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Week Apr 2, 1910

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Array Let us show you the new 3
Pocket Edition
Gillette Safety Razor
TERRY CASH CHEMIST
S.E. coiner Fort an J Douglas
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The Week
A British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria, B. 6.
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HALL & WALKER   J
Agents 3
WELLIN6T0N   COLLIERV 2
COMPANY'S COAL 3
je  1232 Government St. Telephone 88  «J
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VOL. VII.    No.  9
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 2, 191°
One Dollar Per Annum
JDGE LAMPMAN'S COMMISSION
It used not to be considered good form,
■ in accordance with the recognized ethics
' journalism, to comment on a case while
is ' sub judice." The Colonist and the
imes have broken through this whole-
ime rule during the present week, pre-
imably, because their hyper-sensitive
litors could not allow the opportunity to
ip without working in a little homiletic.
he Week will not follow suit, and will
iserve any comment on the evidence until
c case is concluded. It, however, ven-
res with proper humility to point out
at if nothing more is elicited than what
f's already been established in the exploit-
; of the "white slave" traffic by con-
enceless individuals, the appointment of
Commission is more than justified and
11 undoubtedly be followed by some salu-
ry act.   It is refreshing to be reminded
such a juncture that we have in our
Jidst one journal, the editor of which is
■Jt as other men.   He never makes mis-
kes; he never bases an editorial on mere
|mour; he never assumes the role of the
aarisee, or for one moment imagines that
I he pursues his daily avocation, his ven-
able head is surrounded by a halo.   And
|t it must be, since a halo is the dis-
aishing   badge   of   the   immaculate,
leanwhile, he endeavours to justify his
]um to the title by applying the phrase
Tague charges" to matters which are still
|ider investigation, as an illustration of
lat he considers the best type of modern
lftralisfti.   To say. the least of - it, if the
|itor -©1 the Colonist knew the source
om which the "vague charges" eman-
ed, he would either moderate the asper-
of his homiletic or discard the halo.
[POOR EXCUSE
Mr. W. L. Adams, the alien hydraulic
jigineer, who has saddled the ratepayers
Victoria with so many defective works,
which Smith's Hill Reservoir is the
lost conspicuous, has demonstrated by a
Itter to the Times that he is much better
iquainted with yellow journalism than
ith engineering. The Week ventures to
ink that, as a manifesto from a response professional man this is unique, since
evades all the points at issue, indulges
vituperation, and winds up by making
^rsonal charges and imputing bad faith,
■ worse, to his critics. What is the actual
jsition? Mr. Adams was engaged as an
ligineering expert. He has received from
ie City some $6,000 for professional fees,
fhose ever fault it may be, he has be-
leathed to the City a leaky reservoir, a
aky tank and a set of very expensive
imps which have never yet, and The
reek is credibly informed, never will
ark up to the specifications. With re-
>ect to the Reservoir Mr. Adams, after
aking a special inspection in order to
icertain its defects, stated that it would
i all right if a smear of cement were
iubed over it, to close the sun-cracks.
Ihis was done at a cost of $360, which
ight as well have been tossed into the sea.
icidentally, what must be thought of an
igineer who made such a statement and
rected such an expenditure? Subse-
lently, it was found impossible to fill the
eservoir to a greater depth than eight or
ne feet, and at this stage it leaked to the
tent of 160,000 gallons a day. The
ty is now face to face with an estimated
penditure of $30,000 to make the Re
servoir hold water. The Council has given
Mr. Adams an opportunity to come and
make a further • inspection, and offer any
explanation he sees fit to account for existing conditions on Smith's Hill. He has
refused to come, and, instead, has written
the letter referred to. In it he starts out
by skilfully advertising his professional
engagements, in order to show that, in
spite of the failure he has registered in
Victoria, there are still corporations willing to take the risk of employing him. He
places all the structural defects on "careless workmen," and "divided responsibility." He shows that he has read the
criticism of The Week, because he incidentally refers to the prophecy in its
columns that if the Reservoir were filled
it would slide off the hill, and he also notes
the fact that doubt was thrown upon the
skill of the engineer who designed. But
his answer to the specific charges of ignorance on his own part is simply to evade
any direct reply and to allege that all this
is "inflammatory stuff that self-respecting
sheets would not publish." What about
the self-respect of a professional man who
does not think it worth while to spend a
hundred dollars to come to Victoria and
defend his reputation? The conclusion
of the whole matter, so far as Mr. Adams
is concerned, is that all his critics, were
inspired, if not actually paid, by the Esquimalt Waterworks Company, a suggestion which is as false as it'is ridiculous.
It is difficult to see what the Esquimalt
Waterworks Company had to do with the
leaky reservoir on Smith's1 Hill, unless
they bribed the engineer who made defective plans and specifications^ the'foremen
who superintended the work and the
labourers who mixed bad concrete. Does
Mr. Adams subscribe to this wholesale
method of corruption ? If not, he is still
on the. horns of a dilemma, for it cannot
be denied that the Reservoir does leak,
that there was bad workmanship, poor
supervision, and a defective specification.
Mr. Adams seems to have misconceived his
own position in the matter, which is that
of a paid servant of the ratepayers, who
is in honour bound to explain why, having been paid for "bread" he has delivered
"a stone," and on being asked for an explanation has evaded every point raised,
and taken refuge in denunciation of his
critics, and the cheapest kind of clap-trap
about the Anglo-Saxon and the Latin races.
The only wonder is not that a "self-respecting" paper would publish the legitimate
complaints of ratepayers whose money Mr.
Adams had wasted, but that a self-respecting paper would publish his illogical, ungrammatical and abusive reply.
THE COST OF LIVING
A good deal has been said lately about
the cost of living. The subject has received attention all through the United
States and Canada. The Colonist has
published many articles and a mass of statistics, bearing on the subject, but having
been taken to task by some one who professes to see a "knock" for Victoria, hastens to say that it had no intention of
representing that the cost of living in this
city is high. The Week takes a different
standpoint and is prepared, not only to
aver but to prove, that at the present moment the cost of living in Victoria is
higher than in any other city in Canada,
ancl is only exceeded by very few in the
States. A few weeks ago the Colonist
published a comparative statement of the
cost of standard commodities in a large
number of cities. A careful analysis of
these shows that Victoria is absolutely the
highest. But it hardly needed such a compilation to convince a Victorian on the subject. Having travelled considerably of
late, the writer has made a point of comparing prices in a number of Canadian
cities and is satisfied that the figures published by the Colonist rather understated,
than otherwise, the excessive cost of commodities in Victoria. Even in Vancouver
everything is a little cheaper than here;
yet there is no reason why it should be
so. The Victoria wholesale merchants enjoy the same through freight rates as their
competitors in Vancouver. This governs
the cost of all importations from the East,
and from manufacturing centres, and applies to furniture, clothing and provisions
generally. In addition Victoria is far
more favourably situated with respect to
agricultural produce, having a large, fertile, productive hinterland; yet fruit,
vegetables and the products of the garden
are always dearer on the Island than on
the Mainland. Rents are now approximating to the Vancouver figure, although the
available area is so much more restricted
at the Terminal City, and the population
of Victoria is only about one-third. Five
years ago rents in Victoria were less than
half what they are today. Domestic service, which then ranged from $15 to $20
a month, now ranges from $30 to $50.
Fuel is at least twice as dear. The same
is true of "garden truck." Even fish,
with which our waters teem, has shared
inordinately in the advance. There must
be some explanation beyond the mere appreciation which is due to a condition of
genera] prosperity and higher prices.
There is little doubt that the increased cost
of the necessaries of life is mainly due
to the very effective introduction of the
American Trust or Combine system, which
fixes the price of articles arbitrarily and
takes good care that it is not appreciably
effected by the law of supply and demand.
These artificial prices are maintained in
the interests of the few against the many.
It matters not how many stores open up,
the only article which can be depressed in
price is "shoe wear," in which so many
spectacular clearing-out sales are announced, followed, however, by very little
clearing out, and conducted at the rates
which leave a very safe margin of profit.
The Week is not particularly anxious to
inaugurate a campaign against high prices,
but the Citizens' Committee or League, or
whatever it calls itself, might very well devote some time to the consideration of this
important subject. Such work would be
of a more practical character than the passing of devout resolutions whicli never become effective. When the Victoria merchants and tradesmen realise the extent to
whicli exorbitant prices are hindering the
development of the city they may be led
to reconsider their position.
THE DECLINE OF ORATORY
It would be interesting, if not very
profitable, to follow the discursions of the
Colonist into a discussion of "the decline
of oratory." The Week, however, would
hardly, agree with the conclusions of that
respected Family Journal, except in its
advice to young men to study the subject.
For instance, it is alleged that "Mr. George
E. Foster is the best speaker in Canadian
public life, although of late years he has
been more of a debater than an orator."
The Week thinks that Mr. Foster was
never an orator, and never nearly the best
public speaker in Canada. He rarely rose
above the level of a brilliant debater, and
debating is his forte. The best speech
he ever delivered was the Budget Speech
of 1905-6, and that was unique as a statement of fact and a review of the financial
position and possibilities of Canada, but
it lacked any trace of the higher qualities
of oratory, and was absolutely devoid of
the spirit of appeal. By common consent
Joseph Howe was an orator, so was
Adolphe Chapleau. Sir Wilfrid Laurier
at times approaches the standard, but has
not been sufficiently consistent to be
classed with the recognized orators of the
western world. Bryan has been called an
orator, and no doubt in his great Convention speech he must have attaired a very
high level, or he could not have stampeded
the Convention; but that was his only
great deliverance, and he has degenerated
into a "wind-bag." None of the American Presidents since Lincoln have any
claim to the title, and he stands out preeminently as one of the greatest English
speaking orators of all time. Better one
sentence of Lincoln's than fifty paragraphs
of Bryan's. The Colonist dwells upon the
extent to which oratory is cultivated in
the States, but the main outcome is rather
fluency than oratory. Probably the finest
speaker which the great Republic has produced of late years is Joseph Choate, always excepting America's one modern
orator, Henry Ward Beecher. The text
of the Colonist article is the statement of
an English publication that "Lord Roseberry is our only orator," and that at
times Lloyd George comes nearest to him.
This is possibly true, although there are
some who regard Mr. F. E. Smith as the
coming man, but, alas, how many "coming
men" have failed to arrive! There was a
time when Sir Edward Grey bade fair to
be an orator, but he will never now attain
that distinction, although he will probably
always be regarded as one of England's
most effective and polished speakers, and
there is no other in sight. At his best Mr.
Chamberlain was not an orator; his gifts
were very similar to those of Mr. Foster,
with added magnetism and conviction.
During the last forty years English political life has known at least four great
orators—John Bright, W. E. Gladstone,
Joseph Cowen and the Duke of Argyll
(the father of the present duke). During
the same period the pulpit has known at
least seven fully entitled to the designation :—Samuel Wilberforce, Bishop of Oxford; Canon Lidclon, Dean Farrar, Rev.
C. IT. Spurgeon, Rev. Morley Punshon,
Rev. Hugh Price Hughes and Dr. Boyd
Carpenter. Even in the Church these men
do not seem to have left any real successors, and a careful student of public speak-,
ing would have to admit sorrowfully that
this is not an age of oratory. But history
shows that with occasion thc man has
always arisen, and as all great leaders must
be orators the recrudescence of soul-impelling causes will draw unknown men
from obscurity, and the world will be
awakened, as it has been so many times,
by the irresistible appeal of the born
orator. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL a, 1910
The Week is the Best Advertising Medium in
British Columbia, Exchanges with Every Paper in
the Province, and with a good many in the
Dominion.   The Week circulates to Paid
Subscribers in the following places:
VICTORIA
VANCOUVER
ESQUIMALT
ALDERMERE
ARMSTRONG
ALBERNI
ASHCROFT
ARROWHEAD
BEAVER POINT
SALT SPRING ISLAND
BEATON
BANFF, Alta.
