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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Apr 10, 1909

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i
The Week
A British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria, B. e.
jrrrir«T»TrTnnrinr»Tv»***»B
HALL & WALkEtt"
Agents
6bl WELLINGTON   COLLIERY
COMPANY'S COALS
1232IGovernment St.        I Telephone 83  I
__JUULt*.9t»t 9JUittttJUUUU_E_\
/OL.  VI.
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL io, 1909
One Dollar Per Annum
The recent controversy be-
Saster-tide. tween Dr. Carman and Dr.
* Jackson   has   revived   the
|uestion of literal, and parabolic interpre-
iation.    Theology has advanced its out-
losts far since the German critics suc-
leeded  in  imposing  their   views  upon
students of the Bible.    Each successive
sombat between the forces of the old and
he new school strengthens the cause of
vhat is not very happily styled the Higher
criticism.   From the orthodox standpoint
if fifty years ago, or even less, which accepted verbal inspiration as a dogma, and
'l literal interpretation of the Bible from
;he first chapter of Genesis to the last of
Revelations, it is a far call to the scientific
ttitude of today.   Dr. Jackson has been
sustained, not merely by public opinion,
svhich  perhaps  should count  for  little
vhere such momentous issues are at stake,
but by the weight of theological opinion in
Regarding  the  first  eleven   chapters  of
[Jenesis as allegorical.   It is not necessary
to follow the excursions of twentieth century theologians throughout the books of
the Old Testament.   By. a series of scientific tests they have succeeded in classifying the Hebrew scriptures, and no Bible
'student need be in any doubt as to which
looks are historical, which allegorical, or
•which prophetical.    It was natural that
whilst the Higher criticism was vigorously
attacking the Old Testament scriptures,
and stripping away the trappings which
zealous hands had wound around them
orthodox Christianity should i*n\ back upon the absolute inerrancy of the New Testament.   Here was the resting place for
harassed, and perplexed souls;   it might
be that they must, in obedience to the enlightenment of  the. age,  readjust their
position with respect to the older book,
but the New Testament was so infused
with the personality of the Messiah that
the faith of Christianity refused to be
shaken either in its historic accuracy, or
its teaching.   Later the Higher criticism
diverted its attack to the last stronghold of
Christianity, and for twenty-five years the
searchlight of scientific enquiry has been
directed upon the person and teaching of
Christ.     The   net   result   has   been  to
strengthen his claims upon humanity, and
to deepen the reverence in Avhich he is|
held by all devout Christians.    It was
never so apparent to tlie minds of men, as
it is today, that—
"The Church's one foundation
Is Jesus Christ her Lord."
There are naturally thousands of devout;
seekers after truth, not within the fold of
[tlie Christian Church, who disbelieve in
ithe miracles recorded in the New Testament.    There is an increasing number
) within the Church disinclined to accept
them as narratives of fact, whilst regarding them in the same light as Grecian
'fables, and accepting them for their
morals. It is no part of the <Juty of a
secular journal to examine into the findings of theological controversialists, but
at Easter-Tide it is impossible not to be
impressed with the great thoughts which
have seized the minds of men, and the
vital'truths to which they cling amid all
the wreckage of religious' conflict. It is
not to depreciate the importance of his
' toric truth, nor to cast any doubt upon
the literal accuracy of the Crucifixion, and
the Resurrection, to premise that the true
value lies in the faith which has been implanted in the human heart that nothing
of worth can be quickened except it die;
and that the most potent influence for the
uplifting of the world is the hope kindled
by an unshaken belief in the final triumph
of good. The.greatest intellects, and the
wisest men-have discerned that there is
no real ground for optimism apart from a
full recognition of this truth. It is because the world believes in the teaching of
the Resurrection, that men are able ',' to
rise on stepping stones of their dead selves
to higher things." If it were possible to
blot out the story of the Resurrection of.
Christ, and to extinguish the spark of hope,
which it has kindled in the human breast,
pessimism would ride rampant in every
community, all forms of philanthropic and
religious work would be abandoned, crime
would stalk unchecked through the land
and men. would curse God, and die. Hap\
pily the world never had so firm a grip on
the profound truths, and the profounder
teachings which we celebrate at Easter
tide. Its observances are the solatium
of many a bruised and broken life; its
solemnities recall the tenderest memories;
and its hushed inspiration stimulates to
renewed combat with the disintegrating
forces of human society. The world which
is reminded by the purity of the Easter
Lily of "the long ago" may pay but the,
passing tribute of a sigh, but in that sober
moment a new impulse may be born. Truly
men will not readily relax their grip on the
revealed truth which Easter observances
set forth. ■
Every well-wisher of Vic-
The Y.M.C.A. toria will rejoice at the im-
Campaifcn.       pending  campaign of -the
Y.M.C.A. looking to the
erection of a suitable building in the City,
The history of this great movement is the
history of the progress of public opinion
in the direction of social purity. The
great founder, Lord Shaftsbury, builded
better than he knew. Eor many years he
was considered narrow, and the interpretation of his wishes by zealous leaders of
the movement, contributed not a little to
emphasize the impression. In those
there   was   not. a   little   intoler
ance, and more than a little of the
atmosphere of "I am holier than thou"
about the precincts of the Y.M.C.A. But
Lord Shaftsbury had enshrined a jewel,
though it might be in an earthen vessel,
and little by little the movement gained
breadth, and that spirit of sweet reasonableness, which enabled it finally to gain
public confidence, without sacrificing one
jot of the principle whidh it represented.
For ten years now opposition of every kind
has ceased, the control has passed into the
hands of public spirited citizens, who have
endeavoured to steer its course by the
Golden Rule. The result is, not only a
vast increase in the popularity of the
movement among the young men, whom
it was primarily designed to benefit, but
among business firms, and industrial corporations, who have come to recognize that
they can make no better investment than
to contribute to the upbuilding of a great
training institution for turning out honest,
clean living men. This is where the Y.
M. C. A. stands today, and this is why it
can appeal with every confidence for public support. Its plans for the future in
Victoria are broad and generous, the campaign will be conducted in a business-like
manner, it will be supported by the most
influential men in the community, and the
Capital City of British Columbia could do
itself no greater honour than to respond
in such a manner as to ensure the erection
of a splendid, and imposing home for the
most important organization within its
borders,
Getting
Busy.
In the interests of law
and order, and equally in
the interest of law-abiding
hotel-keepers, the police are
to be congratulated on having secured a
conviction of John Irving, proprietor of
the Goldstream Hotel, for illegally selling
liquor on Sunday. The only redeeming
feature of the case was that Irving pleaded
guilty. The good work, however, should
not stop at this stage; there are numbers
of country hotels or inns, which are persistently violating the same law. They do
so to the annoyance of the public, and the
discredit of respectable licensed victuallers.
Public opinion would sustain the police in
an active raid against these law-breakers.
Now is the time to begin before the dry
and thirsty season establishes them in a
renewal of their evil course. This is primarily a matter for. the Provincial Police,
and their action will be closely watched.
wasted. Time and again cargoes of imported apples have been on sale in Victoria, of an inferior grade, to condemned
consignments of the local product. All this
involves heavy loss to the fruit grower,
and is a distinct blow to the industry. It
arises largely from incompetency, and
jealousy. The Province has had about
enough of it, and the time has arrived for
"mending or ending."
The  Week has time  and
Fruit again called attention to the
Inspection.       gross   inadequacy   of   thc
fruit inspection of this Province. It has tried to fasten the responsibility upon the right party, but without
success. It does know that the Minister
of Agriculture is getting grey under the
incessant quibbling and bickering between
the fruit inspectors, the tree sprayers, and
the fruit growers. It is quite certain that
tliere is a lack of harmony among those
who are entrusted with the inspection of
fruits and orchards, and unless some
settled plan of procedure can be evolved,
under which all these officers will work together for the common good, for the protection of the public, and at the same time
for the upbuilding of the industry, the
Department will make no mistake if it
cancelled every appointment and started
out with a new staff. How necessary this
is may be gathered from the fact that last
season trees were destroyed indiscriminately, when they might have been saved
by proper treatment. In other cases, trees
were sprayed with an ineffective chemical,
and the money expended in this way was
Rough
House.
The   Island   Development
Waking Up.     League is doing a good work
in more ways than one, and
noticeably so in arousing other more or less
moribund organizations into activity. The
Nanaimo Board of Trade for instance, is
getting busy, and realizing that, if it is to
share in the advantages of a progressive
campaign, it must do something definite
within its own borders. It has placed on
record a demand for a conspicuous place
in any railway development scheme, and is
objecting to Government aid on the Mainland unless connection is made with the
Island. Whether the bridging of Seymour. Narrows is within the range of
practical politics may reasonably be
doubted, and the most competent engineers
believe: that, for many years to come communication between the Mainland and the
Island, will be effected by means of train
ferries. This may be what Nanaimo has
in view, and if so, it is a reasonable proposition and one which should be urged
upon the Government by the Development
League. There is little doubt that in the
near future a railway policy will have to
be submitted to the Province, and that it
will include extensive developments of
transportation on Vancouver Island, is a
foregone conclusion. The chief advantage
of the new organization with its numerous
affiliations, is that it covers the whole
Island, and ensures that no section shall
be overlooked.
The workmen in Haggerty's
camp had a fine time at the
beginning of the week, when
they filled up with bad
whisky, and smashed everything in sight,
including each other. The Avhisky must
have been, very bad, for the men lost all
restraint, and developed destructiveness to
an amazing degree, for when they had
smashed everything else, they attacked the
pickles and condiments to say nothing of.
the cooking utensils. Four bruised and
battered men appeared in the Police Court
to answer for their strenuous performance, but strange to relate no conviction
followed. This was not the faidt of the
magistrate, but was due to lack of evidence. One cannot but wonder what would
have happened in Court if the proceedings
there had followed a coroner's inquest, as
might easily have happened. With the
country painted red all the way from Gold-
stream to Victoria, and four roaring
drunks., handcuffed and manacled, brought
down in a wagon, it seems as if it should
have been possible to make the punishment
fit the crime. However, perhaps, it is taking too serious a view of these little jubilations, which may after all be a necessary,
relief to the tedium of building the Mill
Bay Road.
Cock and
Bull Story.
Former Deputy Warden
Bourke of New Westminster cut a very ridiculous
figure in the Vancouver
Courts this week, when he abjectly apologized to Mr. A. D. Mclntyre, a lawyer of
Kamloops, for suggesting that he had
secured the release of Bill Miner. In addition to the abject apology, Bourke also
had to pay heavy costs. Bourke is the man
who caused the matter to be brought up in
the Dominion House, by Mr. J. D. Taylor. It is now clear that he furnished
false statements, and public opinion will
agree that he is getting off very lightly
with an apology and costs; all of which
goes to si low that charges affecting the
honour of men, should be very cautiously
handled, especially where tlie slanderer has
an nxe to grind.
The number of newspapers
Hitting the Nail prepared to criticise tie
On the Head. pusillanimity of Sir Wil-
. frid Laurier in the present
crisis is increasing. The more they look
at his conduct the less they like it. Toronto Saturday Night calls his policy
"mushy." Several papers twit him with
offering England "brave words" but not a
dollar. One of the neatest comments is to
be found in a paper which rarely allows
itself the luxury of strong political comment, being essentially a commercial
journal. But this is what it says on the
topic of the moment: "Some papers comment on what they call the admirable way
in which the Parliament of Canada kept
its head during the time of the Dreadnought fever. The thing was only equalled
by the deliberate way in which the same
Parliament kept its money." THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL io, 1908
V
At The Street
Corner
P By THB LOUNGE* ^*
^fl^/M^/i*»^V*»'-"V""^/**D
I notice by the daily press that
poor old Jem Mace is "down and
out"; he has reached what appears
to be the inevitable goal of all pugs
—poverty by the booze route. All
the same, I am just a little surprised
in Jem's case, because all the years
I knew him he was one of the most
abstemious of sports. Up to the time
he met Coburn, he was next thing
to a total abstainer, which means that
he only indulged in an occasional
glass, and never failed to put an appearance in the ring in first class condition.
Looking over the long list of pugs,
whom I have seen perform, I think
that Mace was the most scientific of
them all. True, he belonged to the
old school, and his stand-up attitude
presented a remarkable contrast with
the crouch that is so fashionable today, but there is not in the ring today, and probably never has been, a
man quicker on his feet, with more
lightning speed in his punches, and
with a cooler head.
Mace had no particular punch of his
own special invention, such as was
claimed by McCoy. He was an all-
round fighter with the courage of
Sayers, and more science. Mace shone
when all fights were with naked
knuckles. I saw him up against King
and Goss, that's a long time ago, and
he was the master of both of them.
I met him on his sensational tour
with Herbert Slade, the Maori marvel, who turned out to be nothing but
a great big slob, for although he
weighed 225 to Mace's 160, and had
twenty years advantage in age, Mace
could put him out of business at any
stage of the game.
Mace's legitimate successor was
Mitchell, who was almost as brilliant
a fighter, but he came in with the
gloves, and unfortunately after attaining a few phenomenal successes got
"swelled head." But the worst thing
that ever happened to Mitchell was
falling into the clutches of Pony
Moore, who made him a boozer, and
put an end to his career.
Mace was a good sport to the last;
I shall never forget his two last appearances. The one was in a marquee
in Wolverhampton about thirty years
ago, when he donned the gloves with
Alf. Greenfield, and made that tricky
gentleman look like thirty cents. Less
than twenty years ago, and when he
was nearing sixty, he put up a show
fight at Glasgow with Mitchell. Of
course this is ridiculous for a man
of his age, and he made about as
poor a showing as did Sims Reeves
oh the concert platform, for some
years before his death.
I am rather surprised to learn from
the obituary notice that Mace is 78.
I should have placed him at about 74
,or 75; however, it is sad to think that
a man who fought so many splendid
fights, and never did a mean trick,
should have to finish up in the poor
house. I have always thought that
the greatest fight conceivable would
have been between Mace and Fitz-
simmons, if they had been of an age.
They were matched in weight, and
while Mace was more scientific, and
much .quicker Fitzsimmons had a heavier punch. It is not a little singular
that the two greatest champions of
the last fifty years were both middleweight men.
I am quite aware that the above
is a digression from my usual line,
but there are many Old Country
sports in Victoria, who I am sure will
appreciate a reference-to Mace. As a
matter of fact, with the return of
jSijmmer weather, I must begin to get
busy in my accustomed haunts, for
there is plenty to note, and plenty
to comment upon. I want to congratulate the Chairman of the Streets
Committee on the manner in which
he is rushing the installation of the
salt water main on Government street.
So far it is the quickest job I have
ever seen done in the city, and is
gratifying evidence that we are indeed
living under a new regime.
IMPORTS OF CHAMPAGNES FOR THE MONTHS  OF JANUARY
AND FEBRUARY, 1909.
Compiled From Customs House Records and Absolutely Correct.
Figures Tell the Tale.
G. H. Mumm & Co  20,350 Cases.
Pommery & Greno  7>57*8
Ruinart Pere & Fils   3.310    "
Pol Roger   "...  1,722     "
Louis Roederer _.  1,710     "
Moet & Chandon   1,685     "
Krug & Co :  1,434     "
Dry Monopole    1,410     "
Vve. Clicquot  1,231     "
St. Marceaux   1,123    "
Piper Heidsieck  718    "'
Due de Montebello   300    "
Perrier Jouet" -       150     "
Various other brands (twenty or more)  4,839    "
Total  47,56o Cases.
You will observe that G. H. Mumm & Co. imported nearly 50 per cent.
of the total importations, which is sufficient evidence of the ever-popular
Champagne.
Royal Warrents have been granted to Messrs. G. H. Mumm & Co. by
His Majesty King Edward VII.
His Majesty the German Emperor.
His Majesty the Emperor of Austria.
His Majesty the King of Italy.
His Majesty -the King of Sweden.
His Majesty the King of Denmark.
His Majesty the King of the Belgians.
His Majesty the King of Spain.
G. H. MUMM & CO.'S SELECTED BRUT is a brut champagne of the
very highest quality, made of selected cuvees of vintage years, specially
adapted for dry wines. Connoisseurs pronounce it the very finest brut
imported. It is a very dry and genuine brut champagne of exceeding
purity without being heavy.
, G. H. MUMM & CO.'s EXTRA DRY is noted for its superb quality,
natural dryness and purity. It is made from selected grapes of the choicest
vineyards in the Champagne District. It can now be procured in half-pints
(splits), in which style this unrivalled wine is especially adapted for hospital, fine club, restaurant and domestic use.
PITHER   &   LEISER
_**
Cor. Fort and Wharf Streets, Victoria.
Water Street, Vancouver. Nelson, B. C.
JAMES BUCHANAN & CO.
By Royal Warrants
PURVEYORS TO THE ROYAL FAMILY.
Distillers of the
WORLD-FAMOUS RED SEAL AND BLACK AND WHITE
SCOTCH WHISKIES.
Unsurpassed for AGE, PURITY or FLAVOR.
For Sale by all Dealers.
General Agents for B.C. and the Yukon District.
RADIGER & JANION,
Headquarters for choice nursery stock.
Apple, pear, cherry, plum and peach trees
and small fruits, also ornamental trees,
shrubs, roses, evergreens, etc. . Largest and
best assorted stock in British Columbia.
Ten per cent, cash discount on all orders
above $10.00.
PRICE LIST AND CATALOGUE ON
APPLICATION.
