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Week Dec 15, 1906

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" Bank of Hamilton
Capital $2,500,000
Reserve $2,500,000
Total Assets, $29,000,000
Interest paid half yearly on deposits ef
$1 and upwards in Savings Department.
Drafts and Money Orders on all parts ol
the world. Vancauier tranche., cor,
of HMting and Hamilton Sts., Powell St.
Cedar Grove.
HJ
IJUUUUUJUUiULSUUUJUUUUUt
jd
The Week
TL British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vancouver 8. 0.
to   Stewart Williams R. C. Janion
WILLIAMS ti JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION AND
REAL ESTATE AGENTS
Si F0RT.ST. VICTORIA, B. C.   o
ZsLjLXSLXSULASLSlJLJLX*tjLArULJLXj\Sij3
Vol. III.   No. 46.
DECEMBER 15, 1906
One Dollar Per Annum
[The Editor's Review
©f Current Topics.
Jehindthe   The Week learns on ex- chance  of leading  the rag-tag and
cellent    authority   that; bob-tail of the Liberal party into of-
the manipulators of the fice is, to say the least of it, highly
[Provincial  Liberal  party have  de- improbable.  He can hardly have for-
laigned a wonderful flank movement gotten  yet  that  this  same  crowd
tn order to defeat the McBride ad- threw him down less than four years
[ministration.   The idea is not orig- ago, when he had pre-eminent claims , „ . , .      „  ,   „
linal; indeed, who would expect it? to the leadership, and placed at the my be pr<JSent: °fflcials' the pr6S8 or the pmty °f their intentlons' but word o£ warmnS:   If Dr' Hail «*
But it fairly matches the   cunning head a man who, however able intel- M,d rePresentatlves of the medical •* times very much doubting the wis- the Women's Council persist in tiie
projects which have been hatched by lectually, is the best exemplification 2**"?^'"^ °£ COWtBe>the dergy dom of their Procedure*    There.» ?ndeavour to foist instruction of tbis
'the Toronto gang, who have staked of a round peg in a square hole that The shenfi pUts forwaid the extrar iust one bKmch *f the work whlch< kmd uPon lnnocent childrei1 in the
The Week gave an intimation in its Nightingale, Josephine Butler and which the Women's Council is so
last issue that the general public Frances Willard occupy no inferior anxious to remedy. When it has be-
were being supplied with tickets to position to that of any men who have come fashionable, and the word is
witness the hanging of Featherstone, distinguished themselves by philan- used in a general and not an exclu-
but the hint was not taken; now the thropic zeal. But because all this is sive sense, to substitute amusements
sheriff admits to our representative so true it is the more necessary to and dissipations for the regular dis-
that he issued from twenty to twen- sound a word of warning. Thinking charge of home duties, it is not to
ty-five tickets to outsiders. He at- men have always viewed with a slight be wondered at that the children left
tempts to justify his conduct on the feeling of trepidation the incursions to themselves acquire habits which
ground that the matter is entirely of womens' societies in certain de- would be noticed and checked under
within his own discretion. This is partments of moral reform; never close parental supervision. There is
not true.   The law prescribes who doubting the loftiness of their aims, one last word to be uttered.   It is a
their all on the exploitation of the British Columbia public life has ever
|Grand Trunk Pacific.   The scheme is afforded.     But   even   if   "Billy"
■ troupe, of which "Billy" Mclnnis is "the insult" should be big enough
I to be the leading man.   All the fin- to weigh with him, he is hardly fool
ordinary contention that because oth- they have undertaken, that of rescu- public schools, there will be such an
er persons are not specifically tab- ing   their    "unfortunate"   sisters, uproar   as   will   probably   surprise
[toVtto^tivri'W^ '•f^a'^iaia should~'be found"'compraisant7i-id °,°ed " the statuteS' they may be which has not been   a consPieuous these ardent refers, and will as-
' there with his consent.    The Week success.   The reasons for this need suredly relegate the movement to the
contends that such an interpretation not be canvassed here; they were suf- land of its birth.
1 ancial backing whieh such a scheme enough to throw up a certafnty 7or °f " is ridiculous * that the Pres" ficiently ™&M in the las* issue n     .       	
would require is to be furnished by something worse than an uncertain- ^ °£ a Smgle °utsider was a vio" o£ The Week*    Xt M  8»tlfru* to Genume Grace   DarlinS   bas   stood
the Ottoawa and Toronto friends of ty.  If the party leaders have not in- latl°U °f the laW' an °utrage °n pub" knfflW that the sentiments then ex" Heroism for generations as the fa,
the   G.  T.   P., who   already   have telligence enough to know that the hc d^ney and an insult to the poor pressed met with  very general up- vourite illustration of hero-
1 strings on every side-show connected country will not stand them, he has. 7**ch Up°" the pn;acy. °£ whose *™&l> «T am°ng tbe ladl6S *T" ism and daring on the part of a wo-
last moments morbid curiosity  was selves.   There is therefore ground for
man.   But those who are conversant
with   that corporation.   If such   a     "Billy" Mclnnis is not a green- .    , „   .
mischance should occur as" the defeat hkim at the game. His political P,ermltted *° ^ To many people, the hope that they may bear fruit. .„.,_,_„„„
of McBride, then Mclnnis is to be birth-place was Missouri, and unless *• worst feature of thls disgraceful It is to be feared, however, that the with the details of Mrs. Patterson's
Premier of British Columbia. If, as The "Week is greatly mistaken, the ePisode is the fact that the father Women's Counil is courting disaster action in rescuing the survivors of
is morally certain the scheme ends in last man who can *>e "gold-bricked" ^ brother o£ the murdered girl in taking up a subject introduced by the wreck Coloma, will hereafter be-
failure, Mclnnis is to be provided for is the Governor of tbe Yukon' They T6'6 ^"^ t0 witn6SS the eXeCUti°n Dr" Erne8t HaU' and ^^ ." Keve that to British Columbia bein a substantial manner as a solatium bad theuir cbanee wi*_ Wm °™>eth^ fr°m a ™A™ m the gaoL ™8 such a subject 0nly COuld be Wmf lines the honour of having produed
for relinouishinir the Governorshin of W hm doWn* The M0,d of the seems to be the limit of sensational much reserve and sympathy. The nngs tne nonoul 0I navinS Produea
'the  Yukon* a position   which was Uh6ral party during the last fovu* depravity, and the sheriff defends it Week  has no hesitation   in saying a woman as brave.   What a contrast
avowedly awarded him for political ST? CLt'lbiSt IJZw, by "^ ** ^ aMaX ^^ tUt SUCh a *°pic 8h°Uld neV61' *!? ** C°M "*"** * ^ °f ^
;services.    It is easy to understand J JSt>Sv^"satisfSon """ *" ?Uld ^ *""* *° be "" br°aChed''  ** *?? °f ^ faShi°nable darlingS °f eaSe wh° C0U-
Lwhy the G, T. P. and their friends 7Z h^ZteZth^ml ?T? ? ^ V?J* S *""? ST * * ^l U*   7 " ** ^^ ^ "^ °°n-
! should be willing to make any sacri- apt to remind the party leaders that, " ^ ,*•**.   Bu* the wboleumat- There   is no substitute for  proper ^.^   and resoiution8.
i flee to insure the success of such a having made their bed, they must !f. *°uld ^T if     ^ the™- ho™ *mmng- __.Th!._matt'rS.it°.^
[project. The McBride administration lie on it.
Lhas staked its existence upon the re-
[fusal to make any land grant to the Morbid
lG. T. P. It has adhered to its policy MadneBS,
[in face of temptations and threats,
thorities,  and if  future   executions touched upon are too  delicate and This   noble woman> without a   mo"
  are to be converted into a raree show sacred for any but a parent to ban- ment's hesitation, in the teeth of a
On  Wednesdav   De   mber tbe Pub^e ^wli know, and the fun die, least of all for young women storm which might have driven her
12th   R.   S.   Peatherstone sll0uld not be confined to a favoured teachers in our public schools, nearly to death, literally ploughed her way
was hanged in the yard of few*   The Mcretary «* the Tourist all of whom are unmarried.   There ^^^ twelye miles q£ forest ^
and the Toronto gang know by this the Vietoria gaol for the murder of Association might be authorized to is danger of the worst kind lurking ^ ^^ ^    ^ did ^
[time that they will never get an acre Mary Dalton of Wellington.   The ar- adverhse Pubhc actions as one of behind such a proposition   however       J
of land for building the G. T. P. rangements for the execution are, as the attractioM of "Tbe C"y <* well intended. No man will doubt P«» unti her work was completed,
across British Columbia as long as prescribed by the law, entirely in the Homes- Above all> Provision should that familiarity of conversation on but insisted on rowing across the last
the Hon. Richard McBride and his hands of the sheriff, but although on *» made for a mWl1 of ti«kets to sueh topics, as would be involved in stretch of water, when she might
government are in power. So des- such occasions that gentleman natur- the W* C* T* U* and the Ladies' the teaching for which Dr' Ernest have sent a messenger. For the suf-
perate are they in their determina- ally occupies a somewhat autocratic Council, as we, The Week, have it on Hall pleads would lead to more re- ferfng ^ ^^ ^ wag more than
tion to force a land grant that within position, the statutes prescribe certain the authonty °f the sheriff that many grettable   results than he   deplores.
the last month they offered the enor- limits, Within which Us fancy may in- "ladies" ■»•" for tick^ ^hich, The Week does not believe that the ^d by *e ~ of her mission,
mous sum of $250>0 for a certain dulge itself, and it is not too much h~' he *«* This' in tbe ^t^, in Canadian schools at and nothing that an admiring public
coast paper in order that they might to suggest that other limitations are °Pinion °f The Week* was « entire- «V ****, are anything like as bad as ean do^ will_ weigh wrifc he against
secure the advocacy of an influential, imposed by good taste and public & ilegal refusal> « the twenty or is suggested. Indeed, nothing short that. Stm H is meet that her brav-
established journal for their policy, sentiment. ' After what happened at ^^^ rank outeidere had ^ <* imPendinS catastroPhe wo"ld f" ^ t^ii ? ;ecog™ed; a; ,4 pwf
A eorporaton prepared to expend as Fatherstone's hanging it would be riSht to be ^e. Surely this is a tify taking the matter up by any but be. We all doff our hats to Mrs. Pat-
much as this on a single newspaper superfluous to discuss the subject matter in which there are e1ual riSbts «» child's parents. Dr. Ha1's activ- terson; she has done a noble deed,
will stand at nothing ior a political w4 the sheriff on the basis of good f°r the **<*• "y seems to be stimulated by the and in addition to saving ten lives
eompaign, and will want the strong- taste.   The Week will therefore con-   ^ that a society with similar aims has rendered a public service by nv-
est man in the party to fight the min- fine   its remarks to the other   two Danger   The Week had Pleasure m to bis   °™  already   exlsts Jf ;he   ^ *?'    ? T     v.   T™, f
Signal,   commenting in our last is- United States, but if Dr. Hall does the west coast, and may be stimulat-
not know he can ascertain by taking ing the tardy action of a callous and
Lister who can neither be cajoled nor phases of the question.   Many years
[frightened into compliance with their ago the law prohibited public hang- sue on  the work  and pro- . .      •,-,., .
I demands.     That   "Billy"   Melnnis ing of condemned criminals, in the -„„  of   the   Women's  Coundl. a trip .t0 Seffe' *? th? T^0" government.
was easily the strongest man in the interests   of morality.    Those   who gince then the ammal meeting has °* ^J^tlttewZ Worth
I party when he got his Yukon prize have   read of  the dreadful   orgies 1S smh as *°"U1 lfiRnlt ,n """  M
package  cannot  be  questioned.    If which  characterized  such  occasions
Several    Eastern    banking
been held, and during four lengthy _ng instantly closed if they were up- Noting,   institutions and one West-
any"man could""lead theLiberaTparty fifty"yeare~"ago"would shudder""at'the sessions maxiy matters "f vital Pub" on Canadian soil.    Thank goodness,
in this Province to victory he is the bare thought of taking a retrograde lie  interest were  discussed,   and  a we are not yet come to this pass in    io
ern have purchased lots in
Victoria upon which they intend to
,   .    ,, , ,     .. •„      ,     •   ,, • i    n ir       i*      * i •        o ,i* i   British Columbia.    There are thou- erect bank premises in the near fu-
iman, but will he make the sacrifice step in this regard.  Public sentiment loner   series   of   resolutions   passed. U11WBU  ^"»u"*"*
I ,    j. ,,   •    ,.        ...    ...    . ..       Tv. -*• j  'a '• -'■■ sands of children who are pure, and tare.   Some of these institutions, no-
necessary to fall in hue with  this > a unit on the question, and i   is with none o£ these resolutions, as ^     nQ need of SUCJ ins'tnic. tably   the Bank  of Commerce,   and
scheme?   The Week doubts it.   He surely not too much to ask   hat a can ^ be found by those who Jj * d ^^ ^ ^
lialready occupies a higher and more paid official should discharge his du- '..., „ ,    ...   ., .    _    ,... _. llu" "" ls •»u66l*ow" ■        .,,..,. ,.,   .    ,   .   ..   .
lhonourable position than the party ties with some regard to decency and are desir0l,s of seeU,? the Standwd ^ PMents'   The ^ 1ft™ctlon the'r,°7   n"hl,erts' ™ * " "
could offer him, even if success foi- the   expressed   sentiment  of public of morality raised and specific griev- on such subjects is derived from a out of place to suggest tha  there are
lowed their arms.    As governor of opinion as well as in strict eompli- ances abated.  Nothing less was to be sound moral atmosphere in the home, in  Victoria architects with  reputa-
the Yukon he occupies a lofty and ance with the mere letter of the law. expected from any organization com- and The Week respective y suggests turns second to none in the Domin-
fhonourable position. His administra- It may be too much to a* such an posed of women. The very raison that the Women's Council would be ton, and that on the principle of en-
tion of affairs in that immense tern- official to remember that even in the d'etre of their existence as an organ- on safer ground and engaged in couragmg local talent, and support-
tory has been more than successful, twentieth century it is the spirit that ized body rests upon thin platform, much better work if rt directed its ing local institutions it would be fair
His personal popularity has been es- maketh alive, and the letter that kill- It is impossble to appraise the ines- attention to improving the home-life to give these gentlemen a chance m
[tarnished. When he "came down" a eth. At any rate this would be too timable value of the service rendered of the people. And in this connec- connection with any new buildings
few weeks ago, he had a send-off of much to expect from an official with by Christian women to the cause of tion it is not improper to suggest to be erected here. Such a policy
which a prince might be proud, and an obvious penchant for the morbid, reform.   This work is now exercis- that "example" teaches better than would not be without its advantages
the is a "prince of good fellows." if not barbarous exhibitions which ing the energies of the women ofi "precept;" and that neglect of home from a business standpoint, and there
That he would deliberately fling all disgraced the last century, and four continents, and on the scroll of and the duties of home is one of the ls no respect in which it would not
this overboard for the problematical brought nbout alteration of the law. fame the names of sueh ns Florence most prolific causes of the very evil mure to the advantage of the banks. THE MOTHERLAND.
Exchanges With Our Kindred.
New  Zealand Judge's  Daughter  on
London Halls.
After working her way round the
world, living on the precarious earnings of her art, and often suffering
from actual hunger, Miss Herifiquette
Maude, a little New Zealand girl reciter of nineteen years, has arrived in
London, the goal of her journey, and,
as she expresses it, "the fountain-
head of the dramatic art."
Miss Maude is appearing at the
London Music Hall, and her performance is favourably received. She is
exceedingly clever in pathetic child
parts.
Miss Maude is the  daughter of a
• New   Zealand judge,  and  her native
town  is Napier.    Her desire to fol-
■ low  an  artistic career was  strongly
opposed by her parents.
She had her worst experience in
Colorado, U. S. A., where everything
she possessed—money and clothing—
was stolen. She lived in Chicago for
three days ou 2 i-2d., and for three
nights slept on doorsteps in snowy
weather.
But Miss Maude's fortunes eventually changed, and before she left
the States she won President Roosevelt's gold medal, awarded to the best
artist in a competition for which
there were 500 entries.
Why Women Should Fence.
Lady Colin Campbell is of opinion
that fencing is the best recreation for
women. "To begin with," she informed a representative of Cassell's
Saturday Journal, "fencing brings out
all the muscles; it distributes them,
as it were, more than any other recreation one can name. Then it trains
thc eye as well as the body. It also
teaches a woman manners, how to
preserve her temper, and to be loyal
—at least, it should do."
Love's Young Dream.
The Rev. F. J. Hardy, writing on
the "Romance of Love," has a story
of two bachelor maids who shared a
flat. Every day they told each other
that they would never surrender to
the tyranny of man. But one of
them, who was pretty, did at last get
married. The other abused her, and
was thus answered: "Women may
grow newer and newer, but they will
never be so new as really to despise
the old, old story revealed to them
in love's young dream."
Survival of Credulity.
We are quite as credulous in this
twentieth century as our forefathers
of mediaeval times. What woman
does not believe one of her gowns to
be lucky and the other unlucky? How
many refuse to don opals, while others carry a fetish in the shape of a
crooked sixpence or rusty nail, a
lucky shamrock, or a hideous little
silver pig about them? Everywhere
superstition meets one.—The Graphic.
Doctors' Social Decadence.
If the medical profession wishes to
bc thought a profession of "gentlemen," let it insist that those now
entering it shall have thc traditional
"education of a gentleman." Much as
the General Medical Council has done
to improve medical practice in this
country, its deplorable weakness in
permitting thc educational, and therefore the social, decadence of thc
noblest of callings is something
which cannot be condoned.—W. Gordon, in The Lancet.
Harrying the Colonies.
The great Liberal majority, whatever its origin, was not elected to
pursue ,111 anti-Colonial policy. Had
the nation imagined that the intention of the present government, or
at least of a majority in the cabinet,
was to do their utmost to hand back
the Transvaal to the Boers, by a use
of the royal prerogative and a disregard of parliamentary discussion they
would never have seen office. From
Natal and Newfoundland to thc New
Hebrides and Australia, the Colonics
have been harried by thc government.
—Leader, Johannesburg.
Ceylon's Rainfall.
To the Editor of the Over-Seas Daily
Mail.
Sir,—I have noticed several letters
from different parts of the world in
your columns referring to heavy rainfall.
I append measurements (per standard gauge) of rainfall on this estate
during the last three days:
October 23   2.84 in.
October 24   7.23 in.
October 25    6.45 in.
Total, 16.52 in. for the three days.
We are  likely  to  keep it up, too,
from the look of tilings.
Yours faithfully,
V. Feme Edwards.
Aberdeen, Watawella, Ceylon.
October 26, 1906.
P. S.—The average is about 210 in.
per annum in this district.
Unrefined Dances.
If a stand is taken in Great Britain
as it has been in Germany against
vulgarity in the ballroom, it will be
found that there will be no difficulty
in maintaining it.—Lady's Pictorial.
Dormant Middle Classes.
The British middle classes appear
to be dormant, and are allowing too
much power to get into the hands of
the mere labouring classes.—Wilfred
Campbell (the Canadian poet) in The
Outlook.
BRITISH AMERICAN TRDST CO., Limited
i-ICTORIA OFFICES
Cor. Broad and View   Sts.
■JL
A. C. McCALLUM,
Mgr. Real Estate Department.
FOR SALE
One of the few remaining good Cattle Ranches left
in B. C. This property controls some 300 square
miles of Range and will carry 2000 head of cattle
and 300 horses. Full particulars on application.
Price $45,000.
The Incredulous British Public.
To settle a bet for £50 as to whether the British public knew a good
thing when they saw it, two men—
both of whom are members of the
Portsmouth Civil Service Club — entered the club armed with bags of
coins, and astounded the other mem-|
bers by offering sovereigns at 18s. 6d.
each, five-shilling pieces for 4s. 6d.,
and orins for is. gd. The three bags
containing the coins were placed on
the table, and the closest inspection
was invited. Not a single member,
however, would venture to buy,
though the coins were freely handled.i
They quite failed to appreciate that
the offer was a genuine one, or, in
other words, they were not prepared'
to back their recognition of an ordi-1
nary coin of the realm.
a spirit of hostility to this country;
that Germans set no limit to their
dreams of maritime power; that the
strength of our navy is the main obstacle between them and their chief
ambitions; that they are building
hard, training well, and looking far
ahead; and that if Germany could
succeed in constructing a fleet capable of oisputing the seas with ours,
or in forming such a coalition as was
hoped for before the entente cordiale,
the existence of the British Empire
would not be worth a year's purchase.
Prince Buelow gives us our motto,
Toujours en vedette.—Outlook.
Oxford in American Eyes.
Oxford is the best Britain raised
to the highest power. It represents
the conservativeness, the thoroughness, and the solidity of English life,
character, institutions.—North American Review.
Hypnotising Downing Street.
The recent talk of the American-
isation of Canada is purely mischievous. If not deliberately calculated to
assist the United States experts in
their chosen task of hypnotising the
British Colonial Office to the betrayal of Colonial interests, it is
bound to contribute to that end—Ottawa Journal.
Sex Antagonism.
Men and women not only do not
understand one another, they also
hate one another. It is true Nature
for her ends drugs both of them for
a certain time, and during that period
the man warbles and yodels with
love, and the woman smiles and coddles. But before and after that period? Is it too much to say that
there is a great antagonism, or, t'o
put it roughtly, a war between them?
—Dr. Emil Reich, in The Throne.
When Sirens Bore.
Keen sportsmen at a shoot are apt
to be not a little impatient of the
woman who talks and titters at the
wrong moment, wears a red cloak,
points her gun at shooters, beaters,
and birds with careless insouciance
and makes incessant claims on their
attention and assistance. She may be
a siren at home in a tea gown, but is
safe to be voted a bore and a duffer
when she tries her hand at the business of sport.—Ladies' Field.
Decadence of Noses.
When I was a girl the aristocratic
nose was high, beautifully modelled,
rising in a delicately waving ridge
and at the tip standing well out from
the face and turned up. But now the
fashion has completely changed. The
pretty women one sees portrayed in
illustrated papers and magazines very
seldom havemtt ch tos peak of in the
way of noses.—"Dowager," in The
Throne,
Country House Life.
In country houses papers are read
in the intervals between high pheasants and no trumps.—The World.
To Foster Imperialism.
Imperial sentiment is strong in
Canada, but it could be fostered by
the British Government making more
liberal post office regulations for the
transmission of British periodical literature to this country.—Montreal
Witness.
Misguided Intellect.
The quantity of brains employed in
this country seven days a week, with
the sole aim of getting A to buy from
C what he has hitherto bought from
B, probably exceeds the intellectual
capital of any two of the learned professions.—R. T. Cholmeley, in Independent Review.
Threatened Peers.
The country will never rise against
the House of Lords for amending
this impossible measure, the Education Bill, and the policy of "filling the
cup" will be too transparent to deceive anybody. The Liberal party
will once more have a very bad fall.—
Manchester Courier.
Ungrateful Europe.