CAMP McKINNEY
CRANBROOK
COWICHAN STATION
COWICHAN  LAKE
CAMBORNE
CHEMAINUS
CROFTON
PETERBOROUGH, Ont.
MONTREAL, Que.
CARIBOO, B.C.
CLAYOQUOT, B.C.
SECHART, B.C.
WINNIPEG, Man.
CARSON, B.C.
SAVANOS, B.C.
COLQUITZ, B.C.
CHILLIWACK, B.C.
OTTAWA, ONT.
iSO-MILE HOUSE, B.C.
KIMBERLEY, B.C.
METCHOSIN, B.C.
TULAMUN CITY, B.C.
MILNES  LANDING
MILNES' LAND'G, B.C.
HOSMER, B.C.
PRESTON, Ont.
TOD INLET, B.C.
WILMER, B.C.
SASKATOON, Sask.
PORT SIMPSON, B.C.
COUTLEE, B.C.
FOUR-MILE HOUSE,
V.I., B.C.
KERRISDALE, B.C.
GLACIER, B.C.
LOWER NICOLA, B.C.
BRANDON, Man.
DAWSON, Y.T.
MT. SICKER, B.C.
REGINA, Sask.
HAMILTON, Ont.     .
COMAPLIX
CALGARY, Alta.
CUMBERLAND
DUNCANS
ENDERBY
EHOLT
GRANITE CREEK
GRAND FORKS
GOLDEN
GREENWOOD
GANGES HARBOUR
Salt Spring Island
GALIANO ISLAND
HEDLEY
HAGANS
HAZELTON
KELOWNA
KEATINGS
KEREMEOS
COWICHAN BAY, B.C.
EDMONTON, Alta.
QUESNEL FORKS, B.C.
FIFE, B.C.
EHOLT, B.C.
HALCYON, B.C.
BULLION, B.C.
COMOX, B.C.
AGASSIZ, B.C.
PRINCE ALBERT, Sask.
ATLIN, B.C.   -
QUEEN CHARLOTTE
ISLANDS, B.C.
QUATSINO, B.C.
ROCK CREEK, B.C.
GATEWAY, B.C.
PENDER ISLAND, B.C.
KIMBERLEY, B.C.
NAHUM, B.C.
NORTHPORT ,B.C.
GABRIOLA ISL., B.C.
TULFORD  HARBOUR,
B.C.
SAVANOS, B.C.
CORFIELD, B.C.
FRENCH CREEK, B.C.
SLOCAN JCT., B.C.
COBBLE HILL, B.C.
KISPIOX VALLEY, B.C.
FERGUSON, B.C.
CRESTON, B.C.
PEACHLAND, B.C.
HALIFAX, N.S.
BELLA COOLA, B.C.
TORONTO, Ont.
KAMLOOPS
KITSALAS
KASLO
LORNE CREEK
MIDWAY
MAYNE ISLAND
MARYSVILLE
MOYIE
NICOLA
NICOLA LAKE
NORTH VANCOUVER
NANAIMO
NELSON
NEW DENVER
NORTH SAANICH
ARLINGTON P.O.
NEW ALBERNI
NEW  WESTMINSTER
PENTICTON
LADYSMITH, B.C.
DELTA, B.C.
BANFIELD, B.C.
NANTON, Alta.
BEAUMONT, B.C.
SOOKE, B.C.
MISSION CITY, B.C.
KITLUMGAR, B.C.
OKANAGAN, B.C.
STETTLER, Alta.
EPWORTH, B.C.
SODA CREEK, B.C.
KENORA, Ont.
MITLAKATLA, B.C.
HARRISON HOT
SPRINGS, B.C.
HORNBY ISLAND, B.C.
LYTTON, B.C.
BANFIELD, B.C.
CLINTON, B.C.
SHAWNIGAN LAKE,
B.C.
PARRY SOUND, Ont.
ST. JOHN'S, P.Q.
ALMONTE, Ont.
WESTHOLME, B.C.
EBURNE, B.C.
GOLDSTREAM, B.C.
SARDIS, B.C.
SANDON, B.C.
MINSKUISH, B.C.
FOREMAN, Alta.
GABRIOLA ISL., B.C.
WHITEMORSE, Y.T.
MONTE CREEK, B.C.
PHOENIX
PRINCEON
PORT ESSINGTON
PRINCE RUPERT
PARKSVILLE
ROCK CREEK
REVELSTOKE
ROSSLAND
SLUGGETT
SLOCAN CITY
SIDNEY
STEWART CITY
TURGOOSE
TRAIL
VERNON
WARDNER
YMIR
PIER ISLAND, B.C.
WHITEWATER, B.C.
WILLIAM HEAD, B.C.
SOMENOS, B.C.
MOUNT TOLMIE, B.C.
COBOURG SIDING, B.C
NORTHSIDNEY, B.C.
FIELD, B.C.
PINE ISLAND, B.C.
SILVERTON, B.C.
SEATTLE, Wash.
STRAITS SETTLEM'TS
BALLARD, Wash.
CHICAKO, ILL.
PORTLAND, Ore.
LODI, Cal.
GRANGEVILLE, Idaho.
TACOMA, Wash.
SPOKANE, Wash.
SANTA CRUZ, Cal.
DULUTH, Minn.
SAN ANGEL, Mex.
STEPHEN, Minn.
NEW YORK, N.Y.
CHICAPOO FALLS,
Mass.
LONDON, Eng.
BIRMINGHAM, Eng.
BROXBURNE,
Herts., Eng.
BRIDGEWORTH,
Salop, Eng.
CAMBRIDGE, Eng.
GLASTONBURY, Eng.
At The Street   \
Corner i
P By THE LOUNGER C
Up till last Wednesday I had always been rather proud of the fact
that I was an Englishman and a white
man, but after having been present
for two hours at thc Royal Commission, I have changed my mind.
Prevarication, as practised by the two
gentlemen from the Celestial Empire,
is an art, and if I could do it I would
guarantee myself a fortune inside of
two years. I felt rather for the gentleman who betrayed himself by making a sotto voce remark in English,
as he was deprived of his interpreter.
I was only sorry that time forbade
my staying any longer, for I certainly
enjoyed myself in the County Court
room more than I havc ever done in
any    of    thc    recognized houses  of
amusement.
*     *     *
In Bastion Street there are two
enclosed plots of ground. They are
planted with shrubs and look rather
nice. A sort of air of rusticity pervades the place, but, of course, there
is a drawback. The fencing is composed of iron railings; these are bent
and twisted into every conceivable
shape. Some are broken, others wander round in eccentric curves.. It may
be said that what happens in Bastion Street doesn't matter, because no
one ever goes there, but I would
point out that all the lawyers live in
that district and the Law Courts arp
almost opposite the plots in question.
I don't know exactly whose business
it is to attend to matters of this description, but I sincerely hope that
this paragraph will catch his eye, and
that he will have the defect remedied.
* *     *
On Tuesday evening last the Victoria Kennel Club held a meeting in
Labour Hall, and during the course of
the various items which had to come
under discussion it was resolved that
the formation of a Terrier Club was
entirely in line with the policy of the
first mentioned club. There can be
no doubt but that the average dog-
show frequenter will prefer to see a
large number of fancy terriers than a
big assortment of setters. It is confidently expected that the formation
of this subsidiary club will be of great
benefit to the dog fanciers of the
town, and will be the means of bringing many to the show who would
otherwise have stayed away.
* *     *
I went to Church last Sunday,
Even a Lounger is permitted to do
that on festivals, and I was astounded at the beautiful floral decorations
in the Cathedral. Arum lilies, jonquils and daffodils were most tastefully arranged and the effect was
charming. The music was the finest
that I have heard in a Victoria
Church, and Mr. Pauline, the organist and choirmaster, is worthy of all
praise for the manner in which he
had trained his choir for the Easter
service.
* *    *
On Saturday night I witnessed another instance of the fact that we
don't really need a new theatre. It
was not exactly an empty house which
greeted the Lambardi Grand Opera
Company, but it could not have been
called a packed one. It is useless to
put this down to the fact that the
company was playing in Holy Week,
because I went round to each one of
the vaudeville and moving picture
houses in the course of thc week and
they were all crowded. It simply
means that in spite of our musical
prtensions, we really prefer vaude
ville, and that, with the exception of
a small leavening, we are unable to
appreciate the goods things of this
life when they are brought to us.
* *     *
The smoke from the C.P.R .fliers is
beginning to cause a positive nuisance. On Monday morning the Princess Beatrice was belching forth a
volume of black smoke, sufficient to
make mc think that there was an
enormous fire somewhere.    I do not
Good Skates     Good Instructors     Good Music     Good Time
SKATING
Morning   10.00 to 12.00
Afternoon     2.00 to 4.30
Evening   7-45 to 10.00
LADIES  FREE  AT  ALL  SESSIONS
Assembly Rink
Fort St.
Headquarters for choice nursery stock.
Apple, pear, cherry, plum and peach trees
and small fruits, also ornamental trees,
shrubs, roses, evergreens, etc. Largest and
best assorted stock in British Columbia.
Ten per cent, cash discount on all orders
above $10.00.
PRICE LIST AND CATALOGUE ON
APPLICATION.
c4 Machine That Has No Equal
The Underwood Typewriter
Sold by Baxter & Johnson
809 Government Street       ....       Qff{ce Supplies
What can be more enjoyable than a glass
of sparkling Burgundy or genuine imported,
high grade, Claretf If you want the best
ask for SCHMIDT'S.
RADIGER & JANION
1318 Wharf Street
'British Columbia Agents
Jams You'll Approve Of
C. & B. Jams, different varieties, per glass 25c
C. & B. Jams, 4-lb tin  65c
C. & B. Jams, 7-lb. tin $1.00
C. & B. Apricot and Black Currant, per tin  $1.25
C. & B. Midget Jars Jam, each  ioc
E. D. Smith's Jams, per glass  25c
E. D. Smith's Jams, 4-lb. tin  85c
Robertson's Jams, 4-lb. tin  65c
Morton's Jams, i-lb. tin 15c, 7-lb. tin  90c
Keiller's Plum Jam, 2 lb. tin 35c
Kootenay Jams, Strawberry, i-lb. glass  30c
Midget Glass Strawberry, 2 for  25c
Climax Jams, 4-lb. tins  60c
Upton's Compound Jams, 4-lb. tin  50c
E. D. Smith's Jellies, per glass  30c
C. & B. Jellies, Black or Red Currant, per glass 30c
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
Independent Grocers and Wine Merchants
Tels.: 50, 51, 52 and 1590 1317 Government Street
understand these things and am therefore unaware whether this is due to
bad coal or defective stoking, ,but
surely it is unnecessary.
*     *     *
What a pity it is that the City does
not appoint an inspector with authority to look after the cleaning up of
the streets and vacant lots. As the
law stands at present a person may
be prosecuted for depositing rubbish
in a public place, but it is a matter of
absolute impossibility to secure convictions owing to lack of proof. Rubbish is discarded during the night,
and, though in many cases the police are morally certain as to the
identity of the offender, there is no
evidence which could be produced before the court. Right opposite the
office of the Chief of Police in the
City Hall there is a vacant lot which
is piled high with old scrap iron,
plumbing effects and rubbish in general. It is nobody's particular duty
to remove it, so it will probably remain there until the lot is built upon.
Instances might be multiplied a thousand times, and even then there are
the countless hundreds of similar
abuses which are mercifully hidden by
the hoardings round town. The same
inspector might make it his duty also
to see that the spaces under these
same hoardings are kept clean, and
that where grass grows, it should be
cut. In these respects the "City
Beautiful" is in a bad way. The expense of such an appointment would
be small in comparison of the good
it would do, and the City can well
afford to pay it.
