in contempt. "Big work, kiddo, robbing
fellows that sleep on park benches!"
"I'm awful hungry!" the child
sobbed, one sharp little eye glancing
round his crooked elbow at his captor's face.
"Well—"
The boy hesitated, frowned and
finally released his captive. The brat
drew out of arm's reach, but did not
run away. Some precocious street instinct seemed to bind him to the
place.
"Gimme a cent or two, will yuh,
mister?" he said. "Honest, I'm hungry as thunder!"
"Go on—beat it!" said the boy
roughly.
The little figure turned and slowly
shambled away. The country boy sat
still for a moment; but something in
the child's face, wan and pinched in
the white arc-light, persisted, pleading with him. How hard the city
was! How shocked his mother would
be to know that little ones like that
wandered hungry at night! How
glad she'd be to take him in, and—
"Hey, kid;  wait a minute!"
The forlorn little figure turned pite-
ously round; with outspread hand he
approached the bench and the watch
changed hands.
* Our Western Monthly
The current issue of "Westward
Ho!" is to hand, and presents its
I usual enticing appearance. The cover
design, drawn by J. H. Taucke, is at-
I tractive, and is calculated to catch the
[eye. The issue is replete with stories
I and articles, among the latter being a
contribution from S. S. McClure telling of the founding of the magazine
(which is now a household word.
1 Harold Sands, not unknown in this
[Western country, furnishes a spirited
I illustrated article on aviation. One
lof the most amusing short stories
(which has come across the writer's
[notice during the past few years is
("Septimus Pepper—Polygamist," for
(which Allan K. Stuart is responsible.
IL. McLeod Gould continues his brief
[sketches on Secondary Education in
I Canada, and mention must be made
lof an excellent character sketch on
J Miss Alma Victoria Clarke, the musi-
Ical prodigy of the West, which has
[been written for this publication by
iMary Lomas. There are good stories
land good articles in addition to the
lones mentioned, and the greatest
(credit is due to the enterprising publisher, Mr. Percy F. Godenrath.
C. H. Cotton, well known in Victoria as the late Consulting Engineer
the Cement Works at Tod Inlet,
(left last Sunday for San Francisco,
l.vhere he is to dispose of valuable tim-
jber and land holdings. Mr. Cotton
lias obtained an excellent position
vi_h an American firm, and his many
riends have reason to congratulate
iiim on his late success.
Satisfaction
We guarantee quality and satisfaction with every purchase of
Groceries.
Phone orders carefully attended to.
A. POOL
623 Yates St. Phone 448
Watson's Old Stand
I
tLUE PRINTS
Any Length in One Piece
Six Cents per foot
'IMBER AND LAND
MAPS
DRAUGHTING
lledric Blue Print &
Map Co.
\l8 Langley St. - Victoria, 'B.C.
H
There's
Nothing half
So Sweet
In Life as
Love and
Dudleigh's
Mixture
13*!& Richardson
Cigar Store.
Phone 346
1
ymmmmmmmmmimimm
No. 407
CERTIFICATE   OF   THE   REGISTRATION    OF   AN     EXTRA-PROVINCIAL   COMPANY.
"Companies Act, 1897."
I HEREBY CERTIFY that "The Win-
ton Motor-Carriage Company," an Extra-Provincial Company, has this day
been registered as a Company under the
"Companies Act, 1897," to carry out or
effect all or any of the objects of the
Company to which the legislative authority of the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head offlce of the Company Is
situate at Cleveland, in Cuyahoga
County, Ohio.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is one million dollars, divided
into ten thousand shares of one hundred dollars each.
The head offlce of the Company in this
Province is situate at Victoria (918
Government Street), and Henry G. Lai -
son, Barrister-at-Law, whose address Is
Victoria aforesaid, is the attorney for
the Company. Not empowered to issue
and transfer stock.
The time of the existence of the
Company is perpetual.
The Company is limited.