The newest concert of Europe, so
the despatches affirm, is to be an alliance to prevent the exportation of its
best art to America. Yet the American millionaire collector has bought
thousands of putative old masters at
top prices for every genuine example
he has snapped up.—Nation, New
York.
The King's Tact.
King Edward is the most popular,
monarch in the world. . . . With
his charm and bonhomie he has gained univers .1 sympathies, and with his
tact—that precious gift that so many
lack—he resolves the greatest difficulties with serene simplicity and
without making a fuss.—Novidades,
Lisbon.
Why Germany Builds Ships.
The  truth  is that the  rise of the
German  fleet has been supported in
Adolphe Lemieux, the Postmaster-
General, announces the inauguration
of a policy of protection of the Canadian press—as against the yellow
press of the United States.
The minister explained that it
would be his privilege before long to
give this country intellectual preference by granting British periodicals
and newspapers a cheaper rate of
postage, the object being to disseminate good and sound literature in
this country, and to give to those in
the Western Provinces who came
from the British Isles more information of what was happening in the
Old Country in their old homes and
among the old folk.
Finest Xmas
Groceries
Order by Mail or Personally from the Largest and Finest
Quality Stock in Western Canada.
CHRISTMAS FRUITS
Jap Oranges, per box 75c
Navel Oranges, per dozen....40c
Walnuts, per lb 20e
Brazil Nuts, per lb 25c
Pecan Nuts, per lb 25e
Almonds, per lb  .25c
Filberts, per lb 25c
Shelled Almonds, per lb 50c
Jordan Almonds, per lb 75c
Malaga Raisins, clusters, per
lb 35c
Malaga  Raisins,  extra  large
clusters, per lb 60c
Californian Raisins, per lb...25c
Calil'oTiiian    Raisins,    fancy
box, 2 lbs 50c
Figs, box  25c
Large Smyrna Figs, per lb.. ,25o
Hallowi Dates, per lb 10c
Crystalized Fruits, per box..
 25c, 50c, 75c
Crystallized   Glace   Cherries,
per lb 75c
Crystallized Angelica, per lb.75c
Bon Bons, in fancy boxes....
 25c, 50c, 75c, $1
Cranberries, per lb 20c
Native Port, per bottle 35c
WINES AND SPIRITS
Californian Port, per bottle..50c
Old Dry Port, per bottle. ..$1.50
Tawney Port, per bottle... .$1,00
French Claret, per bottle 50c
Pale Sherry, per bottle $1.00
French Brandy, per bottle. .$1.00
Glenlivet Scotch Whisky   .. .85c
Old Dry Sherry, per bottle.$1.50
Lager Beer, per doz bottles.$1.50
Silver Spring Ale, per dozen
bottles $1.50
Momm's Champagne, per pint
bottle   $1.50
We pay freight on all orders amounting to $25.00 and upwards to all
points on C. P. R. and V. & S. within a radius of 50 miles of Victoria
-"EXCEPT" ON FLOUR, Sugar and Coal Oil.
If desired, two or three families can club together to get the benefit
of the free delivery, provided the goods are consigned in one shipment
to one name.
TERMS:   Cash MUST accompany all orders.
dixi h. ross & ee
Independent Grocers.
in Government Street, Victoria
R. 2064
-rrrrrrTrrvrvrrrrrrr*
WE HAVE JUST PUBLISHED
Championing the Classes. \q
It is simply untrue that the wealthy L—
British classes arc, generally speaking, more addicted to the pleasures of
the table than their equals a century
or half a century ago; while even the
modern craze for bridge is not to be
compared with the reckless spirit of
gambling which permeated British society in the days of Fox and Sheridan.—Advertiser, Kimberley.
A New Map
OP THE
City of Victoria
price, 25 CENTS.
Special terras iu quantities.
We also carry a full line of other maps of the
province and are agents for the
Admiralty Charts.
T. N. Hibben & Qo
Government St.,, Victoria, B. C.
o^ _UimiTll.1ITIlNIIII llllllll IIWWMH.NIIIIM
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1906.
The Pacific Coast
Realty Co, Ltd.
Have an exclusive list of apecially selected ACREAGE, ESTATE and FARM
PROPERTIES for sale at prices which
will attract purchasers.
HOW IS THE TIME TO BUY
Victoria Property is the safest and best
investment to be found in Real Estate on
the Pacific Coast.  There will be a
50 PER CENT. INCREASE
IN VALUES IN 1907.
Vou cannot make a mistake in buying
Business,
Residence, or
Acreage
Property.
Write or call on us for particulars.  We
can show you how to make money.
The Pacific Coast
Realty Co., Ltd.
12 MacGregor Bl'k, Victoria, B.C.
(Opposite Driard Hotel)
Money
Properly invested
leads on to
Fortune.
We are the medium
through which this
happy result can be
ACHIEVED, therefore invest in
Vancouver Realty.
BURNETT, SON  & CO.
Pender St.,
Vancouver,  B. C.
REAL
ESTATE
F RE, LIFE and ACCIDENT
INSURANCE.
Victoria Real Estate today ib the
best investment iu the Province. 3j
Prices advancing rapidly.   I ad'  "
vise immediate investment.
Consult me.
J S. Murray
-—- *
46 FORT STREET
VICTORIA,   B. C.
P. O. BOX 77 PHONE 1279
We Will Buy
10,000 Denora Mines  $o.n*4
5,000 Cariboo McKinney      J04
1,000 Diamond Vale  17
100 Consolidated Smelters  ..134.00
5,000 Telkwa Mines  Offer
We Will Sell
500 International Coal   $0.68
2,000 Rambler Cariboo   34
2,000 Nicola Coal Mines, Ltd...   ,o6"4
500 La Plata   25
100 Dominion Copper   5.80
If you are interested in stocks, our
quotation sheet will be of benefit to you.
We will mail on request.
B.B. MIGHTON & CO.
Mining and Investment Brokers,
Drawer 1082. Nelson, B. C.
The Home
Seekers
Goal.
Special   Bargains  to
Wind Up An Estate.
6% acres in the North
End, only 20 minutes walk
to Post Office, with southern aspect, $600 per acre,
5 acres is all cleared and in
high state of cultivation.
Seaview lots from $50 to
jjSioo each, chiefly cleared,
and ready for building on.
Easy terms if necessary.
■ The B. C. Land & Investment
Agency, Ltd.
Real Estate, Financial and
1} Insurance Agents,
V VICTORIA, B. C.
FOR SALE
In a good Kootenay town, splendid newspaper outfit and job
plant.
An opportunity for a live man
with small capital.
Address "The Week," Victoria.
W.B.Smith
WnflerfftfUr
35 YATES ST
PHONE,     892
Navy
Sale
Having bought up all the
large 8}£ lb. brass shells
curio collectors and others
will find them highiy desirable for umbrella stands,
flower pots, jardinieres,
etc. They aro 4| in. in diameter and cannot tumble
over. Nice for Christmas presents.   To be had at
H. STADTHAQEN
THE INDIAN TRADER
79 Johnson St. VICTORIA
MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED
TRAVELLERS' GUIDE
VICTORIA
STRAND HOTEL
VICTORIA
The home ot nil theatrical and vaudeville
artists while in the Capital city, alto of
other kindred bohemians.
WRIGHT & FALCONER, Proprietors.
CAMBORNE
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining men and
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
REVELSTOKE
Hotel Victoria
REVELSTOKE, B.C.
Headquarters lor miners and
lumbermen.
ROBT. LAUQHTON, Prop'r.
BANFF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
Banffs Most Popular $2 a Dav Hotel.
Close to Station and Sulphur
Baths.
N. K. LUXTON, Proprietor.
PHOENIX.
Deane's Hotel
PHOENIX, B. C.
New. Modern hot water system. Electric
lighted. Tub and shower baths and laundry in
connection.   The miners' home.
"DANNY" DEANE, Proprietor
GREENWOOD,
The Windsor Hote
GREENWOOD, B. C.
American and European Plan.
Cafe in Connection.
ERNEST J. CARTIER, Prop.
BOSSLAND
Hoffman House
ROSSLAND, B. C.
Rates $1.00 per day and up.   Cafe in
Connection.
GREEN & SniTH. Prop's.
NELSON.
HOTEL HUME
NELSON,   B. C,
Leading Hotel of the Kootenays,
J. FRED HUME,      •      Proprietor.
Silver King Hotel,
NELSON. B. C.
The home of the Industrial Workers
of the Kootenays.
W. E. ncCandllsh,
Proprietor
Lbscribe for The Week.
Royal Hotel
NELSON, B. C.
The Best Family Hotel in the City.
11 a da>.
Mrs. Wm. Roberts, Proprietress
CBANBBOOK.
Cranbrook Hotel
Cranbrook, B. C.
Rates $2 per day.   Opposite the C.P.R.
depot.
Hogarth & Rollins, Proprietors.
WE
HAVE
Fruit Lands
Timber Limits
Range Land
and
Mineral Claims
Throughout the
BOUNDARY
DISTRICT
UNRIVALLED OPPORTUNITIES FOR
FRUIT CULTURE
IN THE KETTLE
RIVER VALLEY.
Before Locating Send   Us   Particulars of What You
Require
A.
Erskine
Smith &
Co.
REALTY and MINING
I VESTMENTS
Reference:  Eastern Townships Bnnk.
Grand Forks, B.C.
Having a Climate and Soil I
equal to any other section f
of British Columbia,
Nelson Fruit
Lands
1 • will save you 25 to 50 per
cent, on cost of original
investment.
H. E. CROASDAILE &  CO.
Nelson, B.C.
Nelson Iron Works
Machinery of all kiuds built,
erected and repaired.
Complete Mining Plants
Cammell Laird Steel, Etc.
R. W. Hinton      NclSOP, B. C.
Collectors!
I carry an assortment of 400
subjects of
Genuine
Photographic
Post Cards
of Banff and the Canadian National
Park, also of Northwest Indians,
Mountain and Game Scenes.
PRICE 6oc. PER DOZEN.
FOR THE TRADE ONLY.
My quotations by the hunlred are
the lowest in Canada. Photo post
curds made from any .subject you
may send uie.
Write for particulars.
Byron Harmon
Photographic Artist,
Banff, Alberta.
IDEAL
CLIMATE
SOIL
and
LOCATION
FOR FRUIT
Plots.
That is what I can offer orchardists
on the shores of beautiful Kootenay
Lake.    Write for literature and maps
J. E* ANNABLE,
The Land Man,
NELSON, B.C.
C. S. BAKER
Assayer,
Chemist
and Ore Shippers' Agent.
GRAND FORKS, B. C.
ASSAY CHARGES.
Gold     ""i.oo
Silver    i.oo
Copper   1.25
Lead   1.25
Iron   1.50
Zinc   2.00
Gold and  Silver  1.50
Gold and Copper  2.00
Gold, Silver and Copper  2.50
Gold. Silver and Lead  2.50
Other metals on application.
A discount allowed to regular customers.
YMIR is a thriving mining
town, situated 18 miles
south of Nelson in the rich
mineral district of West Kootenay. It is essentially ft
frco-mlUlngcamp, and there
are six stamp-mills operating
in the viclnlty-one of them
(the Ymir) being the largest
in Canada, with Its80stamps
constantly dropping. There
are numerous mines In active
operation In the camp, and
reliable Information is always available ln Ymir.
Waldorf Hotel
Headquarters for Mining and Commercial Men.
Sample Rooms in Connection.
YMIR, B. 6.
G. S. e0I.BMnN.
Proprietor.
YMIR enjoys every facility
for mining operations.
Timber and Water nre abundant, lhe roads and trulls are
In good condition ln the
main, and new ones are being opened up. There is dk
met railway communication
wilh three smelters, all within fifty miles of lhe town.
The climate Is congenial and
cverv necessary and luxury,
of life can bc secured in the'
camp and at prices that compare favourably with thoso
of any other district. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1906.
R. C. Concert
at Institute Hall
On Thursday evening a very successful concert in aid of the  R.  C.
Cathedral, Victoria, was held in the
Institute   Hall.    Miss   Sehl  was  responsible for the arrangements which
were admirable. The hall was packed,
and many persons had to stand.   The
array  of local  talent impressed for
the occasion was such as could have
been found in very few cities of the
size of Victoria.   With the single exception of Miss  Spencer, who must
now bc considered a professional, the
singers and instrumentalists were all
amateurs.    The  programme  was  an
ambitious one, consisting almost entirely of classical music, the only exception, a regretable one, being the
introduction  of  comic   songs,  which
nothing could justify, least of all the
ability of the performer in such first
class company.   With this single exception   the   programme   was   above
criticism.   Encores were the order of
the  day, or rather the night.    Miss
Spencer is a worthy successor of Miss
Muriel Foster, whose place she will
take for a world tour with the Albani
Concert   Company.    She    gave  two
brief  selections   and  for   encore  repeated the hitter, "Years of Spring."
Her voice is a light contralto, sweet,
full, and fairly strong, better in the
upper and middle register than in the
lower.     Her    singing    was  a  treat.
Mrs.   Harry  Pooley sang up to her
reputation in Blumenthal's old favourite   "Sunshine   and   Rain,"   and   was
deservedly    encored.       Mrs.    Robin
Dunsmuir, who looked charming in a
grass-green    Empire    gown,    which
probably no other woman in Victoria
could have worn so effectively, scored
a triple triumph, for her singing of
"Till   I  Wake,"  with  violin obligato
by   Miss   Elinor   Dunsmuir,   was   so
insistently  encored that she had to
respond with a second and ultimately
with a third selection before the delighted audience would allow her to
retire.    Mrs.  Dunsmuir has a sweet
soprano voice; it is not very powerful,
but it has a pleasing quality, and her
performance on Thursday night has
established  her  popularity with Victoria  audiences.     It  is  to  be  hoped
that she will be heard oftener in future.    Mr. Arthur Gore and Mr. Gideon  Hicks both sang well and were
rewarded with an encore.   The artistic gem of the evening was Mr. Benedict   Bautly's  playing    of  Chopin's
Scherzo in B flat Minor.   This difficult work requires for its interpretation   the  very  qualities    which   Mr.
Bantly  possesses  in  a  high  degree,
delicacy of touch and facility of execution.   His performance left nothing
to be desired; it was as dainty and
poetical as Pachman's work when he
was about Mr.  Bautly's age, and is
full of promise for the future for the
brilliant  young  pianist.    Mr.  J.   H.
Gordon  was  encored   for  his  'cello
solo,   "The    Polonaise"    by   Potter.
Mrs. Hermann Robertson played delightfully throughout, whether as an
accompanist   or   in   the   duet   from
Tschaikowski  with  Mr.   Bantly, and
Mrs.   Pooley,  Miss  Spencer,  Mr.  A.
T. Goward and  Mr. George Phillips
gave    an    admirable    rendering   of
Mascheles'   favourite   old   quartette,
"The Village Chorister." His Honour
the  Lieutenant-Governor, with  Mrs.
Dunsinuir   ;ind   several   members   of
their family were present. Archbishop
Orth, who was assiduous in his attention   to   visitors,   and   Miss   Sehl,
upon  whom  the brunt of the work
of preparation fell, must bc gratified
at the hearty response of the public.
entertained a number of their friends
at Five Hundred on Friday evening
last, a most enjoyable evening being
spent by the many guests.
* *   *
Mrs. Galletly was hostess at a
small dinner party given on Friday
last, covers being laid for eight. The
guests were: Dr. and Mrs. Fagan,
Mr. and Mrs. Hollyer, Mr. Lindley
Crease and Miss Crease.
* *   #
Mrs. Loewen was hostess at a most
enjoyable bridge party given on Tuesday afternoon last at "Rockwood."
The prize was won by Mrs. White
Fraser. The guests were: Mrs. W.
S. Gore, Mrs. T. S. Gore, Mrs. Mat-
son, Mrs. Hickman Tye, Mrs. Little,
Mrs. Freeman, Mrs. Berkeley, Mrs.
Irving, Mrs. Bullen, Miss Dupont,
Miss A. Dupont, Mrs. Tuck, Miss
Miller, Mrs. Gaudin, Mrs. J. H. Todd,
Mrs. Amberry, Mrs. Grahame. The
tea table was prettily decorated in
holly and those who assisted were:
Mrs. Barnard, Mrs. Jones, Mrs. Robertson,^ Mrs. Pooley, Miss Loewen,
Miss Eva Loewen; Mrs. Robin Dunsmuir, and Miss Elinor Dunsmuir.
* *   *
Mrs. James Dunsmuir entertained
at luncheon on Friday, the 7th inst.,
at Government House, covers being
laid for twenty. The table was
charmingly decorated in pink carnations and ferns. Mrs. Dunsmuir was
assisted by her daughter, Mrs. An-
daine. The guests were: Mrs. Freeman, Mrs. Clapham, Mrs. Rhodes,
Mrs. J. li. Todd, Mrs. Rithet, Miss
Dupont, Miss A. Dupont, Miss C. Dupont, Mrs. Hickman Tye, Mrs. Duncan Eberts, Mrs. Loewen, Miss Harvey, Miss Annie Harvey, Mrs. Rocke
Robertson.
Mrs. Norton was hostess at another
of her delightful dances on Friday,
the 7th inst., at thc A. O. U. W. Hall,
Yates Street. The supper room was
very effectively decorated with greenery and pink shaded lights, while the
table was done in pink carnations, and
candles shaded with pink, interspersed
with asparagus ferns and trailing
greenery. Among the many pretty
costumes worn by the ladies, those
looking especially well were:
Mrs. Norton, who wore a dainty
pink chiffon dress.
Miss Paula Irving looked well in
white.
Miss Eberts wore a smart white
gown.
Miss Newling looked dainty in gray
trimmed with lace.
Miss Tiny Monteith wore a pretty
flowered organdie with wide hem and
girdle of pink silk.
Miss Little wore a pretty pink
dress.
Aliss Sehl looked extremely well in
pink.
Miss Hickey wore a white dotted
Swiss over pale blue.
Miss Vera Mason was much admired in pink.
Miss Johnson's dress was of green
and white muslin over a green slip.
Miss Genevieve Irving, in white.
Miss Keefer appeared to advantage
in black.
Miss Bryden was charming in white
silk.
Miss Cobbett was greatly admired
in an old gold silk gown.
Others present were: Mr. and
Mrs. Pigott, Mr. and Mrs. Janion,
Mr. and Mrs. Beauchamp Tye, Mrs.
Janion, Mr. and Miss Arbuckle, Mr.
and the Misses Pitts, the Misses
Mason, Miss Savage, Miss Arbuthnot,
the Misses Blakemore, Miss Corbett,
Mrs. II. F. Langton, the Misses Irving, Mr. and Miss Bullen, the Misses
Goddard, Miss Daisy Langley, Miss
Gladys Green, Miss Keefer, Miss Tiny
Monteith, Miss Dupont, Mr. Browne,
Mr. J. Browne, Mr. Gore, Mr. Taylor,
Mr. Rochefort, Mr. Mackay (Winnipeg), Mr. Gordon, Mr. Walter Brown,
Mr. Bcthune, Mr. Motherwell, Miss
Moresby, the Misses Sweet, Mrs.
Sweet, Mr. A. J. Julier, Mr. Gaudin,
Mr. Brae, Miss Fo.bt, Mr. Foot, Mr.
Cambie. Mr. Warner, Mr. Fletcher,
Mr. Elliott, Mr. Lawson, Mr. Wilby,
Mr. Smythe, Mr. Fisher, Mr. Mc-
Cunly, and many others. Mrs. Nor-
ton intends holding her next dance on
Friday, the 28th inst. The affair is
to be a "bal poudre."
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special licence to cut and carry away timber
from the following described lands:
1. Commencing at a post on the
east side of the North Fork of Coeur
d'Alene River, about 7 miles from its
outlet into Effingham Inlet, Clayoquot District; thence 80 chains north;
80 chains west; 80 chains south; 80
chains east to point of commencement.
2. Commencing at a post by the
southeast corner of* No. 1; thence 160
chains north; thence 40 chains east;
thence 160 chains south; thence 40
chains west to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
d'Alene River, about 100 chains S. of
No. 2; thence 100 chains N.; thence
80 W., along boundary No. 2; thence
60 S.;  thence 40 E.;  thence 40 S.;
thence E. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
4.  Commencing at a post on Coeur
d'Alene River, near and south of the
S.   E.  corner  of  No.  3;  thence   100
chains N.; thence 40 W., to E. boundary of No. 3; thence 40 S., to S.E.
corner of No.'3; thence 40 W.; thence
60 S.; thence 80 E. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
5]   Commencing at a post by the S.
E. corner of No. 4; thence 80 chains
N.; thence 80 E.; thence 80 S.; thence
W. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, iqo6.
6. Commencing at a post by the S.
W. corner of No. 5; thence 40 chains
W.; thence 80 S.; thence 80 E., along
N. boundary of Coeur d'Alene Mineral Claims; thence 80 N., to S.
boundary of No. 5; thence 40 W. to
point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,      .
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
7. Commencing at a post by the
N.E. corner of the Coeur d'Alene
Mineral Claims; thence 80 N., along
E. boundary of No. 6; thence 80 E.;
thence 80 S.; thence 80 W. to point
of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 21st, 1906.
8. Commencing at a post by the N.
E. corner of the Coeur d'Alene Mineral Claims; thence 80 chains S.;
tiience 80 E.; thence 80 N.; thence 80
W. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 21st, 1906.
9. Commencing at a post by the W.
boundary of the Coeur d'Alene Mineral Claims, about 40 chains S. of
S. boundary of No. 6; thence N. 40
chains; thence W. 40 chains; thence
S. 160; thence E. 40; thence N. to
point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 21st, 1906.
10. Commencing at a post by the S.
W. corner of No. 8, and about 10
chains E. of Coeur d'Alene River;
thence 40 chains S.; thence 40 W.;
thence 60 S.; thence 80 E.; thence 100
N., to S. boundary of No. 8; thence
40 W. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 21st, 1906. Dec.15
Ol^t^l*l*l*l*t****i *t^*i^**ktm4+i^**klmj*^***Vmt*i^i*h+ffl
MY SYMPHONY.
Social and
Personal.
Mrs.  Corsan is the guest of Mrs.
John Hirsch, Gorge Road.
* *   *
Mr. James Gaudin and Mr. Motherwell are enjoying a shooting trip to
Cowichan Lake.
* *    *
The friends of Mrs. Cecil Roberts
will be glad to learn that she is convalescing rapidly after her operation.
* *   *
Mr. Kenneth Brown (New Westminster), who has been the guest of
Mrs. Fagan, Pleasant Street, for the
past week, returned to his home yesterday.
Mrs.   Pigott,   Sr.,
*
and
Mr.  Pigott
To live content with small means; to
seek elegance rather than luxury, and
refinement rather than fashion; to be
worthy, not respectable; and wealthy,
not rich; to study hard, think quietly,
talk gently, act frankly, to listen to
stars and birds, babes and sages, -with
open heart, to bear all cheerfully, do all
bravely, await occasions, hurry never;
jn a word, to let the spiritual, unbidden
and unconscious, grow up through the
commonplace.—Channing.
