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Week Jan 26, 1907

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 l^r»*ir*n'Tirir0--jrt^
King$prd Smith & Co. 3
Stock and General        3
AUCTIONEERS 3
Commission and Real Estate Agents.    3
860 Granville, Vancouver. g
4,*"JUUULJU*JU*JUUUAJ*^^
IVOL.  III.    No
m
The Week
TL British Columbia Review.
Published at Victoria and Vancouver B. 6.
rt roTFttrsTnrsvrxvvt i1 wryy*»*j
to   Stewart,Williams R. c. Janion
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION AND
REAL ESTATE A6ENTS
Si FORT ST. VICTORIA, B. C.
tljULSUUUtAJUUUU-KJL-LRJUUU*^
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1907
One Dollar Per Annum
[The Editor's Review
©f Current Topics.
A NEW SLANDER.
In a hurried attempt to divert the
•attention of the electors from the ap-
Ipalling corruption at Ottawa laid bare
Iby the publication of the Order-in-
[Council, approved    by    the Laurier
Cabinet,   requesting'   the   Provincial
government to hand over—for nothing—the Indian reserve at Kaien
Island, containing lands of immense
potential value, to the Grand Trunk
pacific Railway, the Vancouver World
lias invented a nice new slander.
[This Ottawa-controlled, Ottawa-edited
tuardian of the Grand Trunk Pacific's
Interests asserts that, in consideration
if a bribe of $37,000, Mr. R. F. Green,
Ivhile  Commissioner    of Lands  and
forks, had unlawfully approved a
brant of valuable coal lands to a certain syndicate. With the courage of
|ts class, the World waited until both
Ir. McBride and Mr. Green were absent in the Interior before publishing
phis home-made and clumsy falsehood
Ion the chance of drawing public attention away from the Liberal-Grand
Trunk Pacific conspiracy.
The Week is in a position to give an
emphatic denial to the whole of the
■Vancouver World's fascinating fairytale. Not one acre of coal lands has
■been leased by the Chief Commission-
Isr to the Transcontinental Exploration Syndicate. The whole yarn is a
most magnificent 1 er—fabrication on the part of our Ottawa-
hon trolled contemporary.
mercial integrity of their Province is the British Columbia Liberal mem- ceive no less than fifteen million acres
dear to them; they are proud of the bers at Ottawa calmly leave the du- of British Columbia land the moment
high position which it has taken, un- ties which the people pay them to the obstinate McBride Government
der the last three years and a half of perform, in order to come West and   ean be got out of the way.   And this
  good government, in the money cen-  take the stump against the Conserva-  fifteen million aeres of land will be
tres of the civilized world; and they tive party in a Provincial election, an absolutely free gift to the Grand
try, does not need any government; at; have very little inclination to ex- And they do this by assent of the Trunk Pacific Railway Company, as
all. It means that, if a miner has a change a real and present prosperity Dominion Cabinet, who in turn are they have already been paid by the
good mine, he need not trouble to ^or ^e sa^ce °^ enriching a few men acting under the orders of the Grand Dominion of Canada—which includes
work it; all he has to do is to sit °^ doubtful motives and more than Trunk Pacific, who have got to defeat the people of British Columbia—to
down, and the mine will do the rest, doubtful ability. the McBride Government before they build the entire distance to the Pa-
It means that, so long as a farmer has                    can get hold of the fifteen million ciiic Coast.   Query*.   If a government
a good farm, he need not trouble to TRULY IMPARTIAL. acres of British Columbia land which  that gives a railway eight hundred
look after his stock, his crops; they   tliey liave in vain demanded from the  thousand acres of land, in order to
can attend to themselves without his      Tlie Victoria Times prints with en-  Conservatives.    The  completely  un-  keep faith with an agreement made
care.   It means that a merchant with  thusiastic glee an editorial from the biased and impartial standing of the  with  the said railway by preceding
a well-stocked store need not be at Edmonton Bulletin,  denouncing Mr.   Edmonton Bulletin  and its master, governments, is a "potlach" government, what is a government called
-     .     .  that gives another railway fifteen million acres of land for nothing1?
#-
COWARDLY TACTICS.
In connection with the above it is
lo be noted that both the World and
lhe Times are following out the cow-
rdly tactics—first initiated in the
[louse last session by John Oliver and
A. Macdonald-—of attacking civil
lervants by name and individually.
I'hese journals know — as the two
paders of the Opposition knew—that
civil servant's position does not per-
liit him to defend himself against
[olitical attacks through the press or
llatform. He is therefore fair meat
lor the valiant Liberals, who never,
Ixcept by accident, hit anybody who
Bin hit back. What a noble party to
k?pire to administer the affairs of a
Lyestern Province!
'EXPERIMENTS" BILLY.
■\
Vote For a
Conservative Government
Which has refused to give away Public Lands to
Railways. Which stands for Provincial Rights.
Which demands those rights, instead of whining
for charity. Which refuses to be dictated to by
Ottawa on behalf of Corporations. Which has
placed the Financial Credit of British Columbia on a
Sound Footing.
Let Well Enough Alone.
%
W. W. B, Mclnnes now comes forward with the promise of an Experimental Farm, if we will only be good
1'id vote for the Liberals on the 2nd       —    - ■  ■
February.    Billy is something of
ti experiment himself, and there arc  '*le pains to look after the display McBride and all his works, and abus-
)t wanting sceptics who declare that al*d sale of the goods, or enquire into ing the Conservative party in  gen-
'*e Experimental Farm would itself  **u' ability and honesty of his clerks eral.    lt is a good sample of what
by far the bis^est "plant" ever  '" attending to their duties; all he the Times would call '
■•own there. ntH'd do is sit in an  arm-char and side  criticism."    But
  smoke cigars.   It is a nice theory—a member what the Edmonton Bulletin
liBERAL BUSINESS  THEORIES,  very pretty theory   of government; is, doubts begin to spring np as to
                            and should go far to explain why the the worth of its impartiality.   Thus:
A LIBERAL OPINION.
=#
Our Opposition friends and the
A'ictoria Times and the Vancouver
World still persist in representing the
sale of the Prince Rupert townsite to
the Grand Trunk Pacific. Railway
Company by the McBride Government as a betrayal of the Province's
interests. Now, there are many Liberal papers, but there is one journal
of that political persuasion which, by
common consent, stands above them
all. The name of that journal is the
Toronto Globe. It stands today almost alone in Canada as the exponent
of the genuine sturdy Liberalism of
a generation ago, the Liberalism
whicli often made mistakes, but which
stood honestly and fearlessly for the
welfare of the country at large anil
the reform of corruption in both high
and low places. The ideals of that
kind of Liberal were treated with
respect, and the Globe is today the
mouthpiece of the few survivors—
now almost extinct—of the genuine,
patriotic Canadian Liberal, as he was
before the whole party was rounded
up and hail the dollar-mark branded
into their hides. And this is what
the Toronto Globe, on thc 18th of
September, IflOli, had to say with regard to the sale of the Kaien Island
townsite. Read it, and compare it
with the remarks of J. A. Macdonald
and Billy Mclnnes, or the editorials
of the Vancouver World and the Victoria Times:
"Without the railway the land is
practically worthless, and as there is
no reason why value imparted to it
solely by the construction of the line
should go into the pockets of people
who do nothing to earn it, the Provincial Government and the railway
eompany exercised a wise provision
in the adoption of a co-operative
scheme wheh enables them to use
sonic portion of the 'unearned increment' for the advantage of the peo-
= pie of British Columbia, to whom the
is thus 11nii*-
■ unbiased out-
when   we   re-
the Hon. Frank Oliver,
onglily established.
A RIDDLE.
The Liberals arc most indignant
that the Conservatives should fulfil
the obligations of the Province made
land belongs.
"The example set in this ease by
British Columbia may prove to be
just what is needed to bring other
land-owning governments to a sense
of their duty to the public."
The strongest Conservative need
add no word to this.
jThe Liberals continue fo harp on Liberal party, conducting the affairs The  Edmonton Bulletin  is  the  per-  by former governments in the matter
le assertion that, while they cannot of the Dominion of Canada on these sonal organ of the Hon. Frank Oliver of the  Columbia    &   Western  land
|ny    the    prosperity    of    Britisli lines, has apparently got itself into (no relation to our own Honest John), grunt, involving the amount of eight,
Itlumbia, that prosperity is not in sueh financial straits that it has had The Hon.  Frank Oliver is Minister hundred thousand acres.    But not a
§y respect due to the Conservative to form an alliance with a railway of the Interior in the Dominion Cab-  word is said  by these  white-souled
■ministration. It is a curious theory, company in order to get enough money iuel  at  Ottawa.    The Grn id Trunk  patriots about the conspiracy between  the Liberal interest.   For one thing.
Eat, if you come to analyze it; for, for "legitimate expenses."   But the Pacific Railway owns the  Dominion  lhe Liberal party at Ottawa and the  l'10 Similkameen is at present in an
[lit means anything at all, it means people of British Columbia are built Cabinet—as is clearly shown hy the  Grand   Trunk  Pacific,  whereby   the  extremely prosperous condition.     It
HIS GLOOMY PAST.
Smith Curtis is having a hard time
it contest ing the  Similkameen in
|]it a country, if it is a good conn- on more business-like lines.   The com-  fact that, in the middle of a session,  new transcontinental railway is to re-
(Continued on Page 13.] THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1907.
WHAT THEY SAY IN ENGLAND
The remarkable mineral returns for
the year just closed, upon which we
commented last week, were cabled
on the sth inst. to the Hon. J. H.
Turner, Agent-General in London for
the Province of British Columbia, and
that gentleman, judging by results,
has lost no time in spreading the information in the London world of
finance. The figures appear to have
created no little sensation—indeed, it
is evident that they form a sort of
climax to the revival of interest in
British Columbia affairs which has
for the last couple of years been
steadily growing in England. Whatever may be the shortcomings of the
English politician, however great may
be his occasional inability to grasp—
or even show an inclination to inquire
into—political issues in Greater Britain, the English financier labours under no such disabilities. The world
holds no shrewder men than the top-
hatted, frock-coated denizens of the
London Stock Exchange; and it
would surprise many a British Columbian to know how closely, and
with what clear understanding, the
fortunes and political and industrial
developments of this Province are
watched in the London money markets by men who never saw the
Rocky Mountains except in a photograph. And they can form their own
opii.ions, too, these men of finance,
the cold, critical, impartial opinion of
the man who knows that a strongly
governed country is a good country
to make money in, a good country to
invest in; while he knows with the
same deadly certainty, bought of the
experience of ages, that a country
having a weak government is a poor
country for money-making or investment, no matter how valuable its natural resources may be.
Valuable Testimony and a Warning.
Nor, when they think it worth
while, are these men afraid to speak
their opinions plainly. Cable despatches from London, under date of
Thursday, the 17th inst., quote extracts from a lengthy, appreciative
and intelligent article and editorial in
the Financial News, one of the most
important papers in Stock Exchange
circles. We reproduce the despatch
in full herewith, as it is one which
can bc read to advantage by every
voter in the Province—indeed, by
every thinking man and woman. If
it pays Premier McBride and his colleagues a compliment which, we venture to assert, the people of this
Province will heartily endorse, if it
pays a glowing tribute to the magnificent resources of British Columbia, thc richest Province in thc Dominion of Canada, it also sounds a
note of warning which would seem
to argue a close knowledge of the
ulterior motives of the campaign now
being waged by the Liberals against
the Conservative administration. But
we will let the despatch speak for
itself:
London, Jan. 16.—The Financial
News publishes a lengthy and important article and editorial on British
Columbia's progress, lt says in its
editorial:
"Thc large number of home investors who arc interested in British Columbia will watch thc issue of the
elections now in progress there with
close attention and some anxiety.
There is not much reason to anticipate that the strong administration of
Mr. McBride, which has done so
much to advance the prosperity of
thc country will bc overthrown, but
should such an event unhappily occur,
those who have the interests of the
Province most closely at heart fear
that a serious setback in its economic
progress will bc experienced."
In the course of its article the Financial News reminds its readers that
the political national sentiment of British Columbia is
Overwhelmingly British
but only when matters arise which
affect the rights and interests of Britain are English readers at all concerned in thc issues arising in thc
elections.   Thc article proceeds:
"There is, however, a paramount
reason why politics in British Columbia should on  the eve of a general
election excite special interest in
Britain. For years British Columbia
was in a very distressed condition
politically, and there were occasions
when it might have been mistaken
for one of the South American republics, so frequent were the changes of
government. So much turmoil was
associated with the rapidly succeeding
crises that the Province was really
passing through a transition period
from the old-time regime to one in
which the governments of the day
were forced to recognize newer elements and new conditions, and though
it was a severe experience and an
unsatisfactory state of affairs while
it lasted, it was in all probability
An Inevitable Phase of Its Political
History.
What placed the situation in a rather
worse light in thc eyes of Englishmen
was the fact that the industrial enterprises of the Province in which a
large amount of capital was invested,
were seriously affected by the instability of legislative conditions. This
lack of stability affected the credit of
the Province in a variety of ways.
"In brief, British Columbia got a
very bad name. Now the investing
public, while they cannot arrogate the
right to interfere in the internal affairs of the Province, properly require
some reasonable guarantee of permanence of the laws and of administration of affairs affecting their investments. The old uncertainty of legislation, whereby one government
passed acts that were repealed by its
immediate successor, caused in some
instances actual heavy loss to bona
tide investors. It had also an effect
in restricting development, thus keeping down the revenue of the Province,
One can hardly realise to what an
extent the progress of this important
Province was impeded by the conditions which for some time existed.
This became so apparent to those who
had the interests of the Province at
heart, that in 1903, after a rapid succession of Premiers, Turner, Semlin,
Martin, Dunsmuir and Prior, efforts
were made to place the politics of
the country upon
A More Stable Basis.
Whatever may be said theoretically
about the merits of nonparty government, in practice it worked out badly
in British Columbia. Where the allegiance of legislators was only to
persons who happened to be at the
head of thc administration of the day
and not to a party, it was of the most
uncertain kind, whereas allegiance to
a party has always meant that both
the members of the government and
their supporters are bound to that
party and responsible to it. The party
man who shifts about, not only imperils his own political future, but
that of his party. Therefore, the policy that was decided upon when Hon.
Mr. McBride came into power in 1903,
namely, a policy of party government,
has been
Most Beneficial to the Province
in every respect. This is more especially true as his Government set
about placing the finances of the
Province, which were badly out of
joint, in order by a thorough and
judicious adjustment of taxation,
which had not been possible under
the previous uncertain governments.
Great increase of revenue was brought
about, many economies in the public
service were effected, public works
were cut down to actual requirements,
and by a generally careful conduct of
the business of the country, not only
has the revenue been brought to a
parity with the expenditure, a condition which had been unknown in the
previous history of thc Province, but
there have of late been
Substantial Surpluses
instead of annual deficits. Practically
every branch of industry in the Province is in a prosperous condition.
There have been few if any changes
in laws affecting investment. Labour
disputes, which formerly well-nigh
ruined the mining industry, have been
largely eliminated, and when they do
occur, are easily adjusted. Land values have advanced tremendously,
while the timber industry is experi-
BRITISH AMERICAN TRUST CO., Limited
i/ICTORIA OFFICES
Cor. Broad and View  Sts.
J
A. C. McCALLUM,
Mgr. Real Estate Department.
FOR SALE—s acres beautiful
acre, $2,000.
FOR SALE—6 acres on Linde
$1,800.
FOR SALE—Nearly 7 acres, F
sheltered; best of soil; magn
FOR SALE—Some of the bes
city, on Government Street,
FOR SALE—Several desirable
FOR SALE—A limited numbe
FOR SALE—Well situated wa
James Bay, a bargain at $6
FOR SALE—Macaulay Point,
sheltered, 350 feet sea front
land, on Oak Bay car line, at, per
n Avenue; a good buy at, per acre,
owl Bay; extensive sea frontage; well
ificent view; per acre, $2,000.
t improved business property in the
Douglas, Fort and Yates Streets.
islands; per acre, $20.
r of choice farms, with sea frontage,
terfront   lot,   suitable   for   wharfage,
,300.
2 acres, excellent land, fine view, well
age, 7 minutes from car line, $4,000.
NOTICE la hereby given f3lt, sixty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for permission to purchase
the following described land on Porcher
Island, about five miles east of Refuge
Bay, commencing at a post marked Eugene Wacker, northwest corner; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 20 chains
to McKay's northeast corner; thence
west 80 ohains; thence north 20 ohains
to point of commencement, containing
one hundred and sixty acres.
EUGENE WACKER, Locater.
F. A. HUDSON, Agent, j ']
Located Nov. 17, 1906. Dec.2it
NOTICE is hereby given that, sixty
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land on Porcher
Island, about five miles east of Refuge
Bay, commencing at a post marked Arthur McKay, southwest corner; thenoe
running north 20 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 20 chains; thence
west SO chains to point of commencement, and containing one hundred and
sixty acres.
ARTHUR MoKAT, Locater.
F. A. HUDSON, Agent.
Located Nov. 17, 1906. Dec.22
dicing an unprecedented era of activity.
"At this important period in the history of British Columbia when an
election is coming on, when everything is on such a sound and satisfactory basis in business and financial
circles, it is only natural that there
should be a great deal of concern
manifested among British investors
lest there should be another change 1
in the political complexion of the government of the Province.
"It is impossible, perhaps, for British investors to appreciate all the local issues arising at the forthcoming
election but they can very well appreciate that during the past few years
the administration of the country's
affairs has been conducted on sound
and successful lines, and that this fact
alone constitutes a strong argument
in favour of
Leaving Well Alone.
In all competent and well informed
business and financial circles, there is
agreement that no change should take
place at this moment, when so much
depends upon the settled and prosperous conditions continuing. Much attention is, in fact, just now being directed to British Columbia, and several large enterprises are being set on
foot in London looking to the further
extensive development of its resources.
Without knowing any special reason
why the Government, with a good
record of three years, should be removed, it would seem to be a great
mistake if it were not returned to ,
power with a largely increased majority. In this way the great hopes
which are entertained in Great Britain
for the prosperity and success of the
Province will be assured. One hears
a great deal more about the Northwest Provinces of Canada in these
days than about British Columbia, owing to the rush of settlers and the
boom in lands, but the figures for
British Columbia show
More Remarkable Advances.
The product of the mines in 1906 was
approximately $26,000,000, or 18 per
cent over 1904. In 1905 British Columbia for the first time in the history of Canada, led all the provinces
in thc value of its fisheries. Thc output of timber and agricultural industries showed even more remarkable
expansion. The revenue of the Province, which was $1,606,000 in 1904, will
be approximately $3,250,000 for the
current year. Lands and forests, for
the present fiscal year, will turn in
$1,000,000 as against $200,000 in 1901.
"British Columbia has had so many
unfortunate reverses in the past that
all interested in its welfare will regret
to see any change, politically or otherwise, that might check this splendid
economic progress."
We Want Mines
or Prospects.
Copper Preferred
In forwarding us particulars
stick to facts.
We will send our expert anywhere.
A. ERSKINE SMITH & CO.
GRAND FORKS,   B. C.
Reference : Eastern Townships Bank.
DO YOD LIKE GOOD THINGS TO EAT ?
Let us suggest Custards, Jellies and other dainties made from—
BIRD'S CUSTARD POWDERS, per packet 25c
BIRD'S EGG POWDERS, per packet 25c
GOODALL'S CUSTARD POWDERS, per packet, 10 and 20c
CROSSE & BLACKWELL'S JELLY POWDERS, per pkt ioc
PURE GOLD JELLY POWDERS, per packet  ioc
PURE GOLD QUICK PUDDINGS (Tapioca, Chocolate,
Custard), two packets for  25c
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
Progressive Grocers. hi Government St., Victoria.
MAIL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO.
Underwood Visible Typewriter
THE WORLD'S BEST TYPEWRITER.
Office Equipment of all kinds.
Phone 730
BAXTER & JOHNSON, Metropolitan Building, fc1 Ve.<Po,t
Victoria
HOLLY TREES
Price* from 35 cents to $5.00, according
to lire. Write for seed and tree catalog.
JAY A CO.
VICTORIA, B. C.
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
If you love your wife
BUY   HER  A  GAS  STOVE
It will save her a lot of extra work and
give her time for other things
besides cooking.
Cook Your Bout, Do Not Boast Your Cook,
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, LIMITED. THE WEEK, SATURDAY JANUARY 26 1907.
V
Now is Your Chance For Fine
CARPETS and ART SQUARES
If you need a new Carpet in tbe spring you had better buy now while  they  are at old  prices.   Hanufacturers  have
advanced prices, duties have advanced, so you had better buy now, before the rush comes, for  it  certainly
will.   Come now while prices are right.
Do not' neglect watching our window displays on Government street, it will be to your advantage to do so.
Crossley's Diamond
Tapestry Carpets
in many beautiful effects, sewn and
laid at, per yard, 75c.
Brussels Carpets
in many beautiful designs and colors,
sewn and laid at, per yard, $1.90
down to $1.00. Borders to match at
same price.
Wilton Carpets
The very best that can be found
anywhere, in lovely colors and designs, sewn and laid at, per yard,
$3.00 down to $1.85.
Axbury Carpets
These Carpets are noted for long
wear and durability, and are suitable
for library or den, and in beautiful
colors, sewn and laid at, per yard,
$2.75. Borders to match, sewn and
laid at, per yard, $2?50.
Ingrain Art Squares
are of all-wool in many different designs and colorings, from $28.00 down
to $5.00 in different sizes.
Diamond Tapestry
Squares
with only one seam down centre, in
Oriental and floral effects, extra good
quality for the price, in different
sizes, from $27.00 down to $9.50.
Axminster Carpet
Squares
Seamless, in all the lovely Oriental
colors; 8 ft. 3 in. x 11 ft. 6 in., at
$35-00.
Earnscliffe
Reversible Squares
In many floral and Oriental designs; is of extra good wearing qualities; 9 ft. x 10 ft.; price $35.00.
WEILER BROS.,
Complete Home, Hotel and Club Furnishers, Victoria
MAIL ORDERS RECEIVE PROMPT ATTENTION.
Electoral
Reminiscences.
The notes which I penned in last
issue seemed to have been appreciated by my readers with the result
that I am asked for more. I dare
say, that at this time news of elections are appropriate, which accounts
for the request. One of the most interesting campaigns in which I ever
took part occurred in 1895. At that
time I was living in Sydney, Cape
Breton. Without referring to my
notes I think I am safe in saying that
the election took place in November.
At any rate it was in the depth of
winter, and we had typical Cape Breton weather. Anyone who has lived
in that district will know what Cape
Breton weather in November means.
In summer time the climate is perfect, in fact from May until October
I question if it is not superior to
that of Victoria, but with November
comes a mighty change, frost, heavy
snow, and a howling wind; the latter
causes the snow to drift until the
roads are almost impassable, and if,
as frequently is the case, it blows in
from the Gulf of St. Lawrence, the
drifts will pile up as high as the
houses.
On the particular day of which I
am thinking, great things were to
happen. The Chief Commissioner
from London, Sir Charles Tupper,
was contesting the constituency
against George Murray, now, and for
the last ten years, Premier of Nova
Scotia. In order to pave the way for
his candidature, the redoubtable
David MacKcen, the uncrowned king
of Cape Breton, had retired to make
way for his distinguished friend, and
the contest promised to be a right
royal one.
This was nomination day, and for
the occasion the Court House in Sydney had been arranged for. Needless
to say the presence of such a distinguished man as Sir Charles Tupper, fresh from his administration in
the Old Country, excited widespread
interest, which was added to by the
determined efforts of both parties to
secure the victory.
' David MacKeen lived at Glace Bay,
the mining centre of the island which
contributed the largest quota to the
nominating convention. The convention was called for one o'clock, and
David MacKeen was charged with
the responsibility of conveying the
faithful Conservatives of his district.
When the morning broke, the odds
looked at least a thousand to one
against the possibilities of his fulfilling the contract. A bad storm
had been raging for three days. The
The country lanes were h'ocked, and
the railway cuts were filled with snow
from ten to twenty feet deep. Most
men would have accepted the inevitable and wired to Sydney, that travel
was impossible. But David MacKeen
was not that kind of man. He had
promised to get his men to the convention, and hc was determined to do
it "coute qui coute." He first assumed a cheery smile and assured all
doubting ones that the storm was
only local and that the snow-plough
would quickly clear the passage. Then
he ordered a special train made up of
six coaches. By way of emphasising
his confidence in the triviality of thc
storm hc furnished every man with a
shovel from the Dominion Coal Company's store. And then with his six
hundred passengers he boarded the
train. The procession was led by an
immense snow-plough, followed by a
pilot engine, and then by the ordinary
train.
Words fail me to describe the incidents of that journey. First the huge
snow-plough would run full tilt into
a snow bank, the snow would leap
into the air forty or fifty feet like a
cloud of steam, the plough would
come to a standstill, the engine would
snort, thc engineer would reverse his
lever, and the huge machine would
back away to take another drive at
the snowy rampart. Four times we
were fairly "stuck" and then David
MacKeen was seen at his best, jumping from the car, as sprightly as a
boy  of  fifteen,  he  led the  army  of
shovellers who dug and delved like
so many ants until little by little thc
barrier was removed, and the train
would proceed for another mile or so
to encounter a similar obstacle.