Given under my hand and seal of
offlce, at Victoria, Province of British
Columbia, this fourth day of February,
one thousand nine hundred and ten.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for whieh this Company
has been established and registered
are:—
For the punose of manufacturing and
selling moto_--carriages and other
vehicles to be propelled by gas engines, electricity or other motive power,
and to manufacture ancl sell stationary
motors  for  all  purposes. feb 12
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE tliat Alexander Keay
of Everett, W. *h., occupation Accountant, intends to apply for permission to
prospect for coal on the following described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile east of Masset Inlet, Graham
Island and about four miles S.E. of
Delkatla; post marked "A.K.R. S.W. Corner"; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thonce west 80 chains;
thence south SO chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Date of staking Sept. 21, 1909.
ALEXANDER   KEAY,
oct 23 F.  H.  Millard.
NOTICE
"Public Inquiries Act"
NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to the above-named Act, Robert
S. Lennie, of the City of Nelson, Barrister-at-Law; Dav Hort MacDowall, of
the City of Viotoria; and A. B. Erskine, of the City nf Vancouver, have,
by order of His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, been appointed
a Commission to Inquire generally into
the business of Fire Insurance as enr-
ried on in the Province of British Columbia, Including the placing of insurance by persons in British Columbia
with companies or associations in the
United States and other jurisdictions,
ancl to report in writing upon thc re-
suits of the said investigation, and
especially as to the advisability and
best methods of Government supervision of the operations and financial
standing of all companies or associations carrying out the business of Fire
Insurance in this Province.
And as to compelling them to obtain
licences from the Provinee authorising
the transaction of said business:
And to furnish adequate security to
British Columbia policy-holders that all
valid claims they may have against
said companies or associations will be
promptly paid:
And notice is hereby given that sittings of the said Commission, for the
purpose of making inquiry into matters
aforesaid, will be held at the following
points on the dates set opposite, viz.:—
Victoria March    3rd, 1910
Vancouver March    Oth, 1910
Nelson March 15th, 1910
Special sittings may be fixed by the
Commissioners upon sufficient requests
from other sections of the Province.
And notice is also hereby given that
all interested parties may obtain from
any of the Commissioners subphoenas
for the attendance of witnesses at any
sittings of tho Commission.
Provincial Secretary's Offlce,
Victoria, B.C., 23rd February, i.1'10.
feb 26
Cold Storage
Vancouver Island
Cold Storage and
Ice Company
VICTORIA, B.C.
Goods received at all hours.
Expert attention given.
Consignments solicited
Phone 2282    P.O. Box 875
RENFREW LAND DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that James Walker,
of Victoria, mechanic, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 64 chains north and
40 chains east of the north-east corner
of lot 252, Renfrew District; thence
south 24 chains; thence east SO chains;
thence north 24 chains; thence west 80
chains to place of commencement and
containing 192 acres, more or less.
Dated  February  4th,   1910.
JAMES WALKER,
feb 26 J  W. Wiliiams, Agent.
RENFREW LAND DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that F. E. Randall, of
Victoria, clerk, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 60 chains north of the
shore on the east line of T. L. 35,167;
thence east 40 chains; thence north 60
cliains; thence west 40 chains; thenee
south 60 chains to place of commencement, and containing 240 acres, more
or less.
Dated February 4 th, 1910.
F.  E.  RANDALL,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW  LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that John Weaver
Bridgman, of Victoria, broker, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted beside H. P. Simpson's;
thence north 80 chains; thonce east 10
chains; thence south 50 chains; thonco
east 30 chains; thence south 30 chains;
thonco west 40 chains to place of commencement, and containing 170 acres,
more or less.
Dated January 24th,  1910.
