BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

Week Jan 18, 1908

Item Metadata

Download

Media
pwv-1.0344107.pdf
Metadata
JSON: pwv-1.0344107.json
JSON-LD: pwv-1.0344107-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): pwv-1.0344107-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: pwv-1.0344107-rdf.json
Turtle: pwv-1.0344107-turtle.txt
N-Triples: pwv-1.0344107-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: pwv-1.0344107-source.json
Full Text
pwv-1.0344107-fulltext.txt
Citation
pwv-1.0344107.ris

Full Text

 If-'
nf_r_T_Trn_vr_xr__xi_T_r
» Kingsford Smith & Co
j* Stock and General
£ AUCTIONEERS
U    Commission and Real Estate Agents.
n__
1
C 860 Oranville,
Cjuuuuuuuuuuuu
Vaacoaver.
JUUUUUUUL&AJl!
Victoria Edition
The Week
A British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vaacoaver B. C
Vol. IV.   No. 51
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 1908
The contest is over, ex-
The Municipal Alderman Lewis Hall has
Elections. been elected Mayor of Vic
toria for the ensuing year.
He was the choice of the Progressive
Ticket and is supported by six Aldermen
who were upon that ticket. It is his first
turn in the Mayoral chair; as it is also
the first term in the City Council for no
fewer than four of the Aldermen. New
blood has baen infused into the management of the city's affairs and it now rests
with the Council to make good and to justify the choice of the electors upon progressive lines. The contest was one of
the hottest and, on the part of Mr. Morley
and some of his leading supporters, the
dirtiest in the annals of Victoria elections.
The whole campaign so far as they were
concerned was conducted upon the lines of
personal abuse. They questioned the motives of all who opposed them, and their
cowardly attacks culminated in the charges
brought forward by Mr. Morley in the
public meeting in the City Hall on Thursday night. Up to that moment, the chances
of winning out were in his favour, but it
was he himself and not his opponents who
caused the pendulum to swing in the other
direction. "Whom the gods wish to destroy they first make mad," and on Wednesday night Mr. Morley certainly furnished a good exemplification of whatever
truth there may be in this ancient proverb.
When he held up to public execration citizens who have lived here all tlieir lives,
and who enjoy the confidence and respect
of the whole community, and was even so
foolish as to make specific charges which
were proved to be false, he deliberately
shifted the issue of the campaign from
principle to personality; during the meeting some of his own supporters expressed
their disgust at the tactics which he had
adopted and there can be no reasonable
doubt that he alienated more votes than
the sixty-one men who when the final issue
of the poll was declared it was found could
have given Alderman Hall the victory.
With such hair brained charges as that
men like W. G. Cameron, Anton Henderson, Kichard Hall, Wm. Mable, Joshua
Kingham, F. A. Pauline, and A. McKeown, were backed by "rum and prostitution," it would be a waste of time to
deal, the man making it ruled himself out
of court, as the issue proved. Nothing
but the exigencies of a fight in whicli
prudence and fairness were thrown to the
winds, could have induced any man to
associate Dr. Lewis Hall, a lifelong temperance man and Good Templar, with such
a charge. On Thursday night Mr. David
Ker put in an appearance at the City Hall
to demand from Mr. Morley an apology
for the charge launched the previous night,
that he, in the presence of two other gentlemen, when negotiating on behalf of the
City with representatives of the Esquimalt
Waterworks Co., had expressed himself
willing to purchase at their figure of
$1,250,000. He emphatically denied the
statement and declared that the highest
figure he had ever suggested his willingness to support was $700,000 and that was
only a tentative suggestion. Mr. F. A.
Pauline, the President of the Board of
Trade, took the platform and declared tliat
Mr. Morley's charge was false and that
Mr. Ker's statement was absolutely consistent with his attitude throughout the
negotiation. Even then Mr. Morley refused to apologize, taking refuge under the
idea that lie could not divulge the names
EDITORIAL
of the gentlemen who were present as witnesses. It is not an unfair criticism of
Mr. Morley's attitude to say that this is a
subterfuge, especially as Mr. Ker himself
promptly named Mr. Justice Martin as
one of those gentlemen. Mr. Morley stood
upon the platform not only a defeated but
a discredited man. The meeting was practically unanimous in condemning his attitude and did so in a very emphatic manner. This incident is dwelt upon at this
length because it furnished the keynote to
Mr. Morley's municipal career and explains his failure. He has a peculiar
mind with a twist in it. He sees things
in a different light from other people.
