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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Nov 10, 1906

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 rinryinnrro'y'oTroTTiroTnnnnfTp
Bank of Hamilton •
Capital $2,500,000:
Reserve $2,500,000
Total Assets, 129,000,000 >'
Interest paid half-yearly on deposits of
|i and upwards in Savings Department.
Drafts and Money Orders on all parts of
the world.  Vancouver Branches, cor.
of Hasting and Hamilton Sts., Powell St,
Cedar Grove.
UUJUI.'JUUUUttMJUJUUUUULvjC
The Week
fl Provincial Review and Magazine.
to .WANTED..
£    TIMBER LANDS.
jo JSciid Particulars to*
Pacific Coast Realty Co. Ld 3
Offices, 12 Macflre-or Block. J
Telephone ItM victoria, B.C. 3
Vol. III.   No,
m
VICTORIA AND VANCOUVER,   B  C, SATURDAY NOVEMBER io, 1906
One Dollar Per Annum
he Editor's Review
Of Current Topics.
Ihe week    the LIBERAL PRESS
FORECAST.     HAS    BEEN     PREDICTING A PROVINCIAL ELECTION  AT ANY TIME
DURING THIS FALL.   THE COLONIST   SAID   TODAY  THAT   IT
rOULD   PROBABLY    OCCUR
I.VTTHIN     THE     NEXT     SIX
10NTHS.     "THE   WEEK"   VENTURES A PREDICTION THAT AN
IFFICIAL     ANNOUNCEMENT
ILL BE MADE IN LESS THAN
|THREE DAYS,  AND THAT THE
ELECTION   WILL  TAKE   PLACE
iTITHIN A  MONTH THEREAFTER.
The Two   There are some men who
lacs.        are respected in spite of
their opinions,  and  with
these Senator Macdonald of Victoria
mist now be classed) since he felt
Icalled upon to write a letter to the
(opposition organ, denouncing the line
lof conduct pursued by the Hon. Rich-
lard McBride at the Ottawa confer-1
lence.  It is rather singular that a gen-
jtleman of Sen. Macdonald's expedience and known fairness should have
[identified   himself   with   those   who J
charge Mr. McBride with ignoring the !
brant of $115,000 per annum awarded
|to this province under the provisions
of the Quebec agreement.   The Pre-
Imier has again and again explained
(that this grant was not in question.
It had already been decided upon in
[line with similar grants to all the
provinces and formed no part whatever of the case for "Better Terms."
pen. Macdonald also allows himself
f!bo be drawn into the fallacious argu-
nent that the payment of this $115,-
WSOO has been jeopardized by the action of the Premier in refusing the
(offer of $100,000 a year for ten years
Im full and final settlement of the
(claims of the Province for exceptional treatment.   Just how anything can
be exceptional which applies  to  all
jthe provinces would puzzle a greater
logician than Sen. Macdonald to explain, and how a sum apportioned under the  Quebec agreement upon  a
basis common to all the provinces can
be applied to the settlement of a special and exceptional claim passes comprehension.    The  whole  question is
vhether Premier McBride should have
liccepted $1,000,000 paid over ten years
In final settlement of the claims of B.
p. to "exceptional" treatment.   He
vas earful in his address at Victoria
bn returning from Ottawa, to make
It perfectly clear that there was no
connection between the two grants;
Ihat the former was assured in any
lase, and that only the latter was the
lubject of negotiation.   The Senator
declares that the refusal of one or of
koth of these sums was unwise and
nay shut the door for some years to
|he  reopening  of  "Better  Terms"
ase.   This again, is a misstatement
If the facts, for Premier McBride
lever refused the $115,000 a year.   It
ras only the trivia] sum offered in
bttlement of our special claims that
t" turned down so emphatically.   In
Bsuming, with the Liberal press, that
pe Federal  government will punish
pe   province   by   withholding   the
phediile grant  nf  $115,000 heeauge
Premier McBride refused the special
grant, Sen. Macdonald makes himself
a party to the severest criticism which
could be levelled at the Federal government, and one which violates all
the principles upon which constitutional government is conducted. The
assumption that the case is closed for
some years is both gratuitous and indefensible. Premier McBride is not
the man to let it rest. In fact, it
looks as if not a little of the uneasiness so manifest in the Liberal camp
is due to his avowed determination
to fight the matter to a finish. There
is one other point raised in Sen. Macdonald's letter which seems to state
the issue in a manner more ingenious
than ingenuous. When he declares
that any amendment he opposed to  themselves
effective during the whole of his public career as in the manifesto which
he has just issued through the medium of the Vancouver World on the
subject of "Better Terms." He first
accused the Premier of trying to
make it a political issue, which is
just the one thing which the latter
has disclaimed oi every occasion. He
defends the discussion of the subject
by a joint conference of all the Premiers, although such a conference
could not by any possibility exercise
the powers of a tribunal. He condemns the Premier for joining the
conference if he was not prepared to
accept its decisions and to recognize
its authority. In doing this he overlooks the fact that Mr. McBride received no intimation before reaching
Ottawa that the subject of "Better
Terms" was intended by the government to be relegated to this conference instead of being dealt with
in    the    constitutional   manner   by
his claims would not be conceded he
should still have remained and fought
to the end. Mr. Macdonald, although
an educated man, has never heard
that discretion is the better part of
valor. He ignores the fact that Premier McBride did not withdraw until
he had received the ultimatum of the
conference which was so widely at variance with the demands of the case
tliat he could not honourably have
accepted it. Under such circumstances even British ambassadors at International conferences have felt impelled by the dictates of etiquette
nnd honour to pursue a similar course.
Mr. Macdonald, with a glow of heroic
pride, declares that under similar circumstances, a Liberal prime minister
would have at least stood to his guns
and gone down fighting. It is true
that he would at least have gone down
since he would have found himself in
a minority of one, hugging the ultimatum of the conference.   He would
leader of the opposition, somewhat
pathetically, but not very grammatically, asks "Where are we att" If
he does not know it might be fair to
ask why he delivered himself so laboriously through two columns of the
Vancouver World. He hopes "our
champion'' will at once outline a policy which will enable B. C. to recover
her equilibrium. On this point at any
rate he need have no fear. The policy will be outlined, not, however, by
the leader of the opposition, but by
a statesman who knows "where he is
at."
Mr.  Macdonald  places;; also have ''gone down" in the Prov-
-'**i
'■^^tnp^—
j^tapi- ,
• ^TKa-as-u ■»_-
The Two It is not a little singular
Jardines. that the two first liberal
candidates who have been
nominated by their respective associations should bear the same name—
Jardine. To those conversant with
the conditions in Dewdney and Esquimalt the comparison could be carried much further. Both Jardines
have thrown down the gage of battle
to a strong man. It is not likely that
any candidate could defeat Mr. E. C.
Pooley in Esquimalt. Mr. Jardine
of New Westminster is nothing if not
brave, for he has entered the lists
against the Premier. If we know
anything of the situation, Mr. Jardine probably decided on this course
not with any expectation of being returned, but that his name might go
down to posterity in association with
that of some man of note. It would
appear that Mr. Robert Jardine of
New Westminster, not content with
controlling the patronage of the Federal Government in the Royal Burg,
is also anxious to be recognized as
Lord Bountiful in the constituency
nf Dewdney, where his platform oratory is a household word. The conjunction of the (Wo men hearing the
same name is also suggestive of a
third comparison which will probably
occur to our readers certainly after
t he elections if not before.
eity of eranbrook.
the British North American Act will
be at the instance of the Dominion
Government. No one questions this,
but to have been perfectly fair Sen.
Macdonald should have pointed mil
that no modifications of tliat Act nt
the hands of tlie Imperial Government could have been made, whoever
might seek it, without .vi opportunity
being furnished to every province to
raise such objections as they might
hold, and this privilege may yet,
prove to be the salvation of L, C. It
is gratifying to find that in the concluding paragraph of his letter Sen.
Macdonald graciously admits that
Premier McBride lid gain a very 'important point in thc admission tliat
the province is cntitb:! to special consideration, That is a very subuLantia!
item to his credit and one which even
the severest criticism of: his opponents cannot cancel.
The other Mac, whilst candidly in
opposition to Premier McBride on all
political matters and therefore having some raisnn d'etre for his ntti-
himself on record as opposed to tlie
principle of arbitration, a declaration
whicli will surely cause the Liberal
party to gasp. It is perhaps not very
surprising Ihat the leader of the op-
ince of l>. C. if he had remained and
taken pail in the deliberations after
receiving such an ultimatum. There
is one paragraph in Mr. Macdonald's
manifesto which occasions us consid-
position  should have fallen  into the lorable surprise.    He roundly declares
trap set for him by the Vancouver
World. That journal registered a
loud complaint because the Premier
did not invite the leader of the opposition to accompany him to Ottawa on
his. mission. Tl would have been a
little loo "raw" for Mr. Macdonald
lo have endorsed this complaint, hut
he comes very near it in urging tliat.
Mr. George TT. Cowan should have
been taken. One wonders what Mr.
Macdonald and his party would have
said if, as he Suggests, thc Premier
had objected to enter Ihe conference
on the ground that it had no "locus
standi." Tt would al least, have been
urged Ihat he had Honied lhe government, and manifested a spirit of contumacy, a criticism which would not
have been unjust. The final criticism
nf Mr. Macdonald  seems  to be  llial
tudc, has probably never been so in- even when   the  Premier   found Ihal
thai ihe "Dominion Government has
the power to assist our province in
oilier ways, if not by subsidies such
as Air. McBride claimed at the conference, then hy still more liberal
treatment than we have been receiving in the past, and by assisting us in
the development of I hose resources
which nature has so freely lavished
upon us." If Ihis he true one would
like to know how Mr. Macdonald. as
a stalwart Liberal, defends the conduct of the Dominion Government in
turning a deaf car to the numerous
appeals which have \ been made by
both parties since 1S07. If they possess the power and there are other
means so easy and so ready of application which do not require the sanction of the other provinces, how does
Mr. Macdounld excuse the government   for I heir neglect.    Finnllv, thc
Two Good There will be no cavill-
Officers. ing in connection with
two appointments announced this week by the Dominion
Government. Capt. Walbran has
been gazetted to the command of the
Kestrel. It is little short of a scandal that this capable officer should
have waited so long for preferment.
His services at the Coast for many
years past are known and appreciated by every resident. Capt. Walbran has discharged the duties of his
previous office with great intelligence
and fidelity, and to him more than to
any man belongs the credit of such
improvements as have been effected
in West Coast protection for mariners. Mr. P. W. Davey, the new appointee to the customs office at Prince
Rupert, is one of the most popular,
courteous and capable officers in the
customs department at Victoria. No
mnn could discharge the duties of a
difficult and oftentimes an embarass-
bg position with more tact nnd fairness. These characteristics have
gnincd him the confidence of the public, and the appreciation of his chief,
who could not have made a better recommendation fnr the important office
at the new terminus. These are dis-
tinctly two cases of reward for merit,
and we ungrudgingly congratulate the
Dominion Government on the wisdom
and absolute fairness of their choice. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER io,  1906.
Social and
Personal.
Mrs.  Wade  (Vancouver)   is a guest
at Roccahella.
Mr. C. B. Worsnap (Vancouver)
spent a few days in the city during the
week.
Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Poff left on Wednesday for Sherbrooke, where they will
reside in future.
* *   *
The marriage of Miss Dorothy M.
Sehl and Mr. Charles Wilson has been
arranged for the twenty-fourth of November.
* *   *
Mrs. Powell entertained a number of
her friends at the Alexandra Club at
the tea hour on Thurdsay afternoon last
in honour of Mrs. Templeman.
* »   *
The engagement is announced of Miss
Nellie Todd, second daughter of Mrs.
J. H. Todd, "The Leaseowes," St.
Charles Street, to Mr. Alex. Gillespie,
second son of Mr. and Mrs. George
Gillespie, "Highwood," Moss Street.
*.♦'•■*
Mrs. George Gillespie was hostess at
a most enjoyable dance at "Highwood"
on Friday evening. The affair was given in honour of Miss Florence Gillespie, who but lately returned from
abroad. Mrs. Gillespie, who looked very
handsome, received in her usual charming manner, assisted by her daughter,
who made a very pretty debutante.
* * •*
Thc bridge tournament under the auspices of the Anti-Tuberculosis Society,
which has been going on for the past
week t ''Roccahella." has been an unqualified success from every point of
view. Not only have those participating enjoyed the tournament thoroughly,
but a nice little sum of money has been
raised for a worthy object, viz., the
sanitorium. Mrs. Tuck, who so kindly
loaned her residence for the week, deserves hearty thanks, for in this way
expenses were nil.
* *   *
Thc Fancy Fair lo lie given in the
Drill Mall on November 29th and 30th
and December ist, promises to be a
great success. It is to be under the patronage of the Lieutenant Governor and
Mrs. Dunsmuir, Premier and Mrs. McBride, Archbishop Orth. Bishop and
Mrs. Perrin, and Mayor and Mrs. Morley. The young ladies have been working most energetically during tlie past
weeks, and the result will he many dainty articles for sale and many attractions
for the children. An admission of ten
cents will be charged both afternoon and
evening, wilh the exception of Saturday afternoon, when children will be admitted free.
* *   »
A very pretty wedding took place yesterday afternoon nt Christ Church Cathedral when Miss Edith Maitland-
Dougall, only child of Mr. Maitland-
Dougall of Chemainus, was united in
marriage to Mr. Stephen Phipps of St.
Paul, .Minn. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Mr. Dunlap of Duncan,
assisted by Rev. Canon Beanlands, in
the presence of intimate friends of the
contracting parties. Miss Tilton acted
as bridesmaid, and Mr. John Hughes of
Hudson, Wis., filled thc post of groomsman. The bride wore a magnificent
Princess robe- of white chiffon, velvet
trimmed, with rose point, and looked
extremely handsome. Mis Tilton was
charming in ecru lace over champagne
silk trimmed with russet shades of ribbon. Both carried lovely bouquets of
flowers, gifts from the groom, the
bride's being composed of violets and
lillies of the valley, and the bridesmaid's
being a beautiful cluster of mauve carnations. After the ceremony an informal reception was held at the family residence on Burdettc Avenue, after which
Mr. and Mrs. Phipps left, amid showers
of rice and confetti, on the Indianapolis,
on their honeymoon, which will be spent
in Eastern cities. Their future home
will be St. Paul, Minn.
»   *   ♦
Miss Olive Bryden was hostess at a
most enjoyable dance given on Tuesday
evening last, as a farewell to the Misses
Bell, who leave shortly for the Fast.
Miss Bryden was assisted in receiving
by Mrs. Croft, who looked very handsome in white satin trimmed in silver.
Miss Bryden look swcel in while chiffon over green.
Miss Alice Bell looked well in a pale
pink gown.
Miss Bee Gnudin was much admired
in white point d'esprit.
Miss Eva Loewen looked well in
white.
Miss Gladys Perry wns most fetching
in n flowered organdie gown.
Miss Powell looked sweet in white
with red roses.
Mrs. Muspratt Williams looked well
in white satin.
Those present were: Miss Drake,
Miss Powell, Miss Bee Gaudin. Miss
Lonn Eberts. Miss Eva Loewen, Miss
Alice Bell, Miss Nora Bell, Miss fob-
bett, Mrs. Fordham, Mrs. Muspratt-
Williams, Miss Bullen, Miss Perry. Misv
Tilton. Aliss Pitts, Aliss Peters. Miss
K"efcr. Miss Gladys Green, Miss Trving
Miss Monteith. Mr. Basil Prior, Mr.
Bob Powell. Mr. Cobbett, Mr. Blanchard Bell.  Capt.  Williams.  Mr. Douglas
Bullen, Mr. Pitts, Mr. Percey Keefer,
Mr. Cuthbert Keefer, Mr. Roger Monteith, Mr. Jack Cambie, Mr. Irving, officers of H. H. S. Shearwater and others.
*   *   *
Mrs. Norton gave the second of her
series of dances on Friday evening the
second inst., at the A. 0. U. W. Hall.
The affair was most delightful, the music being particularly good and the floor
excellent. The chaperones for the occasion were: Mrs. Hunter, Mrs. D. M.
Eberts, Mrs. Griffiths and Mrs. H. S.
Gore. Among the many handsome
costumes worn, those more especially
noticed were:
Mrs. Hunter looked handsome in pink
satin trimmed with lace.
Mrs. Poff wore a handsome creation
of silk and lace.
Mrs. Dick Janion looked well in
mauve.
Mrs. Beauchamp Tye wore a handsome cream gown with wreath and corsage knot of pink carnations.