* *    *
I was walking up Douglas Street
the other day, and at the corner of
Pembroke Street found a few youngsters playing with the bricks which
had accumulated from the demolition
of a Chinese shack there. They were
building with great glee and energy
and I asked them what they thought
they were building. "A waterworks,
Mister," replied the eldest, "and this
is one which will hold water." Out
of the mouths of babes and sucklings;
eh, what?
* *     *
There is far more interest being
taken in this Terrier Club than is
generally known. To keep a kennel
of setters is an expensive business,
but many a man keeps a dog, and for
preference he keeps a terrier. A terrier of good breed, which he will be
proud to show both to his friends and
(Continued on Page 8) THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 2, 1910
MUSIC
AND   THE   STAGE
By a decisive vote the citizens of
I Victoria have made it clear that they
do not want a new theatre.   This is
lthe only conclusion which it is pos-
I sible  to  draw  from  the  manner  in
I which they patronised the Lambardi
I Opera   Company.   A   finer   aggregation   of  operatic   artistes  has   never
Ibeen heard in Victoria, nor any or-
Ichestra equal to that which  accom-
Ipanied them.   In Scala Brini the com-
Ipany had a tenor who would not fail
Ito win applause in the Metropolitan
(Opera   House   in   New   York.     His
Isinging in II Travotore was a musi-
Ical treat of the very highest  order.
|Mde. Adalberto is a soprano of the
Ihighest type; her singing in the subor-
Idinate part of Michaela was a revelation, and no one who heard her was
surprised that she sat in the box as
spectator instead of taking up the
part of Trovatore with only a handful
_>( people in the theatre.   Whilst these
Iwo artistes outshone the others it is
(impossible to withhold praise from all
vho sang in stellar parts, especially
Ide. Zavaski, the brilliant little Russian lady, who for the second time
pang the music of Lucia in Victoria.
)f the orchestra it is impossible to
Mark Hambourg
On Wednesday evening Mark Hambourg appeared at the Victoria Theatre and rendered a classical programme to about 200 people. The
selections were unimpeachable and the
performance of the artist probably exceeded the expectations of every one
of his auditors. Hambourg is an artist who possesses individuality, but is
not conspicuous for any magnetic
qualities. He was most successful in
his selections from Chopin, of which
there were five. The most acceptable was the Nocturne in G Major,
but his playing of the Polonaise in E
flat was brilliant in the extreme, and
could hardly have been improved upon. The most pretentious of his selections was Beethoven's Sonata Ap-
passionata in F Minor, which was interpreted with insight and feeling.
The only possible criticism is that
the player seemed to be somewhat
fatigued and the performance was
lacking in vigour. Considering the
circumstances under which the artist
played, the whole performance is entitled to very high praise, and it must
forever remain a marvel that the people of Victoria missed an opportunity
which the few who heard him will
always rate among their most enjoyable musical experiences. It is possible that their enjoyment and the
comfort of the artist would have been
increased if he had been supplied
with a better instrument, the one used
was very "tinny."
May Robson, at the Victoria Theatre, April 4th
speak too highly; there were not a
|ew who thought and said that it was
vorth all the money. Yet at four
berformances of such a company the
pox receipts wcre less than had been
|aken at a single performance at the
/ancouver Theatre, and less than the
Victoria Theatre has yielded for a
lingle performance on special occasions. What is the reason? People
|ave said, "Give us a first-class per-
srmance and we will turn up." Here
kras the best operatic performance
Ihich could be heard out of New
[ork, and at popular prices, and yet
our performances drew practically
Ine theatre full. It is difficult to miss
lie conclusion that when all is said
Ind done, Victoria is not a musical
Ity, and the failure of the Victoria
pusical societies to popularize its of-
Irings this season is confirmatory of
le view. When the Lambardi Opera
lompany and as brilliant a pianist as
lark Hambourg play to empty
Inches, there is something rotten in
le state of Denmark.
The New Grand
This week the New Grand has had
one of the best all round shows ever
seen there. Frank Whitman, the
dancing violinist, is distinctly clever.
Fox and Ward as minstrel comedians are amusing. Guise is the best
female impersonator whom I have
ever seen; his make-up and his voice
are admirable, and I hope that he
meets with the success that he deserves. Mr. and Mrs. James McCann have been presenting an excellent short play. Thos. J. Price, the
illustrated song singer, has made the
best of a poor song. I have always
contended that it is a shame for the
circuit to send out poor songs to
good singers. For many years it has
been the custom to send out
"whiney" "Take me home to Mother"
songs, which are only appreciated by
the gallery, and which give the
singer no opportunity to display his
voice.
PICKA^D'S
HAND-PAINTED
CHINA
Is famous the world over as
the choicest procurable. We
have recently received a large
new consignment—most beautiful goods—many exceedingly
rich and effective designs.
Your inspection cordially invited.
Few things commend themselves more for Wedding
or Birthday Gifts than this
lovely hand-painted  China.
No trouble to show goods, just
a pleasure, glad to see you any
time.
W. H. WILKERSON
The Jeweler
915 Government Street
Tel 1606
Pantages Theatre
The Hunt Comedy Company in
"The Devil Up to Date" are more
than amusing. There is good singing, good dancing and plenty of clean
fun. I am glad to see that they are
remaining another week.
MOMUS.
The Rejuvenation of Aunt Mary
It is with no small degree of
pleasure that the management of the
Victoria Theatre announces the engagement of that artiste who has won
fame throughout the country as a
character actress of unusual merit, in
a comedy dramatization of a novel
that has won world-wide reputation.
We refer to the coming of Miss
Robson in "The Rejuvenation of
Aunt Mary," Anne Warner's delightful comedy. Miss Robson's engagement is for one night, Monday, April
4th.
Miss Robson appeared as Aunt
Mary at the Garden Theatre in New
York two seasons ago, where she
made a pronounced hit, received the
most enthusiastic criticism from thc
whole New York press, and remained
three months. She then went to the
Studebaker Theatre in Chicago for a
three months' engagement, where she
continued her success; since then she
has been throughout the Northwest
and to the Pacific coast, everywhere
playing to packed houses. She has
just finished a tour of 89 weeks to
an enormous success and endorsed by
every critic of the entire country. All
who do not see Miss Robson in this
role will miss a rare treat.
The play tells the story of a rich
maiden lady who once had a love
story of her own, but whose heart is
bound to her nephew at college, who
is a little wild but not more so than
the average young man. He is unfortunate enough, however, to become involved in a number of scrapes,
one of which is a breach of promise
suit in which the nephew is blameless. The exposure causes the aunt
to disinherit him, and he hurries off
to New York where he falls in love
with a splendid girl, and where finally
the aunt follows him. She is treated
to a dinner by the college chums of
her nephew, ancl whirled about town
in an automobile, and introduced to
the roof gardens and other popular
places. The sport completely wins
her from her country life, and reconciles her to the marriage of her
nephew with his sweetheart.
The piece is elaborately ancl artistically staged.
Zaza
The Allen Players will take the
boards in the Victoria Theatre, starting from April 7th for some time. The
exact date of their departure is not
yet known, but it is expected that
this popular company will be in the
City for some time. The three opening nights will see the greatest sue-
Interesting
Instructive
ROMHN©
THEATRE
A visit to our amusement house will prove-that we have the best
in Moving Pictures and Illustrated Songs.
Daily from 2 p.m. to 5-3<> p.m., and 7 until 11 p.m.
Saturday performances commence at 1 p.m. sharp.
Complete change every Monday, Wednesday and  Friday.
ADMISSION—Ten Cents; Children at Matinee, Five Cents.
ORCHESTRA IN ATTENDANCE.
ridJDTK
THEATRE
Yates Street, Just Below Government
where you can see the latest and best Motion Pictures
money and skill can produce. Illustrated songs. Continuous performance daily from 2 to 5.30—7 to 11.
Admission—10 cents;  Children to Matinee, 5 cents.
CHANGE OF PROGRAMME
Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday
PANTAGES
THEATRE
Week of April 4
DOUBLE ATTRACTION
Hunt's
Musical Comedy
Company
Presents the
Man From
Kokom o
THE GREAT UNION
ORGANIZER
20—PEOPLE—ao
io—MUSICAL NUMBERS—io
Added Feature
LILLIAN DOON
Mind Reading Wonder
MONSTER SHOW
Prices—ise, 25c; boxes, 50c.
THE
New Grand
Week of April 4
"Many a  Laugh  Awaits
You Here"
Walter Florence
LEROY and CLAYTON
in "A Horse on Hogan"
MAX YORK'S DOGS
The  Cleverest   Canine  Feature
in Vaudeville
A Treat for Music Lovers
NEWELL and NIBLO
Instrumentalists of International Renown
J. Hunter Effie
WILSON and PEARSON
In a Refreshing Singing and
Dancing Oddity
THOS. J. PRICE
NEW MOVING PICTURES
OUR  OWN   ORCHESTRA
cess of Mrs. Leslie Carter, who was
recently in the City, entitled "Zaza."
Miss Verna Felton, the leading lady
in this company, is the youngest leading lady on thc Pacific Coast; although still in her 'teens, she has probably played a larger range of parts
than many players who are her
seniors. The repertoire includes such
well known dramas as "Camille,"
"The Second Mrs. Tanqueray," "Mrs.
Dane's Defence," "Under Two Flags,"
"Sherlock Holmes," "The Truth," and
many ither high class comedies and
dramas. Thc Allen Players, during
their stay in Victoria will change
their plays twice a .week, and every
Saturday afternoon there will be a
matinee.
At New Grand Next Week
There is a very pleasant surprise
awaiting the New Grand patrons next
week,  in  thc most  laugable  comedy
sketch in vaudeville, which is to be
presented   by  those  clever  farceurs,
Walter Le Roy and  Florence Cla^-
•t
ton, entitled, "A Horse on Hoganf'
These artists havc been a tremendous
hit in Eastern cities and will undoubtedly be one of thc biggejt
laughing hits thc Grand has offered
this season. Don't overlook this opportunity for a hearty laugh and tlle
old adage, "Laugh and the world
laughs with you." Dare to resist
laughing during thc presentation of
this clever farcelet. t
Newell and Noble, instrumentalists
of international renown, will make
their first appearance in Victoria at
thc Grand next week. They present
a very pretty and tuneful offering,
including selections on xylophones,
saxaphones and other novel instruments. They render various selections   with   a   certain   neatness   and
(CONTINUED ON  PAGE 9)       • THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL *, 1910
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
•THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
1208   Government St.,   Victoria, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE, Editor
Montserrat
By Bohemian
' In the course of a somewhat travelled career I have visited many
places, but one will always stay in my
mind. I was in Barcelona, called the
Manchester of Spain, a beautiful city
and undoubtedly the most progressive
in the peninsula. There I heard of
Montserrat, that there was magnificent scenery there, numerous traditions and accommodation. I went,
and like the Queen of Sheba, found
that the half had not been told me.
So far as I remember it is something less than an hour's ride by train
from Barcelona to the junction where
the ordinary train is replaced by a
cog-wheel substitute. This cog train
runs about half way up the mountain
and terminates its journey at the
Monastery. This monastery is one of
the most famous on the continent and
during the summer time is thronged
with visitors. There is accommodation for 1,500 people and an excellent
restaurant is also situated on the premises. No charge is made except for
meals, but it is an understood thing
that every guest will make some offering to the Black Virgin, for to her
it is that Montserrat owes its glory.
Tradition has it that a hermit living
on the mountain had a vision in which
he learnt that an image of the Virgin,
having fallen from heaven, was concealed in some spot which was revealed to him. Hastening to the spot
he was rewarded by finding the image.