Whilst everyone else in the City Hall saw
that he had been convicted of a mis-statement, to put it mildly, in the case of Mr.
Ker, he could not see it himself, or if he
did was unable to understand that among
men of honour an apology could not be
withheld under such circumstances. His
attitude towards all who have differed
from him has been similar. He is the one
man who knows it all and knows it every
time, and it is this fatal omniscience which
has marred his public career and brought
about his defeat. Passing on to the policy
of the past and the coming year it should
be noted that whatever excuses may be
made the condition of the City is anything
but satisfactory. One of the worst features, that of the disposal of garbage, will
be remedied in the near future as the
result of the passing of the incinerator
by-law. Street work will also receive attention, and on this point it is only fair to
remark that the criticism directed at the
late Council and Mayor in connection with
the condition of Government Street was
fully justified. What is being done in
January could have been done just as well,
and should have been done, six or eight
months ago. The creosoting plant was not
ordered early enough, the negotiations
with the property owners for their contribution to the cost were not initiated early
enough, and then they were entrusted to
the Mayor who was not a "persona grata"
instead of to the Chairman of the Street
Committee, whose proper business it was.
On the water question much might be said.
The by-law was all but rejected and The
Week is satisfied that in the end the citizens of Victoria will have cause to regret
that it passed even by one vote. This
paper has consistently opposed the expenditure of any money in connection with
Elk Lake, for the following reasons:
First, that thc supply of water available
at that point is inadequate even for the
next few years, without metering. Second,
that without expensive reservoir construction and pumping it affords no protection
against fire. Third, that the question of
quality has never been satisfactorily investigated. On the first point, tlie attitude
of The Week is absolutely confirmed by
Mr. Adams' report. He says in effect:
"Go to Elk Lake, as a temporary expedient, and as a matter of economy, but in
order to get sufficient water even for a
few years you must use meters and restrict lhe supply, and further at an early
date impossible to fix definitely, but dependent upon the development of the country, Elk Lake water will be unsafe, in consequence of pollution." Would it not be
well to pause beforr committing tlie City
which has been waiting for twenty years
for a satisfactory water service to one
which possesses so many obvious limitations.   The fact that the by-law has passed
by one solitary vote surely does not justify
the new Council in proceeding to raise the
money for this scheme.   The Daily Press
has rendered valuable service in calling
attention to the effect upon the appearance
and attractiveness of the City of a scant
water supply.   Victoria should be a City
of gardens, but it will not be if water is
sold by measure.    On the second point,
that of fire protection, this may fairly be
said that the greatest engineering skill
must fail to make Elk Lake satisfactory.
The weakness of the proposed scheme is
the necessity for pumping in order to obtain even a moderate pressure.   Property
owners are complaining bitterly at the 30
per cent, increase in insurance rates. AVhat
will they say when they find that it is the
intention of the Underwriters to make a
further increase of 20 per cent., if Elk
Lake is retained, and yet The Week has
the highest authority for stating that this
may be expected.   Nothing but a gravity
system can possibly be satisfactory for fire
protection.    There should be a constant
pressure at the highest point in the City
of at least 100 pounds to the inch.   Even
if a reservoir were constructed at Smith's
Hill it could only have an elevation of 224
feet above Wharf Street and none above
Rockland Avenue, which means a maximum pressure at the former point of say
100 pounds, and at the latter point of
nil.    Further this pressure takes no account of the fact that the capacity of a
reservoir is limited, and that in case of a
very big fire even tbe supply might run
short.    It seems to The Week that this
question of fire protection is scarcely less
important than the sanitary aspect of the
case, and that the Elk Lake scheme not
only fails to meet its requirements but
will undoubtedly add an amount to the insurance rates of the City which would
more than pay the interest on the extra
money necessary to inaugurate at once a
permanent scheme.    On the subject of
quality The Week has been alone in its
protest.     The  daily  papers  have   been
content with pointing out that at certain
seasons of the year Elk Lake water is both
objectionable and offensive to sight, taste
and smell.   The public has been told that
these peculiarities do not affect its quality
and that it contains no deleterious elements.- The late City Council in advocating the acceptance of the scheme took this
view and relied on the statement of Mr.