Now I want to say a word about
the new fire chief; there seems to be
a good deal of boosting for ex-Chief
Deasy, but for several reasons I think
it would be a great mistake to give
him the appointment. Some of these
reasons should not, in fairness to him,
receive too much prominence, but it
would be a mistake to suppose that
Victorians have short memories. In
the next place I am informed by men
who worked with ' Chief Deasy for
years that he was not the best man
in the world to get on with, and
finally, although he did good work in
Nelson, and is undoubtedly an expert
fireman, he was not regarded as an
ideal chief. Having made inquiries as
to the qualifications of the several
candidates I am going to ask my
friends to support Joe Wachter, who
is ,an experienced fireman, a steady;
sober man, popular with his colleagues, and one capable of instilling
enthusiasm into the members of the
brigade.
I want to call the attention of the
Streets Committee, or possibly I
should say the Parks Committee, to
the manner in which trees are being
planted on some of the boulevards,
particularly on Cook street. Between
Cook and Pandora, and again between
Cook and Fairfield Road, there are a
number of splendid old trees. I notice that new ones are being planted
between them, which is surely quite
unnecessary, as it will crowd the
boulevard, and impede the growth of
the younger ones.
My last kick this week is the old
standing complaint about the triangu.
lar piece of land at the corner of
Government and Belleville. Now that
the C. P. R. have commenced to tidy
up their own corner the city should
certainly do something to remove an
old standing grievance, and an eyesore. Which reminds me that an American visitor, with whom I was
lounging in the Palm Room of the
Empress Hotel one day this week, directed my attention to the view from
the window* looking towards Douglas
and Humboldt. Beyond the ground
which has been so tastily planted and
laid* out by the C. P. R. the .aspect
is anything but encouraging.. A picture of the mud flat, and the rows of
cabins, which disfigure the upper end,
would be most effective in keeping
visitors away from Victoria. Considering that the Government gave all
this flat to the city, it does seem as
if it should have been possible to
raise sufficient money to make it presentable.
Qfa
rTZ*<-fiZ<rt
m
For Health's Sake
Use Oil in Salad
Nothing nicer or more wholesome at this time of the year than
good, fresh Salads with pure Olive Oil as an ingredient:—
C. & B. LUCCA OIL, per bottle... 75c, 50c, 25c
NICELLE OLIVE OIL, per bottle 60c and 30c
ITALIAN OLIVE OIL, per bottle  $1.00
FRENCH OLIVE OIL, per bottle 81.25
Per Gallon Tin  $4.25
Per Half-Gallon Tin $2.25
SALAD OIL, per pint 25c; quart 50c
PURNELL VINEGAR, per bottle   20c
C. & B. VINEGAR, per bottle 25c
GRIMBLE VINEGAR, per bottle  25c
DIXI H. ROSS CO.
INDEPENDENT GROCERS. 1317 GOVERNMENT ST.
Tels. 52,1052 and 1590.
Victoria Fuel Co.
PHONE I3??|i
You want the best Coal, the "Burn all" kind, absolutely free
from Slate, Stones and Klinkers.
We are Sole Agents for The South Wellington Coal Mines
Company (Ltd.).
THIS COAL is admitted by all to be the finest Domestic Coal
mined.
Let us know if you want it quick.
VICTORIA FUEL 60MPHNY
PHONE 1377
618 TROUNCE AVE.
I STEEL-CLAD ELECTRIC IRON
■I
An Electric Iron
costs less to. operate and maintain than any
other.
Easily attached
to any electric
light socket. Invaluable to the
housewife. Unrivalled fof laundry purposes.
I You are particularly invited to call and examine them in our
§    Demonstration Rooms.
I B. C. Electric Company, Limited
^ r Corner Fort and Langley Streets.
llWiMWiWHOT
I
OFFICE EQUIPMENT
TYPEWRITERS, CASH REGISTERS,
SAFES, DESKS, FILING CABINETS,
BAXTER & JOHNSON 809 Qovernment Street!
Victoria, B. C.
If it's for the Office—ask ui.
m
Easter Cakes
Easter Novelties
Hot Cross Buns
..  .We have a choice variety of Fancy Cakes, fresh for Easter.
. We take great care in the preparation of Wedding Cakes.
Caterers'for:*—
BANQUETS,
WEDDING BREAKFASTS,
LUNCH AND TEA PARTIES.
Confectionery of the Best. Quality.
Clay's
619 Port St.
Phone 101
a:-»»*»»n»».s^^^^^ THE WEEK  SATURDAY APRIL io, 1909
a ___W__t ______» ________ —M—___-__- *■_______. _t_ l»—A—_ ___M__m _____________ _____________ __________
*V *v '*' vPwWWwi.' w
Social and        *
Personal. *
f
i____A__li____i__l_i____i_____i _______■ ___a___a___a _______A __________<
f *V '*i' '1' 'I' 'J.' '1' IT'!''fl 'if >V 'V
!Mr. and Mrs. John Hirsch of Dan-
^ns were in Victoria fbr a few days
iiring the past week..
* *   *
I Mr. and Mrs. H. Pooley paid a
niprt visit to Seattle in the early part
If the week.
I *   *   *
I Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Palmer of Che-
liainus were down for a few days.
J *   *   *
I Mrs. Beauchamp Tye is to be one
If the hostesses for the coming week,
|aving issued invitations for Thurs-
ay next, the 15th.
* *   #
Mrs. Hughes, Work Point Bar-
licks, left early in the week for the
ast.
*'.♦•■*
[(The marriage of Mr. R. O. C.
/ard, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs.
(Lobert Ward, Oak Lawn, Leather-
ead, to Miss Florence Tuthill,
laughter of Mrs. Villiers Tuthill,
|)akhill Court, Upper Richmond Road
nd Ballenastona, Limerick, has been
kranged to take place this month.
|r. and Mrs. Robert Ward are very
fell known in Victoria, having reeded here some years ago.
7 *    *    *
Mrs. Robin Dunsmuir left early in
|ie week for California.
* *   *
II Mr. and Mrs. Lamb, of Somenos,
|ame to town for a few days.
Mr. and Mrs. Bradley Dyne,, of
lidney, were in for the Dow Show.
* *   *
Major and Mrs. Greisbach of Dun-
lahs were guests at the Balmoral during the week.
* *   *
Messrs. R. Brooks and E. H. Stan-
lord, Salt Spring, were among the
liitmerous   visitors   during  the   past
Reek.
* *   *
Miss Gaudin left on Thursday last
fo spend the Easter holidays.
Mrs.   Gordon   Hunter   spent   the
liblidays at their pretty summer house
\n Shawnigan Lake.
1 - *   *   *
Captain Clive   Phillips   and   Mrs.
Volley of Sidney came on Wednesday morning's passenger train.     \
■* *   *   * 1
Mr. Hugh Cornwall spent a brief
lioliday with friends here.
" *   *   *
Mrs.    Stretfield    came    in    from
Saanich during the week.
* *   *
Mrs. Burgess of Somenos was registered at the Balmoral this week.
Mr. A. Ward Came down from
Janges and made the Balmoral his
headquarters.
* *   *
Mr. C. ,H. Beaver Potts was registered at the Driard during his visit
ito Victoria this week.
* *   *
Mrs. Cambell McCallum is making
satisfactory progress from her recent
fllness.   She is the guest of her sister,
diss Hawthornthwaite, Esquimalt.
* *   *   *
Mr. J. M. Foot left for Cowichan
|Lake for the holidays.
The Victoria Nurses' Club is giv-
Ihg a dance in the A.O.U.W. Hall on
[Wednesday evening, April 13th, 1909.
Gas Not Necessary.
Scene: Fashionable watering place
■lin Northern Britain, English woman
[-Visitor who is suffering from tooth-
I'ache— I say, gardener, have you a
I dentist here?"
Old Gardener—Yees, mem—yees,
I'mem.
Woman Visitor—Does he extract
(teeth with the aid of gas?
Old Gardener—Bliss us a' mem;
I we hae guid dayiilicht here!
I They had been engaged just seventeen minutes by the clock, when a
scornful look appeared on her face
that was calculated to wither the orange blossoms.
"I can't imagine, dear," he said,
sadly, "what has come over you so
suddenly; I simply asked if you were
romantic, when—"
"Oh, George, forgive me I" she exclaimed, with a convulsive sob, as
she threw her arms about his neck.
"I thought you asked me if I was
rheumatic."
No. 80. Commencing at a post planted seven miles east and 40 chains north
of the S. E. C. of Lot 6, being the S.
E C; thence north 80 chains; thenco
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thenoe east 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated March 12, 1908.
F  FOX
may 8 P. Harrison, Agent.
Oriental Cream
OB lUOXOAX- BEAUTOrm
BEAUTY THAT LASTS.
Where is the woman who has not
the praiseworthy desire to enhance
her personal charms and preserve as
long as possible her delightful power
of enchantment, which lasts as long
as her beauty? The Oriental Cream,
prepared by Dr. T. Felix Gouraud, of
New YoHc City, is a harmless preparation for preserving the delicacy
of the complexion and removing
blemishes. It is the favorite toilet
article of the leading professional
artists, who owe so much of their
popularity to their personal charms.
Scarcely a star dressing room in the
land is without Gouraud's Oriental
Cream, which is the most wholesome
and perfect beautifier known. Druggists will supply you. No. 8.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date the following parties
intend to apply to the Honourable, the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works, for a license to prospect for
Coal and Petroleum on lands situated
on the North Beach of Graham Island,
Queen Charlotte Group:
No. 1. Commencing at a post planted
40 chains north of the southeast corner
of Lot 6, being the S. W. C; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains to point of commencement; containing 640 acres.
Dated March 11, 1909.
GEOBGE YOUNG,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 2. Commencing at a post planted
40 chains north of the S. E. C. of Lot
6, being the N. W. C; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement; containing
640 acres.
Dated March 11, 1909.
JOHN YOUNG,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 3. Commencing at a post planted
40 chains south of the S. E. C. of Lot
6, being N. W. Corner; thence east 80
chains; thence south -80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement; containing
640 acres.
Dated March 11, 1909.
M. HAMILTON,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 4. Commencing at a post planted
four miles east and 120 chains north of
the S. E. C. of Lot 6, being the N. W. C:
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement; containing 640 acres.
Dated March 12, 1909.
J. CLEARIHUE,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 5. Commencing at a post planted
four miles east and 40 chains north of
the S. E. corner of Lot 6, being the
N.E. C.j thehce east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thehce west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains to point of commencement; containing 640 acres.
Dated March 12, 1909.
W. BBYCE,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 6. Commencing at a post planted
four mileS east and 40 chains north of
the S. E. C, of Lot 6, being the N. E.
Corner; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement; containing 640 acres.
Dated March 12, 1909.
N. H. WHITEHEAD,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 7. Commencing at a post planted
on the S. E. C. of Lot 6, being the N. E.
C; thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement; containing 640 acres.
Dated March 11, 1909.
MARGARET YOUNG,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 8. .Commencing at a post planted
one mile east and half a mile north
of the S. E." C. of Lot 6, being the S. W.
C; thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains, to point of commencement; Containing 640 acres.
Dated March 11, 1909.
A. W. YOUNG,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 9. Commencing at a post planted
one mile east and half a mile north
of the S. E. C. of Lot 6, being the N.
W. C.; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated March 11, 1909.
E. M. YOUNG,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 10. Commencing at a post planted
two miles east and half a mile north
of the S. E. C. of Lot 6, being the S.
W. C; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement; containing 640 acres.
Dated March llth, 1909.
MALCOLM W. YOUNG,
P. Harrison, Agent.
__o. 11. Commencing at a post planted seven miles east and 40 chains north
of the S. E. C. of Lot 6, being the S, W.
C; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 040 acres.
Dated March 10,  1-J09.
J. JOHNSON,
P. Harrison, Agent.
/To. 12. Commencing at a post planted seven miles east and 40 chains north
of the S. E. C. of Lot 6, being the N. W.
C; thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated March 10, 1909.
C. McCALLEN,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 13. Commencing at a post planted seven miles east and 40 chains north
of the S. E. C. of Lot 6, being the N.
E. C; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated March 12, 1909.
D. DONALD,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 14. Commencing at a post planted two miles east and half a mile north
of the S. E. C. of Lot 6, thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
Dated March 11, 1909.
JOHN S. YOUNG,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. IB. Commencing at a post planted one mile west of the S. E. C. of Lot
6, being the N, E. C; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
Dated March 11, 1909.
H. CUBBY,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 16. Commencing at a post planted two miles west of the S. E. C. of
Lot 6, being the N. E. C.j thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
Dated March 11,  1909.
S. CURRY,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 17. Commencing at a post planted two miles and sixty chains west and
one mile north of the S. E. corner of
Lot 6; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated March 11, 1909.
J. CURRY,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 18. Commencing at a post planted two miles and sixty (60) chains west
and one mile north of the S. E. C. of
Lot 6; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated  llth  March,   1909.
C. HARRISON,
F, Harrison, Agent:
No. 19. Commencing at a post planted four miles east and 120 chains north
of the S. E. C. of Lot 6, being the Si E.
C; thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated March 12, 1909.
A. J. KITTO,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 20. Commencing at a post planted four miles east and 120 chains north
of the S. E. C. of Lot 6, being the S. W.
C.j thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated March 12, 1909.
T. LIDDLE,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 21. Commencing at a post planted four miles east and 120 chains north
of the S. E. C. of Lot 6, being the N.
E. C.j thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated March 12, 1909.
D. SOULE,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 22. Commencing at a post planted six miles east and two and a half
miles north of the S. E. Cornerf of Lot
6, being the N. E. Corner; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
Dated March 12,  1909.
W. J. SANDERS,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 23. Commencing at a post plant-'
ed six miles east and two and a half
miles north ot the S. E. C. of Lot 6,
being the S. W. C.j thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
Dated March 12, 1908.
A. WHEELEB,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 24. Commencing at a post planted seven miles east and three and a
half miles north of the S. E. C. of Lot
6, being the. S. W. C; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains
to point of beginning, containing 640
acres.
E. CAMERON,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 26. Commencing at a post planted seven miles east and two and a half
miles north of the S. E. C. of Lot 6,
being the S. W. C; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
Dated March 12, 1909.
H. E. HOPPER,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 26. Commencing at a post planted one mile south of the S. E. C, of Lot
11, being the N. E. Corner; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated March 12, 1909.
L. S. BELL,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 27. Commencing at a post planted seven miles west and two and a half
north of the S. E. C. of Lot 6, being
the N. E. C; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated March 12, 1909.
E. WHEELEB,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 28. Commencing at a post planted six mlles east and 40 chains north
of the S. E. C. of Lot 6; being the S. E.
C; thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated March 12, 1909.
M. M. ELLIS,
P. Harrison, Agent.
No. 29. Commencing at a post planted six miles east and*40 chains north
of the S. E. Corner of Lot 6, being the
N. E. C; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 ohalns;
thence north 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated March 12,  1909.    "
F. NASON,
P, Harrison, Agent.
Something New
We are now able to offer to our patrons
A GUARANTEE
on our splendid line of PLATED KNIVES, FORKS and SPOONS.
This line which is specially made for us is guaranteed to have
MORE SILVER than any other standard make and we GUARANTEE to replace
Free of Charge
any of these goods which, after use, do not prove satisfactory. This
condition we believe accompanies no other flatware made.
Prices as follows:—
COFFEE SPOONS  per doz. $4.70
TEASPOONS          " 3-15
DESSERTSPOONS   " 4-95
TABLESPOONS  " 5-85
DESSERT FORKS   " 4-95
TABLE FORKS  " 5.85
DESSERT KNIVES  " 4.95
TABLE KNIVES    " 5.40
Challoner & Mitchell
Diamond Merchants and Silversmiths
1017 Qovernment Street Victoria, B. C.
EMPRESS THEATRE
Cor. Government and Johnson Sts.
HIGH CLASS MOVING PICTURES   AND ILLUSTRATED SONGS.
COMPLETE CHANGE OF PROGRAM   EACH   MONDAY
WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY.
CONTINUOUS PERFORMANCE.       a to 5.30. and 7 to 10:30 p.rt_.
Admission—10 cents.
Children's Matinee Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday—5 cents. THE WEEK, SATURDAY APRIL, 10 1909
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
F-iUUhed at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
1208 Government St., Victoria, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE, Editor.
pire is really face to face with a crisis,
and Armageddon is in sight, then
without a doubt the leader will arise
in some part of the Empire, probably
where least expected, and crystallize
into action the impulse and latent
energy of the British peoples.
On Leaders.
By BOHEMIAN.
The success of every movement depends on the leader. He need not
necessarily be the one who has
evolved the main idea, but he must
be the one to carry it out. There
have been a few great men in the
history of the world, who could both
make the bullet and fire it, but the
combination is rare. In military and
naval movements a Council of War
must precede the action. It is upon
a judicious combination of forces that
'success depends. For years before
the Franco-German war broke, out,
the military schools of that military
Empire were planning and scheming,
and had the armies of Europe set out
upon a chess board until they had
reduced the possibilities of their
movements to a science. The result
was that the most glorious campaign
in history proceeded with the accuracy and regularity of clockwork, and
the great Field Marshall, Von Moltke,
was able to place his finger, days in
advance, upon the site of every great
battle ground.
Not less marvellous in its mastery
of detail was the precision with which
Bismark's master mud worked out
the scheme, which resulted from ix
successful war in effecting the dream
of his life—a United Germany,
In later days the experience of the
Franco-German war has been paralleled in the brilliant and -.decisive
Russo-Japanese war and in the concluding stages of the Boer'War, when
Kitchener and Roberts acted in con-
: junction. It is doubtful if the former
has ever been excelled as a military
organizer, and his latest work in India, under new and exacting conditions, has but added to his fame.