Immediately he went round to the
neighbouring towns and cities, declared the miracle which had happened and raised funds to build a
chapel on the spot where the holy
image had been found. Money was
raised, a chapel was built, in which
the sacred image was placed, and a
monastery founded.
The night on which I was in Montserrat was a festival night. Exactly
what festival it was I do not remember, but I know that I was there towards the end of December. We were
the only guests; the chapel was absolutely empty, save for the monks
and choristers. The altar was a blaze
of light; innumerable candles lit the
chancel, but the rest of the chapel
was in darkness. Then came an organ recital and singing which I shall
never forget. High above the altar
was the celebrated "Black Virgin"
with the Holy Infant in her arms,
and rose and fell the cadences of the
very best church music that I have
heard in any church. I have heard
St. Peter's No. i choir, but it could
not compare with the music I heard
that night at Montserrat.
That night we slept in one of the
cells. No comforts are provided,
merely a truckle bed, a basin and a
pitcher of water. It was so bitterly
cold that we slept* in our overcoats.
Early in the morning we arose to ascend the mountain. The monastery is
situated just about half way up. The
mountain itself is a freak of nature.
Its composition is what is known as
tertiary conglomerate, and the specimens of the rock which are seen on
the ascent are indeed curios. On the
way to the summit we passed the
cross which marks the place where
the French sent headlong to destruction the monks then resident during
the Peninsula War. It was at a time
when guerilla warfare was at its
height. Marshal Ney was in command then in the Northwest of Spain,
and it was supposed that the monks
of Montserrat were shielding the culprits. A body of soldiers was taken
up and the monks were forced to
plunge down a precipitous place to
the rocks below. A cross now marks
the place of their execution.
From the summit the view is unparalleled. Nearly two hundred miles
away lie the Pyrenees, but that day
they were as plainly evident as
though they had been but two miles
distant. A vast flat plain lies between
the solid crag of Montserrat and the
barriers  between  France  and  Spain.
Montserrat is a place well worth a
visit, and anyone making a tour of
the Continent should not fail to include it in their list of places to be
visited.
"I was in Eden with Adam and Eve!"
Cried the man with the wild red eye.
"I was in Eden with Adam and Eve!"
"The devil you were,"  said I.
Harry is six years old. "Pa," he
asked one day, "if I get married will
I have a wife like ma?"
"Very likely," replied his father.
"And if I don't get married will I
havc to be an old bachelor like Uncle
Tom?"
"Very likely."
"Well, pa," he said, after a moment
of deep thought, "it's a mighty tough
world for us men, ain't it?"
"So he praised my singing?"
"Yes," he said, "it was heavenly."
"Really?"
"Well, something like that. He said
it was unearthly."
"Why did you never marry, Tom?"
inquired the young Benedick of the
old bachelor.
"Well, you see," replied the single
one, "when I was quite young I resolved that I wouldn't marry until I
found an ideal woman. I was difficult to please, but after many years
I found her."
"Lucky beggar!   And then "
"She was looking for an ideal
man," replied the bachelor, sadly.
"When you feels a hankerin' foh
great authority, son," said Uncle
Eben, "do a little preliminary prac-
ticin' as a baseball umpire an' see
whether you really enjoys it."
A young Baltimore couple, recently
united in matrimony, were going over
their wedding presents just after their
return from the honeymoon.
"How about that check for $300
we were told your uncle Tom had
promised?" asked the husband. "I
haven't seen anything of it, Marie."
"Well," ventured the young wife,
"perhaps Uncle Tom learned that
your father had already given us a
check for that amount and didn't
wish us to have duplicate presents."
Tired Tim—Say, Dusty, I jest got a
letter from Weary, an' I never saw
such  spellin' in my life.
Dusty—I guess he's got hold of
one of dem new spelling books.
Mrs. Crossway—How many lodges
does your husband belong to?
Mrs. Kawler—Only one, I think,
but it meets six nights in the week.
"You're as beautiful as—as-
"Well, as what?" she asked, looking
down and blushing.
"As a soap calendar," he declared.
Then she put her arms around his
neck and drew a long, glad sigh, feeling that it would be foolish of her
to expect him to say more.
She—Do you think that Dolly will
be successful in comic opera?
He—She will if she has the three
necessary qualifications.
She—What are they?
He—Well, a good voice is one.
Towne—He's sorry  now   that  he
quarreled with his wife.
Browne—She's  gone home to  her
mother,  I  suppose?
Towne—No; she's had her mothe
come home to her.
He—I told your father I could not
live without you.
She—And what did he say?
He—Oh! he offered to pay my
funeral expenses.
WATER NOTICE
Vie*
A story is told of an Irishman who,
while walking with his friend, passed
a jeweler's shop where there were a
lot of precious stones in the window.
"Would you not like to have your
pick?"
"Not me pick, but me shovel," said
Mike.
NOTICE is hereby given that an application will be made under Part V. ol
the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a li-
cence in the Division of Victoria Distriot.
(a) The name of Company in full
West  Coast Power Co.,  Limited.
The   head   office,   514   Fort   St.,
toria,  B.C.
The capital, how divided, showln*.
amount paid up—10,000 divided into on<
hundred $100 shares, $500 paid up.
(If for mining purposes) Free Miner's
Certificate No., not for mining purposes
(b) The name of the lake, stream oi
source (if unnamed, the description is
Nitinat River.
The point of diversion is at a poln
about 2 miles from the mouth of thi
Nitinat River,
(d) The quantity of water applied fo:
(in cubic feet per second) 3,000 2nd ft
(e) The character of the propose!
works is a power plant for the genera
tion of electricity for industrial pur
poses.
(f) The premises on which the wate
Is to be used (describe same), a dam o
weir ls to be placed across river imme
diately above intake and water to b
conveyed to Power House below intak
at some point on the land along th
bank of the Nitinat River about on
mile below intake.
(g) The purposes for which the wate
is to be used—power purposes.
(h) If for irrigation describe the Ian
intended to be irrigated, giving acreag
—Not for irrigation.
(i) If the water is to be used fo
power or mining purposes describe th
place where the water is to be returne
to some natural channel, and the dii
ference in altitude between point of a
version and point of return. The wate
is to be returned to the Nitinat Rivt
at a point within one mile below th
intake.    Difference in altitude, 150 fee
(j) Area of Crown  land  intended   __
be occupied by the proposed works, It
acres.
(k) This  notice  was  posted  on   tli
22r.d day of March, 1910, and applicatio
will  be  made  to  the Commissioner
the 3rd day of May, 1910.
(1) Give the names and addresses
any riparian proprietors or licensees wl
or whose lands are likely to be affectf
by the proposed works, either above
below the   outlet—the   Crown.       Cha
Todd, Victoria, B.C.
Attach copy of such parts of tl
Company's memorandum of assoclatlc
as authorize the proposed applicatlc
and works.
Signature—
WEST COAST POWER CO., LTD.,
Lorenzo Alexander, Directo
P.O.  Address—
P.O. Box 724, Victoria.B.'
The Bear River Canyon Mining Conpy.Ltd
OF
PORTLAND CANAL, BRITISH COLUMBIA
Capital $500,000, Divided
Into 500,000 Shares of
One Dollar Par Value
NON-PERSONAL LIABILITY
BARRISTERS
Pooley, Luxton and Pooley Victoria, B.C.
BANKERS
Imperial Bank of Canada Victoria, B.C.
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
A. G. Howard Potts, Broker Victoria, B.C.
Henry B. Thomson, M.P.P., of Turner, Beeton & Co., Victoria, B.C.
Henry A. Bulwer, of M. Des Brisay & Co Victoria, B.C.
Robert H. Pooley, Barrister Victoria, B.C.
R. G. Monteith, Broker  Victoria, B.C.
For the Purpose of Development
Work we are Offering for the
Company a small issue of Treasury Stock at 30 Cents per share
Situated at the canyon on Bear River,, twelve miles from Stewart, one and a half miles from the Red Cliff mines, with the promised railroad being
built by D. D. Mann passing close to the tunnel mouth, this property, comprising eight valuable claims, all pf which return high assays, is looked upon
as one of excellent promise.
FOR SHARES OR FURTHER PARTICULARS APPLY TO
F. W. Stevenson & Co.
BROKERS FOR THE COMPANY
14-16 Mahon Building
1114 Government Street THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 2, 1910
Start Somethinq!
There can be no continuance without a beginning. There can be no completion without a
continuance.
The only man who DOES anything is the
man who BEGINS something.
Don't wait for someone else to give you a
push.     Don't  be an echo to the other  man's
hurrah.   Don't be a shadow of the other fellow's
work.
Lay  the  corner  stone of YOUR  OWN
initiative.
Get busy! Begin! Commence! Just START!
But be sure you START right!     Do not
START a lap behind!
BIRMINGHAM
Offers you a GOOD start, but you must act quickly.   Lots
are now selling at $70 each.   By May 16th prices will be
$150 to $500
Get in on the ground floor. Don't be a
QUITTER. Anybody can be a knocker, but it
takes brains to see and fully appreciate your
opportunities.
BIRMINGHAM is the chance now offered
to you.
Do not neglect it, grasp it now, delay no
longer.
BIRMINGHAM is situate on the main line
of the G. T. P. and five other projected railways
at the junction of the Fraser and Nechacco Rivers,
at the logical and geographical centre of British
Columbia, equidistant from Vancouver, Prince
Rupert and Edmonton.
We Will Open an Office at 636 View Street on Monday Next
The Birminqham Townsite
Company, Limited
519 Granville St.       Vancouver, B.e. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 2, 1910
f ,r-'t.V-*--"^v*,**^*
)_^&^
j6cji-_**-*aEtt/AA*«*_fai
RICHMOND DISTRICT
Marine Drive, Point Grey.—Road Metal.
Sealed Tenders, indorsed "Tenders for
Road Metal," will be received by the
Hon. the Minister of Public Works up
to and including the 31st instant, for
furnishing and delivering on board a
scow at the Provincial Government
Wharf, situated at the end of Imperial
Street, Lot 540, Point Grey, crushed
granite required for metalling the
Marine Drive.
The maximum quantity required will
probably   bc  about   12,000   cubic   yards.
Specifications can be obtained from
the Department of Public Works, Parliament Buildings. Victoria; Government
Agent's Offlce, New Westminster; and
from Mr, E. McBride, Road .Superintendent. 311 Fairfield Block, Granville Street,
Vancouver, on and after the 19th instant.
Each Each tender must be accompanied by an accepted bank cheque or
certificate of deposit on a chartered
bank of Canada for the sum of one
thousand ($1,000) dollars, made payable
to the Hon. the Minister of Public
Works, which shall be forfeited if the
party tendering decline to enter into
contract when called upon to do so,
or fail to complete the work contracted
for. Tbe cheques of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them upon
the  execution  of  the  contract.
No tender will be considered unless
made out on the form supplied, signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed in the envelopes furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
P. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., 17th March, 1910.
mch 19
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE, that I, William Buck-
land, intends to apply for a license to
prospect for coal on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of Section 29, Township G, Graham Island, being the southeast corner of land applied for; them-*
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
ehains to point of commencement, cow
taining 040 acres, more or less.
Dated  February   25th,   1910.
WILLIAM  BUCKLAND.
inch 12 John Demers, Agent.
PUBLIC INQUIRIES ACT
PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that,
under and by virtue of this Act, a
Commission has been issued to His
Honour Peter Secord Lampman, of the
City of Victoria, Judge of the County
Court of Victoria, for the purpose of
holding inquiry into all actions of the
Commissioners of Police for tlie City of
Victoria, for the year 1910, in connection
with the administration of tlieir public
duties.
The said Commissioner will hold his
first sitting in the County Court room,
at the Court House, on Wednesday, the
30th day of March, 1910, at the hour of
10 o'clock in the forenoon, of which all
persons interested are hereby to take
notice and to govern themselves acocrd-
ingly.