Adams that the quality was satisfactory.
Without directly impugning the reliability
of Mr. Adams' report on this point, it is
permissible  to ask whether he made  a
chemical analysis of the water only or
whether his investigations extended to the
bacteriological features also.    In either
case it is not likely that Mr. Adams conducted the examination himself because it
would not come within his own domain a3
a hydraulic engineer.   The AVeek has for
more than a year been in possession of information furnished in consequence of a
suggestion made by one of the most eminent authorities in the West, himself a
professional expert of the highest attainment, which would lead to the conclusion
that Elk Lake water possesses an element
not generally recognized, but which has
proved most deleterious to thc health of
those who use it.    Of course it is easy to
say in reply to such a statement, "Look at
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTION t ERS
COMMISSION AMD
■UL ESTATI MIBTt
fl ton ST. VICTOBIA, a. c.  •
Onb Dollar Pbjl Annum
the  vital  statisctics  of Victoria,  which
prove it to be a healthy city," but such a
contention does not touch the question as
to whether a particular disease of a fatal
character which figures very low on all
mortality tables is not increased in Victoria by the use of Elk Lake water.   The
Week has proved by expert investigation
conducted at its own expense that the mortality from the disease in question is four
times as great in Victoria as in the average
of all cities in Canada and the United
States,  England, France and Germany.
Also, and this is the apparently conclusive
point, that the cases in Victoria are practically confined to that part of the City
served by Elk Lake Water, and that Victoria West and Esquimalt are almost immune.    Now   it  is  obvious,   at any rate
so far as public  information goes  that
the  only factor  which could  affect the
public health confined to Victoria City
and   not   applying   to   Esquimalt   and
only in part to Victoria West, is water.
The AVeek has tried to get these facts before the late City Council and the Health
Committee on several occasions.    It has
spoken to deaf ears.    It is to be hoped
since they are the result of serious investigations, that the present Council will at
least consider them worthy of a passing
thought, and will pause long enough to ask
themselves whether the data upon which
this statement is made, such data being on
file in the City Hall, and at the Registry
Office, should not be examined before a
by-law carried by the narrow margin of
one and one-fifth vote is put into operation.
Apart from these, the big questions of the
moment, there are many matters of importance which will claim the attention of
the new Council, notably the continued destruction   of   unsanitary   and dangerous
shacks, the enforcement of the City bylaws with  respect  to  the  sanitation  of
Chinatown, and a serious attempt to carry
out the policy enunciated on the Progressive Ticket of securing from the Government the rebate of certain taxes for street
improvement.   The new Council will have
a fair field and no favour, Alderman Mes-
ton appealed last night for the support
of the Press, ancl expressed the hope that
the papers would not criticize the Mayor
ancl Council as they had done during the
last two years.    It is not often that the
press of the City is a unit on any subject.
AVe have two partizan organs in the Colonist ancl the Times, ancl an independent
critical journal in The Week, there must
have been a strong motive to lead these
papers to support a common cause; it
assuredly was not done at the behest of the
Esquimalt AVaterworks Co., because all the
Progressive Candidates supported the Elk
Lake by-law.    It would be difficult even
for thc Machiavellian dexterity of Mr.
Morley to devise any logical explanation,
hut that the Press had for once agreed
to sink all differences in thc public: interest.    Tlieir attitude was justified and
endorsed by the action of the ratepayers
in turning down Mayor Morley and electing seven-tenths of the Progressive Ticket.