At each telegraph station a message would be sent to Sidney "We
are coming." Never was indomitable
perseverance better illustrated, and it
had its reward, for at five o'clock instead of one the belated special arrived in Sidney with six hundred
tired, wet, dishevelled, and hungry
Conservatives. But so keen were
they on the business of the day, that
without waiting for refreshments,
they marched in a body to the court
house, and within a few minutes tlie
Convention was opened. The enthusiasm was tremendous, the house was
packe din every part, in fact the gallery was so crowded that there were
fears of its collapse. Sir Charles
Tupper made a brilliant fighting
speech, one of those closely reasoned,
rhetorical and audacious utterances
which years before had earned for
him the sobriquet of "the war horse
of Cumberland." He had his audience electrified and they rose to every
point, with spontaneity and delight.
It is a matter of history that he received the nomination, that the contest was one of the hardest in the
political records of the Maritime
Provinces and that Sir Charles won
out by over eight hundred majority.
I shall always think of this campaign as one of the most interesting
and decisive in the career of
BOHEMIAN.
Upper Country Gossip.
The Premier's and Mr. Bowser's
tour in the interior, from the press
dispatches, is meeting with splendid
success. The past week they were
at Kamloops, Revelstoke, Field, Golden and Nelson, where the electors
turned out en masse and gave an
attentive hearing of the Government's side of thc case. The coming week the Premier and his colleague will visit the towns of the
southern interior and it is not improbable that one of the larger places
will be the scene of a joint debate,
just so soon as Mr. J. A. Macdonald
and his • chief lieutenant, Mr. Mclnnes, get through with their tour
of the Island, and can journey to the
interior. That John Houston has it
in for Harry Wright is evidenced by
his intention to return to the Province next week and contest, as an
Independent, the Ymir Riding. That
constituency will see a merry fight.
The Liberals have nominated J. Fred
Hume, of Nelson, ex-Minister of
Mines, and a gentleman of high
standing in the district; the Conservatives may or may not renominate
Harry Wright, and if thc choice goes
to Mayor Schoficld of Trail, Wright
may still contest the scat, and the
Socialists will also be represented.
At Kaslo Neil F. MacKay, former
law partner of C. W. McAnn, K.C,
and now Assistant Commissioner of
Lands and Works, has been named
by thc Conservatives as their standard bearer to oppose whom John
Keen has been nominated by the
Liberals. Over in the Similkameen
Smith Curtis, ex-M.L.A. for Rossland,
was the choice of thc Liberals at
their recent convention at Keremeos.
Mr. Curtis has many warm friends
in the riding, where he is well known,
so that Mr. Shatford has a strenuous
fight before him. That Mr. Shatford has been mending his fences
and is popular with his constituents
is no criterion of an assurance of
victory in a riding so extensive as
that of thc Similkameen, where also
it is more than probable a Socialistic
candidate will bc in the running. Over
in Richmond a hot fight is on and
the past week saw the campaign
well launched by Mr. J. W. Wcart,
the Liberal candidate. Mr. J. 11.
Hawthornthwaite also addressed .,
meeting on behailf of his Socialistic
alley, George Kilby. Mr. Carter Cotton (Conservative) and Mr. Livingstone (Independent Conservative) are
yet to bc heard from.
Loan & Savings Co. is best indicated
by the announcement of the annual
dividend and bonus which appears in
another column, showing that a dividend at the rate of nine per cent per
annum upon the Class " A " permanent stock has been declared for the
past half year, and a further bonus
at the rate of one per cent per annum for the year. This is not all,
for, in addition, Manager Thos. T.
Langlois has gladdened the hearts of
all employees by thc announcement
of the directors' intention to pay a
bonus at the rate of five per cent on
their salaries for the past year. The
splendid growth and financial standing of the British Columbia Permanent is due to careful management
and the strictest investigation of both
loans and investments. It is shortly
expected that the Victoria office will
move into more commodious quarters on Government Street, made necessary by the business expansion of
the Capitol City and Vancouver
Island.
CONTINUED PROSPERITY.
The remarkable prosperity enjoyed
by the  British  Columbia  Permanent
From Dr. Torrington of
Thc Toronto College of Music,
Miss Sclina F. Smith,
"Sea View," Dallas Road,
Dear Miss Smith:
It gives me much pleasure to testify to the fact of your ability as a
teacher of the piano. Some of your
pupils have come into my hands and I
have had abundant evidence through
their work of that thoroughness of
ymir plan of teaching. When in Victoria I had the pleasure of hearing
your pupils play and was so mucli
pleased that I felt I could not better
mark my appreciation 01 your work
than by awarding a scholarship to
one of them, Miss Alma Clarke, who
is making real progress, owing largely to the very satisfactory manner in
which the technical foudnation, under you, has been laid.
I may say the same of Miss Muriel
Hall, who was under me last year.
Wishing you every success in your
professional life, I am,
Yours faithfulyl,
F. H. TORRINGTON. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1907.
THE GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC
RAILWAY AND ITS PACIFIC
COAST TERMINUS.
One of the most disconcerting
things which has happened to the
Liberal party in the present—to them
—most discouraging Campaign is the
publication of the extraordinary conspiracy—we can really give it no
sweeter-sounding word—between thc
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Company and the Dominion Government
at Ottawa, whereby the profits and
benefits to accrue to the Province of
British Columbia through its quarter
interest in the townsite of Prince Rupert, are to be rendered valueless by
thc acquisition on the part of the
railway company of a large tract of
land on the Indian adjacent reservation.
Never Considered It a "Good Deal."
To properly understand the reason
for a transaction which—however excusable in a railway corporation
which naturally desires, like any private individual, to get all it can for
itself—covers the Liberal party of
Canada with that blackest disgrace
which attaches to a betrayal of trust
for gain, some explanation of the peculiar motives actuating the "high
contracting parties" is necessary.
To begin with, thc acquisition of
the Prince Rupert townsite was never
considered a "good deal" by thc
worthy officials of thc Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway Company. Not because it was not a good site—for its
position is excellent; not because it
had not a good harbour—for its harbour facilities arc thc finest to be
found on many hundred miles of our
northern coast-line; but simply and
solely because the people of British
Columbia, through their representative the McBride Government, had
been so impolite as to insist upon retaining a quarter interest, waterfront
and all, in thc townsite. Now, shocking though it is to have to write
about such selfishness, the cold fact
remains that, to men nf the type of
Hays, Morse, Cox and the rest of
thein, a deal in which anybody else
has got a show is no deal at all. They
will only make it if they have to.
In this case they did have to. It
was absolutely necessary for the railway to get some foothold on the Pacilic Coast; and it was equally absolutely necessary that some appearance of a decent consideration for
statutory Provincial regulations
should be maintained. There was
nothing for it but to make a purchase
of land from British Columbia and
permit the Province to retain a quarter interest in the same. This was
done.
Letter of the Law Observed; Spirit
Evaded.
The requirements of thc statutes of
Britisli Columbia had now been complied with. The next thing to do was
to get around the statutory provisions which secured to the people of
the Province a quarter interest in thc
townsite waterfront. This required
delicate handling. To rob the people
of their quarter interest would be
perhaps impossible, certainly it would
raise a row. But it might bc possible to so arrange matters that the
quarter interest of the people of British Columbia might be rendered absolutely valueless to them—and therefore unobjectionable to the company.
To do this il became necessary tn call
in the aid of the Dominion Government, the Laurier Government, the
Liberal Government, and that organization—which, lo its eternal shame
and disgrace, has been from first tn
last the willing and slavish tool of
the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway
Company—readily responded to the
call.
How It Was Done.
Thc scheme, as worked out by the
two gangs of conspirators, was a
charmingly simple one. Through the
kindly offices of the Liberal Dominion
Government the Grand Trunk Pacific
people were enabled to secure 13,000
acres of Indian reserve land adjacent
to thc Prince Rupert townsite, paying the Indians therefor thc sum of
$7.50 per acre. Briefly outlined, the
intention was to put the business section of the town of Prince Rupert
upon the Indian reserve on Kaien
Island, and the residential section of
Prince  Rupert upon  the  Indian reserve on Digby Island.
The result of this ingenious move
would be that the quarter interest of
the Province of British Columbia in
the 10,000-acre townsite sold by the
Provincial Government to the railway company would lose all its value.
It could be held in reserve by the
Grand Trunk for as long as they
pleased, provided they did not plot
it into lots, and there would be no
way of forcing them to do this as
long as they had an acre of other
land to sell. All waterfront for wharfage, all land valuable for commercial
and residential purposes, could be
amply supplied from the 13,000 acres
of Indian reserve land thus purchased, and would be under the sole
control of thc railway company; while
the original 10,000 acres in which the
people of the Province have a quarter interest would lie neglected and
unproductive in any way for as long
as tiie railway company pleased,
which, wc may take it, would be for
very many years.
The Grand Trunk Pacific Are Hogs.
It does not sound polite to say so,
but thc Grand Trunk Pacific Railway
Company arc hogs of the first grade.
Their determination is to have all and
give the people nothing, and in pursuance of this Christian ideal they
intend, through the medium and with
the willing assistance of their hired
servants the Liberal Government at
Ottawa, to continue' to keep this
Provinee in the turmoil which they
have done for two years past, until
they get their own way. Once completed, the result of this 13,000-acre
purchase from the Indians would be
that all lands of any value in the
terminal district would be solely in
the hands of the railway company,
and the inside ring of a few men who
control the business administration of
the company could put up the price
of the lots to any figure they wished,
and reap incalculable wealth thereby,
without the people of the Province
deriving one dollar of revenue therefrom.
On the other hand, were the town-
site situated on the 10,000 acres sold
by thc Provincial Government to the
railway company for that purpose,
the 2,500 acres thereof belonging to
the people of the Province would,
when the townsite was laid out, bc
sold in regular form by auction, giving both a chance to the large and
small investor, and a handsome addition tn the Provincial revenue.
So confident in the success of their
nefarious conspiracy is the Grand
Trunk Pacific Railway Company, so
firmly convinced that the Dominion
Government will find a way to coerce
British Columbia into the surrender
of her rights, that it is already ties-
passing upon the lands controlled by
the Provinee. Surveys are being
made and street locations cleared on
the Indian reserve land, and plans
are being made to survey a new
course for the railway which will
bring it round the south and west end
of Kaien Island, stopping short at a
point on the Indian reserve, instead
of on the 10,000 acres originally purchased. This new survey completely
deprives the people of British Columbia oi any benefit from their
quarter interest in thc waterfront on
lhe 10,000-acre townsite.
That Man McBride in the Way Again
Unfortunately for tlie success of
this magnificently simple plan to rob
the people of British Columbia, two
ratifications of thc Grand Trunk Pacilic Railway Company's agreement
with the Indians to purchase the 13,-
000 acres at $7.50 per acre were necessary before the railway company
could obtain a valid title tn the property. Thc lirst ratification was that
of thc Dominion Government, who
are by law thc guardians of the Indians. This was—very naturally—secured with the greatest case; in fact,
it was simply a case of the servant
obeying the master. But thc second
ratification was quite another matter.
It had to bc secured from the Provincial Government, in whom is vested, for thc people, the reversionary
right. The Dominion Government requested the Provincial Government to
surrender this reversion, in order to
secure a valid title to the land on
behalf of thc railway company, and
were met with a blunt refusal  from
Mr. McBride and his colleagues, who,
it is stated, made no secret of the fact
that the tenor of previous negotiations—not unconnected with an attempt on the part of the railway company to extort a free gift of 15,000,-
000 acres of Provincial lands—had imbued them with some doubt as to the
wisdom of further "potlatching" the
pet railway of the Laurier administration, which had already been treated with such lavish 'iberality by the
people of Canada.
For the Second Time.
The Conservative Government of
British Columbia had thus twice prevented the people of British Columbia from being robbed of their land—
first in denying to the railway com
pany a modest request for fifteen million acres as a free gift, and secondly
in refusing thirteen thousand acres as
a free gift. Therefore the order went
forth from Ottawa that the Conservative Government of British Columbia
must make way for a Government
that would treat Sir Wilfrid Laurier's
friends in a more "Liberal" spirit.
Everybody was asked to join in the
raid on British Columbia—and nobly
was the call responded to. Judges
gave up their hard-earned judgeships,
the Commissioner of the Yukon gave
up his commissioncrship, Billy Sloan
and Duncan Ross cast the interests
of their constituents—which the people were paying them to stay in Ottawa and look after—to the winds,
and hurried west, and scores of lesser
fry in varying degrees of official intimacy with the great Liberal party
took off their coats and are now busily engaged in trying to defeat the
Provincial Government. The stake is
certainly big enough, for the returns
of British Columbia's different industries during the past three years of
good and business-like administration
have shown an increase so enormous
as to impress the most sceptical with
the vast wealth of our Province.
Liberal Inconsistency.
In the meantime, the Liberal press
and politicians are denouncing the
Conservative Provincial Government
for selling 10,000 acres of land to the
Grand Trunk Pacific; but no mention
is made by these delicately-minded
patriots of the fact that the Liberal
Dominion Government wanted the
Conservatives to hand over 13,000
acres of land to the same railway for
nothing at all—and are trying to put
Mr. McBride and his Government out
of business because they wouldn't
do it.
A Splendid Issue.
Dealing in a bright, though comprehensive manner with a goodly number
of excellent illustrations, last Saturday's special number of the Vancouver Province was a splendid contribution to the publicity literature relating to British Columbia. Though the
banner place was given to the "Terminal City," Vancouver Island and
the Interior both received attention.
Many thousands of copies were distributed and the knowledge of the
Pacific Coast Province and its potential wealth thus spread broadcast
should prove most beneficial in attracting settlers and capital.
A Vote for
for McBride
is a Vote for
Sound
Financial Policy.
VICTORIA
WILL FALL IN LINE
WITH THE REST OF
B. C. AND RETURN
"THE BIG 4
%
WHY
STOP
PRESENT
PS0S=
PERITY
Richard McBride
H. B. Thomson
H. F. W. Behnsen
«
F. Davey
"Hands
Off
B. C."
**,.
MEETINGS
A. 0. U. W. Hall, Friday, January 25th.
Oaklands, Monday, January 28th.
Victoria West, Tuesday, January 29th.
Old Grand Theatre, Thursday, January 31st.
GRAND RALLY, VICTORIA THEATRE,
FRIDAY FEB. i, ioo7.
#
The True Test of Merit
Is proved by the constantly increasing demand for
BUCHANAN'S Scotch Whiskies
Due entirely to their purity, old age and fine flavor.
Ask your wine merchant for Red Seal, at $1 per bottle; Black & White,
at $1.25 per bottle; Royal Household at $1.50 per bottle;
Liqueur Scotch, at $1.75 per bottle.
JAMES BUCHANAN & CO., by Royal Warradt Purveyors to RoyAl family
Established 1867
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
52 Uovernment St., Victoria, B. C.
Charles Hayward, President. F. Caselton, Manager.
We make a specialty of   Undertaking and Embalming.
An experienced certificated staff available at all times, day
and night.
Phones Nos. 48, 305, 404 or 594, Victoria.
NOTICE
MR. C. E. POOLEY
WILL ADDRESS THE ELECTORS OF
ESQUIMALT DISTRICT
AT 8 P. M.
AT THE FOLLOWING PLACES ON  THE  DATES  MENTIONED:
COLWOOD—Schoolhouse,   Saturday, 26th January.
SOOKE—Charter's  Hall, Tuesday, 29th January.
PARSON'S BRIDGE HOTEL—Wednesday, 30th January.
SCHOOLHOUSE, Lampson Street, Thursday, 31st January. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, 26, JANUARY 1907
EXTRACTS
Prom Hon. Premier McBride's Address in ihe A. 0. U. W. Hall,
Victoria, October 26, 1906.
Arbitration.
■^ "Now, let me say again—the general
"opinion of all the local prime ministers,
and of the federal prime ministers, was
that we were entitled to special recognition. I at once (in line with what has
been all along contended for by the different local administrations that have
taken up this question of better terms)
insisted upon anything that might be
done being done through the agency of
a board of arbitrators. I said that those
who were most expert, who were best
able to judge, had concluded that the
only way that the interests of British
Columbia might be conserved and justice done all parties concerned would be
by proper reference of this question to
a board of arbitrators—this board to
consist of one arbitrator selected from
the local, one from the federal and one
from the Imperial governments. So
that you see they would have a most
representative body indeed, and certainly
men in whom you should be able to
place every confidence and trust; men
who could come right here on the spot
and study the conditions and see for
themselves what we have to cope with.
"Now, when these gentlemen were
good enough to say that they believed
we were entitled to special recognition,
and there was absolutely no question
as to the justice of our claims, what fairer proposal could be made to that conference of local and federal prime ministers than that which I made, and which
embodied a reference to arbitration of
our claims?"
*******
A Big, Broad Question.
"No man is more anxious than I to
see that the question of better terms
is made a big and broad, question, and
bigger than a party question, if such a
thing is possible."
*******
Sir Wilfred Laurier Endorses Special
Recognition.
"You who have followed our case at
all know well just what that amounted
to. You all know how we have tried to
emphasize, and fairly so, too, the physical conditions of British Columbia,
which in themselves afford ample justification for the treatment we were asking at the hands of Canada. And I may
say that I tried to bring out clearly and
strongly these different points to which
I have just referred, and with the gratifying result that when I had finished
my address Sir Wilfrid Laurier said
without secret he was of the opinion
that British Columbia was entitled to
special recognition."
*******
What the Other Provinces Got.
"But I cannot help telling you right
here and now that what struck me
throughout the whole conference—and
especially in connection with the province of Prince Edward Island, New
Brunswick and Nova Scotia—was the
keenness displayed on the part of the
prime ministers of those provinces to
get their extras under the Quebec conference and get back home, because I
found out that my good friend, Mr. Peters, was to get some $70,000, Mr.
Tweedie some $200,000, Mr. Murray
;ome $200,000, and my friend Mr. Gouin
was to get some $600,000 over and above
what they were to get under the terms
of the federation—a very nice sum for
:hose provinces, especially for the Mari-
ime provinces, where we notice with
iome regret that there has not been that
lirogress and prosperity which has so
'narked the Western part of Canada;
find which has spread more or less
hroughout the entire Dominion.
*******
'ederal Ministers Advise Against Arbitration.
"Sir Wilfrid and Mr. Fielding most
mphatically advised the conference that
[ley could never, so far as their judgment would bring them, see how an ar-
itration could satisfactorily settle a
uestion of that kind, and they were
ery kind and generous and very ful-
ome in giving their advice along these
'pes, with the result that when finally
pngress came to pass on this question
b to whether or not our claims might
e submitted to a board of arbitration
>r settlement, why, the majority of the
inference said 'No.'
Premier McBride's Offer.
"Well, ladies and gentlemen, I went
back the next morning, and I brought
with me a proposal which was arranged
on which you might call a sliding scale;
based on the population, and it was arranged in that way because I concluded
that as soon as a country became thickly populated a great deal of our business in the way of civil government
might be carried on in a less expensive
fashion that it is today. And taking
our population today at 240,000 people
we would get $1.00 per head more than
the subsidies which the other provinces
were getting. Then as we grew larger
and larger that amount would be decreased until finally, when the province
might have attained a population of—
say two and a half million of people—
we would be entitled in perpetuity for
all time to come to an extra allowance
of 25 cents per head after we had come
to the population of two and a half million.
*******
Special Claims Admitted.
"Now, when the conference accepted
the responsibility of saying we were entitled to special recognition, it ought to
have followed that to its logical conclusion. For instance, the premises that
had led up to that conclusion were these
—that our physical conditions justified
that treatment; our mountains and our
streams, and our vast extent of territory. (Cries of hear, hear, and loud
applause.) And the fact that we are
away out here in the West, with the
Pacific off on that side, and Uncle Sam
to the north and south of us, and the
great Territories of Saskatchewan and
Alberta to the east of us; a tremendous
province to govern—and the richest
province of Canada. With mountains,
whose records of late, so far as mineral
deposits are concerned, are showing
themselves as being possibly the richest
in the world; but yet at the same time
a province presenting physical obstacles
in the way of road construction and development generally, thus necessitating
the expenditure of a great deal of
money indeed to carry on the government of the country. Now, there was
no more graphic way in which you
could show the conference that these
physical conditions were of so much
moment than by pointing out the cost
of road building, particularly in the
mountain section of British Columbia
as compared with similar work in the
other provinces, and they could see at
a glance that there was no comparison.
*******
Final Action of Conference.
"Now, then, ladies and gentlemen, you
must see what a feeling of discouragement possessed me when the final action
of the conference was to offer me $100,-
000—for ten years only. I said: 'If you
can limit the age of those mountains to
ten years (laughter and applause) there
might be some reason for such an offer,
but such a condition being entirely out
of the question in the West I am afraid
I cannot meet you.' My scheme for settlement was not accepted. There was
nothing but this $100,000 payment for
ten years, and I was given clearly to
understand that I need expect nothing
further.
"I understand that press reports have
it that subsequently Mr. Fielding approached .nie and said that he would take
the responsibility of offering the sum of
$30,000 in perpetuity to thc province of
British Columbia, and $40,000 for ten
years to come. Well, I simply looked
at Mr. Fielding and said I was very
sorry I could not accept, but such a
thing was absurd; it was out of the
question. You know very well, gentlemen, that $30,000 per annum would not
build a piece of trunk road in any of our
mountain sections. (Hear, hear.) And
as to $40,000, the thing was ridiclous
in the extreme.
*******
Not a Beggar.
"All throughout the proceedings what
I tried to do, ladies and gentlemen, Grit
and Tory, was to impress upon the people of Eastern Canada that I had not
come to Eastern Canada to beg (loud
and continued applause) for British Columbia (cries of hear, hear), but that I
had come from the capital of British
Columbia to ask them for the rights of
British Columbia. (Cries of hear, hear.)
*******
Only One Course.
"I say to you again, that there was
absolutely no other course for me to
pursue if I proposed acting in a consist
ent fashion, and were I to go there with
similar responsibilities tomorrow I
would take precisely the same course.
(Loud applause.)
*******
No Alternative But to Retire.
"Speaking for the province of British
Columbia, and mindful of the responsibilities which I had laid upon me—I
could have done nothing other than
what I did do, and I am very pleased
indeed to find such a good expression
of opinion throughout the length and
breadth of the province favorable to that
line of action.   (Loud applause.)
WHEN YOU HAVE THAT
"BLUE PEELING" DROP
IN AT THE
GARRICK'S HEAD
BASTION STREET,
Nupp Sed !
SIM & JACK, Proprietors
VICTORIA, B. C.
How Mclnnes Campaigns.
" We want to hear what some of
our natives and hayseeds call 'the
greatest orator in Canada' last evening, the 12th. It was the first time
I had heard him, and I must confess
that I was greatly disappointed. The
man is an egotist and a ruffian. His
speech consisted of personal and extremely rude remarks directed principally against Mr. R. F. Green and
the Premier. He says he is confident the Liberals will carry the country—there were signs of it everywhere, and that at the end of February he would take his seat as a
Cabinet Minister under Mr. J. A.
Macdonald. He worked himself into
a perfect fury on several occasions;
in fact, at one time, I feared an
appoplectic stroke. It was fortunate,
too, that the city water supply is
low on account of the ice and severe
frost, for he consumed at least three
gallons of water between acts, while
his kerchief, poor man, was almost
reduced to the condition of wet blotting-paper before the first scene was
half through. He denounced the
Premier and his followers in a vile
manner. Thc meeting, which was
half packed with Conservatives, was
extremely noisy, and interruptions
were very frequent. The first
speaker was an old miner, who was
a Socialist at Hawthornthwaite's
meeting the week before, and an ardent Conservative at the Premier's.
He compared Bennett's proposed line
of attack as being like that of
"Blucher." The crowd roared and
cried "Blucher" so lo'ng and loud that
he was forced to retire. Bennett also
dealt in personals, attacking Grant's
address, which, he said, was copied
word for word from his. Very strong
opposition from Socialists was repeatedly shown after Mclnnes got
fairly started, for he continually referred to them in such an insulting
manner as to make one believe they
were pariahs or something worse.
They were wild, and will remember
this at the election. I was surprised
to see such a gathering. Bennett
tried to make capital out of the fact
of the National Anthem being
omitted at the close of the Premier's
meeting. The crowd rose and sang,
while our men jeered and hissed until the end of the refrain. Bennett
is a very cool and collected person in
public, but oh! so narrow and bigoted.
McNiven, who was first proposed,
was withdrawn in favour of a Ladysmith man named Richards, a Revolutionary type, who tried to manage
a paper called "Truth" during the
strike. He is a queer pickle."—The
Cumberland Hayseed.
Girl Learning Monkey Talk.
According to a letter which has
been received in Pittsburg by the
mother of Miss Ida Veronila Simon-
ton, thc Pittsburg girl who went to
Africa to study the language of monkeys, that young woman is now comfortably established in her bamboo
hut in the Congo jungle.