HENRI' ESSON YOUNG,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
24th March, 1910.
mch 2*1
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that George Wheeler,
intends to apply for a license to prospect for coal on the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
■northwest coiner of Section 10, Township 0, Graham Island, being the northwest corner of land applied for; thence
east SO chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west SO chains; thence north 80
chains to point of commencement, containing 040 acres, more or less.
Dated February 25th, 1910.
GEORGE WHEELER,
mch 12 John Demers, Agent.
RENFREW   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that William Mostyn
Thrasher, of Mosten, Sask., farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the ofllowing described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner of Samuel Thrasher's:
thence north SO chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 40 chains to place of commencement, and containing 320 acres, more
or less.
Dated January  24th,  1910.
WILLIAM MOSTYN THRASHER,
feb 20 J. W. Williams, Agent.
Aberdeen School
Sealed Tenders, superscribed "Tender
for School-building, Aberdeen," will be
received by the Hon. the Minister of
Public Works, up to and including llth
day of April, 1910, for the erection and
completion of a large one-room frame
School-building in the Chilliwack Electoral District.
Plans, specifications, contract, and
forms of tender may be seen on and
after the 21st of March, 1910, at the
offices of the Government Agent. New
Westminster; tho Secretary of tbe
School Board, William Merryfield, Esq.,
Mt. Lehman; and the Department of
Public Works, Victoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque or certificate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the Honourable
thc Minister of Public Works, for a sum
equivalent to ten per cent, of the
amount of the tender, which shall be
forfeited if the party tendering decline
to enter into contract when called upon
to do so, or if he fail to complete the
work contracted for. The cheques or
certificates of deposit of unsuccessful
tenderers will be returned to them upon
tlie execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the forms supplied, signed
by the actual signature of the tenderer,
and enclosed in the envelopes furnished.
Tlie lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., ISth March, 1910.
mch 19
RENFREW  LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Abram Thrasher,
of Victoria, farmer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted besides J. W. Williams'
post; thence north SO chains; thence
east 35 chains; thence south SO chains;
thence west 35 chains to place of commencement and containing 2S0 acres,
more  or  less.
Dated  January 20th,  1910.
ABRAM THRASHER,
feb 20 J. W. Williams, Agent
School Chase
Sealed Tenders, superscribed "Tender
for School-house at Chase, B.C.," will be
received by the Hon. the Minister of
Public Works up to and including the
12th day of April, 1910, for the erection
and completion of a two-room frame
School-house at Chase, B.C.
Plans, specifications, contract, and
forms of tender may be seen on and
after the 21st day of March, 1910, at
the office of the Government Agent,
Kamloops; the offlce of the Secretary
of the School Board, James A. Graham,
Esq., Chase, B.C.; and at the Public
Works Department, Vietoria, B.C.
Each proposal must be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque or certificate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the Honourable
the Minister of Public Works, for a sum
equivalent to ten per cent, of the
amount of the tender which shall be
forfeited if the party tendering decline
to enter into contract when called upon
to do so, or if he fail to complete the
work contracted for. The cheques or
certificates of deposit of unsuccessful
tenderers will be returned to them upon
the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the forms supplied, signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed in the envelopes accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer,
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., ISth March, 1910.
mch 19
RENFREW   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird, Jr.,
of San Juan, farmer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the north-east corner
of Lot 109; thence north 40 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east 40 ehains to place
of commencement, and containing 100
acres, more or less.
T.  M.  BAIRD,  Jr.,
feb 2(1 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW LAND DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE tliat Angus M. Plewes
of Victoria, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at an angle of Lot 64, Renfrew
District; thence 60 chains west; thence
about 30 chains south to beach; thence
about 70 chains east along beaeh; thence
north about 50 chains to point of commencement.
Dated March 22nd, 1910.
ANGUS  M.  PLEWES,
apl 7 Thomas Baker, Agent
Ajyi
RENFREW LAND DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Athol J. Cleary,
of Victoria, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 70 chains east of the
north-west corner of Lot 54, Renfrew
District; thence north 20 chains: thence
west 80 chains; thence south 20 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated March  24th, 1910.
ATHOL  J.  CLEARY,
apl 7 Thomas Baker, Agent.
RENFREW LAND DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Benjamin R.
Comings, of Victoria, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at an angle of Lot 64,
Renfrew District, about 40 ehains west
of Boulder Point; thence north 20
chains; thence west 40 chains; thence
south 20 chains; thence east along beach
to point of commencement.
Dated March 21st, 1910.
BENJAMIN R. CUMMINGS,
apl 7 Thomas Baker, Agent.
RENFREW   LAND   DISTRICT
TAKE NOTICE that Samuel Thrasher,
of Mosten, Sask., farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at
a post planted at the north-west corner of Lot 247, thence north 80 chains-,
thence east 40 chains; thence south 80
chains; tiience west 40 chains to place
of commencement, and containing 320
acres, more or less.
Duted January 24th,  1910.
SAMUEL THRASHER,
feb 20 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW   LAND   DISTRICT
RENFREW  LAND  DISTRICT
District of Vietoria
TAKE NOTICE that Bernard Ryan, of
Victoria, gentleman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 40 chains east and about
64 chains north of the north-west corner of Lot 252, Renfrew District; thence
south 01 chain:!; thence west 01 chains;
thence north 04 chains; thence east 64
chains to place of commencement, and
containing 409 acres, more or less.
Dated  February  4th,  191U.
BERNARD  RYAN,
feb 26 J- W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Percy Walls, of
Victoria, clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the north-west corner of Lot
206; thence north 60 chains; thenco west
40 chains; thence south 60 chains;
thence east 40 chains to place of commencement, and containing 240 acres,
more or less.
Dated January 25th, 1910.
PERCY WALLS,
feb 20 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW   LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that John William
Speck, of Victoria, clerk, intends to applv for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at
a post planted at the south-east corner
of S. Douglas'; thence north 70 chains;
thenoe cast 20 chains; thence south 70
chains; thence west 20 chains to place
of commencement, and containing 140
acres, more or less.
Dated  January   20th,  1910.
JOHN WILLIAM SPECK,
feb 20 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW LAND DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE   NOTICE   tliat   Percy   Manser,
of   Victoria,   painter,   intends   tn   apply
for permission to purchase the  following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at an angle of Section  54,
Renfrew District; thenco west 50 chains;
thence   east     along     beach     about   70
cliains;   thence   north   about   20   chains
tn point of commencement.
Duted March  21st, 1910.
PERCY MANSER,
apl 7 Thomas Baker, Agent.
RENFREW LAND DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Allan Andrew
Calwell, of Victoria, liveryman, Intonds
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described hinds:—Commenolng
at a post planted at the south-east enrner of Lot 04. Renfrew District; thonce
west SO ehains; tiience east along beach
nbout SO chains to south-west enrner of
Lot 5*1; thenee north 20 chains fo pnlnt
nf commencement.
Dated March   21st.  1910.
ALLAN ANDREW CALWELL.
apl 7 Thomas Baker, Agent.
RENFREW   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Elizabeth Casheir
Williams, of San Juan, married woman,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of Lot 204; thence
north SO chains; thence west 40 chains;
Ihence south SO chains; thence east 40
chains to place of commencement; containing  320 acres,  more  or less.
Dated January 24th, 1910.
ELIZABETH CASHIER WILLIAMS,
feb 20 J. W. Williams, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotto
TAKE NOTICE that I, Charles Cleveland Intends to apply for a license to
prospect for coal on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest eorner of Section 26, Township 6, Graham Island, being the southwest corner of lnnd applied for; thence
north SO cliains; thence east 80 chains;
tiience south SO chains; thence west 80
cliains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres  more or less.
Dated February 25th. 1910.
CHARLES CLEVELAND,
mch 12 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that I, Bert Wheeler,
intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal on the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of land applied for;
thence north 80 chains; thence east SO
chains; thence south SO chains; thence
west SO chains to point of commencement, containing 010 aeres, more or less.
Dated February 25th,  1910.
BMtT WHEELER,
mch 12 John Demers, Agent.
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Lorenzo Alexander, of Victoria, gentleman, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commen*.
ing at a post planted 4 chains west of
the north-west corner of lot 248; thenee
north SO chains; thence east 20 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 20
chains to place of eommeneement, anu
containing 160 acres, more or less.
Dated January 24th, 1910.
LORENZO ALEXANDER,
feb 20 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW  LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Beard, of
Victoria, gentleman, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at north-east corner of
Lot 248; thenee north 30 chains; thence
east 50 ehains; thence south 30 ehains;
thonce west 60 chains to place of commencement, and containing 150 acres,
more or  less.
Dated January 24th, 1910.
ROBERT BEARD,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
WATER  NOTICE
RENFREW LAND DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Edith Louise
Tubman, of Victoria, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at an angle of Section 54,
Renfrew District; tiience west 60 chains;
thence south to beach; thence east along
beach about 65 chains; thence north
about 30 chains to point of commencement.
Dated  March  21st,  1910.
EDITH LOUISE TUBMAN,
apl 7 Thomas Baker, Agent.
RENFREW LAND DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Bruce Ryan,  of
Victoria,   intends  to  apply   for  permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at  a  post  planted
on north boundary line of Lot 54; thence
north 60 chains; thence west 30 chains,
thence south  00 cliains;  thence east 30
chains to point of commencement.
Dated  March  24th,  1910.
BRUCE RYAN,
apl 7 Thomas Baker, Agent.
RENFREW   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Harry Percy
Simpson, of Victoria, gentleman, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted 20 chains
east of L. Alexander's post; thenee north
SO chains; thence west 20 cliains; thence
south SO cliains; thence east 20 chains
to place of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
Dated  January  24th,  1910.
HARRY  PERCY  SIMPSON,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW LAND DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE tliat Charles Noble
Tubman, of Victoria, contractor, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lunds:—Commencing
;it a pnst plnnted nt an angle of Section 64, Renfrew District, about 20
chains nortli of the north-west cornei
of Lot 113; Ihence west 60 chuins;
thence Bouth 10 chains to shore; thence
cast along shore to west line nf Lol
118; thence north abuut 26 chains to
point nf eommeneement,
Haled   March   21st.   1910.
CHARLES   NOBLE  TUBMAN,
apl 7 Thomas Baker, Agent.
RENFREW LAND DISTRICT
District of Vietoria
TAKE NOTICE that Herbert Taylor,
of Mosten,  Snsk.,  intends  to  apply  for
permission   tn   purchase   the   following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted  on   nnrth  boundary  line of   Lot
54,   Renfrew   District;   thence   east   80
chains;  thence  north  20  cliains;  thence
west so ohains; thence south 20 chains
to  point  of commencement.
Dated March 24th, 1910.
HERBERT TAYLOR,
apl 7 Thomas Baker, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that an application will be made under Part V.
of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a
licence in the Renfrew Division of Victoria Water District.
(a) The name of Company in full,
West Coast Power Company, Limited.
The head offlce, 614 Fort Street, Victoria; capital, $10,000, divided into 100
shares of $100;   $500 paid up.
(b) The name of the lake, stream or
source (if unnamed, the description) is)
Gordon River.
(c) The point of diversion, about 100
yards below what is known as Newton's
No. 1 Camp and about one-quarter mile
above the big Canyon on Gordon River.
(d) The quantity of water applied for
(in cubic feet per second), 3,600.
(e) The character of the proposed
works is a power plant for generation
of electricity for industrial purposes;
a dam or weir is to be placed across
river above the big Canyon and water
conveyed to Power House about two
miles below Newton's No. 1 Camp.
(f) The premises on which the water
is to be used (describe same): At some
point on the land along the bank of the
Gordon river about two miles below
Newton's No. 1 Camp.