ARTHUR JOHN WEAVER BRIDGMAN
feb 2ii J. W. Williams, Agent.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve, notice of which was given In
the Gazette of the 28th October, 1909,
reserving all foreshore abutting on the
East Coast of Vancouver Island, and
extending from the head of Saanich inlet to the 52nd parallel of north latitude,
and all coal underlying the said foreshore, as well as the coal under the
sea fronting the said foreshore and
extending out therefrom a distance of
one mile, Is cancelled.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B.C., January Sth, 1910.
jan 8
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Armstrong, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation,
Master Mariner, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted in the
vicinity of Green Point, Thurlow Island,
Cardero Channel, at a post situate about
sixty cliains In a south-easterly direction from said Green Point, and marked
"R.A.N.E."; thence 40 chains south;
thence 20 chains west; Ihence 40 chains
nortli; thence 20 chains oast to the point
of commencement.
Dated  February  Sth,  1910.
ROBERT ARMSTRONG,
fob 19 Per Chas. McHardy, Agenl
RENFREW   LAND   DISTR1ST
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE tliat Frances J.
Thrasher, of Mosten, Sask., married woman, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the N. E. corner of J. W. Williams';
thence east (10 ohalns; thence south 20
chains; thence west 60 chains; thenco
north 20 cliains to place of commencement and containing 120 acres, more or
iess.
Dated January 20th, 1910.
FRANCES   ,1.   THRASHER,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
LAND REGISTRY ACT
In  the matter of an Application  for a
Duplicate    Certificate    of   Title   to
Lots 7, 13, 27, 3Y  36, 45, 61, 62, 63,
67, 68, 69, 91, 92    '3, 105, Wost half
of  Lot   8 and TV ..-at half of  Lot  M
of Suburban Lots 37 and 45, Esquimau  District.
NOTICE   is  hereby   given   that   it   Is
my  intention  at  the  expiration  of one
month   from  the date of tho  first publication hereof to issue a Duplicate Certificate of Title to said lands, Issued to
Mary   Elizabeth  Nicholson   on   the   2nd
dav  nf  December,  1890,  and  numbered
10806A.
Land   Registry  Offlce,   Victoria,   B.C.,
the llth day of February,  1910.
S.   Y.   WOOTTON,
fob 19 Registrar-General of Titles
RENFREW  LAND   DISTRICT
RENFREW  LAND   DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Lorenzo Alexander, of Victoria, gentleman, Intends to
applv for permission to purchnse the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted four chains west
of the north-west corner nf Lot 248;
thence north 80 chains; tiience east 20
cliains; thence south SO ehains; thence
west 20 chains to place of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or
iess.
Dated January 24th,  1910.
feb 26 J- W. Williams, Agent.
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph William
Williams, of Sai nan, rancher, Intends
to applv for pen Issiun to purchase
the foliowii a dosi I* I 1:.nds:—Commencing at i. I**. i * on the Telegraph Trail about s chnins south of the
south-east eorner of lot 117, T. L. 36,-
048; thence south S chains to the north
line of T. L. 43,560; thence east 15
chains to the north-east corner of T. L.
1,1 560: thence south 60 chains; tiience
east 40 chains; thence north 70 chains;
tiience west 55 chnins to place of commencement nnd containing 292 acres,
more or less. 	
Dated January 26th. 1910.
JOSEPH WILLIAM WILLIAM?,
fob 26
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St.. Victoria
h
_
8
SEE BOLDEN
8
THE CARPENTER AND
BUILDER.
1
s
1
i
1 Fort Street I
i j
rovM n» cext. ov
DEPOSIT.
We pay ton* per cent. latere**
on deposit! of |1 (out dollar)
and np, withdrawable by chef ne.
Special attention giren to de-
poiiti made by mail.
Paid np Capital over 91,000,000
Asset* orer   -      .      9,000,000
b. o. r_._tv_A._n__ LOAW 00,
1310   Government  Street,
Tlctorla, B.O.
Bowes' Elixir
COD LIVER OIL
WITH MALT AND
HYPOPHOSPHITES
At this time most people need
something that will give them
increased vitality, for it is during the change of season that
the system is weak. In this
preparation you get a food as
well as a bracing tonic; it has
an agreeable taste, will not
cause any unpleasant digestive
disturbances so characteristic of
the raw oil, indeed in this unrivalled preparation the oily
part is eliminated, the active
principles alone being used. Especially adapted for women and
children.