Miss Simimton left this country on
Aug. ist and arrived at Fernan Vaz,
in Africa, Oct. ist. From that village she went in a canoe up the Congo, accompanied by a missionary
fr mothc Sleeping Sickness mission
and a number of natives. The natives erected in thc jungle a hut for
Miss Simonton, in which she is now
busy studying the chattering of monkeys. Two hundred yards away from
this bamboo hut is a more substantial one, in whicli she sleeps at night
and in which two natives and the missionary are stationed constantly to
go to the assistance of Miss Simon-
ton in case she should bc attacked
by wild animals. This hut is out of
sight  of the bamboo  hut,  but close
Go to
FRASER'S
Drug Store
and see the latest
Perfumes
Phone 542
30=32 Government St.
VICTORIA.
COAL
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo Collieries.
New Wellington Coal.
The best household coal in the raarke   ar
current rate*   Anthracite coal for sale.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA
Leave Your Baggage Checks at the
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.       A. E, KENT, Proprietor
INSOMNIA
Some people allege that insomnia is practically unknown in Victoria; that the
atmosphere carries such a
balmy restfulness as to make
it impossible to spend a
sleepless night, and some
critics even go further and
hint that the climate is so
restful that many men never
wake up at all. Needless to
say these critics hail from
Vancouver and Seattle, and
envy us our enjoyable night's
rest, an enjoyment which is
intensified if you are wearing
the exquisitely soft and restful flannel, silk, or flannelette
London pyjamas which Sea
& Gowen, the Gentlemen's
Store at 64 Government St.,
are now displaying and selling at London economical
prices, where mail orders get
such prompt attention.
enough so that a revolver shot could
bc heard in case of any attack.
In her letter Miss Simonton says
she is progressing rapidly with her
work. She is equipped with a phonograph upon which to record the cries
of monkeys. She believes she is already able to distinguish words.
JHEATR
"*vV*».\*>«.S\
V?> -i  lESSft.*, MANIC
JANUARY 31st.
The Aristocrat of Comic Opera.
A Masterpiece of Melodious Romance.
Red Feather
(Management Jos. M. Gaites.)
Music by Reginald De Koven, composer of "Happyland" and "Robin
Hood." Book by Charles Klein, author of "The Music Master" and "The
Lion and the Mouse."
Lyrics by Charles Emerson Cook,
author of "The Rose of the Alham-
bra."
The most sumptuous operatic spectacle ever staged, representing an expenditure of $72,000 for scenery, costumes and effects.
Company of seventy-five with
CHERIDAH SIMPSON.
Grand  Singing Chorus.    Augmented
Orchestra.
Prices—$1.50, $1, 75c, 50c, 25c.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 29th.
The Never Failing Delight
W.  E.  NANKEVILLE'S Enormous
Triumph
Human Hearts
A  Story   from    Life    Presented   in
Dramatic Form.
Abounding   in   Humainty,   Bubbling
over with Joyous Comedy.
Thrilling    and    Realistic    Situations
Arouse thc Spectator to the
Highest Pitch of
Enthusiasm.
Prices—$1, 75c, 50c, 25c.    Box office opens 10 a, m. Saturday, Jan. 26.
MONDAY EVENING, JAN. 28.
First Appearance in Victoria of the
Distinguished English Artiste
OLGA
NETHERSOLE
Supported  by  Frank Mills and  Her
London Company.
Under the Direction of Louis Nether-
sole.
Presenting Clyde  Fitch's Dramatization of Alfonse Daudet's
Great Work
SAPHO
Witli the same artistic and adequate
production used by Miss Nethcrsole
in New York and London.
NOTE—The curtain will bc raised
promtly at 8 o'clock.
Prices—50c, 75c, $1, $1.50, $2.
Mail orders accompanied by cheque
will receive their usual attention.
WEEK JANUARY 28
The New Grand
SULLIVAN • CONSIDINE,    Proprl.tor*.
Manaftii-ntn. of ROBT. JAMIESON.
Ella Wheeler Wilcox Presents
MATTIE KEENE & COMPANY
In her Comedy Playlet
"Her First Divorce Case."
CAST.
George  Smart.... Louis  Chevalier
Mary Smart Miss Lawson
Janitor J.  Phillips
—and—
Mattie Keene as.... Lawyer Howl
WILLS AND BARRON
Comedy Sketch.
MESSENGER  BOY   DUO
Singing Comedians.
KIPP AND KIPPY.
Comedy Jugglers.
GEORGE F. KEANE
Song Illustrator.
"Not Because Your Hair is Curly."
PROF  NAGEL'S  ORCHESTRA
W.B.Smith
35 YATE5 5T
PHONE,     892 THE WEEK, SATURDAY JANUARY 26, 1907.
THE GREAT SEMI-READY
Stock-Taking Sale
IS NOW ON
3000 Semi-Ready Suits, Raincoats and Overcoats to be run off at this
sale.   An immense stock of Boys two and three piece Suits
at LESS THAN HALF PRICE.
B. WILLIAMS & CO.
SOLE AGENTS FOR
Semi-Ready Tailoring
The Drama. *
I flusic and      |
^fy<fytyi<ii!i?i?i?<fyififii
VICTORIA.
Today the society vaudeville show
at the New Grand Avill be given and
the Provincial Royal Jubilee Hospital, w,*ich is entitled to public regard
on all other considerations than thc
length of its name, will be richer by
just thc amount of patronage extended. The theatre, with all attaches,
etc., is given by Messrs. Sullivan and
Considine; the programme is given
by a coterie of some forty talented
and hard-working local entertainers;
and all that now remains to assure
complete success is for the Victoria
public to give themselves a merry
afternoon, and incidentally give the
box office $i per. The programme is
printed herewith and indicates the
nature of thc treat provided:
1. Overture, "Freud und Lied"	
 Nagel
Professor Nagel's Orchestra.
2. Mr. Herbert Kent, illustrated song
interpreter, in Charles K. Harris' latest hit, "Somewhere," the
soloist assisted by quartette:
Messrs. Keane, Russell, Gore
and Sehl.
3. Miss  Heyland in  dances  charac-
tcristiquc.
.4. Miss Sehl and Mr. Julier present
the     sensationally     successful
Song of thc Swing, from "Vcr-
oniquc."
5. Harry Earle, monologuist, will re
lieve thc situation with a few
yards of remarks.
6, A tuneful and picturesque excerpt,
"Oolong Li," introducing Mrs.
R. H. Pooley, with Mrs. R. W.
Dunsmuir, the Misses Marion
and Elinor Dunsmuir, Miss
Gladys Perry, Miss Newling,
Miss Heyland, Mrs. Beauchamp
Tye, the Misses Langley and
Miss Anna McQuade.
jr. Mr. George IC. Richmond, in thc
latest song successes of Coon-
town.
6. "Crazed," a comedietta in one act,
offered by Mrs. Herbert Kent,
Mr. Julier and Mr. Charles W.
Rhodes.
9. Moving pictures.
10. "Come Little Girl and Tell Me
Truly"—-the double quintette hit
of "Thc Silver Slipper"—introducing Misses Sehl, Newling,
McQuade and Heyland, Mrs.
Beauchamp Tye, Messrs. Gore,
Berkeley, Dickson, Foote and
Richmond.
"Red Feather."
Cheridah Simpson will make her
first appearance here under (he management of Jos. M. Gaitcs, in the
famous comic opera, "Red Feather,"
011 Jan. 31st, at tlie Victoria Theatre.
Miss Simpson has achieved great individual success under the management of Henry W. Savage, scoring
cuifhatic triumphs in "Kin*; Dodo,"
"The Sultan of Sulu" and "The Prince
of Pilsen." Reginald DeKoven, of
"Robin Hood" renown, composed the
music; Charles Klein, author of "The
Music Master" and "The Lion and
the Mouse," wrote the book, and
Charles Emerson Cook contributed
the lyrics of "Read Feather." The
story of the opera is a romantic one,
incidentally comic, and the music is
stirring in choruses and the lyrics attractive. Among the musical numbers that have become especially popular are "To Arms," "To Call Thee
Mine," "The Merry Cavalier," "The
Garden of Dreams," "The Rose and
the Breeze," "The Sword Shall Win
the Day," "They All Looked at Me,"
"The Humorous Ghost," "A Prince of
Good Fellows," "The Little Milliner,"
"Lessons in Verse" and the madrigal,
the gem of the second act. The company is said to be the best singing
and acting light opera organization in
the country, while sumptuousness is
the only word that will adequately
describe the production, both in regard to scenery and costumes.
Olga Nethersole.
It is becoming pretty generally
known that Olga Nethersole, the
noted English artiste, devotes a considerable portion of her time in the
interest of societies for the suppression, or at least amelioration of, tuberculosis. Little more than a year
ago she organized in England the
"Women's International Anti-Tuberculosis League," and met with great
success. Last April Miss Nethersole
donated the proceeds of one performance of herself and company in Chicago to the American Anti-Tuberculosis League, which amounted to $2,-
700. Since her return to America last
August she has been instituting local
auxiliary societies in this country and
every case lias met with signal success. Although a very busy woman in
her profession, she finds time to do
an immense amount of philanthropic
work. Early in the present month
the newly organized Louisiana Anti-
Tuberculosis League, at its meeting
in thc St. Charles Hotel, invited Miss
Nethersole to address it at some convenient time during her engagement
in that city. Recognizing her efficient
work in the cause of stamping out the
"white plague" she was unanimously
made an honorary member of the
Louisiana organization. As a happy
coincidence in recognition of the
benefit performance she gave last in
Chicago, thc American Anti-Tuberculosis League at its meeting in New
York the same day, elected Miss
Nethersole an honorary member of
that parent body, and ordered her
presented with a badeg of honour.
These two distinctions being bestowed upon Miss Ncthosoie upon the
same day are beautiful recognitions of
the great work that lady is doing iu
the cause of humanity.
In connection with these duties,
Miss Nethersole said recently: "I am
glad to say that great interest is being taken in the league everywhere
I have been. I have addressed meetings in the various cities of Europe
and  laid  the  whole  question  before
Queen Alexandra, at her own request,
who has promised her support. She
Avill also put the league on her list of
charities. Each country will have its
own headquarters. In Scotland the
Lord Provost will be the head, in
Dublin it will be the Lord Mayor,
and in London the new Lord Mayor,
Sir William Treloar, will act as president of the league. He has arranged
for me to address a meeting in the
Guildhall next May."
"Human Hearts."
Good plays, like good wine, improve with age. This is certainly true
of that marvellously successful melodrama, "Human Hearts," which Manager Nankeville offers for the tenth
year. The company to be seen in the
play this season comprises all of last
year's favorites, and wherever a part
could be improved upon the change
has been made, and it is promised that
never before has this beautiful play
been so Avell presented. "Human
Hearts" gives a pure, wholesome lesson that touches the heartstrings in
the pathetic scenes and excites the
risibilities in the humorous ones. Thc
pathos and comedy are so well blended that the audience is in tears one
moment and compulsed with laughter
the next. Thc scenic equipment will
bc perfect in every detail, so it is said,
and the management has done everything possible to insure a first-class
performance.
"The Little Duchess."
Just about four years ago Anna
Held introduced to Victoria theatregoers "The Little Duchess." On Monday night last the same play was
again presented with Miss Olga Von
Hatzfcldt in the leading role. It is
safe to say that the performance was
eminently pleasing to the majority of
the large audience, though it lacked
some of the "vim" which characterised its previous appearance. Robert
Lett will be remembered as having
taken part in the last performance of
"Thc Sultan of Sulu," and his present
showing is fully up to the part which
he took in that well known comic
opera. I Avas agreeably surprised to
see how well the play was staged;
thc scenic effect Avas well above the
average. The chorus Avas distinctly
good and were frequently encored.
At the New Grand this week there
are two turns which are Avell worth
seeing. Charles Duncan as a London
vocal comedian is good; he convulsed
the house, and a full house too, both
with his songs and his stories. Although in figure he can hardly be
compared to T. E. Dunville, he can
certainly sing the same class of song
His "Can't Stop" Avas great. Roland
Travers as an illusionist is a wonder,
lie reproduced Devant's great trick
(Devant of Egyptian Hall fame) of
the canary and the gun; Avith the possible exception of Herbert Brooks he
is the best man in his line that I
have yet seen on the Pacific Coast.
Dorothy Golden appears as a vocalist; all I can say about her is that
I am afraid that she has missed her
vocation.    Mr. Keane, I am glad to
say, has, this week, a chance to show
himself to advantage; his song, "Star
of My Life," was received on the
night when I was present with more
applause than I have ever yet heard
awarded to an illustrated song singer;
and it was well deserved. The sketch
is good, it is certainly very original
in parts. I think that the gentleman
rather forgets to keep up the "drunk"
part throughout the play; if he could
give a recipe for so quickly getting
through the "horrible effects" he
would make a fortune as a quack.
But I must say I liked the sketch and
I wish Mills and Beecher all success.
The moving pictures are good.
MOMUS.
Social and
Personal.
VICTORIA.
Miss Alice Bell is the guest of Miss
Bryden, Head street.
* *   *
Mrs. Gibb entertained a few friends
at  bridge  on  Wednesday   afternoon
last.
* *   *
Mrs. C. E. Pooley entertained a
number of friends at bridge on Thursday, 17th inst., at "Fernhill," Esquimalt road.
* *   *
Miss Olive Bryden was hostess at
a most enjoyable dance given on
Wednesday evening at her home on
Head street.   The affair was given in
honour of her guest, Miss Alice Bell.
* *   *
Mrs. Robin Dunsmuir entertained a
few friends at the tea hour on Thursday afternoon last in honour of her
sister, Miss Schubert, of Sausalito,
Cal., who is visiting Mrs. Dunsmuir.
The guests were Mrs. Andaine, the
Misses Eleanor and Marion Dunsmuir, the Misses Daisy and Jicks
Langley, Miss Little, Mrs. Beauchamp
Tye, Mrs. R. H. Pooley, Miss Dolly
LoeAven, Miss Phyllis Eberts and
Miss Arbuthnot.
* *   *
Mrs. Andaine Avas hostess at a small
informal dance given on Monday evening last at "Burleith," Craigflower
road, in honour of Miss Schubert, of
Sausalito, Cal. Among the guests
were Mr. and Mrs. Francis B. Ward,
Mr. and Mrs. Genge, Mr. and Mrs.
Robin Dunsmuir, Miss Schubert, Miss
Eleanor Dunsmuir, Miss Marion
Dunsmuir, Miss Eva Loewen, Miss
Dolly Loewen, Miss Langley, Miss
Gladys Perry, Miss Phyllis Eberts,
Miss Lorna Eberts, and Mr. Jack
Rithet, Mr. Dougald Gillespie, Dr. Anderson, Lieut. Dalglish, Mr. Brian
Drake, Mr. Prior, Mr. Basil Prior, and
officers of H. M. S. Shearwater and
Egeria, Mr. Muskett and Mr. H. A.
Brownley.
* *    *
The hockey ball given on Friday
evening last in the A. O. U. W. Hall
Avas an unqualified success. The music, which was provided by Miss
Thain's orchestra, was all that could
be Avished for, and the arrangements
for supper were well carried out. The
tables were prettily decorated in red
and white, thc Hockey Club colours,
and presented a charming appearance.
Among the many pretty costumes
Avorn those more especially noticed
Avere:
Mrs. Langley, who wore a handsome Avhite satin dress trimmed with
lovely lace.
Miss Heyland looked well in white.
Mrs. Beauchamp Tye Avore a yellow flowered organdie with broad hem
and girdle of yellow.
Miss Tiny Monteith looked dainty
in white.
Miss Beatrice Gaudin wore a pretty
pale blue frock trimmed with silver.
Miss K. Gaudin wore a handsome
black spangled net over white satin.
Miss Winnifred Johnson wore a
blue flowered muslin dress.
Miss Ethel Brown looked sweet in
pink, trimmed with bertha of real
lace.
Miss Emma Sehl was much admired in a pink dress.
Miss Nocholles looked Avell in pink.
Miss Anna McQuade wore a dainty
costume of blue silk trimmed with
lace.
Miss Jay appeared to advantage in
pale blue.
Miss Newcombe wore a flowered
muslin trimmed with blue.
Among those present were: Mrs.
Langley, Mr. and Mrs. Beauchamp
Tye, Mr. Gaudin, the Misses Gaudin,
Miss Monteith, Miss T. Monteith,
Miss Ethel Brown, Mr. Jack Brown,
Miss Newcombe, Mr. Bridgeman,
Miss McQuade, Miss Sehl, Miss Heyland, Mrs. Mainwaring-Johnson, Miss
Johnson, Miss Gosnell, Miss Winnie
Wilson, Mr. Rochefort, Mr. B. Roche-
fort, Mr. Ewart, Mr. Schwengers, Mr.
and Mrs. Shakespeare, Miss Jay, Mr.
Julier, Col. Gregory and many others.
Do you want a quiet place to
smoke and read the paper while
waiting for   that appointment?
Try then, my friend
The Wilson Bar
VICTORIA, B. C.
*
Beneath Gordon Hotel
Yates Street
DENT'S
LINED
GLOVES
SILK-LINED
W00L-L1NED
MOCHAS
HEAVY SUEDES
GAUNTLETS
THE GENTLEMEN'S
STORE
Sea & Gowen
64 GOVERNMENT ST.
VICTORIA, B. C. THE WKKK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1907.
At The Street
Corner
p By THE LOUNOER p
It is a curious thing that as a small
boy I should always have been peculiarly fond of history; curious, I
say, because it is so rare that the boy
shows what is to become of the man.
Now, as a professional lounger it is
incumbent on me to record local history, and if by any sad chance there
is none to record, it is equally my
duty to make it. Logically, therefore,
I am to be put on a par with such
men as Napoleon, Le Grand Mon-
arque, and Julius Caesar, who also
made history. However, I am not
boastful, and will try and record a
few facts which recur to my mind as
I write.
As an early lover of history I was
able at the tender age of seven to
retail in order the Roman Emperors
from Octavianus to Constantine the
Great without a break; the English
Kings, from Edwy the Fair to Victoria; I could even tell why there
was any dispute about the Austrian
accession, and I always sympathised
with the somewhat unfortunate Maria
ineresa; as for Mary, Queen of Scots,
she was an open history to me; I
could trace her history back to any
king or queen who lived before her;
 but—ah, it is always these "buts"
which make or mar history, I never
could learn dates. Yes, it is sad, but
the only dates on which I governed
my history were 1215, 1415, 1666, 1805,
1815, and finally 1837. By the aid of
these dates only, I have been enabled
to steer through a tortuous course,
first as a school-boy, and later as a
school-master. They gave me the
leading-posts on which to cling.
Judge then, my dear readers, of my
surprise when last Tuesday I found
that for the space of seventy-five
years I had been labouring under a
wrong impression, and had for the
space of five years taught small boys
erroneously. Of course the error was
a mistake, and all the historians have
been wrong, even eye-witnesses, for
there can be no doubt but that the
Colonist never errs, and this old lady
distinctly told us on Tuesday last
that the Battle of Trafalgar, where
Nelson died, was fought in 1814. Well,
'nuff sed, but all the other authorities
put it down to 1805. I'm sorry that
they were all wrong.
We .-ave been distinctly unfortunate this year in our weather; I think
it would be a good idea if all our most
respectable citizens, including myself,
were to send a wire "up top" asking
for a little better advertisement than
we have been having of late. Every
time I go down the street and see an
umbrella it gives me a cold shiver,
and every time I see a Winnipegger
in a fur coat I go into a cold perspiration. This, I hope, shows that I
am a good citizen, because I realise
the disadvantages under which Victoria is at present labouring. Well,
gentlemen from Manitoba and the
Northwest, I beg to assure you that
the weather in Victoria is not as it is
at present as a rule. I have been here
some time; others have been here
longer; and we all agree that this has
been the most inclement winter we
have had for many, many years. We
know that we are not showing up in
a good light, but please remember
that the winter has been over-severe
throughout the civilised world; that
last year was responsible for some of
the greatest disasters which men
have ever seen; that Nature has not
yet had time to get free from her
'jag"; that she is still experiencing
what I am told is the most miserable
sensation possible, viz.: "the cold grey
dawn of the morning after"; and believe us when we tell you that Victoria really has the mildest climate
Jin the world.
That labour is scarce in Victoria
Was proved to me last Tuesday night
'in a most forcible manner. I was
having dinner with a great personal
[friend when a delivery wagon drove
Up with a cord of wood, which was
deposited on thc street walk with a
curt intimation that if he wanted it
he would have to get it.    My friend
said to me, "If I don't get it in immediately it will be stolen." Naturally I offered to help him, and we
hauled that cord into the woodshed.
"Nothing," you say; well try that sort
of work when you are out of training.
I wonder how many times I have
remarked in these columns on the
state of the roads in Victoria when
there is any wet weather. It is a
scandal that one should be unable to
cross a road, except at the junction
of two important streets, without being ankle-deep in mud. The Mayor
and Council would be far more popular if they were to take matters like
this into their consideration in the
place of having "raw oysters followed
by oyster stew."
Politics and elections again. Isn't
it fun? But why, my dear readers,
my very dear readers, my peculiarly
dear readers if you happen to agree
with me, why, I say, is there all this
fuss about these same elections? What
I can't understand is why people get
up in righteous (?) indignation and
denounce the present Government
(for the life of me I can't remember
whether it is a Conservative or Liberal which we have now) for what is
commonly known on this continent as
"grafting." I thought it was an axiom
both in the States and Canada that
every man in office had to "graft."
I don't know whether the present
Government has done any "grafting"
because I don't take any interest in
politics; I am a sensible member of
the community, at least moderately
sensible. I do know that the present
Government has never had a dollar
from me except the head-tax, and I
do know that other governments both
here and in other Provinces have
"grafted" to a horrible extent. Why
on earth not leave well alone? Personally I look on the word "Ottawa"
as the modern translation of what the
Jews called "Gehenna." We have a
shorter word for the same place, but
it is not good form to use it in public. I know that I am going to vote
for the people who have never done
me any harm (one never knows what
the other side may do) and I hope
that all my readers, my very dear
readers, will do the same, and oblige
their faithful friend
THE LOUNGER.
Ahead In
Service.
We are ahead of all competitors in
our service to customers. Ask anybody who knows and then come
and experience what we mean by
our drug store, service. We have
the pleasantest store in town to
trade in.
" Make us prove it."
CYRUS H. BOWES
CHEHIST
98 Government St.    ::    Near Yates.
VICTORIA.
Ladies and
Gentlemen
We give you an opportunity
to buy a nice Xmas Gift at a
low cost. See our line of English Cowhide Travelling Bags,
Rugs, etc., Fancy Vests. We
can make the vests from an
old one and guarantee a fit.
We are making special reductions in all these lines,
Peden's
TAIL0RIN1 PARLORS
31   FORT   STREET
VICTORIA.
jyi
lh Sanitarium Hotel, whicli ie beautifully situated, overlooking the Uow River and its lovely and
romantic valley, is a large 5-story building elegantly
Mtcd with every appointment calculated to bring
Pleasure and comfort to tlie tourist or invalid.
A private hospital, which, though isolated, is in
close proximity to the Sanitarium, is presided over bv
sKiinuiy trained nurses and is also fitted out with
orfSakP!.      °*•lcce88iu'>'t0 "* flrst cluss institution
,.,1, vel$ con",'1™-'0''1- bath-houso adjoins the hotel,
wneie lurkish, Russian, plunge,shower and douche
paths are given under medical supervision, with
water.direct from the celebrated hot sulphur springs.
A first class 1 very 111 connection so that rides and
drives through the niagiiiticaut scenery may be 011-
loyod.   Excellent cuisine.
Terms: 452.01) a day upwards. Special rates by week
or month.  Open all the year.
A. C. THOMPSON, Manager.
Medical Staff:
R. G. Brett, m.d ;   G. M. Atkin, m.d.:
R. H. Brett, d.a.. m d.
"Piccadilly"
The   name   "PICCADILLY" stands for the highest attainable
quality in men's clothing.    That quality is attained by the use of
"MODERN   METHODS,"   which translated means:
—Human skill where it excels.
—Mechanical skill where it is best.
—Combined to make  the  perfect  product.
The cloths, linings and different   materials   used, in  manufacturing PICCADILLY BRAND CLOTHING, are imported direct
from the best mills in Europe, and special care is always taken
to have for each season the  correct  colourings  and  weaves of
cloth.
Manufactured by
H. E. BONO & 6©., Ltd.,      -      TORONTO
£
The Hinton Electric Co., Ltd.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers
Electrical Machinery and Supplies
MARINE  GASOLINE MOTORS, ETC.
^
VICTORIA,
20 Qovernment Street.
VANCOUVER
606 Granville Street.
VICTOEIA
STRAND HOTEL
VICTORIA
The home of all theatrical and vaudeville
artists while iu the Capital city, alio of
other kindred bohemians.
WRIGHT & FALCONER, Proprietors.
CAMBORNE
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining men and
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
REVELSTOKE
Hotel Victoria
• S'
REVELSTOKE, B. C.
Headquarters ior miners and
lumbermen.
ROBT. LAUQHTON, Prop'r.
BANFF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
Banff's Most Popular $2 a Dav Hotel.
Close to Station aud Sulphur j
Baths.
N. K. LUXTON, Proprietor.
PHOENIX.
^
Deane's Hotel
PHOENIX, B. C.
New. Modem hot wnter system. Electric
lighted. Tub and shower baths and laundry In
connection.   The miners' home.