Miss Marie Gaudin looked sweet in
white silk.
Miss Bee Gaudin wore a pretty blue
and silver gown.
Miss Newling looked sweet in pink
and white organdie.
Mrs. Genge wore a handsome gown
of blue and silver spangles.
Miss Eberts looked very well in
black.
Mrs. Fagan wore a pink gown trimmed with daisies.
Miss Genevieve Irving looked very
sweet in white.
Miss Vera Mason appeared to advantage in white.
Miss Bullen looked well in black and
pale.
Mrs. Courtney looked charming in
pale blue crepe de chine.
Those present were: Mrs. Janion,
Mr. and Mrs. Dick Janion, Mrs. Paff,
Mrs. Genge .Mrs. Todd, Miss Todd, Mr.
Todd, Miss Wigley, Mr. and Mrs. Beauchamp Tye, Mrs. Johnson, Miss Johnson, the Misses Gaudin, Mr. Gaudin,
Mrs. Courtney, the Misses Eberts, the
Misses Bell, Mrs. Hickey, Miss Hickey,
Mrs. Newling. Miss Newling, the Misses Mason, Mr. Mason, Miss Foot, Miss
Reade, Miss Sehl, Miss Ethel Browne,
Mr. E. Brown, Mr. J. Brown. Miss Arbuckle, Mr. Arbuckle, Miss Nellie Dupont, Miss Pitts, Miss Marcan Pitts.
Mr. iPtts, the Misses Monteith, Mr.
Monteith, Mr. Prior, Mr. Moresby, Miss
Moresby and others.
November Canadian Magazine.
There are a number of readable contributions in the November Canadian
Magazine. E. L. Howe's profusely illustrated article on "Athens—Ancient
and Modern," indicates that this publication has a wide outlook. "In the
Haunts of the Rail," by Bonnycastle
Dale, is a study which will delight the
students of nature. To photograph this
bird and its nest must have been a work
of patience as well as love, for there is
nothing more shy than the rail in the
whole bird world. 'The Port of Western Canada" is the title of an illustrated
sketch of Fort William, where much of
the wheat pouring out of the West is
transhipped to lake-carriers. "The
Linking of Montreal and Toronto" recalls the opening of the first railway between the two cities just fifty years ago.
A full-page illustration shows a characteristic scene in the Toronto railway station of 1857 Among the stories, that
entitled "The Last Turn of the Screws,"
by Andrew C. Smith, will attiact some
attention. It is an attempt to picture
the tragic circumstances in which a
small merchant finds himself when he
comes face to face with the competition
of some of the large corporations which
are reaching out their long arms into
every branch of trade. "A Western
Harvest." by Myra J. Willson, is a prize
essay written by a pupil of a western
high school, in a competition inaugurated by Ihis publication. A Nova Scotian
writer recalls the career of Benjamin
Franklin and throws some new light on
certain phases of his career. A. F. B.
Clark has a readable analysis of "Student Life" at a Canadian University.
From this recital, the reader will glean
that the number is hy no means weak
in its appeal.
A New Magazine.
The Last Wesl is a new competitor
for public favor. It is published in Winnipeg and aims at advertising and popularizing the wheat lands of the Wesl.
Tt is one of the most attractive ventures
of the kind wc have seen. The paper
is good, the type large and distinct, the
cover attractive and the contents interesting. Nol the least important feature
lo Victorians is that Miss Agnes Deans
Cameron is the assistant editor, and her
virile work is evident throughout the
production. She has a capital story entitled "The Cracksman." Tf the first
promise of the new magazine is sustained il will assuredly realize the scriptural
dictum.
SPECIAL OFFER OF
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Ensilage Corn, Mangel, Turnip, Epe-
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Large Stock of HOME GROWN
Fruit and Ornamental Trees now matured for the fall trade
No expense, loss or delay of fumiga
tion or inspection.
Let me price your list before placing
your order.
We do business on our own grounds
—no rent to pay, and am prepared to
meet all competition.
Catalogue Free.
M. J. HENRY,
3010 Westminster Foad,
Vancouver, B.C.
Waterproof
Coats
For walking, riding or driving.
ANDERSON'S
The same as officially sealed at
the War Office as the standard
coat and guaranteed waterproof.
E. CHAPMAN
Sole agents in British Columbia
for Atkinson's Royal Irish
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DAVIS CHAMBERS
Opposite Strand Hotel,
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FREE!
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IN THE
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LIMITED
336 HASTINGS ST., W. VANCOUVER
Bookkeeping, Gregg and Pitman
Shorthand, Telegraphy, and Engineering.
Eight Teachers.
Forty-five Typewriters.
For particulars regarding how the«e
courses may he obtained, see The Week's
announcement in auotner column.
R.J. Sprott, B.A., Principal.
11. A. Scriven, B.A., Vice-Principal.
J. R. Cunningham, Secretary.
NEW CROP
EXTRA FINE
Smyrna Figs
ARRIVED
2 lb boxes    25c
Extra large specially seleotek Smyrna Figs, per lb    25c
These Figs are the finest ever shipped out
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New Sultana Raisins, per lb      15c
DIXI H. ROSS & eo
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Where Mail Orders are specially called for.
R. 1915
FOR SALE
In a good Kootenay town, splendid newspaper outfit and job
plant.
1 An opportunity for a live man
with small capital.
Address "The Week," Victoria.
Th Sanitarium Hotel, whioh is bountifully situated, overlooking the Bow Itiver and its lovely nnd
romantic valley, is a large o-story building elegantly
fitted with every appointment calculated to bring
pleasure and comfort to tho tourist or invalid.
I A private hospital, which, though isolated, is in
close proximity to tlio Sanitarium, is presided over by
skilfully trained nurses and is also littod out with
every appliance necessary to a first class institution
of its kind.
A very commodious bath-house adjoins the hotel,
where Turkish, Russian, plunge, shower and douche
baths nre given under medical supervision, with
water direct from tho celebrated hot sulphur springs.
A first class livery in connection so tliat rides and
drives through the inagnitlcant scenery may be enjoyed.
Terms: (2.0!) a day upwards. Special rates by week
or month.  Open all the year.
W. H. SOARTH, Manager.
Medical Staff: •
It. G. Brett, m.d ;   G. M. Atkin,
It. H. BRETT, II. A.. M D.
:ji
- I
JAMES BUCHANAN & CO.
LONDON AND GLASGOW
Purveyors to the Royal Family,
DISTILLERS OF HIGH GRADE  SCOTCH   WHISKIES
Buchanan's Royal Household at (1.50 per bottle
Buchanan's Blnck and White at $1.25 per bottle
Buchanan's Red Seal at$t.ooper bottle
ARE LEADERS AMONG THE BEST
for sale by all dealers, VICTORIA, B. C.
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OF
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
PHONB 8g3.: VICTORIA THE WEfiK, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER io, 1906.
ififififififififififi?ifi?
if *
♦ A Lady's Letter *
By  BABETTE. V
if if
ifififififififififi>ififif
Dear Madge:
An interesting problem was suggested
to me the other day by a friend who
has just returned, after a seven-
months' sojourn in China, where she
observed that individuality nowadays
seems to be a dead letter, all women
apparently striving to dress exactly
alkie. That there is a good deal ol
truth in this observation no once glancing round any well-dressed assembly
can doubt. Every tailor-made has its
vest and its neat hint of embrodiery;
every coat has its leg-of-mutton sleeve
and collar and cuffs o'f velvet; every
blouse its motifs, its broderie and its
laces, and above all, every arm has its
abbreviated sleeve and supplementary
long glove.
Provided that the effect is good in
the main—proving the successful attempts of the majority to reach an elevated standard—does this similarity
matter? Individuality is good in the
abstract, but in such concrete matters
as dress it is apt to assume a rather
doubtful distinction. That the English
as a nation are infinitely more conservative, not to say stereotyped, in the
fashion of their habilaments than the
Americans is proved by the appearance
of these visitors in our midst from time
to time.
But after a year abroad, with only
two months spent at a fashionable
French watering place—so cosmopolitan
in its character that English, Americans
and the fair feminine of gay Lutetia
were equally in evidence—I have come
to the conclusion that the Queen of
Sheba was a Frenchwoman—if not climatically, at all events characteristically, which line of argument is enough
for my purpose. This gorgeous mon-
daine of ancient days believed in the
potentiality of clothes, and evidently
knew how to wear her trappings, as witness lhe admiring testimony of that
most expert and experienced of judges.
His Majesty King Solomon. [All authentic pictures of the Queen of Sheba
represent her as more dishabille than
habille.—Ed. Week.} Now, of all others to evolve much effect from meagre
clothes, commend me to a Frenchwoman. She is seldom as beautiful as
an Englishwoman, or as smart and
amusing as an American, yet she will
produce a completeness of effect that
none of these other daughters of Eve
:an achieve as far as externals go, bc-
:ause her waist is so beautifully neat,
her shoes, her stockings, her lingerie so
inexpressibly dainty, her hair, ob! so
fbien soigne," her gloves perfection and
per hat a poem, perched at the most
perfect angle at the edge of her coiffed
locks. "How is it done?" one naturally
asks at the end of this tirade, and tbe
inswer is that a Frenchwoman bas an
'nfinitc capacity for taking pains, and
levotes that excellent quality to her
ioilette as well as to other affairs of
tie.
The summing up of an Englishwoman,
« the other hand, was shown most
iompletely in a paragraph from a weekly
Ivhicb came under my notice the other
lay. Tt pointed out that "an English-
oman usually wears the loosest cor-
ets, the largest boots, the easiest
loves, and the floppiest of hats." A
hocking indictment, indeed, and one
hich. with, of course, the usual excep-
jions—must be sorrowfully admitted.
The Anglo-Saxon, in a word, is too
olid for the role of sorceress, too sober
r She of Sheba. [Thank God—Ed.
|eek.]
That a woman's hair is her crown-
ig glory is too well known to need
petition here. The fact, too. that tbis
eauty is apt to fade, becomes apparent
\> those past their first youth. But if
e hair is properly taken care of there
ed be no fear of losing its glory
en in old age.
A handsome overmantel in keeping
ith the scheme of decoration in one's
arnnent is very desirable. A fine pic-
re or an anticiue mirror quaintly
'Imed and set into thc ornamental is
c best motif for its decoration, and
e mantelpiece should never be over-
|nwded. Quantities of knick-knacks
suallv more or less useless and inar
tistic) anywhere in a room produce a
sense of irritation fatal to artistic comfort—and this is as important as animal
comfort to those who have the artistic
temperament. Above all things, let the
chairs and lounges be comfortable and
inviting. There is nothing so inhospitable as having straight-backed comfort-,
less chairs in one's house. Then they
should be grouped, with a view to promoting sociability, round some rallying
point in a room. It may be round the
fireplace or round a tea-table or ingle-
nook.
But to return to lhe overmantels;
don't forget to interview Weiler Bros,
on the subject, and remember that such
a piece of furniture would make a most
useful Xmas gift for a newly married
couple.
BABETTE.
Regimental.
FIFTH REGIMENT, 0. A.
Regimental  Orders by Lt-Col.  J.  A.
Hall, Commanding.   No. 45.
Regimental Headquarters,
Victoria, B. C., 7-11-06.
1. Return to Duty.
Captain C. M. Roberts having returned
from leave will resume duty with No. 3
Company.
2. Reverts to Ranks.
Bandmaster W. V. North, at his own
request, reverts to the ranks.
2.   Taken On.
The following man having been duly
sworn, is posted to No. 3 Co.: No. 311,
Gunr. A. Rumsby, 5-11-06.
4. Promotion
The Officer commanding has been
pleased to approve of the promotion of
Gunr. A. Rumsby to be bandmaster.
5. Struck Off.
The following man, having been
granted his discharge, is struck off the
strength of the Regiment: No. 247,
Gunr. F. Baker.
By order,
(Signed)     W. Ridgway-Wilson,
Capt., Adjutant Sth Regt. C. A
Memo.—The Officer commanding will
meet the secretaries of the Sergeants'
Mess, Company Associations, and the
Rand at 8 p. m. on Wesdnday, 14th inst.
in the orderly room.
Preliminary Conditions of Competition for His Excellency's Musical
and Theatrical Trophy.
1. The competition will take place at
the Russell Theatre during the week
commencing on lhe 28th of January,
1907.
2. Each provincial capital city or
each city hving a population of 50,000
may send one company. If iwo or more
companies desire to enter the competition, the one receiving the endorsation
of thc Lieutenant Governor of the Province shall alone be entitled to enter.
3. The entertainment given by each
company shall be limited to one hour
and a half.
4. The character of thc entertainment, whether musical, theatrical, or
otherwise, shall be absolutely in thc discretion of the respective companies.
5. The number of performers is discretionary, but they must all be strictly
amateurs.
fi. Entries must be made before the
ist of December. Previous notification
of intention to enter will he of service
of the committees.
Tbe Pacific Coast
Realty Go,, Ltd.
Have an exclusive list of specially selected ACREAGE, ESTATE and FARM
PROPERTIES for sale at prices which
will attract purchasers.
NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY
Victoria Property is the safest and best
Investment to be found in Real Estate ou
the Pacific Coast.   There will be a
50 PER CENT. INCREASE
IN YALUES IN 1907.
You cannot make a mistake in buying
Business,
Residence, or
Acreage
Property.
Write or call on us for particulars.   We
can show you how to make money.
The Pacific Coast
Realty Co., Ltd.
12 MacGregor Bl'k, Victoria, B.C.
(Opposite Driard Hotel)
The Tayior Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Buildiug Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
If you love your wife
BUY  HER  A  GAS  STOVE
It will save her a lot of extra work and
give her time for other things
besides cooking.
Cook Your Roast, Do Not Boast Your Cook,
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, LIMITED.
Ch.in.ooe  made Shirts fi^ Overall*
MUST GO!
UNION-MADE.
|RN BRAND -i
BUTTING AHEAD.
Sunken Treasure Located by Use of
Divining Rod.
Mr. John Stears, the famous Yorkshire water diviner, located the hulk of
t'he Spanish treasure ship in Tobermory Bay on Friday by the aid of the
divining rod.
He fount! the hull split in two right
from the bow to the stern, and the
cannon which had been thrown out at
the time of cleavage ranged in two
rows alongside.
He has also distinctly located two
chests of specie, one containing gold
and silver coins mixed, and has fixed
the positions of no fewer than fourteen
bronze guns, all of one type and 4ft. oin.
in lenpth. He is satisfied that when
these arc recovered the rest of the
equipment of fifty-two guns and the bullion will be easilv reached.
Mr. Stears's method of divining,
which he explained fully to our representative at Tobermory, is as  follows:
He holds his divining rod over the
stern of the boat as it proceeds, and
immediately on coming over a mass of
metal the forked twig twists upward
like a living thing in his hand, making
a sound that is easily audible.
The present is the third attempt in
recent years to recover the treasure of
the sunken Armada galleon, Admiral of
Florence, which had treasure of over a
million on board when she was sunk.
The Cab Horse Vanishing.
"By the end of November we shall
have one hundred taximeter motor
cabs on the streets; by the middle of
January at least 500, and within a year
t.ooo; and it is my confident belief that
i na very few years the cah horse will
be a thing of the past, so far as the
streets of London are concerned," said
Mr. Edgar Cohen, of the General Motor-Cab Company. Limited, on Wednesday.
A Bloated Pluralist.
Burglar Bill: "One latch-key one
vote, eh? What price this 'ere skeleton-
key, as'll let me into any 'otne? W'y,
I mils' be a bloomin' constituency I"—
Punch.
NOTICE is hereby given that 00 dnvs
nfter dnte I intend to npplv to tie Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd Works
for permission to purchnse the following
described lnnd sltunted ln the Coast District, Rnnge 5: Beginning nt n post
plnnted on the north bnnk of the Skeenn
river, at the month of Zymqetltz river nnd
marked B. ft.'s Southwest Corner; thence
running north 100 chains; thence enst 80
chains; thenee south to lMink of Skeenn
river about 40 chains more or less; thence
following mennderlng of Skeenn river ln
n southwesterly direction to post of eoni-
| mencement,  containing 040 ncres of lnnd
| more or less.
BEATRICE BATEMAN.
J. E. BATEMAN, Agent.
Located  September 20th,   1908.
NOTICE is hereby given thnt 80 dnys
; nfter d«te I Intend to apply to the Hon.
I Chief Commissioner of Lands nnd Works
: for a special licence to cut and carry awny
I timber from the following described lands
on west shore of Alice Arm, Observatory
| Inlet. Cnsslnr District, II. C.s   Starting at
a post marked southenst corner, said post
plnnted nbout 20 chains from point dividing
Alice nnd llnstings Arms running 20chains
west to T. L. 0141; thenee north 160 chains;
thence enst (10 ehnlns to shore; thence south
along the shore 160 chains to point of commencement.