. But it is not only in military affairs
that the great qualities of leadership -
are displayed; the Victorian era has
furnished many brilliant illustrations
of men born to rule, born to originate and lead great popular movements, and born to achieve success.
Men like Disraeli, Gladstone, Bright,
Peel, Palmerston, Salisbury, Balfour
and Chamberlain, stand out as great
leaders. They have all been associated with some policy which has
immortalised them, and if they have
■not all achieved success, they have
achieved immortality.
With the development of Greater'
Britain, and the grappling with Imperial problems by statesmen from
beyond the seas, the development of
leadership became inevitable, and although so far the Colonies have only
produced one really great statesman
of; outstanding excellence, they have,
produced many men of high attainment and noble character, who only
just missed being great leaders. It
takes big issues to evolve big men,
the greatest issue which has ever been
presented to the Colonies, that of
Imperial Federation, is now to the
fore, and with the hour will undoubtedly come the men, born of the responsibilities of a high position, and
of the traditions of our race.
The Premier of Canada has impressed his personality on the Empire
and today holds a place in the popular esteem second only to that enjoyed by Sir John A. Macdonald.
But Sir Wilfrid Laurier has limitations which are recognized even by
his most enthusiastic followers. If to
nobility of character and a high humanitarian purpose he added the gift
of decision and executive force he
would cross the rubicon which differentiates talent from genius and excellence from greatness. But this will
never be, and one of the finest and
courtliest of men will pass into thc
pages of history without realizing thc
ambition of achievement. If, as the
highest authorities declare, the Em-
CORRESPONDENCE
The Week accepts ho responsibility
for the views expressed by its correspondents.
Communications will ba inserted
whether signed by, the real name of
the writer or a nom de plume, but the
writer's name and address must be
given to the Editor as an evidence of
bona fides. In no case will lt ba
divulged without consent.
Editor The Week.
Sir,—I should so much like to have
your opinion upon the following: Am
I correct in saying the flag exhibited
here as "Irish," is only a rebel flag,
as it does not bear the "Crown above
the harp?"
From an Irish Loyalist's point of
view am I not right? I should like,
if possible, to have my,opinion substantiated by good authority.
LOYALIST.
Victoria, B. C,
April 7, 1909.
Editor The Week.
Dear Sir,—In answer to query from
"Loyalist", "Am I correct in saying
the flag exhibited here as 'Irish,' is
only a rebel flag, as it does not bear
the 'Crown above the harp'?", permit
me to say:
Such a flag is the "Irish National
flag," in. proof of which I quote from
"Library of Universal Knowledge,"
Vol. 8, p. 346—"In a manuscript in
the Herald's Colege of the time of
Henry VII the National flag of Ireland exhibits the harp in a field vert
"(green)."
' No mention is made of the Crown
above the harp. Later, in same
volume, same place, we read: "The
royal badge of Ireland as settled by
sign-manual in 1801, is a harp of gold,
stringed argent, arid a trefoil vert,
(green), both ensighed with the Imperial Crown."
■ The Crown was added to the royal
badge in 1801. But tne National flag
of Ireland exhibits no crown. We
maintain that Ireland never admitted
the loss of her nationality—she maintains her nationhood, consequently
her time-honoured flag.
• This of course will not please
friend "Loyalist,"; and when he asks
whether the Irish flag, "without the
crown" is not a "rebel" flafc from an
Irish Loyalist's point of view, I
answer, that is his point, from which
he may view the question, but from
an Irish Nationalist's point of view I
maintain that the "National flag of
Ireland" has ever displayed and does
display the harp "without the crown"
—yet we too are quite as loyal to
the British Crown, as some who are
repeatedly reminding us of their
"loyalty."
Yours faithfully,
.      CLEMENT CAINE
ififififipififififiififif
k if
* A Lady's Letter *
* *
J »y  1AMTTE. J
jf if if ^fifif if if if if if if if
The New Grand.
Included in a promising programme
arranged for next week at the New
Grand are Frank Manning and Joseph
Dixon in their laughable absurdity, "A
Smash-up in Chinatown." Leon Miller and Gracie Tempest in a singing,
dancing and athletic specialty; Bonnie Gaylord, "The Girl from Posey
County"; Glenroy Russell & Co., in a
one:act comedy "At Casey's Reception"; Henry Lewis and Harry Young,
singing affd dancing comedians; Thos.
J. Price, singing the illustrated song,
"Comrade Mine"; two new moving
pictures entitled, "Unlucky Horse
Shoe," and "Silver Dollar,'' and a new
overture entitled "The Battle," a descriptive tone picture, composed and
arranged by M. Nagel.
What Willie Saw.
When Willie saw a peacock for the
first time he said to his mother:
"Oh, mamma, you should have seen
it! Electric lights all over the ferns
and a turkey underneath."
Dear Madge:
"Dress," says Bob Acres, "does
make a difference." Carlyle points
out the same grim fact in Sartor
Resartus, when he declares that a
naked House of Lords would inspire
no awe.
There are a few peoples still in
this Twentieth Century of grace who
ignore dress, but these chiefly because
of the torrid heat at the equator.
The adult costume of the native of
Hawaii was once described as "a
smile, a malo, and a cutaneous eruption." The children were clad in even
less, or as Mark Twain has it, "in
nothing but sunshine—a very neat-
fitting and picturesque apparel."
It is true, we are told, that "in the
days of man's innocency" (Aand pray
when was that?) men wore no clothing, not even a coating of tatoo or
talcum, but in these latter days of
chiffons, laces, and "full dress," we
feel, with Huckleberry Finn of affectionate memory, they were by no
means "dressed fittin'."
Yet in spite of our fondness for thc
ancient tale anent the hardiness of
Godiva, and in face of the fact that
Hercules was killed by a dress shirt,
we feel ourselves safe in predicting
that everywhere popular opinion is
prejudiced in favour of clothes. Indeed, a philosopher has gone so far
as to say "Society js founded on cloth.
Apart from the mere considerations
of aetheticism and art, clothes may be
said to have a purpose. They are of
use for two reasons: Firstly, to keep
the rain off, and secondly, to prevent
automobiles from shying at us.
Next to a stout heart, nothing helps
a man so much as clothes—I mean
good clothes. They are not mere
superficialities; but on the contrary a
good paying investment. We assert
this with assurance for the reason
that not more than ten men will read
your character from your face, for
every five hundred who will decipher
it from the cut of'your coat or the
tilt of your hat. This may be a doctrine of false worths, but '"Tis true,
'tis pity; and pity 'tis 'tis true."
Thackeray said that to dress badly
was to throw away so many points in
the game. Sterne also held dress to
be a valuable asset and claimed if you
lived in a garret and dined on an
onion you must not betray it in your
clothes. Goldsmith declared that a
well-attired man holds the passport to
the highest grades of society. Thor-
eau had the same conviction, for "It
is astonishing," he writes, "how
far a merely well-dressed, .good-looking man may go without being challenged by a sentinel." This we may
reason out, is because the well-attired
man is supposed to be a gentleman
just as a man with cap and gown
is supposed to be a student for it is
now, as in Shakespeare's time, "The
apparel oft proclaims the man.'" We
do not mean to say that clothes make
up the man, but when you come to
think of it the only part of him not
clothed are his hands and face—truly
a small proportion of his area.
And as to this small remaining proportion it is highly important that it,
too, should be well-groomed. Old
"Gorgon" Graham in writing to his
son Pierrepont, says, "Appearances
are deceitful, I know, but so long as
they are, there is nothing like having
them deceive for us instead of against
us. I have seen a ten-cent shave get
a thousand-dollar job."
The same idea is brought out in the
incident reported from Moscow in the
cowering cold of winter.' One morning, a General presented himself before Napoleon in full-dress and freshly shaven. Seeing him thus attired,
the Emperor said: "You are a brave
man, my General." The man's clothes
were the external wrappages showing
him superior to defeat and demoralization—outward and visible signs, so
to say, of ,an inward and spiritual
grace.
The "Iron Duke" hit a nail square-
continued  on  Page  Nine)
IB. C. Funeral Furnishing Co'y j
| 1016 Government Street, Victoria, B. C.
_>
I
_
I
I
m
Ohas. Hayward, Pres-
R. Hayward, Sec.
F, Caselton, Manager {
Oldest and most up-to-date
Undertaking Establishment
in B. 0.
Established 1867
!
1
Telephones—48,   594,   1905,   305,   or   404. *
Bargains in Oriental Silks
Silk Nightdresses, Kimonas,
Handkerchiefs, Waist Patterns
Our Prices are the Lowest.
if
'x
Pongee Silk
In purchasing Pongee Silk it will be to your advantage to visit
our premises. We have a line of the finest quality in the follow-
ings widths:—
34 inches wide 50c per yard.
34 inches wide 60c and 65c per yard.
EXTRA HEAVY QUALITY.
34 inches wide $1.00 per yard.
26 inches wide ..'. .40c per yard.
We are correct in stating that we carry the nest make of grass
linen at—
34 inches wide.  Regular price $1.00, now goes for 80c.
ORIENTAL IMPORTING COMPANY
510 Cormorant Street - . - - Phone iaai.
So Hop & Co.. 639 Fort Street
PHONE 1884. 639 FORT STREET.
GOODS AND SAMPLES SENT FREE
BY MAIL
Silk Dresses Made to Order to Meet
the Latest Tailoring.
e
to^JHEATRi
Jw   ___**~7 y.' i *t tio
Commencing Monday, April zath.
TWO NIGHTS
THE EDGAR FORREST CO.
Presents that Odd Comedian
HARRY BERESFORD
And a remarkably Clever Company in
'"WHO'S YOUR FRIEND?"
By Harry and Ed. Paulton.
The Laughing Sensation of the
Pacific Coast.
Prices—25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50.
Box Office opens Friday, April 9th,
at 10 a.m.
Mrs. Melville Parry
SOPRANO
CONCERT,
ORATORIO,
OPERA.
VOICE PRODUCTION AND
EXPRESSION IN SINGING.
Pupils Received at Residence.
1645 OAK BAY AVENUE,
(Near Terrace Ave.)
WEEK ISTH ATVO.
The New Grand
SULLIVAN • COttSlSINI,    Pr.prl.tor..
FBANK   MANNING   AND   JOSEFS
DIXON
The Hebrew Passenger and the Dope
Fiend Cabman ln their Laughable
Absurdity
"A Smaih-Up In Chinatown."
"on  Oracle
MULES and TEMPEST
In Their Oddity
"Mix and Tri«."
BONNIE GtAYLOBD
"The airl From Foiey County."
OLSNBOY BUBSELL * 00.
In a One-Act Comedy
"At Oaiey'i Exception."
Henry Harry
LEWIS and YOUNO
"Watch The laugh."
TKOS. J. PBICE,     Song niuitrator
"Comrade Kin*."
NEW MOVING PICTUBES
"Unluoky Hon* Shoe."
"Silver Dollar."
OUB OWN OBCKESTBA
IL Nagel, Director.
"The Battle," a descriptive Tone Picture composed and arranged by
M, Nagel. THE WEEK  SATURDAY, APRIL io, 1908
VICTOBIA LAND DISTRICT
J District of Coast
Ike notice that W. Wentworth Bell,
Toronto, Ont., engineer, intends to
for permission to purchase the
Iwing described lands:—Commencing
I post planted about 80 chains north
I. of the north west corner of Lot
JI.A.W. script; thence east 40 chains;
|ce north 40 chains; thence west 40
lis, more or less, to lake; thence
herly along lake 40 chains, more or
I to point of commencement,
■lted February 15th,  1909.
W.  WENTWORTH  BELL.
27 J.   R.  Morrison,   Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
ke notice that Lilias Ross, of Vic-
married woman, intends to apply
lpermission to purchase the following
Iribed lands:—Commencing at a post
lted* about 20 chains north or tue
llh west corner of Lot 28; thence west
Mains; thence north 40 chains;
lice east 40 chains; *,thence south 4u
Ins to point of commencement,
■lted February 15th, 1909.
LILIAS ROSS.
27 J.  R.  Morrison,  Agent.
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 8 miles east of
forks of Palmer trail and Morrison's
trail to Lewis Creek, and about 100
chains east of small lake lying north or
trail; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 320 acres, more
or less.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
JANET E. MESHER.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT      .
District of Coast
like notice  that William Fernie,  of
orla, capitalist, Intends to apply ror
|nission   to   purchase   the   following
•ibed lands:—Commencing at a post
ed about 20 chains north of the
h west corner of Lot  25, Anaham
; thence running west 80 chains;
_ce south 40 chains; thence east 80
ns; thence north 40 chains to point
mmencement.
ted February 15th,  1909.
WILLIAM FERNIE.
27
J.   R.  Morrison,   Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
■*"■■: District of. Coast
Jake notice that Edith Rose Scott, of
Icouver, B.C., spinster, Intends to ap-
lifor permission to purchase the foiling described lands:—Commencing at
J;>st planted about 20 chains north of
■north-west corner of Lot 25, Anaham
lie; thence east 80 chains; thence
Tf.h 40 chains; thence west 80 chains;
lice south 40 chains to point of com-
Jicement.
Bated February 15th, 1909.
T EDITH ROSE SCOTT.
|*27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
_*, District of Coast
I'ake notice that Susan Mary Baiss, of
■'toria, B.C., married woman, tntenus
■apply for permission to purchase tne
llowing described lands:—Commencing
I'a post planted about 3 miles east of
Imon river and about 16 miles north
1 Anaham Lake; thence north 40
Alms; thence east 40 chains; thence
lith 40 chains; thence west 40 chains
■point of commencement.
Bated February 15th, 1909.
" SUSAN MARY BAISS.
i 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
_, District  of  Coast
■rake notice that Chartres C. Pember-
ln, of Victoria, B.C., lawyer, intends to
■ply for permission to purchase the
llowing described lands:—Commencing
fk post planted about 3 miles east or
f/imon River and about 14 miles north
i Anaham Lake; thence north 80
Bains; thence east 40 chains; thence
Kth 80 chains; thence west 40 chains
| point of commencement.
■Dated February 16th, 1909.
1 CHARTRES C. PEMBERTON. ■
|b 27 J- R. Morrison, Agent:
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
_ District  of  Coast
■Take notice that Katherine Phylliss
lirrell, of Victoria, marled woman, ln-
|nds to apply for permission to pur-
lase the following described lands:—
Ammencing at a post planted about 3
■lies east of the Salmon River and
tout 15 miles north of Anaham Lake;
lence north 80 chains; thence east 40
lains; thence south 80 chains; thence
last 40  chains  to point of commence-
■bated February 16th, 1909.
■ KATHERINE PHYLLISS BUERELL.
lib 27
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
. District of Coast
ITake notice that William S. Maher,
t Victoria, capitalist, intends to apply
tr permission to purchase the fellow-
fig described lands:—Commencing at
1 post planted about 40 chains south of
lie south west corner of Lot 28, Ana-
Am Lake; thence south 40 chains;
lience west 20 chains; thence north 40
lialns; thence east 20 chains to point
If commencement.
I Dated February 15th, 1909.
J WILLIAM  S.  MAHER.
feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
, District of Coast
J Take notice that James Stevenson
Jsaiss, of Victoria, rancher, intends to
■pply for permission to purchase the
■Snowing described lands:—Commencing at a post planted near Morrison
■rail to Lewis Creek (branch ot Sainton River) and about 10 miles from
forks of said trail and Palmer trall;
Jhence north 80 chains; thence east 80
lhains; thence south 80 chains; thence
■Vest 80 chains to point of commence-
■nent, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated February 15th,  1909.
I        JAMES   STEVENSON  BAISS.
l>eb 27 , __
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
• Take notice that Charles T. Dupont,
ht Victoria, capitalist, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following
described    lands:—Commencing    at    a
liost  planted  about   4   miles   north  of
l?lsh  trap  where  Palmer  trail  crosses
1-lalmon River; thence north 80 chains;
Ihence west 40 chains; thence south 80
Ehains; thence east 40 chains to point of
Lommencement,   containing   320   acres,
nore or less.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
CHARLES   THOMAS   DUPONT.
fob 27
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast
.   Take notice that Charles Poole, of Vic-
llriao, laborer, intends to apply for per-
jmlsion to purchase the  following des-
J.ribed   lands:—Comencing   at   a   post
I'jlanted on  the  east  shore of Anaham
lLake, about 2 miles from head of lake;
Ithence east 80 chains; thence south 80
Khalns  to  lake;  thence  westerly  along
■lake   80  chains,   more   or  less;   thence
Inortherly along lake 80 chains, more ot
less, to point of commencement, contam-
ng 640 acres, more or less.
Dated February 16th,  1909.
CHRALES POOLB.
Feb 27
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
■   Take notice that Janet E. Mesher, of
■Victoria,  married    woman,    intends  to
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast
Take notice that Isabella Bell, of
Toronto, married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described landa:—Commencing
at a post planted about 8 mlles east of
Fish trap on Palmer trail, and about 40
chains south of small lake near Lewis
Creek; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 40 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence east 40 chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more
or less.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
ISABELLA BELL.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Mary L. Dupont, of
Victoria, married woman, intends to apply for permision to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 4 1-2 miles soutn
of the Indian ranch on Salmon River;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 40 chains to point of Commencement.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
MARY L.  DUPONT.
Feb 27 J. R; Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast-
Take notice that Michael Finnerty, of
Victoria, farmer, intends to apply for
permision to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 4 miles east of Salmon
River and about 7 miles north of Anaham Lake; thence west 40 chains! thence
south 40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of commencement,   containing   160  acres.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
MICHAEL FINNERTY.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast
Take notice that Charles C. Revans,
of Victoria, farmer, intends to apply for
permission   to   purchase   the   following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 4 miles north of Ananam
Lake;   thence  south   80  chatns;   thence
west 40 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 40 chains to point of commencement,
Dated February  15th,  1909.