•• DANNY " DEANE, Proprietor
GREENWOOD,
The Windsor Hotel
GREENWOOD, B. C.
American and European Plan.
Cafe in Connection.
ERNEST J. CARTIER, Prop.
ROSSLAND
Hoffman House
ROSSLAND, B. C.
Rates $1.00 per day and up.   Cafe ia
Connection.
GREEN & SHITH. Prop's.
NELSON.
J>
Established 1856
M. R. SMITH & CO.
Factory and Head Office:
VICTORIA
Manufacturers of
Warehouse and Offices:
VANCOUVER
BISCUITS - CONFECTIONERY
Note Our Leader   -   SMITH'S SWISS CREAHS
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OF
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
phone 893. VICTORIA
HOTEL HUME
NELSON,   B. C,
Leading lintel of the Kootenays,
J. FRED HUME,       -       Proprietor.
Silver King Hotel,
NELSON.  B. C.
The home ot the Industrial Workers
olthc Kootenays.
W. E. ricCandllsh,     -      Proprietor
Royal  Hotel
NELSON, B. C.
The Best Family Holel in the City.
11 « din.
Mrs. Wm. Roberts, Proprietress
CRANBROOK.
Cranbrook Hotel
Cranbrook, B. C.
Rates $2 per day.   Opposite the C.P.R.
depot.
Hogarth & Rollins, Propr ic 1«is.
CARLTON SALOON
AND LOUNGE
(I.ate Vernon Hotel.)
THE FIRST-CLASS BAR
R. 1*. CLARK, Proprietor,
(Late of Dawson Cily and South Africa)
Cor. Douglas and View Sts. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1907.
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
OScm:
88% Government Street. .Victoria, B.C.
Rd. 14, McKinnon Blk. .Vancouver, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE.. Manager and Editor
Campaigning
in Alberni.
By the Editor.
Time has its revenges. For several
weeks past I have been fighting my
old battles over again—this week the
Nemesis of fate has decreed that once
more I shall hit the trail and contribute my quota to the conflict now
being waged in Provincial politics.
Nothing loth, I gird on my armour
and set out for the North, the (politically speaking) historic constituency
of Alberni being my destination. Before I reached that Mecca of thc summer tourist there were many happenings of which my readers shall be
told.
Shawnigan Lake.
At the head of Cowichan Lake a
C. P. R. survey party is at work seeking a route across country to Alberni.
It is not certain whether thc latter
point can bc reached better thus than
from Nanaimo by way of Wellington.
A good authority whom I met favours
the Cowichan route and it has the
advantage of being fifty miles shorter
to Victoria.
Ladysmith.
Heavy snow is the feature all the
way to Nanaimo, the only considerable town passed through being Ladysmith. An obliging brakeman informed me that the population of
Ladysmith is 10,000, but as I have no
means of checking the information I
give it for what it is worth. He told,
with pride, that eight years ago there
was no Ladysmith except what was
contained in an old car and two
shacks. Today it is one of the most
prosperous towns on the Island, with
a smelter, coal mines, two lumber
mills, an iron-working manufactory
and a brewery. The coal mines belong to thc Dunsmuir interests, the
men arc well treated and in order that
they may enjoy the advantages of living in the town on the waterside they
are carried to and fro to their work,
a distance of ten miles, free. As far
as I could learn Parker Williams is
the uncrowned king of Ladysmith.
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo may fairly be dubbed thc
Coal City of thc Island. Its splendid
■location on the Sound — its railway
connections—its strategic position at
thc head of the Alberni route, its famous coal mines and its numerous
subsidiary industries all stamp it as
a prosperous and progressive city,
with great possibilities of future development.
For practical pin poses it is the
present railway terminus, so I had to
effect a transfer from train to stage.
This gave an opportunity for a '.< ind
dinner at thc Wilson Hotel and a chat
with many prominent citizens on the
business of the moment—thc Provincial elections. There were two opinions emphatically expressed: that the
Mcliride Administration would bc
sustained by a largely increased majority and that Mr. Hawthornthwaite
could not be defeated.
A Business Vote.
Here I met for the first time an
argument which I have heard repeated in every place since visited—that
many Liberals intend to vote for thc
Government on purely business
grounds. They realise that it would
bc detrimental to thc interests of the
Province to have a change of Government when everything is in thc full
swing of prosperity, and they deprecate Federal interference in local affairs. These were the staple arguments used by Conservatives and Liberals alike, and after conversing with
some hundreds of voters in thc Alberni constituency I am convinced
that this conclusion will stand, and
will mean thc recording of many Liberal votes for Mr. Manson.
Strenuous.
Leaving Nanaimo by sleigh stage I
faced a fifty-mile journey. In the
summer it would be delightful—in the
winter with two balky cayuses, and
eleven sacks of mail-matter, with two
feet of snow and twenty degrees of
frost for half the journey, and rain
and slush for the latter half, it was
hardly a continuous picnic.
Wellington.
Seven miles out Wellington was
reached, or rather what is left of Wellington. When I was last here in
1899 it was a prosperous town with
two or three coal mines in operation
under the capable management of
Andrew Pryden. Now it is a deserted
village, but alas! not the least like
Goldsmith's "Auburn."
Scores of houses empty, half demolished, public buildings and churches
boarded up, colliery erections dismantled, only a few dirt mounds and head
frames to represent the busy mines in
which a thousand men once found
occupation and from which four or
five thousand people derived their
support.   .
The mining population is scattered
and today Wellington is represented
by a couple of hundred mechanics,
lumbermen and railroaders. The one
redeeming feature is a very neat, attractive schoolhouse recently erected.
Through the Woods.
From Wellington the road to Alberni lies through the woods. It is
just a single wagon way like a rut
through the m'ghty forest. The wealth
of timber disclosed is marvellous, fir,
pine and cedar predominating. The
road parallels the shore for nearly five
miles—to Parksville—when it strikes
to the left and continues in a westerly direction.
There are only two settlements en
route, Nanoose and Parksville. The
former consists of perhaps twenty
families, the latter is larger and more
ambitious, aspiring to the dignity of
a small town of two hundred people.
There are stretches of fertile land and
Parksville is the centre of a prosperous colony. j
As the stage left Nanaimo as late
as 2 o'clock, it rested for the night at
Parksville Half-way House, where
Mr. and Mrs. Keith dispensed hospitality in the most grateful form of a
hot stove and plenty of good cheer.
A Village Dance.
In spite of the fact that our driver,
with the enthusiasm and energy of
youth, attended a dance, he had us
up at 6 o'clock next morning to breakfast at 6:30 and resume our journey
at 7, "for," said he, "I carry King
Edward's mails and must get in on
time," a sentiment so admirable that
I could not in fairness relieve my feelings by protesting against the discomfort of a 6:30 breakfast. Later, however, I felt that the discomforts of
life are perhaps pretty evenly divided
when hc confided to me that the dance
was not exactly a howling success
since the only music was a mclodeon,
and there were but seven damsels to
twelve swains, so, said he, ruefully,
"I left early"; only coming from
Aberdeen he pronounced it "airly."
Cameron Lake.
There was no further incident until
the narrow snow road brought us to
the shores of Cameron Lake, thirty-
five miles on our journey and 600 feet
above sea level. Hither in tlie summer time come many tourists to fish
and rusticate. The lake is a beautiful
sheet of water four miles long and
one mile wide. It is clear and very
deep. The fishing is said to bc excellent both in thc lake and the river of
thc same name which Hows through
it. As thc stage road skirts it there
is every convenience of travel, and I
can readily believe that it is a favourite resort.
Shepherd's Camp.
Here I met an old acquaintance and
spent a delightful half hour with F.
II. Shepherd, tlie well known engineer
and one of the most expert and accomplished coal mining engineers on
the continent. Hc is conducting a
survey for thc C. P. R. from Nanaimo
to Alberni and hopes to get there in
two months. When I reached he
was "moving camp," but insisted on
refreshments and among other interesting news told me of thc recent in
vasion of the valley by the once invincible "Billy Mclnnes" (of which
more anon) and gave me an opportunity of hearing the latest New York
success on a Victor gramophone. As it
is not without some appropriateness
in the light of recent events I reproduce the chorus:
"Waltz me around again, Willie,
Around, aronud, around."
From Cameron Lake to the summit—i,3SS feet—is a steep climb, but
thence to Alberni is an easy seven-
mile glide down to sea level.
Alberni.
At 12:10 — only ten minutes after
schedule time—we drove into the historic place which gave its name to the
constituency. In spite of the weather
conditions the first impression was favourable, not to say attractive.
Alberni is like no other place in
Canada, in fact although in Canada it
is not of Canada. The people, and
between Alberni and New Alberni
there are from 600 to 800, speak of
"going out" and "coming in." If they
are bound for the Mainland they say
"going to British Columbia"; if east
of the Rockies they say "going to
Canada." Such a happy, contented,
independent people could not but be
Conservative.
Alberni is an outpost of civilization.
It is barely connected with the outer
world by the fifty miles of mountain
track and telegraph line which links
it to Nanaimo. It looks rather to the
sea than to the land. Once a week
the Queen City steams up its beautiful
natural canal with supplies and an
occasional passenger, then steams
away to render a similar service to
Clayoquot, Ucluelet, Quatsino, Cape
Scott and a number of other nameless
or unpronounceable settlements on
the West Coast of Vancouver Island.
There is an air of aloofness from
the outside, a sense of sufficiency, a
deep-rooted conviction that Alberni is
all right and will come to its own
without any boosting. The people
have the courage of their convictions,
too, for they hold their land at $200
to $300 an acre, twice as much as one
can buy good land for in Saanich,
within twelve miles of Victoria. They
think they have the finest climate in
the world and tell with pride how last
summer many ardent motorists drove
their autos from Nanaimo over the
mountains to Alberni, and how one
well known Victorian found it so delightful that he stayed three months.
They tell also a far more picturesque story of the Queen City landing
a wonderful party of pedagogues from
the Capital City who brought their
own boat, a thirty-foot sloop stored
with provisions. They hired a huge
lumber wagon, loaded up the boat,
clambered into it and were driven
through the streets of Alberni like so
many Neptunes in a barque, out over
thc road twelve miles to Great Central Lake, where they rusticated for a
month.
Alberni has many charms and a
great future. Fishing, bathing, boating, shooting galore. Two lumber
mills, one belonging to tlie enterprising firm of Woods Bros, and the other
to Burns, a model dairy and two
churches. In the background is a
farming district stretching fifteen
miles. In the further background arc
a number of high-grade mining properties, discovered by one of the most
intrepid and persistent prospectors in
the Province, Joe Drinkwater, who
may fairly be regarded as the pioneer
prospector of the Interior. I wish I
had space to tell of his "Gi "t Interior" mine, fifty miles west of Alberni, at an elevation of 6,500 feet,
near the foot of a great glacier not
known to exist until he discovered it.
A beautiful green crystal sea of ice
two miles long and a half a mile wide.
But I must hurry on, especially as the
readers of The Week will have an opportunity of seeing a unique series of
photos of this marvellous copper summit taken by Mr. Leonard Frank and
developed with exquisite skill.
All this time I have been neglecting
politics. Campaigns and elections
have been far from my mind and I
have been roaming among thc natural
beauties of a highly favoured section
whose charm will be spoilt for me
when the iron horse comes screaming
LANGUAGE OF
SEALING-WAX
Revival   of  Curious  Old
Custom.
V.
Colored sealing-wax will be
the fashion during the coming
season, and large quantities are
being bought by London stationers. The revival in the use
of sealing-wax for ordinary correspondence is believed to be
largely due to the increased demand for signet rings, which
has been noted by dealers all
over the country. Another feature of the coming fashion
promises to be a complete
phraseology of sealing-wax, according to the color employed.
These are as follow:
White..Invitations to weddings
Chocolate, Invitations to dinner
Violet, Expressions of sympathy
Green Hopeful   lovers
Ruby Engaged lovers
Red  Business
Pink  Youthfulness
Brown	
Refusals of offers of marriage
Blue  Constancy
Grey Firm friendship
Yellow    Jealousy
Black    Mourning
—Extract from the Daily Mail,
London, Eng.
HI
*\
THE EXTRACT in the adjoining column from a leading
English paper, on the revival of
a quaint but most useful and
ornamental fashion, will give
additional emphasis to the beautiful selection of handsome Signet Rings, for both ladies and
gentlemen, which we are now
displaying in our showrooms,
and which include all the latest
designs in hand-carved shanks.
SIGNET RINGS
For Ladies, in plain gold, from
$1.75 up to $10.
For Ladies  or   Gentlemen,  in
gold,   set   with   bloodstones,
cornelians,  sardonyx,  agates,
etc., from $5 up to $10.
For Gentlemen, in plain  gold,
from $5 up to $15.
Cameo Signet Rings, beautifully
carved, from $5 up to $10.
Signet Rings with photo frame
concealed in signet.
SEALS
Seals in brass, silver or bronze,
from 50c up.
CHALLONER
AND
MITCHELL
DIAMOND MERCHANTS
47 and 49 GOVERNMENT ST.
VICTORIA, B. C.
EVHRYBODY LIKES
HUNTLEY
AND
PALMER'S
SOLD EVERYWHERE
BISCUITS
It,P   2094
BLACKWELL'S
MARMALADE
Let Us Show You
Our MASSEY-HARRIS NO. 2 Root Cutter and Pulper,
excellent   machine   costing   very   little   money.   Our
Massey-Harris No. 1 Root Cutter and Pulper costs a dollar
or two more, hut has several new points.   Our WATSON'S
"EXCELSIOR''
double action Root
Cutter is absolutely perfection;
with a DOUBLE
ACTION; cutting
roots into small
slices one way and
into small squares
for sheep when reversed. If you are
interested in dairying "The Melotte"
Cream Separator,
for which we are
sole agents in B.C.,
will add 25 per
cent to your profits; it costs you
nothing to test this
statement. If you
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SEE US on the
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.   If you cannot get to Victoria or any of our numerous
depots our travellers will call upon you when desired.
E. Q. PRIOR & CO., Ltd.
Hardware, Iron and Steel Merchants,
123 Government Street, Victoria, B. 6.
Also at Vancouver, Kamloops and Vernon.
Subscribe for the Week THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1907
down the valley and tracks and aerial
tramways scar the mountain side.
Will Return Manson.
Still an election will come first and
the people of Alberni will send Mr.
Manson back to the Provincial Parliament. There are three reasons for
this. The first is that "Billy" Mclnnes has been here; the second is
that the voters are convinced that the
best guarantee for a continuance of
the present prosperity is not to change
the management; the third is that
they are proud of their representative.
We held our meeting in Brand's
Hall on Saturday night. It was as to
weather about "the worst ever." Yet
the room was nearly filled — there
were nearly twice as many present as
at Mr. Mclnnes' or Mr. Hawthornthwaite's meeting. The opposition
was there, small but compact. The
president of the Liberal Association
was too modest to take the platform
in response to a cordial invitation,
but he motioned to a Mr. Best, who
asked many questions—and got his
answer. He caused great amusement
by advocating "state education" for
Siwashes. The meeting was good-
humoured, the addresses were carefully listened to and well received,
and the overwhelming testimony was
in favour of the Government candidate. Old timers told me tnat it was
the best political meeting ever held
in Alberni; in any event it was an
auspicious and gratifying inauguration of Mr. Manson's campaign.
Monday morning brought a great
•change in the atmospheric conditions
at Alberni. The thermometer had
risen to 8 above freezing point. Rain
had been falling steadily for thirty-
six hours and the roads were covered
with a foot to eighteen inches of snow
and slush. These were the conditions under which we resumed our
journey and the conditions under
which we continued it for a distance
of nearly thirty miles on our return.
The conviction was, however, borne
in on my mind that few places on the
Island or in the Province could vie
with Alberni for natural beauty and
attractions.
On the Trail.
A winter campaign is no carnival—
we travelled slowly, our horses sinking in at every step—then the runners
would cut through and the heavily
laden sleigh would stop. The passengers would have to get out into the
snow, water and slush and plod a
spell. A hasty scramble again for
seats and another short ride. Half
way up the summit it was found impossible to ride further and a climb
of three miles on foot was no joke.
Finally, between walking and riding,
Ave got within a few miles of Nanoose
and walked in.
Nanoose.
Nanoose is a unique settlement, redeemed from obscurity by a handful
of brave pioneers and the best conn
try hotel on the Island. Percy Good
and his charming wife deserve and
receive the thanks of every traveller
between Nanaimo and Alberni for the
comfort and cleanliness of their hotel and the excellent table spread. Beyond this Percy is a vade mecuin on
all subjects—treats his guests to music, and furnishes the only communication with thc outside world by
means of a telephone service to the
telegraph station at Englishman's
River.
Small but Choice.
At thc schoolhouse we held our
meeting on Monday night. Now
Nanoose has a grievance which, however, is to be promptly removed—the.
schoolhouse is three miles from the
centre of the settlement. When it
was *erccted tliere were a few early
settlers close at hand. Their children
have grown up and now it is so inaccessible that it has been closed fo.
several years, and all because the
people cannot agree among themselves where to locate a new one
Mr. Manson, however, by thc exercise
of skilful diplomacy brought the conflicting interests together, arranged
for substantial aid from the Government, and this spring a new school-
house will be built on or very near
the main road. The ubiquitous and
genial Inspector Mr. Wilson was on
the ground on Tuesday morning arranging the    details.    A    telepathic
message had summoned him at the tients; must have at least three more.
psychological moment.
Enthusiasm.
This point satisfactorily settled, thc
meeting listened with the closest at-
All Nelson taking Kirkpatrick's prescriptions."
*   *   *
Ottawa, Jan. 22.
tention to Mr. Manson's address and To Vancouver World:
enjoyed itself by asking a few ques- "McBride  too  popular  altogether.
tions  which  were  satisfactorily  an- Manufacture another Green scandal:
swered.   Mr. Knight made an excel- QUICK."                      MACHINE.
lent chairman and after my own little *   *   *
spiel a small but enthusiastic meeting From    Willie    Wells,  Golden,  to
sang the  national    anthem and we Wandering Willie, Vancouver: "Help!
trudged back by the aid of lanterns Help!   The Parsons policy is killing
to Percy Good's hostelry to carry on me."
the debate into the wee sma' hours. *   *   *
This may be a small community but From   John   Houston,  Nelson, to
it is terribly in earnest and is deter- "Anybody," Goldfields:   "Send me a
mined to do its share in sustaining
the Government.
Parksville.
Back on Tuesday ten miles to
Parksville and a whole day spent in
canvassing. Fine weather, mild atmosphere and green fields and forests once more instead of the snow
Many were the calls we made and
delightful the hospitality we received.
Sometimes driving three miles along
a  branch  road  to  a  solitary  settle
Victoria homes. To show our impartiality in the matter, we may remind
our readers that, some months ago,
we took the Victoria Colonist to task
for poisoning its readers with the
same kind of rubbish, with the result
that the nuisance was abated. Let
the Times do likewise. It has given
abundant evidence during the past
year of being able to manufacture its
own scandal without going across the
international boundary line.
Maps!
of British Columbia
ticket.   Am no good here."
* *   *
From Col. Prior, Victoria, to R.
McBride, En Route:' "Has Mclnnes
asked you for vacant cabinet position
yet?   He'll be after it on the 2nu.'
E. G.
* *   *
From McDonald, Rossland, to Templeman, Ottawa: "Urgent. Get another immediate Pacific Coast construction letter from Hays.   Last one
ment such as Walter Auld's at Green  w°"* out   Also shiP at once severaI
lifeboats,  wharves,  and  all  the   fat
jobs left.   Must send goods this time;
people say your promises worse than
counterfeit money."      J. A. MAC.
*   *   *
From  Minister  of  Public  Works,
Lake, or to Jim Craig's. Now of
Craig I shall not have much to say,
but he is to have a chapter to himself in a future issue. He is too bift
a man for a paragraph. He is the
renowned    panther    hunter,    having
killed more  than a hundred  in  the   °"*wa' to May°r Morley' Victoria'
B. C:   "Not necessary send dredge;
last two years.   I have a lot of fine
photos which I intend to publish for J'mes can furmsh a11 mud re1uired
the benefit of The Week's readers. fi" hotel Ms'\
Mr. R. W. Hickey is one of the
best known  ranchers in the district From the PeopIe of B*  C  to Sir
and is president of the Conservative ^llfnd Laurier' 0ttawa:    "Why did
Association.    The Lee brothers and McInnes res'gn from the Governor-
several other sons of Erin are among shlp of the Yuk°n?"
STILL NO EXPLANATION.
An amused and sceptical electorate
is still anxiously awaiting some reasonable explanation as to why Mr.
W. W. B. Mclnnes gave up $12,000 a
year to come and struggle for a seat
in the Legislature of British Columbia whieh is only worth $800 a year—
if he gets it. To tell the public, as
the Liberal spell-binders are doing,
that Mr. Mclnnes was solely moved
by love of British Columbia and a
desire to advance her interests, is
putting it a little too strong. That
self-sacrificing sort of thing is out of
date, and. even if it were not, Billy
Mclnnes s hardly the man to practice it. He is a jolly good fellow,
and quite one of the boys, but when
it comes to throwing away a certain
$12,000 for a very uncertain -S00 just
for the sake of patriotism—oh, well,
come now. Tell us another ghost-
story.
Townsite Maps
Mining Maps
Timber .Maps
District Maps
of all portions of the province.
Reply:   "Refer you to political definition of word  'resign.'    Yukoners
consigned him  to warmer climate."
LAURIER.
the powers in prosperous Parksville.
There are reminiscences here of a
young Englishman now winning his
laurels on the literary staff of The
Week, last year rusticating here. But
I must hurry.
A Fine Meeting.
iir   ,   j    c .■ rr,     , The handing over of New British
We had a fine meeting on Tuesday B       »«"■•"«»« ""'»"
night in the schoolhouse under the  Columbla fcP the <*. T* p* Railway.
WHAT  THB  LIBERALS  OFFER.
presidency of Mr. Hickey. Mr. Man-
son, Mr. Cartwright (the Socialist
candidate) and the writer spoke.
Every phase of the Government's policy was closely scrutinized, and as the
evening wore on the meeting became
An  opening for the  Ottawa machine to exploit   their   graft under
Provincial management.
*   *   *
Support for the two most seurril-
demonstrative    in    its    support    of ous sheets printed in Canada —the
Mr.  Manson  and  his  platform.    It Vancouver World  and the Victoria
was a critical gathering of hard-
headed and horny-handed men loiiij-
waiting for prosperity and satisfied
that they were never so surely on tin.
road as today. Almost to a man they
will vote for Mr. Manson.
MARCONI WIRELESS.
(Via Grand Trunk Pacific Marconi
Stations.)
Ottawa, Jan. 26. W. W. B. Mclnnes, Vancouver. "Does the machine need oil? Can spare you one
more barrel." WILFY.
* *   *
From T. W. Paterson, Islands, to
Liberal Committee, Vancouver: "Send
two boat loads this year. Better use
Empress.    Iroquois not big enough."
* *   *
From Liberals of the Yukon to
Vancouver City, B. C: "Good Lord
deliver you."
Times.
* *   *
The two Maes as leaders. Nuff
said!
* *   *
Quebec domination in British Columbia.
* *   *
No construction of the Grand
Trunk Pacific in British Columbia
until every other inch of the railway
is completed.
* *   *
To continue to milk the Province
for the benefit of Eastern Canada.
* *   *
Bitter terms.
* *   »
A campaign of lying slander.
A CHRISTIAN SPIRIT.
One does not realise until one reads
the Liberal papers nowadays, and
listens to the platform talk of the
Liberal spell-binders, what a beautiful, Christian, forgiving disposition
the C. P. R. has got. The Opposition
are frantically assuring the electorate
that the C. P. R. are straining every
nerve to get Mr. McBride and his
Conservative colleagues returned to
power on the 2nd of February. And
yet, since Mr. McBride assumed the
reins of office, the C. P. R, has been
made to pay some three times the
amount of taxes into the Provincial
treasury that they ever paid before.
In plain English the McBride Government has about trebled the taxes
of the C. P. R. on its property in this
Province. Oh, yes, the C. P. R. must
fairly worship Mr. McBride
A  machine-made
deliver (ho goods.
leader
will
Insnlis to organized labor.
From John Irving, Atlin, to Willie
Sloan, Ottawa: "Splinter my top
lights, send cruiser "Maud" with usual
cargo. The Liberal frost has frozen
all my Red Eye. The Young One
has me hard a-starboard with the lec
rail under.    No port in sight."
*   *   *   ,
From Stewart Henderson, Ashcroft,
to  Honest  John,   Delta:    "How   do  free §'ift forever*    Don ' for?et that
REMEMBER.
A vote for Macdonald and the Liberals means a vote of fifteen million
acres of British Columbia land to the
Grand  Trunk  Pacilic  Railway  as  a
THOSE "INFLUENCES."
The Vancouver Guardian is not
the only paper in the Provinee that
has suddenly and mysteriously come
under the Liberal "influence"—not
by a long chalk. Here, for instance,
is the way the Cranbrook Herald
spoke of J. A. Harvey, the Conservative candidate in that riding, on the
21st of June last:
"J. A. Harvey has been a hard
worker in thc Conservative party,
and he may reap Ihe reward that is
coming at the next election."