(g) The purposes for which the water
is to be used, Power Purposes.
(h) If for irrigation describe the land
intended to be irrigated, giving acreage, not for irrigation.
(i) If the water is to be used for
power or mining purposes describe the
place where the water is to be returned
to some natural channel, and the difference in altitude between point of diversion and point of return. The water is
to be returned to the Gordon river at a
point about two and one-half miles below Newton's No. 1 'amp. Difference
In  altitude,  about     '     *eet.
(j) Area of Cr*. and  intended  to
be occupied by the pijposed works, 100
acres.
(k) This notice was posted on the 17th
day of March, 1910, and application
will be made to the Commissioner on the
first day of May, 1910.
(1) Give the names and addresses of
any riparian proprietors or licensees who
or whose lands are likely to be affected
by the proposed works, either above or
below the outlet: The Crown, J. D.
Grlerson, Port Renfrew; A. G. Murray,
Port Renfrew, B.C.
Attach   copy   of   such   parts   of   the
Company's memorandum of association
as   authorize   the   proposed   application
and works.
Signature—
WEST COAST POWER
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Lorenzo Alexander, Director.
P.O. Address, P.O. Box 724, Victoria, B.C.
CANCELLATION OF  RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve,   notice  of  which  was   given  in I
the Gazette of the 28th October,  1909,
reserving ail foreshore abutting on the
East  Coast  of Vancouver  Island,  and [
extending from the head of Saanich Inlet to the 62nd parallel of north latitude,
and  all  coal underlying the  said fore-1
shore,   as  well  as  the  coal  under  tne
sea   fronting   the   said   foreshore   and
extending out therefrom a distance of |
one mile, Is cancelled.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.!
Lands Department,
Victoria, B.C., January 6th, 1910.
jan S
RENFREW   LAND   DISTRIST
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Frances J.I
Thrasher, of Mosten, Sask., married wo-l
man, intends to apply for permission!
to purchase the following described!
lands:—Commencing at a post plantedl
at the N. E. corner of J. W. Williams' ;l
thence east 60 chains; thence south 20|
chains; thence west 60 chains; thencel
north 20 chains to place of commence-l
ment and containing 120 acres, more or|
Dated January 26th, 1910.
FRANCES   J.   THRASHER,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.!
RENFREW LAND DISTRICT
District of Vietoria
TAKE NOTICE that James Walker!
of Victoria,* mechanic, intends to appljf
for permission to purchase the follow-l
ing described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 64 chains north and
40 ehains east of the north-east eorneil
of lot 252, Renfrew District; thenci
south 24 ehains; thenee east 80 ehainsI
tl.ence north 24 chains; thence west 8}
chains to place of commencement anq
containing 192 aeres, more or less.
Dated  February  4th,  1910.
JAMES WALKER,
feb 26 J  W. Williams, Agentl
RENFREW   LAND   DISTRICT
RENFREW LAND DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Paris S. McCutcheon of Victoria, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following'
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at an angle of Lot 54, Renfrew
District; thenee north 20 chains; thence
west 10 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence west 30 chains; thence south 60
ihalns; thence east 40 chains tc point
of commencement.
Dnted   March   24th,  1910.
PARIS S. MeCUTCHEON,
apl 7 Thomas Baker, Agent.
RENFREW LAND DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Denis Campbell,
of Vietoria, clerk, Intends to npply for
permission to purchase the following
described lnnds:—Commencing at a post
planted al un angle of Lot 64, Renfrew
District; Ihence west 20 chains; thence
nnrth 20 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thenco nnrth 20 chains; thence west 20
chuins; snuth about 60 chains; thenco
eust along beach about 80 chains;
thenco north nbout 40 chains to point
uf  cuinmeiicement.
DENIS CAMPBELL,
Dated  March  23rd,   1910.
apl 7 Thomas Baker, Agent.
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Samuel Douglas,
of Victoria, gentleman, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 42 chains west from
the north-east corner of lot 117, T. L.
36,048; thence north 70 chains; thence
east 20 chains; thence south 70 chains;
thence west 20 chains to place of commencement, and containing 140 acres,
more or less.
Dated January 26th, 1910.
SAMUEL   DOUGLAS,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW LAND DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that F. E. Randall, ol
Victoria, clerk, intends to apply fol
permission to purchase the followlnl
described lands:—Commencing at a posl
planted about 60 chains north of thf
shore on the east line of T. L. 35,1671
thence east 40 chains; thence north 6|
ehains; thence west 40 chains; thenci
south 60 chains to place of commence
ment, and containing 240 acres, mon
or less.
Dated February 4th, 1910.
F.  E.  RANDALL,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agenl
RENFREW  LAND DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that John Weavd
Bridgman, of Victoria, broker, intena
to apply for permission to purchase thL
following described lands:—Commenelnl
at a post planted beside H. P. Simpson'L
thence north 80 chains; thence east ll
chains; thence south 50 chatns; thencf
east 30 chains; thence south 30 chainq
thence west 40 chains to place of eon
mencement, and containing 170 aere|
more or less.
Dated January 24th, 1910.
ARTHUR JOHN WEAVER BRIDGMAl
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agonl
LAND REGISTRY ACT
In the matter of an Application for
Duplicate   Certificate    of   Title  tl
Lots 7, 13, 27, 36, 36, 46, 61, 62, 6-f
67, 68, 69, 91, 92, 93, 106, West hal
of Lot 8 and West half of Lot ll
of Suburban Lots 37 and 46, Esquf
malt District.
NOTICE  is hereby  given  that  it il
my  intention  at the  expiration of onf
month  from the date of the first pull
lication hereof to issue a Duplicate Ceil
tlficate of Title to said lands, issued tl
Mary  Elizabeth Nicholson  on  the  2n|
day  of December,  1890,  and numbereT
10806A.
Land   Registry  Offlce,   Vietoria,  B.C
the llth day of February, 1910.
S.  Y.  WOOTTON,
feb 19 Registrar-General of Titld
RENFREW  LAND   DISTRICT
RENFREW  LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that S. J. Millikln,
of Midland, Ont., merchant, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 30 ehains
south of Sec. 31, Tp. 12, at the northeast corner of S. Thrasher's claim;
thence north 30 chains to the south line
of Sec. 31, Tp. 12; east 80 chains; south
30 chains, west  80 chains.
Dated February 4th, 1910.
SAMUEL JOHN MILLIKIN.
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW  LAND   DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Lorenzo Alexander, of Victoria, gentleman, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted four chains west
of the north-west corner of Lot 248;
thence north 80 ehains; thence east 20
ehains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 20 chains to place of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or
less.
Dated January 24th, 1910.
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph WllliaJ
Williams, of San Juan, rancher, intenq
to apply for permission to purchas]
the following described lands:—Conl
mencing at a post planted on the Tela
graph Trail about 8 chains south of tn
sputh-east corner of lot 117, T. L. 36l
048; thence south 8 chatns to the nortL
line of T. L. 43,660; thenoe east ll
ohains to the north-east eorner of T. IT
43,660; thence south 60 chains; thend
east 40 chains; thence north 70 chain!
thence west 55 chains to place of con
mencement and containing 292 acre|
more or less.
Dated January 26th, 1910.
JOSEPH WILLIAM WILLIAMS,
feb 26
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE   NOTICE   that   Robert   Aral
strong, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Master  Mariner,  intends  to apply ff
permission  to  purchase   the  followl:
described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted In t!
vicinity of Green Point, Thurlow Islan
Cardero Channel, at a post situate abo]
sixty chains In a south-easterly dire
tion from said Green Point, and marki
"R.A.N.E."; thence 40 ohains sout
thence 20 chains west; thence 40 chai
north; thence 20 chains east to the poi
of commencement.
Dated  February  8th,  1910.
ROBERT ARMSTRONG,
feb 19 Per Chas. McHardy, Agi
RENFREW  LAND   DISTRICT
District of Viotoria
TAKE NOTICE that Harvey ErnJ
Thrasher, of Mosten, Sask., farmer, ]
tends to apply for permission to pi
chase the following described lands!
Commencing at a post planted aboutl
chains east and about 64 chatns no|
of the north-west corner of Lot
Renfrew District; thence south
chains; thence east 80 chains; thel
north 24 chains; thence west 80 chaT
to place of commencement, and contq
Ing 192 acres, more or less.
Dated February 4th, 1910.
HARVEY ERNEST THRASHEF
feb 26 •   J. W. Williams, AgJ THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL a, 1910
SOME BIO BARGAINS
IN OUR LOW-PRICED BEDROOM FURNITURE
Some Excellent Values in Low-Priced Pieces for the Bedroom
Seldom indeed is such an opportunity offered the seeker after something real stylish in low-priced furniture for the bedroom. Qood
fortune on our part—in the buying—enables us to offer these splendid pieces at such interesting prices. We bought at the right time.
Prices have since advanced, and when this lot is sold, they cannot be duplicated at these figures. Remember that these pieces are made of
SOLID Oak—not imitation. The designs are new and stylish. Every pricing represents a very special value. Come in today and see
these—it'll pay you. A nice room can be furnished with solid Oak Dresser, with mirror, solid oak Washstand and solid oak 5-drawer
Chiffoniere, for only $27.00.   And don't forget that we allow 5 per cent discount for cash off all these prices.
Chiffoniere—Has 5 full length drawers and
a shaped British bevel plate mirror,
12x20 in. Solid oak in golden finish.
Extra good value at, each $14.00
Chiffoniere—This chiffoniere is made of
solid oak, nicely finished in the golden.
Top measures 19x33 in. Has 5 full
length drawers.  Special value at $9.00
Dresser—This is a stylish dresser, made of
solid oak, finished in the golden. Top
measures 20x40 in. Two short and 2
full length drawers. British bevel
mirror $16.00
Chiffoniere—Made of solid oak, golden
finish. Top measures 20x34 in. Five
full length drawers. Top drawers have
serpentine front. This is a very attractive chiffoniere. Splendid value
at $10.50
Dresser—This style has a British bevel
plate mirror 14x24 in. Made of solid
oak. Finished golden. Has three long
drawers. This is an excellent design
and is special value at  $12.00
Dresser—This dresser has a 19x40 in. top.
Has 3 long drawers. Made of golden
finished solid oak. Has 18x24 in.
shaped British bevel plate mirror.
Specially priced at $14.00
Dresser—Here's an excellent value in a
stylish dresser. Made of solid oak in
the golden finish. Top measures 21x42
in. Has 2 full length drawers and 2
short drawers. British bevel mirror
22x28 in.   Priced at $18.00
Dresser—This style has 3 drawers. Serpentine front. Top measures 21x42 in.
Made of solid oak, golden finish. Has
a shaped British bevel plate mirror.
Splendid value at $20.00
Dresser—This dresser has 2 long drawers
and 4 small drawers for collars and
small articles. Made of solid oak, finished golden. Top measures 19x40 in.
Has a Colonial style British bevel plate
mirror, 22x28 in.   Priced at $18.00
Chiffoniere—An oval, British bevel mirror,
16x20 in., adds style to this chiffoniere.
Has 5 long drawers. Top drawer has
serpentine front. Made of golden finished solid oak.   Priced at $18.00
Chiffoniere—Made of solid oak and nicely
finished in the golden. Top measures
19x33 in. Has 4 long and 4 short
drawers. Has a Colonial style British
bevel plate mirror, 16x20 in. Priced
at  $18.00
Washstands — We have washstands to
match the above. Stylish pieces, made
of solid oak and finished in same
manner as dressers and chiffonieres—
19x30 in. tops, at  $6.00
20x32 in. tops, at $7.00
FURNISHERS OF
CHURCHES
SCHOOLS
BOATS
SINCE 1862
AT VICTORIA, B.O.