Speaking for The Week which has been
perhaps the most persistent in its hostility to ex-Mayor Morley, Alderman Meston
may rest assured that if Mayor Hall and
his Council should adopt the retrograde
policy ancl bring about the disgraceful condition in City affairs which existed under
thc late regime, thc criticism of The AAreek
will be just as severe and uncompromising.   It does not anticipate any such necessity, but, it has the satisfaction of knowing
that, the result of yesterday's election was
due in no slight measure to its vigorous
campaign. I'HK WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 1908.
Western Society
Notes.
Mr. F. J. Crowe, formerly of Vancouver, will now reside in Kamloops.
* *   *
Mr. W. Roberts of Winnipeg is
spending a few weeks in Vancouver.
* *   *
Mrs. J. Shafer of Kamloops is
spending the winter in Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. A. L. Whitworth of Edmonton
is on a trip to Montreal.
* *   *
Mr. Justice Martin has returned to
Vancouver from the interior.
* *   *
Mr. F. S. C. Lee of Calgary is
spending some time in Winnipeg.
* *   *
Mr. J. B. Wood of Victoria, B.C., is
registered at the Winnipeg Hotel in
that city.
* *   *
Mr. A. P. Basher of Tacoma returned home this week after spending a couple of weeks in Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. A. J. Witherspoon of Vancou-
veris registered at the King Edward
in Toronto.
* *   *
Mr. J. J. Binns of Vancouver spent
the holiday season with  Mrs.  Binns
in Alabama.
* *   *
Miss Susie McRae of Bellingham
spent Xmas and New Year's with the
Misses McConnell in Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Shain and son
of Vancouver spent the last three
weeks in the Sound cities.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Olaf Housens Strand
are expected in Vancouver from their
wedding tour on February 1st.
.    .    *
Mrs. Neill of Kamloops has returned home after a visit to friends in
Vancouver.
* *   *
Miss Evelyn Marchant of Victoria
spent the holidays with Mrs. P. H.
McEwen of Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Still have returned
to their home in Vancouver after a
delightful three months in the east.
* *   *
Mr. Frank Waring is visiting his
mother, Mrs. Waring of Haro street,
Vancouver.
* *   *
Miss St. Clare of Vancouver has returned home from Nanaimo where she
spent  the  holidays.
* *   *
Mr. Milloy of Kilmarnock, Scotland, is on a business trip to Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. J. Harper of Toronto, Ont., is
at present in Vancouver. He spent
some days recently in Victoria.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. E. O. S. Scholefield
of Victoria have returned from New
Westminster.
* *   *
Mr. L. H. Levi of Vancouver registered at the Astor House in New
York this week.
* *   *
Dr. C. M. Kingston of Grand Forks
is registered at the Hotel Vancouver
in the last named city.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. W. Lossee of Victoria
are spending the' New Year's festivities with friends in Toronto, Ont.
* *   *
Mr. L. James and wife of Calgary
are registered at the King Edward in
Edmonton.
* *   *
Mr. John Zoroski of Vancouver is
registered at the St. James in Edmonton.
* *   *
Mr. A. L. Berdoe of Vancouver is
on a trip to New York and registered
at the York.
* *   *
Mrs. Rolph, Richards street, Vancouver, has Mr. Black, a well-known
lumberman of Winnipeg, visiting her.
* *   *
Mr. W. Paul, a well-known business
man of Edmonton, spent New Year's
with his friends in Spokane. He is
now in Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. W. J. Millchamp, a prominent
business man of Toronto, is at the
Coast and is registered at Hotel Vancouver.
* *   *
Mrs. William H. Horn of Agassiz
B.C.. had Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Flummerfelt and family of Vancouver visiting her for New Year's.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. F. 11. Lantz and Mr.
Harry Cripps of Vancouver arc now
in the Nicola Valley on a visit to the
new coal mines.
* *   *
Mr. H. Barries of Kelowna who has
accepted an engineering position in
Vancouver, will reside there in future.
* *   *
Mr. Lawrence Macrae, private secretary to the Hon. Richard McBride,
has returned to the Capital, after a
pleasant trip to Dewdney.
Mr. A. Prescott and family of
"Glenwood," Vancouver, have returned home after spending the holiday
season in Seattle.