And this is what the Cranbrook
Herald says on the 3rd of this month:
"J. A. Harvey will be tho worst
defeated man in the Province."
How times do change! Can it bo
the effect of another kind of
"change"?
ADMIRALTY
CHARTS
Tide Tables
B. C. Pilot
Agents of the British Admiralty office.
THOMSON
STATIONERY CO
325 Hastings St.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Gloves
Ladies', Gentlemen's
and Children's
Fowne's Dogskin (Ladies),
$1.25 and $1.50.
Silk Lined Antelope  (Men's, $2.00.
Men's Suede, $1.50.
Ladies' Silk Lined Mocca, $2.00.
Dent's   Chevrette   Gloves,
$1.50 and $1.75.
Fowne's Driving Patent Grip, $2.25.
Men's Reindeer, $3.00 and $4.00.
Cadette Gloves, sizes 00 to 7.
$1.00 and $1.25.
Foxe's Patent Puttees, $1.50, $2.25.
E. Chapman
Davis Chambers, Vancouver, B.C.
Sole Agents in B.C. for R. A. Hin-
son's Royal Irish Poplin Ties.
JOHN COOPER
Taxidermist and Pur Dresser
Mounting Largo Game Heads
a Specialty.
826 PENDER  STREET,
VANCOUVER.
"FISHY."
you get farmers'
at once.   Reply:
croft."
"Semlin knows; ask him
here."
vote?   Send recipe  w'inn y°u cast J'0111' vote on the 2nd
S. Henderson, Ash- of February.
Too busy
OLLALA.
NOTES.
The  Victoria    Times    is   running
short of its  stock  of  native,  homc-
"Wud a few sodjer  manufactured  scandals.    On  Thurs-
beat Dick?  day  evening it  devoted  over  thrce-
votin'    for  quarters of a page to a lurid biography of a trio of American criminals,
accompanied by three atrocious photographs  of their  crime-marked vis-
From  Jardine,   Esquimalt,  to  Jardine, Dewdney
votes help yc oot    tae
Thc'rc    a    dizzen   here
Pooley I canna baud.    Can yer rai
way no send them a pass?"   JOCK.
*   *   *
From Dean, Nelson, to World and ages, and a six-inch square illustra-
Times: "For heaven's sake send tion of two deplorable plug-uglies en-
more slanderous scandals. Dr. Hall gaged in "cracking" a safe. This sort
says old ones have no effect on pa- of journalism  is  not wanted in our
The New Westminster Daily News
says that the Hon. Mr. McBride did
his best to put the Fraser Kiver fishermen out of business. The 'Victoria
Times says that the Hon. Mr. McBride did his best to put the Island
fish-traps out of business in the interests of the Fraser Kiver fishermen. Now, would these two zealous
supporters of the great railway company of Laurier, Hays, Cox & Co.
kindly put their think-tanks together
and fake some sort of au explanation
of these two diametrically opposed
statements? To an ordinary elector
they both seem more than a little
"fish v."
M.J. HENRY'S
NURSERIES
and SEEDHOUSES
VANCOUVER,   B.   C.
WRITE FOR
=1907—
CATALOGUE
if
M.   J.   HENRY
:ioio Westminster Koah
VANCOUVER,    B.   C. IO
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1907
He Could Find Out.
A Scocth girl, rosy cheeked and
demure, was in one corner of a compartment in a Continental train. In
the corner opposite sat a heavy German. The Scotch girl was reading
in the Bible. The German noticed
the fact. After looking the girl over
critically, he asked her whether she
actually believed all she found in the
Bible.
"Aye," answered she, raising her
eyes to him from the page.
"Not the story of Adam and Eve?"
"Aye."
"And of Cain and Abel?"
"Aye."
"But certainly you don't believe the
story of Jonah and the whale?"
The girl said she believed that, too.
The German was puzzled.
"But how are you going to prove
it? Ask Jonah when you get to
heaven?"
That idea struck the girl as a good
one, and she said she could prove it
that way.
"Supopse he isn't there? What
then?   How would you prove it?"
"Ah," said the demure maiden,
"then you ask him."
Mr. B 's funeral at the church
tomorrow at ten-thirty?"
Mr. Douty was no more acquainted
with Mr. B than with the stranger who asked the favour, but he is
an obliging man, and so said he
would sing as requested, whereupon
the stranger rang off.
The musician had just looked
through his music and made a selection, when the 'phone again summoned him, and the same voice asked:
"By the way, Mr. Douty, do you
mind telling me what it is that you
have so kindly consented to sing tomorrow at the funeral?"
"Not at all," said Mr. Douty. "I
have just looked over my music and
decided to sing a very pretty setting
which I have to Tennyson's 'Crossing the Bar.'"
There came an explosion from the
friend of the deceased.
"Good Heavens!" cried the unknown.   "Don't think of singing that!
Didn't you know that Mr. B was
a saloon-keeper?"
Wives Grow Dearer.
Fashion alters much more frequently now than it did even a quarter of a century ago, and controls far
more women than it did then; therefore, it must now inevitably cost morp
to keep a wife.—"The Graphic."
A Varying Average.
"I suppose you see a good many
automobiles passing this way," said
the touring statistician to the farmer.
"Oh, yes, a tolerably good number."
"Possibly a half dozen a day?"
"Oh, more'n that, I reckon."
"As many as a dozen a day?"
"Waal, I guess some days I've seen
as many as a dozen, but it ain't often."
"Well," persisted the tourist, "about
how many do you figure you average
a day?"
"Waal, I'll tell you," replied the
farmer, thoughtfully stroking his
chin, "the average varies!"
Fish Day.
Miss Askham—And do you paint
nothing but animal pictures every
day?
Mr. D'Auber—Well, on Fridays I
paint fish.  ■
Not the Same.
Aunt—I think you say your prayers
very nicely, Reggie.
Young Hopeful—Ah, but you should
hear me gargle!—Punch.
A Clever Coon.
In a Broadway cafe a man with a
string tie, long moustache, and slouch
hat, who bore in every detail the
"South of Mason and Dixon's line"
trademark, listened to a stage veteran, who was saying:
"Yes, Ave were playing the Jarrett
and Palmer circuit in Othello, and—"
The Southerner's eye brightened at
the familiar word.
"I saw that play once!" he broke
in, delightedly. "Doavii in Nashville,
I "
"What did you think of it?"
queried a bystander.
"Mighty good show," agreed thc
Southerner. "There was a nigger
named Salvini in it, and I couldn't
see but what the coon acted as good
as any of thc Avhite folks they had."
President of What?
President Roosevelt likes to leave
the White House at times and make
calls on his friends. One night last
winter he strolled up to Attorney-
General Moody's house and rang the
bell.
The negro butler came to the door.
He peered out suspiciously and
asked, "What you all want?"
"I should like to see Mr. Moody."
"Mr.   Moody ain't  in  to  nobody."
"Oh, I guess hc will see me. Tell
him the  President is here."
"The President?" said the butler
suspiciously.
"Yes, the President."
The butler pulled the door almost
shut. He looked at Mr. Roosevelt's
slouch hat with disdainful eye and
inquired scornfully: "President of
what?'*
Life's Little Ironies.
"That settles me," said the street
car conductor, as hc returned to the
rear platform after having made his*
collection of fares.
"Anything Avrong?" was asked.
"I should remark! There was an
inspector looking through thc front
doors at me while I was collecting
fares, and there Avas a spotter on the
car besides."
"But you are an honest man."
"Sure, but that has nothing to do
Avith it. Me girl is in the car. I
had to hold out my paw for her
nickel as well as the rest. I have
passed her free a score of times, but
this time I couldn't. She blushed
and paid, but that ends thc romance.
Tonight when 1 sIioav up at the house
as usual I'll find it in darkness, and
when 1 ring away at the bell, somebody '11 call out from a top window:
"Go away! Wc have no umbrellas
to mend here!"
Tainted Money.
On a road Avhere a gang of laborers
Avere Avorking last summer, a big
touring car whizzed by with a roar
like a gigantic rocket, and Pat and
Mike turned to watch it disappear in
a cloud of dust.
"Thim chug wagons must cost a
hapc av cash," said Mike. "Thc rich
is fairly burnin' money."
"An' bc the smell av it," sniffed
Pat, "it must be thot tainted money
we do be hearin' so much aboot."
Crossing the Bar.
As Nicholas Douty, thc song composer, Avas sitting in his studio in
Philadelphia the other day, the telephone bell rang and, upon Mr.
Dout's answering the call, a man
whom he did not knoAV asked:
"Will you be good enough to sing
a  solo  of  some  appropriate   slrt  at
A Shrewd Turn.
When the bottom dropped out of
the boom in Kansas a great many
years ago, the desire to get rid of
property Avas as great as it had been
to acquire it.
One day, a lawyer while travelling
along a couutry road met an old
friend of his wearily but happily
leading a reluctant coav toward town.
Inquiry drcAV out thc reply that he
had acquired the cow in exchange for
a city lot,
"And do you knoAV," said the hcav
owner of the bovine, lauhing, "I just
turned a great trick with that old
bewhiskcred rube. Hc can't read a
word, and in the deed I Avorked off
two lots on him instead of one."
Wise.
"But, Tommy," said his mother,
"didn't your conscience tell you you
were doing Avrong?"
"Yes'm," replied Tommy, "but I
don't  believe everything I  hear."
THE CHILDREN LIKE THEM
LIKE WHAT?-
WHY—
B&K
ROLLED OATS
Chinese- made Skirts ^Overalls
MUST GO!
UNION-MADt.
RN BRAND
BUTTING AHEAD.
ADVERTISE IN THE WEEK THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1907.
11
Tbe Pacific Coast
Realty Co., Ltd.
Have an exclusive list ol specially selected ACREAGE, ESTATE and FARM
PROPERTIES for sale at prices which
will attract purchasers.
NOW IS THE TIME TO BUT
Victoria Property is the safest and best
investment to be found in Real Estate on
the Pacific Coast.  There will be a
50 PER CENT. INCREASE
IN YALUES IN 1907.
You cannot make a mistake in buying
Business,
Residence, or
Acreage
Property.
Write or call on us for particulars.  We
can show you how to make money.
The Pacific Coast
Realty Co., Ltd.
12 IHacOregor Bl'k, Victoria, B.C.
(Opposite Driard Hotel)
Point Grey
Lands.
Some Choice  Blocks on 4th
and 6th Avenue at
$1,500 to $1,700
au acre.
BURNETT, SON & CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,   B. C.
Tel.   1373,
C. S. BAKER
Assayer,
Chemist
and Ore Shippers' Agent.
GRAND FORKS, B. C.
ASSAY CHARGES.
Iron  , 1.50
Gold    Iloo
Silver   1.00
Copper   1.35
Lead   1.35
Zinc   3,00
Gold and Silver  1.50
Gold and Copper  3.00
Gold, Silver and Copper  150
Gold, Silver and Lead  a.50
Other metals on application.
A discount allowed to regular customers.
IDEAL
CLIMATE
SOIL
and
LOCATION
FOR FRUIT
Plots,
That is what I can offer orchardists
on the shores of beautiful Kootenay
Lake.   Write for literature and maps
J. E- ANNABLE,
The Land Man,
NELSON, B.C.
FRUIT
LANDS
Oa Kootenay Lake and Wait Aim.
Lake and River frontage. Wo
have large and small traots of
good land anl prices to mlt aU.
Also several partly Improved
ranches. PuU particulars willingly given.
H. E. CROASDAILE & CO.
Nelson, B.C.
BOND SIGN CO.
VANCOUVER
******************** **-* *****
■►
:i
;t
;>
;i
1!
<!
■.!
1!
'■>
'.!
\>
REAL
ESTATE
F RE, LIFE and ACCIDENT
INSURANCE.
i Victoria Real Estate today is the ;;
best investment in the Province. ;',
4 Prices advancing rapidly.   I ad- J
<|       vise immediate investment.
,'. Consult me,
! t	
* ■	
J S. Murray
46 FORT STREET
VICTORIA,   B. C.
p. 0. box 77 PHONE 1279 '£
_ : i
************************** •
|The Home
: Seekers
: Goal.
P. O. Box 739
Victoria, B. C.
Phone 1208
Cables,
"Phoenix Victoria'
Codes,
Western Union and
Private.
Loans and Mortgages
Arranged.
The Phoenix
Land - Trust - and - Investment
Association
Acting strictly on commission for the sale and purchase of city and suburban real estate, agricultural,
timber and mineral lands, the promotion of industrial corporations, and all business of a fiduciary
choracter.
Rooms 9 and II Macgregor Block, corner Vfew and
Broad Streets,
VICTORIA, B. C.
Have an excellent list of exclusive properties
for sale, inciuding the finest residentia sites in
Victoria, Business Blocks, Fruit and Agricultural
Acreage, at bed-rock prices. If you are interested
in rea estate in Victoria and Vancouver Island, or
have money to invest you should write for this list.
In all financial tranr    tions we save you money,
We have also some excellent investments in Bank
and Railway Shares.
:
y Special   Bargains  to
> Wind Up An  Estate.
6}4 acres in the North
End, only 20 minutes walk
to Post Office,  with soutli-
} ern aspect,  #600 per acre,
i 5 acres is all cleared and in
high state of cultivation.
Seaview lots from $50 to
$100 each, chiefly cleared,
and ready for building on.
I Easy terms if necessary.
The B. C. Land &, Investment
Agency, Ltd.
Real Estate, Financial and
Insurance Agents,
VICTORIA, B. C.
Subscribe for The Week.
We Will
Sell
1,000 International Coal 66A
2,000 Ramblre Cariboo 29
1,000 Nicola Coal Mines 07
500 B. C Amalgamated ....     Bid
2,000 Sullivan 08
100 Dominion Copper       6.90
1,000 La Plata Mines 21
500 Denora Mines   12A
25 Cons. Smelters     i45'°o
2,000 Diamond Vale 27
If you will buy at prices above
named, we shall be pleased to have
you wire us at our expense.
B.B. MIGHTON & CO.
Mining and Investment Brokers.
Drawer 1082. Kelson, B. O.
WANTED
TIMBER
LANDS
1   have   connections  with   Eastern
j capitalists wanting timber lands, saw
; mills  and   logging  outfits.    1   would
> like to meet cruisers or others having
these properties for sale.
E. R. CHANDLER
Room 8, Jones Building,
407 Hastings Street, Vancouver, B. C
Nelson Iron Works
Machinery of all kinds built,
erected and repaired.
Complete Mining Plants
Cammoll Laird Steel, Etc.
It', W. Hinton     MclSOfl, B. C.
Water St.
This is a most desirable business
property, having splendid truckage
facilities.
Five Story Brick
Warehouse
I with lofty basement, between Abbott and Cambie Streets, $51,000,
and $20,000 cash will handle this,
balance can be arranged upon easy
terms.
I A. 0. P. Francis & Co
510 Pender Street
VANCOUVER, B. C
Notice is hereby given
that a dividend of Nine Per
Cent, per annum has this
day been declared on the
permanent stock of thc company for the half-year ending December 31st, 1906,
and a bonus at the rate of
One Per Cent, for the year
1906. Thc same will be payable at the head office of the
company, No. 321 Cambie
street, Vancouver, B.C., on
and after January 15, 1907.
By order of the board,
THOS. T. LANGLOIS,
President.
Vancouver, Jan. 11, 1907.
The B. C. Assay &
Chemical Supply
Company, Ltd.
Importers and Dealors in
Assayers' and
Chemists' Supplies
513 Pender St.
VANCOUVER,   B.   C.
YMIR is 0 thriving minim:
town, situated 18 miles
SOUtll Of Nelson in the rich
mineral district of Wesl Kou-
tenay. It is essentially a
iree.mllltugcatnp, nnd tliere
nre Rlxstitmp.milIs operating
in tlie vicinity—one of them
(tlie Ymir) being tlie tarirosi.
in Canada, with Its80ltatnps
constantly dropping. Th.ro
arc numerous mines In active
operation in the camp, and
reliable Informal!.n Is always available In Ymir.
Waldorf Hotel
Headquarters for Mining and Commercial Men.
Sample Rooms in Connection.
YMIR, B. €.
g. s. e«i.Bmn\.
Proprietor.
VMIR enjoys evory facility
1 tor mining operation!.
Timber and Wnter 11 rcahund-
nnt, lhe mail, and trails are
In good condition In the
main, and new ones are be*
Ing Opened lp. Tliere Is direct rnilwny communication
wilh three sine Iters, all wi thin lift)* miles Ol ibe town.
The climate is congenial nnd
every neceuat** and luxury
of life can b* seiMi-ed In the
camp nnd nt prices that compare favourably with those
of any other district. 13
THE WEEK, SATURDAY JANUARY 26, 1907.
TO.    ^B
**£8
DBFABTKBNT   Of  MINES.
COAL MINES REGULATION ACT.
BOARDS  OF  EXAMINERS.
stuffs,  glassware,  toilet  articles,  to- NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 flays
.               ,.                                ... after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
baccos,    liquors,    cigars,    stationery, chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
fanrv    crind**     nerfumeries     sureical for special timber  licenses  to cut and
xancy   gooas,   penumenes,   surgical carry away tlmber from the following
apparatus,   physicians'   and   hospital described lands, situate in Renfrew Dis-
,.       .   ;.,         .                -    ,, ■ trict,   in  the  Province  of  British  Co-
supplies, bottles,   jars,   cans,   boxes, lumbia.
rnntninpr*-   l**hpk and nthpr similar or *• Commencing at a post planted about
containers, iaoeis ana otner similar or 3 ml]eg southeast of ^ "Juan Riveri
kindred   articles   and   druggists    and marked "G. Young's southwest corner";
,                       . •          i          „,. thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
general   store   sundries   and   supplies chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
and articles  entering into  the  com- west 80 chains to point of commence-
position   thereof;   and   for   the   said 2. Commencing at a post planted at
„ 4    „„„...*— „_j 4„t,„ „ ...    . the southeast corner of No.  1;  thence
purposes to acquire and take over as SOuth 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
going concerns the undertakings  of thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
66                                                °.. chains to point of commencement,
any   persons,   firms   or  corporations 3. Commencing at a post planted at
Appointed  by  the  Owners - Charles  engaged in any such business and all SStHo^n^enweSt SO1 chains!
Matthews.                                                                      portion   or   portions   of   the thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
Alternates—David Walker, David Nel-          .,,-.•,-•        .     •. chains to point of commencement.
I,.,                                                             assets and liabilities of said persons, 4. Commencing at a post planted at
;'                              .,    .  „               ,     <;.„„ „.. „ „„.^4;„„c.  n„A 4„ „..„..:.,, the southeast corner of No.  3; thence
Appointed by the Lieut.-Governor ln  firms or corporations, and to acquire south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
Council—John Kesley.                                 and hold stock in any other corpor- thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
Elected hv tha Miners—Thomas Rit>-     .*                                                ,   i_     • chains to point of commencement.
anectea by tne Miners— i nomas nip   atlons carrying on any such business 5. Commencing at a post planted at
leJ**                                                                      „.  „„,.,,;„.,   anfi   tn  nop  thp   funds the southeast  corner  of No.   4;  thence
Alternates —John    Horbury,    Daniel   or  operations  ana to  use  tne  tunas north 40 chains; thence west 166 chains;
Stewart                                                      of this Corporation in the purchase thence south 40 chains; thence east 16»
oiowa.ru                                                       .<                     r                            r chains to point of commencement.
All persons Interested may obtain full  thereof, and to assume and pay the 6. Commencing at a post planted at
Information by applying to the Secre-   rou.i, nr „„v nrirtinn  nr nnrtinns nf the northwest corner of No.  6; thence
4 . 4v._ „'—/■.,-   t.^_ t,„,„.  ..  wnoie or any portion or portions oi north 40 chalns. thence west 160 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence east 160
chains to point of commencement.
Each  containing   640   acres,   more  or
Dated December 10, 1906.
Jan.19 GEORGE YOUNG, Locator.
NOTICE is hereby given that the following constitute the Boards of Examiners for the various Collieries during
the year 1907:—
CUMBERLAND   COLLIERY.
tary of the Board, Mr. John Kesley, of
the liabilities of such other corpora-
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
Cumberland, B. C.
EXTENSION COLLIERY. tion- and lf deemed advisable, to take
Appointed   by    the    Owners-James on assignment or assignments all or
Sharp. anY °f such liabilities.
Alternates—Alex. Bryden, Alex. Shaw. ■
Appointed by the Lieut.-Governor ln      64.    Commencing  at  a post  planted after date, I intend'to apply to the Hon.
Council-W. G Simpson. at .the  northwest   corner of   Hubert ^S'fcr"tai'"!Sn.e' to*S8 and
Elected by the Miners—Thomas Do- Haines    land,  thence   west  80   chains, carry away timber from the following
herty. thence north 80 chains, thence east 80 described lands, situate in Rupert Dis-
Alternates-William   Anderson,   Ben- chains, thence south 80 chains to point Bn^eQsouth °sho°rTofThfweTi?m"d'
"amln Berto. of commencement. Claim 1. Commencing at a post mark-
All persons interested may obtain full ELIZABETH KNIGHT.      ed   "E.   J.   Mathews,   northeast   corner
G B. Watson  Agent.      P°st,"  planted  about  10  chains  north'
Sept 10th, 1906.
Information by applying to the Secretary of the Board, Mr. W. G. Simpson,
of Ladysmith, B. C.
NANAIMO COLLIERY,
Appointed
Mills.
west of the northwest corner post of
Lot 203; thence south 40 chains; thence
west 1G0 chains; thence north 40 chains;
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty SSmTnt' 1G0 chains t0 point of oom"
by   the   Owners-Thomas  &"«g2ft&iJR$» g^and      *"*" °Tl fewl,^' "°C-
Agnates-George Wilkinson.Charles  Works for permission to.cut and carry ^ J. McNeil*. Agent.
raham* CvSnS^ a   a .I'mS "GA       N°TICE Is *™* *iven that, 30 days
Appointed by the Lieut-Governor in  commencing at a stake m««<■«• •«*• after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
,„„„„    -m,    ' „ T,„rf„, B. No. I,    planted on the east bank of  the Chief Commissioner  of Lands and
Mammon    River,    thence   north    iflo Works  fc:* special license to cut and
..•,.,:.,„     ft,..,,..  ....   ,„ -koine    thptiM  carry away timber from the following
chains,   thence east  40 chains,   thence desc'ribed lands, situate in Rupert Dis-
south 100 chains, thence west 40 cnains trict, Quatsino Sound, Vancouver Island,
on the south shore of the West Arm:
Claim 2. Commencing at a post mark-
ed   "E.  J;   Mathews,    northeast   corner
December 8. post,"  planted  on  shore about  2  miles
                    northwest of the northeast corner post
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty of No. 1 Claim; thence south 80 chains;
days after date I intend to apply to the thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
Appointed   by   the   Owners-Robert  Chief   Commissioner    of   Lands    and of commencement '
Works for permission to cut and carry
Graham.
Appoi
Council—Thomas Budge.
Elected by the Miners—John Carr.
Alternates—Thomas C. Piper, George
Moore. •       *
au «=..«„= ir,to.M*=/i ,v,o„ .m.i. #„,,  to point of commencement.
All persons interested may obtain full        v PT7A   A   "RTf*T7T OW
information by applying to the Secre- WiU* A- mu'1IAJW-
tary of the Board, Mr. Thomas Budge,
of Nanaimo, B. C.
MICHEL  COLLIERY.
ati
Strachan.
Alternates—John John, James Derby-  away timber   from  the following   de-
sh«re. scribed lands, situated on the east bank
Appointed by the Lieut.-Governor in  0f   Marmon    River,   Graham   Island:
Council—Evan Evans,
Elected by the Miners—Sidney Blrt.
Located on the 26th day of Dec, 11)06.
E. J. MATHEWS,
Jan. 19 J. McNeill, Agent.
„ . • ,    ,   ..„    .        NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
Commencing at a post marked    G, A. after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
B.'s   No. 2  Claim;"   thence  south   160 the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Alternates —Joseph    ThomaB,    John   chains*   thence  east 40 chains:   thence Works  for  special  license  to  cut and
T_.         ciwiiB,   wenw   eds*.  4" <-»«"*> 1   lusuw; carry away timber from the following
Laurenson. north I00 chains; thence west 40 chains described  lands,   situate  on  Limestone
All persons interested may obtain full   t0 point of commencement Island, Rupert District, Quatsino Sound,
information by applying to the Secre- GEO. A. BIGELOW v«™ c^mme^cing at a post mark-
tary of the Board, Mr. Evan Evans, of      December 8.  ed   "E.   i.  Mathews,   northwest  corner
Michel, B. C. NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty post,"  planted  at  the   northeast point
days after date, I intend to apply to the of the  entrance  to  Quiet  Cove,  Lime-
t_t„.   r.i.i.* r..m*«tDa]nnn. „** 1 on/ic qt,/i stone 1 sland.    adioimnir    Frecoii s Pre-
COAL CREEK COLLIERY.
tin.