BRITISH  COLUMBIA TIB AND TIMBER
CO.,   LTD.
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt 30 days
nfter dnte I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd Works
for a speclnl licence to cut and carry awny
timber from the following described lands
on east shore of Observatory Inlet, Cassiar
District, It. C.: Starting nt a point marked
southwest, plnnted nbont seven miles above
the Pnclflc Northern Cannery Co.; running
enst 40 chnins; north 80 chains; east 40
ehnlns; north 80 chains; west 40 chains to
shore; thence south following shore to
point of commencement.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TIB AND TIMBER
CO.,   LTD.
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt 60 days
nfter dnte I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following
described lnnd: Commencing at a post at
the northeast corner of Lot 182. Range
five (5), Const District, mnrked E. Dnvles'
Southeast Corner; thence running 40 chains
west; thence 40 chains north; thenee 40
chnins enst, more or Iras, to Ky-yex river;
Ihence following mennderlng of Ky-ycx
river to point of commencement, containlig
one hundred and sixty acres, more or less.
E.   DAVIES.
located July 12th. 1006. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER io, 1906
The Week
▲ Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Offices:
U& Government Street .... Victoria B. C.
Empire Block  Vancouver, B. C.
W. BLAKEMORE...Manager and Editor
NOTICE.
The   Week   Publishing   Company,
Limited, announces the preparation of a
special Cristmas number of The Week,
which will be entirely devoid of any advertising scheme. In addition to the
usual matter, it will consist of literary
contributions by the most prominent
newspaper men of British Columbia, and
will be beautifully illustrated with a series of half-tone pictures prepared from
photographs taken by your own representative, who has just returned from
a tour of Southern British Columbia.
The edition will consist of about 32
pages, and 5,000 copies will be printed
and circulated. The issue will be ready
on Saturday, December 22d, and will
reach all points in the Interior in time
for Christmas Day. For this number
original contributions of a seasonable
character will be accepted for consideration, and paid for at usual rates if published.
 illfL_
BADINAGE
By BOHEMIAN
t.t.t. ,„. 33,g||j |falsitiiiiil
There is an old saying that there is
nothing new under the sun. In the
course of a lifetime there are few men
who do not meet with an experience
which tends to confirm this. At one
time or another we all have ideas, and
are vain enough to think that some of
them, at any rate, arc original. Delving among the musly tomes in a secondhand book store the other day 1 came
upon a tiny volume, bound in the traditional brown calf, yellow with age and
printed in the old fashioned type in
which most of the letters had tails, and
"s" was made like "f." lt was published by a well-known firm in Paternoster Row in the year 1836. The author's name is given in full as
Oliver Crooklcy, and the title of the
book "The Dailie Journale, and How to
Make It Paie." Needless to say this
was a topic which appealed to me, and
having for a modest "two-bits" become
the proud possessor of this "vade me-
cum" to journalistic success, I hied ine
to the cosy corner of my bohemian
sanctum and proceeded to devour ils
contents. They were extremely interesting, as well as instructive, and while
they furnished many valuable pointers,
they also illustrated to a nicety the
truthfulness of the adage with which I
commenced this article.
The newspaper world of Victoria has
been stirred to its profoundest depths
by recent departures in journalism. Old
fashioned ideas have been superseded
by up-to-the-minute regulations, and indeed the whole sclicne and regime of
the newspaper office have been revolutionized in order that the intelligent
readers of the oldest and most venerable organ in the Province should be
suitably regaled. The credit for such
a superabundance of originality and
freshness has been naturally given to
those experienced and cultured gentlemen who control the destiny and direct
the policy of the organ referred to.
Far be it from Bohemian to suggest
that their up-to-the-minute ideas ire
not original; we have the highest authority for the statement that grent
minds run in grooves, and because Oliver Crookley's gray matter evolved similar ideas in 1836, it is not permitted
Io doubt that the gentlemen mentioned
would evolve the same ideas in the year
of grace 1906.
Further there is another possible and
even probable explanation, which in respect of its scientific premises is distinctly up-to-the-minute. 1 refer to the
theory now being propounded and elaborated in almost every magazine, that
of reincarnation. If the spirit .of the
profound and prescient Oliver Crookley
is now revisiting this sphere in the symmetrical and Adonis-like form ot the
chief director of the paper under consideration, then the whole mystery is
explained, without impugning the originality of the latter and without the
slightest suspicion of plagiarism. But
1 must hurry lo a conclusion, and in
order to vindicate my promise will give
a few extracts from Oliver Crookley's
work on "The Dailie Journale and
How to Make It Paie." Consideration
of space compels me to omit the very
interesting explanation with which he
prefaces his instructions, I can only
.summarize and modernize the latter,
which are as follows:
1. In order to convince the readers
of the truthfulness of his argument the
editor must not believe in it himself.
He should be a life-long convert to the
opposite view.
2. In order to give confidence to the
readers that the journal will be properly
directed, the manager should know
nothing about journalism, or he will be
biassed.
3. The staff should be chosen from
among those who have worked for an
opposition journal. This will prevent
them from being narrow in their views.
4. The manager should treat his staff
with generosity, always remembering
that merit should have its reward.
5. The staff must take an interest in
their work, must attend to duty during
all the prescribed hours—and afterwards, and must never get tired.
6. It is undesirable for members of
the staff to devote their leisure to the
writing of monumental works, which
would divert their attention.
7. Every member of the staff must
he a pointer; he should have a nose for
news, and should remember that no
news is too small for some papers.
7. The editor should at least once a
week treat his readers to a religious
symposium, in order that they may be
found in the right frame of mind to
receive his daily ministrations.
9. Members of the staff should be
instructed to read daily every exchange
coming to hand, from beginning to end,
including thc advertisements and obituary notices.
10. In their spare time the staff
should carefully study their own journal, and should be examined on the
subject of style, composition and punctuation, by the manager, at least once
a week.
11. No member of the staff should
proceed to an assignment without taking under his arm a set of the British
Encyclopedia for reference, and a copy
of Debrett in order to avoid misspelling
of proper names.
12. Every member of the staff, from
the manager down, should beware of
the wine when it is red in the cup, and
avoid the card, the dice and the race.
After carefully reading these maxims
I am sure that my readers will agree
that an up-to-the-minute journal conduced on these up-to-the-minute lines
will he a huge literary and financial success, and would insure at least a laurel
wreath for the brows of lhe up-to-the-
minute hero, who leads this up-to-the-
minute staff to victory. I fear, however,
that although this is a consummation
devoutly to be wished, ere it come to
pass the grass will he growing over
BOHEMIAN.
Two Important Additions to Colonist
Staff.
Mrs. Hasell of the Jubilee Hospital,
and Mr. Ditchburn, chairman of the ex-,
ecutive of the Liberal Association, have
joined the staff of the Colonist. Mrs.
Hasell will report the musical and theatrical news and Mr. Di.chburn will superintend the composing.
W.B.Smith
WnttrtaUr
35 YATES S
PHONE.     892
The Water The inhabitants of Vic-
Question, toria have more intelligence than Mayor Morley gives thein credit for. We have
neither time nor space to recapitulate
the erratic and inconsistent course
pursued by His Worship on the water
question; that has been admirably
done by Alderman Stewart in an interview which he gave to the local
press on Thursday. Suffice it to say
that at one time or another during
the year the Mayor has both supported and opposed every suggestion that
has been brought forward. Why he
should have persisted in forcing his
proposed by-law to the issue of a
vote is not easy to understand in
view of the emphatic turndown which
it received. The trouble with the
Mayor is that he is too old to learn,
and when a man reaches that period
his usefulness is at an end. When he
came into office he was an open advocate for acquiring the Goldstream
property. Since then he has at different times advocated Elk Lake,
Highland and Sooke. The action of
the voters on the by-law submitted in
accordance with the report of the
water committee would have convinced any man of ordinary intelligence
that Victoria would have nothing to
do with further expenditures on an
Elk Lake scheme. It should also have
demonstrated that they had accepted
in its entirety the policy which The
Week has ben advocating from the
commencement of the present discussion, as set forth in the motto which
we suggested, "Water—pure water—
plenty of water." Why Victoria
should be satisfied with anything less
than this neither Maylor Morley nor
his apologists nor the advocates of
the other inferior schemes have ever
attempted to explain. It has, however, been amply demonstrated that
under no circumstances could Elk
Lake comply with any one of these
conditions. It is now admitted by
everyone except the Mayor that contamination of the most direct and offensive kind cannot be avoided there.
It is not open to dispute that the utmost constant pressure which can be
obtained from that source is 40 lbs.
These considerations have placed it
out of count from the first, although
it has taken nine months' discussion
and two emphatic votes by the ratepayers to drive this fact home to the
Mayor and Council.
All this time there has been a
wholly satisfactory water supply
available in the property of the Esquimalt Water Co. The Week believes, and always has believed, that
this will prove the only satisfactory
soltuion of the question, and has never had a doubt that it would be ultimately adopted. In saying this, we
have no desire to see the city pay one
dollar more than is absolutely necessary, and we are convinced that if
the negotiations had been intrusted to
the right parties a settlement on
equitable terms would have been effected long ago. Those who oppose
the Goldstream scheme forget that in
acquiring it the city would also acquire a large income from established
sources of revenue, unlimited water
power, and with it the medium for
developing the manufacturing industries which are daily assuming increasing importance. It is probably
necessary at the present stage to allow the appeal to be taken, although
Tlie Week ventures to think that even
that delay will prove abortive. Meanwhile data is being collected in the
Highland district. Probably by the
time the appeal is decided this data
will be available. Engineer Topp is
quite competent to advise the city and
to prepare estimates for Highland
district water scheme. This should
be done and so enable the public to
make comparison with the Goldstream
project. It is quite certain even before such an estimate is made that it
will he the more costly of the two
schemes, but it is desirable to have
the   information   in   definite   form.
Cxu
THE
QUALITY
^OF THE GOODS
IS SEEN AT A
GLANCE
I
The glorious season of Yuletide is rapidly approaching. It is now
eo near that gifts for dear friends in distant parts must be thought
out. Naturally we have made greater preparations than ever to
put before our customers a vast and splendid assortment of the
choicest gifts, personally selected in the busy marts of Europe,
American and the Orient, in addition to our own factory's creations
in local and most appropriate novelties. Every week in this space
we will publish lists of suitable presents.   This week we deal with—
GENUINE EBONY
Genuine Ebony will last a lifetime. Imitations such as stained
wood, vulcanite, etc., look shabby and worn in a few months, and
the funniest thing about it is, those who take you in with the spurious article generally charge you more than we do for our well
known REAL Ebony goods imported direct from Paris. Here are
a few of our prices.   See our windows for the goods:
GENUINE EBONY HAIR BRUSHES, from $0.75
GENUINE EBONY HAT BRUSHES, from 75
GENUINE EBONY CLOTHES BRUSHES .from 75
GENUINE EBONY MILITARY BRUSHES, from  1.75
GENUINE EBONY MIRROSS, from  2.00
GENUINE EBONY MANICURE SETS, from 75
NUGGET  JEWELRY
We are the largest manufacturers of this typical Western jewelry.
Naturally the pleasure of receiving gifts from friends at a distance
is intensified when the gift is typical of the giver's location. Here
it is no novelty, but in the home land it is very uncommon and
much appreciated.   We quote factory to wearer prices as follows:
SCARF PINS, from 75c to $5
PRETTY BROOCHES, from $1 to $20
ELEGANT BRACELETS, from  $12 up
HANDSOME  NECKLETS, from  $14 up
USEFUL CUFF LINKS, from  $5 up
GENTLEMEN'S FOBS, from  $12 up
FASHIONABLE CHARMS, from $2 up
ETC., ETC.
IMPORTANT.
Our Mail Order Department gives  special  attention to  country
orders and inquiries.   Goods can be selected and stored free until
required.
CHALLONER & MITCHELL
THE XMAS GIFT STORE
47 and 40 Government Street, Victoria, B. C.
C M, 1918
1
FEED CUTTERS AND ROOT  PULPERS,  GRAIN  GRINDERS AND HAY PRESSES,   MANURE   SPREADERS   AND
EVERY   SORT   OF  UP-TO-DATE   AGRICULTURAL   MACHINERY,    WAGONS    AND   CARRIAGES,   LAMPS   AND    -
FARMERS'  HARDWARE AT BEDROCK PRICES.
The largest and most complete stock in the whole of Western
Canada at
E.G. PRI0R & e©., Ld.
(THE BIRMINGHAM OF B. C.)
123 Government Street, Victoria, B. e.
Also at Vancouver, Kamloops and Vernon.
Vi
P. R.1S19
^ THE WEEK, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER xo, 1906.
NOTES ON PROVINCIAL NEWS.
Good Advice.
The Kamloops Standard advises the
[British Columbia Municipalities Union
[to beware of the fate of the Provincial
I Mining Association, which, it says,
Icame to grief because of the attempt
lof the tail to wag the dog. The
■advice is good; the illustration
■used is not very apt. The real
treason that the Provincial Mining Association came to grief is because it
vas all tail.
Prosperous Comox.
The Hon. R. F. Green, who returned
last week from a visit to the Comox
/"alley, declares that he was surprised
It the development of the last few years,
hnd at the extent of fertile land in the
[■alley.   Prosperity and contentment are
he prevailing features of the district,
Ind as there is every probability of railway extension within the next year or
Iwo, this garden of the island bids fair
jo justify the high opinions which have
long been  entertained of it by those
Ivho have had the good fortune to pass
Ihat way.
fernie School Gets Government Aid.
The Fernie city school board is in
Receipt of a letter from the education
pepartment at Victoria, intimating their
villingness to assist the city in educating non-resident pupils this year by paying the difference between the actual
post and the present government grant.
This is good news, and the school board
Is to be heartily congratulated upon
■heir success.
These enterprising gentlemen are now
establishing a branch in Greenwood in
order to compete for the Boundary
trade. Their pluck deserves the success
it will undoubtedly meet with.
An Important Decision.
Major Anderson, the purchasing agent
of the Great Northern Railway, is authority for the statement that it has
been decided to build the V. V. & E.
Railway from Princeton to the Coast
by way of the Tulameen River and the
Hope Mountain Pass. This is an important decision, as it settles the vexed
question of the crossing of the Hope
Mountains north of the International
Boundary line.. It also means that the
shortest possible route to the Coast will
be taken, and incidentally that Princeton will become an important railway
center. All things come to those who
can wait; Princeton has waited fifteen
years, and seems about to reap its well-
earned reward.
A Socialist Candidate.
A convention of Socialists met at
Peachland on the 24th inst., for the
purpose of 'nominating a candidate for
this constituency. Delegates were in
attendance from Penticton, Summer-
land, Peachland, Kelowna, and other
lake points and from Mara and Enderby. The chair was occupied by Geo.
Van Hice of Peachland and A Houston acted as secretary. Several names
were presented to the meetings as candidates, but all withdrew in favor of
J. W. S. Logie, who received the unanimous nomination of the meeting.
Change of Management.
On several occasions reference has
|)een made in The Week to the unsatisfactory condition of affairs at Hedley
Jity, due chiefly to the autocratic methods adopted by Mr. R. B. Lamb, the
general manager who succeeded Mr. M.
Rogers . The trouble has been end-
Id by the removal of Mr. Lamb, and the
Instalment of Mr. F. A. Ross, well
Jnown in the Rossland mining canip,
Ivho is a man of different colour alto-
tether, and if he has a free hand will
loon put things straight. Hedley is to
Ite congratulated on the change.
I The Artistic Jap.
i Two Japs, a man and woman, gave
an exhibition of moving pictures for
a couple of nights last week in the
Oddfellows' hall, and secured good
houses at each performance. The pictures—especially those representing
scenes in the Russo-Japanese war—were
of an extremely interesting nature, and
1 a number of comic pictures also brought
forth much applause. The quaint manner in which the little Japanese lady explained the various scenes was almost
worth the price of admission of itself.—
Vernon News.
An Intelligent Prediction.
The country from the Yellowhead
J?ass to Prince Rupert and for miles
forth and south of a line drawn between
liose two points will be the scene, next
|ear ,of great activity.    Not only will
he location of agricultural and grazing
pnds be large, but the country will be
lrospected very extensively'for the previous  metals   other   than   placer  gold.
lany immense copper, silver and gold
luartz veins are known to exist, but
lere valueless at the time discovered on
[ccount of the danger and difficulty of
etting to and from them.   Now, how-
yer, that a railway is assured sooner
later, these men may be expected to
fcturn to the finds of earlier days, and
It their wake will come dozens whom
Jiey have indirectly influenced. Tiie
■ext couple of years will witness excep-
lonal activity along the lines above
lamed, and we believe that the nevt few
bars will give to the province the big-
est and richest mines of the country.—
Ishcroft Journal.