CHARLES C.  REVANS.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast
Take notice that Ellen a. Bell, of Victoria, widow, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the north east corner of Lot
27, S.A.W. script; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
Dated February 16th,  1909.
ELLEN  S.  BELL.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast
Take notice that J.. Stirling Floyd, ot
Vietoria, clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the' following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south west corner of
Lot 28, S.A.W. script, near Anaham
Lake; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated February 15th; 1909.
J.   STIRLING  FLOYD.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that John V. Clegg, of
Victoria, accountant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 80 chains south oi
the south east corner of Lot 28, S.A.W.
script, near Anaham Lake; thence east
80 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 40
chains to point of commencement.
Dated February  15th,  1909.
JOHN V. CLEGG.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast
Take notice that H. P.  O'Farrell,  of
rancher,  Intends to apply ror
permission   to   purchase   the   following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 40 chains north of Lewis
Creek  (branch of Salmon River)  at a
point   about  13   miles   from  mouth   of
creek;   thence   south   40  chain*.;   thence
west 40 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 40 chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more
or less.
Dated   February   15th,   1909.
HENRY PERCY O'FARRELL.
Feb 27
described lands:—Commencing at a. post
planted west of the Salmon River, about
1 1-2 miles from foot of Anaham Lake;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 40
chains, more or less, to river; thence
northerly 80 chains along river; thence
west 40 chains, more or less, to point
of commencement.
Dated February  16th, 1909.
JOSEPH D.  VIRTUE.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the Reserve existing on Lot 223, Rupert District, is cancelled.
ROBERT A RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Department   of   Lands,
Victoria, B.C., March 17th, 1909.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Land Registry Oflice, New Westminster.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast
Take  notice  that  Marion  Maher,   ol
Victoria,  married    woman,    intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at
a post planted near the south bank of
Lewis Creek (branch of Salmon River)
and about 12 miles from mouth of creek;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains;  thence west 80  chains;  thence
south 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less-
Dated February  16th,  1909.
MARION MAHER.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast
Take notice that Isabella McQuillan
of Victoria, married woman, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the narrows on
Salmon River, near the foot of Anaham Lake, on west bank of river; thence
west 40 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence east 40 chatns, more or less to
lake; thence northerly along lake to
point of commencement.
Dated February  15th,  1909.
Isabella Mcquillan.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Joseph D. Virtue, of
Victoria,   accountant,   intends   to  apply
for permission to purchase the following
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Land Registry Offlce, New
Westminster," will be received by the
Honourable the Minister of Public
Works, at the Department of Public
Works, Victoria, B.C.', up to and including Monday the 26th of April next, for
the erection 'and completion of a Land
Registry Office at 'New Westminster,
B.C.
Specifications, conditions of tendering
and contract, may be seen at the ofllce
of the Public Works Engineer, Victoria,
B.C.; at the offlce of the Government
Agent, at New Westminster; and at the
office of the Provincial Timber Inspector, Vancouver, B.C.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque, or certificate
of deposit on a chartered bank in Canada, made payable to the Hon. the
Minister of Public Works, or by cash,
in the sum of five per cent, of the
amount of the tender, which sum shall
be forfeited if the party tendering decline to enter into contract when called
upon to do so, or fail to complete the
work contracted for.'
The cheques, certificates of deposit,
or cash, of unsuccessful tenderers will
be returned to them after the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the forms supplied signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclose.;} in the envelope
furnished.
F.  C. -GAMBLE,
Public' Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B. C, 27th March, 1909.
apl 3
"LAND REGISTRY ACT."
In  the  matter of (in  application for a
Duplicate   Certificate   of   Title   to
Sub-division 4 of Suburban Lot 12,
Victoria  City.     *    .
NOTICE is hereby given that it is my
intention at the expiration of one month
from  the  date  of the first publication
hereof to  issue a Duplicate Certificate
of Title to said land issued to Walter
Dunbar   Kirkaldy   Gibson   on   the   26th
day   of   October,   1S94,   and   numbered
18783A.
Land Registry Offlce, Victoria, B. C,
the 26th day of March, 1909.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
apl 24 Registrar-General of Titles.
CASCADE MINERAL CLAIM.
Situate in the Alberni Mining Division
of the Alberni District.
Where located—On Uchucklesit Harbour,
Alberni Canal.
TAKE NOTICE that we the Cascade
Mining Company, Limited, Non-Personal
Liability. Free Miner's Certificate No.
B2315I, intend, 60 days from the date
hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder
for a Certificate of Improvements for
the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant
of the above claim.
And further take notice that action
under section 37 must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated this ISth day of March, 1909.
THE CASCADE COPPER
MINING COMPANY, LIMITED,
mch 20 Non-Personal Liability.
No. 372.
CERTIFICATE   OF   THE   REGISTRATION   OF   AN   EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANY.
Companies' Act, 1897.
I HEREBY CERTIFY that the "Michigan-Pacific Lumber Company" has
this day been registered as an Extra-
Provincial Company under the "Companies' Act, 1897," to carry out or
effect all or any of the objects of the
Company to which the legislative authority of the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company is
situate at the City of Grand Rapids,
Kent County, State of Michigan, U.S.A.
The amount of the capital of the
Company ls One Million Five Hundred
Thousand Dollars, divided into One Hundred and Fifty Thousand shares of Ten
Dollars each.
The head office of the Company in
this Province is sltuute at No. 1114
Langley Street, Victoria, and William
John Taylor, Barrister-at-law, whose
address ls No. 1114 Langley Street, Victoria, B.C., Is the attorney for the
Company.
The time of the existence of the
Company is Thirty years from the 26th
of January, A.D. 1909.
Given  under  my  hand  and  Seal  or
Office at Victoria,  Province  of British
Columbia, this first day of March, one
thousand  nine hundred  and  nine.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has   been   established   and   registered
are:—Buying,    selling,    manufacturing,
and dealing in forest products,
mch 6
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take  notice  that David H. Bale,  or
Victoria, contractor, intends to apply for
permission   to   purchase   the  following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 3 miles south of Indian
house on Salmon River; thence south 80
chains;   thence   east   40   chains;   thence
north 80 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated February  16th, 1909.
DAVID   H.   BALE.
Feb.   27 J.   R.  Morrison,   Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Elsie Bell, of Victoria, married woman, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 1 1-2 miles nortn
west of the north west corner of Lot
27; thence north 20 chains; thence west
40 chains; thence south 20 chains; thence
east 40 chains to point of commencement.   .
Dated February 15th,  1909.
ELSIE BELL.
Feb.   27 J.   R.  Morrison,   Agent.
I
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take  notice  that Arthur  Davies  Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described  lands:—
Comencing   at   a  post   planted   at   the
south  east  corner of Lot  26,   Anaham
Lake;   thence  south   40  chains;   thence
west 40 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 40 chains to point of commencement.
Dated February Uth, 1909.
ARTHUR   DAVIES.
Feb 27 J, R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that George C. Mesher, of
Victoria, contractor, intends to apply for
permision to purchase the following described   lands:—Commencing   at   a   post
planted about 4 miles south of Indian
ranch   on   Salmon  River;   thence   south
80 chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated February  16th,   1909.
GEORGE  C.  MESHER.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast
Take notice that Elizabeth M. Coultn-
ard, of Victoria, widow, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 3 1-2 miles
southerly from Indian ranch on Salmon
River; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 40 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west*40 chains to point of commencement.
Dated  February 15th,  1909.
ELIZABETH M. COULTHARD.
Feb.   27 J.   R.  Morrison,   Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast
Take notice  that Francis Barton,  of
Victoria, merchant, intends to apply loi
permission   to   purchase   the   followini,
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 1 mile south of Blayney's
pre-emption;  thence    south    80 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence north su
chains;  thence west 40 chains to point
of comencement.
Dated February 15th,  1909.
FRANCIS BARTON.
Feb.   27 J.   R.  Morrison,   Agent.
NOTICE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that the Reserve on Lot 29a, Range 4, Coast District, is cancelled.
R. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of
Lands and Works.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., 16th October, 1908.
3m
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Coal Prospecting Notice—Tumbo Island.
Notice is hereby given that Arthur S.
Blakemore will within 60 days from this
date, apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a License to prospect for Coal under the
area described as follows:—-
Commencing at a post on a stump at
the centre of the north shore of Tumbo
Island at high water mark; thence north
one mile; thence west one mile; thence
south one mile; thence east one mile
to piace of beginning.
February  llth,   1909.
apl 17 ARTHUR S. BLAKEMORE.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT.
Coal Prospecting Notice—Tumbo Island.
Notice is hereby given that Clarice
Blakemore will within 60 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Com-
mlsioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
License to prospect for Coal under the
area described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
extreme westerly end of Tumbo Island
at high water mark; thence north one
mile; thence west one mile; thence south
one mile; thence east one mile to place
of beginning.
February llth, 1909.
apl 17 CLARICE  BLAKEMORE.
_
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|| Prompt, Careful.
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Leave Your
Baggage Checks at
The Pacific |
Transfer
Co.
i
No. 4 FORT ST.        j
H VICTORIA
i !
•g A. E. KENT, Proprietor        j
if Phone 241. i
if i
%k*KKn»xK.:*iismxww%Mm_i
Make Some
Money on
the Side
CYPHERS
INCUBATORS AND
BROODERS
Will enable you to do this without trouble. Call and see us or
write.
WATSON &
McGregor
647 Johnson St.
if
i.
You Get What 1
You Want
1 When You
Want It
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT.
Coal Prospecting Notice—Tumbo Island.
Notice is hereby given that William
Blakemore will within 60 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
License to prospect for Coal under the
area described as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
extreme easterly _n_ of Tumbo Island
at high water mark; thence north one
mile; thence east one mile; thence south
one mile; thence west one mile to the
place of beginning.
February llth, 1909.
apl 17 WILLIAM BLAKEMORE.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT.
Coal Prospecting Notice—Tumbo Island.
Notice Is hereby given that Barbara
Blakemore will within 60 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
License to prospect for Coal under the
area described as follows:—
Commencing at a post made on a
stump at the centre of the north shore
of Tumbo Island at high water mark;
thence north one mile; thence east one
mile; thence south one mile; thence west
one mile to the place of beginning.
February llth, 1909.
apl 17 BARBARA BLAKEMORE.
*
I
O,  ■
>:
i.
AT THE
if
t
Empire Hotel and f
Restaurant     j
I
\
!
Meals, 20c and up.
Rooms, 25c and up.
Telephone 841.
Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
Bring your Family.
A. LIPSKY, Proprietor,
Milne Block
568 Johnson Street,
VICTORIA, B.C.
«a«a««8W»»a«««84«:4a«:-w8t4«s
Y. M. C. A.
40 BROAD STREET. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL io, 1909.
Provincial Elections Act
VICTORIA CITY ELECTORAL DISTRICT
TAKE NOTICE that objections have been filed with me against tha tt_n_._.__. _
on the grounds set forth. " me agalnMt th8 blowing person.' name, being retained on the Ll.t of Voter, for th- __„      _.. *_
AMD FUBTHEB TAKE HOTICE that I will, on Monday  the Srd _l»» „, „       , *"" Bb0Ve dtat-dot
Bastion Square, Victoria, hold a Court of Revision for the puipose"of_*SL2 ___\^___lSSSt ,Bt **• ««"» of 10 o'clock ln the fanu.     * „.    _,
Unles. the person objected to or  some  other  FroviTiS Voter  »TL hthtS      *** 'M ""J80"0"- rm00n' ** th° 0ourt »°«"'
not well founded, I shall .trike th. name of the person .0 ohjJotld to 0™t£\2_t_lt*™'m »* «"» «■« Court and satl.fle. me that the .aid ohwi™ .
Dated thi. 7th day of April, 1909. ohjeotion 1.
Christian Name and Surname of Voter.
Besidence.
Abbott, Frank 	
Abbott, Frank  	
Abbott, Ralph Lome	
Abolaila David	
Ackrill, Francis Herbert	
Adams, George Kennet Baker .
Adams, Joseph  	
Adelson, Aaron  	
Algar,  Charles Duncan   	
Allen, John	
Anderson, Charles Ferdinand  .
Anderson, Herbert Glass  	
Andreoli, Rinaldo 	
Arbuckle, Matthew	
Aris, Thomas  	
Arkless, Thomas 	
Arnold, Archibald Andrews 	
Ashton, Edgar 	
Atack, George Day	
Aubin,  Charles  William   	
Baillie, Peter  	
Baird, William  	
Baker,  Clarence   	
Baker, Frederick Charles	
Baker,  Frederick Charles  	
Barbour, Bobert S	
Barnier, James Lambert 	
Barrack, George 	
Barrett,  William   	
Barton, William Henry  	
Basso, Nicholas	
Beaumont, Arthur  	
Bechtel, Daniel Arthur	
Begg, Alexander	
Belt rey, Arthur Edward	
Berryman, William  	
Black, William	
Blake, Henry Charles 	
Blygh, Andrew	
Bourman, Harry Eustace  	
Boorman, William Scoons 	
Booth, Charles   	
Borde, Louis Auguste	
Brakes, Henry	
Bremner, Allan	
Brenchley, Arthur  	
Brewer, Harry	
Brock, Frederick George	
Calwell, James  	
Campbell, Alexander Blackwood
Campbell,  John  	
Carruthers, William John  	
Casselton,   Richard   	
Catterall,  John	
Catterall, William	
Christopher, David Baxter 	
Clark, Lawrence	
Clark, Lawrence	
Clegg, John	
Clyde, Archibald  	
Clyde, Frederick ,
Cornish, Charles J	
Cort,  George Harris   	
Cowan, James Edward 	
Cox, John Graham 	
Craig, Thomas P.	
Cruicksbank, George 	
Davis, James   ..
Dennis, Arthur George 	
Devereux, William E	
Dier, Elmore D.	
Dodgson, H. A. M	
Earl, Wesley 	
Evans, John	
Evans, Timothy Blchard 	
Ferris, Frank Elwood  	
Fowler, Stanley 	
Fox, William Charles	
French,  Charles  Hunt   	
Gallighe?, John 	
Gates, Benjamin 	
Goudle, Edward John	
Goudie, Thomas	
Gregg, Frank Beck 	
Greig, John  	
Haggart, William    ,.
Harper,  William   	
Harrison, George Benjamin	
Heathcote, Frederick William
Hicks, William  	
Higgins, Thomas	
Higham, Bobert Mulllns 	
Humber, Frank Russell 	
Jamieson, James Robert 	
Johnson, James 	
Jordan, William Grahame 	
King,  Walter H	
Lambeth, William  	
Lavin, Patrick 	
Leitch, Archibald  	
Le Messurler, Thomas 	
Lester, Henry William 	
McCue, Michael 	
McLaren, Thomas William 	
McLean,  Laug hiin  	
Mapleton,  John Charles 	
Mathews,  Harold Leslie  	
Mesher, Frederick James 	
Murray, Edward  	
Murray, James Thomas 	
Murray, Robert	
Nellor, Fred. James	
Nesbitt, John Saunders 	
Norton, Mark 	
Osterhout, Smith Stanley 	
Parry, George E	
Patterson, Robert	
Patterson, William   	
Pearce, John S	
Pearce, Edward, Sen'r	
Phillips, James 	
Phillips, Josiah Eva	
Pooley, William Henry	
Potts, Thomas  	
Prldham, Edward Rendall  	
Rice, Charles 	
Richmond, John 	
Rogerson, Frederick ,
Rounding, Samuel  	
Scott, William 	
Shaw, John  	
Shaw, John 	
Sheaff, Percy Richard	
Stewart, Alexander 	
Stewart,  Charles   	
Swords,   Robert   	
Tallyard, James  	
Tulk, Samuel 	
Turner, Richard William  	
Tyson, John 	
West, John Harvey	
Wheatcroft, Fred	
Wlckwire,  Aylmer McNeil  	
Wood, Benjamin Lomas 	
Woods, John	
Worthfngton, Thomas Irwin 	
Yates, Henry Myers  	
Youngson, John  	
California Saloon, John Street	
33 Johnson Street	
46 Yates Street	
Empress Hotel	
634 Gorge Road	
91 Blanchard Street 	
Hillside Avenue and Cook Street	
21 St. Louis Street 	
Lot 7, Oakland District	
Cor. Russell Street and Esquimau Street
48 Store Street 	
Balmoral Hotel, Douglas Street	
840 Johnson Street	
East side Richmond Avenue	
162 Government Street	
California  Hotel   	
9 South Park Street 	
Dominion Hotel  	
11 Whittaker Street	
76 John Street  	
50 Yates Street	
ES South Boad, Spring Ridge	
64 John Street 	
64 John Street	
64 John Street   	
160 Fort Street	
460 Superior Street	
5   Sisters   Block
348 Douglas Street	
Cor Sunnyside Av and Craigflower Rd.
47 Rock Bay Avenue 	
32 Bay Street	
312 Douglas Street	
9 Humboldt Street	
44 Rae Street	
Brunswick Hotel, Yates Street	
Henley Point, Beacon Hill	
Turpels Yard	
140 Fort Street	
129 Michigan Street 	
129 Michigan Street 	
61 St. Lawrence Street	
42 Chatham Street	
Howard Street off Edmonton Road	
Gordon Hotel, Yates Street 	
120 Belleville Street	
Burnside Road  	
46 Hillside Avenue 	
113 Pandora Street 	
87 Henry Street	
2831 Bridge Street 	
31 Work Street 	
12 First Street	
47 First Street	
Profession, Trade or Calling.