AnDointed bv the Owners—David Mar- Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and stone Island, adjoining Fregon s Preappointed Dy tne owners uavia Mar W(jrka (Qr a gpecial llcenge to cut and emption, thence running south SO
n. carry away timber from the following chains; thence E. SO chains; thence
Alternates—John Hunt, Henry Miard. described lands, situated in Rupert Dis- north 80 chains; thence weat 80 chains
Appointed by the Lieut-Governor in trict, ^^SSSt^X^SSSA ^tWgll)., «1
)Uncil—John McCliment. then™ west SO chains: thence north 80 E. J. MArHEWb,
J. McNeill, Agent.
Council-
Elected by the Miners—W. H. Moore.
Alternates—Charles Webber, Abraham   south 80 chains
Brown Jan' E' M
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains;  thence  east  80  chains;   thence  Jan. 19
All persons interested may obtain full
A   MACDONALD. NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
xrUmfTi*,—-^—^iT^.i^.-^i - n,„4   4v,i.*« after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty the Chlef commissioner of Lands and
?ua»ys^lte!;^ten„L^ei,l^ .^SWJ! Works   for   special   license  to  cut   and
information by applying to the Secre-   the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands aw      timber from the following
*       -■ and Works for a special license to cut descrlbed  landa,  situate  on  the  north
and  carry away  timber from  the foi- snore o£ tne southeast Arm of Quatsino
lowing described lands, situated in Ru- So    d      Rupert     District,     Vancouver
na.t   Tilatriot    Vannniivoi'  Tolonrt" Tola     !•
tary of the Board, Mr. John McCliment,
of Fernie, B. C.
Note.—Alternates act as members of  pert District, Vancouver Island:
the Board in the absence of those regularly appointed or elected to act thereon.
Dated this 20th day of December, 190b.
RICHARD McBRIDE,
Dec.22 Minister of Mines.
6. Commencing  at   a  post   placed   at
the  south-east  corner   of   Section   22,
Claim 5. Commencing at a post marked   "E.   J.   Mathews,   southwest   corner
Township   27;   thence  north   80  chains    stake," planted 40 chains south of soutli
thence west 80 chains; thence south SO
chains;  thence east 80 chains.
Jan. 5. A. B. EATON.
east corner of Pre-emption 181); thence
running north 160 chains; thence east
40  chains;     tiience   south    160  chains;
NOTICE  Is  hereby given that,   sixty   thence west 40 chains to point of com
days after date. I intend to apply to the   mencement.
„•..„„.   __     .„   _,„„,_,.  _t,_     Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
LICENSE   TO   AN   EXTRA-PRO-   Works  for  permission   to  purchase  in
VINCIAL COMPANY.
" Companies Act, 1897."
Canada,
Province of British Columbia.
No. 370.
THIS is to certify that the "National Drug and Chemical Company
of Canada,   Limited,"   is   authorised
the Coast District the following described land, situated on the south side
of the Bulkley River: Commencing at a
Located on the 4th day of Jan., 1907.
E. J. MATHEWS,
Jan.19 J. McNeill, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
post located at the N. E. corner of Geo. after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
A. Potty's land, and marked "D. Petty, the  Chief Commissioner  of  Lands  and
initial  post";   thence  south   80  chains; Works   for  special   license  to   cut  and
thenco east 80 chains; thence north 80 carry away timber from the following
chains;  thence west 80 chains to point described   lands,   situate   on   the   north
of commencement; containing 640 acres, shore   of  the  southeast   Arm  of Quat-
Jan.  5.      •                             D.  PETTY. sino Sound, Rupert District, Vancouver
NOTICE is hereby given that application will be made to the Legislative as- ed
sembly of the Province of British Col-
and licensed to carry on business umbia at its next Session by the Securities Corporation of British Columbia,
Limited,   for an   Act   empowering   any   north 80 chains; thence west SO chains;
sino Sound, Rupert District, Vancouver
Island:
Claim 6. Commencing at a post mark-
E. J. Mathews, southwest corner
post," planted at the northwest corner
post of Paul Cramers' Pre-emption;
tiience  running east   80  chains;  thenct*
or any of the objects of the Company to which the Legislative authority of thc Legislature of Britisli
Columbia extends.
thence   south   80   chains,   to   point   of
commencement.
Located on the 1st day of Jan., 1907.
E. J. MATHEWS,
J. McNeill, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
within the  Province  of British  Columbia   and to carrv out or effect all   Court of Law or Equity to appoint the
umoui, auu 10 (.arry our ur encti an   Company   wlthout security,  to exercise
'   ''         ' the   office   of   executor,   or   trustee,   or
guardian of the estate of any minor, or
committee of the estate of any lunatic Jan. ill
or  liquidator  of any  company  or  corporation, or Official Administrator under
the   "Official   Administrators   Act,"   for ,          fl      , ,    .  .  ,     . .          .    ,    .,-
„„,,..         .   ,     ,,                .     any one or moro counties  in  the said days after date I intend to apply to the
The head office of the Company is  province, and conferring power on the Chief    Commissioner   of   Lands    and
situate  in the City of  Montreal,  in  »',■}"n0,fpa^'vt°ofac,,i1eePt.said1 office"'* a*nd Works for permission to cut and carry
the Province of Quebec                         giving  tho  company  the  right   to  be away  flimber   from the   following  de-
T.     „_,„,.„, „,.,„ „„„;f.,i  „t 4t,„  appointed tt sole trustee notwithstanding scribed land, situated at Kum-ea-lon In-
fhe  amount of  the  capital  of  the   that but for such Act it would be neces- ,„.    ci,«.„.   n;..-:,...     r™,™...™  ,,
        , ,,         ,.    s„rv to annoiiit more than one trustee •""*•  skeena District:    Commencing at
Company  is  six  million  dollars,  di-  ^/enabling the"safd cSSrts to1 direct a  stake   marked  "W.   R.   F.'s  Initial
vided  into sixty thousand  shares  of  that moneys brought or paicl Into Court post»   planted   near   shore   of   Inlet,
...,,.              .                           shall  he.deposited  with  the  Company, „,_„;.  ,f„,lU   ,„ „,,..,,.   „,.„,.„  .„.. ^
one hundred dollars each.
The head office of the Company in
westerly alon gshore  line to point of
commencement.
WALTER R. FLEWIN.
this Province is situate at Vancouver,
and   William   Henderson,   Druggist,
whose  address is Vancouver, is  the   any*Company? or of any auilmrity
attorney for the Company.
and    giving"   the    Company    power to  thence  north 40 chains, thence  east 60
guarantee, by means of policies of In-  chains, thence south 100 chains, thence
SyC%e0o\1r0etdhl7o^\a^b?eaTnTetr ol wes.   {* «&«"» 1°  sh°re  '.ine'   *«»
In    respect    of    debenture    bonds,    debenture   stock,     contracts,     mortgages,
charges,   obligations   and   securities   of
prome, municipal, local or otherwise, or
of   any persons   whomsoever,   whether
Given under my  hand and seal  of   corporate or unlncorporate.
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd day
December 8.
office, at Victoria, Province of Brit
ish Columbia, this third day of Jan
of December.  1906.
BARNARD & ROBERTSON,
Solicitors for the said Company,
uary, one thousand nine hundred and   Jan* 3*
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after dnte. I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away timber from the following described land, beginning at a post situate
at the mouth of Kilsonschultz River, on
seven.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTON,
RetrUtrir nf Toint Stock Companies })'"tkn   f<.r t^1,",1?10.',   t0, 'V"'c,,,ase ,'" tho north   hank  of the  Skeena  River,
Kcgistrar 01 joint  oiock   1,-Miip.iiiii-,. (],„   coast   District   the   following   de- _,' „,„  . ,,c   w   ,-.       \.;*if„j  t „:..h.i.
The   nhierts   fnr   which   thc   Com- scribed land, situated on the north side "\;'r*<c(1    S. W.  Cor.  Wilfred  Loiselle S
the  objects  lor  wnici   tne   wm of tho Bulkley River:   Commencing at Timber Claim:" thence north 40 chains;
pany   has   been   established   and   11- a post located about 60 chains east of thence cast ifio chains* thence south 40
censed are; $$£ f. fffi, ft-ftf ^ Thence chains: thence west 160 chains to point
To manufacture,  import, purchase. ^SO^hafn* thenee west ^chains, "f^™T      (h
sell and deal    in    drugs,    chemicals, chains east to point of commencement; urn itduti t oicitt t it i..,i™
...            ,    ,   ,         .'           •,       .  .. containing 640 acres. _ wiui kpaj L1UIOJIL.L1D, i^ocaior.
medicines,  alcohol,  paints,  oils,  aye Jan   B                     GE0  Ai pETTy, December 8.
I HEREBY GIVE NOTICE THAT IN CONFORMITY WITH
THE ELECTIONS ACT, SECTIONS 193 AND 194, THAT THE CANDIDATES NOMINATED FOR VICTORIA CITY HAVE APPOINTED THE FOLLOWING GENTLEMEN AGENTS:
CANDIDATES— AGENTS.
H. F. W. BEHNSEN-Agent H. D. Helmcken, K.C, Bastion Street
W. G. CAMERON—Agent H. E. A. Courtney, 108 Cook Street
F. DAVEY—Agent W. C. Moresby, Yates and Government Streets
R. L. DRURY—Agent F. B. Gregory, Langley Street
DR. E. A. HALL—Agent ...A. MacEachern, 42 Henry Street
RICHARD  HALL—Agent F. B. Gregory, Bastion Street
A. JOHNSON—Agent Phil R. Smith, Yates and Government Streets
W. H. MARCON—Agent O. L. Charlton, Lansdowne Road.
R. McBRIDE—Agent George Jay, Bastion Street
J. D. McNIVEN—Agent Frank Higgins, Bastion Street
H. B. THOMSON—Agent G. H. Barnard, Bastion Street
J. C. WATTERS-Agent John Arnason, Rock Bay Hotel
WM. HY. PRICE,
Victoria, Jan. 19, 1907. Returning Officer.
I
(t
^
VICTORIA
WILL
FALL IN
LINE WITH
THE REST
OF B. e.
AND
RETURN THE
BIG 4
RICHARD McBRIDE
HENRY B. THOMSON
HENRY F. W. BEHNSEN
FREDERICK DAVEY THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 26 1907.
13
•» HIS GLOOMY PAST.
(Continued from Page 1.)
feels that it is no longer out of the
world; that the long years of neglect
are passed; that it is at last coming
into its own. Under the McBride
Administration the long-looked-for
era of railway construction has at
last commenced — railway construction, too, which has not cost the
Province an acre of land or a cent of
money for bonus. And, business being good and themselves prosperous,
they listen with unbelief to Smith
Curtis wild denunciations ot fhe Con-
servatve Government, and put little
faith in his equally wild promises of
the high old time that is to come
when Laurier, Hays, Cox & Co. shall
reign in undisputed control over British Columbia's destinies. Moreover,
Smith Curts was not always thus.
And some people have stll got memories. Today he is championing the
cause of W. W. B. Mclnnes, the disinterested patriot who gave up $12,-
000 a year in the Yukon for the privilege of raising Merry Cain in British Columbia for a blissful, red-lined
three weeks, before his sun shall set
■forever. A man of such high ideals
charms Smith Curtis. But the people and the papers persist in annoying him with what is known as the
"deadly parallel"; that is, they insist on comparing his present worshipful attitude towards Mclnnes
with the remarks he made about that
gentleman in 1903, which were:
"Mclnnes is absolutely impossible,
if Liberalism is to emerge from the
cold shades of Opposition by putting*
honourable men at the helm of the
Liberal ship.''
And, for the life of him, poor
Smith Curtis can't—or daren't—explain why he is talking differently
just now.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum on the following lands, situated on Queen Charlotte Islands:
No. 1. Commencing at a post planted
on the east line of Lot 6, about six miles
east from Masset Inlet, Graham Island,
being the S. W. corner; thence N. SO
chains; E. SO chains; S. SO chains; W.
SO chains to place of commencement.
WM. SHANNON.
S. R. MacCLlNTON, Agent.
No. 2. Commencing at a post planted
on the east line of Lot 6, about six miles
E, from Masset Inlet, Graham Island,
being the N. W. corner; thence S. SO
chains; E. SO chains; N. SO chains; W.
SO chains to place of commencement.
E. J. SHANNON.
S. R. MacCLlNTON, Agent.
No. 3. Commencing at a post planted
on the N. E. corner of Wm. Shannon's
Location No. 1, about seven miles 10.
from Masset Inlet, Graham Island, being
the S. W. corner; thence N. SO chains;
E. SO chains; S. SO chains; W. SO chains
] to place of commencement.
GEO. MARTIN.
S. R. MacCLlNTON, Agent.
No. 4. Commencing at a post planted
on the N. E. corner of Win, Shannon's
Location No. 1, being the N. AV. corner;
thence S. SO chains; E. SO chains; N. SO
chains; W. SO chains to place of commencement.
I. M.  MARTIN.
S. R. MacCLlNTON, Agent.
No. 5. Commencing at a post planted
on the S. E. corner Of Geo. Martin's
Location No. 3, about eight miles E.
.from Masset Inlet, Graham Island, being the S. W. corner; thence N. SO
chains; 10. 80 chains; S. SO chains; AV. SO
'chains to plnce of commencement,
S. R, MacCLlNTON.
S, R. MacCLlNTON, Agent.
No. 6. Commencing at a post planted
on thc S. W. corner of S, R. MacClln-
ton's Location No. 5, about eight miles
E. from Masset Inlet, Graham Island,
being the N. W. corner; thence S. SO
chains; E. SO chains; N. SO ohains; AV.
SO chains to place of commencement.
F. MacCLlNTON.
S. R. MacCLlNTON, Agent.
No. 7.    Commencing at a post planted
Ion the S. E. corner of S. R. MaoCHn-
ton's Location No. 5, about nine miles
E. from Masset Inlet, Graham Island,
being the S. W. corner; thence N. SO
'bains; E. SO chains; S. SO chains; AV.
•!0 chains to place of commencement.
A. S. SUTHERLAND.
S. R. MacCLlNTON. Agent.
I No. S. Commencing at a post planted
in the S. E. corner of S, R. MacClin-
.oil's Location No. 5, about nine miles
0. from Masset Inlet, Graham Island,
lelng the N. W. corner; thence S. SO
:hains; E. SO chains; N. SO chains; W.
10 chains to place of commencement.
K. SUTHERLAND.
S. R. MacCLlNTON, Agent.
(No. 9. Commencing at a post planted
m the S. E. corner of A. F. Sutherland's
jocation No. 7, about 10 miles E. from
{asset Inlet, Graham Island, being thc
1. W. corner; thence N. SO chains; Ii SO
hains; S. 80 chains; AV. SO chains to
dace of commencement.
W. E. GREEN.
S. R. MacCLlNTON, Agent.
(No. 10. Commencing at a post planted
■n the S. E. corner of A. F. Sutherland's
Location No. 7, about 10 miles E. from
Masset Inlet, Graham Island, being the
N. W. corner; thence S. 80 chains; E.
80 chains; N. SO chains; W. 80 chains
to place of commencement.
M. GREEN.
S. R. MacCLlNTON, Agent.
No. 11. Commencing at a post planted
on the N. E. corner of W. E. Green's
Location No. 9, about 11 miles E. from
Masset Inlet, Graham Island, being the
S. W. corner; thence N. 80 chains; E.
SO chains; S. 80 chains; W. SO chains to
place of commencement.
CHARLES GRAHAM.
S. R. MacCLlNTON, Agent.
No. 12. Commencing at a post planted
on the N. E. corner of W E. Green's
Loctaion No. 9, about 11 miles E. from
Masset Inlet, Graham Island, being the
N. W. corner; thence S. SO chains; E.
SO chains; N. SO chains; W. 80 chains
to place of commencement.
M. POWELL.
Jan. 20.        S. R. MacCLlNTON, Agent.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for aspecial license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands:
1. Commencing at a post on the E.
side of Cascade Creek, Uchucklesit Harbour, and about 40 chains N. of the N.
boundary of Green's application for timber license; thence 40 chains S.; thence
40 E.; thence 160 N.; thence 40 W.;
thence S. to point of commencement.
E. D. LEVERSON.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Jan. 14, 1907.
2. Commencing at S. E. corner at a
post adjoining No. 1; thence 40 chains
W.; thence 40 N.; thence 40 W.; thence
60 N; thence 80 E.; thence 100 S. to
point of commencement.
E. D. LEVERSON.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Jan. 14, 1907.   ja26
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands:
1. Commencing at the lower N. E.
corner, at a post situate about 60 chains
S. E. from Ritherton Creek and about
2% miles from its outlet into San Mateo
Bav, Barclay District; thence 40 chains
N; thence 100 W.; thence SO S.; thence
60 E.; thence 40 N.; thence 40 E. to
point of commencement.
E. D. LEVERSON.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Jan. 11, 1907.
2. Commencing at S. AV. corner post
adjoining N. E. post 1; thence 40 chains
N.; thence 160 chains E.; thence 40 S.;
thence 160 W. to point of commencement.
E. D. LEVERSON.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Barclay District, Jan. 11, 1907.
3. Commencing at N. E. corner post
adjoining N. E. No. 1; thence 40 chains
AV.; thence 160 S.; thence 40 E.; thence
160 N. to point of commencement.
E. D. LEVERSON.
AV. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Barclay District, Jan. 11, 1907.
4. Commencing at the N. W. corner
post adjoining N. E. No. 1; thence 160
chains S.; thence 40. E,; thence 160 N.;
thence 40 W. to point of commencement.
E. D. LEVERSON.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Barclay District, Jan. 11, 1907.
5. Commencing at the lower N. AV.
corner post situate on or about the E.
boundary of No. 1 and about 40 chains
S. of the N. E. corner of No. 4; thence
40 chains N.; thence SO E.; thence 120
S.; thence 40 AA'.; thence SO N.; thence
40 W. to point of commencement.
Barclay District, January, 1907.
E. D. LEVERSON.
AV. B. GARRARD, Agent.
6. Commencing at the N. AV.
corner post, adjoining tlie lower N. AV.
corner post of No. 5; thence 160 chains
S.; thence -10 E.; thence 160 N.; thence
40 AV. to point of commencement.
E. D. LEVERSON.
Jan.26. AA'. B. GARRARD. Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum on the following lands, situate on Queen Charlotte Islands, B. C.:
No. 13. Commencing at a post planted
on the S. E. corner of C. Graham's Location No. 11, about 12 miles E. from
Masset Inlet, Graham Island, being the
S. AA'. corner; thence N. SO chains; E. SO
chains; S. SO chains; AA'. SO chains to
point of commencement.
A. YOUNG.
No. 14. Commencing at a post planted
on the S. E. corner of C. Graham's Location No. 11, about 12 miles E. from
Masset Inlet. Graham Island, being the
N. W. corner: thence N. SO chains; E.
SO Chains; S. SO chains; AA'. SO chains to
place of commencement.
J. GRAHAM.
No. 15. Commencing at a post planted
on the S. E. corner of Al. Young's Location No. 13. about 13 miles from
Masset Inlet. Graham Island, being the
S. AA'. corner; thence N. SO chains; E,
SO chains; S. SO cluiins; W. SO chains to
place of commencement.
J. YOUNG.
A. YOUNG, Agent.
No. 16. Commencing at a post planted
on the S. E. corner of Al. Young's Location No. 13, about 13 miles from
.Masset inlet, Graham Island, being tho
N. AV. corner; tiience S. SO chains, 10.
SO chains; N. SO chains; AA'. SO chains
to place of commencement;
W. RADLEY,
No. 17. Commencing at a post planted
ou the N. E. corner of J. Young's Location No. 15, about 14 miles from
Masset Inlet, Graham Island, being the
S. W. corner; thence N. SO chains; E.
so chains; S. SO chains: AV. SO chains to
place of commencement.
G. YOUNG.
AL. YOUNG, Agent.
No. IS. Commencing at a post planted
ou tlie N. E. corner of J, Young's Location No. 16, about 14 miles E. from
Masset Inlet, Graham Island, being the
N. AV. corner; thence S. SO chains; E.
SO chains; N. SO chains; AV. SO chains
to place of commencement.
N, YOUNG.
AL. YOUNG, Agent.
No. 19. Commencing at a post planted
on the N. E. corner of N. Young's Location No. 16, on the III Ellen River,
about three miles from the mouth, Mas-
set Inlet, Graham Island; thence N. SO
chains; E. 80 chains; S. SO chains; AV.
SO chains to place of commencement.
B. GRAHAM.
A. YOUNG. Agent.
No. 20. Commencing at a post planted
on the N. E. corner of N, Young's Location No. Ill, on the 111 Ellon River,
about three miles from the mouth, Mas-
set Inlet. Graham Island; thence S. SO
chains: E. SO chains; N. SO chains; W.
80 chains to place of commencement.
D. GRAHAM.
Jan.26. A. YOUNG, Agent.
NOTICE ls hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase Section 33, Township 8, Range 5, Coast
District, Bulkley Valley.
S. S. ROGERS, Loeator.
Vancouver, B. C, Jan. 7, 1907.
Jan. 12.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase Section 2, Township 1, Range 5, Coast
District, Bulkley Valley.
G. A. ROGERS, Loeator.
Vancouver, B. C, Jan. 7, 1907.
Jan. 12.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special licence to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands:
(1) Starting from a post on the S.
boundary ofSee. 70 on the S. shore of
Great Central Lake; thence 40 chains S.;
thence 230 chains E.; thence N. to lake
shore; thence following the shore line
W. to E. boundary of Sec. 70; thence
following the boundary S. and W. to
point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 3, 1906.
(2) Starting at a post on the S. shore
of Great Central Lake, about 2 miles
W. of Thunder Mountain; thence S.
to the N. boundary of See. 70; thenoe
W., following the N. boundary line of
Sec. 70, 100 chains; thence N. to lake
shore; thence to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 4, 1906.
(3) Commencing at a post about 1%
miles from Great Central Lake, on the
S. shore of river, entering at the head
of lake on the W. side; thence 80
chains W.; thence 80 ohains S.; thence
80 E.; thenee to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec, 6, 1906.
(4) Commencing on the S. shore of
river entering at head of Central Lake
on the W. at a post by N. E. corner of
No. (3); thenee 100 chains E.; thence
40 N.; thence 160 W.; thence 40 S.;
thence to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 5, 1906.
(6) Commencing  at  post  on  the  E.
shore of Central Lake, about 1V4 miles
from   the   head;   thence   40   chains   N.;
thence 40 E.;  thence 80 N.;  thence W.
to E. boundary of Sec. 73: thenee S. to
lake shore; thence following the shore
line to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 6, 1906.
(6) Commencing at a post about 1%
miles from the head of Central Lake,
E. shore, by the initial post of No. (5);
thence 60 chains E.; thence 40 chains
N.; thence 40 E.; thence S. to phore
line; thence following shore line to
point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 6, 1906.
(7) Commencing at a post on the W.
boundary of Sec. 73, on Central Lake,
Clayoquot District; thence 80 chains
W.; thence 80 N.; thenoe 80 E. to point
of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
December 6, 1906.
(8) Commencing at a post by the S.
E. corner of No. (7) on Central Lake,
Clayoquot District; thenee SO chains
W.; thence SO S.; thence E. to lake
shore; thence following shore line to
W. boundary of Sec. 73; thenee N. to
point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
December 6, 1906.
(9) Commencing at a post on tho E.
shore of the river entering the head of
Central Lake, Clayoquot District, about
5 miles from the head of the lake;
thence 40 chains W.; thence SO S.;
thence SO E.; thence SO N.; thence W.
to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
December 6, 1906.
(10) Commencing at a post on the N.
side of the E. Fork of the river entering
the head of Central Lake from the N„
about 1% miles from the main river;
thence SO chains N; thenco SO AA'.;
thonce 80 S.; thence E. to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
AV. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 7, 1906.
(11) Commencing at a post by S. E.
corner of No. (10), on the E. fork of
the river entering the head of Central
Lake; thence SO chains S.; thence SOW.;
thenee SO N.; thence E. to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 7, 1906.
(12) Commencing at a post by S. E.
corner of No. (10) on tho E. fork of
the river entering the head of Central
Lake; thence 60 chains E.; thence -10 N.;
thence 40 E.J thonce 40 N.; thence 100
W.; thenco S. to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Doc. 7, 1906.
(13) Commencing at a post by tlie
S. E. corner of No. (10), on tlie E. fork
of tho rivor entering the head of Central Lake; thence 60 chains E.; thence
40 S.i thenco -10 E.; thence -10 S.; thence
100 W.; thenco N. to point of commencement.
C.  T. DUNBAR.
AAr. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 7, 1900.
(14) Situated on the E. fork of the
river entering the head of Central Lake,
commencing at a post about 60 chains
easterly of S. E. corner of No. (10);
thence 100 chains E.; thence 80 N.,
thence 60 W.; thence 40 S.; thence 40
W.; thence S. to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
AV. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 7, muo.
(15) Commencing at a post by n'e
S. W. corner of No. (14), on the 13.
fork of the river entering the head of
Central Lake; thence 100 chains E.:
thence 80 S.; thenco 60 AV; thence HI
N.; thence 40 W.; thence N. to point of
commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
AA'. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 7, 1906.
(16) Commencing at a post near the
N. boundary of No. (7), on the river
entering tile head of Central Lake, about
2 miles from the lake; thence 10 chains
N.; thence 140 E.; thence 60 S.; thence
W. to E. boundary of Scc. 73; thence
N. and W., following boundary of 73;
thence W. to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 7, 1906.