A Trusty Vetern.
There is no more honourable man
aud no more reliable judge of mining
conditions in the Slocan than William
Hunter of Silverton, who says that the
camp is looking better now than it has
done for a long time past. One of the
causes of the progress is the work being done on the Vancouver by the Le
Roi No. 2 of Rossland and the outlook
on the Standard. On this property
John Finch of Spokane has been working systematically for the past two
years, doing development work merely,
and only shipping the ore encountered
in development. Now the vein has
heen uncovered in one place running
20 feet wide, mostly concentrating ore,
and the management is putting up buildings and installing machinery so as to
be able to take advantage of the development done up to the present. Mr.
Hunter expects that there will be much
good ore shipped from the Standard
and Vancouver ihis season.
Too Fair for Ross.
[Mr. H. 0. Lamb, who for nine months
Is been endeavouring to lift the Boun-
Jfry Creek Times to the level of decent
jumalism, and to rid it of the unsav-
Itry reputation which it had acquired
Tider the direction of Duncan Ross, is
Ivcring his connection with the paper,
■circumstance to be regretted by every-
le who is acquainted with the consci-
Itious work he has done. Mr. Lamb is
It the first good man who has found
Inself handicapped by a political mas-
Branching Out.
[Ft is only a few months since B. A.
mac and R. W. Hinton purchased the
llson Iron Works, and reorganized the
jjness which had been carried on prof-
jhly for many years by Mr. J. Honey-
lin. Thc plant has been remodelled
|d  adapted  to  modern  requirements,
A Good Thing for Nelson.
Among those who have just been
granted certificates to practice the profession of medicine in this province is
Dr. A. G. Levy (M. D., London, England), who is about to establish himself in Nelson.
Dr. Levy is one of the members of
the British Medical Association who
attended the congress at Toronto, at the
close of which he came to Victoria and
was welcomed by Mr. Arthur Leary,
who has known his family for thirty
I years.
I    Mr. Leary, whose acquaintance with
! thc  English  medical profession  is ex
j tensive, speaks in the highest terms of
i Dr. Levy, for whom he predicts a speedy
recognition and appreciation, both of his
ability and  personality, on the pari of
the inhabitants of Nelson.
MAKE A MEMO.
LEST  YOU FORGET.
A Great Han Said: "Young Man Go West."
All married men in Victoria say to their wives
" Young woman, go to
THE WEST END
GROCERY."
Phone 88.
42 Government Street, Victoria
t
C?|^iV.*»<<AW*»^»*»»N%^HV^»^>^*«V^ A^»A>»
C.H.Smith&Co.
Fine Art Dealers
32 iFort St., Victoria.
Just a reminder that
the Xmas buying
season is at hand
and Kodaks are
always useful gifts==
Other things too.
■
;1
Our Lively Age.
This is an age of cigarettes, chnni-
pagne, golf, motors—brisk, active, lively, brief things—not an age of reflection or repose.—A C. Benson in "Corn-
hill  "Magazine.
A Modern Parable. (
Upton Sinclair,  author of The Jungle,   told at   a  dinner   in   New  York, j
apropos of the pure food laws, a story
of four flies.
"Four flies, four brother flies," he
said, "set out into the world one summer day to seek their fortunes.
"Up and down they flew, and finally,
a window being open, they found themselves in a large, delightful room.
Tliere was a great white table in the '
middle of thc room, and on it many
tempting viands were spread.
"The first fly, with a buzz oi delight, j
settled  upon  a dish  of lovely, amber  i
colored jam.    lie  ate his till    Then,
with a low cry of agony, he expirde.
The  jam.   alas,   was  adulterated   with
copperas.
"Thc second fly saw in his comrade's
fate a moral. Luxuries, he reasoned,
were deadly. He would stick, therefore,   to the  plainest,   simplest  things.
)
And so he fell to upon a crust of bread,
and in another moment breathed his
last. The bread was adulterated with
alum.
"The third fly was so grieved over
the fate of his two comrades that he
resolved to drown his sorrows in drink.
There was a glass of beer handy. I le
settled into it greedily. But thc beer
was adulterated with cocculus indicus,
and in less than a minute the fly, quite
dead, floted wtih limp wings on the
surface of the amber fluid.
"In despair thc fourth fly hid himself
in a corner. Sorrow overpowered him,
Large tears rolled from his compound
eyes. And unfortunately, in this mood,
his glance fell upon a large dish of fly
poison.
" 'What is life.' he muttered, 'without
my three dear brothers? I'll kill myself
'And he sipped a little of the poison
It  was palatable, even appetizing.    Re-
*V***rfV**»»M*»N^M'»»^f«J3
solved to make a good job of it, he
drank greedily, and, still drinking,
awaited the end.
"But the end did not come. The fly
poison, like everything else in tbe room,
was adulterated. The little insect found
it harmless. Indeed, it cheered, exhilarated, strengthened him, so that lie no
longer desired death."
Not What He Meant.
The visiting clergyman, addressing
the little folks at the children's service,
became impressive. "Only think, children," he said, "in Africa there are ten
million square miles of territory without a single Sunday sihool, where little
hoys and girls can Spend their Sunday
afternoons. Mow, what should we all
try to save up our money for?" The
children (unanimously): "To go to
Africa." THE WEEK, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1906
J> BUY  &
BEFORE the ADVANCE
A SPLENDID INVESTMENT FOR QUICK PEOFITS.   BUY NOW THE STOCK OP THE PITTSBURG-MANHATTAN MINING COMPANY OF TONOPAH, NEVADA.   100,000 SHARES—PAR VALUE $1.00, FULLY PAID AND NON-ASSESSABLE—OFFERED AT 10 CENTS PER SHARE.
Property and Location.
The most notable facte of the Company are that it owns proven gold and silver hearing land; not only is the ore there, but it is there in quantities, an apparently
inexhaustible supply of pay ore. The Company owns the Gregory Group of Five Claims, situated in the famous MANHATTAN DISTRICT, and also has several Claims
in the LONE MOUNTAIN DISTRIOT; both these districts are the richest in the WORLD. The tunnels have been opened up on the Lone Mountain Claims and indications point to striking large bodies of high-grade ore carrying values in gold and silver.
Mining Has Built Many Great Fortunes.
Nothing so surely offers large returns as a good Mining Stock. Probably you do not realize how many pe
suit from investing in Mining Stocks. There are thousands of them, and they are largely those who bought the
shares at a low price before the company had begun to pay dividends. Stocks of many mining companies have
from $100 to $1,500 a share in value, and besides have paid back to the investors in dividends many hundred ti
paying from 100 per cent to 1,000 per cent in dividends on the first price of the stock. To grasp tihis opportuni
TAN MINING COMPANY at 10 CENTS a share means success to you; and that means houses, good living, tra
you do not grasp this opportunity and secure a good share of wealth you are likely to be classed as a failure. The
tegrity cannot be questioned, and these men pledge themselves to see that each and every investor in the enter
have examined the property, and it is the universal opinion that it has a wonderful future.
ople there are who are enjoying a regular income as a re-
ir stock when the opportunity was first offered to secure
advanced from a few cents a share to prices ranging
mes what they first invested. Many of the companies are
ty and purchase stock in the PITTSBURG-MANHAT-
vel, education and social privileges for your children.   If
proposition is in the hands of men whose ability and in-
prise receives an equal division of the profits.   Experts
Organization.
The Company is organized under the laws of the State of Nevada. Capital stock of $1,000,000, divided into shares of the par value of $1.00 eaeh; 400,000 shares
are in the treasury, which will be sold as required for developments from time to time.
10 Cents Per Share, Cash or Installments.
We want to impress upon you the fact that you don't have to be rich in order to become a shareholder in this splendid Company. The price of shares is only 10
cents, and you can bny as few as one hundred (100), $10.00 worth. If you are not in a position to pay cash for all the shares you desire to own we will accept a small
payment down with the order, the remainder to be paid in five monthly installments. Suppose you want to invest $10.00 in this Company; simply send us $2.50 with your
order for 100 shares, and thereafter $1.50 per month for five months and the stock will be paid for. It's very easy—anyone can afford to do this. Almost everyone has
enough money in a year to Imp them an interest in this Company which would make them independent for life. Send in your order today. The following table will show
you just how many shares your money will'buy, the amount you send if you want to pay all cash, and the plan for monthly payments:
What Your Money Will Buy.
shares, $ 10.00 cash, or $ 2.50 cash and $ 1.50 per month for 5 months
shares. 20.00 cash, or 5.00 cash and 3.00 per month for 5 months
shares. 30.00 cash, or 500 cash and S-°o per month for 5 months
shares, 40.00 cash, or 5.00 cash and 7.00 per month for 5 months
shares, 50.00 cash, or io.oj cash and 3.00 per month for 5 months
shares, 60.00 cash, or 10.00 cash and 10.00 per month for 5 months
shares. 80.00 cash, or 10.00 cash and 14.00 per month for 5 months
shares, 100.00 cash, or 20.00 cash and 16.00 per month for 5 month s
shares. 200.00 cash, or 40.00 cash and 32.00 per month for 5 montns
shaves, 500.00 cash, or 100.00 cash and 80.00 per month for 5 months
shares, 1,000.00 cash, or 200.00 cash and 160.00 per month for 5 months
In offering this stock wc present it as a solid and safe investment, not a
speculation. The resources of their properties and the amount of rich ore
seems so inexhaustible that we recommend the purchase 01" this stock to
cverv investor. ;
100
200
300
400
500
600
800
1,000
2,000
5,000
10.000
Mackay, Munroe & Co.,
Bankers and Brokers,
Goldfield, Nevada.
Gentlemen:
I hereby subscribe for shares
(at ioc. per share) of the Capital Stock of the PITTSBURG-MANHAT-
TAN MINING COMPANY of Tonopah (par value, $1 per share), for
which find enclosed $	
Please issue stock in name of:
Name  (in full)	
Street and No	
City or town	
Slate 	
Yours truly,
Signature 	
Week, Victoria, B. C.
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS:
ROBERT M. WINTER (Land Trust Company, Pittsburg); President. T. THOMER (Tonopah), Vice President.
K. (',. MTNARD (Mine Owner and Operator, Tonopah), Secretary. E. B. CUSHMAN, Cashier Stale Bnnk and Trust Co., Tonopah), Treasurer.
W. B. BARTHOLOMEW (Tonopah & Goldfield Railroad Co., Tonopah), Director.
100 000 shares of the above Stock are now offered for public subscription at 10 cents per share. MAIL APPLICATION WITH REMITTANCE (CHECK,
DRAFT, P. O. or EXPRESS MONEY ORDER) TO PAY FOR NUMBER OF SHARES YOU DESIRE. CERTIFICATES WILL BE IMMEDIATELY FORWARDED
ON RECEIPT OF YOUR LETTER.
Address all communications to
MACKAY, MUNROE & CO'Y, Goldfields, Nevada.
BANKERS   AND   BROKERS.
Reliable Representatives Wanted Everywhere.
	
■■ THE WEEK, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER io 1906
Notice is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intende to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands situated on Long Lake,
which empties into the Owun River,
which flows into Masset Inlet, Queen
Charlotte District:
Claim 18—Commencing at a post
planted at the northeast corner, at the
head of Long Lake, thence 80 chains
west, 80 chains south, 80 chains east,
80 chains north to post of commencement.
Claim 19—Commencing at a post
planted at the southwest corner, at the
head of Long Lake, thence 80 chains
east, 80 chains south, 80 chains west,
80 chains north, to post of commencement.
Claim 20—Commencing at a post
planted at the southeast corner, on the
wets shore, at the head of Long Lake,
thence west 40 chains, 160 chains north,
40 chains east to shore of lake, then
following the shore to point of commencement.
Claim 21—Commencing at a post
planted at the southwest corner, at the
east shore, at the head of Lonk Lake,
thence east 40 chains, north 160 chains,
west 40 chains to shore of lake, then
following to shore to point of commencement.
Claim 22—Commencing at a post
planted at the southeast corner, two
miles from the head of Long Lake, on
the west shore, thence 40 chains west,
160 chains north, 40 chains east to shore,
following the shore to point of commencement.
Claim 23—Commencing at a post
planted at the southwest corner, two
miles from the head of Long Lake, on
the east shore, thence 40 chains east,
thence 160 chains north, thence 40
chains west, more or less, to shore, following the shore to point of commencement.
Claim 24—Commencing at a post
planted at the southeast corner, on the
west bank of Long Lake, four miles
from its head, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence south to shore, thence
following the shore to point of commencement.
Claim 25—Commencing at a post
planted at the southwest corner, on the
east shore, four miles from the head of
Long Lake, thence cast 80 chains, 80
chains north. 80 chains west to shore,
more or less, thence following the shore
to point of commencement.
Claim 26—Commencing at a post
planted at the southeast corner, on the
north shore, about five miles from the
head of Long Lake, ihence west 80
chains, tiience north 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, more or less, to the
Omun River, thence following the
shore, river and lake, to point of commencement.
Claim 27—Commencing at a post
planted at the southwest corner, on
the northeast shore, about five miles
from the head of Long Lake, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains, more or less, to
the Owun River, following the shore of
the river and lake to the point of commencement.
Claim 16—Commencing at a post
planted on the west side of lake, at thc
crossing of south line of lot 32, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80 chains,
theuce 80 chains east, more or less, following the lake shore to point of commencement.
CHARLES WATKINS.
JOHN DORSEY, Agent
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands situate upon the southwest shore of Stuart Lake and about
nine miles from Fort St. James. Coast
District,  B.  C,  viz.:    Commencing at
LAND NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for permission to purchase
section 24, township 8, range 5, Coast
District.
EMMA HOWE.
JOHN DORSEY, Agent.
October 29th, 1906.
No. 20.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, 1
intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lauds and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Tahsish Arm, Kyuquot Sound, Rupert
District:
Beginning at a post planted on the
east boundary of Application No. 13,
about 60 chains south of the northeast
corner thereof, thence east 160 chains,
thence north 40 chains, thence west 160
chains, thence south along said boundary
40 chains to point of commencement.
Kyuquot Sound, Oct. 5th, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. U.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
Intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,  Rupert District:
Beginning at a post planted at the
southeast corner of No. 8 Application on
Tahsish Arm, thence north along the east
boundary of No. 8 40 chains, thence east
80 chains, Lhcnce north 40 chains, thenco
east 80 chains, thence south about
chains to the shore, thence following the
shore southwesterly to point of com
mencement, containing 640 acres more or
less.
Kyuquot Sound, Oct. ist, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. 22.
Take notice that, 30 days after date,
intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following desoribed land, situate on
Kyuquot   Sound,   Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Application No. 8 on
Kokshittle Arm, thence east 40 chains,
north 80 chains, west 60 chains, south to
tho shore of Kokshittle Arm, thence
southeasterly along said shore to get one
mile of southing, thence east about 40
chains to a point north of the initial
stake, Ihence south 40 chains to point of
commencement.
Kyuquot Sound, Oct. ist, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. 23.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works lor a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
the Ka-o-winch River, Kokshittle Arm,
Kyuquot  Sound,  Rupert District:
Beginning at a post planted on the
north boundary about 20 chains weat of
the northeast corner of Application No.
7, on the east bank of the Ka-o-winch
River, thence east 20 chain's, north 160
chains, east 20 chains to point of com
mencement, containing 640 acres more or
less.
Kyuquot Sound, Sept. 29th, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH
No. 27.
Take notice that, 30 days after date. 1
intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special llcensr
to cut and carry away timber from th<
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,   Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted near thi"
initial post of Application No. 26, theno,
east 40 chains, thence south 80 chains
west 80 chains, north 80 chains, east V'
chains to point of commencement, con
taining 640 acres more or less.
Kyuquot Sound, Sept. 25th, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH
No. 28.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
intend to apply to the Chief Commissionet
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from thi
following described land, situate or
Kyuquot   Sound,   Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted on tht
west side of Union Island about 20 chains
south of a group of small islands in Blind
Entrance, thence 80 chains east, Ihence 61
chains north, thence 40 chains wesl
Ihence 40 chains north, thence west about
20 chains to the shore of Blind Entrance
thence southerly along said shore tc
point of commencement.