Bartender   	
Marine Fireman .....""
Steamboat Man  	
Chemist	
Carpenter '.','
Minister 	
Letter Carrier '.'.'."
Merchant	
Retired	
Engine Driver  .■"' ■
Sealer 	
cierk ;;;;•
Labourer      ,',','
Marine Engineer .....'.'.''
Bricklayer	
Marine Fireman ",'.'.
Window Dresser	
Seaman	
Insurance Superintendent
Ship Carpenter	
Steward	
47 First Street ....'.'.'.'.'. '.'.'.'.'.  '.'.'.'. ..
Sumas Street	
671 Henry Street 	
571 Henry Street 	
208 Pandora Avenue	
516 Henry Street      	
28 Bock Bay Avenue	
1282 Gladstone Avenue 	
Jubilee Alley, Johnson Street	
221 Pandora Street	
42   King's   Rood   	
574 Hillside Avenue	
9 Bay Street 	
Rock Bay Hotel 	
WA Third Street  ,	
126 Richardson Street	
45 Fernwood Road	
58 North Chatham Street 	
16 Ellis Street	
Empire Hotel 	
14 Market Street 	
42 King's Road	
12 King's Road 	
26 Third Street 	
25  First Street   	
Rock Bay Hotel 	
Cor. Stanley Av. and N Chatham St....
Alpha Street	
SS. Quadra	
87 John Street 	
134 Cormorant Street 	
30 John Street 	
Garbally Road	
42 Second Street 	
118 Dallas Road  	
14 Market Street 	
634 Gorge Road 	
19 Rae Street	
Topaz Avenue 	
36 Bridge Street	
Work Street, near Point Ellice Bridge..
46 Hillside Avenue 	
9 Bodwell Street	
240 Simcoe Street 	
SS. Charmer	
647 Henry Street	
Garbally Road	
911 Blanchard Street	
Jubilee Saloon	
54 Fourth Street	
Clarence Hotel  	
24 Vlnlng Street	
42% Bridge Street	
50 Second Street  	
39 Princess Avenue	
42 First Street 	
213 Douglas Street 	
Bridge Street near Bay	
Clarence Hotel ,
42% Bridge Street	
Topaz Avenue 	
80 Fairfield Rood  	
63 Henry Street	
Dallas Hotel 	
15 North Road	
329 Douglas Street 	
Beacon St., N. side, near Simcoe St...
Angel Hotel, Langley Street 	
Corner David and Turner Streets	
42 Bridge Street  	
20 Second Street  	
Rock Bay Hotel 	
8   Rendall   Street   	
Lot 80, Fairfield Road  	
Cor. Gorge and Garbally Roads  	
34 Walnut Street  	
Cor. Cadboro Bay Rd. and Belcher St..
1610 Belcher Street	
41 Work Street 	
Gorge Road	
W. C. T. TJ., Yates St	
524 John Street 	
Lot 80, Fairfield Road 	
20 King's Road 	
61 Bellot Street 	
424 Work Street  	
5 Psnwell Street	
Bridge Street, near Bay Street 	
2 Gorge Road 	
7 Speed Avenue	
Str. Pilot	
116 North Pembroke Street ....
Regent's Park, Cadboro Bay Road
Burnside Road  	
Boiler-maker 	
Driver	
Moulder	
Real Estate Agent .
Teamster ,
Bookkeeper 	
Teamster  '
Professor of Music ,
Boiler-maker	
Cabinet Maker	
Student 	
Author t
Merchant	
Bartender	
Groom	
Ship Carpenter	
French Polisher	
Bookkeeper	
Clerk  .
Engineer . .,
Plumber	
Gentleman	
Clerk  	
Wholesale Merchant .
Clerk	
Salesman 	
Blacksmith 	
Miner	
Ship Carpenter 	
Manufacturer	
Gentleman	
Plumber 	
Clerk ; .
Bookkeeper 	
Iron Ship Worker ..,
Boilermaker	
Gentleman ,
Boilermaker	
Boilermaker	
Driver	
Longshoreman	
Clerk ...'.	
Merchant ,
Boilermaker	
Tanner 	
Labourer 	
Grocer 	
Civil Engineer	
Dentist	
Electrician 	
Stove Mounter  ......
Seaman	
Clerk	
Master Mariner  	
Carpenter 	
Carpenter 	
Fur Buyer	
Boilermaker's Helper
Labourer 	
Lineman	
Fireman	
Tailor	
Millhand	
Manufacturer	
Milkman  	
Agent 	
Clerk	
Salesman	
Conductor 	
Steward	
Dentist	
Mariner	
Fisherman  	
Machinist	
Teamster ; ...
Transfer Man	
Fireman	
Boilermaker	
Agent	
Grocer 	
Longshoreman	
Plumber	
Master Mariner	
Labourer	
Painter	
Contractor 	
Teamster	
Mariner  	
Teamster	
Miner	
Contractor 	
Steamboatman	
Clergyman	
Jeweller	
Millman	
Miner	
Architect	
Miner	
Gardener	
Stonecutter 	
Engineer 	
Mariner  	
Cabinet Maker 	
Labourer
Carpenter 	
Painter 	
Bookkeeper 	
Carpenter	
Clerk 	
Hardware Clerk	
Fireman	
Foreman Moulder	
Hotel Worker	
Advertizing Manager	
Master Mariner	
Ship Carpenter	
Traveller .,	
Mason -.	
Furniture Maker	
Miner 	
Carpenter 	
Tailor	
Fireman	
.Clerk	
Bookkeeper 	
. I Seaman 	
HABVEY COMBE, Registrar of Voters.
Nature of Objection.
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Ceased to
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I Ceased to
reside
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in the District,
in the District,
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in the District,
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in the District.
reside in the District.
reside in the District,
reside in the District,
reside in the Distriot.
reside in the District,
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reside in the District,
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reside in the District.
reside in the District.
reside in the District,
reside in the Distriot.
reside in the District,
reside in the District,
reside in the District
reside in the District.
reside in the District,
reside in the District.
reside in the District.
reside in the District.
reside in the District,
reside in the Distriot.
reside ln the District.
reside in the District
reside ln the Distriot.
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reside ln the District,
reside in the District.
reside in
reside in
reside in
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Name on
reside in
reside in
reside In
reside in
the District.
the District.
the District.
the. District
the( District.
the District.
the District.
the District.
List
the District.
the District.
the District.
the District.
reside in the District.
reside In the District,
reside in the District,
reside in the District
reside in the District.
reside ln the District
reside in the District,
reside in the District.
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Name
in the District,
in the District,
in the District,
in the District,
ln the District
in the District,
in the District,
in the District,
on List
reside in the District,
reside in the District
reside in the District,
reside in the District.
reside ln the District
reside in the District.
reside in the District,
reside in the District
reside ln the District,
reside in the District,
reside in the District.
reside in the District,
reside in the District
reside ln the District.
reside in the District
reside in the District
reside in the District
Name on List
Name on List
reside in the District.
reside ln the District
reside in the District.
reside in the District,
reside in the District.
reside in the District,
reside in the District,
reside in the District
reside ln the District,
reside ln the District
reside ln the District
reside ln the District
reside ln the District.
reside in the District.
reside in the District.
reside in the District.
reside ln the District
reside ln the District
reside In the District.
reside ln the District.
reside ln the District THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL io, 1909.
Provincial Elections Act
ESQUIMALT ELECTORAL DISTRICT
TAKE NOTICB that oh] oo tlon. have heen filed with me against the following per.on.' names being retained on the List of Voters for the above district
on the ground, .et forth.
AND FUBTBEB TAKE NOTICE that I will, on Monday, the Srd day of May, 1909, at the hour of 10 o'clock ln the forenoon, at tho Court House,
Bastion Square, Victoria, hold a Court of Revision for the purpo.e of hearing and determining said objection*.
Unless the per.on objected to or some other Provincial Voter on his behalf appears at tho .aid Court and satisfies me that the said objection is
not well founded, I shall strike the name of the person so objected to off the said List.
Dated this 7th day of April, 1909. HABVEY COMBE, Begistrar of Voters.
Christian Name and Surname of Voter.
Allison, Alfred  	
Allen, Samuel  	
Alexander, Thomas 	
Anderson, William Harold Kerr	
Annett,. John Sheridan 	
Atkinson, Charles D. Trlsham 	
Argyle, Albert Abercomble	
Bainbridge, Richard Taylor 	
Barber, William Davin 	
Barker, George 	
Birse, James Charles	
Batterbury, John	
Battersby, John George 	
Bennett, John	
Bennett, Noble John	
Blanchard, Herman Samuel 	
Bennett, Frederick Morris	
Bergen, Otto	
Black,  William   .;	
Blatchford, John Saunders 	
Boyd, David	
Brooks, Benjamin	
Bufton, Stephen i.
Burton,  William Albert   	
Clarke, James Henry  	
Craig,  James  Joseph   	
Crouch, Sidney 	
Christopher, John William  	
Campbell, Donald  	
Carmichael,   John   	
Carter, Alexander 	
Chisholm,  Relney   	
Clement, Thomas Moyes 	
Coutts, Alexander	
Dack, Septimus   .-	
De Courcey, John   	
Davidson,  Daniel   	
Deane, David	
Dixon, Joseph Marion	
Emery, John	
Ervine, James  	
Emery, Arthur Samuel  	
Fea,   Henry   	
Fisher, William Henry  	
Forsen, Alexander Enoch 	
Fountain, George 	
Fraser,  Norman Stewart  	
Furlonge, Alexander Montgomery S...
Garside,  Harrison	
Gibbons, Charles Harrison  	
Graylen, Arthur James 	
Griffin, Patrick Power 	
Harvey, Charles	
Henderson,  John   	
Hammond, Charles	
Henderson, Edward Ernest 	
Hill, Robert Oakshott 	
Hodgklns, Henry  	
Hogan, John	
Holligan, James Joseph 	
House, Herbert   	
Hubbard, Frederick William	
Humby, Arthur George 	
Howard, Victor Llewellyn .'	
Ingle, Alfred  ,	
Irish,  Arthur Milroy  	
Irving,  John  	
Johansen, Johnson Frederick	
Jenkins,  Edward	
Jeves, Henry Mathew 	
Johnston, William	
Jones, Arthur	
Kiell, James	
Kermode, Thomas	
Kneebolter, Samuel 	
Kerrison, Thomas William	
Lambard, Phillip John  	
Logan, Hugh   	
Lafontaine, George	
Lodwick,   Geoffrey   	
Lomax, William 	
McAuslan, James	
MacDonald, Charles  >	
MacKenzie, Donald  	
MacKenzie John Roderick 	
McCloskey, James  	
McCosh, Allan Percival 	
McDonald, Murdock	
Mclnnes, Angus	
Mclnnes, Neil 	
McNeal, William	
McPhee, Norman  	
McKay, Kenneth	
Mcintosh, Robert William	
McBeth, Alexander	
Malrs, James H	
Marshall, William	
Mason, Walter	
Milne, James  •	
Mullens, Joseph Frank	
Murray, Allan Grlerson 	
Malbon, Edward John ,	
Mann, Gilbert '...'	
Martin, Thomas  	
Miller,  James   	
Morrison, James 	
Neary, Patrick	
Nelson, William Wesley ....
Nichols, Walter  	
Ogilvie, John 	
Olford, Richard Edward ....
O'Neill, Edward  	
Paine, George Fred'k Vosper
Park, Arthur	
Patterson, Samuel  	
Payne, Hubert St. John .'.'...
Perry,  Calvin   ,	
Poole, Walter  	
Pooley, Thomas Edward
Poulton, George	
Preston, Frank 	
Prindiville, Edward 	
Pender, Arthur Geo. John
Phillips,   Richard   	
Prisk, Thomas	
Quinn,   Bernard   	
Richardson, Robert John  ..
Ridge, Richard  	
Ross,  Robert Spence  	
Roye, Samuel 	
Robinson, William 	
Ryan, Thomas Walter	
Shorey, Henry William ....'
Smith, William Luther ....
Scott,  William  	
Searle, Herbert James	
Skinner, James Alexander  ..
Slavln, Francis Patrick 	
Smith, Samuel  	
Spreadbow, Edwin 	
Stewart, William Louis	
Stuart, Gilzean Roland W. .,
Stubbs, Frank 	
Tylor, John Gibbert 	
Tylor,  Owen Gilkes	
Taylor, Henry 	
Unsworth, John 	
Woodward, Charles  	
Walmsley, Peter	
Williams, Edwin	
Witty, John Frederick	
Weber, Adolph  	
White, Samuel	
Williams, Reg. L. Musprat .,
Woodley, George	
Wright, Charles 	
Young, John	
Young, William  	
Residence.
Foster's  Pier, Esquimalt  	
S.W. M Sec. 14, Tp. 11, Port Renfrew..
The Alders 	
Quarantine Station, William Head	
Sec. 61, Millstream, Highland District...
Pike Lake Road, Highland District	
Rocky Point, Metchosin	
2 Wharf Street, Esquimalt	
Bay Terrace, Esquimalt & Dunsmuir Rd.
Daylesford, Constance Avenue	
Work Point Barracks 	
Old Esquimalt Road  	
N. side Craigflower Rd. nr. Gorge Rd...
Happy  Valley,  Metchosin   	
Port Renfrew	
Craigflower Rd„ Cor. Lampson St	
S.W. >A, Sec. 14, Tp. 11, Port Renfrew..
Goldstream Power House 	
Globe Hotel, Esquimalt 	
Head Street, Esquimalt	
Coach & Horses Hotel	
Coach & Horses Hotel	
Esquimalt Hotel 	
S.W. Y_, Sec. 14, Tp. 11, Port Renfrew...
Gore  Street   	
Royal  Naval  Yard   	
Gore Street, Esquimalt	
Colwood   	
Otter Point  	
Coach & Horses Hotel  	
Esquimalt Hotel 	
Constance Cove Road 	
Bailey Cottage, Esquimalt Road	
The Alders  	
Work Point Barracks	
Work Point Barracks  	
Coach & Horses Hotel, Esquimalt Road.
Esquimalt	
Millstream	
Glengary, Metchosin 	
Cedars,   Colwood	
Old Esquimalt Road, near Pottery	
1 Gore Street, Esquimalt	
Coach & Horses Hotel, Esquimalt Road.
Port  Renfrew  	
Constance Cove Rd., near Esquimalt Rd.
Fort Renfrew  	
Sec. 7, Range 5, Malahat District	
Helmcken Road	
Head Street 	
Esquimalt Road facing Wharf Street...
Port Renfrew 	
Half-Way House, Esquimalt Road 	
Coach & Horses Hotel, Esquimalt Road.
Near Masonic Hall, Esquimalt	
Colwood	
Near Half-Way House	
Naval Hospital	
Esquimalt Hotel 	
Esquimalt Road 	
Constance Avenue, Esquimalt Road ....
S.W. Vi. Sec. 14, Tp. 11, Port Renfrew..
Esquimalt  	
Wharf Street	
Work Point Barracks	
Beaumont	
Goldstream	
Metchosin	
Beaumont Avenue 	
Wharf  Street	
Port Renfrew	
Ship Inn	
Rose Bank, East Sooke 	
Quarantine   Station   	
S.W. hi Sec. 14, Tp. 11, Port Renfrew...
Head Street, near Gore Street	
Port Renfrew	
Esquimalt Road	
Admiral Road	
Sooke Road	
Albert Head  	
Wharf Street, Esquimalt	
Old Esquimalt Road	
Constance  Cove,  Road   	
Esquimalt Road, near Head Street	
Coach & Horses	
Quarantine Station 	
S.W. Vi Sec. 14, Tp. 11, Port Renfrew..
S.W. y« Sec. 14, Tp. 11, Port Renfrew..
Coach & Horses Hotel	
Head Street	
Constance Cove Road 	
Port Renfrew.	
Port Renfrew	
Work Point Barracks 	
Millstream	
Esquimalt Rd, N. side, nr Half-Way Hse
Esquimalt 	
Coach & Horses	
Constance Avenue	
N. _ S.E. % Sec 22, Tp 11, Port Renfrew
Work Point Barracks 	
Lampson Street, Esquimalt 	
Metchosin	
Strawberry Vale, Burnslde Road 	
Hamilton Powder Wks, Magazine, Parsons Bridge 	
Esquimalt  Hotel   	
Port Renfrew 	
Half-Way House 	
Coach & Horses, Esquimalt	
Hospital Street	
Wharf Street	
Constance Avenue	
Colwood	
Craigflower Farm, Craigflower 	
The Rectory	
Constance Avenue	
Happy Valley  	
Fern Hill, Lampson Street 	
Millstream Road, Highland District ....
Port Renfrew	
Esquimalt	
Albert Head  	
Miller's House, Parson's Bridge	
Port Renfrew	
New Inn, Esquimalt Road 	
Coach & Horses, Esquimalt Road	
Esquimalt Road, near Half-Way House..
William Head Station	
Albert Head	
Wharf Street, Esquimalt	
Work Point Barracks	
Gore Street	
Esquimalt	
Esquimalt Hotel	
Work Point Barracks	
Lampson & Lyall Street 	
Constance Avenue	
Port Renfrew	
Boom Hse, Gordon River, Port Renfrew
Port Renfrew	
Esquimalt Road (Eversley)  	
Colwood Park, Colwood	
Port Renfrew	
Port Renfrew	
Work Point Barracks 	
Esquimalt	
Work Point Barracks	
Goldstream 	
Admiral's Road 	
Bilstone, Metchosin 	
Wharf Street	
Wharf Streot, Esquimalt  	
Work Point Barracks 	
Coach & Horses 	
Ferncliffe, Metchosin	
Gordon River, San Juan, Port Renfrew.