Per Bottle, $i.oo
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
1228 Government Street
Near Yates
RENFREW   LAND   DISTRICT
TAK1*
of   Vict
mission
scribed
planted
sollth-WC
Renfrew
chains;
Millike*
thence c
menoemi
more or
Dated
teb 30
District of Victoria
NOTICE tliat Annie A. Beard,
>rla,   Intends  to  apply  for  per-
to purchase the following de-
lands:—Commencing at  a  post
at the south-east corner of the
ist quarter of See. 32, Tp.  12,
District:     thenco    south     30
thence west  10  cliains to  S.  J.
's claim; thence north 30 chnins;
inst  10 chains to place of com-
.-nt,   and   containing   30   acres,
less.
February  1th, 1910.
ANNUO A.  HHAHD,
J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW   LAND   DISTRICT
District  nl' Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Leigh II. M1I1I-
ken, n( Vancouver, clerk, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at
a post planted at the north-east corner
of S. Thrasher's claim; thence nortli
30 chains to lhe south line of Sec. 31,
Tp, 12; thence west SO chains; thence
soutli 20 cliains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 10 chains; thence east 40
chains to place of commencement, and
containing 210 acres,  more or less.
Dated February  ith,  1910,
LEIGH  11.   Mll.l.lIv'ION,
fob 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RliNFUI-.W   LAND   DISTRICT
District  of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE tliat Harvey Ernest
Thrasher, of Mosten, Sask.. farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about 40
chains cast and about lil chains north
of the north-west corner of Lot 252,
Renfrew District; tiience south 21
chains; thence east SO chains; thence
north 24 chains; thence west SO chains
to place of commencement, and containing 192 acres, more or less.
Dated February 4th, loio.
HARVEY ERNEST THRASHER,
fob 26 .1. W. Williams, Agent. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 1910
MR. DOOLEY ON THE COST OF
• LIVING
(Continued from Page 5)
S'ciety is much stirred up be a rc-
poort iv th' engagement iv Miss Myrtle Snooks to th' Jook iv Bunbury.
Th' father iv th' prospective bride is
wan iv th' richest men in th' wurruld.
His wealth is varyously estimated
fr'm three hundherd millyons up to
figures that cannot be justified be
ayether th' iditor or th' compositor.
Besides ownin' an inthrest in sivral
large churns in Ohio, he is th' principal stockholder in th' cillybratcd hen
Golconda. Th' elder Snooks owns
th' on'y pair iv socks in a complete
state iv preservation outside iv th'
Morgan collection an' those in th'
Methropollytan Museum. . . There
was threemenjous excitement in th'
milk exchange yisterdah with heavy
buyin' iv th' October option. This
option advanced on purchases iv two
an' three quart lots to 212 f'r no apparent reason ontil at twelve o'clock
th' news flashed acrost th' wires that
th' Haggin-Ryan-Rockyfellar-Armour
Cow Wealth-iv-th'-East had been run
over be a locymotive at a grade crossing in Akron. In a minyit th' room
was thrown into a frenzy.
A man givin' th' name iv Muzinski
was arrested yisterdah while makin'
away with an' oil painting an' a li-
mon' pin fr'm a house on Mitchigan
Avnoo. Th' man is plainly demented,
f'r in th' same room where he found
these things was a valuable paper
collar which tli' owner had carelessly
left on a table.
A Visit to the Clothing Merchant
"Well, sir, I don't know what to
think iv it. Whin Grogan sinds me
in his bill I go down to him an' says
I: 'What made ye stop where ye did?'
says I. 'Have ye got writer's palsy
or did I fool ye be concealin' that
thirty cents in me boot?' says I.
'But,' says he, 'what do I get out iv
it? I've had a good year but I'm
no more ahead.'
"I go to me irind Solly to chaffer
with him f'r a coat. 'Two dollars
an' sixty-two cents,' says he. 'I can't
take a penny less,' he says. Well, ye
know how ye always are with a Jew.