NOTICE is hereby given that, sixty
days (60) nfter date, I intend to apply to thc Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works, Victoria, B. C,
fr * permission to purchase the southwest quarter of Section Twenty-three
(23) Township Eight (8), Range
Five (s), Coast District, Bulkley Valley, containing one hundred and
sixty (tool acres, more or less.
.H E. WILDMAN.
ist December, 1906. Dec.15
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land on the right
bank of the Skeena River, Range V,
Coast District: Commencing at a
post marked "James McGown, initial
post," at thc N.E. corner of the New
Town Indian Reserve; thence west,
along the Indian Reserve line, 40
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence
east 40 chains; thence south along
the Skeena River to point of commencement containing 150 acres,
more or less.
JAMES McGOWN.
December 13th, 1906. Dec.15
TAKE NOTICE that, 60 days from
date, I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following described lands, situated on
the left bank of the Skeena River,
about one mile below the Little
Canon and commencing at Ed. Mi-
chaud's N.E. corner post on the bank
of the Skeena. Thence S. 40 chains;
thence E. 40 chains; thence N. 42
chains, more or less, to Sousie's S.
boundary; thence W. 38 chains, more
or less, to thc Skeena River; thence
N. 3 chains, more or less, to point of
commencement, containing 170 acres,
more or less.
N. GOWEN.
A. W. HARVEY, Agent.
Dec. 15
TAKE NOTICE that, 60 days from
date, I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following described land, commencing at
a post planted on the bank of the
RETIRING FROM BUSINESS
Ribbons of every description about half price.
A special line of Silk and Satin Taby Ribbon at 20 cents
a doz., good for tying Christmas parcels.
Mrs. W. Bickford, 61-63 Fort Street.
lh Sanitarium Hotol, which is beautifully situated, overlooking the Bow Itiver and its lovely and
romantic va|ley, is a large 5-story building elegantly
fitted with every appointment calculated to bring
pleasure and comfort to tho tourist, or invalid.
'■A private hospital, which, though isolated, is in
close proximity to thc Sanitarium, is presided over by
skilfully .trained nurses and is also fitted out with
every appliance necessary to a first class institution
of its kind.
A Very commodious bath-house adjoins tlie hotel*
where I urkish, Hussian, plunge, shower and douche
baths nre given undor medical supervision, with
water.dlrect from the celubratod hot sulphur springs.
A first, class livory in connection so that rides and
drives through the maguifieant scouery may be en-
loycd.
Ternis: $2.0i) a day upwards. Special rates by week
or month.  Open all the yoai*.
W. H. SCARTH, Manager.
Medical Staff:
lt. G. Brett, m.d ;   G. M. Atkin, m.u.;
It. H. Bkett, B.A.. M D.
If you love your wife
BUY  HER  A GAS STOVE
It will save her a lot of extra work and
give her time for other things
besides cooking.
Cook Tour Boast, Do Not Boast Your Cook,
VICTOKIA GAS COMPANY, LIMITED.
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OP
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
PHONE 803. VICTOR 1/
Skeena River two and a half miles
below Kitwangat, at the N.W. corner
of  A.   E.   Price's    purchase    claim;
thence S. 22 chains, more or less, to
the S.W. comer of A. E. Price's purchase claim; thence W. 40 chains to
the S.E. corner of Elizabeth Price's
purchase claim; thence N. 31 chains,
more  or  less,  to the  Skeena  River,
containing 100 acres, more or less.
F. PRICE.
A.  ./. HARVEY, Agent.
Dec.15
NOTICE is hereby given that ixty
sdays after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for permission to
purchase the following described lands,
situate on the  north  shore of Stuq
Lake about 2l/2 miles inland and abc
half way between  Pinchi and Tachj
Rivej-s,   in  the Coast District of  tl
Province   of   British   Columbia,   vi.i
Commencing at a post marked "R.
C," placed at the northeast corner
lot 331; thence atsronomicall" north
chains;   thence  astronomically east
chains; thence astronomically south
chains; thence  astronomically   west ,
chains, and thence astronomically noi
40 chains  to the point of commend
ment, and containing 640 acres, morel
less. L
ROBERT SENIORl
J. A. Hickey, AgentJ
August 24, igo6.
December 8. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1906
STILL   MORE
CHRISTMAS OFFERINGS AT WEILER BROTHERS.
Beautiful
Homes.
Of course the whole of our energies and knowledge are devoted to
the creation of beautiful homes in
Western Canada; but the art of furnishing artistically and economically
has made such gigantic strides during
recent years that specialization. is
absolutely necessary to keep abreast
of the times; that is why our showrooms are so organized that each
floor deals with specialized parts of
home, hotel, club or office furnishing.
OUR DRAPERY SECTION.
At this season of the year our
Drapery Section appeals most strongly to every lover of the home beautiful. It is here they find those rich
draperies and art fabrics so absolutely necessary in correct schemes of
furnishing. In this department are
also exhibited those smaller and most
recherche lace, tapestry, silk and art
fabrics which form such delightful
gifts for those friends who take a
pride in their home surroundings.
LIBERTY CURTAINS
These are new goods, Liberty's
latest creations. Curtains, Table Covers and Bedspreads, en suite, in white
background with elegant floral tracery. We sell these either in the
suite or separately.
Curtains, 5x8 feet, per pair $12 00
Bedspread, 9x9 feet    8 50
Table Cover, 36 inches square..   I 25
Many other Liberty Fabrics and
Furnishings in our Drapery Section.
CUSHIONS
We are showing a great wealth of
Cushions and Cushion Covers in our
Christmas display, including—
Indian Printed Muslin Cushions, excellent for divans, each $1 50
Silk Cushion with floss filling, in art
designs, in many different color
schemes, each  $2 25
Silk Cushion, floral centre, self-colored silk border and frilling, down
filled, each  $3 5°
Very large and elaborate Brocaded
Silk Cushion, trimmed with real
Connemara hand-made lace, down-
filled, a very beautiful piece of
work, each  $13 50
CUSHION COVERS
In Tapestry, all colors, many designs,
each    25c
Liberty Design Cushion Covers, large
size  50c      I
Dutch and Burne-Jones Design Cush-    j"^
ion Covers, each 65c   A*
Nursery Rhyme Cushion Covers, ex- "jm
tremely fashionable, each 65c   M
Plush Art Cushion Covers, excellent
for sofas and easy chairs, each.$i 35
Silk Cushion Covers, very dainty designs, each  $1 50
Embroidered Linen Cushion Covers,
with frill, each $1 50
Cushion Pads of every description,
from  60c up
NEW BEDSPREADS
Most Dainty Creations in Linen, with
very beautiful lace centres, size 72X
72.   Prices $8 50 and $10 00
"What lack ye ladies?
Cushions or covers, satinettes or silks?
Herein ye find a wondrous choice,
A very marvel of sweet devices."
(Copyright) A. D.
SOLID STERLING SILVER
Corkscrew, Boar's Tusk Handle	
 $6 00 ea.
Match Box   2 40 ea.
Pomade Box, Cut Glass and Silver
Top  $3 00 ea.
Sugar Spoons  1 50 ea.
Sugar Tongs   2 25 ea.
Souvenir Spoons 75c to $1 00 ea.
Sardine Forks   2 50 ea.
Hair Brush and Comb.$7 50 to $10 ea.
Hair   Brush,   Conib  and   Mirror  in
case  $20 00 ea.
Shoe Horns         75 ea.
Shaving Brushes   2 00 ea.
Salt Spoons 50c and $1 00 ea.
Oyster Forks, set of six in case.$8 00
Serviette Rings, each  2 00
The above  is only one of many beautiful designs in Quadruple Silver
Plate Tea and Coffee  Sets we  are offering.
S pieces as illustrated or very similar   $25 00
20-in. Tray with handles, ea... 20 00
17-in. Tray without handles, ea. 14 00
Oriental
Rugs.
Of the most beautiful description;
sublime specimens of rich Oriental
colorings and designs are ready for
your inspection. The long velvety
pile of these sumptuous floor coverings invites the tread, and gives a
most restful feeling to the feet; the
eye never wearies of the wealth of
design used in weaving these masterpieces of Oriental art.
We give particulars of three sizes
as a guide to prices:
10 ft. 1 in. by 8 ft $ 80 00
11 ft. by 9 ft  no 00
10 ft. 1 in. by 12 ft  125 00
BUNDERABBUS RUGS
Noted for their extremely rich Oriental effects in dark blue, greens and
reds and their exquisite silky pile,
combined with great strength and
durability.
4 ft. 8 in. by 3 ft. 1 in $11 25
6 ft. 6 in. by 5 ft. 3 in  22 50
8 ft. 7 in. by 6 ft. 4 in  30 00
7 ft. 6 in. by 11 ft  60 00
MIRZAPORE RUGS
We have a very fine, well-selected
stock of the Genuine Mirzapore Rugs
—most effective in coloring and design, and very low in price for Genuine Oriental Rugs.
2 ft. by 6 ft $ 8 00
3 ft. by 6 ft    9 00
7 ft. by 10 ft  35 00
9 ft. by 9 ft  50 00
GENUINE SAKAI RUGS
Are so remarkably low in price that
everyone  can afford to utilize  their
effective Oriental colorings for home
.•,'?'■" ?r{K\    decorations  in   addition  to  securing
?   '".ai'Sl    warm, comfortable floor coverings for
"      n  cold nights.   They are very heavy in
texture,  and   require   no  tacking  to
keep them    in    position.    Sizes and
prices arc as follows:
1/4 ft. by 3 ft $     75
j'/j ft. by 5 ft  2 OO
3 ft. by 6 ft  2 50
4 ft. by 7 ft  4 OO
6 ft. by 9 ft  8 00
7Y1 ft. by 9 ft  10 00
o ft. by 9 ft  12 00
9 ft. by 12 ft  16 00
12 ft. by 15 ft  25 00
ALL OUR PRICES ARE
SUBJECT TO A DISCOUNT
OF 5 PER CENT.
FOR CASH.
flgr Mail Orders Filled Promptly and Carefully
Weiler Bros.
Complete Home, Hotel, -Slab and Office Furnishers,
SHOWROOMS:
33 GOVERNMENT STREET
Corner of Broufhton and Government Streets, Victor's, B. C
FACTORY SS
HUMBOLDT   STREET,
VICTORIA, B.C.
WAREHOUSE
Cor. of Broad and Broughton Sts.
VICTORIA, B. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY DECEMBER 15, 1906.
I    At The Street   $
* Corner h
P By THE LOUNOER ef
"Is a proper appreciation of Poetry
necessarily contingent upon being in
Love?"   This is a question which has
been propounded to me for treatment
in this column, and I have decided to
- do   the best   I   can   with   it   in  the
week's issue.   A most unfair task, and
•one whieh should by all the laws of
right and wrong have been left for
my brother of the quill,  Bohemian,
who delights in these abstruse argu-
iments; whereas I, Ss a'mere Lounger,
I am  supposed  to  have  my  attention
i riveted on more mundane affairs, and
am usually forbidden to soar into the
ethereal domain, where Love is popularly supposed to hold his sway.
I have come to the conclusion that
the best and safest way to examine
this proposition is to regard in a
J purely logical light. It is fairly s'af-
; to take for the major syllogism, "All
men in love appreciate poetry."' This
I think is true in almost all cases, *f
one may judge from wiiat the nov
elists say, and from the fact that all
the men whom I have met when they
are suffering from severe heart disease profess to find relief in poetry
(on many occasions I have found
them reading it). The minor syllogism then would be "Smith is in
love," which brings us to the conclusion that "Smith appreciates poetry." So far so good, but how does
the converse hold good? Supposing
that Smith were not in love, would
hc appreciate poetry just the same?
In other words, is his appreciation
the direct result of his being in love?
I know many men who are not in
love, who do not value poetry one
atom. Amongst them I am not
ashamed to class myself. I know
many married men who do not vaiuc
poetry, but whether that argues ihat
they are no longer in love, I hesitate
to say. Far be it from me to wreck
any happy home by such a suggestion. I don't know any woman who
docs not appreciate poetry, but this
1 fancy is mostly due to the fact
that no woman would dare to confess
to a failing in this respect. Poetry
and woman are one and the same
, idea. At least they are supposed to
be, and to be correct and in keeping
it is as well to bug the delusion. How
much poetry would there be if there
were no women? True there have
been many poems written on other
subjects; for instance, "Old Dog
Tray" and-"The Minstrel Boy," but
when all is said and done it is the
"eternal feminine" who is responsible
for the majority of verses which
flood the market.
Let us examine this feature a little
more closely. There is nothing outre
in that little song entitled "Drink to
me only," but at the Same time thc
expressed opinion that a rose, after
having been given to a dog for inspection, "breathes not of itself but
thec" would bc somewhat suggestive.
Tennyson's beautiful invitation to the
garden is admitted to be without a
rival, but we can hardly imagine that
this gem would have attained to its
present popularity if it had been addressed to thc Maud of the comic
newspapers. Certainly what one
might call thc soul of poetry depends
very largely upon the sentiments affecting the writer; it is undoubted
that in the majority of cases these
.sentiments arc those of love; it is
also undoubted that to soul-less individuals like myself, and others
whom I could name, these same sentiments sound like a conglomeration
of high-falutin' balderdash. There
can be no possible doubt in this case
then that there is something lacking
in thc reader's composition, and it
requires no stretch of the imagination
to conclude that the thing lacking is
the state of being in love.
Personally I find that I am too
practical to appreciate all the sweet
impossibles which are woven into the
typical verse. Of course my readers
must understand that in this disquisition I make a difference between
real poety and mere verse. I yield
to no man in my love of The Ingolds-
by Legends, or in my full apprecia
tion of the common or garden, but
often intensely humorous Limerick.
I am referring solely to the ravings
couched in verse which entreat beautiful maidens, whose eyes are comparable to every jewel in the dictionary to be wafted down Zephyrs
amidst balmy spices in the soft
gloaming. You know the kind I
mean. Honestly, reader, ask yourself whether you really appreciate
poetry; the masterpieces, mind, not
rubbishy little things; be quite candid
with yourself, because you needn't
tell anyone; then ask yourself whether you are in love, and finally just
make up your mind whether you
think that it is really necessary to be
in love to appreciate poetry. If wheu
you have come to a conclusion *you
would drop me a line as to the result,
you would confer an inestimable benefit, as if the one is not dependent on
the other, I will go in for a strong
course of poetry^ and try and learn to
like it, whereas if it is dependent, I'll
just wait till the blind god plays the
part of Homocea.
It has come to. my ears that Victoria, although the capital of a Province, and the centre of civilization on
this coast, is yet unsafe at nights.
There is nothing wonderful in this.
Thugs and other desperadoes will
abound wherever victims congregate,
but all the same it was rather a surprise to me to hear that so populous
a part of the city as James' Bay
should furnish a hunting-ground for
vermin that find amusement in
frightening ladies, as early as io
o'clock in the evening. Yet such has
been the case. An extra policeman in
that section might do much good, but
even if the offenders are caught it is
disappionting to reflect on the fact
that they can never get what they
really deserve. Oh, for the days of
the cat and the pillory.
It is a curious thing that one of
thc most frequently used passages in
Victoria should invariably be known
by its wrong name. What is the
name of the by-way connecting Broad
street and Government street, up
which you pass six times a day? If
you were asked where The Grotto
was or were trying to describe the
position of the C. P. R. Telegraph
Office, what would you say? Trounce
Alley, did I hear? Wrong, quite
wrong, and yet that is what ninety-
nine men out of a hundred men will
say every time. I don't suppose one
man in the whole day would tell you
that it was Trounce Avenue, and yet
that is what is written up, under the
windows of the Y. M. C. A., at the
Broad Street end of the passage. It
is a popular theory, and like most
popular theories, an erroneous one,
that an avenue must have trees planted on each side of the road. Of
course no such thing is necessary.
An avenue simply signifies a means
of coming to a place or a state. We
talk about an avenue of thought leading to such and such a conclusion,
clearly showing that the word was
originally, used as a synonym for passage. How the idea for the necessity
of trees first came into being and
grew, is hard to say, but though it
is true that at the present day an
avenue means a tree-planted road,
there is no hard and fast rule for this,
and Trounce Avenue stands in our
city as an excellent example to the
contrary.
There is much discussion on the
tapis just now about the bridging of
Seymour Narrows. I thinks that
British Columbians would be intensely surprised, and very much amused,
if they knew that the majority of
people in the Old Country, who have
not had anything to do with British
Columbia, believe that such a bridge
already exists, and that the distance
between thc Island and the Mainland
is about the same as across the Menai
Straits. And though this seems curious to us, yet why should they not
think so? It is hard to appreciate
distances from maps; no geography
which I have ever seen tells specifically the distance. I plead guilty to
having firmly believed that when I
reached Vancouver by the C. P. R.
I should cross a bridge and find myself in Victoria in about a quarter of
an hour. And I have had a good
education, at least it was supposed to
bc a good one. I have had letters
from well-educated friends referring
to Vancouver and Victoria as though
one   could   walk   across.    One   man
The Fur business is done better in Victoria than almost anywhere else on the
continent. We set the pace w ith hancl=
some displays of
Persian Lamb Jackets
Canadian riink Coats
Handsome
Sealskin Coats
Labrador Mink Stoles
in qualities that are absolutely dependable, and at the lowest prices that really
high-grade Furs ever sell for. We know
the market and we know your needs.
Out-of-town customers should write for our catalogue.
THE B. C. FUR MANF'fl COMPNY
VICTORIA. B.C.
CIGAR
for the .Christmas trade are being received daily
also presents for the most fastidious devotee of
Lady   Nicotine.
Your Favorite Brand Can Now Be Had in Perfect Condition.
If you smoke Havanas we shall be pleased to show aud quote low prices for fine cigars.
The Old Post Office Cigar Store
J.   A.   WORTHINGTON, PROP. VICTORIA. B.
800KS FOR
CHILDREN
In an age like this when the best
books may be had at a price which puts
them within the reach of every one, it
is little short of a crime to keep the
children in a state of intellectual starvation.
Put some good books into their hands
which they shall learn to value as their
own. Let the seed of high and noble
thought be planted in their receptive
minds, and, with the ground preempted, they will be much less likely
in the stress and strain of after years
to give entrance to the things that
scar and stain.
We are showing a particularly fine
selection sf Books for the young of all
ages. Books to suit every taste, every
age. To list these here would be impossible. We will gladly have you
call and look them over.
THOMSON
STATIONERY C
325 Hastings St.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
wrote to me once and said that it
must bc a terrible nuisance doing
without theatres and electric light. I
should imagine that the persistent advertising which has been given to
British Columbia lately must have
had some effect in dispelling these
notions, but I am only speaking of
two years ago. Truly is it said that
to the stay-at-home Englishman the
hub of the universe is the fountain in
Piccadilly, and to him all other places
are as the Cannibal Islands; all very
well to look at, but not healthy spots
in which to stay for dinner. However, when once John Bull does settle down abroad he contrives to
make himself comfortable, and no
more wants to go back home again
than does
10 Per Cent. DISCOUNT
FOR THE  NEXT
FEW DAYS
C  ... 1
LEATHER
GOODS.
Our stock includes the
latest fashion fancies in
Bags, Suit Cases, Fitted
Bags, Gladstones, etc., iu
fine leathers, genuine walrus, alligator, etc., etc.
Prices from $7.50 to $65.00
E. CHAPMAN
DAVIS  CHAMBERS
Opposite Strand Hotel,
Vancouver.
IL
FREE!
Three Courses
IN THE
Sprott-Shaw
Business Institute
LIMITED
836 HASTINGS ST., W.
VANCOUVER.
Bookkeeping, Gregg and Pitman
Shorthand, Telegraphy, and Engineering.
Eight Teachers.
Forty.fi ve Typewriters.
For particulars regarding how these
courses may be obtained, see The Week's
announcement in unotner column.
R.J. Sprott.B.A., Principal.
H. A. Scriven, B.A., Viot-Principal,
J. R. Cunningham, Secretary.
JOHN COOPER
Taxidermist and Pur Dresser
Mounting Large Game Heads
a Specialty.
626 PENDER STREET,
VANCOUVER.
M. J. HENRY'S
NURSERIES and SEED HOUSES
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Headquarters for Pacific Coast grown
Garden, Field and Flower Seeds for
Spring planting.
A large stock of home grown Fruit
and Ornamental Trees now matured
for the Spring trade.
No expense, loss or delay of fumigation or inspection.
We do business on our own grounds
—no rent to pay—and are prepared
to meet all competition.
Let me price your list before placing your order. Greenhouse plants,
floral work, bee supplies, fruit packages, fertilizers, spraying material,
etc.   Catalogue free.
M. j. HENRY
3010 Westminster Road, Vancouver' I_^_____I__B_-_BB_B_BB_HBBHLI>b-1HKS-B
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1Q06.
0LLA P0DR1DA
Didn't Want'the Complexion.
"Hab yo' got  any medicine dat will
purify de blood?"
"Yes; we keep this    sarsaparilla    at
one dollar a bottle.   It purines the blood j
and clears the complexion.
A GIRL'S ESSAY on Man. ..*....*..     "Well> boss* hasn,t y°' gQt suffin' fo'i
Men are what women marry.   They about fifty cents. Jess fo' de blood?   I?
drink and smoke and swear and  have don't keer about de complexion."-I.
ever so many pockets, but they won't ■»: if-
go to church.   Perhaps if   they   wore ™
bonnets they would.    They are more Rio De Janeiro English,
logical than women and more zoologi-     A firm in Rio de Janeiro recently sent
cal.   Both men and women have sprung out the following advertisement    about
from monkeys, but women spring fur- oil:
ther than men." "Ours olives oils have guarantzied of
.  fitts  quality.    Diligently  fabricated and
John Randolph and the Appeal to filtrated;   the consumer will find with
Posterity. them the good taste and perfect preser-
During the delivery of one of those vation. For to escape any counterfeit,
tedious and intermniable speeches that is necessary to requiere on any bottles
are often inflicted upon the House of this contrmarc deposed conformably to
Representatives, a member who had oc- the law.
cupied the floor for many hours, was     "The   corks   and the boxes have all
called to order, on the ground that his -marked with the fire."
remarks were not pertinent to the ques
CAflPBELL'S
A Sell.
And what price shall I put
t|6;n   before the House.   "I know it,"
said he, "I am not speaking   for   the     Clerk.   _wu   „,._ ^.^ _,..„.,
benefit of the House,.but for posterity." on tn*s ]ot 0f wf,ite duck trousers?
"Speak a little longer," said Randolph,     Employer:   Four and a half a pair.
in an undertone, "and you   will   have
your audience before you."
Robert Burns.
Robert Burns was one day in a very *ess of cost gjr
fine private library of books, which the 	
proprietor seemed to value more for
their outward show thna for their internal value. Bums, -tier some few
hours'  conversation with    the    owner.
Clerk: But they cost only forty-five
cents a pair.
Employer: I don't care what they
cost.   This is a closing-out sale, regard-
Both Pairs in the Same Fix.