(17) Commencing at a post on the S.
shore of Central Lake, about 3 miles
from the head; thenee 100 chains W.;
thence 80 N.; thence E. to shore line;
thence S. following the shore line to
point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 9, 1906,
(IS) Commencing at a post on the S.
shore of Great Central Lake, and lying
S. of Lot 83, about 1% miles E. of S. E.
corner of No.   (17);   thence  100  chains
S.; thence 80 W.; thence 60 N.; thence
40 E.; thence N. to shore line; thence
following shore line to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 9, 1906.
(19) Commencing at a post by the N.
E. corner of No. (18) on Great Central
Lake S. shore, and lying S. of Lot 83,
Clayoquot District; thence 100 chains
S.; thence 40 E.; thence 40 N.; thence
40 E.; thence N. to shore line; thence
following the shore to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 9, 1906.
(20) Commencing about 1 mile W. of
Lot 82, Clayoquot District, at a post on
the S. shore of Great Central Lake,
about 2% miles E. of N. W. corner post
of No. (19); thence 40 chains S.; thence
120 chains W.; thence N. to shore line;
thence following shore line to point of
commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 9, 1906.    Jan.12
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, situated near
Camelia Inlet about 18 miles from the
mouth of thu Skeena River, commencing at a post marked G. B. Wadham's N.
W. corner adjoining C. Takada's purchase claim; thence running east -,0
chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing
160 acres, more or less.
Dated 2nd November.  1906.
GORDON B. WADHAMS. Locator.
Jan. 5.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, situated on the
south bank of Camelia Inlet, about 18
miles from the mouth of the Skeena
River, commencing at a post marked
C. Takada's N. W. corner; thence running east 80 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence west 80 chains to shore;
thence north along shore to point of
commencement, containing 320 acres,
more or less.
Dated 2nd November, 1900.
C. TAKADA. Locator.
Jan. 5.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands, situated in Rupert District,  Vancouver  Island:
No. 1.—Commencing at a post placed
at the north-east corner of Section 28,
Township IS; thence west 80 chains;
thence south SO chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north SO chains.
Jan.  5. F. H. EATON,
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and AVorks for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands, situated in Rupert District, Vancouver Island: Commencing ut a post situated at the S.
W. corner of Sectiin 34, Township IS;
thence E. 80 chains; thence N. 80
chains; thence W. 80 chains; thence S.
80  chains. .
Jan. j> c. w. Mcdonald.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, 1 intend to apply to
the Hon Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a spocial license to
cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands, situated in
Rupert   District,   Vancouver   Island:
No. 2—Commencing at a post placed
at the N. AV. corner of Section 27,
Township IS; thence east SO chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence along
shore line SO ohains, more or less;
thence north SO chains to place of beginning.
Jan.   5 W.   F.  BEST.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date. I intend to apply to
tho Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands, situated in Rupert District. Vancouver Island:
No. 3.—Commencing at the N. E. corner of Section 29, Township IS; thence
west SO chains; thence south SO chains;
thence east SO chains; thence north SO
chains to place of beginning.
Jan. 5 L. S. EATON.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date. 1 intend to apply to the
Hon, Chief Commissioner of Lands ami
Works for a spocial license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
desoribed lands, situated in ltupert District,  Vancouver  Is'ind:
No. 4.—Commencing at the N. E.
corner of Section 19. Township lg;
thonce soutli to shoru lino; thenee toi-
lowlng the coast line 80 chains; tiience
nortli -10 chains to place of beginning.
Jan.   5 „ R. AV.  EATON.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands, situated in Rupert District. Vancouver Island:
6. Commencing at a post placed at
the north-east corner of Section 15,
Township 27; thence S. SO chains;
thence W. SO chains; thence N. SO
chains; thence E. SO chains.
Jan. 6. E. A. HALL.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend io apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
timber on tho following described lands,
situated in Rupert District, Vancouver
Island:
7. Commencing at a post situated at
the north-west corner of Section 14.
Township 27; thence east 80 chains;
thonce soutli SO chains; tiience west SO
chains;   thenco  nortli   SO  chains.
Jan. 5. AV. G. DICKINSON.
'-NOTl"CE~ls~hereby"giveif that."thirty
days after date. 1 intend to apply to
tlie Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and AVorks for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands, situated in Ru-
port  District.  Vancouvor  Island:
8. Commencing at a post at the north-
wost corner of Section 13, Township
27; thence north 40 chains; thenco east
SO chains; thence south 80 chains;
thenco west 80 chains; thence north 40
chains to point of commencement.
Jan.  6. R.  McNAUGHTON.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special licence to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands, situated on Hecate Channel, adjacent to Zebalos Arm, Nootka
Sound:
(a) Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's northwest post"; thenee
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chains;
south 40 chains; thence 110 chains to
shore line; thence northwest to point of
commencement; containing 640 acres,
more or less.
(b) Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's northeast post"; thenee 80
chains west; SO chains south; 80 chains
east, and SO chains to place of commencement; containing 640 acres, more
or less.
(y) Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's northeast post"; thence
40 chains south; 40 chains west; 40
chains south; 80 chains west; 40 chains
north; 40 chains east; 40 chains north,
and 80 chains east to place of commencement; containing 640 acres, more
or less.
(x) Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's southeast post"; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east to shore; thence south along
shore line to place of commencement;
containing 640 acres, more or less.
(z) Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's northeast post"; thence
80 chains south; thence 80 chains west;
thence 40 chains north; thence 40 chains
east; thence 40 chains nortli; thence 40
chains east to place of commencement;
containing 640 acres, more or less.
(r) Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's northeast post"; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of commencement.
J. A. FERGUSON, Locator.
November 27, 1906. Jan.19
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for special licence to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands, situated In Nootka Sound,
AVest Coast District of Vancouver
Island:
1. Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's southwest corner post,"
situated at the head of Zebalos Arm or
Inlet, and 1% miles from the mouth of
the river, east bank; thence east 40
chains; thence 160 chains north; thence
west 40 chains; thence south 160 chains
to place of commencement; containing
640 acres, more or less.
2. Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's southeast corner post,"
and adjoining No. 1 Section west; thenee
west 80 chains; thence north SO chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains to place of commencement; containing 640 aeres, more or less.
3. Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's southeast corner post,"
and adjoining No. 4 on west; thence 40
chains west; thence 40 chains north;
thence 10 chains west; thence 40 chains
north; thence 80 chains east; thence SO
chains south to place of commencement; containing 640 acres, more or
less.
4. Commenslng at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's southwest post," and adjoining No. 3 on east; thence SO chains
north; thenco SO chains east; thence 80
chains south; thence SO chains west to
place of commencement; containing 040
acres, more or less.
5. Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's southeast corner post,"
near the northwest corner of No. 4;
thence SO chains Avest; thence SO chains
north; thence SO chains cast, and 80
chains south to place of commencement,
containing 640 acres, more or less.
6. Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's southeast post," and adjoining No. 5 on southeast; thence
east SO chains; thence north SO chains;
thonce west SO chains; and SO chains
south, to place of commencement, containing 610  acres,  more or  less.
7. Commencing at a post inarked "J.
A. Ferguson's southwest post," and adjoining No. 6 on nortli; thence SO chains
east; thenco 40 chains north and 40
chains east, -10 chains north, SO chains
west, 40 chains south, -10 chains west,
and 40 chains soutli to place of commencement; containing 640 acres, more
or less.
J. A. FERGUSON, Locator.
December 1. 1906. Jan.19
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away timber from the following described land, situate on Hastings Arm
of Observatory Inlet: Commencing at
a post planted on east shore of Hastings Arm, inarked "E. D.'s S. W. Corner," thence east 40 chains, thence north
160 chains, thence Avest 40 chains to
shore line, thence southerly along shore
line to point of commencement.
E. DONEHUE.
December 8.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon,
chid' Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license Io cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands:
Commencing at a post on the 10. side
nf Cascade ('reck. Uchucklesit Harbour,
and about 40 chains N. of the N. boundary ui' Green's application for timber
license; tiience 10 chains S.; thenco 100
AV.; thence SO N.; thenee 60 E.; thence
40 s.; tiience -10 10. to point of commencement,
J. J. RE10IILING.
XV.  I'.. GARRARD. Agent.
Clayoquot District, Jan. 14, 1907'.   ja26
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I Intend to apply tn tho lion.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands, situated iu Clayoquot District. B. I'.:
No. 1. Commencing at 11 post at the
northeast corner, situated about two and
one-half (2%) miles from head of Anderson Lake, on southwest side; tiience
west one hundred and sixty (160 chnins.;
thence soutli forty (40) chains; thenee
east une hundred and sixty (160) chains;
thence north forty (40) chains to point
ol' commencement.
Located December 30, 1906.
A. F. GAVIN.
Jan.26.
THOMAS ROAVLEY, Agent. H
THE WEEK   SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1907.
31. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 34,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to a point of commencement; 640 acres.
J. J. TEETZEL,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
32. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 18,
Township 12, Range 6, Poudrier Survey;
tiience south 40 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being the north half of Section, 8, Township 12, Range 5, of said
survey.
BENJAMIN WERDEN,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 20th, 1906.
28. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 17,
Township 10, Range S, Poudrier Survey;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 17 of said
survey.
BERTHA FISHLEIGH,
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitssumkalum Valley commencing at a
post planted at the N. E. corner of L.
June's purchase claim marked C. W.
Peck. S. E. corner, thence running 40
chains west, thence 40 chains north,
thence 40 chains east, thence 40 chains
south to post of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
Located 26th October,  1906.
C. W. PECK. Locator.
F. W. BOHLER, Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following
land situated on the south bank of the
Skeena River adjoining H. A. Draper's
preemption claim, south boundar/ line,
at a post marked M. V. Wadham's N.
W. corner post, thence east 40 chains,
thence south 40 chains, thence west to
bank of river, following the river bank
north to post of commencement. •">"-
taining one hundred and s
more or less.
Located 26th October. 1900.
M. V. WADHAMS, Locator.
H. DRAPER. Agent.
Dec. 22.
office at Victoria. Province of British
Columbia, this 20th day of December,
one  thousand  nine  hundred  and  six.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
To buy. manufacture and sell logs,
timber, lumber and all kinds of forest
products and for that purpose to improve streams, obtain franchises thereon for the floating of logs, lumber and
other forest products, and owning and
maintaining logging railroads, sawmills, machine shops, docks, wharves,
tugs, boats, vessels and other plants
necessary and convenient for the purpose of carrying on the logging and
timber operations of said corporation;
to lwn, buy, sell, mortgage or lease
timber lands, mining lands, farm lands,
buildings and real estate in general;
to mine, smelt, quarry and prospect for
minerals and mineral products and to
purchase, produce, manufacture, sell
and distribute the same; to purchase
and sell and deal generally at wholesale or retail in all goods, wares and
merchandise and lumbermen's and
miners' supplies, tools, implements and
other outfits and equipments; to gen
orally do, carry on and coi
and all matters and things connected
with or Incidental and appurtenant to
the foregoing business and purposes,
or any part thereof.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I Intend to apply to
the Honourable the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for permission to
purchase the following described lands,
situate on the north shore of Stuart
Lake about 2% miles inland and about
half way between Pinchi and Tacher
Rivers, in the Coast District of the
Province of British Columbia, viz.:
Commencing at a post marked " R. S.
C," placed at the north-east corner of
lot 331; thence astronomically north
40 chains; thence astronomically east
80 chains; thence astronomically south
80 chains; thence astronomically west
SO chains, and thence astronomically
north 40 chains to the point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
ROBERT SENIOR,
J. A. Hickey, Agent.
August   24,   1906.
December 8.
thence north 8o chains; thence west 8o
chains; thence south 8o chains; tnence
east 8o chains to point of commencement; and being said Section 8 of said
survey.
GEORGE CURRIE,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 6th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that, sixty
days (60) after date, I intend to apply to ihe Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works, Victoria, B.C., for
permission to purchase the south-west
carry on and conduct "any ! quarter of Section Twenty-three (23),
- 'Township   Eight   (8),   Range   Five   16.,
Coast District, Bulkley Valley, containing one hundred and sixty (160)
acres,  more or less.
H. E. WILDMAN.
1st December, 1906. Dec. 15.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, 1 Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special licence to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands, situated on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Group;
Commenging at a post planted In the
northeast corner, and marked "C. D. E.,
N. E. corner"; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to place
of commencement; containing 640 acres.
Dated  November  7th,  1906.
Dec.22 C. D. EMMONS.
conacres,
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply tu the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at tke N. E. corner of L.
L. Watson's purchase claim, marked D.
M. Moore, S. E. corner, thence running
40 chains west, thence 40 chains north,
thence 40 chains east, thence 40 chains
south to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less. Located
October  26th.  1906.
D. M. MOORE, Locator.
F. W. BOHLER, Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in
the Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing
at a post planted at the S. W. corner
of D. Menard's purchase claim marked
D. Curther's S. E. corner, thence running 40 chains west, thence 40 chains
north, thence 40 chains east, thence 40
chains south to post of commencement,
containing 160 acres moro or less.
Located 26th October, 1906.
J.  CURTHERS,  Locator.
D. MENARD. Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to me
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands,
No. 23. Beginning at a post planted
on the north boundary, about 20 chains
west of the northeast corner of application No. 7, on the oast bank of the
Kaowlnch River; thence east 20 chains:
north 100 chains; west 40 chains; soutli
160 chains; east 20 chains to point of
commencement; containing 640 acres,
more or less.
JOHN HIRSCH,
Kyuquot Sound, Sept. 29, 1906.
Jan. 5
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I Intend to apply to
the Honorable Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber, exclusive of hemlock, from the following
described  lands:
No. 16. Commencing at a post planted
at the west side of lake at the crossing of the south line of lease 33, thence
following the shore 0... mile south;
thenco SO chains west; thence SO chain*)
north; thenco SO cluiins, more or less,
to point of commencement, .
CHARLES WATKINS,
J. DORSEY. Agent.
Jan. 5
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date, 1 Intend to apply to tho
Honorable Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a speclnl license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands:
No. 34. Commencing at a post at ihe
of the north fork of the Managuam
northwest corner of claim no. 25, north
River, New Westminster district; thence
west 40 chains; north 160 chains, east
40 chains; south 160 chains to point of
commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
J. MeShane, Agent.
Jan. 6
No. 2S9.
CERTIFICATE    OF    TEE   REGISTRATION OF AIT EXTRA-PROVINCIAL
COMPANY.
" Companies Act, 1897."
I hereby certify that tho "Henry
Swart Lumber Company" has this day
been registered as an Extra-Provincial
Company under the "Companies Act,
1897." to carry out or effect all or any
of the objects of the Company to which
the legislative authority of the l.egls.
lature of British Columbia extends.
The hend ofllce of the Company Is
situate in the City of Marinette. County
of Marinette and Stnte of Wisconsin.
Tho amount of the capital of the
Company is one hundred thousand dollars, divided Into one thousand shares
of one hundred dollars each.
Tho head office of the Company in
this Province ls situate at 34 1-2 Government Street. Victoria, and James
Hill Lawson, Junior, barrlster-at-law,
Whose address is the same. Is the attorney for thc Company. Not empowered to issue and transfer stock.
Given   under   my   hand   and   seal   of
NOTICE is hereby given that, sixty
days; nfter date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land on Porcher
Island, about five miles east of Refuge
Bay, commencing at a post marked Mrs.
Mary Odgers, northwest corner; thence
running south 40 chains; thence east 40
chain;,; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 40 chains to McKay's southwest
corner and point of commencement, containing one hundred and sixty acres.
MRS. MARY ODGERS, Locater.
R. BRAUN, Agent.
Located Nov. 9, 1906. Dec.22
4. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 36,
Township i, Range 4, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 36
of said survey.
E. A. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 5th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to 1., ply to *he
Chief Commissioner of Lands, and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated In the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the N. W. corner of D.
Menard's purchase claim, marked W.
Bruce, S. E. corner, thence running 40
chains nortli, thence 40 chains east,
thence 40 chains south to post of commencement, containing 160 acres more
or less.
Located 26th October, 190li.
W. BRUCE, Locator.
D. MENARD, Agent.
Dec. 22.	
NOTICE is hereby -riven that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, commencing
at a post planted on the right bank of
the Skeona River about 20 chains bo-
low the Yamoqotitiy and at the N. E.
corner of Indian Reserve and marked
L. S. H„ S. E. corner post, thence west
40 chains, thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40 chains
to place of commencement, containing
160 acres more or less.
L   Located  Oct.  1st,  1900.
L. S. HUTCHESON, Locator.
J. E. BATEMAN, Agent.   '
Dec. 22.
6. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 4,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 4 of
said survey.
EMMA HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 5th, 1006.
12. Commencing at a post planted at
tne north-east corner of Section 5,
Township 10, Range S> Pondrier Survey; thence south 80 chains: thence
west 80 chains; thence rorth 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement and being said Section 5
of said survey.
MARY E. LINEHAM,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 6th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for permission to
purchase the following described lands,
situate on the north shore of Stuart
Lake, about half wy between Pinchi
and Tacher Rivers and about 2lA miles
inlands in the Coast District of the
Province of British Columbia, viz.:
Commencing at a post marked "W. J.
F. S. E," and placed at the northeast
corner of lot 331; thence astronomically
west 80 chains; thence astronomically
north 80 chains; thence astronomically
east 80 chains; thence astronomically
south 80 chains to the point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
WALTER J. FRIEDLANDER.
J. A. Hickey, Agent
August 24, 1906.
December 8.
17. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section if,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 choins; thence sonth 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section if
of said survey.
ANDREW F. WEIR,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
18. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Section 15,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence 1 iuth 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 15
of said survey.
CLARA WEIR,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 8th ,1906.
PRIVATE BILLS NOTICE.
The time limited by the Rules of
the House for receiving petitions for
Private Bills will expire on Saturday,
the 16th day of March, 1907.
Bills must be presented to the
House not later than the 28th day of
March, 1907.
Reports from Committees on Private Bills will not be received after
the 4th day of April, 1907.
Dated this 2nd day of January, 1907.
THORNTON FELL,
Clerk of the Legislative Assembly.
7. Commencing at a ;ost planted at
the north-west corner of Section 34,
Township I, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 34 of said
survey.
ISABEL HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 5th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the S. E. corner marked
L. L. Watson, thence running 40 chain!'
west to N. E. corner of E. A. Wadham's purchase claim, thence north
40 chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
south 40 chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
L. L. WATSON, Locator.
)•'. \V, BOHLER, Agent.
Doc. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the N. AV. corner of W.
Bruco's purchase claim, marked E. A.
Wadham's S. E. corner, thence running
•10 chains west, thence 40 chains north,
thence 10 chains east, thence 40 chains
south to post of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
Located 20th Oct.. 1000.
E.  A. WADHAMS, Locator.
F.  W.  BOHLER, Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days from dale we Intend to apply to
tho Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for permission to purchase
the following described lands in the
Nechaco  Valley,  Coast District:
1. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-oast corner of Section 25,
Township 1. Range I, Poudrier Survey:
thence south SO chains; thence west SO
chains; thence north SO chains; thence
east 80 chains, to point nf commencement, and being said section 25 of said
survey,
W. II. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 5th, 1906.
2. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 26,
Township 1, Range 4 P.oudrier Survey;
thence east 80 chains, thence soutli SO
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north SO chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 26 of said
survey.
EDWARD E. HARVEY,
A.  T.  Clark,  Agent.
August 5th, 1906.
TAKE NOTTCE that, sixty days from
date, I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following
described land, commencing at a post
planted on the bank nf the Skeena River
two and a half miles below Kltwangat,
at the N. W. corner of A. E. Price's
purchase claim: thence R. 22 chains,
more or less, to the S. W. corner of
A, E. Price's purchase clnim; thence
W. 40 chains to the S. E. corner of
Elizabeth Price's purchase claim;
thence N. 31 chains, more or loss, to
the Skeena River, containing 100 acres
more or less.
F. PRICE.
A, W. Harvey,  Agent.
Dec.   15.
8. Commencing at a post planted at
tne north-east corner of Section 33,
Townshpi 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey:
thtnee south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 33 of said
survey.
MAGGIE B. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 5th, 1006.
20. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 36, Tp.
12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains,
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement; 64O
acres.
C. A. PORTER.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 16th, 1906.
30. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 36,
Township 12, Range S. Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to place of commencement; 640 acres.
G M. BTRKETT.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 16th, 1906.
3. Commencing at apos t planted at
the north-east corner of Section 35.
Township 1, Ranp-e 4, Poudrier Survey:
thence south 80 chains: thence west 80
chains, thence north 80 chains; thence
east Ro rhniVs tn nnjnt nf commencement, and being said Section 35 of said
survey.
C. W. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 5th, 1906.
19. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 6,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains, thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 6 of
said survey.
MINNIE BOWDEN,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 8th, 1906.
20. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section I,
iownship 11, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 1
of said survey.
E. H. BOWDEN,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
21. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Section 7,
Township 10, Range Si Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 7 of
said survey.
THOMAS SHOPLAND,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 8th, 1906.
22. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 12,
Township 11, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
tnence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 13
of said survey.
MABEL BOWDEN,
A. T. Clark, Agent,
August 8th, 1906.
0. Commencing at a post planted at
thc south-east corner of Section 9,
Township to. Ranee 5. Poudrier Sur-
vev thence north 80 chain's: thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains:
thence east 80 chains tn place of commencement, and being Section 0 of said
survey.
D. M. LINEHAM,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August fith, 1906.
10. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Section 10,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey: thfnce north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being slid Section 10
of said survey.
LILLIAN HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent
.vttgut 6th, 1006.
11. Commencing at a pot planted at
the outh-eat corner of Section 8, Town-
10,   Range 5, Poudrier Survey;
23. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section II,
Township n, Range 5, Poudrier Survey ; thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of com*
mencement, and being said Section 11
of said survey.
WM. STANLEY BATT,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August ioth, 1906.
Notice is hereby given that there
will be offered for sale at public auc
tion at the Lands and Works Depart
ment. Victoria, on Tuesday, thc 22nd
day of January, 1907, at eleven o'clock
in the forenoon, all that piece or parcel of land situated in thc City of
Victoria, Victoria District, containing fifty-six one-hundredths of an
acre, more or less, and forming part
of section numbered sixty-eight (68)
on the official map of the said Victoria District—said parcel being more
particularly described on a plan thereof filed in the Lands and Works Department.
Thc said land will be offered for
sale subject to a right of way over
thc western portion thereof, as shown
on the said plan, and subject also to
a reserve bid.   Terms of sale, cash.
Dated at the Lands and Works De
partment, Victoria, B. C, this ninth
day of January, 1007.
NETL  F.  MacKAY.
Deputy Commissioner of L. & W.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for permission to
purchase the following described lands,
situate on the north shore of Stuart
Lake, about half way between Pinchi
and Tacher Rivers and about 3A miles
inland in the Coast Distritc of the
Province of British Columbia, viz.:
Commencing at a post marked "E. F.
S. W.," placed near the north boundary
of Walter J. Friedlander's purchase,
about 40 chains from the northeast corner; thence astronomically north 80
chains] thence astronomically east 80
chains; thence astronomically south 80
chains, and thence astronomically west
80 chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or less.
EDGAR FRIEDLANDER.
J. A. Hickey, Agent.
August 24, 1906.
December 8.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special licence to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands:
No. 2. Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner of Timber Licence No. 8661, at the north end of
Sechelt Peninsula, New Westminster
District; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to the shore; thence following the shore to the point of commencement.
No. 3. Commencing at a post planted
near the shore on the east side of
Agamennon Channel, New Westminster
District, thence E. about 60 chains;
thence N. to the S. boundary of No. 2
claim, at the N. end of Sechelt Peninsula; thence E. about 60 chains to shore
of Long Lake; thence following the
shore southerly about 100 chains; thence
W. to shore; thence following the shore j
to point of commencement.
No. 5.   Commencing at a post at N.W. j
corner of Lot 672, N. end of Sechelt j
Peninsula, New  Westminster  District;
thence N. 40 chains; W. 80 chains to thel
shore; thence  S.  following    the   cast;
boundary of T. L. 8661 to S.E. corner!)
thereof;  thence  E.  40 chains to  S.W.
corner of Lot 672; thence N. 40 chains
to lake; thence following the lake shore
easterly and northerly to point of commencement,
M, GREEN.
JOHN WEST, Agent.
44. Commencing at a post planted at j
the south-east corner of Section it], <
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey; I
thence north 80 chains; thence west 8t)T
chains; thence south 80 chanis; thence
east 80 chains to point of commence-1
ment, and being said Section 27 of said |
survey.
J. S. McEACHERN,
A. T. Clark, Agent
September 17th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissi. ■' Lands ane
Works for a special license to cut ane*
carry away timber from the followinj
described lands in Alberni District: a
Commencing at a post situate 80 chaiai
west and 20 south ofsoutheast bounds!*}
post of Lot 658; thence 80 chains weat
thence 80 north; thence 80 east; thenct |
80 south, to point of commencement
J. T. BUCKLEY,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent
Oct. ioth, 1906.
	 THE WEEK, SATURDAY JANUARY 26, 1907.