I can't help thinkin' that Sol is thry-
in' to thrim me, although he's been
me frind f'r years, he's always.voted
th' ticket an' in his day he had as
good a left as anny wan ye iver see,
although in a rough-an-tumble ye saw
at wanst he was not a Christyan. But
I always think in a thrade he's thry-
in' to best mc. So says I: 'Two dollars an' sixty cents!' says I. 'Ar-re ye
crazy, man alive? D'ye ralize what
that amount iv money means?' says I.
'D'ye ralize that there ar-re poor
fam'lies,' says I, 'in Boolgahrya,' says
I, 'that ar-re supported f'r years on
less thin that,' says I. 'I'll give ye a
dollar eighty,' says I. 'Ikey,' says
he to his son,,'wrap up this coat f'r
Misther Dooley. Will ye have a cigar, Martin? This is almost spring
weather,' says he.
"Well, I was Irtiad enough to swear
out a warrant f'r him*. I hate bein'
cheated an' whin I niide me offer I
thought th' coat was worth not a cent
less thin two dollars. But I ca'med
me wrath an' set down with him, hav-
in' an idee iv playin' him a game iv
forty-fives, f'r like all his race he
injyes ca-ards an' is poor at it. They
don't undherstand th' clement iv
chance which is th' on'y clement except air that an Irishman is at home
in. Well, sir, befure we've been talk-
in' two minyits what's this crafty
thrader, this skinflint, tllis usurer, do-
in' but sheddin' tears because he can
har'ly make enough to live on.
There's compytition again laid down
th' sthreet. His landlord has boosted
th' rent. Throlley cars that now take
people down-town in what seems to
me months where it formerly took
years, robs him iv his pathronage.
People that ought to bc frinds iv his
wud rather combine business an'
pleasure be makin' a dash down-town
an' payin' th' enormous rentals, elec-
thric-light bills, aelvcrtisin' expinses,
gaudy displays in th' front windows,
care an' upkeep iv a bfcy to open th'
dure f'r thim, to buyin' th' simple
homespun garmints that he made with
his own hands at a fire sale. 'An' I
give ye me wurrtid an' honor,' says
he, 'that if it wasn't f'r an occas-nal
good thing happenin' in, like ye-ersilf,
a thrue frind, Martin, I'd light a
candle in th' cellar an' turn on th'
gas,' says he. Th' thing that's been
bothrin' me since is how much was
that coat worth.
The Real Cause of All the Trouble
"An' so it goes. I complain iv th'
rent me landlord asts me an' sometimes I accede, as Hogan says, to his
request. Me landlord complains iv
th' way th' plumber overcharges him.
Th' plumber says he can't do anny
betther thin make a livin' on account
iv th' rapacity iv th' plumber's union.
Th.' most prom'nent, distinguished
an' wealthy member iv th' plumber's
union borrid two dollars fr'm me yes-
terdah because he cudden't pay his
bills out iv th' vast hoards that he'd
wrenched fr'm his boss f'r mendin'
waste pipes.
"An' th' sthrange thing about it is
that it's always been thrue in my recollection an' I can remimber almost
as far back as to think iv mesilf hol-
erin' 'mort' to yc whin wc were
buildin' th' pyramids. Ye says th'
cost iv livin' was niver higher f'r
ye an' ye ar-re right. Ye say it niver
was so high an' ye-re wrong. It's
always been th' same f'r ye an' th'
likes iv ye. I niver knew th' day
whin ye weren't about th' same number iv jumps behind in th' race with
th' price iv eggs. Whin ye're not
wurrukin' eggs is down. Whin ye
ar-re wurrukin' they're up. That's
all there is to it. Ye're to blame, me
boy, because a colledge profissor in
Harvard can't afford to buy himsilf
a new hat. Ye've caused th' boost
in prices. Whin yc had less wurruk
ye ate less an' wore out fewer clothes.