Complete Home Furnishers
Victoria, B.C.
FURNISHERS OF
HOMES
HOTELS
CLUBS
SINCE 1862
AT VIOTORIA, B.O.
Miss E. G. Lawson is visiting
I relatives at  Pender  Island.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Burt, from Cal-
Igary, are visiting in the city.
* *   *
Mrs. Heyland of this city is stay-
ling with friends in Vancouver.
* *   *
Captain R. G. Tatlow was a visitor
|to Vancouver during the week.
* *   *
Captain J. F. Parry, R.N., left last
I Monday evening for the Old Country.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Gore, Burdette
lAvenue, spent the Easter holidays at
IShawnigan Lake.
* *   *
Mrs. Lindsay, Rockland Avenue,
lis enjoying a two weeks' holiday at
IShawnigan Lake.
* *   *
Mr. Wm. Barton, from the Canadian Bank of Commerce, Vancouver,
[spent Easter with his relatives in
|his city.
* *   *
Messrs. R. W. Clark and George
■/oung left last Monday night for
bpokane on a short business trip.
A very pretty wedding of interest
to Victorians was celebrated on
March 16th in Los Angeles, when
Miss Ada Seabrook, only daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. B. R. Seabrook, well
known in Victoria, Was united in
marriage with Mr. A. E. Todd, of
this city. The ceremony was performed by thc Rev. Baker P. Lee at
Christ Church. The bride, who looked very charming in a wedding gown
of white chiffon cloth with an overdress of chiffon, with real lace trimmings, entered the church on the arm
of her father. The only ornament
she wore was a necklace of pearls
and turquoise, a gift of the bridegroom. The matron of honor was
Mrs. Watson, who was becomingly
gowned in a dress of crepe de chine
with silver trimmings. She wore a
large picture hat trimmed with ostrich plumes. The bridegroom was
supported by his brother-in-law, Mr.
J. H. Gillespie. After the ceremony
was over the guests drove to the
home of the bride's parents where a
large reception was held. The honeymoon will be spent in California and
other southern cities. On the return
from their honeymoon Mr. and Mrs.
Todd will take up their residence in
this city.
Mr. Howard Potts is the guest of
Mr. Beemish in the Upper Country.
* *   *
Captain James Gaudin spent a few
days of thc week visiting his daughter
Mrs. J. A. Harvey, of Pier Island.
* *   *
Mrs. R. A. Mackenzie, accompanied
by her two daughters, left last Tuesday  for Vancouver  en  route to  the
* *   *
Old Country, where they will make a
short visit.
* *   *
Mrs. Rithet, who has been spending the winter months in Southern
California, returned to Victoria last
week.
* *   *
Mr. J. R. Wright is paying a short
visit to Kansas City.
* *   *
Mr. J. C. Barnacle has returned
from Seattle where hc has been enjoying a  short holiday.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Percy Purvis and
family have left for their future home
in Bancroft, Wyo.
* *    *
Mrs. Roy Troup was a visitor to
Vancouver during the week.
The members of the Alexandra
Club, the Woman's Canadian Club
and the Victoria Ladies' Musical Society, held a reception last Tuesday
afternoon in the club rooms at the
Alexandra Club in honour of Mr. and
Mrs. Mark Hambourg. The guests
were received by the presidents of the
respective clubs—Mrs. Henry Croft,
president of the Alexandra Club; Mrs.
Fred Pemberton, president of the Women's Canadian Club; Mrs. J. D.
Helmcken, president of the Victoria
Ladies' Musical Society. The club
rooms were decorated with greenery
and quantities of yellow daffodils.
Some of those present were: Mrs.
Paterson, Mrs. Wasson, Mrs. Wright,
Mrs. McCurdy, Mrs. Mesher, and the
Misses Mesher, Mrs. F. B. Pemberton, Mrs. Hasell, Mrs. Nash, Mrs.
Marvin, Mrs. Mess, Mrs. McBride,
Mrs. C. Wilson, Mrs. Cooper, Mrs.
Thornton Fell, Mrs. Rocke Robertson, Mrs. Cooke, Mrs. Jones, Mrs.
J. D. Helmcken, Miss Dupont, Mrs.
Briggs, Mrs. McClure, Mrs. Hcarne,
Mrs. Harris, Mrs. Troup, Mrs. R.
Beaven, Miss McNaughton Jones,
Miss Muriel Hall, Miss Bryden, Miss
Elinor Dunsmuir, Miss Mara, Miss
Fitzgibbon, Miss Sehl and Mrs. Tilly
and the Misses Tilly, and Mrs.
Richard Jones.
* *   *
Last Tuesday evening Mrs. Simpson held her masquerade ball which
was very largely attended. Miss
Thain's orchestra played for the evening.
* *   *
The Victoria Nurses' Club will hold
a ball on April 6th in the A. O. U. W.
hall.
* *   *
Mr. V. B. Harrison, from Ladysmith, was a visitor to Victoria during the week.
A quiet marriage took place on
March 29th, between Miss Ethel
Brown and Mr. C. A. K. Cornwall,
son of the late Hon. H. T. Cornwall.
The wedding service was conducted
by thc Right Rev. Bishop Perrin, at
St. Joseph's Hospital in the sick room
of the bride's mother, who is recovering from a severe attack of penu-
monia. The bride was attended by
her two brothers, Mr. Edgar Brown
and Jack Brown. The groom was
supported by his brother, Mr. T.
Cornwall. On the return from their
honeymoon which is being spent in
Vancouver, Mr. and Mrs. Cornwall
will take up their residence in Victoria.
* *   *
A very pretty wedding, which was
celebrated recently was that of Miss
Gertrude Evelyn Mills, youngest
daughter of Mr. S. Perry Mills, well
known in this city, and Mr. Charles
Ross MacAdam of Vancouver. The
marriage was solemnized at the palace of the Roman Catholic Bishop in
Victoria, the Rev. Father Gillis officiating at thc ceremony. The bride,
who looked very handsome in her
wedding gown, was attended by Mrs.
Charles G. Stewart, Duncan, and the
groom was supported by Mr. Charles
G. Stewart, Duncan, After the ceremony was over the wedding party
drove to thc Empress Hotel, where a
wedding supper was served, only the
intimate friends and relatives of the
young couple being present. Mr.
and Mrs. MacAdam were the recipients of many very handsome gifts.
The honeymoon is being spent in the
South and on their return they will
take up their residence in Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. Maurice Berkeley, accompanied
by his mother, Mrs. Berkeley, leaves
for Southern California for a short
visit THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 2, 1910
Why Not Make Ironing Day
a Pleasure?
Hot Point Electric Flat Irons can do this,—they make laundry
work light. No trips back and forth to the kitchen stove—no
bending over a hot coal fire—no dirt—no dust. In the summertime they may be attached to electric power current on the veranda
where ironing may be done in coolness and comfort.
The economy of operation, freedom from dirt, fire, danger and
odor make these scientific devices particularly satisfactory and
desirable.
Hot Point Electric Flat Irons are greatly superior to any other
electric laundry iron procurable.
Come in any time and allow us to show you them in operation.
Let us explain how small is their cost to operate and maintain.
Price Complete, $5*00
_^/^tS_____
mm
W&w
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fEwRFmk
NUffiu^t^ 'W
^^||El
1        1 III^**<J V  \ w\\\^
_J      jn£=^sT%ffillf
A
>"-IL-^ WO?
& G Electric Company, Ltd
Corner Fort and Langley Streets
Telephone 1609
Victoria, B, C.
At the Street Corner
By THE LOUNGER
(Continued from Page 2)
to the judges. Promises of support
have been brought back to Victoria
from Vancouver by one of the leading terrier fanciers of the City; he
says that the leading men in this line
in the Terminal City have promised to
support the Victoria Terrier Club and
to exhibit at the annual shows. This
is satisfactory, and goes to prove that
the introduction of the new branch
will in no wise "crab" the dog shows,
as at present held. Far from it. It
is an undoubted fact that many ladies,
who have felt themselves debarred
from taking an interest in sporting
dogs, such as pointers and setters,
will take a great interest in the new
club, which will embrace terriers. And
when the ladies' help is engaged the
welfare of a club is assured. To me
it is an extraordinary thing that the
average daily papers will devote
columns of to space to baseball, lacrosse and other sporting items, and
will deliberately ignore the dog
shows which are concerned with thc
smaller breeds. Pointers and setters
get theii due meed of glory, the club
sees to that. It is to be hoped that
the newly formed Terrier Club will
do the same.
"To be or not to be," said Hamlet.
But that was in the old days. Now
the question is: "Who owns the
roads?" The chaff curs seem to think
that they do. Pedestrians think they
don't. Cyclists arc not in sufficient
majority to have much opinion, but
the experience of one of the latter
may be interesting. He was cycling
down Fort street. "Toot-toot," came
from behind. Being a man of nerve
and principle he "budged" not an
inch. "Are you deaf?" said the occupants of the car, as it passed. "No,"
he yelled, "but I own as much of the
road as you do." And he was just
about right, too.
I    "M-e-at;  me-a-t me at the garden
i gate  by  twilight,"  yelled  the   home
soprano, when thc young man was
! calling.    But she wouldn't have said
so much about meat if she had known
the   prices   at   present   prevailing  in
Victoria.   A roast of mutton for 75c
for three people.   "Nuff sed."
*     *    *
It is not often that I undertake to
say a word about financial matters,
but I cannot refrain froc calling the
attention of my readers to the splendid opportunity afforded by the Dominion Stock & Bond Corporation, Ltd.,
of which our popular Minister of
Lands, Mr. Ellison, is president, for
parents and guardians to make a
modest investment for the children.
One hundred dollars placed with this
company would be a splendid nest-
egg, and the proceeds would mount
up rapidly, if allowed to remain at
compound interest.
I have already written a paragraph
on thc subject of cleaning up the
streets. Since then I have come across
another flagrant example. Outside
thc new Immigration Shed there is a
pile of stuff which used to be lumber.
What it is now, I cannot tell. I call
it "rubbish." Whether the City or
thc Provincial or thc Federal authorities are responsible for this I do not
presume to say. It is a disgrace to
the City; new arrivals at the Outer
Wharf must notice these things, and
must have a poor opinion of Victoria, Honestly, I think that the
best thing that the City can do is to
appoint me Mayor, with absolute
authority and with no Council. I am
a "peach" at signing cheques, and
at the end of the year the City
would wake up to find that there wcre
a lot of improvements, but no little
BIRMINGHAM TOWNSITE
There is no more conspicuous evidence of the development of British
Columbia, especially in the North,
than the locating of numerous town-
sites in districts which will, in the
near future be intersected by railways, and are at present served by
water transportation. Among the localities which have attracted attention
are Stewart, Hazelton and Fort
George. Any available townsite land
in the neighbourhood of the latter
bids fair to become extremely valuable. Fort George is situate at the
confluence of the Nechaco and Fraser rivers; it will become the head
centre of the Cariboo country. Within
three years, at least two great transcontinental railway systems will pass
through it, and within ten years the
number will be increased to four or
five, because all railways, making their
way from the Rockies to the Coast,
in this Northern section, must follow
the valley of the Fraser. When the
Hudson's Bay Company selected it as
one of their trading posts more than
100 years ago, they anticipated the
time when it would become an important commercial centre, and developments in 1910 testify to their sagacity. The Birmingham Townsite Co.
have purchased a valuable tract of
land, abutting on the Fraser in the
most favourable position for developing a town. It is exactly opposite
the point where the Nechaco flows
into the Fraser and also opposite the
Indian Reserve and the Hudson's Bay
territory. It is level prairie land and
high enough above the river to ensure
a perfect drainage. There is no doubt
that lots purchased there at present-
day prices will yield a handsome return within a few years.