Wharf Street, Esquimalt 	
Profession, Trade or Calling.
Naval Pensioner	
Logger 	
Labourer ...
Physician 	
Lime Burner	
Farmer	
Painter  	
Pattern Maker	
Clerk in Holy Orders
Warrant Officer	
Corporal P. A. M. C.
Labourer 	
Accountant 	
Far ..ier  	
Woodsman	
Plasterer 	
Logger 	
Electrician	
Sailor	
Carpenter	
Carpenter 	
Ship Carpenter  	
Labourer	
Logger   	
Miner	
Inspector of Engines
Army Staff Sergeant .
Farmer	
Farmer	
Piper 	
Labourer	
C. E.  ...
C. G. A.
Labourer .
Carpenter
Labourer .
Sapper R.
Gunner, R.
Butcher
Civil Engineer    	
Farmer	
Farmer   	
Farmer   	
Carpenter	
Expense Store Ace	
Labourer	
Logger	
Cab Driver	
Logger	
Farmer	
Rancher	
Journalist ..,	
Founder  ...'.	
Hook Tender 	
Bartender	
Boilermaker	
Blacksmith	
Farmer	
Chief Writer R. N	
Nurse *
Hostler	
Millman	
Draughtsman	
Logger	
Shipwright	
Hotel Keeper	
.Gunner, R. C. G. A	
Machinist   	
Hotel Keeper	
Farmer   	
Bricklayer	
Engine Fitter	
Blacksmith	
Bartender   ■*.
Farmer	
Deck Hand 	
Logger	
Warrant Officer, Imp. Forces
Farmer	
Navy Armourer	
Labourer	
Gentleman	
Rancher	
Boatman	
Ship Carpenter	
Labourer	
Civil Servant   	
Iron Worker's Helper	
Gentleman ...*'.	
Logger 	
Logger	
Carpenter	
Labourer	
Labourer	
Logger	
Blacksmith	
Corporal, R. C. G. A	
Farmer 	
Labourer	
Labourer	
Labourer	
Clerk 	
Rancher 	
Gunner, R. C. G. A. 	
Labourer 	
Farmer	
Farmer	
Caretker 	
Labourer	
Logger 	
Saloon Keeper 	
Miner	
Copper Smith	
Fireman	
Ordinance Foreman
Surveyor 	
Rancher	
Preacher 	
Fastener  	
Farmer	
Barrister	
Farmer 	
Logger	
Chief Engineer	
Railway  Engineer
Gentleman	
Mine Manager  .
Saloon Keeper	
Carpenter	
Coachman	
Watchman 	
Farmer	
Gentleman	
Gunner, R. C. G. A	
Foreman of Works ....
Dock Yard Employee ...
Labourer	
Actg Bonb. R. C. G. A.
Teamster	
Miner	
Miner	
Miner 	
Hook Tender	
Rancher	
Farmer	
Farmer	
Farmer	
Gunner, R. C. G. A	
Cook  	
Sapper, R. E	
Farmer	
Boilermaker's Helper ..
Farmer	
Engineer	
Boatman 	
Major, R. C. G. A.
Fireman	
Farmer	
Miner	
Labourer	
Nature of Objection.
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to reside in the District,
to reside in the District,
to. reside in the District,
to reside ln the District.
to reside ln the District,
to reside in the District,
to reside ln the District
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District.
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District.
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
to reside ln
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District.
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District.
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District.
to reside in the District.
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
to reside ln
to reside in
to reside in
to reside in
the District,
the District
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District,
the District.
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
ln the District
in the District
ln the District
in the District
ln the District
ln the District,
ln the District,
ln the District,
in the District,
in the District,
in the District.
ln the District,
in the District.
to reside ln the.District,
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District.
to reside ln the District
to reside ln the District.
to reside in the District,
to reside ln the District,
to reside in the District.
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
ln the
ln the
in the
in the
ln the
in the
ln the
ln the
ln the
in the
In the
in the
in the
in the
ln the
in the
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ln the
District.
District.
District.
District.
District.
District.
District.
District.
District.
District.
District
District.
District.
District
District
District.
District.
District
in the
in the
In the
in the
in the
ln the
ln the
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ln the
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District.
District.
District
District.
District.
District
District
District.
District
District.
District.
District.
District.
District.
District.
District.
District.
to reside in
to reside ln
to reside ln
to reside ln
to reside ln
to reside in
the District,
the District
the District
the District
the District
the District.
to reside ln the District.
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
in the District,
in the District
ln the District,
in the District
ln the District
in the District,
ln the District
ln the District,
ln the District,
ln the District
in the District,
in the District,
in the District
in the District.
to reside
to reside
to reside
to eslde
to reside
to reside
to reside
In the Distriot
ln the District
in the District
ln the District
in the District,
ln the District,
ln the District THE WEEK,  SATURDAY, APRIL io> 1908.
Sample of Zinc Cut.
TO THOSE WHO ADVERTISE
AND THOSE WHO DON'T
' "Advertising is to  Business what Steam is to Machinery."
No matter where your business is located, we can write your advertisements. Special rates given for
series of 12, 25, 50 and 100 advertisements.
Perhaps your present advertising is not producing the results you expect, may be it is lacking the want
of proper illustration; if so, let us know, and we will prove to you that "advertising is to Business what
Steam is to Machinery."
Circulars and Booklets compiled and distributed.
Advertisements written and controlled for all lines of
business.
Promoters of contests and other methods for drawing
trade.
Corporation and Banking Publicity.
Real  Estate Advertising.
If you are wanting publicity of any kind, call on us or
write.   We charge nothing for advice.
When desiring information please forward us copy of
advertisements you have been preparing, which we shall
take pleasure in criticising, without charge.
Illustrations, Designs, Engraving
We are prepared to quote the lowest rates on illustrations, designs, and engraving.   If you wish for small sketches and cuts
use in the newspaper, magazine or circular—we can supply you with same at moderate cost.
WHEN THINKING OF PUBLICITY, THINK OF US.
The Newton Advertising Agency
Advertising and Circulation Managers for "The Week," (a Provincial Review).
W. F. Quick, Assistant Manager, .       Tele-zranhic Address—"Publicity"  Victoria Res- phone> lfa9-
Office Phone, 1283. leiegraphic Address- Publicity,    Victoria.        p 0. Bdx 781.   G. W. Newton, Mgr.
Head Office 1208 Goverrifjient St.
VICTORIA, B. C.
Sample of our Illustrating Department.
^
J
CERTIFICATE   OF   THE   REGISTRATION  OF  AN  EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANT.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Alternative Sealed i Tenders, superscribed "Tender for Wharf, Prince Rupert," will be received by the Honourable the Minister of Public Works up
to noon of Tuesday, the 27th April,
1900, for the erection and completion
of a reinforced concrete wharf with timber, superstructure at Prince Rupert,
B.C.
, 1. For wharf complete inclusive of
slips:
2. For   wharf  complete  exclusive  of
slips.
Plans, Specifications, Contract and
Forms of Tender may be seen on and
after the 27th day of March, 1909, at
the offices of the Qovernment Agent,
Prince Rupert; of the Government
Agent, New Westminster; of the Provincial Timber Inspector, Vancouver;
and at the Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C.
Each proposal must be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank of
Canada, made payable to the Hon. the
Minister of Public Works, for a sum
equivalent to ten per cent, of the
amount of the tender, which shall be
forfeited if the party tendering decline
to enter Into contract when called upon
to do so, or if he fail to complete the
work contracted for. The cheques or
certificates of deposit of unsuccessful
tenderers will be returned to them upon
the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the forms supplied, signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed ln the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
EDWARD MOHUN,
EDWARD HOHUN,
Assistant Engineer.
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., 19th March, 1909.
apl 24	
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that John D. Bell, of Victoria, banker, Intends to apply for permision to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the east shore of Anaham
Lake, about 2 miles from head of lake;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 40
chains, more or less, to lake; thence
80 chains, more or less, south westerly
along lake to point of commencement,
containing 320 acres, more or less.
Dated  February 16th,  1909.
JOHN  D.   BELL.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
"Companies' Act, 1897."
No. 374.
I HEREBY CERTIFY that "The Michigan Trust Company" has this day
been registered as an Extra-Provincial
Company under the "Companies' , Act,
1897," to carry out or effect all or any
of the objects of the Company to which
the legislative authority of the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head offlce of the Company is
situate at the City of Grand Rapids,
Kent County,  Michigan,  U.S.A.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is Two hundred thousand dollars, divided into Two thousand shares
of One hundred dollars each.
The head offlce of the Company in
this Province is situate at No. 1114
Langley St., -Victoria, and William John
Taylor, Barrister-at-law, whose address
is Victoria aforesaid is the attorney for
the Company, not empowered to issue
and transfer stock.
The time of the existence of the
Company is thirty years from the lst
day of June, A.D., 1889.
The Company is limited.
Given under my hand and Seal of
Offlce at Victoria, Province of British
Columbia, this sixteenth day of March,
one thousand nine hundred and nine.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for whicn this Company
has been established and registered are:
To carry on a trust deposit and security business, and any other business
authorized by the provisions of Act. No.
108 of the Public Acts of 1889 as
amended, the same being Sections 6156
to 6189 of the Compiled Laws of 1897
of the State of Michigan, U.S.A.
apl 24 \\\\\\\\M
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that George Edward Wilkerson, of Victoria, gardner, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted at the south east corner of Lot 26, near Anaham Lake; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 20 chains;
thence south 40 chaitis; thence west 20
chains to. point of commencement, containing 80 acres,  more or less.
Dated   February   16th,   1909.
GEORGE EDWARD WILKERSON.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Jessie Clara Bell, of
Victoria, spinster, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on Palmer trail, about 5 miles
north west of J. Lunos' ranch on Upper
Salmon River and about 1 mile east of
Towdestan Lake; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence north SO
chains; thence east 40 chains to point of
commencement, containing 320 acres,
more or less.
Dated  February  16th,  1909.
JESSIE  CLARA   BELL.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Frederick Stewari
Burell, of Victoria, accountant, intenus
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted on the west bank of
Salmon River, about. 10 chains north ot
ford on the Bella Coola Ootra Lake trail
and near the foot of Anaham Lake;
thence west 10 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east 80 chains, more or
less, to river; thence northerly along
river  to  point of commencement.
Dated  February 15th,  1909.
FREDERICK STEWART BURRELL.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
LICENCE    TO    AN    EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANY.
"Companies' Act, 1897."
WING ON
Employment Agent.
Wood and Coal for Sale.
Also Scavenging.
1709 Government St. Phone ._
VICTORIA, B.C.
Maps
Timber and Land.
Thr    kind    thai    show    what'i
taken    np   ami   what's   vacant
Electric Blue Print & Map Co.
ui8  Langley Street
Victoria. B. C.
Canada:
Province of British Columbia.
No. 469.
This is to certify that the "Winnipeg
Oil Company, Limited," is authorised
and licensed to carry on business within
the Province of British Columbia, ana
to carry out or effect all or any of the
objects of the Company to which the
legislative authority of the Legislature
of British Columbia extends.
The head offlce of the Company is
situate .at the City of Winnipeg, in the
Province of Manitoba.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is fifty thousand dollars, divided into flve hundred shares of one
hundred dollars each.
The head offlce of the Company in tnis
Province is situate at the City of Victoria, and Andrew Wright, Financial
Agent, whose address ls Victoria aforesaid, is the attorney for the company.
Given  under  my  Hand and  Seal  of
Offlce at Victoria, Province of British
Columbia,  this  third day of February,
one thousand nine hundred and nine.
(L. S). S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has been established and licensed are:
To purchase, acquire, hold, and operate oil refineries, plant and machinery
of all kinds; to carry on the business
of buying, leasing, letting and selling
petroleum and oil lands; buying, selling,
producing and manufacturing all kinds
of oil and all products and compounds
thereof, and all articles and substances
of which oil ls an Ingredient; of sink-
ink, boring, making, putting down, and
building oil wells, and all buildings and
erections which may be requisite in connection therewith and of otherwise developing and operating upon petroleum
oil lands; of erecting, leasing, buying,
letting and selling oil refineries together
with all such buildings and works as
may be necessary in connection with the
production and sale of oil products and
all compounds thereof, and all sud-
stances and articles of which oil is an
ingredient; to manufacture, buy, sell,
and deal in oil producers, machinery,
supplies, and utensils of all kinds; to
carry on the business of storing, tanking and warehousing refined and cruae
oil and all products and compounds
thereof, and all substances and articles
of which oil ls an Ingredient and granting warehouse receipts for the same;
to construct, equip and operate pipe
lines and other contrivances or appliances for the transportation of on;
the doing of all such other acts ana
things as are incidental or conducive
to the attainment of any of the objects
aforesaid,
BRADSHAW & DAVliS
Solicitors for the said Company,
mch 20
CANCELLATION OF  RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the re-
serve covering the fractional sections
31, 32 and 33, Denman Island, notice
of which was published ln the British
Columbia Gazette of October 21st, 1876,
ls cancelled.
ROBT. A RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of
Lands and Works,
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., December 17th, 1908.
Dec.  17
NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve placed upon certain lands ln the
vicinity of Lower Kootenay River, District of Kootenay, notice of which appeared in the British Columbia Gazette
of the 14th of August, 1884, Is cancelled, for the purpose of disposing of
such lands by public auction, and to
permit of giving effect to the recommendations contained in the report of
Mr. W. F. Teetzel, a commissioner appointed to adjudicate upon the claims of
certain squatters upon the said lands,
but for no other purpose.
ROBERT A.  RENWICK.
Deputy Commissioner of Lands and
Works, Lands and Works Department
Victoria, B. C, 6th October, 1908.
jan}.
Houses Built
ON THE
Instalment
Plan
d. hTbale
Contractor and Builder.
Phone 1140.
Cor. Fort and Stadacona Streets THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL io, 1909
New Arrivals,
Wilton Squares
I*    Chief among the late arrivals  in
, the  carpet  store  are  these  Wilton
Squares—handsome new creations for
' Spring.
Wilton is a favorite carpet style,
the pile giving a rich appearance and
excellent service.
In these new ones we have cho'sen
a fine range of patterns and colorings
; —an offering worth while.   We have
I these in greens, reds and fawns in
beautiful conventional and floral designs.   We would greatly appreciate
>an  opportunity  to  show  you  these
I* squares.
Size 9 x 10-6  $27.50
Size 9 x 12 $32.5°
I Sizen-3 x 12     $38.50
Size 11-3 x 13-6  $48.50
HALL MIRROR
. NEW DESIGN-$7.50.
''   Here is a snappy design in a Hall
Mirror.
This is an attractive frame of Early
English Oak finish. Has a bevel plate
mirror of best quality, hooks for hats
and coats and would be an excellent
addition to most any hall.
We show a wide range of other
styles in hall mirrors and offer a wide
variety of hall seats, hall racks, cos-
tumers and other hall furniture needs.
But see this mirror at—
$7.50
r^nr.n'fi
'     SPRING'S LATEST CREATIONS NOW ON SHOW
The best British makers have contributed some charming creations to this Spring's Carpet showing.
Daintiness was never more apparent than in this season's offerings. All who have seen these have been
enthused and we think you'll add to the praise.
But we sell satisfaction as well as carpets, and would rather miss a sale than send out something
inferior and unsatisfactory. Carpet quality is woven in—doesn't always show on the surface. It's the
wool and the quality of the wool, the brilliancy and the fastness of the colors and the manufacturers'
experience that makes for carpet satisfaction.
We sell only guaranteed kinds and we positively guarantee you carpet satisfaction. Our carpet values
cannot be beaten.   Pleased to show you.
Velvet Carpets, per yard..$1.50
Wilton Carpets, per yard..$1.90
Ingrain Carpets, per yard . 60c    Brussels Carpets, per yard $1.00
Axminster Carpets, per yard, $1.90    Tapestry Carpets, per yard ...75c
These prices are for carpets made and laid by skilled workmen.
Qood Things for Your Dining Room
AN UNSURPASSED COLLECTION IS OFFERED YOU.
Doesn't your dining-room need the addition of a piece or two of new and attractive furniture? From
such stocks as we offer it is art easy matter to choose something that's make it different—distinctive.
We have a wide variety of dining-room furniture styles, and offer a big  choice  in  the   matter  of
expenditure.   Come in and let us show you through the stock.
In Dining-room Tables we show an excellent range of styles in Golden Elm, Golden Oak, Early English
Oak and Mahogany.    Prices range from $100 down to  $7.50
In Buffets we have many splendid new designs in several woods and finishes.   Prices run from $150 to $25
Dining Chairs, in many designs to match the above from $1.00
Brussels Squares
Give Good
Service
Brussels Squares have aweave that
makes them a very serviceable and
satisfactory floor covering where carpets are subjected to considerable
traffic.
The close, hard weave makes them
an easy carpet to keep clean and also
prevents the dust from filtering
through.
Brussels is called the "housekeeper's carpet" because it lightens
the labour of the daily housecleaning.
We are showing some fine squares
in several sizes and in a wide choice
of patterns and colorings. Come in
and let us show you some of these.
Quality the best—prices the fairest:
Size 9x9 feet  $18
Size 9 x 10-6  $21
Size 9 x 12 $24
Size 11-3 x 12 $30
Size 11-3 x 13-6  $33
Library Table
STYLISH PIECE, $13.50.
If you are partial to Early English
finished furniture you will lok long
before you'll find a more attractive
library table style than this one.
This is a table made from selected,
quarter cut oak specially well finished
in Early English.