Kyuquot Sound, Oct. 10th, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. 24.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, 1
Intend to apply to the Chief Commissionet
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut nnd carry away timber from tht
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,   ltupert  District:
th-
Beginning  al  a post  planted    on
.     ,      .  ■       ,,      , .       ,        - „j (south shore of Narrow Gut Inlet, thenet
a post placed on   lhe   lake  shore  and   souln $ onalllS|  lnonce   easl 4o cnai„a
marked "E. J. M.—N.  E.'  and thence j tiience  north 40  chains,  thence  east    8(1
astronomically   west  80   chains,  thence   chains,  thence about 40 chains north tc
astronomically south 80 chains, thence ^wSS? th°e fZTl TvSnSk, *%££■
astronomically south so chains, tnence   uou   10   point  of    commencement,   con
astronomically    east    80   chains,    and   taining 640 acres more or less,
thence  astronomically north 80 chains, j    Kyuquot Sound, Oct. 7th, 1906.
to  point   of  commencement  and   con-
tain'ng 640 acres.
E. J. MATHEWS.
Per J. A. HICKEY, Agent.
July 23d, igo6.
WE
HAVE
Fruit Lands
Timber Limits
Range Land
and
Mineral Claims
Throughout the
BOUNDARY
DISTRICT
t Having a Climate and Soil
I equal to any other section
♦      of British Columbia.
!  Nelson Fruit
Lands
will save you 25 to 50 per
cent, on cost of original
investment.
H. E. CROASDAILE &  CO.
I Nelson, B.C.
>♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
UNRIVALLED OPPORTUNITIES FOR
FRUIT CULTURE
IN THE KETTLE
RIVER VALLEY.
Before Locating Send   Us   Particulars of What You
[Require
A.
Erskine
Smith &
Co.
REALTY and MINING
I  VESTMENTS
Reference:  Enstern Townships Bunk.
Grand Forks, B.C.
Nelson Iron Works
Machinery of all kinds built,
erected and repaired,
Complete Mining Plants
Cammell Laird Steel, Etc.
R. W. Hii'iton      NelSOH, B. C.
British Columbia
FRUIT
Collectors!
I carry an assortment of 400
subjects of
Genuine
Photographic
Post Cards
of Banff and tho Canadian National
Park, also of Northwest Indians,
Mountain and Game Scenes.
PRICE 6oc. PER DOZEN.
FOR THE TRADE ONLY.
My quotations by the hiuir'red nre
the lowest in Canada. Photopost
oards made from any subject you
may send me.
Write for particulars.
Byron Harmon
Photographic Artist,
Banff, Alberta.
LANDS
JOHN HIKSCH.
No. 25.
Take notice that, SO daya after date,  1
i intend to apply to the Chiei Commissionet
of Lands and Works tor a special licenst
■ lo cul and carry away  timber from  tht
 j following    described    landt    situate    on
,T_„T„„  .   , . ,      I Kyuquot  Sound,  Rupert  Distriot:
NUIlLli is hereby given that thirty j Beginning at a post plained at the
days after date T intend to applv to southeast corner of Application No. 1, on
the Honourable the Chief Commission - "so^ SSSS, ffiEc." SlSSfS
er of Lands and Works for a special chains, thence north 80 chains to point ol
license to cut and carry away timber : commencement, containing 040 acres mor<
from the following described lands sit-1 or^PJJ'
uate on the southwest shore of Stuart
Lake and about ten miles from Fort
St. James, Coast District, viz.: Commencing at a post placed on the lake
shore and marked "E. J, M.—S. E.."
tbence astronomically west 8o chains,
thence astronomically north 8i chains,
more or less, to said southwest shore of
Stuart Lake and at a point known as
the "Bit' Bay." and tbence following the
snid shore In a southeasterly direction
to tbe point of commencement and contouring about 120 acres, more or less.
E. T. MATHEWS.
Per J. A. HICKEY. Agent.
Tuly 23d, 1906.
Kyuquot Sound, Sept. 27th, 1906.
JOHN  HIKSCH
No. 26.
Take notice that, 30 days at'ler date, 1
Iniend 10 apply to lhe Chief Commissionet
of Lands and Works tor a special license
to cul and curry away timber from tin
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot   Sound,   Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted on the
east side of a river unnamed entering Into Clan nlnick Harbor about l',fe miles
from the mouth, Ihence ens: 60 chains
north 80 chains, west 80 chains, south sr
chains, east 20 chains to point of com
menuemoht, containing 610 acres more or
less.
Kyuquot Sound, Sept. 25th, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
The Kootenay and Columbia Valley
contains about 100,000 acres of choice
fruit lands, which are being rapidly settled up. These lands border on, tbe lakes,
are well located, and have daily transportation hy boat and rail. The fruit
grown in this section cannot be excelled
in any part of North America. Peaches
pears apples, cherries, plums, grapes,
and all kinds of small fruits grow in
abundance. 10,000 acres of these lands
are now being divided into small holdings. These will be placed on the market this season. The price will be reasonable and those who buy first can purchase at ground floor prices. The climate is good, the lakes and rivers do not
freeze in winter. Tbe steamboats run all
year round. The thermometer seldom
goes below zero.
Should you desire uiore information,
write to
J. E- ANNABLE, NELSON, B.C
C. S. BAKER
Assayer,
Chemist
and Ore Shippers' Agent.
GRAND FORKS, B. C.
ASSAY CHARGES.
Gold     $1.00
Silver    1.00
Copper   1.25
Lead   1.25
Iron    1.50
Zinc    2.00
Gold and  Silver  1.50
Gold and  Copper  2.00
Gold, Silver and Copper  2,50
Gold, Silver and Lead  2.50
Other metals on application.
A discount allowed to regular Mstomers.
CAMBORNE
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining men and
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
REVELSTOKE
Hotel Victoria
REVELSTOKE, B. C.
Headquarters for miners and
lumbermen.
ROBT. LAUQHTON, Prop'r
BANFF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
Banff's Most Popular J2 a Day Hotel.
Close to Station and Sulphur
Baths.
N. K. LUXTON, Proprietor.^ g
PHOENIX.
Deane's Hotel
PHOENIX, B. C.
New-. Modern hot water system. Klectric
lighted. Tub ;nnl shower baths nnd laundry in
connection.   The miners' home.
"DANNY" DEANE, Proprietor
GREENWOOD, B. C.
The Windsor Hote
GREENWOOD, B. C.
American and European Plan.
Cafe in Connection.
ERNEST J. CARTIER, Prop.
ROSSLAND
Hoffman House
ROSSLAND, B. C.
Rates J1.00 per day and up.   Cafe in
Connection.
GREEN & SriITH. Prop's.
NELSON.
HOTEL HUME
NELSON,   B. C,
Leading Hotel of the Kootenays.
J. FRED HUME,       -       Proprietor.
Silver King Hotel,
NELSON.  B. C.
The home of the Industrial Workers
ottho Kootennys.
W. E. ricCandlish,
Proprietor
Royal  Hotel
'nelson, b. c.
Tlio Hest Family Hotel In the Cily.
fl 11 day.
Airs. Wm. Roberts, Proprietress
CRANBROOK.
Cranbrook Hotel
Cranbrook, B. C.
Rates $2 per day.   Opposite the C.P.R.
depot.
Hogarth & Rollins, Proprietors.
YMllt Is n thriving mining
town, situated 18 miles
south of Kelson In tho rich
mineral district of Wen Kootenay It is essentially 11
free.iiillliu.ir camp, nml there
are six stamp-mills operating
in tlie Vicinity—ono of them
(the Ymir) being lhe Inrpcst
In Canada, wilh ItsfiOsiamps
consianily dropping. Tliere
ure numerous mines in active
operaMon In thc camp, and
reliable Information is nl-
wnvs available In Ymir.
Waldorf Hotel
Headquarters for Mining and Commercial Men.
Sample Rooms in Connection.
YMIR, B. 6.
G. S   eOLEMHM.
Proprietor.
YMllt enjoys every facility
for minim; operations.
I Imboraud Water arc. abundant, llic roads anil trails are
in food condition in lhe
main, and new ones are be-
Ing opened up, There is direct railway communication
•Mill three smellers, all within fifty miles ol lhe town.
Tlie climate Iscongonlal nnd
every neoossaiy nnd luxury
of life can be seen ed In the
cninp nml nt prices Hint compare favourably with those
ot any other distriot. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER io, 1966.
NOTES ON PROVINCIAL NEWS
The Pioneer's Annual.
The Pioneer Publishing Company of
Phoenix is out with an announcement
relating to a fourth holiday number,
which will appear on Christmas Day.
The Boundary district was never in so
prosperous a condition with its mines
and smelters producing and reducing
some 4,000 tons of copper-gold ore
daily, and it is certain that Editor Wilcox will keep pace with the spirit of the
times in publishing an edition worthy
of the Boundless Boundary. This
year's Pioneer Annual will have many
new features profusely illustrated with
•     half-tone engravings.
Has Opened In the Capital.
George Fraser, M.P.P., on Monday
last went into possession of the J. L.
White & Co. Pharmacy on Government
Street, Victoria, and from now on will
conduct the People's Popular Prescription Pharmacy. The new proprietor has
been for over a quarter of a century intimately associated with the drug business. Previous to coming to Victoria
he was in business both at Rossland
and Grand Forks, where he achieved
success, and in fhe "Smelter City"
earned in addition the confidence of the
electors as their representative in the
Provincial Parliament. It is the intention of Mr. Fraser to entirely remodel
and improve the drug store, and also
to employ a graduate assistant in the
dispensary.
retced at the British Empire Mine,
near Vernon, the following extract from
the last issue of the Vernon News will
not be without interest to those who
follow the vagaries o fself-constituted
mining critics who do not know the
difference between rock and ore:
"Professor Van Denbroch, a New-
York mining engineer of continental
reputation, has been spending a few
days in the district, the object of his
visit being to inspect the British Empire Mine, opposite Okanagan Landing,
in the interest of eastern stockholders.
He made a most thorough investigation of the property, and it affords us
pleasure to be able to state that he
seemed to be well satisfied with the
result.
"He gave expression to his belief
that there was every chance of striking
the main body of ore at a depth which
would at once demonstrate the mine to
be an exceedingly valuable property.
His remarks were of such a nature as
to encourage those interested in the
development of this very promising
mine in the belief that ultimate success
is bound to reward their unshaken faith
and energetic work."
Kootenay Central Eailway.
Mr. Hungerford Pollen, the popular
president of the Kootenay Central Railway, is in Victoria for the purpose of
interviewing the government on the subject of the early construction of the
much needed line of railway from Fort
Steele to Golden. In an interview with
The Week he declared that there was
no possibility of the work going ahead
without aid from the Provincial Government, as the Dominion subsidy was
not sufficient to induce London capitalists to finance its construction. Thc
railway is badly wanted; it would pass
through one of thc most fertile valleys
in the Province, and it is greatly to be
hoped that some means will be devised
to enable the neecssary work to he proceeded with as early as possible.
Obituary Notices.
"Are you the editor that takes in society news?" inquired the caller, an undersized man, with a tired and timid,
appealing look on his face. "Y.es, sir,"
replied the young man at the desk. "I
can take in any kind of news. What
have you?" "Why, it's this way," said
the caller, lowering his voice. "My
wife gave a small party last night, and
I am willing to pay to have this report
of the affair put in the paper." "We
don't charge anything for publishing society news," observed the young man
at the desk, taking the proffered manuscript and looking it over. "That's all
right," was the reply. "You don't understand. I wrote this up myself, and
I put in a line or two that says, 'Mr.
Halfstick assisted his distinguished wife
in receiving the guests.' That's the way
I want it to go in, and I don't care if
it costs a dollar a word. I want my
friends to know, by George! that I still
belong to the family."
Becoming Civilized.
The Golden Star declares that the
Hindus who have found their way to
that ambitious and prosperous city arc
rapidly becoming civilized. In order
that there may be no mistake as to the
meaning of the term, the editor of the
Golden Star endeavours to make it clear
in the following paragraph:
"The Hindus are not averse to Canadian whisky and Western civilization.
Ther were several of these gentry seen
carrying respectable jags around Golden
this week, and, strange to say, they acted just like a white man. Golden has
certainly got one good article—whisky.
Pity the Poor Moose.
Governor Mclnnes, in his anxiety to
confer a favour upon lhe capital cily.
has presented the Catincil with a young
moose, which arrived at White Horse
on thc steamer from Dawson a few days
ago. Whether it has yet reached Victoria we do not know, but it would be
an act of kindness to the moose if it
were slaughtered at White Horse, unless better accommodation is afforded
than al present exists in Beacon Hill
Park, Victoria.
Pnck of Poot's Hill.
Rudyard Kipling's new book, "Puck
of Poot's Hill," has just been published
by the Macmillan Company of Canada,
Limited, Toronto. It easily ranks with
the finest work from Kipling's pen. At
the outset the reader fears that it is a
work for children only, but as he reads
on, it takes a grip on him, and when he
has reached the end he wishes for another volume of it. In this book Kipling takes the small section of country
near his own home in England, and in
successive chapters he calls back to life
the various great personages who once
lived and loved, fought and fell on
those hillsides. He weaves story after
story, and carries the reader back to
fhe old days when the Romans "kept
the wall" against the Picts and the
"winged hats" who came at them from
the sea. It is a splendid piece of literary craftsmanship, and suggests better
than anything Kipling has produced for
a long time, what treasure he may yet
have in reserve.
In the Nicola Coal Field.
The Diamond Vale Coal Company are
busy drilling on their property at the
Forks. No time is being lost and two
shifts are kept continually on the work,
with indications of good coal measures
gone through on the way down.
James Laird, the foreman of the work,
who is also a skilled diamond setter,
came up recently from Vancouver Island to take over his duties.
The management of the company are
naturally reticent as to the results obtained from the drilling operations, but
there is no doubt that there arc good
indications of a large body of coal
awaiting development.
■Fools Rush In.
In   view   of   the   adverse   criticism
which some  ignorant persons have  di-
Are You "Shure."
Rudyard Kipling dined on one occasion with a party that included several
other well-known writers—a fair proportion of men and women, who knew
something about literature, and a large
number who knew little and made up
for their lack of knowledge with pretense. Several of the last described
kind started a useless discussion concerning spellings, pronunciation, etc.,
and one, firing his remark straight at
Kipling, said: "I find that 'sugar' and
'sumach' are the only words beginning
with 'sti' that are pronounced as though
beginning with 'sh.'". Bored though
he was Kipling's politeness did not desert 'him, and, assuming an expression
of interest, although his eyes twinkled
behind his glasses, he asked: "Are you
sure?"
FUEL
In cold, chilly, damp weather nature calls
for warmth and heat. The human body
carries warmth and heat but it needs fuel
to keep the fires going and the blood
warm and healthy. The finest fuel in the
world for the human body is a dish of
-B. & K. ^
Rolled Oats
B KI1920
The Fur business is done better in Victoria than almost anywhere else on the
continent. We set the pace with hand-
some displays of
Persian Lamb Jackets
Canadian Hink Coats
Handsome Sealskin Coats
Labrador Mink Stoles
in qualities that are absolutely dependable, and at the lowest prices that really
high-grade Furs ever sell for. We know
the market and we know your needs.
Out-of-town customers should write for our catalogue.
THE B. C.  FUR  MANFG  COMPNY
VICTORIA, B.C.
for the Christmas trade are being received daily
also presents for the most fastidious devotee of
Your Favorite Brand Can Now Be Had in Perfect Condition.
If you smoke Havanas we shall be pleased to show and quote low prices for fine cigars.
The Old Post Office Cigar Store
J.   A.   WORTHINGTON, PROP. VICTORIA, B. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER io, .906.
«    NO   A.      7-IHCH  »LaTR
'KINOSTON PATTERN
, NO   44T      0.L
VERNA PATTERN
No. « PATTERN
, No. 171     O...I,
KINOSTON PATTERN
■/:£^<\
,. Ill     ■•INON  BO..
' KINOSTON PATTERN
No   140    W..tn Moti.i
' NEW BRILLIANT PATTERN
,,    No. HI    Co.. J*.
' EMPRESS PATTERN
a. 714    Tun.li.
' KINOSTON PATTERN
NO. 440    two**
' VERNA PATTERN ,
> o.o    Cm.-
' VERNA PATTERN
VERNA PATTCKN
NO   IS     4.IMBH   4.UGI4
NEW BRILLIANT PATTERhI
A Great Addition to
Decorative Art in B. Q.
THAT is the verdict of a leading architect after being shown through our new cut glass room, the latest addition to
Western Canada's greatest furniture store; his professional eye was probably a captive to the brilliant effect caused
by the combination of the most beautiful cut glass in the world, displayed in a room specially designed and constructed by our decorative and factory staff, in perfect harmony with its brilliant contents.