Whin ye got a steady job ye raided
th' grocery store, th' price iv pork-
chops took a sudden leap an' whin th'
profissor at Harvard wint down to th'
foreman an' got his pay check that
had been ample while ye were onem-
ployed he found har'ly enough in it
to pay th' butcher's bills. Whin ten
millyon iv th' likes iv ye gets twinty-
five cents a day more pay there's
just that much added to what it costs
ivrybody to live."
"But what am I goin' to do about
it?" said Mr. Hennessy.
'Some pollytickal economists are iu
favor iv ye're not eatin'," said Mr.
Dooley. "I wud say stop wurrukin'
if it gives ye such an appetite."
Miss Clute, who has been visiting
her sister, Mrs. Beauchamp Tye, has
returned to her home in New Westminster.
Along the Same Line
Dr.    Pillem—You    needn't    worry
about your wife.   She has a wonderful constitution.
Henpeck—Say,  doc, you  ought  to
see her by-laws, rules and regulations.
A Relief
If I might have his daughter's hand,
I asked old Mr. Crockett.
He answered: "If you take the one
That's always in my pocket."
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
RENFREW  LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird, Jr.,
of San Juan, farmer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the north-east corner
of Lot 109; thence north 40 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
ehains; thence east 40 chains to place
of commencement, and containing 160
acres, more or less.
T. M. BAIRD, Jr.,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW   LAND  DISTRICT
TAKE NOTICE that Samuel Thrasher,
of Mosten, Sask., farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at
a post planted at the north-west corner of Lot 247, thence north 80 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thenee south SO
chains; thence west 40 chains to place
of commencement, and containing 320
acres, more or less.
Dated January 24th,  1910.
SAMUEL THRASHER,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Lorenzo Alexander, of Vietoria, gentleman, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commer._
ing at a post planted 4 chains west of
the north-west corner of lot 248; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 20 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 20
chains to place of commencement, aiiu
containing 160 acres, more or less.
Dated January 24th, 1910.
LORENZO ALEXANDER,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, John Steer, of Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted half a.
mile east of the southeast corner of lot
397, being the northeast corner of land
applied for; thenee west 80 chains;
thence south SO chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains to the
point of commencement, containing 640
acres more or less.
JOHN STEER,
feb 26 Mathew Yeoman, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, M. L. H. Steer, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a license to prospect for coaf on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
half a mile east of the southeast corner
of lot 397, being the southwest corner of
land applied for; thence north 80 chains;
thence east SO chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains, to point
of commencement, containing about 640
acres more or less.
M. L. H. STEER,
fab  26 Mathew Yeoman, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Mary Glguere, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
half ta mlle east of the southeast corner of lot 397, being the southeast corner of land applied for; thence north 80
chains; thence west SO chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains,
to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
MARY GIGUERE,
feb 26 Mathew Yoeman, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Emma Auger, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
half a mile east of the northeast corner of lot 436, being the northwest cor-
near of land applied for; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains,
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres more or less.
EMMA AUGER,
feb 26 Mathew Yoeman, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Richard Giguere,
'if Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
one-half mile east of lot 435, the northeast corner of lot 435, being the northeast corner of land applied for; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 ehains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains, to point of commencement, containing 040 acres more or less.
RICHARD GIGUERE,
feb 20, Mathew Yoeman, Agent.
Arrow Park School
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for School' Building, Arrow
Park,' will be received by the Honou.-
able the Minister of Pubile Works up
to and Including the 31st day of March,
1910, for the erection and completion of
of a large one-room frame school-building in the Ymir Electoral District.
Plans, specifications, contract, and
forms of tender may be seen on and
after the 7th clay of March, 1910, at
the offlce of the Government Agent at
Nelson; the offlce of the Government
Agent at Revelstoke; the offlce of the
Secretary of the School Board, J. N.