* *   *
Mr. Owen McKay died at Edmonton on Tuesday, Dec. 30th. He was
a brother of Mrs. Shannon of Pembroke, Ont.
* »   *
Miss Jessie Carlaw and Mr. William Carlaw spent Xmas with their
brother in Victoria. They returned
to Fairview this week.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. J. Saint are down
from the north to spend a month
with Mr. Saint's parents on Westminster Ave., Vancouver.
* *   *
Mrs. Curtis of Ninth avenue, has
spent the past three weeks in Edmonton.    She  returns  to Vancouver
this week.
* *   *
Mr. Donald McLaurin of the Revelstoke High School staff, has returned after spending the New Year's
holiday with friends in Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. G. P. Carter, who
were guests at the Howitt-Currie wedding in Vancouver, have returned to
their home in Victoria.
* *   *
Mrs. Bertram Skuse, a new arrival
from England, has taken up residence
on   Keefer   street,   Vancouver.     Mr.
Skuse arrived a couple of months ago.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Roblin, formerly
of California, have taken a house on
Hawkes Ave., Vancouver and will reside there in future.
* *   *
Mrs. Horace S. Hulme of Edmonton returned home this week after a
very pleasant visit to her sister, Mrs.
D. McNair, Nelson St., Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. C. E. E. Ussher of Winnipeg,
assistant passenger traffic manager of
the C. P. R., spent the holiday season
in Victoria with his family who are
wintering there.
* * ■' *
On the return journey home to
Tacoma, Wash., from Australia, where
a pleasant three months was spent,
Dr. and Mrs. Wagner spent some time
in Vancouver last week.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Ha rry Finnie, (nee
Miss Lois Beetz of Vancouver) are
spending the honeymoon in Spokane
and on their return this week will take
up residence in Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. G. F. Hardy, a prominent pulp
expert of New York, accompanied by
his wife, have been spending some
time in Vancouver and Victoria and
are this week in Seattle.
* *   *
Mr. A. Williams of Calgary is registered at the Metropole, Vancouver.
Mr. W. Sandhoff and family of
Manitoba are now settled in their
home on Seventh Ave. west, Vancouver, where they will reside.
* *   *
At the parsonage of t ehMount
Pleasant Methodist church, Vancouver, on Tuesday, Dec. 24th, Mr. Ellsworth Mustard was married to Miss
Sarah Jane Wood by the Wev. J. P.
Westman.
* *   *
Mrs. Goddard of Kamloops spent
the festive days with her parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Savage, Fifth Ave, Fairview,
Vancouver. She is now on a short
stay with relatives in  Ladner.
* *   *
' Mr. and Mrs. James J. Wright are
now settled in their home at 1138
Cardero St., Vancouver. Mrs. Wright
was Miss Camilla Avery of St. Louis,
Mo.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. J. R. McDonald have
returned from a short trip to the
Island this week. They have been
on a tour of the Coast cities and
coming recently from Portage la
Prairie, have decided to make their
home in Vancouver.
* *   *
Mrs. Frank Harrison of Vancouver,
who spent New Years with Mr. and
Mrs. Fred Colson, Ottawa, is now
in Stratford, Out., on thc return journey.
* *   *
The marriage was solemnized on
Tuesday, Dec. 24th, at 400 Cordova
street, Vancouver, of Miss Margaret
Fordyce to Mr. James Wilkie. Miss
Annie Spence and Mr. J. Meldrum
assisted.
* *   *
Miss Clara Chadwick who has spent
the past term teaching school at
Tynehead, spent the holiday season
with her parents on Pender street,
Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. I. Clugson, who has been north
for some time, and recently spent
some time in Victoria, is now visiting  relatives  in  Eburne.
* *   *
Mr. Duncan Macl.ean of Cranbrook
B. C.i has the deep sympathy of a
large circle of friends in the death of
his father, Mr. Hector Mayne Mac-
Lean, who passed away at the family
residence, 108 Strathcona Ave., Ottawa, on January 2nd, in the 66th year
of his age.
The Merchants Bank
Canada
Established 1864.