I put up one night at an inn and the
servant took my boots to polish them,
hours'  conversation with    tlie    owner   ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^^
wrote the following couplet, and left it ^ ^ ^ ^   ^   ..^^   ^
on the library table: boots, boss."
"Free through these books, ye maggots,     J ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^
seek your winding, servant wjth one ,ong boot   and   one
But for the owner's sake, O spare tne ^^ ^    j ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ fcy
binding."
_^^^^_^^_^^ boots mixed up with another pair, and
 f    7~r.   ■ said:   "What's the matter, Pete?   Why
Sheridan Taking the Chair. « ^..^      boQts arg mt of {he same
The late R. B. Sheridan being once on length?„
a parliamentary committee, happened to     ^
.. r „
enter the room when most of the members of the committee were present and
seated, though business had not commenced ; when, perceiving there was not
another seat vacant, he, with his usual
readiness, said, "Will any gentleman
move that I may take the chair?"
'Sho, sah, I dunno," said hte servant
But, sah, what bothers me de most is
dat de pair below am in de same fix,
sah."
Bridget Whist.
"Phwere hov yez been this avenin'?
asks O'Tunder, of O'Toole.
"Sure,   I've   been   playing   Bridget
whist.   'Tis a foine game, it is."
"Bridget whist?   An' how do yez play
Aristotle on Learning.
Aritsotle was asked what were the advantages of learning. He replied, "It
is an ornament to a man in prosperity,    °**    ...... ,
7     1      4~ h.~. in adv#.r*iitv" "Oi sit in the kiechen wid Bridget and
and a refuge to htm in advers.ty. ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^.^ ^ ^
W al Fame Bridget hears the mistress comin' she
Scott   had   tasted   at ouu house the ^ys     'Whist'!'    and   Oi hide in the
Yarmouth bloaters, then an article of Panthr>**      	
less savory notoriety than at present. "
allowed their superority to the "Fin- Peace on Both Sides.
nan baddies," and enquired where they     A travelling salesman died suddently
were to be got.   My mother, having un- in Pittsburg, Pa., and    some   of   his
dertaken the commission, applied to our friends  telegraphed  to the undertaker
fishmonger, Mr. B n,   of   Billings- an order to make a large wreath.   In-
gate, a most worthy and matter-of-fact vestigation showed that the telegram or-
Triton whom no one would have sus- dering the wreath read as follows:
pected'of an addiction to poetry or ro- "Rest in peace," on both sides of tlie
mance. Hearing that the half hundred ribbon; if there should be room: "We
small fishes were to be sent, as far as shall meet in heaven."
Sussex Place, he rather shook his head The undertaker was out of town, and
at the inconvenient distance. the new assistant handled the job.   It
"Rather out of our beat, ma'm. There was a startling floral piece which turned
are plenty of places where they can be up at the funeral.   The ribbon was extra
.       j,, wide, and it bore the inscription:
"I am sorry for that, for I am afraid "Rest in peace on both sides, and if
Sir Walter Scott will be disappointed, there is room we shall meet in heaven."
having learned that yours are the best." „.«...
"Sir Walter Scott, ma'am!  God bless Married Tae His Sister,
my soul, is Sir Walter Scott in town? A story is told of a shrewish Scotch
Tom go and pick the very best half woman, who tried to wean her husband
hundred you can find in that fresh lot from the public-house by employing her
from Yarmouth. Well, ma'am, and how brother to act the part of a ghost, and
is he looking? Why, of you had told frighten John on his way home. 'Who
me they were for him I would have sent are you?" said the guidman, as the ap-
them to Jerusalem or Johnny Grot's paration rose before Him from behind
house. Now mind, Tom, that the boy a bush. "I am Auld Nick," was the restarts directly; remember 24 Sussex ply. "Come awa', man," said John,
Place, and no mistake about it." nothing daunted, "Gie's a shake 0' your
This circumstance being recounted to hand—I am married tae a sister 0'
Scott, he cordially exclaimed: yours."
"Well,   now.   this is something like —	
real tangible fame. I like this more The Pride of Ancestry.
than all the minauderies of the old An Englishman was boasting to an
French countesses, who used to bother American of his ancestry. He put his
me at Paris with their extravagant com- hand in his pocket and drew out a coin
pliments, and were only thinking, I'll be bearing an impression of the head of
sworn, of their own vanity all the George IV. upon its surface. "That,"
wnjie_» he said, "is the likeness of the man who
 made my grandfather a lord."
An Athenian who warned eloquence, After surveying it the American in his
but who was an able and brave man, turn drew out from his pocket a copper
when one of his :ou,itrv trie- had in a cent bearing the device of the bead of
brilliant speech promised -Teat things, the American Indian. "That," he said,
rose and said, "Men of Athens, all that "is the likeness of the man who made
be has said, I will do." my grandfather an angel."
HANDKERCHIEFS
THOUSANDS of handkerchiefs,
specially imported for the Xmas
season, direct from Old England
and Belfast, and the real Irish linen handkerchiefs with small real
lace edges, from ioc up. See our
windows.
LADIES' BELTS
IN SILK and Leather, smart new
creations, correct in detail and correct in prices. See the Elsie Janes
Belt, shaped, with patent fastener.
LADIES' BAGS
SUCH pretty bags in new and
beautiful shapes and shades; the
interiors are as well finished as
the exteriors.
CHRISTMAS
OFFERINGS
GLOVES
Dent's Special, per pair $1.00
English Kid Gloves, per pair. 1,00
French Kid Gloves, per pair..  1.00
Maggioni Kid Gloves  1.50
Perrin's Best, per pair   1.50
EVERY PAIR GUARANTEED.
Full stock of ladies' evening gloves
in lace, suede and silk.
NECKWEAR
IN ENDLESS variety, all the latest London and Paris fashions,
lace, chiffon and accordion pleated,
packed in special boxes for mailing.
FANS
SEE the goods, then examine the
prices, and you will buy one because they are perfectly beautiful
productions.
CHILDREN'S DRESSES
IN    Embroidered    Muslin,' such
pretty party frocks, costing very
little money.   Also Bibs, Bonnets
and Bearskin Coats.
SILK BLOUSES
SPECIAL   importations   for our
Xmas showing; splendid goods at
specially low prices.
COATS AND COSTUMES
NEW   Hand-Tailored   Costumes
from London and Paris; recent arrivals for our early spring orders.
EIDER ROBES
WILL keep you warm and comfortable; why  not  have one  this
Christmas?   Suggest it.
SKIRTS
FINEST  effects  in Tweeds  and
Ladies' Cloths—a great wealth of
selection, including the new chiffon-Panama and black silk.
OPERA CLOAKS.
BEAUTIFUL   productions   from
Paris.   Husbands should take this
hint   and   this   chance.     Bridge
Jackets   and   Berthas   in   White
Cream and Black Lace.
UMBRELLAS
HERE we  give you decided advantages in durability, pretty handles  and  low  prices;  they  nii'lo*
most desirable Christmas gifts.
EVENING DRESSES
EXCLUSIVE GARMENTS, bearing the hall mark of the finest
London, Vienna and Parisian Cos**
tumieres; in spite of the value giv-
en, our prices arc no higher
Angus Campbell & Co
THE LRDIES' STORE
Promis Block, Government Street. Victoria
C. 2083
YOUTH
How happy were the porridge days when all the world
was young and we were young with it, when every goose
was a swan and every gander a dragon to be overcome.
What would we give to renew that youth, to sit down each
morning at breakfast with the fire of youth and the appetite of unadulterated joy? It is quite easy when you know
how; live simply, and eat
Rolled Oats
D K  191a THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1906.
The Week
▲ Provincial RevUw and Itacailne, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Offl.ee-.:
Mi Qevernment Street .... Victoria B. C.
Umpire Block  Vancouver, B. C.
W. BLAKEMORE...Manager and Editor
"=~"~~' NOTICE."
The Christmas number of The
Week, which will be published and
circulated on Thursday, the 20th inst.,
will consist of the ordinary issue of
sixteen pages, and a special literary
supplement devoted exclusively to
Christmas literature. The whole will
be in the hands of subscribers on
Thursday evening. Following is a
synopsis of the contents of the supplement:
Story The Letter
Paul D'Arblay.
Sketch Lest We Forget
Agnes Deans Cameron.
Story Xmas and the Beachcomber
G. S.
Pioneer Story The Tenderfoot
J. G. Potter and H. W. Powe».
Idyll The Light in the Window
Agnes Cumberland.
Story Tommy's Xmas Teapot
Mary Langton.
Sketch Kootenay Pioneering
Martin Burrell.
Story The Vacant Chair
L. McLeod Gould.
Story The Ghost of Payne Mt.
Harold Sands.
Story.. Call of the Bunch Grass Hills
F.  Harding.
Poem	
Clive Phillips-Wolley.
Poem    Environment
J. Forsyth Smith.
Poem Peace on Earth
W. Blakemore.
A few weeks ago I ventured to express my idea on the subject of recreation, and the various modes of
spending one's leisure. On further
consideration I feel that more should
have been said upon one branch of
the subject which was barely touched,
I mean the almost universal tendency
in the cities of the western world to
devote all one's spare time to the
relaxation of inglorious ease. Perhaps this idea will be better expressed
as the growing indisposition to indulge in physical exercise, and especially in the most healthful and invigorating of all' exercise, walking.
The subject is suggested to my mind
by a paragraph which appears in another part of this issue dealing with-
the desire on the part of certain residents in Vancouver to have the cars
iii Stanley Park. The fact is that
tyhile trams are an excellent institution, and indeed quite indispensable
under existing social and business
conditions, they have so far superceded walking as to develop, especially among our women folk, a disinclination to walk at all. It is true
that this is more marked in the
United States than in Canada. There
it is quite a common thing to see a
lady mount thc car for a ride of a
single block. In Canada untold dollars are spent every year which
would bc better saved, in making
Short rides. The thing has been carried to excess. Under modern conditions what should always be regarded as a convenience has been
converted into a necessity. I enter
my feeble protest against this, solely
on the ground of health, although the
objection might fairly be extended to
Other considerations, such as the
greater facility which is afforded to
the foot passenger to study nature,
to observe its beauties and to become
acquainted with its wonderful works.
Now, on the ground of health, two
facts stand out prominently. The
first is that in spite of the general
improvement in public health due to
the vastly superior sanitary and hygienic conditions demanded, by an
enlightened civilisation, it is nevertheless a  fact that men and women
still suffer from many diseases which
owe their origin to insufficient physical exercise, and which would be directly benefited by longer and more
frequent walks. The other fact is
that this circumstance is well known
to, and uften expatiated upon, by the
medical fraternity. There is therefore common sense and scientific authority to support my contention. It
is a well-known fact that our American cousins are to an alarming extent victims of dyspepsia, biliousness
and their attendant evils. The prevalence of sallow faces and the almost
entire absence of ruddy cheeks is the
outward and visible sign of the distressful condition. This is generally
attributed to quick eating and injudicious diet, and no doubt these play
an important part in the matter, but
lack of physical exercise is far more
potent in producing the dread results.
A man can eat and drink many forbidden things with impunity if he
works off the effect physically, and
there is no means in which this can
be so effectively and readily done as
by walking. It is singular how the
disinclination to walk has grown. Ia
all ages there have been men like
William Cobbett and Mr. Chamberlain, who never walk if they can help
it. Although the former wrote the
best book of advice to young men
which ever issued from the press, his
biographer declares that he never
went a walk for the sake of the walk
in his life. There had to be some
business at the end of the walk before he could be induced to start out.
But neither of these men, in spite of
their brilliant intellectual achievements, attained to the hale and hearty
old age which should be the goal of
every man's ambition, and therefore
they are poor examples for young
men to follow, and furnish another
illustration of the adage, "Do as I
say, but not as I do."
The excuse usually given by men
who object to walking is that they
have not time. A woman's excuse
generally is, either that she is too
tired, or that she objects to expending the required energy. Just how
fatuous all these contentions are is
demonstrated by the rich men and
women of to-day, who ride everywhere. One has only to run over the
list of stomachless millionaires, men
worth hundreds of millions, who can
scarcely digest good bread, and women so anaemic as to be utterly listless and indifferent, to realise the
folly of violating nature's first law.
I am proud to say that these remarks-
have less application in Victoria than
in any other city in Canada, unless it
be Halifax, a condition of affairs
mainly due to the high percentage of
English born inhabitants.
Among the many things of which
English men and women are proud,
the love of walking is not one of the
least important. They are born to it,
they practise it, and they carry the
liking for it all over the world. What
more delightful occupation is there
than a long tramp with an agreeable
companion? The sense of detachment, the opportunity for intimate
conversation, the facility for observation, the invigoration and, if it be a
very long walk, the final air of lassitude, all combine to render the recreation as enjoyable as it is beneficial.
It is no uncommon thing in the Old
Country for two friends to take a-ten-
mile walk, and the girls are just as
keen as the boys. The former may,
as Babette regretfully declares, wear
large, flat-heeled shoes, eschew a
pompadour coiffure and run to 24-
inch waists, but they do allow themselves room to breathe, and they
know how to dress for the part they
are going to play. How many of tlle
chic French, or cute American women
could be induced under any consideration to dress suitably for tramping? I fear they think too much of
appearances, and yet in spite of their
high finish Art requires to do for
them what Nature does for the English girl who takes walking exercise,
before they will bear the slightest
comparison with her in the ballroom
or the salon. The difference is that
the English girl is willing to pay the
price in a little exertion and a little
temporary self-denial, to gain a rosy
check and a sparkling eye, an erect
carriage and a healthy and vigorous
body. The French and the American
woman have not been trained to at"-
tain the  desired  result bv the same
means. It is not their fault, but all
the same they have to pay the penalty for their defective training. I
should like to see the old-fashioned
walking parties revived. Any hostess
who had the courage to break through
the existing conventions, which have
labelled golf, skating and hockey as
the only suitable exercises for girls,
would render a service to her sex,
and would assuredly increase her own
popularity. A ten-mile tramp on a
frosty day with a substantial lunch
as a prelude, and afternoon tea as
the sequel could be made one of the
most popular society functions, and
where fashion leads the world follows
sooner or later. In the interest of
healthy girls, with high spirits and
energetic habits the rehabilitation of
walking would be welcomed by every
man who has studied the subject, not
less than by
BOHEMIAN.
BY WIRELESS   FROM
THE COAST.
Mayor Morley's liquor by-law
turned down by Council. General
conclusion that Victoria is sober city. I
Now rumoured that Morley will enter |
municipal campaign on the anti-
Peruna ticket. Little Bethelites rallying to his support under leadership
of Leroydakin. Water, water, everywhere. Total immersion now threatens the Mayor.
Argument in suit of Victoria City |
vs. Esquimalt Water Company concluded.    Judgment   reserved.    Even
betting  that  Duff's  decision  is  sus- I
tained.    Peters'  argument    the best |
thing he has yet done in Victoria.
Fisticuffs at Old Grand Theatre
last Saturday a fizzle. Slavin beaten
before he came into ring. Has fought
his last fight. Police will not allow
Burley and McNamee to meet. The
latter out-classed. Burrows will probably take on Mac. and dress him
down. Saunders and Rhodes show
good form. At next meeting referee
will be in the ring instead of on the
floor.
Association football looking up at
Capital City. Rovers easily best team
on present showing. Wanderers weak
at centre-forward, right half and
back. Will finish below Garrison unless strengthened. Championship
likely lies between Rovers and Ladysmith.
Sensation sprung last night by
leaders of Liberal party. Scheme to
dethrone J. A. McDonald and off.er
Billy Mclnnis the leadership of Provincial party with Premiership in reversion. Financial backers Grand
Trunk Pacific political agents in Ottawa and Toronto. The man in the
street doubts Billy's anxiety to play
the part of a clown in order to boost
a Punch and Judy show with John
Oliver, Stuart Henderson and R. L.
Drury as partners. Strongest confirmation of story will be furnished
by Victoria Times denial.
Canadian Club formed at Capital
City. This is the fifty-first organisation now doing business here on
patriotic lines. Great difficulty in
procuring new names for officials,
every man in the city over twenty-
one years of age being already in
office. Proposed to import wealthy
Winnipeggers for the purpose. For
once the Times scooped the Colonist
on thc details of organisation, and
threw the Old Lady with a half Nelson.
Great rush of wealthy Manitobans
who are buying up all the real estate
in Victoria. The oldest inhabitants
are selling their houses and furniture,
and camping in tlie fields. Real estate men sitting up all night. Telegraphic news crowded out of daily
press. Acres and lots the only jargon
on the street and at the club. Cuthbert radiant.
Fraternal Greeting.
Peck MacSwain, the great philosopher, geologist, printer, boozer and
poet, has got tired of forking hay at
Wilmer and left last week for Cranbrook, where he will drop back to his
old trade as a printer. "May your
feet never get cold. Peck."—Golden
Times.
THE BEST
CUTLERY
FOR GIFTS
Is that bearing the names of the most
celebrated'makers
G.
WOSTENHOLM & SONS
ALFRED FIELD & CO.
E.
M
DICKENSON & H. BOKER
I
E.
The large purchases for our various branches
enable us to give special advantages in prices in
the cutlery manufactured by the above celebrated
firms.
CARVING SETS.
Game and Meat Carvers, on cards, in cases and
handsome wood chests, 2, 3 and 5-piece sets,
at all prices, from $1.00 to *. .$12.50
TABLE CUTLERY.
Silver Plated and Nevada Silver Forks and
Spoons, from, per dozen, $1.00 to $7.50
Best Sheffield Sttel Table Knives for, per dozen, $1.00 to  $7.50
G. PRIOR & ee.. Ld.
Hardware, Iron and Steel Merchants,
f
123 Government Street, Victoria, B. 6.
Also at Vancouver, Kamloops and Vernon.
p. R. 1911
J
BOOKS
FOR BOYS
AND GIRLS
The taste of the average boy and girl, while
largely at variance in many respects, is usually
at once when it comes to books. No other Christmas gift is prized more highly, lasts longer, or
gives more complete satisfaction to the owner
than does a good book.
There have been published this fall an unusually large number of books peculiarly suited to
the needs of the boys and girls. We mention
just a few of the many on our Book Tables:
Puck of Pook's Hill, Rudyard Kipling $1.50
Adventures of Billy Topsail, Norman Duncan  1.50
The Roosevelt Bears   1.75
Trafalger Refoguht, Sir Wm. Clowes 2.00
John Dough and the Cherub, Frank Baum.. 1.50
Boys and Girls from Geo. Eliot  1.75
• Boy, Pohn Luther Long 1.50
Is There a Santa Claus? Jacob A. Rus 50
The Boys' Life of Christ, Wm. B. Forbush. 1.75
The Story Bible, Margaret E. Sangster 2.50
The Child's Bible (illustrated)  3.50
Merry Adventures of Robin Hood, Howard
Pyle   3.50
Ten Girls from Dickens  1.75
THOMPSON STATIONERY CO
^
^
325 Hastings Street, Vancouver, B. C.
^ mmmmmmm
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 15, i9°6
By  BABETTE.
ifif*ifififififififififif
if A Lady's Letter *
if ' if
ififififififififififififif
Dear Madge: We. have all made up
our minds to a perfect old-fashioned
Christmas, with holly, mistletoe, yule
logs, plum pudding and cake galore.
In a moment of enthusiasm some one
revived the ancient office of "Lord of
Misrule" in my favour, and a resolution was passed extending refreshment, under compulsion, to all who
enter the house between Xmas and
New Year. We shall have a children's party, and a "grown-up" feast,
and make merry to our hearts' content.
We are also bustling and hustling
at this busy season of Christmas
shopping, and a great many of us
give our attention to everything else
but the real necessity of clothing ourselves, with warm "dessous" in these
wintry days of dripping rain or biting
winds. A stitch in time saves many
a nine in the matter of colds and influenza, however, so shopping folk
or stay-at-homes may equally be reminded that Angus Campbell & Co.
have all thebest make in unshrinkable
underwear and good woollen stockings, gloves, etc. It goes without
saying that the Christmas and New
Year presents to be seen in the
show-rooms of Challoner & Mitchell
are excellent examples of art, to
which the company devotes its splendid experience, and that they are
worthy for any one to give and for
any one to receive. Notable is their
silverware, then there are gold and
jewelled brooches, necklets, 'charms,
bracelets, pendants and so on galore;
beautiful gem rings, gold and gem-
sets studs, buttons, sleeve links,
purses, thimbles and watch chains;
mirrors, dainty articles for the writing table and for the toilet table—in
a word, all that man or woman could
desire in the way of gold and silver
articles, ornamental or useful or both.
Those who are within call should
certainly visit their show rooms.
The fashions of 1906 have been
chiefly remarkable for their variety;
we have tried all periods and have
been faithful to none. Empire and
early Victorian and Romney frocks
have all had their turn and have
rubbed shoulders with Japanese kimonos and Grecian draperies. Among
one or the most noticeable whims of
fashion this year has been the entire
relegation into the background of
everything black: the numerous new
colors are so lovely that they have
for the time quite extinguished our
old favourite. One notices that in
the multiplicity of modish millinery
a sense of fitness does not always
prevail in the matters of "age and
weight," for extremely robust ladies
of obvious maturity sometimes venture forth in chapeaux the size of
c ockle shells perched unwarily on
purchased curls at an angle of forty-
five degrees. There are women- and
women. There are also hats and hats.
Some of the former can wear any of
the latter; others, alack! needing the
right sense of "eternal fitness" are
apt to venture forth in headgear that,
taken in juxtaposition with their identities, would make a melancholic
maniac shake with laughter.
A semi-invalid friend of mine with
a mania for reading has solved the
difficulty of reading in bed without
catching cold by appearing in amazingly pretty "liseuses"—intricate and
fascinating mixtures of ribbons, lace,
silk and wool. She further has the
- amazing audacity or originality, or
both, to receive her friends in dainty
lace caps to match the aforesaid garment. Long lapels and rosettes of
bebe ribbon give the prettiest effect
to these glorified "night-caps," and
looking at her one can readily realise
the fascinations our grandmother's
may have exercised in their cobwebby
caps and frills and furbellows of lace
and delicate stitchery.
One hears on all sides that bridge
is at last dying out, that the craze
for it is "demode." At any rate, as
one of those who long for its early
death, I can triumphantly produce a
maid whose mother gives "bridge
parties" in a little "parlour" where
the  window  is  only  opened  once  a
year, and the fireplace is decorated
with chenille drapes and big sea
shells. The maid in question goes to
these bridge parties in a white Japanese silk blouse with the collar taken off and a pearl dog collar with
diamond slides which in the distance
might be worth quite $1,000, but as a
matter of fact I believe was about
$1.50 at a large dry goods store.
What a lesson in economy she might
be to her mistress!
But alas, bridge cannot and will not
die out; in spite of everything that
can be said about it, we must go on
playing till something is provided to
take its place. Everyone has become
accustomed to spending hours and
hours devoted to it, and these hours
will have to be filled somehow before
we can shake off the fetters of the
game. How we should all welcome
with open arms something really
 like "Pigs in Clover," for instance.