15
NOKCE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to make application
to the Honourable Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special licence to cut and carry away timber
from the following described lands, situated on Esperanza Inlet, lying east of
the Ehatezat Indian village: Commencing at a post marked "J. A. Ferguson's
southwest post"; thence 40 chains east;
thence 40 chains north; thence 40 chains
east; thence 40 chains north; thence 80
chains west; thence 80 chains south to
place of commencement; containing 640
acres, more or less.
The above is exclusive of the Indian
J. A. FERGUSON, Locator.
November 25, 1906. Jan.li)
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special licence to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands, situated "on south side of
Tahsis Narrows, Nootka Sound: Commencing at a post marked "J. A. Ferguson's northeast corner"; thence south
40 chains; thence west 120 chains; thence
north 40 chains to shore Une; thence
east alongside shore to place of commencement.
J. A. FERGUSON, Locator.
December 15, 1906. Jan.19
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands situated on the west side
of the Homltah Lake, Nit-i-nat District:
No, 1. Commencing at a post marked
"Edward E. Hardwlck's northeast corner," adjoining the Indian Reserve and
one chain west from the bank of the
Homltah River; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north SO chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres.
No. 2. Commencing at a post situated
on the north bank of the Homltah Lake
marked "Edward E. Hardwlck's southeast corner"; thence north 40 chains;
thence west 160 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east 160 chains along
shore of lake to point of commencement,
containing 640 acres.
No. 3. Commencing at the southeast
corner of No. 2 and thence 40 chains
north; thence 160 chains west; thence 40
chains south; thence 160 chains east
along shore of lake to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated at Clo-oose this 15th day of
December, 1906.
Jan.19
EDWARD E. HARDWICK.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase Section 6,
Township 9, Range 5, Coast District,
Buckley Valley.
Jan. 19 T. D. SHORTS.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following
■described lands in Bulkley Valley, viz.:
South half of Section flve (5), Township
six (6), containing 320 acres.
Jan. 19 SYDNEY COOPER.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following described land, situated in Skeena
District: Commencing at a post on left
bank of Skeena River about 4 miles
from Port Essington, marked "J. C.'s
N. W. Cor."; thence S. 20 chains; thence
JS. 20 chains; thence N. 20 chains to
bank of Skeena River; thence westerly
along the bank to point of commencement, containing 40 aeres, more or less.
JOHN CUNNINGHAM.
Port Esslngton, B. C, Dec. 10, 1906.
Jan. 19.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to cut and carry away
timber from the following land: Commencing at a post on W. shore of Lar-
•com Islnad, Observatory Inlet, adjoining G. W. Morrow's timber claim, marked "E. D.'s N. W. Corner"; thence E.
100 chains, more or less, to E. shore of
Larcom Island; thenco southerly, westerly and northerly along shore line of
said Island to point of commencement,
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Jan.19 E. DONEHUE.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands situated in Rupert District:
1. Commencing at a stake planted at
the S. W. corner of J. A. Coates' claim
marked "W. Bulman's N. W. Corner";
thonce S. 80 chains; thence E. 80 chains;
thence N. SO chains; thence W. SO chains
to point of commencement, containing
■640 acros.    Located 1st January, 1907.
2. Commencing at a stake planted
about one-half milo in a southerly direction from Duval Point, on the west
shore of Hardy Bay and marked "VV.
Bulman's N. E. Corner"; thence running
W. 40 chains; thence S. 160 chains;
thence E. 40 chains; thence N. 160 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres.   Located 7th January, 11*07.
W. BULMAN, Loeator.
Jan.19 Per J. A. Coates.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commlsslone rot Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands, situated In Rupert District:
Commencing at a post planted about
one and one-half miles from the mouth
of tho Tsulquate Kiver and about 400
yards from the north bank of said river
marked "J. A. Coates' N. E. Corner";
thence W. 80 chains; thence S. 80
chains; thence E. 80 chians; thence N.
SO chains to point of commencement,
containing 640 acres. Located 29th De-
cebmer, 1906.
J. A. COATF3S, Locator.
Jan. 19 Per B. Blenkinsop.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special licence to cut and carry away timber
from the following described lands:
1. Commencing at a post on the
east side of the North Fork of Coeur
d'Alene River, about 7 miles from its
outlet  into  Effingham   Inlet,   Clayo
quot District; thence 80 chains north;
80 chains west; 80 chains south; 80
chains east to point of commencement.
2. Commencing at a post by the
southeast corner of No. 1; thence 160
chains north; thence 40 chains east;
thence 160 chains south; thence 40
chains west to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
d'Alene River, about 100 chains S. of
No. 2; thence 100 chains N.; thence
80 W., along boundary No. 2; thence
60  S.;  thence 40  E.;  thence 40 S.;
thence E. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
4. Commencing at a post on Coeur
d'Alene River, near and south of the
S. E. corner of No. 3; thence 100
chains N.; thence 40 W., to E. boundary of No. 3; thence 40 S., to S.E.
corner of No. 3; thence 40 W.; thence
60 S.; thence 80 E. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
5. Commencing at a post by the S.
E. corner of No. 4; thence 80 chains
N.; thence 80 E.; thence 80 S.; thence
W. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, iqo6.
6. Commencing at a post by the S.
VV. corner of No. 5; thence 40 chains
VV.; thence 80 S.; thence 80 E., along
N. boundary of Coeur d'Alene Mineral Claims; thence 80 N., to S.
boundary of No. 5; thence 40 W. to
point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
7. Commencing at a post by the
N.E. corner of the Coeur d'Alene
Mineral Claims; thence 80 N., along
E. boundary of No. 6; thence 80 E.;
thence 80 S.; thence 80 W. to point
of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Ageut.
November 21st, 1006.
8. Commencing at a post by the N.
E. corner of the Coeur d'Alene Mineral Claims; thence 80 chains S.;
thence 80 E.; thence 80 N.; thence 80
VV. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 21st. 1006.
9. Commencing at a post by the W.
boundary of the Coeur d'Alene Mineral Claims, about 40 chains S. of
S. boundary of No. 6; thence N. 40
chains; thence W. 40 chains; thence
S. 160; thenee E. 40; thence N. to
point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 21st, 1906.
10. Commencing at a post by the S.
W. corner of No. 8, and about 10
chains E. of Coeur d'Alene River;
thence 40 chains S.; thence 40 VV.;
thenee 60 S.; thence 80 E.; thence 100
N., to S. boundary of No. 8; thence
40 W. lo point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 21st, 1906. Dec.15
Commencing at a post by the southeast
boundary of Lot 77, Nahmint Bay;
tnence Oo cnains west; thence 20 north;
thence 90 west; thence 50 sout.i; thence
east to the waterfront thence following
the shore line to point of commence-
inent.
C. LUTKIN,
W. B. GiVRRARD. Agent
Oct. 37th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to app ly to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut aad
carry away timber from the following
described lands: 1. Starting at a post
10 chains east of the raoutk of Handy
Creek, on the nortli shore of Alberni
Canal; thence 160 chains north; tbence
40 chains west; thence south to tbe
shore line; thence following tbe shore
line to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 4th, 1906.
bo. Commencing at a post planted at
iue norm-west corner 01 J. A. xiarveys
iojiu. uieuce nulla ou cuauis; uieuce
wessi ou cnauis; uieuce :*outn 00 cnauis,
uieuce casi 00 ciums 10 pouii 01 coiu-
meucuuenu
HAKKliiT MijLiOiS,
U li. Watson, Agem.
September 10U1, 1900.
2. Starting at a post 40 chains north
of the initial post of No. 1, near Handy
Creek, Alberni Canal; thence 40 chains
east; thence 160 chains north; thence 40
chains west; thence 160 chains south to
point of commencement
W. B. GARRARD.
Clayoquot District, Nov. 4th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date we intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands: Commencing at a
post by the southeast corner post of Lot
79, on Uchuckletit Harbour; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 100 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west to
waterfront; thence along waterfront to
point of commencement, excepting
thereout the lands covered by existiag
mineral claims.
W. E. GREEN.
W. B. GARRARD.
Clayoquot District, Oct 29th, 1906?
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands in Alberni District: 1.
Commencing at a post situated 80 choins
west and 20 south of southeast boundary
post of Lot 658; thence 80 chains west;
thence 80 south; thence 80 east thence
80 north, to place of commencement
E. CURTIT,
Per W. B. Garrard, Agent
Oct. 19th, 1906.
30. Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of Section 16, Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thenct south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 21, Township
12, Range 5, of said survey.
CHAS. LEVE'11,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 20th, 1906.
46. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 36,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 36 of said
survey.
S. L. TEETZEL.
A. T. Clark, Agent
September 17th, 1906.
48. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 24,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 25, Township 4,
Range 4, of said survey .
M. A. MACDONALD.
A. T. Clark, Agent
September 17th, 1906.
43. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of the north-east
quarterof Section 32, Township 4,
Range 4, Poudrier Survey; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains, thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement, and being
the north half of Section 23 and south
half of Section 26, Townhsip 4, Range
4, of said surrey.
EMMA BATEMAN,
A. T. Clark, Agent
September 17th, 1906.
55. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 15,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 22, Township
4, Range 4, of said survey.
LILIAN CAMPBELL,
A. T. Clark, Agent
September 15th, 1006.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
daya after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands aad
Worka for a special licease to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, in Alberni District: 3.
Commencing at a post by the shore of
Alberni Canal, near the southeast bosm-
dary post of Lot 658; thence west 8*
chains; thence south to the north bossn-
dary line, or the same produced of Lot
69; thence east to Alberni Canal; thence
following the shore line to point of commencement
W. C. RALEIGH,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Oct. aoth, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, in Alberni District:   5.
56. Commencing at a post planted on
the north-east corner of Section 15,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Surrey;
thence west 80 chains; thenee south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 15 of said
survey.
GLEN CAMPBELL,
A. T. Ciark, Agen.t
September 15th, 1906.
57. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Lot 547;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement; 640 acres.
KATE CLARK,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September ioth, 1906.
01. Commencing at a *. ist planted at
uie norui-wesi corner of J. A. xiarvey s
laud; uieuce uorui bo cnains; uieuce
east 60 cnauis; uieuce south co chains;
uiuice west so cnauis lo pouit ot commencement
CAROLINE HAINES,
G. a. Wtasoii, Ageut
September ioui, 1900.
02. Commencing at a post plained at
the iiorui-wesi corner ot u. An. tiiruett s
laud; uieuce norm ou cnauis; tnence
nurui txi cnams; uieuce vasi 6u chaws;
Uieuce south 00 chains 10 poiui 01 cuin-
uieiiceiiieuu
MARGARET LNGLliS,
G. ii. Watson, Agent
September lotli, 1900.
bs. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of .-lubert Haines'
laud; uieuce norm 00 cnains; tnence
souiii do chains; tiience cast do chains;
thence north 60 chains to pouit ot commencement
MAXWELL S. INGLES,
G. H. Watson, Agent
September ioth, 1906.
06. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of. Kniguis lcaes;
land; thence north 0o (hauls; thence
chains; thence souht 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point ot commencement
ROSABELLA GOODWYN,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September nth, 1906.
75. Commencing at a posi planted at
the south-east corner 01 h. L. Blake*!
lease; thence west 80 chains; south Uo
chains; east eo chains to bank ot Nechaco River; thence following bank of
said river 10 pouit ot commencement.
040 acres, more or less.
MAKVT BLi\KE,
A. T. CLARIS, Agent
September 12th, 190b.
70. Commencing at a post planted at
the soutli-easi corner ot Mary Blake's
lease; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 cnains; tiience east 80 <->""*■■,
more or less, to the Nechaco Kiver;
thence following the bank of said river
to point oi commencement; 040 acres,
more or less.
GEORGE BATEMAN,
A. T. Clark, Agent
September 12th, 1900.
77. Commencing at the south-east cor*
near of George Batemau's lease; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
ihence east 80 chains, more or less, to
the Nechaco Kvier; thence following
the bank of said river to point 01 commencement; 040 acres, more or less.
U. P. COOK,
G. B. Watson. Agent.
September 13th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date 1 intend to apply to the
tion. Chief Commissioner ot Lands
and Works for permission to purchase
section 24, township a, range 5, Coast
District
EMMA HOWE.
JOHN DORSE*, Agent
67. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of E. Knight's
land; thence north 80 (.hams; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement
CHAS. KNIGHT,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September nth, 1906.
68. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Chas. Knight's
land; thence uorth 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 cnains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement
W. H. GOODWIN,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September nth, 1906.
69. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Chas. Knight's
the north-east corner of Knight's land;
south 80 chains; thence east 80.chains,
thence north 80 chain sto point of commencement
E. N. MacBETH,
A. T. Clark, Agent
September nth, 1906.
70. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 35,
Township 12, Range 5. Poudrier survey; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement
M. WERDEN,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 17th, 1906.
71. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of the south-west
quarter of Section 14, Townshm 12,
Range 5, Poudrier survey; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement, and being
the south half of Section 14 and north
half of Section 11, Township ia, Range
5, of said survey.
H. RENNIE,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 19th, 1906.
37. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 16?
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey: thence south Bo chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of com-
mencemtnt and being section 15, Township 12, Range 5, oi said survey.
W. VAN ARSDALEN,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 20th, 1906.
72. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of B. P. Cook's
lease; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence couth 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement; 640 acres
WILLIAM MEREDITH,
A. T. Clirk, Agent.
September 13th, 1006.
73. Commenting; at a post planted at
the south-west comer of Maxwell S.
Ingles' lease; thence soath 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, r.ore or less, to
ithe Nechaco River; Ihence following
bank of said river to the south line of
Maxwell S. Ingles' lease; thence west
80 chains, more or less, to point of commencement.
MINNIE CURRIE,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 12th, 1006.
Located July 12U, lUOU.
27. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 18, Tp.
10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence
soutn 80 chains; thence east 80 chain*;
tiience north 80 chains; thence thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 18 of said
survey.
J. C. PORTER.
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 15th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days
after date I intend to apply to die Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following described land, viz.:
Commencing at the south-west corner
of Lot 9, Cassiar District, situated on
the Skeena River; thence east 40 chains
to the south-east corner of Lot 0,
thence south 20 chains, thence west 40
chains more or less to the Skeena River,
thence northerly along thc Skeena River
to the point of commencement, containing 80 acres more or less.
December I, 1906.
 e. f. g. McGregor
NOTICE is hereby given that 60
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situate in Cassiar District, viz.:
Commencing at the  North-East corner of Lot 9, Cassiar District  on  the
Hawilghet   River—thence     south     46
chains  and  26  links to  the south-east
! corner of Lot 9, thence east 20 chains,
! thence north 40 chains more or less to
the Tlagwilghct River, thence following
I the river in a westerly direction to the
! point of commencement, containing fo
1 acres more or less.
Decemher t, igo6.
G. P. ROBERTS.
i 1
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60
days after date. 1 intend to apply to
1 the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land on the right
bank of the Skeena River, Range V,
Coast District: Commencing at a
post marked "James McGown, initial
post," at the N.E. corner of the New
Town Indian Reserve; thence west,
along the Indian Reserve line, 40
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence
east 40 chains; thence south along
the Skeena River to point of commencement, containing 150 acres,
more or less.
JAMES McGOVVN.
December 13th, 1906. Dec.15
58. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Lot 547; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
J. A. HARVEY,
A ,T .Clark, Agent.
September ioth, 1906.
74. Commencing at a post plsnted at
a point on the west side of the Upper
Nechaco River, opposite tfie south-west
I corner of Lot 545;   thence   west    80
chains; thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, more or less, to the bank
of the Nechaco River; thence follownf
bank of said  river to point of commencement; 640 acres, more or lem.
EDGAR L BLAKE.
A T. Clark, Agent.
September 12th, 1506.
TAKE NOTICE that, 60 days from
date, I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following described lands, situated on
the left bank of the Skeena River,
about one mile below the Little
Canon and commencing at Ed. Midland's N.E, corner post on the bank
of the Skeena. Thence S. 40 chains;
thence E. 40 chains; thence N. 42
chains, more or less, to Sousie's S.
boundary; thence VV. 38 chains, more
or less, to thc Skeena River; thence
N. 3 chains, more or less, to point of
commencement, containing 170 acres,
more or less.
N. GOWEN.
A. W. HARVEY, Agent.
Dec.15 i6
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 26 1907
The Vancouver Office of
THE WEEK
Room  14, MacKinnon Block.   <j*j
Phone 2769. j|
VANCOUVER NOTES.
The Liberals Avere surprised in 1903
by what Vancouver did. A similar
painful surprise is awaiting the survivors of that party — for many of
them have already, convinced by the
prosperity of the past three years and
a half of good government, joined the
ranks of the Conservative party—if
any reliance can bc placed on the determination and enthusiasm evident
throughout the meetings held here
during the past Aveek. Monday evening at Mount Pleasant, Avherc ths
Liberals a Avcek previous addressed
less than one hundred and fifty electors whom even ex-Judge Henderson
could not rouse to any marked enthusiasm, Hon. Mr. Tatlow, Mr. Macgowan, Mr. J. F. Garden, Dr. G. A.
McGuire and Mr. A. L. Belyea, K. C,
addressed close to five hundred. Wednesday evening at thc City Hall .1'
monster rally Avas held by the Conservatives at which all the candidates
made capital speeches. Mr. BoAvser,
K. C, fresh from his tour of the Interior, created the greatest enthusiasm in a recital of the party's prospects for victory on February 2nd.
Other meetings were held in Pender
Hall and Fairview and tonight at the
doAvn-toAvn central committee rooms
a packed house will undoubtedly greet
the speakers. On Monday next a
meeting will be held at Cedar Cove,
Tuesday at Mount Pleasant, and on
Wednesday night the electors of Vancouver Avill hear Premier McBride at
the City Hall. The excellent Avork
being done by President Woodward
and his officers in thc thorough organization of the city will bring out
every Conservative voter.
Victory Assured.
The candidature of Thomas Gifford, in NeAv Westminster, Frank
Mackenzie in Delta and S. A. C.-nvley
in Chilliwack is meeting with success
and the certainty of the Premier's
election in Dewdney gives promise of
a solid quartette from the Fraser valley being sent to Victoria. Splendid
meetings have been held in the ridings and excellent Avork is being done.
Reports from Ashcroft tell of Mr
Semlin making an active canvass, and
from Kamloops riding the return of
Mr. Fulton by a handsome majority
over Mr. Swanson, his Liberal opponent, is conceded by even the Grits.
Notwithstanding the advent of Duncan Ross, M. P., Avho has left his
duties at Ottawa at the dictate of
"the machine," in the Similkameen
and Okanagan ridings thc Conservatives have little cause to fear that
cither of these seats Avill bc lost.
Thomas Taylor, the popular member
for Revelstoke, is assured of an easy
victory and Mr. Parsons, according
to the latest reports, is making great
headAvay in his campaign to capture
Mr. Wells' seat. In the Kaslo riding-
Neil F. McKay, Avho formerly practised law in Kaslo, Avas the past week
touring the northern end of the constituency in company with Robert F.
Green. Doavii in the "Boundary" a
strenuous fight is on in both the
Greenwood and Grand Forks ridings.
In thc former "Plinkey" Warren expects to defeat George R. Naden and
Ernest Miller, son of the Postmaster
of Vancouver, is slated to capture the
latter seat.
At the Opera.
At the Vancouver Opera House
Manager Ricketts has some splendid
bookings for the next two weeks, including Olga Nethersole, who opens
on Tuesday evening in "Sappho" and
presents "The Second Mrs. Tan-
queray" the following evening. Wednesday the rural drama "Human
Hearts," which has been on the road
for the past decade, will again be
seen. February ist and 2nd thc "Red
Feather" will hold the boards. On
the 5th the biggest attraction of thc
theatrical season is scheduled Avlicn
William H. Crane and Miss Ellis Jeffreys, supported by a cast of superlative strength, will appear in Oliver
Goldsmith's famous comedy, "She
Stoops to Conquer." This comedy
proved the most marked triumph the
London stage has Avitnessed for many
DID YOU HEAR
MADAME
SCHUMANN-
HPllVrk" at WEDNESDAY'S
llClllvIV CONCERT?
Wouid you like to hear her again ,vhen you please and
in whatever selections you like best ?   If so
Buy a
Gramophone
and the Famous Red Seal Records,   reproducing faithfully the voices of Caruso,  Melba,   Patti,
Schuiiiaiin-Heiuck, Tamagno, &c.
FLETCHER BROS.
93 GOVERNMENT STREET
VICTORIA
Sole Agents Vancouver Island.
Mail orders and inquiries receive  prompt  and  careful
attention.
IL
years. "Yon Yonsen" is due on the
7th, Isabelle Irving on the 12th,
"Uncle Tom's Cabin" on the 14th and
"The County Chairman" on the 15th
and 16th. After several obstacles
overcome—a change of dates and the
engagement of another pianist to replace Peje Storck, who is -compelled
by serious illness to abandon con-
certizing for the season—Manager C.
H. Gibbons announces that he will
open the coast tour of what is described as the most notable musical
trinity since the conjunction of
Ysaye, Gerardy and Lachaume, with
the concert at the Vancouver Opera
House on February 22nd. The artists are Frieda Stender, the famous
coloratura soprano and the possessor
of a truly regal voice; Otie Chew,
whom numerous critics have rated
far and away above Leonora Jackson or Marie Hall; and Thilo Becker,
of Leipzic, unquestionably the ablest
pianist now on the Pacific Coast. The
honour of inaugurating such a tour
is a distinct one, and it is confidently to be expected that Vancouver will display full appreciation by
crowding the house.
Who Will Be Judge?
Speculation is rife, especially among
Liberal legal lights, as to who will be
appointed County Court Judge in succession to Judge Henderson, who resigned his office and $3,500 a year at
thc command of the "Ottawa machine" to enter local politics. Among
the names mentioned are Mr. A. E.
Beck, Mr. G. F. Cane, Mr. W. C.
Brown and Mr. F. R. McD. Russell.
Capt. Hart-McIIarg informed The
Week that he had no intention of
seeking the vacant position, though
his name has been among those most
mentioned.
Pythians Entertain.
Not for many a day has Vancouver
been host to as large a number of
visitors as on the occasion of the
banquet given to the grand lodge officers and visiting brethren of the
Knights of Pythias on Wednesday
evening at the Bismark Cafe. Covers
were laid in thc spacious dining hall
to some 200 jovial brethren and ample justice done to the viands and
wine provided by the caterers, Messrs.
Bancroft & McKinnon. The Bismark,
with its comfortable atmosphere and
music, is coming into its oavii as the
place par excellence for the visitor
to enjoy thc best the market affords.
Changed Hands.
The Paterson Shoe Company, Limited, 301 Hastings street, next thc Arcade, one of the pioneer shoe houses
of the city, has sold its Vancouver
business to Messrs. Colvin & Harris.
The business will be continued at
the same stand under the firm name
of Colvin & Harris. Mr. J. Colvin
has been local manager for thc Pat-
A Cosy Corner at the Poodle Dog.
The
Poodle Dog
Grill,
Yates St.,
Victoria, B. C, is
the only real
"grill" in British
Columbia—the
only place where
you can
•XCTUALLV
obtain your
choice of meals
and all the delicacies of the
season.
SMITH & SHAUGHNESSY
Proprietors.
It Is Evident
from the large crowds at the Bismark each day that the
people of Vancouver appreciate a strictly first-class Restaurant.
For a thoroughly enjoyable meal, upper-country visitors should patronise
The Bismark
CORNER ABBOTT AND HASTINGS STREETS
VANCOUVER.
(N.  B.—Three-piece orchestra every afternoon and
evening.)
erson Shoe Company for the past two
years and his enterprise ami business
ability have gone a long way to placing the Paterson Shoe Company's
business in its present enviable position. Mr. D. A. Harris, Avho is a
member of the staff of the Bank of
Hamilton, will not be actively interested in the business. By carrying an
extensive and well assorted stock and
endeavouring to give thc public thc
best possible value for their money
and having thoroughly experienced
salesmen who Avill assist Mr. Colvin
in waiting on the old customers as
well as all new ones, patrons may be
assured of the most courteous treatment.
ADVERTISE IN THE WEEK
....Let "Well Enough" Alone....
British Columbia for British Columbians.
No surrender to the hungry Liberal hordes from Ottawa.
The Yukon graft is exhausted, the grafters now have their eyes on British Columbia.
Protect your Province by voting for—
THE SOLID FIVE
VANCOUVER COMMITTEE
ROOMS.
CENTRAL—410 Hastings St.
West.   Telephone 2806.
FAIRVIEW —2147 Granville
Street.
WARDS III. and IV.—546
Westminster Avenue.
MOUNT PLEASANT—Three
doors south of Seventh on
Westminster Avenue.
BOWSER,
GARDEN,
HACGOWAN,
ITGUIRE,
TATLOW,
The Citizen's Ticket
WEEK'S MEETINGS.
MONDAY—Cedar Cove.
TUESDAY—Mount  Pleasant.
WEDNESDAY—City Hall.
THURSDAY—Central  Rooms.
All capable, honest citizens of Vancouver who have never sold your interests and never will. A
vote for the Conservatives is a vote for honest government, better terms, political peace and CONTINUED PROSPERITY.

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