Capital, fully paid $6,000,000
Reserve Funds    4,000,000
Head Office: Montreal.
Banking By Mail.
Deposits and withdrawals can
be made by mail; no delay, and
will receive prompt attention.
Savings Bank Department.
Interest allowed quarterly at
highest current rate.
Victoria Branch: R. F. TAYLOR,
Manager.
Y. W. C. A.
1208 Government Street
VICTORIA.
Reading and rest rooms, lunch and
tea rooms. Instruction in English,
French, Music, Physical Culture,
Needlework, Domestic Science, etc.
Bible Class. Social evening every
Wednesday.
Y. M. C. A.
A home for young men away from
home. Comfortable Reading Room,
Library, Game Room, Billiards, Hot
and Cold Shower Baths, Gymnasium
and efficient instruction.
Manitoba Free Press on file for
Middle West visitors.
40 BROAD STREET
VICTOR A
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St.. Victoria
Best Buy.
BEST  BUT  IN  VICTORIA  OF  BUSI-
NESS PROPERTY. WITH WATER
FRONTAGE ON JAMES BAT.
Double Corner on Wharf and Government streets, with 100 feet water
frontnge on James Bay. This property
has the Post Ofllce to the North, the
C. P. R. Hotel to the East, Parliament
Buildings to the South, and a Steamship Company's wharf to the West of It.
Aa an Hotel Site the situation of these
lots Is unrivaled ln the City of Victoria,
hundred of thousands of dollars have
been spent In valuable Improvements on
all sides of them by the Provincial Qovernment, the City Council and the
C. P. R.    Price $52,500.
Easy terms can be arranged with deferred payments bearing Interest at 7
per cent.
For further particulars apply to
A. 0. P. FRANCIS, Broker.
510 Pender Street,
VANCOUVER. B. C.
ST. ANDREW'S
COLLEGE
TORONTO
A Rasid.atial amd Day School for Boya
Handsome New Buildings. Larg"
Athletic Field. Carelul Oversight in
every Department. First Class Staff.
Lower and Upper School. Boys prepared for the Universities and Business.
Calendar sent on Request.
Rev. D. Bruce Macdonald, M.A..LL.D-
Principal
Re-opens after Xmas on Jan. 8th, 1908.
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OP
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
PHONE 893. VICTORIA
WHY   NOT   HAVE   THE   BEST
THE REPUTATION OF
James Buchanan & Co'sSCOTCH   WHISKIES
Ii world-wide, and stands for the BEST that can be produced.
The following brands are for sale by all the leading dealers:
RED SEAL BLACK AND WHITE
ROYAL HOUSEHOLD      VERY OLD  LIQUEUR SCOTCH
RADIGER & JANION, Sole Agents for B.C.
CHRISTMAS
GOODS
Ward's Safety Razors
Curley Ideal Safety Razors
Whiltt's Razor Strops
I. X. L. Carving Sets
I. X. L. Pocket Cutlery
Boker's Pocket Cutlery
I. X. L. Table Cutlery
All in great variety and at right prices
PGR SALE BY
e. g. prior & ee..
LTD.
LTY.
VICTORIA, VANOOUVER, KAMLOOPS, VERNON.
Established 1867
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
52 Uovernment St., Victoria, B. C,
Charles Hayward, President F. Caselton, Manager.
We make a specialty of  Undertaking and Embalming.
An experienced certificated staff available at all times, day
and night.
Phones Nos. 48, 305, 404 or 594, Victoria.
The V. 8. e. Novelty Works
mm   AWTIQUB,   ABTISTIC    ASS    ABOBXT-BOTUBA__,
DXUOBBD WOBX ____._. TO OBDEB.
I am now ready to fulfil any orders for all kinds of Banks, Stores,
Offices, Churches, Barber Shops and Hotel Bar Fixtures and Furniture
1000 Oranvttle Street     tl     11 it       1:       VABOOVTBB, B. a
T. LeOAXB,  .Proprietor.
Investigate the
"Cushman" flarine Hotor
As good as the best.   Cheaper than the rest.
BAXTER & JOHNSON 811 Government Street
Victoria, B. C. THE WEEK., SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 1908
Western Society Notes.