Did you ever have one of your
neighbor's children come to your
home and proceed to handle your
choicest books and photographs with
their sticky, smutty, little fingers?
Did the mother sit close by and
never seem to notice it? Perhaps
your soul writhed as the pretty binding of your favourite volume creaked
and strained apart and the white
pages grew dark with small, finger
prints.
Did the small visitor then handle
every piece of your choice afternoon
tea-service and surreptitiously pocket
as many lumps of sugar as he could,
while the mother, engrossed in conversation, seemed not to notice it?
Of all nuisances the friend or
neighbor who ignores the rudeness of
her children when away from home
is one of the worst, as many women
who have been afflicted will acknowledge. Not long ago a woman, while
calling on a neighbor, took a book
from a table and gave it to her young
child to quiet it, saying: "Johnnie,
you may look at the pictures, but be
careful, won't you, dear?" Result, at
close of call, two torn pages, besides
several soiled and crumpled ones and
the expensive binding strained. The
mother said: "Why, Johnnie! I
thought I told you to be careful!"
The same child, a year later, happened to go to a nearby house while
the family were at dinner. He did
not hesitate to walk up to the table
and help himself to a piece of cake
without invitation.
The mother who puts away every
book or piece of bric-a-brac, "so
Johnnie can't get hold of it," makes
a mistake. Not only does she deprive
her child of the first lessons in self-
control and provoke embarrassment
and aversion from her neighbors, but
she also is helping to build a weak
spot in her child's nature that in later
life will give way under the strain
of temptation.
Mothers, love those little, inquisitive fingers, but have respect for your
neighbor's property and teach your
children to see desirable objects without handling them. This one simple
lesson may mean more than you can
dream now, but it may have a large
result as truly as "all large things
are often only a repetition of minute
ones."
These remarks, dear Madge, are,
I am sure, appropriate to the season
of candy and cakes.
BABETTE.
"Stop 1" commanded Miss Nurox, with
a disdainful sniff. "The idea of your
proposing to a lady in my station of
life I   You ought to know better!"
"Well," replied Mr. Hunter, "I do
know better, but no richer."—Philadelphia Press.
SPIRITUOUS ADVICE.
Try Us For Your Christmas
Wines and Liquors*
Twenty-year-old Scotch Whisky, a bottle.. .$2.00
Imperial Quart 12-year-old Scotch  1.25
Caledonian Scotch, a bottle  1.00
Watson Scotch, a bottle ' 1.00
Dewar's Scotch, a bottle  1.00
Three-Swallow Irish, a bottle  1.25
Burke's Irish, a bottle  1.00
Mitchell's Irish, a bottle  1.00
XXX Brandy, a bottle  1.25
X Brandy, a bottle  1.00
Old Nick Rum, a bottle  1.25
Burke's Rum, a bottle  1.25
Demarara Rum, a bottle  1.00
Cockburn's Port, a bottle..$1.50, $1.25 and 1.00
Amontillado Sherry, a bottle 1.50
Finest Table Sherry, a bottle 1.00
California Sherry, a bottle 50
Native Port, a bottle 35
California Port, a bottle 50
Zinfandel Claret, a bottle 35
St. Julien Claret, a bottle 75
La Rose Claret, a bottle  1.00
Sparkling Hock   2.00
In fact, we arry all the well known brands.
THE WEST END
GROCERY.
Phone 88.
42 Government Street, Victoria
Shipping orders promptly attended to.
^••W*!-^*****^^^'*'^**'-*-**.
PICTURE
FRAMING
:
Have you ever thought what
makes a good picture frame?
The frames we make always
suit the picture; they are well
made and are reasonable in
price—in other words, they
are good frames. We make
this a special feature of^ our
% business—other things too.
wmmmmmm
\
\
C.H.Smith&Co.
Fine Art Dealers
32 Fort St., Victoria!	
^i^^^^h^^^tm^^^ ■■ t+ma+m*n**+ .***.*W'*»IL ^**^t****+H**s****+**S&&
Why He Laughed.
A college girl was copying an inscription one day in the British Museum
when two young women entered. Looking at the rosetta stone, one of them
said, "What is this? R-o-s-e-t-t-a—
rosetta stone." Then leaning down to
it, she cautionsly sniffed at i tseveral
times, and, lifting her head, said to her
companion, "Why, it does have a peculiar fragrance like a rose." When
the college girl got home she told the
story to her brother, who laughed and
laughed, and, when he recovered his
breath sufficiently, exclaimed, "Why,
didn't she know that Rossetti was a
poet?"
Ckinese- made Skirts ^Overalls
MUST GO I
UNION-MADE.
>RN BRAND
BUTTING AHEAD. uo
THE WEEK, SATURDAY DECEMBER 15, 1906.
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2,000 Dozen Ties and
Scarves at 25c, 50c, 75c,
and $1.00
The Latest Novelties
Just to hand for Xmas.
50 CASES CHRISTMAS GOODS
JUST OPENED AT THE SEMI-READY WARDROBE.
Comprising Smoking Jackets, Dressing Gowns, Umbrellas, Gloves, Silk and
Linen Initial  Handkerchiefs, Fine Hosiery, Suspenders, Neckwear, Etc.
B. Williams & Co., Sole Agents for Semi-Ready Tailoring
Fine Underwear in Lin
en Mesh, Silk & Wool
Derby Rib Natural Woo
Camel's Hair, Etc.
Also Bags, Suit Cases
.and Valises.
NOTES ON PROVINCIAL NEWS
Convalescent.
A month or so ago reference was
made in these columns to the serious
illness of Mr. C. W. McAnn, the well-
knowivbarrister of Kaslo. Mr. McAnn was taken in a condition of collapse to Rochester, Minnesota, where
he underwent a painful operation. His
many friends will be delighted to hear
that the operation was successful, and
that Mr. McAnn has now returned to
Kaslo, very week, but still convalescent. He is receiving the congratulations of all his acquaintances, .n
which The Week joins.
Breeze at Vancouver.
There is a breeze in Vancouver, not
due, however, to rude Boreas, but to
the disconcerting fact that the Dominion Government has inserted in
thc document conveying the use of
Stanley Park to the city, a clause
barring trams. A number of the citizens are in favour of a car-service
into and around the Park; many others are opposed to it. Just which
section will be in the majority, if a
plebiscite were taken is doubtful, but
the action of, the Government is creating considerable comment, and furnishing the opportunity for many
forcible expressions of opinion. It is
a case of weighing the advantages
against the disadvantages. At present Stanley Park provides one of the
finest drives conceivable, and is fairly
accessible by tram. Its picturesque-
ness would undoubtedly be spoilt if
the cars are allowed inside the Park,
and it is difficult to see what the
counter-balancing advantages would
be. There is altogether too much disposition nowadays to do away with
walking altogether, and to coddle
people to the extent of furnishing the
means of locomotion to every conceivable point. Surely if the cars
carry people to the entrance of Stanley Park, they will benefit by strolling round the Marine Drive at their
leisure, and there are few who would
not bc the better for making the full
circuit of thc Park.
Still at It.
It was hardly to be expected that
the Kelowna Courier would take a
hint from The Week. It is like the
woman who insists on having the last
word; and even if that last word involves the further washing of dirty
linen in public, and the further flinging of mud from the Okanagan to the
Kootenay and back again, it cannot
resist the temptation. The ranchers
of both these fertile valleys arc busy
growing fruit; the newspapers of
Nelson and Kelowna would bc better
occupied if they bent all their energies to popularise the industry and to
attract settlers. This would leave no
time for mud-flinging and would bc
more creditable to all concerned.
Boilspeilers.
The Kootenay country is already
enjoying a typical Canadian winter.
There has been a light fall of snow,
and sufficient frost to make good ice.
The men of the Kootenay are noth
ing if not enthusiastic sportsmen, and
already the Kootenay Curling Association has held'its annual meeting at
Rossland, elected officers for the ensuing year, and chosen Cranbrook for
the holding of the winter Bonspiel.
This selection is due to the personal
influence and bonhommie of as true
a sportsman as ever handled a stone.
Pete Wilson among his friends, His
Honour Judge Wilson in legal circles, is thc president of the association, and the life and soul of the
sport. Last year he resided in Nelson, and the Bonspiel was held there.
This year he resides in Cranbrook,
and the Bonspiel goes with him. May
good luck go with him, too, and a
development of curling in East Kootenay such as his influence has done
much to produce during the last ten
years in West Kootenay.
Chilliwack the Beautiful.
A beautifully illustrated pamphlet
of 98 pages, descriptive of Chilliwack
and Chilliwack Valley, has been issued by the firm of Cawley & Paisley,
mhich, if widely circulated, cannot
fail to draw a desirable class of settlers. The whole pamphlet is replete
with interest.
Hawthornthwaite.
According to the Nanaimo Daily
Herald of the 7th inst, J. H. Hawthornthwaite has been nominated as
the standard-bearer of the Socialist
party in Nanaimo at the next Provincial election. The Herald declares with the utmost seriousness
that no fewer than ten Socialists attended the convention, and that the
nomination was unanimous, all of
which must be very gratifying to Mr.
Hawthornthwaite.
A Mental Twist.
A few days ago the Victoria Times,
with that singular ineptitude which
characterises most of its editorial utterances, misquoted and distorted an
editorial in the Vernon News, and
made it apear that that paper had
charged Premier McBride with making "Better Terms" a political issue.
No one who is familiar with the Vernon News, and the sanity of its utterances was for a moment deluded
by tbe trick. Just exactly what the
attitude of the Vernon News is on
this particular phase of an interesting
question may be gathered from thc
following paragraph in its latest issue:
"It is curious to find Mr. J. A. Macdonald, leader of the provincial opposition, expressing regret that Mr. McBride has made "better terms" a party issue. Surely it is not Mr. McBride
who has made the matter a party issue. It is the ill-advised Liberal partisans who eagerly seized upon a
flimsy excuse to back down from
their previous attitude of support to
the government in its demands upon
the federal authorities, and who have
thus bartered provincial rights for an
imaginary party advantage.
The New Judge.
His Honour, Judge Clement of
Grand Forks, is now Mr. Justice Clement of Victoria. His promotion is
a well-deserved tribute to legal
acumen, judicial ability and high personal character.. The traditions of
the Supreme Court will not be tarnished by any act of his, and it was
a graceful compliment to the Interior
that he should have received a coveted appointment. It goes without
saying that a local barrister will succeed him as County Court Judge. The
name of Mr. J. R. Brown of Greenwood has already been mentioned in
this connection. Mr. Brown would
fill the position admirably, for in one
respect, at any rate, he resembles his
party leader, in that he is much better adapted for judicial than political
work.
A Just Conclusion.
The Nicola Herald directs attention
to a matter which is not as generally
recognised as it should be, viz., that
every part of the Province will share
in the prosperity which is evidently
in store for British Columbia. When
it reads of a boom at Victoria, and
a boom at Vancouver, it docs not display the spirit of envy, but of emulation, and this is the right way to
look at the matter. If the feeling
were more widespread, there would
be co-operation in everything that
makes for the advancement of the
Province. Every newspaper which
quotes and preaches from this text is
rendering a service to the community
in which it is published, and a wider
service than it wots of. The concluding paragraph of a very thoughtful editorial may with advantage be
quoted:
"Every district is bound to participate in the prosperity which is sure
to result from the awakening of cap-
itay to the possibilities of this Province, and no district more than Nicola
Valley which combines in a remarkable degree!!, mineral and agricultural
resources second to none in British
Columbia."
Dividends Talk.
The Rossland Miner is in as good
a position as any newspaper in the
Province to appraise the condition of
the mining industry. Being published
in the capital of the copper camp, and
within a stone's throw of the Canadian smelter it is in touch with
everything that transpires in the mining world. In a recent issue it has
to say:
"Dividends and .interest disbursements on Canadian securities during
the present month will aggregate two
and a half million dollars. No less
than fourteen of the thirty-five chartered banks will pay quarterly or half
yearly dividends, amounting to upwards of $1,600,000. Many industrial
companies will pay interest on capital stock and on bonds, while the
Granby and some of the Cobalt companies will pay dividends amounting
to a large sum. Then there are a
large number of close corporations,
which never publish their dividends,
and these combined will swell the list
probably to $10,000,000 for the month.
This shows how prosperous the country is and to what large proportions
the financial, industrial and mining
corporations are growing. The shares
of these corporations are held by
many thousands of people, some owning a few and others thousands of
the shares of the stock. The dividends will be a great help to all who
receive them in making Christmas
pleasant for themselves and their
friends."
Condolences.
A. Maxwell Muir, C. E., of Vici
toria, has just received the sad intell
ligence of the death of his mother ir
Glasgow, Scotland. The deceased lady
was in her seventy-eighth year, anrj
up to the time of her death enjoyed
excellent health. She was a descend1
ant of one of the oldest Scottish fam.
ilies, and used to enjoy speaking oi
the deeds of her ancestors, some ol
whom fought with Sir William Wallace in the Scottish war of independence, while others were prominent
figures in the British army and navy
The Prodigal Daughter.
"The prodigal son is generally welcomed warmly; the light gleams in
the window for him, the bells are
rung and anthems of joy float upward
on the wings of air. But the light
dies out and the doors are locked
should the Prodigal Daughter struggle homeward through the snow and
on her way falter on the road, and
if she falls and dies she may lay
where she has dropped by the roadside to be pointed to as a Horrible
Example. Is this as it should be?"—
Enderby Progress.
Hitting the Nail on the Head.
The Nicola Herald has a concise ant
lucid editorial on the subject of "Bettei
Terms," from which the following par
agraph is taken. It sums up the situation admirably: I
"The question of better terms is beinj
thoroughly muddled by the Liberal presi
of this province. They say it is not ;
party question, and then with all thei;
puny might they twist and turn motivei
and statements to suit their own end:
and in many cases make rash statement:
the very reverse of true. The statemen.
that the Premier refused the grant 0
$115,000 per annum is a gross libel an(
has been done purely from political mo
tives, and it says little for the causi
which it is supposed to represent, whei
the Liberal press continue to publisl
these misstatements, and try to deer;
the attitude of the Premier on a ques
tion in which he should have the whole
sotiled support of everyone in the prov
ince."
Waking Up.
The New Westminster Daily News
declares that the Royal City is waking up; that its growth has been slow
but solid and that there is no city on
the continent which is more firmly
established, or which has a more assured future. In view of this summary of affairs it is rather surprising
and not a little amusing to find that
the News has nothing whatever to
say to the citizens on the subject of
the municipal election. Instead of intelligently discussing the situation and
endeavouring to lead public opinion
in the important matter of selecting
the best representative, it falls back
upon the trite reflection that each
ratepayer should choose the men who
in his judgment can best be trusted
to advance the interests of New
Westminster. Who those men are
the News cither docs not know, or is
not prepared to state. A newspaper
which has neither courage nor initiative can be of little service in a western community. Its natural habitat
is Sleepy Hollow.
What the Ledge Thinks.
A. B. Docksteader of Nelson has
decided to contribute $200 to the provincial treasury. He will deposit $200
for the privilege of running in the
Liberal interests in Slocan riding. It
may safely be prophesied the returns
will indicate that A. B. "also ran."
An Ishmaelite.
Vancouver has a new paper, at
least comparatively new, since it has
reached its twenty-second issue at the
time of writing. What its policy is
and where it will ultimately settle
down, if it continues publication, is
a matter of conjecture. All that can
be safely asserted is that like the
Ishmaelite it has its hand against
every man. How this peculiar feature
harmonises with the title of "The
Guardian" is not very obvious; perhaps when it has let off the steam,
and settles down to business, it will
endeavor to formulate a constructive
policy. At present it is wholly destructive.
Veteran Engine-Driver.
After forty-four years' service Mr
David Hughes has retired from thi
Great Western Railway Company, foi
whom for many years he acted as drive:
of royal trains.
In 1889 he was a driver on the Bris
tol and Exter line, and was selected a
the driver of the company's royal train
being the only driver to wear a dis
tinctive uniform. (
He keenly felt the responsibility 0
the position, and vividly recalls the per
sonalities of many foreign potentatei
whom he drove from Paddington f-
Windsor.
He told a Daily Mail representativi
with tear-dimmed eye of the last servio
he rendered to the late Queen, the tra.-
bearing whose remains he drove.
The railway directors presented hin
with a beautifully designed medal, bit
the souvenir of service which he cher
ishes most highly is a bronze medal J
the Royal Victorian Order, which hi
was specially summoned to Marlbor,
ough House to receive at the hands o
the King as a recognition of servicei
to the late Queen. '
John Drew on Drawing Poker.   <
A fellow actor was the subject of dis
cussion at The Players' Club not lonj
ago. j
"He is perfectly devoted to tha,
blonde"—so Mr. John Drew was Irl
formed. "His family think it is a easl
of hypnotism."
"Seems more like chemical attraction,1
said the great actor thoughtfully. THE WEEK, SATURDAY DECEMBER 15, 1906.
n
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
■lays after date I intend to apply to the
IChief Commissioner of Land and
IWorks for permission to purchase the
following described land: Commencing
'jit a post planted on the left bank of
.Skeena River, about four miles above
lLakelse River, adjoining L; W.' ndrth-
IWest corner, and marked "N. M. J.s' N.
JWl Corner," thence running south 80
■phaihs; thence east 80 chains; thence
porth 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
fto point of commencement, containing
640 acres, more or less.
N. M. JOSEPH, Locator.
J. E. BATEMAN, Agent.
west 80 chains to place of commencement,
containing 640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew on the 30th day
of October, 19U6.
ALEXR.   YOUNG.
November 17, 1906.
I Notice is hereby given that sixty days
after date   I  intend to   apply  to the
■Chief Commissioner    of1; Lands    and
■Works .for permission tot purchase the
following described lands,   Range Vi,
ISkeena   River District,   about ~i   milie
Ifrom the Little Canyon.
1  Commencing at a post planted pn the
[South-west,cobier, marked- A; O. Cunningham's S. W. Corner, thence 'North
p   (forty)   chains( thence    East, 40
[forty) chains, thence South ;4*> (forty)
•hains to Little's    Southwest'   corner,
hence West 40 (forty) chains, to point
if commencement,  and containing 160
/one hundred and sixty) acres more or
located October ist, 1906.
■  A. C. CUNNINGHAM, Locator.
S. ,C. WEEKS, Agent.
No. 8—
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner ot 'Lands and Works
for a specual license to cut and carry away
timber from the following described lands,
situated' ou the south side of Sun Juan
River, Renfrew District, adjoining T. Lee's
southeast corner: Commencing ut a post
marked "A. Young, Southwest Corner,''
thence north 40 chains; thence east 160
chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
west 160 chains to place of commencement,
containing 640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew on the 30th day
Of October, 1908.
ALEXR.  YOUJJG.
November 17, 1906.
Commencing at a post by the southeast
boundary of Lot 77, Nahmint Bay;
thence 60 chains west; thence 20 north;
thence 90 west; thence 50 sout.i; theiuc
east to the waterfront, thence following
the shore line to point of commencement.
C. LUTKIN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
. ?.... 2/ih, 1900. ■
NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days
after date 1 Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lauds and Worka
for permission to purchase the following
described land situated in the Coast District, Rajige 5: Beginning at, a post
planted on the north bank of the Skeena
river, at the mouth of Zyinqetitis river and
marked a. B.'s Southwest Corner; thence
running north 100 chains; thence east 80
chains; theuce south to bauk of Skeen*
river about 40 chains more or less; thence
tallowing'meandering of Skeenu river in
u southwesterly dltecuon to post ot commencement, containing 640 ucres of land
more or less.
BEATRICE BATEMAN.
S. E. BATEMAN, Agent.
Located  September  2Uth,   1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply tp the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands: 1. Starting at a post
10 chains east of the mouth of Handy
Creek, on the north shore of Alberni
Canal; thence 160 chains north; thence
40 chains west; theuce south to the
shore line; thence following the shore
line to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 4th, 1906.
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point oi commencement.
G. M. iJlKKETT,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 10th, 1900.
00. Commencing at a post planted ai
the north-west corner ol J. A, narvey's
land, tiience north 80 cnains; tiience
west So chains; tiience south Bo chains;
ihence east 80 chains to point ot com-
meuctment
HARRIET NELSON,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 10th, 1906.
NOTICE Is hereby given that 60 days
after date 1 intend to apply to the CMef
Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to purchase tlie fallowing described lauds situate lu the Kltsum Kalum
Valley, Range V, Coast District: Commencing ut a stake planted at the N. B.
oorner of Jas. Adams' purchase claim,
marked N. T. C. No. 1 Initial Post; thence
40 chains west; theuce 40 chains north;
tbence 40 chains east; thence 40 chains
south to point of commencement and containing 180 acres more ar less.
N. T. CUNNINGHAM, Locator.
F. W. BOHLER, Agent.
Located  October 1st,   1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner - of Land and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land: Commencing
at a post planted on the left bank oi
Skeena River, about 31/9 miles above
the Lakelse River, and joining Jphn
Neidhart's northeast corner, and marked
"L, W. S.'s Northwest Corner," and
running south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; therce north 80 chains, more or
less, to left bank of Skeena River;
"ihence westwardly along Skeena River
to point of commencement, containing
P40 acres, more or less.
L. W. SLOAN, Locator.
J. E. BATEMAN, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
'Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
Carry away timber from the following
described lands, in Alberni District: 4.
Commencing at a post situate on or near
the northwest corner of Lot 79, Muck-
toosh; thence 40 chains east; thence 40
north; thence 100 west; thence 80 south;
thence 60 east; thence 40 north, to point
of commencement    ..».«__
C. F. PARK, ffl
W. B. GARRARD, Agent
Oct. 22d, 1906.
vNo.  3—
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days nfter dnte I Intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of iLands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry away
timber from the following described lanas,
sltunted on the south side of Snn Juan
River, Renfrew District, adjoining Mrs.
J. S. Young's south boundnry: Commencing at a post mnrked "A. Young, Northwest Corner," thence south 80 chains:
thence east 80 chnins; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chnins to place of
commencement, containing 840 acres.
1   Dated nt  Port  Renfrew,   October iOth,
1906
ALEXR.  YOUNG.
November 17, 1906.
37. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 16,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey thence south 80 chains; thence east
3o chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of com-
mencemtnt, and being Section 15, Township 12, Range 5, of said survey.
W. VAN ARSDALEN,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 20th, 1906.
2. Starting at a post 40 chains north
of the initial post of No. 1, near Handy
Creek, Alberni Canal; thence 40 chains
east; thence 160 chains north; thence 40
chains west; thence 160 chains south to
point of commencement
W. B. GARRAljD.
Clayoquot District, Nov. 4th, i960.
61. Commencing at a i.ast planted at
the north-west corner of J. A. riarvey's
land; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thtnee west 80 chains to point of commencement
CAROLINE HAINES,
G. B. Wtason, Agent
September 10th, 1906.
of the Nechaco River; thence following
bank oi  said  river  to point of commencement; 640 acres, more or less.