This room is built purely for the comfort and enjoyment of our customers and visitors to our showrooms. All
are equally welcome. All are at liberty to take full advantage of the opportunities it gives to study the beautiful
workmanship of the justly celebrated Libbey Cut Glass, whom we represent as factory selling agents.
For the benefit of those who cannot get to Victoria we have added a few short descriptions and prices, having in
mind the fact that Christmas is rapidly approaching and that no gift in the World is more useful, more decorative or
more appreciated than brilliant cut glass. It is easily packed and dispatched in execution of mail orders. Our Mail
Order Department will always forward full descriptive lists of any article required.
llmtfME,!r1^
NO. 144     C444N	
' NBW BRILLIANT PATTERN
FLOWER VASE, No. 292—Pattern
58, 6 inches high $35°
FLOWER VASE, No. 500—Pattern
59, 6 inches high; a beautiful design  $4-50
FLOWER VASE, No. 360-^ diamond design, 12 inches high, finished with silver rim $500
PERFUME BOTTLE—Pattern 716,
an elegant present for a lady—$5.00
CREAM AND SUGAR—Libbey cut
set, splendid new design $6.00
Y.'.TIET BOWL—Corinthian pattern, a very dainty piece of cut
glass, makes a delightful present.$350
FRUIT DISH—Elmore pattern, exquisitely cut  $6.00
JAM DISH—Pattern 64, 5 inches. .$3.00
JAM DISH—Pattern 64, 6 inches. .$3.50
COMPOTE—Pattern 766, very similar to design opposite, but shorter
stem.   Price  $5.00
COMPOTE—Somerset pattern, in
elegant tall stem, exactly as pattern 665 opposite, 12 inches high. ..$12
VASE, No. 208—Brilliant pattern, see
left hand corner designs; a very
beautiful piece of workmanship, in
three sizes—10 inches high, $10.00;
12 inches high, $12.00; 7 inches
high   $6.50
Address mail orders to Mail Order
Department,
J .Wl.lLtRBROS.   |
Government Street, Victoria, B. C.
&r'«
at   c.mol. tr.ea
EMPftBSS PATTERN
U       NO. •«■     COHrOTlV
SOMERSET PATTERN .
No  171    c,....
. KINOSTON PATTERN
NBW BRILLIANT PATTERN
WATER BOTTLE—Verna pattern,
see design at right hand, No. 329;
a massive piece of work $8.00
BERRY DISH-Keystone design. .$4.00
GINGER DISH-Zenda pattern; a
delicate and charming design; 7-
inch size  $7.50
CREAM AND SUGAR BOWLS-
Iona pattern, cut in very deep relief.   Set  $7.50
VINEGAR or OIL BOTTLE—Fern
pattern or Corona pattern, both very
charming designs  $7.50
BON BON DISHES-5-inch $5.00
CLARET JUG—Corona pattern, quart
size  $18.00
DECANTER—Corona pattern ...$16.00
WHISKY JUG—Corona pal tern.. $20.00
WATER BOTTLE-Corona pattern  $15.00
FRUIT DISH-Venetian pattern; 8-
inch size only $6.00
ROSE BOWLS-In the beautiful
Corinthian pattern; 5-inch size,
$10; 6-inch, $12; 7-inch $14.00
CARVER REST—No. 314 $3.50
FRUIT DISH—Somerset pattern; 9-
inch size; elliptical edges $18.00
Address mail orders to Mail Order
Department,
I    WEILERBKOS    j
Government Street, Victoria, B. C.
Jittr*   -' ••'  «•«■'■ ■"•■
"      . PLAIN PLUTE PATTERN
, No, 14,     Die....4
VERNA PATTERN
, NO fit   01, 4>e.... '
'KINOSTON PATTERN
> ,01   v...   ,
' No. J» PATTERN
J KINOSTON PATTERN
Jlblllil no 11.   ».... a.....
8«-^      VERNA PATTERN
M.J,
*=->-- NEW 11
NEW BRILLIANT I'ATTLRN
NO. 4.1     44444.   V .
' KINOSTON PATTBRN
.  No   4,1     a.wtao C».4.
r   KINOSTON PATTERN
.0 444    .4-1.cm v
No. JI PATTERN 10
THE WEEK   SATURDAY, NOVEMBER io, 190b.
On The Trail.
By The Traveller.
"Cranbrook is conceded to be one of
the best towns in the interior of British
Columbia by those who make a business
of travelling over the province. Cranbrook has a population of 3,200 to 3,500,
and has always been prosperous and
progressive. It is advantageously situated in the center of a rich district,
with unlimited resources in lumbering,
mining, agriculture and fruit, and is the
natural supply point of the whole region. Cranbrook lias a fine system of
waterworks, electric light and telephone,
the latter having branches to all the
towns in the district. The residential
portion of Cranbrook is the pride of thej
town. As a scenic center Cranbrook is
superb, having within two or three
hours ride, the historic Wild Horse, the
wonderful valley of Perry Creek, the
marvellous Elk Canyon and the placid
beauties of Moyie Lake. Cranbrook
looks good to her home people, in fact,
Cranbrook looks good to everybody."
The above greeted my eye as I picked
up the dinner menu at tbe Cranbrook
Hotel the evening of my arrival. For
a brief description, it covers the point.
Mine hosts Hoggarth & Rollins have
that unbounded faith in their home
town that they are not afraid to spend
dollars in "printers' ink." They are of
the stamp tbat believes in publicity, and
knowing this one docs not mrvel at
their prosperous condition.
For a place still in its 'teens. Cranbrook is today one of the most prosper-
largely to the financial prosperity of the
growing city. Evidences are not wanting of its stability. Baker Street is well
built up, and among the new business
blocks is a fine fireproof cement block
nearing completion, for The Fink Mercantile Co. A combined $20,000, two-
and-a-half-story building is to be erected
by the Province and Municipality. That
the city does not lack enthusiastic
sportsmen is shown by the ease with
which some $4,000 was raised for the
building of a 6oxi58-foot curling rink.
It is also well understood that V. Hyde
Baker and L. A. Hamilton of Winnipeg
purpose in the near future to build a
modern hotel on the site of the present
Cranbrook Hotel. While the plans have
not been definitely matured, .Mr. Baker
—who is the pioneer of the town—is
working on them. Altogether Cranbrook is a good, healthy little city, that
has a great future before it, the way for
whicli is being paved by as energetic
and  progressive a  body of  citizens  as
j can be found in British Columbia.
Wardner.
I Twenty-two miles west of Cranbrook
is Wardner. the home of the Crow's
Nest Pass Lumber Company. It was
founded by the late "Jim" Wardner during the construction of the railway, and
for a brief spell enjoyed considerable
prosperity. Today it can truthfully
boast of having the largest and most
modern lumber mill in thc Crow's Nest
region, where 120 men find employment
in the plant and yards and during the
winter season 250 more in the neighhor-
I ing lumber camps.   Its product is ship-
men employed. Business conditions at
Moyie, as elsewhere through the East
Kootenay show signs of betterment, and
Messrs. MacMahon Bros, the original
owners of the townsite, are still doing
business at the Hotel Kootenay. Moyie
not only boasts of magnificent scenery,
but excellent hunting and fishing is also
to be bad. As a summer resort few
places in the district surpass tbis pretty
little town on the placid waters of Moyie Lake.
THE TRAVELLER.
A Few Hints to the Cub Reporter.
Written   for "The Week" by  Frederic
Arthur Palmer, New Grand
Theatre, Victoria.
ped as far east as Winnipeg, and tbis
live and  substantial municipalities I season 'l Z00^ Portion fo,md a '^
market in Saskatchewan, along tbe Canadian Northern line.   Equipped without
regard to expense, having adequate fire
protect ion and electric lighting, the enterprising owners have gone farther and
provided  for their  employees a  social
hall  and  library,  known   as   the   Em-
I ployees' Club, which was made possible
1 by thc good heartedness of Mr,  Peter
. T.und.   Besides the manufacture of lum-
j ber,  the mill having a capacity per 10
j hours of  from  100.000  to  150.000 feet,
, and the manufacture of laths, the coni-
! pany also makes from 20,000 to 25,000
1 ties per month.   Just now it is installing
j an entirely new planing mill, the power
j for which is being supplied by the Wat-
| erous Engine Works and the machinery
I by the Berlin Manufacturing Co.   Wardner boasts of three hotels and a well-
supplied  departmental store   owned  by
the mill company.
Marysville.
Wycliffe, Marysville and Kimberly are
supplied. There is also a splendid bos-! reached by a spur line of the C. P. R.
pital—-the St. Eugene Hospital—man- j At Wycliffe is one of the largest milling
aged by the sisters and containing sixty- industries of llic East. .Kootenay. Marys-
five beds. Thc financial needs of the ville is the home of the Sullivan Group
city and district are taken care of by Mines, Ltd., smelter, which employes
the Canadian Bank of Commerce and | some 130 men under the superintendent-
ship of Ed. I). Dolph, and distributes,
roughly, $10,000 a month.   The town is
ous,
of the interior. It shows it in many j
ways. Miles of well constructed side- ]
walks, an excellent fire hall, with up-
to-date appliances and a crack volunteer
department are things that the infant
municipality can well pride itself on.
While the public utilities, such as waterworks, electric light and telephone are
in tbe hands of private ownership good
service is given the citizens. Again,
take a peep into the numerous stores,
and besides quantity you note quality
in the goods displayed. I was told thai
the best tbe country produces finds a
ready sale in all lines, and imported
stuffs of the most expensive nature have
the readiest sale. It speaks well for
the people, and it speaks well for Ihe
limes. Out on Baker Hill is tbe principal residential section. There arc many !
. fine homes, costing thousands, and with |
five churches and a public school., including a high class, the home life, educational and ministerial needs arc well
the Imperial Bank, which have branches
here.   The former has erected a really
handsome brick bank building.    'Bad" —,^^—™
Grace, who for over a decade has edit- j dium of its Board of Trade. A considered the "Prospector." and "Old Man" 1 able amount of literature has been sent
Simpson of the "Herald" deserve well ' out to the world regarding the local
of the community for the manner in j mines and the possibility of tbe in vest -
which they both everlastingly keep ment of capital in this direction. The
Cranbrook and the district generally be-1 Traveller was greeted on his arrival at
fore the reading public. j Kimberly by Harry Drew, mine host of
Al Cranbrook the Canadian Pacific the North Star Hotel. Since Harry
Railway Company distributes between ! graduated from a broncho-busting cs-
$55,000 and $65000 per months to its tablishment on the plains cast of ibe
employees Here is (be headquarters of I Rockies, he has become oue of the must
Superintendent D. Erickson, who man-! genial landlords in the Kootenays, and
ages 430 miles of line between the Koo- j while Fortune has been chary of her
tenay lakes and Medicine Hat, Alta. smiles he holds firmly to the belief that
One hundred and sixty-live trainmen | some day his efforts will be rewarded,
make the city their headquarters, Fifty ! Kimberly is in the heart of a rich min-
men are employed in ihe mechanical de- j ing country, where the Sullivan, North
partment, and the maintenance of way I Star and Stcmwindcr mines arc located,
department, tributary to Crarbrook, lias j besides sores of good prospects. A lit-
011 its payroll 600 more names. When! 'le below the town is the plant of the
D. C. Corbin's line, the Spokanc-1 titer- Kimberly Milling & Manufacturing
national, is in operation, and the lirst Company, which employs at thc mill
through freight between Si. Paul and j and two camps between 80 and too men.
the Falls City is scheduled to start on j C. Gaskill is manager,
the 25th, an additional number of men | Moyie.
will be concentrated here. 1» passing! At the St. Eugene mine I was inlet mc tell you what a prominent busi- j formed by Superintendent W. P. White
ness man had to say of the railroad boys that they were extracting from 13.000
of  Cranbrook:    "From   Superintendent | to   15,000 tons of galena ore a •iionth
If you are doing fires it is necessary
that you should count the gong beats
correctly before leaving the office for
the "scene of the conflagration." Nos.
321 and 132 are frequently several miles
apart. I know it. I have made the mistake myself.
Wben you write about a suicide, be
sure to say that "the unfortunate man"
committed the "rash act." There are a
few iconoclasts who deride this ancient
and picturesque style, but don't let them
influence you.
If a celebrity passes through your
town in his private car at 3 a. m., don't
waken him by throwing pebbles at the
windows of his sleeping compartment,
even if your editor has told you to get
an interview or lose your job. The celebrity might open the window and say
a few words, but they would be nothing
that your paper would care to print.
A clear knowledge of the value of
news is every reporter's most valuable
mental equipment. I think that old
Dave Hill's definition is the best one to
remember. He was the veteran, the
"old reporter" when I was the cub on
the Rochetser Post-Express. "If a dog
bites a man," he said, "it is worth a
stickful of type and a one-line head. If
the man is prominent, stretch it to half
a column and put it at the top of the
page. But if the man bites a dog, use
a scare head over a double-leaded story,
and print pictures both of the dog and
of the man. It's the unusual that counts
in a newspaper."
Interviewing requires some tact under any conditions. Don't ask the Prohibition candidate to "come out and
have something," until you have taken
all your notes. It might annoy him and
seriously interrupt his little talk.
Never open a jack-pot with a pair of
eights. This paragraph may have no
bearing on ideal journalism, but as I
am writing of newspaper making as I
have known it, it is very pertinent. It
cost me most all my week's pay once,
and if my warning saves some callow
gambler from a like experience, "I shall
Special   Bargains  to
Wind Up An Estate.
6y2 acres in the North
End, only 20 minutes walk
to Post Office, with southern aspect, $600 per acre,
5 acres is all cleared and in
high state of cultivation.
Seaview lots from $50 to
$100 each, chiefly cleared,
and ready for building on.
Easy terms if necessary.
The B. C. Land & Investment
Agency, Ltd.
Heal Estate, Financial and
Insurance Agents,
VICTORIA, B. C.
COAL
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo Collieries.
New Wellington Coal.
The best household coal in the market at ' I
current rates.   Anthracite coal for sale.'
34 Broad Street.
VICTORIA
Phone 647
!
Erickson down, the C. P. R. has centered here one of the finest body of men
anywhere in the employ of ils great
system. They take an active part in all
thai helps the upbuilding of lhe place,
whether in civic affairs or sport an J as
a class cannot be beaten."
Besides the railroad payroll, the linn-
herin;' industry Incited here adds a bi"
monthly sum. distributed in supplies and
wi'gcs, and the nearby mines contribute
not have written in vain."
hustling for recognition through the me- j    During your first six months on the
paper, don't threaten to resign unless
your salary is raised to suit your ideas
of your worth. Remember that you
dont' belong to a union, and that your
noble profession has had the S. R. 0.
sign out for some little time.
Don't refer to "when I was at college" more than eight times an hour.
Perhaps your editor is a self-made, vulgar man, that peddled the paper before
he edited it, and you might hurt bis
feelings.
Get confidential with the office boy as
soon as possible. You may depend that
he knows more about tbe "sheet" and
the "town" than any person on the paper.
Don't call the managing editor "Sam,"
even if his name does happen to be
Samuel. He may prefer some pet name
which is more familiar.
Don't tell each member of the staff
that you are superior to newspaper I
work, and are only making it a stepping-
stone to literature. Reporters are
rough, coarse, unappreciative sort of 1
people, and it might not make you popular with them.
Don't attempt  to show   the political j
writer that he has made a serious error |
in judgment in  an editorial,    Political
editors are frequently dogmatic and re-1
sent ful of harsh criticism.
British American
Trust Company,
Limited
OFFICES: Vancouver, ft. C.
% Grand Forks, B. C.
I Victoria, B. C.
\ . Transacts a General Financial and
\ Fiduciary Business. Acts as Exe-
i cutor, Administrator, Ttustee,etc.
I   Buys and Sells High Grade Invest-
I*  ment Securities.   Manages, buys,
sells, rents fltiH   nnfirnifipfi rpnl *»«-
sells, rents and appraises real estate. Collects Rents and Places
Insurance. Negotiates Loans on
Real E»tate. Makes Loans on
High Grade Securities.
Correspondence Solicited.