Mr. and Mrs. Sweet and Mr. Wal-
r Sweet returned this week to their
.me in Kennewick, Washington, af-
■r a delightful holiday in Vancouver.
* *   *
The engagement is announced of
tiss Dorothy Robillard, youngest
aughter of Dr. Adolphe Robillard of
Utawa to Mr. A. Maynard Bezanson
f Edmonton, Alberta.
* *   *
Mr. Thomas Wylie Carleton and
diss Eva Marvin Bolensky, both of
/ancouver, were married on Tuesday,
December 24th, in that city by Rev.
Dr.  Fraser.    They will  reside there.
* *   *
' On December 30th in St. Andrew's
[church, Vancouver, Miss Edna Mac-
^Quarrie was married to Mr. R. C.
iGosse by Rev. R. J. Wilson. Thc
Ihoneymoon is being spent in Seattle.
f *   *   #
, Mr, Malcolm McCannell, formerlv
lof Glengarry, Ont., but who has recently spent some time in Manitoba,
lis now on a visit to Mrs. E. Mc-
iCannel on Princess street, Vancouver.
, *   *   *
Mrs. Ledger, widow of the late A.
Kitt Ledger, who was formerly a
resident of Vancouver, but who died
recently in London, England, is visiting in the city of Vancouver, the
guest  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.   McLachlan,
Ninth Ave, Fairview.
* *   *
Mr. W. T. Shatford of Penticton,
who spent last week in Vancouver, is
en route to Halifax. He will then
visit  the   West  Indies   and  Jamaica
before returning.
* *   *
On Christmas Day the Rev. Father
• Naisens married in St. Joachim's, Mr.
Lome  T.   Murray  of   Edmonton  to
Miss Anna Coffey of Toronto. They
will reside in Edmonton.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. MacFarlane
and baby Lorna have returned to
their home in Vancouver from a visit
of three months to Mrs. McFarlane's
cousins in Carleton Place, Ont. She
also visited her old home in Niagara
Falls and took  a  side trip to  New
York.
* *   *
Mr, and Mrs. Edgar Potter of Winnipeg are spending some time with
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Potter, 1144
Pacilic street, Vancouver. Mrs. Edgar Potter was one of last summer's
Vancouver brides, and her many
friends are glad to welcome her back.
*   *   *
James   R.   Hamilton,
Mr. James R. Hamilton, Jr., of
Vancouver, has the sympathy of
many friends in the death of his
father, which took place in Ottawa
on January 4th. Mr. James R. Hamilton, Sr., was very much respected by
a large circle of friends.
* *   *
Miss Maud I. Cawley and Miss
M. Cawley spent the holiday season
at their home in Chilliwack. Miss
Maud returns to the Normal in January, while Miss Ethel is engaged as
teacher in the Fairfield Island school.
* *   *
Mr. Harry L. Webb and Mr. A.
Chapman of Chilliwack havc returned
to their homes after attending the
preliminary session of the Normal
school in Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. R. Gorman, who has spent the
past six months in Vancouver, returned to Ottawa for the merry Christmas season. He is largely interested
in the British Columbia Tie and Timber Company.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. N. Raines (nee Lillian May Wright, of Cloverdale), are
ensconced in their cosy new home on
Seymour street, Vancouver, and will
be at home to their friends shortly.
They spent the honeymoon in Portland.
* *   *
At St. Paul's church, Regina, Sask.,
on Thursday, Jan. 2nd, the Rev. E.
P. Selby Spencer, M.A., brother of
thc bride, assisted by the rector of
St. Paul's church, married Miss Mabel
Harriet, second daughter of Rev. Canon Spencer of Mount Forest, Ont.,
to Mr. Albert Seymour Maxwell,
manager of the Merchants Bank of
Canada, Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta.
* *   *
On December 23rd the Rev. C. C.
Owen united in marriage Mr. Evans
Holmes Goodfellow and Miss Edith
Victoria Thornley of Vancouver in
that city. The bride has a numerous
host of friends who testified in a
tangible manner with handsome
tokens of good-will and gifts of artistic merit.