Table has a drawer and shelf beneath.   The design is very pleasing.:
We show an excellent line of other
styles in library tables—all prices.
. This one is fine value at
$12.50
TO RETAILERS
Isn't it poor business to
carry a large stock in your
little town when the quantities you require may be purchased from us on short
notice. We help you. Prompt
and satisfactory service guaranteed.
WEILER BROS.
Complete Home Furnishers
VICTORIA, B. C.
TO DEALERS
We solicit correspondence
from dealers who are not
already acquainted with us
and who wish to get
acquainted with the largest
wholesalers of Homefurnish-
ings in the West. Try furniture as a "side-line"—we
help you.
A LADY'S LETTER.
(Continued from Page Four)
lly on the head when he remarked,
I" Dandies always fight well."
in Canada, this was exemplified by
|the first settlers at Quebec from
vhose ranks arose such heroic youths
las Adam Dollard and such brave
Imaidens as Madeleine de Vercheres.
■Although menaced on all sides landward by hordes of blood-thirsty sav-
lages and in constant dread of hostile
Ifleets to seaward, it is recorded of
I them by an eye-witness that they paid
Igreat attention to their dress. This
lis the more remarkable when we re-
I member they had to weave their own
I serges, linens, and buntings. A
I Swedish professor who visited Quebec in 1749 describes the women of
I that time as wearing "elaborate head-
) dresses, short skirts, high-heeled
I shoes, t flirting their fans of turkey-
[feathers and trilling their light little
isongs of broken-hearts and lovers."
lit is true the Swede did not approve
[of these habiliments or doings and
[said it would require an earthquake to
[shock the settlers into "modesty of
[attire," but there are some of us, in
[truth many of us, who applaud these
[braveries of our long-since dead-and-
[gone grandmothers. We have no
j,doubt grandfather was properly di-
l verted and beguiled by the gewgaws,
[by the whisper of the skirts, and general modishness of his spouse. It was
[all so very pretty and not in the least
[sinful. Of grandfather, himself, Char-
jlevoix said, he "enjoys what he has
land makes a show of what he has
lnot."
And besides (put a pin in this Sir)
lthe fact of dressing smartly and in
[gay clothes made their life and posi-
I tion more assured with the savage
I tribes of the Canadian forests.
It is a good move to look something
very special when you have to deal
with wholly untutored folk. This may
be illustrated by an incident in the
career of Lord Curzon. In his early
travels he visited Afghanistan, which
journey he made at the risk of his life
and purse. To protect these he called
to his aid an eminent military tailor
who built him a uniform of scarlet
and gold so dazzling that the Afghans could hardly bear to look at it.
Thus bedizened, he passed through
their country, not only unscathed but
everywhere being reverenced -ias a
tremendously superior person. It may
thus be seen that while knowledge is
power, dress runs it a close second.
But apart from the bearing a man's
dress has on others, it has also a distinct effect on himself. The wearing
of cap and bells would debase a
bishop into a clown, just as the wearing of striped clothes turns prisoners
into hardened criminals or lunatics.
A well-tailored suit with a correct
tie and shoes inspires a man with confidence and rouses him to his responsibilities. We should have added a
collar to this outfit because its absence will upset a man's poise as
quickly and certainly as if he stepped
ou a banana peel. Besides, the mere
absence of a collar will make a handsome, intellectual face look positively
vulgar.
A man invariably changes his outlook with his clothes. This is the
reason he is more religious on Sundays than on week-days. A dirty coat
makes dirty actions natural. A shabby
suit makes a man shy of his fellows
just as a Prince Albert coat and silk
hat gives him a sense of superiority.
They are to him as a sword and
buckler. In this respect, men are Very
much like lettuce salads; their excellence is largely a matter of dressing.   This is the reason tailoring may
be described as one of the principle
fine arts of the age.
In putting forth a plea for fine apparel, we must not be mistaken as
advocating dandyism or a finical foppishness like that of Beau Nash, Beau
Fielding, or Beau Brummell, although,
in this connection, it is not to be
forgotten that William III offered the
honour of knighthood to Nash for no
other reason than that the Beau was
a well-disposed, handsome youth who
dressed superbly. On the contrary,
what we urge is the folly, from a
business or social standpoint, of being slipshod and shabby in a world
where four times a year even Nature
puts on new clothes.
lt is true many noted men wear
clothes that are frayed, faded, and
baggy; but this is because they feel
their position sufficiently eminent to
warrant their neglect of personal appearances. In other words, their contempt of the nicities of dress is, in
reality, the outcome of pride, or what
the Man on the Street would vulgarly
but aptly designate as "swollen head."
This is an old form of pride—a pose
practised years and years before the
Christian era; for we read in Greek
history that Socrates twitted Antis-
tlienes, the leader of the school of
cynics with it. "Antisthenes," he
gibed, "I see thy vanity through the
holes in thy coat."
It is reported of a certain enormously wealthy English Duke that his
ragged clothes have placed him on a
par with the needy knife-grinder
whose would-be exploiter told him—
"Torn is your coat, your hat has got
a hole in it,—so have your breeches.'
There arc, of course, rare instances
where devotion to old clothes arises
out of a queer unexplainable twist in
an otherwise well-balanced mentality.
Such men must be circumvented by
domestic   strategy   as   was   Domini -
Sampson who, you will remember, was
so cleverly reclothed, piece by piece,
that the process was wholly unnoticed and thus failed to elicit from
the good old Dominie his usual
puzzled ejaculation, "Prodigious!"
These, however, are not men to imitate, Extremes of any kind are to be
deprecated but, in dress, of the two
extremes—rags and gorgeousness—we
would rather emulate Beau Brum-
mell's much caluminated butterfly for
"The butterfly was a gentleman
Which nobody can refute;
He left his lady-love at home,
And roamed in a velvet suit."
BABETTE.
Bondage.
(By Reginald Wright Kauffman)
1 am the slave of day,
And underneath the sun
I play my part with  stubborn heart
Until the day is done;
I do the petty task,
I earn the grudging pay,
And none can guess I wear a mask,
Indentured to the day.
But when the sun has set
And labor ends again,
How easy to forget
The walks and ways of men!
Deep in my heart I seek
The lilac and the rue,
The white rose and the rose of red:
The memory of you.
What though the miles divide,
What though the years are past?
Across the night I dream aright,
And am my.-ielf at last;
A bondsman of the day,
While day is on its throne,
The secret stars all know I am
Your slave, and yours alone!
They met at the lunch counter.
The girl with fluffy hair had ordcr-
i-_! ice cream, cake, chocolate pudding,
nnti  cream 'puffs.
"For thc lands sake, Belle!" exclaimed the girl with the picture hat.
"How can you get away with all that
stuff?"
"I'm dieting," freezingly answered
the girl with thc fluffy hair. 10
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL io, 1909
WHEN OLD SOL SMILES
If you have a good Gas Range in your kitchen life is worth living in the warm weather.   So different to cooking the cook (more especially if the cook is
yourself) over a hot coal or wood stove.   If you do not like cooking all the more reason for making your labor as easy as possible.
A housewife will revel in the possession of a Gas
Range, appreciating the saving in time, strength and
worry, the cleanliness, accuracy and healthfulness of
gas for cooking purposes. Henceforth she will have
no kindlings to buy, no coal to carry in, no ashes to
take out, no blinding, choking smoke in starting wood
or coal stove, no blistering heat while cooking and no
fear of fire from over-heated flues. Early breakfast
will have no terrors for her, just as easy will she be
able to get up a late supper for unexpected guests.
If she has a dinner to cook which takes hours, she
will set the Range right and she will find it hours
later just exactly as she left it.
A Gas Radiator qr a Gas Grate forms a charming
addition to any residence.   Either is extremely use
ful to a lady or a man who "batches" even if only one
room forms "home." A furnace may be balky, or out
altogether, steam heat may become obstreperous, wood
or coal fires entail labor in relighting, but a Gas
Heater is always ready with the turn of the tap and
scratch of a match. It is a most economical apparatus,
the expense stops the minute the gas is turned off.
It can be brought into service in a second without
work, so different from fire-building. It will not only
give the required warmth, but will at once dispense a
genial air of hospitality. As a little heat is required
almost every day of the year in British Columbia, a
Gas Radiator, or a Gas Grate, should be installed in
every house.
You are most cordially welcome to visit our showrooms whether you desire to purchase or merely to look.   We will gladly explain the many advantages of Gas
for cooking and heating purposes.
Victoria Gas Company, Limited
Cor. Fort and Langley Streets, Victoria, B. C.
Sporting Comment
The victory of St. Ives, the French
runner, in the Marathon Derby at
New York last Saturday came as a
surprise to many followers of Marathon races, but now the race has been
run and an opportunity been given to
look into the records of the plucky
little Frenchman, it can easily be seen
that he is a good one, In an interview given before the race Shrubb
plainly stated that Ives was the dark
horse arid the one of whom he was
afraid, and it proved to be the
Frenchman who put him to the bad.
Of the showing made by Longboat,
I can only say that it leaves a very
bad taste with "ail true Canadians.
Longboat when in Condition can easily run a better race and why he
should disappoint his supporters as he
did on Saturday is something that
can only be answered by those who
know. It looks very much as if the
master hand of Tom Flanigan was
again at work and it would not be
surprising if the Frenchman and
Longboat were matched for another
Marathon within a few months. The
whole aspect of the race, was anything but for sport, this side of the
question being entirely overlooked for
the question of money.
The defeat of the Cambridge crew
at the hands of the Oxfords upset the
calculations of many critics but when
a crew goes out for a practice and
beats the best. time ever made in a
face, that crew should be given some
consideration. It appeared to be a
foregone conclusion that Cambridge
would win with its well tried crew,
but the best laid plans "gang aft a
glee."
At last the statement has been
made by the officials of the New
Westminster and Vancouver Lacrosse
Club that the players have been getting a hand-out every season. This
sounds very good after the delegates
from these clubs at the meeting held
in Victoria last year, had signed a
statement that they would see that
the players of the clubs they repre
sented played strictly amateur. This
is another instance where sport is
played not for the sport there is in
it but for what' can be made out of
it. Truly, a bright idea for players in
an amateur association. As far as
Victoria is concerned the players last
year were strictly amateur and there
is no reason why the clubs which
broke the regulations should not be
penalized. Now that the association
has affiliated with the Canadian Federation, I suppose the matter will be
overlooked, but this shows that the
system of' running amateur associations in B. C. is entirely too lax.
The local team made a start for the
season yesterday morning and although the practice was not a strenuous one it served as a starter and
shows that there is material in this
city for a first class team.
The baseballers are rounding into
tine form and should show good ball
during the coming season. It is very
apparent, however, that unless some
very quick work is done in connection
with the grounds, the diamond will
not be ready for the opening game.
The International Basketball championship of the Pacific Northwest has
been won by the Y.M.C.A. team of*
this city after a very hard season. So
close was the race for the trophy
that two extra games were necessary
to decide the supremacy between
Vancouver and Victoria, and although
the Terminal City players won the
first of these games, the locals came
back strong in the second and gave
their opponents a stinging defeat. The
local boys deserve great credit for the
consistent manner in which they have
played during the season and it is
only necessary to add that it was
through regular practices that they
have been able to wip the championship. In referring to the work
of the team it would be unfair to overlook the work of Physical Director
Findley, who has been largely instrumental in bringing the boys to their
present stagC of perfection.
Although the Marathon race at Oak
Bay took place yesterday I will defer
my remarks until our next issue.
A. Y. P. Exposition.
Rear Admiral Robley D. Evans,
better known as "Fighting Bob," was
a visitor in Seattle during the. past
week in the course of his lecture tour
of the country, and during his stay
here was the guest of the Alaska-
Yukon-Pacific Exposition officials for
a trip around the fair grounds. Thc
Admiral was the first noted visitor to
the fair who has been taken through
the interior of any of the buildings.
On the occasion of his visit the party
went through the Manufactures and
Oregon State Buildings, in both of
which exhibits are being installed.
Admiral Evans expressed his approval
of the fair in the following words:
"If one should comb all the world
he could not find a more beautiful
spot for an Exposition than the site
of the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Fair. I
have never seen anything myself to
equal it. It's a veritable jewel of a
place. And the Fair will be ready,
too, in my opinion."
"Fighting Bob" is not a man given
to many words, but his quiet remarks
about the exposition were fully appreciated by the fair management. The
Admiral saw the Exposition Grounds
with most of the large buildings complete, and a score of the smaller ones
nearing completion. The fair grounds
will be everywhere dotted "with these
smaller structures, and they do much
to complete the general plan of the
grounds, and to give the finishing
touches to the. completed picture as
it has been planned by the landscape
men and the architects. Among the
small buildings now being finished are
the Dairy, Good Roads, Women's,
Grand Trunk Railway, Arctic Brotherhood, Masonic, Y.W.C.A., and Hoo
Hoo Buildings. Then there are three
county buildings, representing Spokane, Chehalis and Yakima counties,
and of course the dozens of shows
along the Pay Streak.
The construction of booths has
commenced in the manufactures
building, and from the preliminary
work it is evident that the big national concerns which will exhibit
there are sparing no pains pr money
The Mixture
That's Different
To Others.
Is Dudleigh's Mixture. Does
not burn the tongue, has a
pleasant aroma and is sold at a
moderate price.
££L Richardson
Phoae 346
JALLAND BROS.
Fine Groceries
FRESH  FRUIT  DAILY.
623 Yates St.    ■    VICTORIA. B.C
to install shows that will please the
visitors. In the Oregon State Building the greatest progress has been
made in interior decoration and the
installation of exhibits. In the great
dome, artists are at work on a panor
amic painting of Oregon scenery,
which is being decorated with native
grains and grasses of the state. On
the second floor the decorating is well
under way, while on the main floor
cabinet makers are at work constructing cases for exhibits, and shipments
of exhibits are being unpacked. Those
already on hand include exhibits of
fruit, grains and farm products, polished woods, and stuffed and mounted
animals. Other consignments have
not been unpacked. Oregon was the
first state to complete her A. Y. P.
building, and bids fair to be the first
to complete her exhibit.
HAVE YOU AN OLD
BLACK STRAW HAT?
If it's a becoming shape don't
throw it away, because it can
be made practically good as
new with
BOWES' BLACK
STRAW HAT
VARNISH.
This splendid varnish is waterproof—the black cannot come
off. We would like every wearer
of straw hats to know more
about its economy and worth.
Only 25c at this store.
GYRUS H BOWES.
CHEMIST
Govt. St., Near Yatea.
He—If a man marries a prudent
girl the two can live as cheaply as
one.
She—Pshaw! A prudent girl would
not think of marrying a man with as
little money as that.
Prepare yourself against Jack fj
Frost.
See BOLDEN    i
THE CARPENTER AND
BUILDER.
For your weather strips,  etc., I
760   Yates   St.   Op.   Dominion *
Hotel.   Phones: House, A.1125:
Shop, B1828.
The Taylor Mill Co]
Limited.
All kindf «f Building Material,
LUMBER
SHSH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
______________________ THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 10, 1908
11
msmm^m^^^if-m
■H3tstQtxKasare3ioiS)s^^
WHAT WE HAVE DONE
Six weeks ago we offered for subscription 300,000 shares
of the Preference Stock of this. Corporation. Within that
comparatively short time, over one-third of the capital
necessary for the purchase of the 100 square miles of
timber limits and for the erection of the first unit, 90-ton
pulp plant, has been subscribed, and every dollar has been
secured from Vancouver Island. What does this splendid
result mean? It means, if. it means anything, that the
people of Vancouver Island are awakening to the great
possibilities in the development of their natural resources,
and are prepared to support any industry that is built
upon good, clean, sound, substantial business principles
and which has for its object the utilization of the timber
or mineral resources.. When we organized the company,
considerable criticism was manifested because we were
obliged to sell our stock through the medium of the press
and by personal solicitation. We adopted this plan
because it was the only policy which promised success,
and the only manner of bringing the proposition to the
attention of the intelligent thinking people of Vancouver
Island. The majority of the big enterprises of the world
are those that have been built up by popular subscription
from the plain people. In every political, industrial or
educational movement in this or any other country it has
always been the plain intellectual people who have responded to' its formation and made it possible. As a
matter of fact, the majority of the large corporations of
both the United States and Canada are made up of small
stockholders. The railroads of the United States alone
have over 500,000 stockholders. The United States Steel
Corporation has 110,000; Pennsylvania Railroad 60,000,
28,000 of which are women; Union Pacific and Southern
Pacific, 30,000; Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad,
25,000; New York Central, 22,000; American Sugar Co.,
20,000;  Bell Telephone, 24,000;  Pullman Car Co., 13,000;
American Smelter Co-., 10,000; General Electric Co.,
12,000; National Lead, 8,000. The average individual
holding in the above stocks represents only 85 shares.
If we are to develop the great natural resources which
nature hath so bountifully supplied us with, we must get
out into the great highways of life and shout its praises.
Not only should we develop the Wood Pulp and Paper
Industry, but there are other' industries of equal importance likewise development. Notwithstanding the tremendous advantages possessed by British Columbia in the
Manufacture of Wood Pulp and Paper by the fact of
having unlimited Pulpwood and magnificent waterways,
this industry has remained absolutely undeveloped while
Ontario and Quebec, with far less natural resources, have
forged ahead at a tremendous rate. During the last few
years millions of dollars of new capital has been invested
in the Pulp mills of the Eastern Provinces, giving employment to thousands of people, and making possible new
enterprising towns. Experience lias shown that the only
manner of making these new enterprises possible is to get
out and arouse public opinion, so that the people can see
for themselves the tremendous possibilities possible in the
utilization of their natural resources.