EDGAR L BLAKE,
A. T. Clark, Agent
September 12th, 1906.
75. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of E. L. Blake's
lease; thence west 80 chains; south 80
chains; east 80 chains to bank of Nechaco River; thence following bank "of
said river to point of commencement,
640 acres, more or iess.
MARY BLAKE,
A. T. CLARK, Agent
September 12th, 1906.
62. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of G. M. Birkett's
land; thence north 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains;' thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement
MARGARET INGLES,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 10th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date we intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands: Commencing at a
post by the southeast corner post of Lot
79, on Uchucklesit Harbour; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 100 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west to
waterfront; thence along waterfront to
point of commencement, excepting
thereout the lands covered by existing
mineral claims.
W.E. GREEN.
W. B. GARRARD.
Clayoquot District, Oct 29th, 1906?
30. Commencing at a post planted at' the
north-east corner of Section 16, Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thenct south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 21, Township
12, Range 5, of said survey.
CHAS. LEVE'ii,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 20th, 1906.
[No. 4—
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry away
timber from the following described lands,
situated on the south side of San Juan
River, Renfrew District, adjoining A.
Young's southwest corner: Commencing at
a post marked "J. Young, iNorttowest Corner," thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to place of commencement,
containing 840 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew on the 29th day
of October,  1906.
JOHN YOUNG.
November 17, 1906.
(No. 5—
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
ior a special license to cut and carry away
timber from the following described lands,
situated on the south side of San Juan
River, Renfrew District, adjoining John
Young's southeast corner: Commencing at
'a post marked "A Young, Northeast Corner," thence north 40 chains; thence west
"60 chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
wast 160 chnins to place of commencement,
containing 640 acres.
Dated at 'Port Renfrew on the 29th day
lot October, 1906.
November 17, 1906.
ALBXR.   YOUNG.
I No. 6—
NOTICE ls hereby given that thirty
'Jays after dnte I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry away
'Imber from the following described lands.
,'ltuated on the south side of San Juan
Iliver, Renfrew District, adjoining T. Lee's
southeast corner: commencing at a post
marked "J. Young, Northeast Corner,"
"hence south 80 chains: thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chnins; thence east
SO chains to place of commencement, containing 640 ncres.
\ Dated at Port Renfrew on the 30th day
tf October, 1906.
JOHN YOUNG.
November 17, 1906.
43. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of the north-east
quarterof Section 22, Township 4,
Range 4, Poudrier Survey; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains, thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement, and being
the north half of Section 23 and south
half of Section 26, Townhsip 4, Range
4, of said survey.
EMMA BATEMAN,
A. T. Clark, Agent,
September 17th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands in Alberni District: 1.
Commencing at a post situated 80 choins
west and 20 south of southeast boundary
post of Lot 658; thence 80 chains west;
thence 80 south; thence 80 east thence
80 north, to place of commencement.
E. CURTIT,
Per W. B. Garrard, Agent.
Oct. 19th, 1906.
6<*. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Hubert Haines'
land; thence north 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains to point of commencement
MAXWELL S. INGLES,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September ioth, 1906.
76. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Mary Blake's
lease; thence west 80 chains; thenoe
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains,
more or less, to the Nechaco River;
thence following the bank of said river
to point of commencement; 640 acres,
more or less.
GEORGE BATEMAN,
A. T. Clark, Agent
September 12th, 1906.
77. Commencing at the south-east cor-
near of George Bateman's lease; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, more or less, to
the Nechaco Rvier; thence following
the bank of said river to point of commencement; 640 acres, more or less.
B. P. COOK,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 13th, 1906.
66. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of. Knignts leaes;
land; thence north 80 chains; thence
chains; thence souht 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement
ROSABELLA GOODWYN,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September nth, 1906.
46. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 36,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 36 of said
survey.
S. L. TEETZEL.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 17th, 1906.
44. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section VJ,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chanis; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 27 of said
survey.
J. S. McEACHERN,
A. T. Clark, Agent
September 17th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commisci f Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands in Alberni District: 2.
Commencing at a post situate 80 chains
west and 20 south ofsoutheast boundary
post of Lot 658; thence 80 chains west:
thence 80 north; thence 80 east; thence
80 south, to ooint of commencement.
J. T. BUCKLEY.
W. B. GARRARD. Agent.
Oct. 19th, 1906.
So.  7-
NOTICB ls hereby given that thirty
Inys after date I Intend to apply to the
Ihlef Commissioner of 'Lands and Works
:or a special license to cut and enrry awny
.Imber from the following described lnnds,
iltunted on the south side of San .lunn
liver, Renfrew District, adjoining T. Lee's
'.ontbenst corner: Commencing nt a post
narked "A. Young. Northwest Corner,"
ihence south 80 ehnlns; thence enst 80
hnlns;    thence norm 80 chains;   tiience
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date T intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the followine
described lands, in Alberni District: 3.
Commencing at a post by the shore of
Alberni Canal, near the southeast boundary post of Lot 658; thence west 80
chains: thence south to the north boundary line, or the same produced of Lot
6g: thence east to Alberni Canal; thence
following the shore line to point of commencement
W. C. RALEIGH.
W. B. GARRARD. Agent.
Oct. 20th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry awav timber from t<*e following
described lands, in Alberni District:   5.
48. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 24,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey J
thence north 80 chains: thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 25, Township 4,
Range 4, of said survey .
M. A. MACDONALD,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 17th, 1906.
67. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of E. Knight's
land; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement.
CHAS. KNIGHT,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September nth, 1906.
68. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Chas. Knight's
land; thence north 80 Chan s; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement
W. H. GOODWIN,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September nth, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for permission to purchase
section 24, township 8, range 5, Coast
District.
EMMA HOWE.
JOHN DORSEY, Agent
NOTICE ls hereby given that two months
after date I intend to npply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lnnds und Works
for a special licence to cut and carry away
timber from the following described lands,
commencing at a post planted at the southwest comer of Lot 313, Deer creek, Clayoquot, thence east 40 chains, thence soutli
40 chains, thence west 40 chains, thenee
south 80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence northerly along the beach to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
mare or less.
M. .1. HAOCJKN.
August 28th, 1906. 	
NOTICE Is hereby given'that sixty days
from date I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of ILands and Works
for permission to purchase the followine
described land, sltunted in Rnnge 5, Skeena
River District, about one and one halt
miles from Little Canyon, commencing at
a post marked West N. E. Corner and K.
Bruun S. E. Corner, thence 80 chains west
to Schilling's S. E. Corner, thence north 40
chains, thence east 80 chains, thence south
40 chuins to point of commencement, containing 320 acres more or less.
Located Sept. 3rd, 1906.
K. BRAUN.
69. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Chas. Knight's
the north-east corner of Knight's land;
south 80 chains; thence east 80_chains,
thence north 80 chain sto point of commencement
E. N. MacBETH,
A. T. Clark, Agent
September nth, 1906.
55. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 15,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east So chains; thence
south 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 22, Township
4, Range 4, of said survey.
LILIAN CAMPBELL,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 15th, 1906.
56. Commencing at a post planted on
the north-east corner of Section 15,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence west 80 chains; thenee south 80
chains: thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 15 of said
survey.
GLEN CAMPBELL,
A. T. Ciark, Agen.t
September 15th, 1906.
57. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Lot 547;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement; 640 acres.
KATE CLARK,
A. T. Clark, Agent
September loth, 1906.
58. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Lot 547; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
J. A. HARVEY,
A .T .Clark. Agent.
September ioth, 1006.
70. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 35,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier survey ; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
M. WERDEN,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 17th, 1906.
71. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of the south-west
quarter of Section 14, Townshin 12,
Range 5, Poudrier survey; thence south
So chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement, and being
the south half of Section 14 and north
half of Section 11, Township 12, Range
5, of said survey.
H. RENNIE,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 19th, 1906.
72. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of B. P. Cook's
lease; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement; 640 acres.
WILLIAM MEREDITH,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 13th, 1906.
59. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Lot 547; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
73. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Maxwell S.
Ingles' lease; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, more or less, to
<tiie Nechaco River; thence following
bank of said river to the south lino of
Maxwell S. Ingles' lease; thence west
80 chains, more or less, to point of commencement.
MINNIE CURRIE,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 12th, 1906.
74. Commencing at a post planted at
a point on the west side of the Upper
Nechaco River, opposite th'e south-west
corner of Lot 545; thence west 80
chains: thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, more or less, to the bank
NOTICE ls hereby given thut 60 days
from date I Intend to apply to thc Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to purchase the following described
land, adjoining Lot 646, Skeena District:
Commencing at a post marked "A. C.'s N.
W. Corner"; thence enst 40 chains along
south boundary of T. Flewln's claim; tbence
south 40 chuins; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains, along east boundary of Lot 646 to point of commencement
containing 160 acres, more or less.
ANNIE COPELAND.
NOTICE ls hereby given that 60 days
after date 1 Intend to apply to the Hot.
Chief Commissioner of Lauds and Works
for permission to purchase the following
described land: Commencing at a post at
the 110rt.hcu.si cornel- of Lot 182, Range
Ure (5), Cuust District, marked E. Davies'
Southeast Corner; theuce running 40 chain*
west; .thenee 40 chuins uorth; thence 40
chuins eust, more or less, to Ky-yex liver;
theuce following meuuduriug of Ky-yex
liver to point of couunencemeut, containing
oue hundred and sixty acres, more or less.
B.  DAVIES.
Located July 12th,  1906.
27. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 18, Tp.
10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence
soutn 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
tnence north 80 chains; thence thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 18 of said
survey.
J. C. PORTER.
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 15th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that Oo days
after date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following described land, viz.:
Commencing at the south-west corner
if Lot 9, Cassiar District, situated on
'he Skeena River; thence east 40 chains
to the south-east corner of Lot 0,
thence south 20 chains, thence west 40
chains more or less to the Skeena River,
thence northerly along the Skeena River
to thc point of commencement, containing 80 acres more or less.
December 1   iqp6.
e. f. g. McGregor
NOTICE is hereby given that 60
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase lhe
following described land situate in Cassiar District, viz.:
Commencing at t''c North-East corner of Lot 9. Cassiar District on the
Hawilghet River—thence south 46
chains and 26 links to the south-east
corner of Lot 0, thence east 20 chains,
thence north jo chains more or les' to
tbe Hanwilofhet River, thonce following
Ihe river in a westerlv direction to th"
point of commencement, containicg To
ar-ps more or less.
Deccnilipr T   no6.
G. P.  R^PFRT<; 12
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 15. 1906.
REVIEWS.
"The Fighting Chance," by Robert
Chambers is worth reading, which at
once differentiates it from the majority of works of fiction recently
placed on the market. It preserves
all the marked characteristics of the
author, a strong dramatic instinct, the
love of grappling with life problems
at close quarters, a tendency to high
colouring, if not luridness, keen psychological insight and a firm grip of
elemental truth. Few modern writers
of fiction display more courage and
decisiveness in moral crises, and hardly one possesses greater power of
depicting the final stages in a struggle between the conflicting forces
which rend the human soul. There
are several chapters in "The Fighting
Chance" which are hardly surpassed
in nervous power and thrill. This is
especially true of the chapter where
Sylvia surrenders to Siward under
circumstances which render the incident unique and profoundly interesting. In spite, however, of all its excellencies this book contains a trace
of the same morbidity which tinctures
all Mr. Chambers' work. He has not
yet produced a book which is free
from this taint, and seems to be oppressed, as do most modern writers,
by the inevitableness of events. There
may be a little excuse for this in a
book which, like "The Fighting
Chance," is dealing with the subject
of heredity, although one would prefer a saner treatment. If hereditary
instincts absolutely determine the end
of every struggle, and if a study of
the subject furnishes no loop-hole
through which a man may escape the
consequences of inherited vice, then
what becomes of moral force, moral
influence, individuality, the exercise
of will, and the appeal to reason and
judgment? That heredity may impose
a serious handicap on all the influences and energies which make for
the retrieval of man may be admitted, and surely without conceding
that the struggle is hopeless. The
hero of this powerful story inherited
a vice from many generations of ancestors, all of whom had fallen victims to its fatal power; but he had
every natural equipment to enable
him to make a successful struggle
against it, high intelligence, culture,
honour, ambition, a non-sensual temperament, the sympathy of a large
and influential circle of friends and
the love of a brilliant woman, yet all
these barely sufficed and the best that
Mr. Chambers could do for a long
time was to immure his hero in the
dingy library of the family mansion
to brood over his temptation, and to
despair of escape, why forsooth? Because he had inherited the taste. No
doubt the conclusion is logical as applied to many instances which have
occurred in real life, but the weakness of the reasoning lies in the
treatment of the case, which regards
the result as inevitable, and which
refuses to admit any other solution
until driven to do so by the force of
circumstance. Such reasoning is
false; it takes too much for granted;
it ignores the many successes which
have been achieved, even with the
same environment as Mr. Chambers
has provided for his hero. Apart from
this defect it is a book which will
furnish considerable satisfaction to
the lover of literature and the student
of human problems. Incidentally it
renders tremendous service to the
cause of social reform by presenting
one of the most vivid pictures yet
produced of the luxuriance, the extravagance, the emptiness, the vanity
and the uselessness which characterise thc lives and conduct of certain
circles so much in evidence in the
United States, since the Almighty
Dollar became the ruling power. In
this direction Mr. Chambers has ia
an artistic and convincing manner efr
fected more than could have been
clone by all the Socialist lecturers and
writers, who are now clamouring for
the reconstruction of society. "The
Fighting Chance," by Robert Chambers.   On sale at the Victoria Book &
On sale at the Victoria Book and
Stationery Co., Government Street,
Victoria.
"The Man Who Rose Again" is a
strikingly strong novel dealing with
thc life, love and hate of a freethinker.    It  is  not  often  even  in  a
story that a man attends his own
funeral as a looker-on, watches his
only friend mourn for him and then
goes away and buries himself in a
foreign land. The hero of this tale
is twice the accepted lover of the
same lady. Once he is jilted and
once—but no, that would spoil the
story. Anyone who reaches the first
love scene will be sure to get to the
second and probably the final with
one burning of the candle. That is
anyone who loves a good story.
"The Man Who Rose Again" is by
Joseph Hocking, published by the
Copp Clark Co., Toronto, and can
be obtained from the Victoria Book
and Stationery Co.
In "Beyond the Rocks" Miss Elinor
Glyn has treated the old story of a
young girl bought and sold for the
benefit of her family to a successful
Australian business man, who started
lite as a grocer's assistant in England. The girl being of good family
and great beauty, the sequel naturally
follows. Lord Bracondale appears on
the scene, and the remainder of the
book consists of hopeless love scenes
and of many broken resolutions to
see no more of each other. The
strongest part of the whole book is
where Morella Wihmarleigh, the woman selected by herself and others
as the destined wife of Bracondale,
discloses the true state of affairs to
Josiah Brown, the injured husband,
who rises superior to the occasion,
and thinks only of his wife's peace
of mind. In this passage he redeems
all his previous vulgarity, so that
when his inevitable death occurs Lord
Bracondale thus apostrophises him,
"There lived no greater gentleman."
The love scenes are well laid throughout the story, and the book furnishes
interesting reading.
"Beyond the Rocks," by Elinor
Glyn. Published by Duckworth &
Co., London, Eng. On sale by T.
N. Hibben & Co., Government Street,
Victoria.
The B. C. Permanent.
The British Columbia Permanent
Loan and Savings Co. is a home institution. It first saw the light at Vancouver in 1898 and from its inception
to the present day its career has been
one of unchecked prosperity and continued growth. From small beginnings the company in eight years has
grown and expanded until to-day it
may be said to stand with the soundest of Vancouver's many sound financial companies. During the present
year the permanent paid-up capital of
the company has been increased from
$197,000 to $250,000, and the reserve
fun from $50,000 to $70,000. As was
mentioned yesterday, the first issue
of accumulative stock matured on October 31, and all later issues have
been credited with sufficient profits to
mature them in the time estimated on
the stock certificates. This is very
gratifying, not only to the company
and the invetsors, but to the general
public, who have a keen interest in
the stability and permanency of all-
financial businesses that have their
chief offices here. The Permanent is
expanding and is reaching out for
business. It has invaded the four
most western and the two most eastern provinces and the reports from
all the agencies are most gratifying.
Amongst those who are heavily interested in the company are several
leading citizens of Victoria, who have
all the way from $10,000 to $35,000
invested. Capt. William Grant, of
that city, recently remarked that his
investments in the B. C. Permanent
were the most satisfactory he has
ever made. The company loans on
improved property in the best towns
and cities and confines its loans almost entirely to houses occupied by
the owners. Consequently, losses are
low and slight. Referring to the annual reports of the company since its
foundation, wc find that all promises
made to shareholders have been faithfully Kept, and as a consequence the
company now enjoys the complete
confidence of all who have carefully
investigated its methods.
Time to Call a Halt.
Sir,—Alderman Stewart is heartily
to be commended for the outspoken
way in which, at last Monday's meeting of thc City Council, be denounced
thc grossly    false    reputation which
Five Good Toasts.
While there's life on the lip, while there's
Warmth in the wine,
One deep health I'll pledge, and that health
Shall be thine.
—Owen Meredith.
Let schoolmasters puzzle their brain
With grammar and nonsense and learning;
Good liquor, I stoutly maintain,
Gives genius a better discerning.
—Oliver Goldsmith.
Then fill the bowl, away with gloom 1
Our joy shall always last!
For hope will brighten days to come,
And memory gild the past.
—Thomas Moore.
Drink, for you know not
When you came, nor why;
Drink, for you know not why
You go, nor whence.
—Omar Khayyam.
MUMM'S  CHAMPAGNE.
PX. 2067
Established 1867
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
5a Uovernment St., Victoria, B. C.
Charles Hayward, President. F. Caselton, Manager.
We make a specialty of Undertaking and Embalming.
An experienced certificated staff available at all times, day
and night.
Phones Nos. 48, 305, 404 or 594, Victoria.
Established 1856
M. R. SMITH 4, CO.
Factory and Head Office:
VICTORIA
Manufacturers of
Warehouse and Offices:
VANCOUVER
BISCUITS •■" CONFECTIONERY
Note Our Leader  -   SMITH'S SWISS CREAMS
The True Test of Merit i
Is proved by the constantly increasing demand for
BUCHANAN'S Scotch Whiskies   jj
^ > Due entirely to their purity, old age and fine flavor. i >
{'  Ask yonr wine merchant for Red Seal, at 111 per bottle; Black & White, ''
(* at $1.25 per bottle; Royal Household at $1.50 per bottle;
< > Liqueur Scotch, nt $1.75 per bottle.
JAMES BUCHANAN A CO., by Royal Warradt Purveyors to RoyAl family
MODERN OFFICE APPLIANCES.
"Underwood" Visible Typewriter.
"Macey" Piling Cabinets.
"Gunn" Sectional Bookcases, Etc., Etc.
BAXTER & JOHNSON, Government Street,  VICTORIA.
Phone 730 Opp. Post Ollice.
self-seeking politicians and their spiritual advisers are, for cash and votes,
seeking to thrust upon Victoria at
the very moment when her long period of depression is passing and
wealthy men with families are coming to seek homes within our borders.
Victoria is the best-governed and
most law-abiding sea-port on the
American continent to-day, and it is
time that clerical wanderers and vote-
hunting politicians were taught that
it is no more safe to slander a city
than to slander an individual. Alderman Stewart is right—we have had
too much or this sort of advertising.
Give us a rest on the liquor question,
and let us have some decent water to
drink. Give us fewer parsons and
more civil engineers. Give us better
streets and fewer salary-grabbers.
PRACTICAL.
Go to
FRASER'S
Drug Store
and see the latest
Perfumes
Phone 542
30-32 Government St.
i
1
Have You Seen Our
Assortment of
French Worsteds
and Scotch Tweeds
Suitings ?
They are the finest, and the
way we make them np is the
very best and fit guaranteed.
We want yonr business and
we will treat you right.
Peden's
TAILORING PARLORS
31   FORT   STREET
COAL.
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo Collieries.
N.w Wellington Coal.
The best household coal in the marke  at
current rates.  Anthracite coal for sale.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
HOLLY TREES
Prices from 25 cents to $5.00, according
to size. Write for seed and tree catalog.
JAY & CO. VICTORIA, B. C.
Pure
Medicine.
That is our constant thought.
We never let the purity idea
escape from us one minute.
It's with us constantly and we
put purity in your prescription
CYRUS H. BOWES
9S Government St., near Yates St.
Leave Vour Baggage Cheeks at thc
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.      A. E, KENT, Proprietor BaSKWW^^^myr^^^nm,mimr^r~irmnmmTni
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 15 1906.
*3
CHALLONER & MITCHELL
CHRISTMAS GIFT GUIDE
W
E SINCERELY  TRUST these little lists of suitable presents may be of use to you and assist in deciding that all important question,   at  this
season of the year :   WHAT SHALL IT BE ?
For Ladies.!
Solid Gold Rings $1.75 up
Fashionable Brooches  50c up
Artistic Bracelets  $1.50 up
Long Chains  $2.25 up
Exquisite Pendants  $1.50 up
Useful Watches   $5.00 up
Handy Pencils  50c up
Card Cases $1.00 to $3.50
Perfume Bottles 50c to $5.00
Pomade Jars 50c to $2.00
Cut Glass Powder Box $2.50 up
Opera Glasses $2.75 to $30.00
Fancy Clocks  $1.50 up
Jewel Cases   $2.50
Silverware Novelties 50c up
Oak Goods, Butter Dish $2.75
Diamond Rings  $10.00 up
Individual Umbrellas    $3.25
Hand Bags  $1.00 up
Purses 75c up
Writing Desk Novelties 50c up
Pretty Lockets $1.00 up
Solid Silver Scissors $1.00
Stone Paper Weight 75c
Brass Inkstand  $2.00
Cut  Glass Water Jug $4.50
Real Ebony Hair Brush 75c up
Ivory Ring Box $3.00
Ablone Pearl Pin Tray ....$2.25
Solid Silver Hat Pins 25c
Solid Silver Thimbles 25c
Cut Glass Tooth Brush Bottle.. .$1.25
Nugget Cross  $6.00
Silver Plate Tea Service $12.00
Sterling Silver Toilet Set...$15.00 up
Parisian  Feather Fan 75c
Cut Glass Bon Bon Dish $1.25
Gun Metal Card Case $2.7*5
Art Chinaware  $1.25 up
For Gentlemen.