Can
Little Eugene, aged 3, is the baby
of the family. One night, after having had his supper and being put to
bed he propounded to his mother the
question: "Mamma, who got my sup
per for mc when you was little?"
Dog's Head Bass
Dog's Head Guinness
We have accepted the agency for these celebrated
brands, bottled by Read Bros., Limited, London, the
largest bottlers of export "Bass" and "Guinness" in the
world.
This fact will now enable you to obtain these unrivalled
brands at any first class hotel, bar or restaurant in B.C.
Your licensed grocer can supply you for home nse.
Pither & Leiser
Wholesale Distributors
Corner Fort and Wharf Streets, Victoria
Vancouver and Nelson, B.C.
RENFREW LAND DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Henry H. Nash,
of Victoria, occupation Gentleman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described Iands:—
Commencing at a post planted 40 chains
west from S. W. corner post L 146, Renfrew District; thence 40 chains north;
thence west 80 chains; thence along
shore line in easterly direction to point
of commencement containing 160 acres
more or less.
Dated March th, 1910.
HENRY H. NASH,
apl 7 Edward Doyle, Agent
RENFREW LAND DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Edward DoylJ
of Port Renfrew, occupation Linemaij
intends to apply for permission to pui
chase the following described lands:-f
Commencing at a post planted about
chains west from L 146, Renfrew Dil
trict; thence north 40 chains; thenl
east 40 chains; thence south 50 chainl
thence west 40 chains along shore lir)
to point of commencement, contalnin
180 acres, more or less.
Dated March 7th, 1910.
apl 7 EDWARD DOYLE. | THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 2, 1910
MUSIC AND THE STAGE
(Continued from Page 3)
j finesse, which makes the act exceedingly attractive and appealing. Miss
Newell is a handsome woman and a
cultured musician.
The clever canine novelty which is
presented by Max York's animal actors, could hardly be arranged more
brilliantly for the delight of the children. Mr. York has a troupe of five
fox terriers and they are put through
a series of feats that is really remarkable. In fact, these canines do everything but talk.
The inimitable comedienne, Effie
Pearson, is presenting an entirely new
and novel act. With the assistance
of J. Hunter Wilson, who will be re-
aembered as the principal comedian
ia ''Alaska." The cleverness of both
these artists will be combined in offering one of the most refreshing
pinging and dancing oddities in vaude-
Ville.
J .The illustrated song, sung by Mr.
In Price, and the moving pictures
■vill be billed as usual.
A Parody
Last week "Bohemian" asked if
anyone could supply him with the
words of the sesquipedalian prize winning parody in Truth's competition on
"Twinkle, twinkle, little star." A correspondent has kindly complied with
this request, and the words are as
follows:
"Scintillate, scintillate, globule vivific;
Fain would I fathom thy nature specific;
Poised in the firmament's ether so
spacious,
Mostly resembling the gem carbonaceous.
"When torrid Phoebus refuses his
presence,
And ceases to lamp us with fierce
incandescence;
Then you illumine the regions supernal.
Scintillate, scintillate, semper nocturnal.
"The victim of hospiceless peregrination
I
Mm.......
It
».
I
\.»    .      '
IWOPOStO   BUILDING
\wutMt.a~
______m___m_mmm___m__wtt<_______t___________\
Cold Storage
Vancouver Island
Cold Storage and
Ice Company
VICTORIA, B.C.
Goods received at all hours.
Expert attention given.
Consignments solicited
Phone 2282    P.O. Box 875
[The Dominion Stock & Bond Corpokation, Ltd., Building
I.GILT EDGED INVESTMENT
The Dominion Stock & Bond Cor-
ration, Ltd., is entitled to be classed
ta gilt edged investment.    It is a
|e of a new company buying out an
one, but the old one has a record
(ich fully justifies the prediction of
(prosperous   future.   Most   people
pw that Trust Companies are pro-
Ible ventures.   The pioneer of these
(Canada, the National Trust, made
profit of 18 per cent,   last year.
Dominion Stock & Bond should
[better, because its money will be
Jested in the West, where the high-
Irate of interest prevails, and where
opportunities are most numerous,
old company has been in exist-
|e a little more than six months,
on the investment of small capital
able to show certified profits of
per cent.   Under the same man-
Iment the new company should at
\t do well.   The best guarantee of
is in the personnel of the direc-
e, which include Hon. Price El-
n, Chief Commissioner of Lands;
John Arbuthnot and Mr. M. B.
(in,   who   may   be   accounted   as
Ingst the wealthiest and most en-
Irising business men of the Prole.   This is pre-eminently an open-
|for investment of a small or a
amount, where the end aimed at
leurity and a high rate of interest,
litions which are not always com-
ple,  but  which  the  splendid   re-
Jces  of British  Columbia  render
[ble.
Gratefully hails your minute coruscation.
He could not determine his journey's direction.
But for your bright scintillating protection."
Law Students
The debate between the Law Students of Victoria and those of the
Law Faculty of Washington which
was to have taken place in Victoria
on April 6th, has been postponed to
May 6th, when a great forensic treat
may be anticipated if the quality of
the oratory displayed at the recent
banquet at the Empress hotel is maintained.
In a recent issue of The Week it
was erroneously stated that Mr. G.
W. Cotton, who has lately left for
San Francisco, was the consulting engineer of the Cement Works at Tod
Inlet. The statement was made in all
good faith, but it appears now that
Mr. Cotton's position in the Cement
Works was that of a mechanic.
"That boy in college has writ home
agin fer $100," said the old man.
"What fer?"
"Fer a wine supper!"
"Did he write it in Greek?"
"No, by thunder! It's wrote in plain
Georgia, with 'God bless our home,'
an'  'How's  all  the  family?'  at  the
end!"
xTHEATR
 i IE55EC S.MANAC "
COMMENCING
Thursday, April 7
MISS VERNA FELTOIM
AND
The Allen Players
Opening With Mrs. Leslie's Carter's
Great Success, entitled
ZAZA
Prices—25c, 50c, 75c.
Matinee on Saturday afternoon.
Watch newspapers for further announcements.
Satisfaction
We guarantee quality and satisfaction with every purchase of
Groceries.
Phone orders carefully attended to.
A. POOL
623 Yates St. Phone 448
Watson's Old Stand
Monday, April 4
THIRD SEASON
L. S. Sire Presents
May Robson
In the Delightful Comedy
REJUVENATION
OF
AUNT MARY
(By Anne Warner)
A PLAY WITH A THOUSAND
LAUGHS
Prices—50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50, $2.00.
Seat Sale now open.
RENFREW   LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Leigh H. Mllll-
ken, of Vancouver, clerk, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at
a post planted at the north-east corner
of S. Thrasher's claim; thence north
30 chains to the south line of Sec. 31,
Tp. 12; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 20 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 10 chains; thence east 40
chains to place of commencement, and
containing 210 acres, more or less.
Dated February 4th, 1910.
LEIGH H.  MILLIKEN,
feb 26. J. W. Williams, Agent.
There's
Nothing half
So Sweet
In Life as
Love and
Dudleigh's
Mixture
I «ndnN™y   Richardson I
j;  Cigar Store.     I^IVIIOI USUI1  g
$ Phone 346 8
* I
BLUE PRINTS
Any Length in One Piece
Six Cents per foot
TIMBER AND LAND
MAPS
DRAUGHTING
Electric Blue Print &
Map Co.
1218 Langley St. -  Victoria,'B.C.
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
AU kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
(see BOLDEN
ft
S     THE CARPENTER AND
jj BUILDER.
I Fort Street
foub fee, cent, ov
DEPOSIT.
We pay fow per out. latere*
on deposits of $1 (one dollar)
and np, withdrawable by ehoqne.
Special attention given to de-
posits made by mail.
Paid np Capital over 91,000,000
Assets over   -      .      8,000,000
B. O. PERMANENT LOAN OO,
laio  Government  street,
Viotoria, B.O.
The McK. & R.
Nose Cup
A necessary addition to the
toilet. The removal of dust and
other filth which accumulates in
the nostrils of everyone living
in a city, is a hygienic necessity. The McKesson & Robbins
Nose Cup
PRICE 35c
Works wonders in cleansing the
nostrils and securing protection
from infectious diseases. It assures perfect breathing through
the nose and general improvement in the tone of the whole
system. Affords great relief to
catarrh sufferers.
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
1228 Government Street
Near Yates
RENFREW  LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Annie A. Beard,
of Victoria, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-east corner of the
south-west quarter of Sec. 32, Tp. 12,
Renfrew District; thence south 30
chains; thence west 10 chains to S. J.
Mllliken's claim; thence north 30 chains;
thence east 10 chains to place of commencement, and containing 30 acres,
more or less.
Dated February 4th, 1910.
ANNIE A. BEARD,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
SQUABS!
SQUABS!
SQUABS!
Victoria and Vancouver Hotels
are calling for Squabs. We have
orders for thousnnds every month.
Learn how to make $500 a year
profit from 40 ft. x 30 ft. of solid
rock, In our 300 page illustrated
Manual, telling you how to start.
We founded the Squab business
ln America and can ship you the
finest stock, including all freight
charges and guarantee safe delivery. Send One Dollar and start
right  now.
Plymouth Rock Squab i
Boa 35
PEKOES ISLAND, B.O. 10
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 2, 1910
Would You Benefit by the Money
Making Power of Lar^e Capital ?
Your money, working in combination with the money of other investors, will produce larger profits for you than
it will working alone. Moreover, such combination minimises risk and uncertainty. It is the old principle of the
benefits of co-operating.
THE DOMINION STOCK & BOND CORPORATION, LIMITED, has outgrown its present capital, and can
give profitable employment to a large additional amount. The earnings of the capital already in the business, amount to
30 per cent, for the four months ending February, 1910, or at the rate of 120 per cent, per year.
These results have been achieved by shrewd, conservative, yet progressive management. The Company is doing
business along lines which ensure stability and permanence, and at the same time exceptional profit.
The business will include, in addition to Real Estate and Investments^ the receiving and holding of money on
deposit, all forms of trust deeds, acting as transfer agents for stock issues, the loaning of money on mortgages, the discounting of notes, the purchase of agreements of sale, etc.
One of the projected investments of the Corporation is a splendid new 10-storey office building, which it is
proposed to erect in the heart of the City. This will be a profitable revenue-producer and a permanent advertisement for
the Company.
The success of large Canadian financial institutions generally, as well as our own success thus far, point to a
splendid future. If any further guarantee of the future be needed, it will be furnished by the personnel of the directorate, men prominent in the business and public life of British Columbia.
DIRECTORS
THE HON PRICE ELLISON, President
Chief Commissioner of Lands for British Columbia;
President   of   Imperial   Fire   Insurance
Underwriters' Corporation, Ltd.
J. ARBUTHNOT
President of South Wellington Coal Co., Ltd., and
Pacific Coast Coal & Coke Co., Ltd.
J. A. HARVEY, K.C.
Barrister-at-Law, Director of the Bank of Vancouver.
M. B. CARLIN
President of thc Canadian Northern Coal Co., Ltd.,
Saanich Lumber Co., Ltd., and Barclay Sound
Cedar Co., Ltd., Vice-President of the
Bank of Vancouver
ARTHUR  E.   HEPBURN
A.I.M.E.. C.I.M.E., R.S.A.
Consulting Mining Engineer.
GEORGE H. SALMON
Managing Director
The authorized capital of the Company has been increased to $2,000,000. A limited number of shares are now
being offered at par, $100. Of this amount $20 is payable on application, $10 on allotment, and the balance at the rate
of $10 every 30 days.
Write TODAY for Prospectus (jiving Full Information About This Exceptional Investment
DOMINION STOCK & BOND CORPORATION, LTD.
Registered Office:   The Winch Building
Hastings Street
Vancouver, B. C.

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