HAROLD M. DALY, Manager |
VICTORIA,   B. C.
and   reducing  from  J.500 to 2.600 tons
of concent rale.   Previous to the present
strike in the Crow's Nest Coal field the
I product was sent to the Trail and Nelson smelters, but at present it is going        _________^__^_^__
to St. Louis, Mo. To date there is \ Britain's BlcocTess Concmest.
nbout I'i'.'lu miles of itndenrrouncl devel- j Persia has been completely ematv-i-
opmenl' and the mine is being opened J patcd from tl"; protectorate of Russ:-.
nn at a rate nf 1.200 fct per month, and has fallen under the fmnrcH as
The monthly payroll at ibis mine aver- j well as ooliticnl influence of Gre-f Triages over $32,000, there being sonic 300   tain.—Pours?   Gaze'te,   S'..   Pdcrslvr;.
We Will
Buy
5,000 Denora Mines  $0.0814
10,000 White Bear 04
5,000 Diamond Vale  17
5.000 Five Metals   Offer
5 Great West Permanent.. 105.00
10,000 Cariboo-McKinney   04
WE WILL SELL
2.000 Rambler-Cariboo  $0.34
2,500 International Coal 64
5,000 Nicola Coal Mines 071'■
2,000 American Boy 031,:,
5,000 Canadian Gold Fields 08
16 Consolidated Smelters ...140.00
We recommend any of the above as
a good purchase at these low quotations.   Write for information today.
B.B. MIGHTON & CO.
Mining and Investment Brokers,
Drawer 1082. Nelson, B. C.
George Fraser
of Grand Forks
Begs   to   announce  to  the  readers  of
"The Week" that he has purchased
J. L. WHITE'S PHARfTACY
VICTORIA
And will be pleased to receive a continuance of the patronage.
THE PEOPLE'S
POPULAR PRESCRIPTION
PHARMACY.
From tha Semi-ready Style Book.
While the young men o j
Canada, quickly open to mod-l
em ideas, at once adopted the
Semi-ready system of tailoring,
the older and more conservative men soon became as
enthusiastic about it.
Why pay $30 for a wait-to-order]
suit when you can get the same J
material better tailored for J20?
You may see just how its looks]
made up before yon buy. ,*>.
Semi-ready Suits are finishes tol
measure in two hours after thel
order 19 booked. Every suit is]
fashioned to fit some particular]
physical type.
BSMl.RIADV WARDKUB*
B. Williams &C0.I
Sole Agents
68-70 Yates St,
Victoria
Use Bowes Antiseptic
TOOTH
PASTE
Whitens the teeth and purifies
the breath.
CYRUS H. BOWEi
98 Government St., near Yates St. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER io 1906.
n
j. i.
Notice is hereby given that thirty
ys after date I intend to apply to the
morable the Chief Commissioner of
rids and Works for a special license
cut and carry away timber from the
lowing described lands, situate in
last District in the Province of Brit-
1 Columbia, viz.: Starting at a post
irked "J. A. H." situate on the east
le of Finlayson Channel, about four
les from the south end of the channel,
:nce running east 120 chains, thence
nth 60 chains to the shore, thence
>ng shore to place of beginning.
Dated the nth day of October, 1906.
J. A. HUMBIRD,
By his agent, J. F. Marshall.
Notice is hereby given that thirty
ys after date I intend to apply to the
morable the Chief Commissioner of
nds and Works for a special license
cut and carry away timber from the
lowing described lands, situate in
ast District in the Province of Brit-
> Columbia, viz.: Starting at a post
irked "J. A. H.," at the northwest
rner of lot number one (i), thence
ining north 80 chains, thence east 4°
lins, thence north 40 chains, thence
st 80 chains to shore, thence along
)re to place of beginning.
Dated the nth day of October, 1906.
J. A. HUMBIRD,
By his agent, J. F. Marshall.
1. 3..
Notice is hereby given that thirty
ys after date I intend to apply to the
morable the Chief Commissioner of
nds and Works for a special license
cut and carry away timber from the
lowing described lands, situate in
ast District in the Province of Brit-
i Columbia, viz.: Starting at a post
irked "J. A. H.," on Finlayson Chan-
I, about one mile south of Mary's
ve, thence running east 80 chains,
:nce south 120 chains to shore, thence
ing shore to place of beginning.
Dated the nth day of October, 1906.
J. A. HUMBIRD,
By his agent, J. F. Marshall.
1. 4.
Notice is hereby given that thirty
ys after date I intend to apply to the
morable the Chief Commissioner of
nds and Works for a special license
cut and carry away timber from the
lowing described lands, situate in
ast District in the Province of Brit-
Columbia, viz.: Starting at a post
irked "J. A. H.," on Mary's Cove,
ilayson Channel, thence running east
chains, thence south 80 chains, thence
st 60 cnains to shore, thence along
ire to place of beginning.
Dated the 12th day of October, 1906.
J. A. HUMBIRD,
By his agent, J. F. Marshall.
>■ 5'
Notice is hereby given that thirty
ys after date I intend to apply to the
morable the Chief Commissioner of
nds and Works for a special license
cut and carry away timber from the
lowing described lands, situate in
ast District in the Province of Brit-
Columbia, viz.: Starting at a post
.rked "J. A. H.," at the northwest
•ner of lot number four (4), thence
ining east 40 chains, thence north 60
lins, thence west 100 chains to shore,
mce along shore to place of com-
ncement.
Dated this 12th day of October, 1906.
J. A. HUMBIRD,
By his agent, J. F. Marshall.
Notice is hereby given that thirty
is after date I intend to apply to the
morable the Chief Commissioner of
nds and Works for a special license
cut and carry away timber from the
lowing described lands, situate in
ast District in the Province of Brit-
Columbia, viz.: Starting at a post
rked "J. A. H.," on Finlayson Chan-
, two miles north of Mary's Cove,
nee running east 40 chains, thence
!th 160 chains, tbence west to shore
, chains, thence along shore to place
beginning.
)ated this 12th day of October, 1906.
1 J. A. HUMBIRD,
By his agent, J. F. Marshall.
1. 7.
jiotice   is  hereby  given   that   thirty
fs after date I intend to apply to the
norable the Chief Commissioner of
kds and Works for a special license
cut and carry away timber from the
Dwing   described   lands,   situate   in
t District in the Province of Brit-
Columbia, viz.:   Starting at a post
•ked "J.  A. H.," on  Watson Bight,
ayson    Channel,    thence    running
h 60 chains, thence west 120 chains
bore, thence along shore to place of
inning.
>ated this 13th day of October, 190S.
j. a. HUMBIRD,
By his agent, J. F. Marshall.
oticr is hereby given that thirty
i after riate I intend to apply to the
lorable the Chief Commissioner of
1s and Works for a special license
ut and carry away timber from the
wing describe l lands, situate in
;t District in the Province of Brit-
Cohimbia, viz.: Starting at a post
ked "J. A. H-," at the northeast
er of lot number seven (7}, thence
'ing south 4 ochains thence cast
chains,  thence norih 40 chains to
shore, thence along shore to place of he-
ginning.
Dated the 13th day of October, 1906.
J. A. HUMBIRD,
By his agent, J. F. Marshall.
Mo. 9.
Notice is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands, situate in
Coast District in the Province of British Columbia, viz.: Starting at a post
marked J. A. H.," on Goat Cove, Finlayson Channel, thence running south
40 chains, thence west 120 chains, thence
north to shore, thence along shore to
place of beginning.
Dated the 13th day of October, 1906.
J. A. HUMBIRD,
By his agent, J. F. Marshall.
No. 10.
Notice is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands, situate in
Coast District in the Province of British Columbia, viz.: Starting at a post
marked "J. A. H.," at the head of lagoon, Goat Cove, Finlayson Channel,
thence running east 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence south to shore of lagoon, thence
along shore to place of beginning.
Dated the 14th day of October, 1906.
J. A. HUMPIRD,
By his agent, J. F. Marshall.
No. n.
Notice is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands, situate in
Coast District in the Province of British Columbia, viz.: Starting at a post
marked "J. A. H.," at the head of lagoon, Goat Cove, Finlayson Channel,
thence running north 80 chains, thence
west 120 chains, thence south to shore,
thence along shore to place of beginning.
Dated the 14th day of October, 1906.
J. A. HUMBIRD,
By his agent, J. F. Marshall.
No. 12.
Notice is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands, situate in
Coast District in the Province of British Columbia, viz.: Starting at a post
marked "J- A. H.," about four miles
northerly from the north end of Finlayson Channel, thence running west 80
chains, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains to shore, thence along
shore to place of beginning.
Dated the 14th day of October, 1906.
J. A. HUMBIRD,
By his agent, J. F. Marshall.
No. 13.
Notice is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands, situate in
Coast District in the Province of British Columbia, viz.: Startintr at a post
marked "J. A. H.," on Hickish Narrows, Finlayson Channel, thence running south 80 chains, thence east 120
chains ,thence north to shore of Narrows, thence along shore to place of beginning.
Dated the 14th day of October, 1906.
J. A. HUMBIRD,
By his agent, J. F. Marshall.
No. 14.
Notice is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands, situate in
Coast District in tbe Province of British Columbia, viz.: Starting at a post
marked "J. A. H.," at the northwest
corner of lot number thirteen (13).
thence running south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to place of beginning.
Dated the 14th day of October, 1006.
J. A. HUMBTRD,
By bis agent. J. F, Marshall.
NOTICE Is hereby given that 30 days
nfter date I .Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands nnd Works
for n speclnl licence to cut nnd entry away
timber from the following described lnnd,
situated ln New Westminster District:
Commencing frem a post on tbe enst shore
of the large kke, northern end of Sechelt
Peninsula; tbence north 160 cbalns; enst
40 ehnlns; south 160 ehnlns, more or less,
to shore, tbence following shore to point
of commencement.
M.  GREEN.
Sept. 17th, 1006.
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt 00 dnys
after dnte I intend to npply to tbe Chief
Commissioner of Lnnds nnd Works for permission to purchase the following described lands situate ln the Kltsnm Ktiluiii
Vnlley, Range V. Const District: Commencing nt n stnke planted nt the N. E,
corner of .Lis. Adams' purchnse clnim,
mnrked N. T. C. No. 1 Initlnl Post; tbence
10 chains west; tbence 40 ehnlns north;
thenee 40 cbnlns enst; tbence 40 ehnlns
south to point of commencement nnd containing 160 ncres more or less.
N.  T.  CUNNINGHAM, Loentor.
F. W. BOHLER, Agent.
Loented  October  1st,   1900.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a lease of the
foreshore abutting the entire Pacheena
Indian Reserve, lot two (2), Renfrew
District, which said foreshore includes
the islands belonging to the said reserve: Commencing at a post marked
"A. Young, Southeast Corner," placed
on the foreshore at the southwest corner of the said Pacheena Indian Reserve, thence running north along the
entire reservation.
Victoria, B. C, 30th day of October,
1006.
ALEXANDER YOUNG.
Notice is hereby given that sixty days
.ifter date I intende to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, situated in
range 5, Skeena River district, about
one mile from Little Canyon, commencing at a post planted on the southeast
corner, marked "R. Braun," thence running west 80 chains to Turner's southeast corner, thence north 40 chains to
Frank's northeast corner, thence east
40 chains, thence north 40 chains to
Johnson's southeast corner, thence east
40 chains, thence south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing 480
acres (more or less).
Located September 1st, 1906.
R. BRAUN.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, situated in
range 5, Skeena River district, about
one miles from Little Canyon, commencing at a post planted on the southeast
corner, marked "R. Braun," thence running west 80 chains to Turner's southeast corner, thence north 40 chains to
Frank's southeast corner, thence east
40 chains, thence north 40 chains to
Johnson's southeast corner, thence east
40 chains, thence south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing 80
acres (more or less).
Located September ist, 1906.
R. BRAUN.
of Mayne Island and situate about SO
chains 'to the southeastward of the northeast corner of section nine, Mayne Island,
and containing about 16 acres.
Dated this 19th day of September, 1906.
GEORGE GEORGESON.
NOTICE Is hereby given that 60 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works,
for permission to purchase the following
land near Kaien Island, In Skeent district:
Commencing at a stake planted at
southeast corner of Jot 646, marked
"W. C's. corner;" thence east 40 chains;
thence south about 65 chains to W. Mc-
Kenzle's north boundary; thence west 20
chains to A. G. H. Pott's east boundary;
thence north about 30 chains to A. G. H.
Pott's northeast corner; thence west along
said boundary 20 chains to east line of
lot 646A; thence north 20 chains to point
of commencement, containing' 140 acres
more or less.
WILLIAM   COPELAND.
NOTICE Is hereby given that 60 days
from date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to purchase tbe following described
land, adjoining Lot 646, Skeena District:
Commencing nt a post marked "A C.'s N.
W. Corner"; thence east 40 chains along
south boundary of T. Flewln's claim; thence
south 40 chains; thenee west 40 chains;
thence north 40 chnins, along east boundary
of Lot 646 to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
ANNIE COPELAND.
IMPORTANT
AUCTION
SALE
OF
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply lo the
Chief Commissioner of Land and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land: Commencing
at a post planted on the left bank of
Skeena River, about 31/., miles above
the Lakelse River, and joining John
Neidhart's northeast corner, and marked
"L. W. S.'s Northwest Corner," and
running south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains, more or
less, to left bank of Skeena River;
thence westwardly along Skeena River
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres, more or less.
L. W. SLOAN, Locator.
J. E. BATEMAN, Agenl.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apnlv to the
Chief Commissioner of Land and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land: Commencing
at a post planted on the left bank of
Skeena River, about four miles above
Lakelse River, adjoining L. W.' northwest corner, and marked "N. M. J.s' N.
W. Corner," thence running south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres, more or less.
N. M. JOSEPH, Locator.
J. E. BATEMAN, Agent.
Notice is hereby given that sixty days
after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described lands, Range V.,
Skeena River District, about 1 mile
from the Little Canyon.
Commencing at a post planted on the
South-west comer, marked A. 0. Cunningham's S. W Corner, thence North
40 (forty) chains( thence East 40
(forty) chains, thence South 40 (forty!
chains to Little's Southwest corner,
thence West 40 (forty) chains, to point
of commencement, and containing 160
(one hundred and sixty) acres more or
less.
Located  October   1st.  loort.
A. C. CUNNINGHAM. Locator.
S. C. WEEKS, Agent.
NOTICE Is hereby given that 30 days
nfter date I Intend to npply to the Hoi.
Chief Commissioner of Lnnds and Works
for a special licence to cut and carry nwny
timber from the following described lands
on Observatory Inlet, Cassiar District, B.
C: Starting nt n post marked southwest
corner, located opposite the Northern Pacific
Cannery Co; running enst 120 ehnlns; iitrth
SO chains; west 00 ehnlns to shore of bny;
southwest along shore to point of commencement.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TIE AND TIMBER
CO.,   LTD.
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days
after date I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Land and Works
for a licence to cnt and carry away timber
from the following described lands situated
In Renfrew District:
No. 6. Commencing at a post 20 chains
"ast of the first fork of Dnhah creek, nbout
t mile from salt water; thence B. 40 chains;
S. 160 chains; W. 40 chains; N. 160 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 7. Commencing at southeast corner
of No. 6 claim on Dubah creek; thence
east 160 chains; N. 40 chains; W. 160
"hains; S. 40 chains to point of commencement,
No. 8. Commencing at a post planted
about 20 chains N. of the N. B. corner of
No. 7 claim, on the north side of Dubah
creek; thence W. 80 chains; N. 80 chains;
B. 80 chains; S. 80 cbalns to point of commencement.
No. 9. Commencing at a post at the
south end of .Batadat Lake, about half
mile S. B. of Nltlnat Lake; thence E. 80
chains; S. 80 ehnlns; W. 80 chnins; N. 80
chains to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
JOHN McSHANE,
Agent.
Provincial
Government
Lands
To be held in the
NOTICE is hereby given thnt 60 days
after dote I intend to npply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to purchase the following described
land situated In the Kltsumkalum Valley,
Range 5, Coast District: Commencing at
a stake planted at the N. E. corner of N.
T. Cunningham purchase claim, marked)
W. A. Wadhams' No. 1 Initial Post; thence
running 40 ohains west; tbence 40 chains
north; thence 40 chains east; thenee 40
chains south to post of eomimenieement,
containing 160 aeres more or less.
W. A. WADHAMS,  Loentor.
F. W. BOHLER, Agent.
Located  October  1st,   1906.
NOTICE Is hereby given tliat 60 days
after date I Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to purchase the following described
land sltunted in the Kltsumkalum Vnlley,
Rnnge 5, Coast District: Commencing nt
a stnke planted at the N. E. corner of
W. A. WndJiams' purchnse claim, marked L.
Gune No. 1 Initlnl Post; thence running
40 chains west; thence 40 chains north;
thenee 40 chnins east; thence 40 chains
south to post of commencement, containing
160 acres more or less.