Cuff Links  50c up
Fountain Pens   $2.00 up
Match Boxes  $1.00 up
Chains  50c up
Shaving Brushes   $1.25 up
Shaving Sets   $3.50 up
Scarf Pins  25c up
Vest Chains  $1.00 up
Dressy Fobs !li.25 up
Guaranteed Watches  H3.00 up
Solid Gold Rings $1.50 up
Stamp Boxes   75c up
Seals    50c up
Field Glasses  $6.00 up
Military Brushes !li.75 up
Walking Canes  iii.oo up
Umbrellas  ! 13.75 up
Flasks   !l2.oo up
Cigar and Cigarette Cases.. .S1.25 up
Pipe Sets  $2.50 up
Pouches    75c up
Decanters $3.00 per set
Gun Metal Cigar Cutter 50c
Cut Glass Carver Rests, pair $1.00
Nugget Fob  $11.00
Nugget Cuff Links $4.50
Brass Ash Tray 25c
Brass Smoking Set $1.00
Brass Calendar    75c
A Bone Pearl Smoking Set $11.00
Ivory Paper Knife 90c
Gun Metal Cigar Holder $2.00
Leather Purse  !,1.75
Solid Silver Photo Frame iii.oo
Leather Car Ticket Case 25c
Solid Silver Pencil 75c
Fungus Photo Frame 75c
Real Ebony Clothes rush 75c
RBeal Ebony Shaving Brush $1.00
Magnificent Selection of Beautiful Rings.
Of all gifts, none give greater satisfaction to the receiver than a beautiful Ring. It is a mistake to think that Rings are expensive. Excepting where very large, rare and costly gems are used, Rings are quite inexpensive; 75c will buy a Gold Ring for a child; $1.50 a Solid Gold Ring set
with stones for a lady; $5.00, a very beautiful Solid Gold Ring set with five large New Zealand opals. The reason why we give such great
value in Rings is because we are large wholesale dealers in diamonds and other precious stones, and the stone setting is done in our own factory,
thereby enabling us to give our customers the benefit of factory to wearer prices.
For the Bairns.
m.
Gold Rings  7^c '     \
Solid Silver Bracelet 25c
Leather Watch Chain 25c -_-—
Baby Pins    25c *^_»    ' vjRT•'.'.
Necklets    50c
r i^rsEHfcA Solid Silver Spoon 75c *M    M _*_§5T"/'/^^^_fc?l1'- •"_§"
E-)jA Souvenirs   50c -__B_P^ _*SB"R»/Z*'».>y_Bki ,_«W.. i
i *' £j 1 JMk   ■"'   >. Lockets   75c ^^
7»'~. Serviette Ring, Solid Silver 75c        _r_.IM i :"*■
Boy's Watch    $1.00
Girl's Watch, Solid Silver $5.00
Boy's Real Ebony Hair Brush.. .$1.75 ^^^  ipiiii      _■*■_.■■ _■*.   w     ^_^_t       '»l
Girl's Fan    75c M m       StV ini ftwru \. *' <l|
•■■,^^H5H_K£5E3_2'^iI_rf?5_|_^_^_LL. Nuggett Brooch   $1.00
r'^^SSk^S^^^^'^^^^\'..... Fungus Stud  Box   75c ___*j_P_^ W^*"_C^*S*'
Fungus Jewel Case $1.50 "*"■
Gun Metal Pocket Knife 75c
Gun Metal Pencil 50c   , _-_-__■_-_-_-__.-    P-«-_-_--r-
rWM^^W -i^'i ** *&& i  • • *"\*ls<si$
-■•WW"**"'" -_rf^i. -. ''.,•-
SILVER-PLATED TABLE   WARE ^) EUROPEAN    ART   GOODS
f nA ?.2?MSrta"? «?'?• ' Eath ,pi*ie pf sT,1|y SelCHted,WT?E />*>-S°*^                 Our selection of French Bronzes, Art Chinaware and other cut goods is
of the artistic beauty of the design and the  durability and value  of  the .»«_»f*_7*r_*ifi»-—-_*iT\              ,,     ,     ,         ,      •             .                  •            • •,       .            ,
platewares now gathered together in our showrooms and windows ready *sW^£££JljMs£^\ really the best showing we have ever been privileged to make.    It pre-
for your inspection at this, "The Gifting Season." \"h sents innumerable opportunities for beautiful and artistic gifts.
CHALLONER Si MITCHELL
THE XMAS GIFT STORE. JEWELERS AND SILVERSMITHS.
47 and 49 Government St., Victoria, B. C. H
THE WEEK   SATURDAY, DECEMBER 15, 190b.
31. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 34,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence tiuth 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement; 640 acres.
J. J. TEETZEL.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 17th, 1906.
32. Commencing at a post planted at
tne south-east corner ot Section 18,
Township 12, Range 5, Pouurier Survey; thence south 40 cnains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being the north half of
Section 8 ,Township 12, Range 5, of
said survey.
BENJAMIN WERDEN,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 20th, 1906.
No. 10.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated on the north
side of San Juan River, Renfrew District, adjoining E. J. Palmer's northeast
corner: Commencing at a post marked
"A. Young, Southeast Corner," thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated at Port Renirew this 5th day
of November, 1906.
ALEXR. YOUNG.
Nov. 24.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated on the
south side of Camelia Inlet, about 18
miles from the mouth of the Skeena
River, commencing at a post marked C.
T., N; E. corner purchase claim, thence
running south 80 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains to point of commencement, containing 320 acres more or less.
C. TAKADA.
November 2nd, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chfie Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission 0 purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the N. E. corner of L.
June's purchase claim marked C. W.
Peck, S. E. corner, thence running 40
chains west, thence 40 chains north,
thence 40 chains east, thence 40 chains
south to post of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
Located 26th October, 1906.
C. W. PECK,
Locator.
F. W. BOHLER,
Agent.
Nov. 24.
No. 11.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated on the north
side of San Juan River, Renfrew District, adjoining A. Young's east boundary of limit No. 10: Commencing at a
post marked "A. Young, Southeast
Corner," thence north 160 chnins,
thence west 40 chains, thence south 160 j
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence |
south 160 ch.ains, thence east 40 chains j
to place of cemmencement, containing
640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew this Sth day I
of November, 1906.
ALEX. YOUNG.
Nov. 24.
No. 12.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated on the north
side of San Juan River, Renfrew District, adjoining A. Young's timber limit
No. 11, on the east boundary: Commencing at a post marked "J. Young,
Southeast Comer," thence north 160
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
south 160 chains, thence west 40 chains
to place of commencement, containing
640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew on thc 5th
day of November, 1906.
JOHN YOUNG.
Nov. 24.
No. 13.
NOTICE is herehy given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated on the north
side of San Juan River, Renfrew District, adjoining J. Young's east boundary of limit No. 12: Commencing at a
post marked "A. Young, Southeast Corner," thence north 160 chains, tbence
east 40 chains, thence south 160 chains,
thence west 40 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew on the sth
day of November, 1906.
ALEXR. YOUNG.
Nov. 24.
No. 14.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date 1 inttnd to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated on the north
side of San Juan River, Renfrew District, adjoining A. Young's east boundary of limit No. 13: Commencing at a
post marked "J. Young, Southwest Corner," thence north 160 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 160 chains,
thence west 40 chains to place of commencement.
Dated at Port Renfrew on the 5th
day of November, 1906.
JOHN YOUNG.
Nov. 24.
28. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 17. Tp.
10, Range 5. Poudrier Survey; thence
south 80 chains: thence west 86 chains:
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains tn point of commencement, and
being said Section 17 of said survey.
BERTHA FISHLF.IGH,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 15th,  1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated on the
south bank of the Skeena River adjoining H .A. Draper's preemption claim,
south boundary line, at a post marked
M. V. Wadham's N. W. corner post,
thence east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west to bank of river,
following the river bank north to post
of commencement, containing one hundred and sixty acres more or less.    •
Located 26th October. 1906.
M. V. WADHAMS,
Locator.
H. DRAPER,
Agent.
Nov. 24.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the N. E. corner of L.
L, Watson's purchase claim, marked D.
M .Moore, S. E. corner, thence running
40 chains west, thence 40 chains north,
thence 40 chains east, thence 40 chains
south to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less. Located
October 26th, 1906.
D. M. MOORE,
Locator.
F. W. BOHLER,
Agent.
Nov. 24.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the S. W. corner of D.
Menard's purchase claim marked J.
Cttrther's S. E. corner, thence running
40 chains west, thence 40 chains north,
thence 40 chains east, thence 40 chains
south to post of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
Located 26th October, 1006.
J. CURTHERS,
Locator.
D. MENARD,
Agent.
Nov. 24.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the N. W. corner of D.
Menard's purchase claim, marked W.
Bruce, S. E. corner, thence running 40
chains north, thence 40 chains east,
thence 40 chains south to post of commencement, cintaining 160 acres more or
less.
Located 26th October, 1006.
W. BRUCE,
Locator.
D. MENARD,
Agent
Nov. 24.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixly
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described lnnd, commencing
at a post planted on thc right hank of
the Skeena River about 20 chains below the Yamoqotitiy and at the N. E.
corner of Indian Reserve and marked
L. S. H., S. E. corner post, thence west
40 chains.thenco north 40 chains, thence
cast 40 chains, thence routh 40 chains to
place of commencement, containing 160
acres more or less.
Located Oct. 1st, 1006.
L. S. HUTCHESON
Locator.
J. F. BATEMAN,
Agent.
Nov. 24.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land rituated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the S. E. corner marked
L .L. Watson, thenee running 40 chains
west to N. E. corner of E. A Wadham's
purchase claim, thence north 40 chains,
thence east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
L. L. WATSON,
Locator.
F. W. BOHLER,
Agent
Nov. 24.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
daysafter date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the N. W. corner of W.
Bruce's purchase claim, marked E. A.
Wadham's S. E. corner, thence running
40 chains west, thence 40 chains north,
thence 40 chains east, tnence 40 chains
south to post of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
Located 26th October, 1906.
E. A. WADHAMS,
Locator.
F. W. BOHLER,
Agent
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the.
following described land situated near
Camelia Inlet about 18 miles from the
mouth of the Skeena River, and adjoining C. Takuda's purchase claim, commencing at a post marked G. B. W., N.
E. corner purchase claim, thence running west 40 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chainsh t opost of commencement, containing 320 acres more or less.
November 2nd, 1906.
GORDON B. WADHAMS,
Locator.
W. A. WADHAMS,
Agent.
Nov. 24.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30
clays after date, we intend to apply to
the Honourable the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special licence to cut and carry away timber
from the following described lands in
Eas* Kootenay: Commencing at a post
planted 20 chains south of the southwest
corner of the Isabel Mineral Claim;
thence east 80 chains: thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains to place of commencement.
Dated November 12th, 1906.
CROW'S NEST PASS LUMBER CO.,
LTD.,
N022 ED. GEAGAN, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30
days after date, we intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special licence to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands in South-East
Kootenay, viz.: Commencing at a post
planted on the southeast corner of Lot
494, running south 50 chains, more or
less, to the northern boundary of Lot
2 595; thence east 100 chains, more or
less, to thewestern boundary of Lot
423 ;thence north 80 chains, more or less,
to Lot 2; thence west 6b chains; south
20 chains; west 40 chains to place of
commencement; containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated November 12th, 1906.
CROW'S NEST PASS LUMBER CO.,
LTD.
N022.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60
days from date, we intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for permission to purchase
the following described lands in the Nechaco Valley, Coast District:
1. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 25,
Township 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said section 25 of said
survey.
W. H. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August sth, 1906.
2. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 26,
Township 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
non,. 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 26 of said
survey.
EDW ' HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 5th, 1906.
3. Commencing at apos t planted at
lhe north-east corner of Section 35.
Township I, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
ihence south 80 chnins; thence west 80
chains. Ihence north 3o chains; thence
cast 80 chnins lo point of commencement, and being said Section 35 of said
survey.
C. W. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August sth, 1906.
4. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 36,
Township 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 36
of said survey.
E. A. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August sth, 1906.
6. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 4,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 4 of
said survey.
EMMA HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August Sth, 1906.
7. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 34,
Township I, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 34 of said
survey.
ISABEL HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August Sth, 1906.
8. Commencing at a post planted at
tne north-east corner of Section 33,
Townshpi 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thtnee south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 33 of said
survey.
MAGGIE B. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August Sth, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a lease of the
foreshore abutting the entire Pacheena
Indian Reserve, lot two (2), Renfrew
District, which said foreshore includes
the islands belonging to the said reserve: Commencing at a post marked
"A. Young, Southeast Corner." placed
on the foreshore at the southwest corner of the said Pacheena Indian Reserve, thence running north along the
entire reservation.
Victoria, B. C, 30th day of October.
1006.
ALEXANDER YOUNG.
Notice is hereby given that sixty days
•ifter date I intende to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, situated in
range 5. Skeena River district, about
one mile from Little Canyon, commencing at a post planted on the southeast
corner, marked ''R. Braun," thence running west 80 chains to Turner's southeast corner, thence north 40 chains to
Frank's northeast corner, thence east
40 chains, thence north 40 chains to
Johnson's southeast corner, thence east
40 chains, thence south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing 480
acres (more or less).
Located September 1st, 1906.
R. BRAUN.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, situated in
range 5, Skeena River district, about
one miles from Little Canyon, commencing at a post planted on the southeast
corner, marked "R. Braun." thence running west 80 chains to Turner's southeast corner, thence north 40 chains to
Frank's southeast corner, thence east
40 chains, thence north 40 chains to
Johnson's southeast corner, thence east
40 chains, thence south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing 80
acres (more or less).
Located September 1st, 1906.
R. BRAUN.
NOTICE Is hereby given that sixty days
nfter date I Intend to npply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to purchase the following described
lnnd, starting from a post planted on the
smith line of lot 109, at the head of Union
Ray, thence 40 ehnlns east, thence 40 chains
south, thence 40 chains west to shore
line, thenee northerly along shore
line of Union Bay to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
Stnked September 4th, 1906.
JOHN  G.  JOHNSTON.
20. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 36, Tp.
12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains.
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement; 640
acres.
C. A. PORTER.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 16th, 1906.
9. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 9,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey, thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to place of commencement and being Section 9 of said
survey.
D. M. LINEHAM,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 6th, 1906.
10. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Section 10,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section IO
of said survey.
LILLIAN HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent,
.vugut 6th, 1906.
n. Commencing at a pot planted at
the outh-eat corner of Section 8, Town-
10, Range S> Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains* 'iience
east 80 chains to point of commencement; and being said Section 8 of said
survey.
GEORGE CURRIE,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 6th, 1906.
12. Commencing at a post planted at
tne north-east corner of Section 5,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains* thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and beimr said Section 5
of said survey.
MARY E. LINEHAM,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 6th, too6.
30. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 36,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to place of commencement; 640 acres.
G. M. BTRKETT.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 16th, 1906.
17. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 16,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey ; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 choins; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 16
of said survey.
ANDREW F. WEiR,
A.. T.' Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
18. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Section IS,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 15
of said survey.
CLARA WEIR,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 8th ,1906.
19. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 6,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains, thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 6 of
said survey.
MINNIE BOWDEN,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
20. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section I,
'township 11, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section I
of said survey.
E. H. BOWDEN,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
21. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Section J,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey ; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 7 of
said survey.
THOMAS SHOPLAND,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
22. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 12,
Township 11, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence nortli 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
tnence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section ia
of said survey.
MABEL BOWDEN,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
23. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 11,
Township n, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 11
of said survey.
WM. STANLEY BATT,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August ioth, 1906. THE WKF.K, SATURDAY. DECEMBER 15   196
*5
Congo Horrors.
A gunboat at the mouth of the
Congo would rapidly bring the Kinp;
of the Belgians to reason. The British Government is morally bound to
insist that British missionary societies should, in accordance with the
terms of the convention, have free
right of entry in the Congo. Ic is
now the solemn duty of Great Britain
to put an end to these reeking abominations.—The Observer.
Dr. Osier on Vegetarians.
"Vegetarians are not as a rule as
robust mentally as they are physically," said Professor William Osier in
a lecture on "The Care of. the Body"
'at the Working Men's College,
Crowndale road, St. Pancras.
"Unfortunately," he said, "we are
not well built to get the necessary
elements from vegetables alone. The
human body is like a steam engine-
it requires sufficient fuel. The essential food for a clay must contain 13
ounces of sugar, three ounces of curd,
three ounces of fat, and one ounce of
> salt. Milk contains all these elements
■' and a man can live on milk alone.
Bread and potatoes are supposed to
some to be only starch, but through
the action of the pancreatic juice they
are converted into sugar, which produces energy."
The Triumph of a Yorkshire Chorus.
A prophecy ten years ago that a
body of English singers would visit
Germany and be there accorded a
glorious greeting, would have been
considered a harebrained phantasy;
but such a journey is now a matter
of history.
Three hundred and sixty singers,
selected from the famous choirs of
Sheffield and Leeds, have given concerts in Dusseldorf, Frankfort, and
Cologne, arousing in each place
boundless enthusiasm and unstinted
praise.
The works chosen were intended to
enable the hearers to judge of various
, British composers. Chief among them
was Elgar's "Gerontius"; various
shorter pieces also enabled the singers to demonstrate their ability to
interpret various modes of musical
expresisoii. Handel's "Messiah" was
given at Dusseldorf by special request.
The notices in the German papers
might well be styled rhapsodies, for
of criticism there seems to be none.
Detailed reports will doubtless appear in the musical press, so I only
note one or two expressions from
leading German authorities.
Herr Julius Buths, the conductor
of the Dusseldorf Festival, after the
close of the first concert, gave most
unstinted praise to choir and conductor.
"It is difficult to gauge the feelings
of the audience, except by the silence,
more expressive than a hurricane of
applause." "The audience were in
raptures." "The singing has provoked
extraordinary enthusiasm." "No such
enthusiasm has ever been witnessed
at a concert in Frankfort."—Review
of Reviews.
National Opera House.
A scheme to provide London with
a National Opera House has been organised, and Colonel Mapleson and
those acting with him are negotiating
'for an important site.
There will be a permanent orchestra and a permanent chorus of carefully selected vocalists, and the principal singers will be selected from the
chief European opera houses, and, in
addition, prize vocalists from the
Royal College of Music and Royal
Academy of Music will be engaged.
Canada's Emigration Tide.
South Africa is the only part of
the' British Colonial Empire to which
emigration from the British Isles
shows a falling off this year. The
total has fallen from 22,074 in ten
months of last year to iq,375- Canada, much more fortunate, has received this year 109,180 English,
Scotch, and Irish, against 78,629 during the ten months January-October
of lasty ear. The United States, however, still claims the highest propor-
)ion of the exiles from the British
Isles; it has received this year 132,-
362.
By Appointment to His
Majesty the King.
Manufactured with scrupulous cleanliness and care,
from the choicest materials
only.
HUNTLY & PALMERS
BISCUITS
Are always superlatively
dainty and good. Insist on
HUNTLEY & PALMER'S.
Refuse all proffered substitutes.
H. P. 1968.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief    Commissioner    of   Lands    and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away  timber   from  the  following   described land, beginning at a post situate
at the mouth of Kitsonschultz River, on
the north   bank  of the  Skeena  River,
; marked "S. W. Cor. Wilfred Loiselle's
I Timber Claim;" thence north 40 chains;
thence east 160 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence wesl 160 chains to point
of beginning.
Dated Nover 17th, 1906.
WILFRED LOISELLE, Locator.
December 8.
to shore; thence westerly along shore
to point of commencement.
W.  E.  GREEN,
W. B.  Garrard, Agnet.
.Clayoquot District. no29
THE NAME
CROSSE &
BLACKWELL
On a jar or tin of Marmalade or Jams is a certain
guarantee of the absolute
purity and delicious flavor
of the contents.
C. & B.'s Jams and Marmalades are sold by all up-
to-date grocery stores.
C. B. 2066.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
clays after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on the
southwest shore of Stuart Lake, about
ten miles from Fort St. Tames, in the
Coast District of the Province of British Columbia', viz.: Commencing at a
post marked "E. J. M. S. E.," and
placed about 10 chains west from the
lake shore; thence astronomically west
40 chains; thence astronomically north
40 chains; thence astronomically west
40 chains; thence astronomically north
40 chains, more or less, to said southwest shore at a point near the head of
what is known as the Big Bay; thence
following said shore in southeasterly direction for about 60 chains; and thence
astronomically south for about 20 chains
to point of commencement, and containing about 400 acres, more or less,
E. J. MATHEWS.
J. A. Hickey, Agent.
August 30, 1906.
December 8.
COUNTRY
GENTLEMEN
GENTLEMEN LIVING in the
country frequently have a difficulty
in obtaining the correct articles of
dress to which they are accustomed.
For instance, best English flannel j
shirts cut full in the skirts, giving,
that comfortable fit which is so desirable; Welch, Margetson's fine flan-j
nel pyjamas and Turkish towelling!
bath robes; the latest styles of English neckwear in Derby, Ascot, and
other fashionable ties; knitted vests,
not the departmental store style but
the vests which are worn by men of
discrimination and refined tastes;
Christy's stylish and most comfortable hats, and all those hundred and
one little items which assist good
form and comfortable living. This
difficulty can be immediately overcome by communicating with SEA &
GOWEN, the Gentlemen's Store, 64
Government Street, whose MAIL ORDER DEPARTMENT is organized so
as to give the utmost promptitude
and the utmost value in the execution
of all out of town orders; for instance, the comfortable English flannel shirts can be purchased from
$2.00 to $3.50; Welch, Margetson's
pyjamas, from $2.50 to $8.00; exclusive knitted vests from $3.50 to $6.50.
SEA & GOWEN are exclusively gentlemen's hattere and furnishers at
their only address, 64 Government
Street, Vietoria.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for permission to
purchase the following described lands,
situate on the north shore of Stuart
Lake, about half wy between Pinchi
and Tacher Rivers and about 21/* miles
inlands in the Coast District of the
Province of British Columbia, viz.:
Commencing at a post marked "W. J.
F. S. E.," and placed at the northeast
corner of lot 331; thence astronomically
west 80 chains; thence astronomically
north 80 chains; thence astronomically
east 80 chains; thence astronomically
south 80 chains to the point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
WALTER J. FRIEDLANDER.
J, A. Hickey, Agent.
August 24, 1906.
December 8.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special licence to cut and
carry away timber from the following
uebcnbed lands, in Alberni District:
No. 1.—Commencing at a post on the
east side of Silver Lake, about 40 chains
from the outlet; thence 40 chains E.;
80 chains N.; thence west to Silver
Lake; thence following the shore line
to point of commencement.
No. 2.—Commencing S. W. corner of
No. 1, on east shore of Silver Lake;
thence 40 chains E. 40 chains N.; 60
chains E.; 80 chains S.; thence west to
outlet of lake; thence following the
shore line to point of commencement.
No. 3.—Commencing at a post at the
outlet of Silver Lake; thence 40 chains
S.; thence 40 chains W.; thence 40
chains N.; tnence 100 chains W.; thence
V. "-i Silver Lake; thence following
shore line to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. Garrard, Agent.
31st October,  1906. no29
In Memory of "The Padre."
Mr. Rudyard Kipling is among the
subscribers to the brass tablet which
has been unveiled at Christ Church,
Fulwood, Preston, as a memorial to
his old tutor, the Rev. George Willcs,
late vicar of Fulwood, who died exactly twelve months ago. The deceased gentleman was the original of
"The Padre" in which Kipling's popular school story, "Stalky and Co.,"
and he acted as tutor to the famous
author while the latter was being educated at the United Services College
at Westward Ho!