One year ago the British Canadian Wood Pulp and
Paper Company of Vancouver was organized. At that
time it was universally predicted that sufficient money
could not be secured in Western Canada to assure the
success of such an enterprise. Within ten months over
one-quarter of a million dollars has been subscribed and
the Company are flow about to 6p6ti 6iie of the most
modern Pulp and Paper Mills in Canada. The above
Company will manufacture nothing but Book, Ledger,
Bond and Writing Papers, while the local Victoria Company will confine itself exclusively to the manufacture of
News Paper, Ordinary Wrapping, Building Paper and Box
Board. The manner in which the people of British Columbia have responded in the support of these two Companies is conclusive proof that we no longer are obliged
to look to the Eastern Provinces or to England for
sufficient capital to develop our resources or to make
possible industries essential for the building up of our
country.
Upon the incorporation of this Company we secured
almost 100 square miles of Pulp Limits on Quatsino
Sound, at the Northern part of Vancouver Island and are
now rushing work pn a 90-ton Pulp plant, which we are
reasonably certain of having in operation by December
ist. There is no question but that the stock which we are
now offering will eventually prove one of the best dividend
paying propositions ever offered for subscription in
Western Canada. At the present time ti is absolutely impossible to buy stock in the majority of the Pulp and
Paper Mills of Canada and with our tremendous pulp
limits and other natural advantages regarding water ways
and proximity to the Oriental markets, there is no reason
why we should not pay considerably larger dividends than
the Eastern operating plants. Th? Eastern Pulp and
Paper mills are now mpvifljj paper into Australia, Japan
and China at 3 freight rate of about $13.00 per ton. Not
only are we able to manufacture these products, much
cheaper than the Eastern mills but we are likewise able
to secure a freight rate to the Oriental markets at from
$3.00 to $5.00 per ton. At the present time there is a
universal shortage of both news and wrapping paper, and
the question of securing sufficient wood pulp for the
Manufacture of finished paper is yearly becoming a more
serious question. It has long been the conviction of expert
authorities on paper that it is only a question of time
before British Columbia with her vast forests will become
the leading producer of Wood Pulp and Paper in the
world.
The Preferred Stock is entitled to a cumulative dividend
o'f 7 per cent., payable out of the net profits of the Com
pany before any dividend is paid on the Ordinary Stock;
after a like amount has been paid on the Ordinary Stock,
both Stocks thereafter participate equally.
WE NOW OFFER FOR SUBSCRIPTION THE REMAINDER OF THE FIRST ISSUE OF
300,000 PREFERENCE SHARES
In Blocks of 100 Shares at $1 per share.
PAYMENTS : 15 per cent, on application.   15 per cent, in 30 days. ^Balance 10 per cent, per month until fully paid.
COL. HENRY APPLETON, Royal Engineer, retired, Director
British Canadian Wood Pulp & Paper Co., Ltd.
CHARLES J. V. SPRATT, President Victoria Machinery Depot.
Victoria.
DR. LEWIS HALL, Mayor of Victoria, B.C.
CHARLES LUGRIN, Editor "Colonist," Victoria, B.C .
DIRECTORS
W. K. HOUSTON, Member W. K. Houston & Co., Victoria.
JOSEPH McPHEE, Gen'l Merchant, Cumberland and Courtenay.
F. J. MARSHALL, formerly Asst. Manager National Bk. of India
FREDERICK APPLETON, Director M. R. Smith & Co.. Ltd.,
GREELY KOLTS, Director and Fiscal Agent British Canadian
Wood Pulp & Paper Co., Ltd.
Address all subscriptions direct to the Head Office of the Company, 638 View Straet, Victoria, B. C.
WESTERN CANADA WOOD PULP & PAPER COMPANY, LTD.
GREELY KOLTS, Fiscal Agent.
«8a«5J8mB«5amBm8a«8888888||
if
Music and Stage £
Harry Beresford Coming.
Interest centers around the appear-
ice at the' Victoria Theatre next
eek of Mr. Harry Beresford in
Who's Your Friend?"
Mr. Beresford was last seen here
l "The Wrong Mr. Wright," when
drew a crowd which taxed the
opacity of the Victoria Theatre. Ex-
ellent criticisms have this season
een given to Mr. Beresford and his
ompany from New York to the Pa-
ific Coast.   San Francisco, Los An-
:les, Portland and Seattle have add-
d such unreserved praise that pa-
■ons of the Victoria Theatre may
onfidently expect the most laughable
omedy seen here this season, when
lat playhouse raises the curtain on
lis laughing success, next Monday
nd Tuesday, April 12th and, 13th, re-
jectively.
Dr. W. F. Fraser
DENTIST
Has Established Himself At
723 Yates Street,
Garesche Block
Harry Beresford,  in  His   Laughing Success, "Who's Your Friend?"
Victoria Theatre, Monday and Tuesday, April 12 and 13.
Where he is prepared to perform
dental operation according to the
latest scientific methods. Specialist
in Crown and Bridgework.
Phone 261. Hours: 9 a.m., 4 p.m.
that, Anglo-Saxons by bathing so
much have produced 144 new varieties
of skin disease," while a Chicago doc-'
tor w6uld have bathing stopped altogether. Here is a choice bunch of
international opinion.
Happy Canada.
Canada should be happy. Persia is
am by internal dissensions;  Turkey
being constitutionalized; Spain and
'ortugal fear revolutions; France
as trouble between cleric and anti-
leric; Austria and Hungary have race
oubles; Germany fears isolation by
British-Russian-French combination,
ie United States has its colored pro-
lem. Canada has only an excellent
arvest and good trade prospects.
Sunday° Somnambulism.
Vicar: "Well, Mary, I was very
surprised tp see John walk out in
the middle of the sermon yesterday!"
Mary: "Ah, sir, I do 'ope you'll excuse my poor Hisband. 'E's a terrible
one for walkin' in 'is sleep."
An English doctor warns us that a
ewly-shaven skin is an open door
>r germs, and a Vienna doctor says
His Rival.
Holmes—You've got a Morris chair
at your home, I suppose.
Henpeck—Yes.
Holmes—Great for comfort; don't
you enjoy it?   '
Henpeck—I do when I get a chance
but Maria's cat usually beats me to it.
The following verses must have
been the work of a genuine anti-
woman-suffragist:
If all the harm that women have done
Were put in a bundle' and rolled into
one, ■
Earth would not hold it,
The sky could not enfold it,
It could not be lighted nor warmed
by the sun,
Such masses of evil
Would puzzle the devil,
And keep him in fuel while Time's
wheels run.
But if all the harm that's been done
by men
Were    doubled    and    doubled    and
doubled again,
And melted and fused into vapor and
then
Were squared and raised to the power
of ten,
There wouldn't be nearly enough, not
near,
To keep a small girl for a tenth of
a year..
Her Loving Friends.
Nan—Where do poor, dear Lil and
the husband she has managed to get
at last expect to spend their honeymoon?
Fan—There won't by any honeymoon.   She's a wasp.
Beware of Poets!
If womenfolk were wise, they would
avoid like the plague all men who
have a facility for stringing rhymes.
The turpitudes of poets in relation
to the sex are as multitudinous as
the star of a summer night.
Scott—What makes you think that
the trust originated in Rhode Island?
Mott—Dad used to speak of the
trust in Providence as far back as
when I was a boy.
Isaac Sprenkle, of Snyder county,
Pennsylvania, is blessing his dentist
who made him so strong a set of false
teeth that when Isaac, out rabbit
shooting, was shot accidentally
through the mouth the teeth prevented the shot from entering his
brain.
It is so dry near Port Jervis, N.Y.,
that, it is said, the birds fly backward to keep the dust out of their
eyes.
His Wife a Riddle.
Bacon—You say he always gives up
riddles?
Egbert—Yes; he's going out to Dakota now to see if he can give up
one. Provincial Elections Act
SAANICH   ELECTORAL DISTRICT
on «_»*£££* ?rt ftfrtS** oW•otio,u, have been Hea ^^ me a8falast tne *o-»owintr per.cn. named bein? retained on the Li.t of Voter, for the above di.trlct
Road^^^V^^ " -*«  "-doo* in th. forenoon at T.»ny.on.
well f?£?eW£T^ aPPear'' ftt the "" °°nrt «* •fttUflM »e «"* «• -*■ o*J~tlon 1. not
Dated thi. 8th day of April, 1909. WILLIAM 0BAHAM, Registrar of Voter..
Christian Name and Surname of Votei'.
Anderson, Aug. Corbett ...
Bruce, James Alexander  ..
Case, Henry Oscar  	
Daley, James Bradford ...
Flesh,   Charles   Sherman   .
Ferguson, Everard Percival
Ferguson, Samuel Gardiner
Garnham, William 	
Percival,   Everard   	
Pamphlett, Robert 	
Robblns,   John   	
Spotts, Frederick Walter ..
Stevens, David  	
Yates, James Stuart 	
Residence.
Strawberry Vale, Colquitz P.O	
Strawberry Vale, Colquitz P.O.	
Strawberry Vale, Colquitz P.O	
Colquitz Lake District, Colquitz. P.O	
Chas. Spring's Lot, Holland Avenue,
Maywood P.O.  	
Strawberry Vale, Colquitz P.O	
Strawberry Vale, Colquitz P.O	
Corner Wilkinson and Cary Roads, Colquitz P.O	
Glanford Avenue, Viotoria P.O	
Tennyson Road, Maywood P.O	
Strawberry Vale, Colquitz P.O	
West Saanich Road, Heal P.O	
Westwood Farm, West Saanich Road...
Cralgielea Farm, Gorge Rd, Victoria P.O.
Profession, Trade or Calling,
Farmer	
Farmer   	
Teacher 	
Farmer	
Farmer	
Farmer	
Farmer	
Farmer	
Farmer	
Marine Engineer
Farmer	
Farmer	
Farmer	
Barrister-at-Law
Nature of Objection,
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Deceased.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Ceased to reside ln the District.
Deceased.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Ceased to reside in the District.
Provincial Elections Act
ISLANDS ELECTORAL DISTRICT
TAKE NOTICE that objection,  have been filed with me against the following per.on. named being retained on the list of Voter, for the above dUtriot
on th. ground, .at forth.
AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that I will, on Monday, th. third day of May, 1909, at th. honr of eleven   o'olock  in  the  forenoon  at   Gang'..
Harbour,   hold   a   Court   of   Revision for th. purpose of hearing and determining' th. .aid objection..
Unless th. per.on objected to, or .om. other Provincial voter on hi. behalf, appear, at th. .aid Court and .atl.fie. mo that the .aid objection i. not
well founded, I .hall .trika th. nam. of «noh person off th. .aid lilt
Dated thi. 8th day of April, 1909.
X-HANX O. NORRIS, Registrar of Voter..
Christian Name and Surname of Voter.
Allen, Robert White	
Allberry, Henry Percy  	
Arthur, Clarence 	
Ashby, John B	
Bennett, Frederick 	
Bowyer, Frederick  	
Bown, Charles Quinton
Brien, Daniel 	
Carter, Ralph R	
Carpenter, John	
Chamberlain, Chas. Henry
Cepe, Joseph	
Clark,  Samuel   	
Connorton, Thomas  .......
Cooke, Fred	
Conery,  Socrates Tobias  ..
Cottell,  Charles   	
Cundell, Christopher Wm.
Dawson, Henry	
Dunckle, Gus Theophilus ..
Elder, Ernest James	
Elliot, George  	
Evans, William  Edward   ..
Forrester,  David  G	
Freeman, George Arthur  ..
Furze, John   	
Franklin, Florian Herschel
Gardner, George 	
Gardner, Alfred	
Georgeson, John 	
Grubbe, Robert	
Graham, John 	
Harrison, Ernest Leopold ..
Gaunt, Cyril  	
Harris, James  	
Hamilton, Andrew Victor .
Hardie, Alexander  	
Harrison, William Edward
Herron, Thomas E	
Howard, Henry Newton ...
Howard, George H	
Irwin, Joseph T	
Irwin, Earl Bruce	
Jones, Wm. Went. Eaton ..
Johnson, Henry  	
Karlberg, August	
Kelly, Henry 	
Kelly, Henry Bennett	
Knowles, Robert Earle ....
Knight, William Francis ..
Lannan, William   	
Lidgate, Thomas Richard .
Manley, Harry 	
Marriott, Walter	
Mason, Job	
McDonald,  Duncan	
McLean, Thomas William ,
McLean, Robert John 	
Miller, John 	
Moore, J. C	
Morris, Tom Raymond 	
McKinley, George	
O'Neill,  Joseph   	
Otto,  John   	
Paddon,  Qeorge  Locke   ...
Residence.
Profession, Trade or Calling.
Mallamott Farm, North  Saanich  ......
Sidney   Island   	
Sidney 	
North Salt Spring Island	
Mayne  Island   	
Thetis  Island   	
North Saanich 	
Sidney  	
Sidney 	
South  Salt  Spring Island   	
Sidney	
Sidney I
Pender Island 	
North Saanich	
Sidney  	
South Salt Spring Island	
Sidney    ■
South   Salt  Spring  Island	
Sidney	
Kuper Island	
Sidney   	
Portland Island	
Sidney   	
Sidney Island   	
North Saanich      	
Sidney Island	
Ganges, Salt Spring Island	
Ganges Harbour 	
South Salt Spring Island 	
Galiano Island	
Galiano Island	
Salt Spring Island 	
Ganges Harbour, Salt Spring Island .,.
North. Saanich  	
Fulford Harbour	
Pier Island  	
Sidney  	
Salt Spring Island, Central Settlement.
Fulford Harbour	
Sidney
South Salt Spring Island
Salt Spring Island
Sidney
Sidney    ^BmmBBIIBim^BllllllllllllHllllimilllM
North Saanich   j
Sidney Island !
Salt Spring Island	
Salt Spring Island 	
Meadlands Farm, North* Saanich .
Sidney  	
North Saanich	
Sidney	
Ganges Harbor, Salt Spring Island
South Pender Island	
Vesuvius Bay, Salt Spring island .
Pender Island	
North Saanich  	
Sidney	
Fulford Harbor	
Pender  Island   	
North Saanich	
Sidney	
North Saanich	
North Saanich	
Mayne   Island       ......   ...
Farmer	
Farmer ...  .
Marine Engineer
Farmer   	
Farmer  	
Farmer   	
Hotel Keeper ...
Deckhand 	
Baker	
Carpenter	
Cook	
Fisherman  	
Carpenter 	
Farmer	
Bartender	
Farmer 	
Deckhand  	
Farmer	
Clergyman ..,
Fireman  ...
Fisherman ...
Waiter	
Farmer	
Farmer	
Labourer ....
Stenographer
Farmer	
Light House Keeper
Farmer 	
Farmer	
Seaman	
Farmer	
Farmer	
Pruyn, Thomas Dorland    North Saanich ....
Roe, William Burns     Pender Island	
Sculthorpe, Alf. Clem. Fish    North Saanich ....
Schultz, Charles John     Saturna Island —
Scovlll, James Henry     Jams. Island   	
Simpson, Albert    Sidney	
Sivell, Alfred Gilbert      Portland Island ...
Shcpard, John Smith   I Salt Spring Island
Stephenson,  Albert  Edmond    j South Salt Spring ,
Thomas,  Morris Asbury   ' Sidney  	
Thompson, Robert William  * Sidney  	
Townsley,  Guy    ' Sidney 	
Trefusls, Robert Peel    Ganges	
Warne, William   Sidney	
Wain, Henry     North Saanich
Wilson, Harold    Sidney  	
Williams, George     Beaver Point	
Edgerman
Carpenter .
Farmer ...
Purser
Farmer
Painter
Logger
Steamboatman
Farmer 	
Farmer	
Farmer	
Rancher 	
Farmer	
Butter-maker .
Farmer	
Seaman	
Farmer	
Farmer ......
Miner	
Farmer	
Farmer 	
Farmer ....
Rancher
-Farmer ....
Rancher
Blacksmith
Carpenter ..
Storekeeper
Farmer	
Engineer	
Farmer	
Seaman  	
Farmer	
Farmer	
Farmer	
Carpenter 	
Preacher of Gospel
i Carpenter  ....
Fireman  	
< Gentleman
I Lumberman ...
Farmer	
I Railway Clerk
Farmer	
Nature of Objection.
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
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Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Dead.
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased.
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Name
and
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
Ceased
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
to reside
in the
in the
ln the
ln the
ln the
in the
in the
in the
in the
in the
in the
in the
in the
in the
in the
in the
in the
in the
in the
District.
District.
District.
District.
District.
District.
District.
District.
District.
District.
District.
District.
District.
District.
District.
District.
District.
District.
District.
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District.
to reside in the District,
to reside ln the District,
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District,
to reside ln the District,
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District,
to reside ln the District,
to reside ln the District,
to reside in the District,
to reside ln the District,,
to reside ln the District,
to reside In the District,
to reside In the District,
to reside In the District,
to reside ln the District,
to reside ln the District,
to reside in the District
to reside ln the Di.trlct.
to reside In the District
te reside In the District,
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District,
to. reside in the District
to reside in the District,
to reside in the District
to reside in the Distriot
to reside ln the District,
to. reside ln the District
put on Voter's List by mistake*
that he is not entitled to vote.
to. reside in* the District
to reside ln the District,
to reside in the District
to reside ln the District,
to reside tn tha District
to reside ln the District,
to reside in the District
to reside ln the District
to reside tn the District,
to reside ln the District,
to. reside in the District,
to reside in the District
to reside in the Distriot.
to reside ln the District,
to. reside in the District,
to reside In the District
to reside* ln. the District.
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