L.  GUNE,   Locator.
F. W. BOHLER, Agent.
Located  October  1st.   11)06.
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt two months
after dnte I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special licence to cut and carry away
timber from the following described lands,
commencing nt a post plnnted about three
fourths of a mile west of the Elk river,
thence north 80 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence soutb 40 chains, thence west
40 chnins, thenee south 40 chains, thence
enst 40 chains, thence south 40 chains,
thence east along the beach of Kennedy
lake, thence north to point of commencement, containing 640 ncres, more er less.
M  J   IIAi'OKN.
Sept. 1st,   1906.
NOTICE Is hereby given that sixty days
nfter date I Intend to npply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands nnd Works for permission to purchnse the following described
lnnd, starting from a post planted on the
smith line of lot 109. nt the hend of Union
Bny, tbence 40 cbnlns enst, tbence 40 chains
south, thence 40 chains west to shore
line, tlicncc northerly along shore
line of Union Bay to point of commencement,  containing 100 acres more or less.
Staked September 4th,  1006.
JOHN   fi.   JOHNSTON.
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days
after date I Intend to npply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands nnd Works
for a special licence to cut nnd carry nway
timber from the following described lands
In rear of G. McKay's west license on
Alice Arm, Cassiar District, B. C.i Starting at a post marked southwest corner,
running nortli 40 chains; enst 160 chnins;
south 40 chains; west 160 chains to point
of commencement.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TIE AND TIMBER
CO..   LTD.
NOTICE Is hereby given Hint 60 (lays
nfter dnte I Intend to apply to thc Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lnnds and Works
for permission to purchase the following
described land:
A small tiniinnied Island outside the S.E.
corner of Campbell bay, off the east coast
NOTICE Is hereby given that two months
nfter dnte I intend to npply to tbe Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd Works
for n special licence to cut nnd enrry nwny
timber from the following described lands,
commencing nt a post planted at the southwest corner of Lot 313. Deer ereek, Clayo-
(|tiot, thenee east 40 chains, thenee south
40 chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thenee west 80 chains,
thenee northerly along the beach to point
of commencement, containing 610 acres,
more or less.
M. .1. HADQKN.
August 28th, 1906.
NOTItE Is hereby given that sixty dnys
from dnte I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd Works
for permission to purchase the following
described land, situated In Rnnge 5, Skeenn
Itiver District, about one and one half
miles from Little Cnnyon, commencing nt
a post mnrked West N, E. Corner nnd K.
Braun S. E. Comer, thence 80 cbnlns west
to Schilling's S. E. Corner, thenee north 40
chains, thence cast ,80 ehnlns, thence south
40 chains to point nf commencement, eontnlulng 320 aeres more or less.
Located Sept, 3rd, 1000.
K.  BRAUN,
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt 60 days
from date I Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission t<> purchase the following described
land, adjoining Lot 846, Skeena Distriot:
Commencing at n post marked "A. C.'s N.
W. Oorner"; thenee east 40 chains along
south boundary ofT. Flewln's claim; thence
south 40 chains; thenee west 40 chains;
thenee north 40 chains, along cast boundary of Lot 0-10 to point of commencement,
containing 160 acres, more or less,
ANNIE COPELAND.
City of Vancouver
On
NOVEMBER 20,
1906
And Following Days.
In the'snle will be included
WATER FRONT
LOTS
and two to three acre parcels in
DISTRICT LOT 540
South Vancouver, generally known as
the
POINT GRAY  RESERVE
the choicest residential section of Vancouver West.   Also about
300 LOTS IN
DISTRICT LOT 54o
City of Vancouver, being the choicest
residential lots situated in the locality known us Kitsilano.
Also about
250 ACRES IN LOT 2027
South Vancouver, divided   into   ire
and ten acre parcels, all choice lots
suitable for settlers.   Also about
140 Lots and 350 Acres
in the
HASTINGS TOWNSITE
adjacent to the B.C. Electric Railway
and the Great Northern Line
Also about
2,000 Acres in
NORTH VANCOUVER
In the vicinity of Capilano Ocek.
For maps,   catalogues   and further
particulars apply to
The Auctioneers,
John S. Rankin, 514 Pender SI.
Arthur J. Ford, 747 Pender St.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt 00 dnys
after date I Intend to npply to the lion.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following
described land, situated In the Coast District, Range ,*>: Beginning at a post plant-
til on the north bank of the Skeena river
about one mile southwest of Zymqetltsi
river at the southeast corner of ,1. B. Bate
man's pre-emption claim nml marked IS. B.'s
Northeast Corner; Ihence running west 120
chains; thence south about no chains, more
or less, to bank of Skeenn river; Ihence In
a northeasterly direction following meandering of tlle Skeena river to post of com-
niencenient, containing about 820- ncres of
land  more or  less.
EMMA  BATEMAN.
J. E. BATEMAN, Agent.
Located September 2oth, 1900. 12
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER io, 1906.
itfyifi?^^ if%?itfyti?tyi?
I riusic and J
%   The Drama. I
Events of the Coming Week.
Monday and all the week—The society drama, "Americans Abroad," at the
Empress Theatre. |
Tuesday—Chrysanthemum show in
the Carnegie library in aid of the Protestant Orphans' Home—Miss Jessie
Maclachlan at the Victoria Theatre.
Wednesday—"Arizona" at the Victor-!
ia  Theatre—Chrysanthemum   show   at
Carnegie library.
Thursday—The Marriage of Kitty";
at the Victoria Theatre.—Concert and
annual sale for the benefit of St. James'
Church  in  the  schoolroom  of  Christ
Church Cathedral.
Friday—Robert Edeson in "Strong-
heart" at the Victoria Theatre.
Every day next week, first class vaudeville performance at the New Grand
Theatre.
On Monday night the old favourite
''Under Southern Skies" was put on at
the Victoria Theatre. This is not a
high class play, nor does it make great
demands either upon tbe capabilities of
the actors, or upon the intelligence of
the audience. There is a dash of southern colour both in the real and the figurative sense, but it is rarely a success
when white people attempt to play negro
parts, nor is the Northerner always happy in his reproduction of the Southern
drawl. Still, making allowance for
these deficiencies the show seemed to
please a fairly large audience, and at any
rate earned the continuous applause of
the gallery.
ious   Lord   Deverell,"   a   fascinating
drama of English life.
On Wednesday next that breezy western play "Arizona" will be seen at the
Victoria Theatre. Of its type it is easily the best now before the public, and
the company billed can be counted on
for a clever all-round performance.
In the sparkling comedy "The Marriage of Kitty," which Jules Murry
promises to produce at Victoria Theatre
on Thursday, November 15th, the heroine marries a millionaire to assist him
with his fortune (which comes to him
by the death of an uncle) and is to relinquish all claim upon him at the end
of a year in order that he may then
marry the woman of his choice. The
marriage takes place and the little wife
settles down to her wearvy vigil—waiting for the time to come when she can
take her rightful place in the world and
liberate her husband to marry the one
woman of his heart. A year has passed
and Sir Reginald, the husband, comes
suddenly upon the scene of his wife's
cozy home on the Lake of Geneva. He
has been pretty well disillusioned of his
former love and is in a particularly happy frame of mind to be on with any new
love that strikes his fancy. He funds
his wife all that any woman could be—
pretty, well dressed, charming, sympathetic and best of all, exceedingly lovable.   They both capitulate at first sight.
On Wednesday night Manager Ricketts offered a first class company in "The
Sign of the Cross." The staging was
excellent and all the actors capable.
James Gordon as Marcus Superbus was
exceptionally good; Harry Morton as
Nero also did credit to himself. In the
part of Dacia Miss Katherine Naefz,
most of her, was seen to advantage. It
is impossible for an old playgoer to see
"The Sign of the Cross" without recalling the magnificent performance of Wilson Barrett and his original company at
the Princess, London. It is essentially
a spectacular play, and one extremely
difficult to render adequately, and even
fair representation is a matter for congratulation. The performance at the
Victoria Theatre can at least be classed
as something better than fair.
There has been a good show at tbe
Me* Grand this week; above the aver'-'
age, as the turns are all well balanced.
Prof. Clarke demonstrates the truth of
the theory that kindness only is necessary to train animals to perform tricks,
and his "chorus" of cats, dogs and monkeys give an entertainment which is well
nigh unique. Go and see "The Man of
Mystery." Frederick Palmer is well
worth a visit; not only is he a clever
conjurer, but also a clever writer. For
many years Mr. Palmer followed the
profession of the quill, and when he forsook it to become a shining light on the
vudeville stage, he still kept up his literary ambitions by contributing verse and
stories to the press. The best of his
tricks are the handkerchief, and the billiard ball juggling, and he possessess
withal that great requisite of a stage
magician, a "gift of the gab." The
comedy sketch is most laughable, and
is certainly one of thc best which has
visited Victoria during tbe past few
months. The Banta Brothers put up a
mandolin act, but the best feature of
their turn is the solo by one of the
brothers, on the subject of tbe ever
present Wabash, which follows us from
the wedding to the grave. Fred Roberts
sings "Dear Old Dixie" with excellent
pictures, and the moving pictures depict
the bliss attendant on a iournay to the
stars.
"The Private Secretary" was the feature of the Empress Theatre during the
first three days of the week. This well
known comedy attracted good houses,
and the antics of the unique Hooley as
the Rev. Spalding elicited roars of genuine laughter. The "Private Secretary"
is* not a play which allows the gentle
sex much opportunity to excel, but in
tbe second half of the week, Miss Knat-
vold achieved a success in "The Myster-
tle and inspired to give the public the
best that is in her. For the concert here
on Tuesday evening next at lhe Victoria
Theatre, a programme has been arranged which, although ittrjreiy Scottish
in its character, contains a sufficient
number of the works of notable composers of other lands to strongly appeal
to music-lovers generally. I" her programme, which is given lulow, the star
and prima donna, Miss Maclachlan, has
the support of Mr. Douglas Young, the
famous lyric tenor of Aberdeen. Mr.
John McLinden, one of the rising master 'cellists of the present day, and Mr.
Murray Graham, the celebrated Glasgow pianist. Mr. Robert Buchanan,
who has previously accompanied Miss
Maclachlan on Canadian tours, on this
occasion comes with her as director of
her concert forces.
Special 10-cent children's matinee on
Saturday afternoon with Prof. Clark's
dog, cat and monkey minstrels and balance of week's programme.
MOMUS.
Robert Edeson finds that even the tremendous mental and physical force essential to the interpretation of his role
in "Strongheart" is not sufficient to give
outlet to the energy and vitality of the
strong man, so during his season in
"Strongheart" he is rehearsing wherever
it is possible several plays which will
in future form part of a repertoire, the
principal one being Hauptmann's "El-
ga." "1 witnessed a splendid production of this drama at the Lessing Theatre in Germany two years ago," says the
actor, "and was so impressed that I
made arrangements to put it on in
America. Of course it differs very radically from the plays I have previously
done and is more or less a venture so
far as its reception by the public is concerned. It is like all Hauptmann plays
in that it has a social as well as philosophical problem back of it. Used only
as one of a repertoire I have confidence
in its success." While Mr. Edeson has
in view a new play for next season it is
probable that for a part of the year he
will appear in some of the larger cities
in this contemplated repertoire. Robert
Edeson will be seen at the Victoria Theatre on Friday, November 16th. He
made his first great success with Miss
Maude Adams in "The Little Minister."
There are two standards by which
grPat singers are measured by the public. Quite commonly the possession of
a large and tuneful voice, together with
that finished technique that is only obtained through schooling under the best
of masters, arc taken hy the critical public as making tbe great singer. Hut
beyond both voice and technique, to
qualify as a true artist in fhe realm of
song, it is also imperative that the singer shall possess that indefinite quality
known as temperament—by which the
music of the masters is intelligently in-
| tcrpreted and the poetry and message of
the great composers made plain to the
masses of the public. The singer who
has temperament, alone is able to command the hearts of the people. Such a
singer was Jenny Lind, or Patti, in the
days of their glory. Such a singer today is Jessie Maclachlan. who, in addition to magnificent vocal endowment,
possesses that passionate love for the
melodies of her country, and its poetry
set to music, that she might almost be
termed the laureat of tiie Scottish song
world. Miss Maclachlan, who is now
nl the climax of her vocal power and
of her fame, is now rnnki.ig a farewell
world tour, in lhe course of which it bas
been found possible to arrange dates for
this city, as a result of which a grand
concert will be given under the auspices of the St. Andrews and Caledonian Society, on Tuesday next, at lhe
Victoria Theatre. Although there is
sufficient magnetism in fhe name of Jessie Maclachlan to attract the sons of
Scotland everywhere she goes, her man-
aginenl provides much more than the
prima donna on thc present notable
tour. There are, indeed, three others
in her support of so high quality that
the star is continually put upon her nicl-
Wednesday, November 14th.
America's Greatest Play,
Arizona
By Augustus Thomas.
SAME GREAT COMPANY
One year each in New York, Chicago,
and London, Eng.
Grand Production Complete.
Prices—$1.50, $1.00, 75c, 50c, 25c.
THUHSDAY, NOV. 15th.
JULES MURRY'S COMEDY CO.
Headed by Miss Florence Gear in
The Marriage of Kitty
The biggest comedy hit of the past two
seasons. This year funnier than ever
before.
Prices—$1.00, 75c, 50c, 25c.
Box office opens 10 a.  m.  Tuesday,
November 13.
FRIDAY, NOV. 16.
First apearance here
ROBERT EDESON
In the greatest  dramatic attraction of
the new century,
Strongheart
j   Box office opens 10 a. m. Wednesday,
November 14.
Prices—$2.00, $1.50, $1.00, 75c and 50c.
,
ANNOUNCEMENT
Having acquired tbe HOTEL DAVIES,
Yates Street, Victoria, which includes the
well knoton POODLE DOG CAFE, I solicit a continuance of your patronage. Theatre parties, banquets, etc., catered for and
satisfaction guaranteed.
w. s. a SMITH,
Proprietor.
B. Altman & Go.
FIFTH AVENUE
THIRTY-FOURTH AND THIRTY-FIFTH STREETS
NEW YORK
ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THAT THEY ARE NOW ESTABLISHED   IN THEIR   NEW  BUILDING, WITH  SELECT
STOCKS OF AUTUMN MERCHANDISE.
»
CATALOGUE UPON REQUEST.
NO BRANCH ESTABLISHMENTS.
ARE MAINTAINED IN SAN FRANCISCO OR ELSEWHERE
NATIVE GROWN
HOLLY SEEDS
Prices from 25 cents to $5.00, according
to size. Write for seed and tree catalog.
JAY & CO.
VICTORIA. B. C.
EMPRESS
THEATRE
H. M. OWENS. Leasee and Manager.
William T. Brady's great society drama,
Americans Abroad
Will be played at the above theatre every day during the coming week.
This play ran for three seasons at Tbe
Academy of Music, New York.
Prices—ioc, 20c and  30c.    Matinees
Wednesday and Saturday.
Week November 12
The New
Grand
SULLIVAN « CONSIDINE,    Proprietor*.
Management of ROBT. JAMIESON.
MADDOX and WELVIN
Comedy Sketch
ARTHUR KHERNS
German Comedian
HAROLD KELLY CO.
In the One-act Comedy, "The Thoroughbred"
TWO-LA RENOS-TWO
Acrobats, Ring and Wire Artists
FREDERIC ROBERTS
Illustrated Song
"While the Old Mill Wheel Is Turning"
NEW MOVING PICTURES
PROF. M. NAGEL'S ORCHESTRA
f
START
TONIGHT
THERE is nothing like independence.
We will start you on the right road tonight between 7 to 9 p. m. Deposit a portion of your week's wages in our Savings
Department, where interest is compounded
quarterly.   Start to-night.
The Northern Bank
VICTORIA BRANCH
GODFREY BOOTH
Manager.
Genius
has been defined as the "art of
taking pains." This aptly illustrates the methods we employ to achieve the results we
secure.
Could you know the painstaking care we devote to the
production of every suit or
overcoat that leaves our premises, 'twould be easy for you
to understand our unique position in the tailoring world.
Peden's
TAILORINI PARLORS
31   FORT   STREET
8
BRITISH COLUMBIA
AND ALASKAN
INDIAN
CURIOS
ANTIQUE   BRASS
COPPER
AND PEWTER.
Also Brass Shell Cases from departec
British Navy. Useful as cut flower
stands and jardinieres; also for umbrel'
la stands. j
H. STADTHAGAIN
THE INDIAN TRADER,       I
79 Johnson Street, Victoria.       j
(Mail  orders  solicited.)

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