Pennock, Arrow Park, and at the Department of Public Works, Victoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque or certif.
cate of deposit on a chartered bank of
Canada, made payable to the Honourable
the Minister of Public Works, for a
sum equivalent to ten per cent, of the
amount of the tender, which shall be
forfeited if the party tendering decline
to enter into contract when called upon
to do so, or If he fail to complete the
work contracted for. The cheques or
certificates of deposit of unsuccessful
tenderers will be returned to them upon
the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the forms supplied, signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed In the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C.  GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Department Public Works,
Vietoria, B.C., March 2nd, 1910.
mch 5
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Arcadus Glguere,
of Seattle, Wash., Intend to apply for
a license to prospect for coal on the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted one
miles east of the northeast eorner of
lot 435, being the southwest corner of
land applied for; thence north 80 chains;
thenee east SO chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains, to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres
ARCADUS GIGUERE,
feb 26 Mathew Yoeman, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Frank Demers, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
one mlle and a quarter east of the northeast corner of lot 437, being the southwest corner of land applied for; thence
north 80 chains; thence east so edging;
thenee south 80 chains
ehains, to point of
taining 640 acres nyrf§" a_U 1
land lies east of i/tfrtl^'&Nia of Kundls
Island.
FRAN*t_T>EMERS
feb  26 Matl/fenrVSToeman,
wm
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Qfteen Charlotte flow
Take notice that^k Rob* » Centers,  °*C
Seattle,   Wash.,  IntentB* *-   ' _
license to prospect for "ft-ea-fcjjn t
lowing described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted one
mile east of the northeast corner of lot
437, being the northeast corner of land
applied for; thence west SO chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains, to point
of commeneement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
ROSE DEMERS,
feb 26 Mathew Yoeman, Agent.
SKEEN^ fiAND DISTRICT
Qistricx of (Queen Charlotte
. v_ A (notice thai I, James Twait,  of
HSe&tU'er Wash.,   iiftend  to  apply  for  a
license to prospetft for coal on the fol-
wing described/lands:—
Commenging/at   a  post   planted  two
milts* east ..pf'' the southeast corner  of
1st "SrbViUi-ence south 80 ehains; thence
jast^trchains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commeneement,  containing  640  acres  more
or less.
JAMES TWAIT,
feb  26 John  Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, John Demers, of
Seattle, Wash., Intend to apply for permission to prospect for coal on the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile and a quarter east of the
northeast corner of lot 437, being the
southeast corner of land applied for;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains, to point of commencing,
containing 640 acres more or less. This
land lies 3 miles east of the north end
of  Kumdis  Island,  Massett  Inlet.
JOHN DEMERS,
feb 26 Mathew Yoeman, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Emma Giguere, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile east of the northeast corner of
lot 435, being the southeast corner of
land applied for; thence north 80 cnains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains, to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
EMMA GIGUERE,
feb 26 Mathew Yoeman, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, George Wheeler,
of Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for
a license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted two
miles east and two miles south of the
southeast corner of lot 355, thenc*. south
SO chains; thence west 80 chains; thenoe
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains,
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres more or less.
GEORGE   WHEELER,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Bert Pollard, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal ou the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted four
mlles east and two miles south of tho
southeast corner of lot 355, thenee south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north SO chains; thence west 80 chains,
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres more or less.
BERT POLLARD,
feb  26 John Demers,  Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Joseph  Boyle,  of
Seattle,   Wash.,  Intend   to  apply   for  a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted southeast corner of A. P. No. 25768; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south SO chains; thence east 80
chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
JOSEPH  BOYLE,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I,  Gus. Wincell,  of
Seattle,   Wash.,  intend  to  apply  for  a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast eorner of A. P., 25768; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
GUS. WINCELL,
feb  26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, James Mullin, of
Seattle, Wash., Intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted one
mlle east of the southeast corner of A.