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special licence to cut and
carry away timber, exclusive of hemlock, from the following described
lands:
1. Commencing at a post by the N.
E. boundary post of the India:! Reserve, on the shore of Nahmint Bay by
the mouth of the river; thence 80 chains
N.; thence 80 chains W.; thence S. to
Nahmint River following same to N.
boundary of I. R.; thence E. to point of
commencement.
2. Commencing at a post by the N. E.
bniv"'"**v post of the Indinn Reserve
and at the S. E. corner of No. 1;
,i...,.r "-, chains jj. ; thence F. t* W.
boundary of Lot 79; thence S. to shore
line; thence following the shore to E.
boundary of I. R.; tnence to point of
commencement.
Located October 28th, 1006.
W. B. GARRARD.
Alberni District. 11029
General Booth's Geishas.
General Booth is going to Japan, \
via the United States or Canada, at 1
the beginning of next year, and hopes
to spend April in that country.
Speaking on Wednesday evening, the
general said tbat the Salvation Army
had been instrumental in rescuing
30,000 Geisha girls from their life of
bondage.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30
clays after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special licence to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands: Commencing at a post
on the N. shore of Uchucklesit Harbour, on the W. boundary of Loe 699,
"le" Mineral Claim; t'encc N.
nnd E. along boundary of "Cascade"
AT. C. tr> the W. boundary of Lot 70:
thence N. .ind E. along 70 to Fern M,
C. thence N. and E. alone boundaries
nf "Fern " "Wasp" and "Sunshine" Nn.
2 Mineral Claims, to the N. E. corner
"' "Sunshine" M. C.: thenc N. ti
chains; thence W. 100 chains: Ihence S.
NOTICE Is Hereby given that 60 days
from date I Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to purchase the following described
land, adjoining Lot 646, Skeena District:
Commencing at a post marked "A C.'s N.
W. Corner"; thence east 40 ohains along
south boundary of T. Flewln's claim; thence
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains, along east boundary
of Lot 646 to polut of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
ANNIE COPBLAND.
No. 9—
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Work*
for a special license to cut and carry away
timber from the following described lands,
situated on the uorth side of San Juan
River, Renfrew District, adjoining B. J.
Palmer's southwest comer No. 2: Commencing at a post marked "J. Young,
-Southwest Corner," theuce nortli 80
ohains; thence east 80 chains; thence eoutti
80 chains; thence west 80 chalus to place
of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew ou the 1st day
of November,  1906.
JOHN  YOUNG.
November 17,  1906.
NOTICE ds hereby given that 60 days
after date I intend to apply to the Chief i
Commissionei* of Lands and Works few permission to purchase the following described j
land situated ln the Kitsunikalum Valley,
Range 5, Coast District: Commencing at
a stake planted at the N. E. corner of N.
T. Cuiinlnglwim purchase claim, marked
W. A. Wndhams' No. 1 Initial Post; ithence
running 40 chuius west; theuce 40 chains
north; thence 40 chains east; thence 40
chains south to post of comiuiencement,
containing 160 acres more or less.
W. A. WADliAMS,  Locator.    !
F. W. BOHLER, Agent.
Located  October  1st,   1906.
~WT7CE~ls~'iereby~girai that 60 days
after date I iutend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to purchase the following described,
land situated in the Kitsumkalum Valley,
Range 5,  Coast District:   Commencing at i
a stake  planted at  the  N.   E.  corner of
W. A. Wadhams' purchase claim, marked L. j
Gune  No. 1 Initial Post; thence running
40  chains  west;  theuce  40  chains  uorth; |
thence  40  chains east;  thence  40 chains
south to post of comimencement, containing *
160 aeres more or less.
L.  GUNE,  Locator.
F. W. BOHLER, Agent.
Located  October  1st,   1906.
THIRTY DAYS AFTER DATE I Intend to make application to the Chief
Commissioner of Lunds and Works for per.
mission to out and curry away timber from
the following   described   lands,    situated
No. 1. Storting at a post in Bay ou west
sldb of extreme end of the lake and run-
nlug SO chains west; 80 chains north; 80
chuius more or less, eust back to shore
and following shore buck to point of commencement.
No. 2. Starting at the southwest corner
of No. 1 running west 166 chains; running
north 60 chains; running eust 106 chains,
and south (IU chains back to point of commencement.
No. 3. Beginning 10 chains south of the
northwest corner of No. 2 and running ml
chuius south; 106 chains west; 60 chains
north and 106 ohains east back to point of
coinmeucenient.
No. 4. Beginning at a post 10 chains
from the northwest comer of No. 3 running
south 60 chnins; west 108 ehalus; north 60
chalus and east 106 chalus back to point
of commencement.
ALBERT   FRASER
Victoria, B. C, November 11, 1906.
November IT,  1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that two months
after date I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Ohlef Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special licence to cut and carry away
timber from the following described lands,
commencing at a post planted about three
fourths of a mile west of the Elk river,
thence north 80 chains, thenee west 40
chains, thence south 40 chains, thence west
40 chains, thence south 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40 ohains,
thence east along the beach of Kennedy
lake, thence north to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Al J   IIAUUEN.
Sept. iot, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that, jo
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissi mer of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, in Alberni District:
Commencing at a post on the Alberni
Canal, about 30 chains S. of Hayes
Landing; thence W. 40 chains; thence
S. 160 chains; thence E. to water front;
thence following the water front to
point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. Garrard, Agent.
wctober 29, 1906. 11029
64. Commencing at a post planted'
at the northwest corner of Hubert
Haines' land, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
ELIZABETH KNIGHT.
G. B. Watson, Agent.
Sept. 10th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days
nfter date, I Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following land,
adjoining Lot 467 on Portland Canal:
Starting from a post marked "W. P. IP's.
N. W. Comer"; thence 20 chains south;
thence 40 chains east; thence 40 chains
north; thence 40 chains, more or less, west
to shore line; thence southerly along shore
Hue to point of commencement, containing
120 acres, more or less.
W. P. FLEWIN.
November 17, 1906.
NOTICE ls hereby given that 60 day*
after date, I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of iLands and Works for
permission to purchase the following land,
situate on Observatory Inlet, adjoining
Lot 479: Starting from a post marked
"W. G. P'8. S. W. Cor."; thence north 20
chains; thence east 20 chains; thence
south 20 chains, more or less, to shore
line; thence along the shore Une westerly
to point of commencement, containing 40
acres, more or less.
W. G. PINDEU.
November 17, 1906.
NOTICE ls hereby given that sixty (80)
days after date we Intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following
described land situated near Graveyard
Point, commencing at a post on the North
bank of the Skeena river, thence in a
westerly direction 40 chains; thence northerly 40 chains; thence easterly 40 chains;
thence southerly 40 chains along bank of
river to point of commencement, contaln-
In,e 160 acres, more or less.
Located October 16, 1906.
E.   E©Y  AND 8.  McKENZIE,
Locators.
November 17, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away timber from the following described land, situate on Hastings Arm
of Observatory Inlet: Commencing at
a post planted on east shore of Hastings Arm, inarked "E. D.'s S. W. Corner," thence east 40 chains, thence north
160 chains, thence west 40 chains to
shore line, thence southerly along shore
line to point of commencement.
E. DONEHUE.
December 8.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away l|imber from Wie following described land, situated at Kum-ea-lon Inlet, Skeena District: Commencing at
a stake marked "W. R. F.'s Initial
Post," planted near shore of Inlet,
thence north 40 chains, thence east 60
chains, thence south 100 chains, thence
west 40 chains to shore line, thence
westerly alon gshore line to point of
commencement.
WALTER R. FLEWIN.
December 8.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away timber from the following lands:
Commencing at a stake inarked "G. A.
B. No. 1," planted on the cast bank of
Mammon River, thence north 160
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
south 160 chains, thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
GEO. A. BIGELOW.
December 8.
NOTICE Is hereby given that sixty (60)
unys after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated near
Graveyard Point: Commencing at a post on
the North bank of the Skeena river; thence
In a westerly direction 40 chnins; thenee
southerly 40 chains; thence easterly 40
chains; thence northerly 40 chains along
bank of river to point of commencement,
containing 160 aeres, more or less.
Located  October  16, 1908.
H. McKENZIE,  Locator.
S.   McKENZIE,     Agent.
November  17, 1908.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty (60)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Ohlef Commissioner of Lands nnd
■Works for permission to purchase the following described land situated near
Graveyard Point: Commencing nt a post on
the North bnnk of the Skeena river; thence
ln a westerly direction 40 ohains; thence
northerly 40 chains; thence easterly 40
chains; thence southerly 40 chains following bnnk of river to point of commencement, containing 16u acres, more or less.
Loented October 16,  1906.
G.  B. RAILLIE,  Locator.
B. EBY,   Agent.
November 17,  1906.
No. 1_
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands nnd Works
for n special license to cut nnd carry away
timber from the following describee! lands,
situated on thc south side of Snn Juan
Ulver, Renfrew District, Joining i'trkin-
son's southenst corner: Commencing at a
post mnrked "A. Young, Northeast Corner," thence south 160 chnins; thence west
40 chains; thence north 160 ehnlns, thence
enst 40 chnins to place of commencement,
eontnlulng 610 acres.
Dated nt Port Renfrew on the lfith day
of October, 1908.
November 17, 1906.
ALEXR   YOUNG.
No. 2-
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
dnys after dnte I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of 'Lands and Works
for a special license to cut nnd carry away
tl/mlier from the following desoribed lends,
situated on the south side of San Juan
Hlver, Renfrew District: Commencing at
n post mnrked "J, Young, N. E. Corner,"
ndjoinlng Mrs. .1. S. Young's south boundnry, thence south 120 chnins: thence west
80 chnins: thenee north 40 chains; thence
enst 40 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence enst 40 chnins to plnce of commencement, containing 640 ncres.
Dnted nt Port Renfrew, this 20th dny of
October,  1906.
November 17, 1906.
JOHN  YOUNG.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
clays after dale I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands, situated on the east bank
of Marmon River, Graham Island:
Commencing at a post marked "G. A.
B.'s No. 2 Claim;" thence south 160
chains; tbence east 40 chains; thence
nortli 160 chains: thence west 40 chains
lo point of commencement.
GF.O. A. BIGELOW.
December 8.
NOTICE Is hereby given that 60 dey*
after date I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Work*
for permission to purchase thc following
described land, situated In the Coast District, Range .">: Beginning at a post planted on thc north bank of the Skeena river
nbout one mile southwest of Zymqettta
rivor at the southeest corner of J. B. Batsman's pre-emption claim and marked B. B.'s
Northeast Corner; thence running west 120
chains; thence south about CO chains, more
or less, to tank wf Skeena rlveT; thence In
a northeasterly direction following meandering of the Skeenn river to post of commencement, containing nbout 820 ncres of
land more or less.
EMMA BAT '.MAN.
J. E. BATEMAN, Agent.
Loented September 20th. 1908. i6
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 15 1906
I Husic and      |
if
The Drama. |
On Monday night Miss Florence
Roberts and company appeared at the
Victoria Theatre in a play entitled
"The Strength of the Weak." I will
dispose of the latter first by saying
that it is the joint product of two
ladies, that it is a problem play, that
its main features and its most striking incidents are derived from Pin-
ero's masterpiece, "The Second Mrs.
Tanqueray." Its tragic finale, in
which the heroine shoots herself in a
room off the stage, being an exact
counterpart of Paula Tanqueray's
coup de grace. The dialogue is polished and witty, but lacks the philosophic insight and epigrammatic smartness of Pinero and Wilde. The play
obviously had a double motive, one
being to furnish dramatic entertainment, the other to preach one of
Marie Corelli's phillipics anent the
unjust attitude of public sentiment
towards the short-comings of the
weaker sex. This screed is worked
off in the third act, where the heroine
faces her betrayer and exhausts the
repertoire of stock arguments in support of her contention. The play is
interesting, and some of the situations are strong, notably that where
the heroine and her betrayer learn
face to face that the youth who has
fallen in love with her, and whom she
desires to marry, is none other than
the son of the latter. But the question naturally arises whether in the
interests of art ot moral ethics, it is
desirable to produce such a situation
upon the stage. Such incidents have
occurred in real life, but they are few
and far between, and certainly do not
prevail to such an extent as to justify
their public representation. The situation is not merely embarrassing, it
is painful, incongruous and unnatural,
and lacks the excuse of probability.
The latter part of the play, although
strong from the dramatic standpoint,
is morbid and unhealthy to the last
uegree. In this case at any rate the
end was inevitable, and it might have
come sooner with advantage. It is
not to lay one's self open to prudish-
ness to condemn plays of this type;
they serve no good purpose, they
lack the saving grace of humour, they
have long ceased to contain a spark
of originality, "the woman with a
past" has been done to death, and
all the piquant situations which her
peccadilloes can furnish have been
handled by greater dramatists with
infinitely more skill. But it is the
same with the drama as with fiction,
"when lovely woman stoops to folly"
she "out-Herods Herod," and nothing
less than the absolute limit satisfies
her artistic sense. It was so with
the most brilliant novelist among living women, Lucas Malet, when she
outraged every artistic and ethical
sense in the pages of "Richard Cal-
mady." And it is so with the ladies
who compiled "The Strength of the
Weak."
When one comes to the work of
the players little but praise is their
due. Miss Florence Roberts is an
emotional actress of intelligence and
force. She has the dramatic instinct,
and in one scene recalled the best
work of Genevieve Ward in "Forget-
me-not." It was in the third act of
the play, when in order to prevent
a meeting of the father and son, she
gets rid of the former in a side room
and subsequently dismisses the latter. Then with her back to the door
which she has only just closed, she is
seized with a paroxysm of grief and
despair, the portrayal of which touched the high water mark of emotional
acting, and sent a thrill through the
audience. It reminded me of the last
act in the play, which will forever be
associated with Miss Ward's name,
when having seen the shadow of her
avenger upon the blind she staggers
from the room only to meet her
death in the doorway. No higher
praise than the suggestion of this
comparison could be given to Miss
Roberts. In personal appearance and
in manner she is not unlike Miss
Ward, but it is only just to say that
she lacks the stage presence, the
grand air and the vocal equipment
so necessary for the portrayal of
characters in the class of Paula Tanqueray and Forget-me-not. Her support was good, the best individual
work being that of C. J. Williams as
a German baron, and the poorest that
of Charles Kent as the betrayer.
Thurlow Bergen as Dick Adams was
good but by no means excellent, his
conception of the part lacked delicacy and  finish,  indeed  all  through
The Old Home
Down on the Farm
Will be brighter, more attractive  to the young folks
and dearer to the old folks too, if cheered by
a first-class
.Talking Machine..
We are sole agents on Vancouver Island for
Columbia Graphophones,
Victor and Berliner Gramophones,
and Edison Phonographs
Catalogues of Machines and Records sent to any address
on application.
FLETCHER BROS.
SUPERIOR QUALITY   MUSIC HOUSfi
93 GOVERNMENT STREET
there was a noticeable lack of sympathy and anything approaching tenderness between him and the heroine.
The play was beautifully staged, and
the only regret that one could possibly have is that so much ability and
expense were wasted upon a worthless play.
All patrons of the New Grand
Theatre will learn with regret that
this week concluded the Victoria engagement of Mr. Fred Roberts, who
for the last seven months has been
acting in the dual capacity of song
illustrator and stage manager. Mr.
Roberts has been a universal favourite in Victoria vaudeville, and his loss
will be felt by patrons and actors
alike. Next week Mr. Keene, who
will take Mr. Roberts' place here,
will enter upon his engagement; he
is the possessor of a good tenor voice,
and will no doubt prove a great success. Kelly and Calvert have been
the great draw this week in an original sketch. Whatever may be the
general verdict as to the propriety of
drunken scenes on the stage, there is
no question that there can be no fault
found in this one, there being an excellent moral attached. Joe Belmont,
who has been seen in Victoria before,
gives his famous whistling performance, and thc last turn by Cook and
Rothert presents some wonderful
acrobatic and tumbling feats. Charles
McDonald as the Irish Brummell
completes the company at the New
Grand this week.
On Thursday the Empress Stock
Company left Victoria for Nanaimo,
where they finish their engagement
to-night, departing for Ladysmith on
Monday. The Fort Street theatre
will be reopened on Thursday night,
the 16th inst., with the well-known
Irish piece, "Con, the Shaughraim."
For Christmas week a strong Biblical
play is being prepared, entitled "The
Gates of Heaven," which depicts
Christian life in Rome at the time of
the Caesars. This is a very powerful
drama, and the Empress Company
arc leaving nothing undone to ensure
its success, and to preserve strict
accuracy in all details. Special attention is called to the fact that this
play will run all week.
The last play performed by this
company before leaving Victoria was
"Finnigan the Millionaire," a laughable Irish farce which gave M. J.
Hooley every opportunity to exercise
his farcical ability, which he did with
great success. H. Lewin, who played
the part of Pat, the dude son, sustained the part excellently, and An-
netta Daunnetta as Kate gave a very
creditable performance. There is one
thing, however, to which I should like
to call attention, and that is the
tendency of some of the actresses to
laugh when on the stage at their own
parts. It is distinctly bad that in
the midst of a presumably sad dialogue, in which tears arc supposed to
How, one of the performers should
catch the eye of a friend in the audience and start giggling, to be followed by her fellow. No doubt this
is one of the hardest things with
which a stock company has to contend, seeing that its members are
sure to have many friends and admirers in the body of the theatre, but
none the less it is a lesson which
must be learned before any measure
of true success can bc attained.
A bright, clean and unique little
entertainment at popular prices is to
be provided for up-Island towns next
week, the International Juvenile
Vaudeville Company going into Chemainus, Nanaimo, Ladysmith, Cumberland and Duncan for one night
stands. There are twelve people in
all, kiddies and adults, and the company itself might be termed an application of the Pollard Opera Company principle to vaudeville. The
programme embraces high grade instrumental work, parlour acrobatics,
a very clever vcntriloquial sketch,
character dancing, monologues, etc.
Features arc made of a string quartette introducing America's youngest
violinists; thc musical skit from
"Mile. Napoleon," introducing tlle
popular song hit, "Pretty Molly Shannon," with animated doll chorus; and
melodious medleys on the Edison
marimbaphone and silver organ
chimes.
A Cony Corner at the l'oodle Dog.
W. S. D. SMITH
The j j
Poodle Dog. i
Grill, ! J
Yates St., , *
Victoria, B. C„ is    j j
the only real 11
"grill" in British      ''
Columbia—the
only place where
you can
ACTUALIV
obtain yout
choice of meats
and all the deli*     (,
cacies of the < 1
season. -'
Proprietor
t
The Coming of "Richard the Third."
Lovers of the highest ideals in dramatic art are continually finding fault
with the too-frequent appearance, not
only here, but in all the cities, of silly
farcical plays, cheap sensationalism,
and the other immaterial features of
current theatrical productions, and are
always clamouring for the works of
Shakespeare and the other great masters of literature. It is a pleasure to
announce in this connection the early
appearance here of the eminent tragedian John Griffith and his splendid
company of legitimate artists in
Shakespeare's immortal tragedy,
"Ricliard the Third," with brilliant,
lire-proofed scenic equipment, electrical effects, chemical illusions and
all the details needful to insure an
absolutely perfect performance of
this, the greatest of the great master's plays. Everywhere that Mr.
Griffith has appeared, the local press
has teemed with praise of his magnificent performance and it will be a
real pleasure to welcome him to this
city. The engagement is announced
for Monday night, December 17, and
promises to be the one great big
event of the season.
EMPRESS
THEATRE
Under New Management.
Thursday, Dec. 20th,
CON, The Shaughraun
Monday,  Dec.  24th,  and throughout
Xmas  Week,
"THE GATES OF HEAVEN"
A powerful Biblical drama of Rome
in the time of the Caesars. Usual
prices.
The announcement of the coming
engagement in this city of John Griffith on Monday night, December 17,
carries with it a great deal of interest
to the best class of theatre-goers and
this interest is intensified by the fact
that he will present Shakespeare's
immortal tragedy, "King Richard the
Third." Mr. Griffith's presentation of
it will have most adequate aid in the
very excellent company he has selected, and the splendid fire-proofed
scenic equipment furnished by his
management. Many novel and thrilling electrical effects and chemical illusions have been added and the performance in its entirety will be the
most important event in the season's
theatrical history. Mr. Griffith is personally a most interesting character,
a combination of the mental and
physical. In appearance he suggests
the peerless Edwin horrest and has
the frame and strength of the champion pugilist, James J. Jeffries, while
mentally he is one of the greatest
students of the day of classic literature, and is fairly a crank on the
works of the divine bard, Shakespeare.
WEEK DECEMBER  7
The New
Grand
SULLIVAN * CONSIDINE,    Pro-.-liters.
M.n.g.m.nt t>f HOST. JAMIESON.
THE THREE WALSEYS
Wonderful  Acrobats and Posturing Feats.
KURTIS AND BUSSE
With Their Trained Toy Terriers.
THE GREAT EARL
Banjo Virtuoso.
AMY STANLEY
Comedienne.
JULES HARRON
"The Little German."
GEORGE F. KEANE
Our New Song Illustrator.
NEW MOVING PICTURES.
WHEN YOU HAVE THAT
"BLUE FEELING" DROP
IN AT THE
GARRICK'S HEAD
BASTION STREET
Nuff Sbd !
SIM & JACK, Proprietors
VICTORIA, B. C.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands, situate on thc
southwest shore of Stuart Lake, about
nine miles from Fort St. Jmes, in the
Coast District of the Province of British Columbia, viz.: Commencing at a
post marked "E. J. M. N. E.," and
placed about 10 chains west from the
lake shore, thence astronomically west
3o chains; thence astronomically south
40 chains; thence astronomically east 40
chains, thence astronomically south 40
chains; thence astronomically west 40
chains; thence astronomically south 40
chains; thence astronomically east 40
chains; thence astronomiclly north 40
chains; thence astronomically east 40
chains; thence astronomically north 80
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres.
E. J. MATHEWS.
J. A. Hickey, Agent.
August 30. 1906. December 8
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands  and  Works  for  permission  to<1
purchase the following described lands,!
situate on  the north  shore of  Stuart I
Lake,  about  half way between Pinchi
arid Tac'ier Rivers and about 3*4 miles ,
inland  in  the   Coast  Distritc  o)f  the.«
Province   of   British   Columbia,   viz.:
Commencing at a post marked "E. F.
S. W.," placed near the north boundary .
of   Walter   J.   Friedlander's  purchase,]
about 40 chains from the northeast corner;   thence   astronomically   north   80
chains;   thence  astronomically  east 80?
chains] thence astronomically south 80!
chains, and thence astronomically west
80 chains to  point of commencement^
and containing 640 acres, more or less.
EDGAR FRIEDLANDER.
J. A. Hickey, Agent.
August 24, 1906.
December 8.
'
■/•fts,-

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