P., 25768;*thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less. ,
JAMES MULLIN, ' [
feb 26 JoJhn Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, JoJhn Quinn, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east of the southeast corner of
T. L., 353SS; thence north 80 chains;
thence east SO chains; thenee south SO
chains; thence west 80 chains, to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
JOHN QUINN,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Edward Parson, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal on the following  described  lands:—
Commencing at a post planted one
mlle east of the southeast corner of
lot 355, thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
iil£nee west 80 chains, to point of com-
-neifiS-Sis-ent,  containing  640  acres more
V& ffs'sa,. Howard parson,
feb 26    ^0)A AJohn Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Sam Lee, of Seattle, Wash., Intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted three
miles east of the southeast corner of
lot 365, thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west SO chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less.
SAM LEE,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Mlnard Bachelor,
of Seattle, Wash., Intend to apply for
a license to prospect for coal on the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted foar
miles east of the southeast corner of
lot 356, thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 50 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement,  containing  640  acres  more
MINARD BACHELOR,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Edward Huff, ef
Seattle Wash., intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east and two miles south of the
southeast corner of lot 355, thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south SO chains; thence west 80 chains,
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres more or less.
EDWARD HUFF,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, William Boyle, of
Seattle,  Wash.,   intend   to  apply  for  a I
license to prospect for coal on the following described  lands:— *,
Commencing at a post planted southeast corner of T. L. No.  36388; thence I
north SO chains; thence east 80 chain*;i
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80 |
chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less. ■
WILLIAM BOYLE,
feb 26 JoJhn Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Joseph Courtney,
of Seattle,  Wash.,  intend  to apply  fori
a  license  to prospect   for  coal on  the!
following described lands:— j
Commencing at a post planted four!
miles east and two miles south of thel
southeast corner of lot 355, thence south I
80 ehains; thence west SO chains; thencel
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains, I
to point of commencement, containing |
640 acres more or less.
JAMES COURTNEY,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take  notice  that  I.  Lloyd  Allan,  ofl
Seattle,   Wash.,   Intend   to  apply  for a|
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted four!
miles east and two miles south of thel
southeast corner of lot 356, thencel
north SO chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south SO chains; thence east 80|
chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
LLOYD ALLAN,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Frank Morgan, ofl
Seattle,  Wash.,  intend  to  apply  for  a|
license to prospect for coal on the fol-i
lowing described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted two!
miles east and two mlles south of the!
southeast corner of lot 355, thenee northl
80 chains; thence east 30 chains;:thencel
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains,"
to point ot Commencement, containing
640 acres more or less.
FRANK MORGAN,
feb 26 JoJhn Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Mark Strong, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
one mlle east, of the northeast corner
of lot 437, being the northwest corner
of land applied for; thence soutli 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains,
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres more or less.
MARK STRONG,
feb 26 Mathew Yoeman, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Edward Quinn, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east of the southeast corner of
lot 355, thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west SO chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less.
EWARD QUINN,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Edward Williams,
of Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for
a license to prospect for coal on the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted one
mile eost of the southeast corner of
lot 365, thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less.
EDWARD WILLIAMS,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Claws Pearson, ofj
Seattle,  Wash.,   Intend   to  apply  for
license to prospect for coal on the fol-J
lowing described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted two!
miles east and two miles south of thel
southeast corner of lot 365, thence south"
SO chains; thence east SO chains; thencd
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chainsl
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres more or less.
CLAWS PEARSON,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Clarance Baldj
win, of Seattle, Wash., intend to applf
for a license to prospect for coal oi
the following described lands:— I
Commencing at a post planted twl
miles east and two miles south of th|
southeast corner of lot 355, tnence nortl
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thenci
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chain*
to point of commencement, contalninl
640 acres  more or less.
CLARANCE BALDWIN,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, John Boyle, of Si
attle, Wash.,  intend to  apply ror a ll
cense to prospect for  coal on the fol
lowing described lands:— r
Commencing at a post planted at tl
southeast corner of T. L. No. 3538|
thence north 80 chains; thence west
chains; thence south 80 chains; thenl
east 80 chains, to point of commencT
ment, containing 640 acres more or lei
JOHN BOYLE, I
feb 26 John Demers, AgentJ

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