* *   *
On Dec. 23rd, at the residence of
Mr. Morice. Wright, T051 Hare St.,
Vancouver, Miss Edith L. Jrnt, formerly of Halifax, N.S., was married
to Mr. E. F. Roach of St. Ives, Cornwall, England, by the Rev. Robert
Milliken, B.A., pastor of thc Wesley
Methodist church. After thc honeymoon spent in Calgary and Red Deer-
Alberta, they will reside at 1070 Haro
St., Vancouver.
* *   *
At the manse of the First Presbyterian  church,  Vancouver, on Tues
day, December 24th, Rev. Dr. Fraser
united in wedlock Miss M. J. Bag-
ley of Aylwin, P.Q., and Mr. C. B.
Albert Corder. The happy couple
will reside in Vancouver. The groom
is the only son Of Abraham C. Corder of Brisbane, Australia.
.    *    .
On the morning of the same date,
Dr. Fraser also united in matrimony
Mr. R. H. Baxter and Miss Amy
Gedge. Miss Edith Vicers was bridesmaid and Mr. J. Woolhead Griffin
was best man. They are at home to
their many friends on January 21st.
* *   *
Mr. G. W. Gallagher of Edmonton
is a guest at the Royal Alexander,
Winnipeg.
Mr. and Mrs. Bowker, who were
married in St. Luke's church, Ottawa,
on Jan. 4U1, will arrive at their future
home in Rimby, Alberta, this week.
Mrs. Bowker, who was Miss Mabel H.
J. Bond, is a niece of (Hon.) Mrs.
William Templeman, of Victoria, B.
C, and youngest daughter of the late
Joseph Bond of Almonte.
* *   *
On Christmas Day at the residence
of Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Carman, 1999
Beach avenue, Vancouver, B.C., Miss
Ruby Akin, their niece, and the
daughter of the late A. C. Akin of
Cornwall, Out., was married to Dr.
Albert Victor Summers of New Lis-
keard, Ont. The happy couple will
make their future home in New Lis-
keard.
* *   *
Another of the weddings taking
place on Xmas day in Fairview, Vancouver, was Mr. F. J. Mayers, principal of the Fairview public school, to
Miss Pearl Lloyd of Wapella, Sask.
Rev. H. Beachem was the officiating
clergyman. The newly married couple
will reside in Fairview.
* *   *
At. St. Andrew's church, December
30th, in Vancouver, Mr. Harold Payn
LeSueur of Calgary and Miss Beatrice
Norton of Victoria were married.
They will reside in Victoria for thc
winter and later make their home in
Calgary.
Miss Elsie Sparrow of Victoria
spent the past two weeks with Mrs.
Lester in Vancouver.
* *   *
On Christmas day a double wedding
was solemnized at the residence of
the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. G.
H. Connor, 21 Thirteenth Ave., Vancouver, when Miss Norma A. was
wed to Mr. Harry Neely and Miss
Nora M. was married to Mr. Wilbur
A. Paul, both young men being from
Saskatchewan. The brides are twin
sisters and very popular and will
therefore be much missed as they go
to make their home in the near-by
province. They each in turn acted as
bridesmaid for the other and during
the ceremony stood under a white
wedding bell which was suspended
from an arch of ferns and holly, everything partaking of the Xmas color
scheme, crimson, except the bridal
bouquets and wedding bell which were
composed of white roses. They were
both gowned alike in cream silk eolienne and their veils were caught up
with little coronets of roses. Guests
to the number of 75 or thereabouts
were in evidence and the gifts were
costly and handsome, some beautiful
specimens of cut glass and art pieces
being particularly noticed.
thence east 80 ehains; thence south 80
chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains distant and in an easterly direction from east bank of Quatham River, about ten and one-half miles
east of Bamsy Arm; thenee west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains.
21st December,  1907.
MAX.  J. CAMERON,
Jan 18 L. W. Kingsley, Agent.
In  courtship's  happy  days  gone  by
Before I married Stelle,
We used to sit upon the beach
Behind the same umbrella.
Now if it rains your humble friend
Must  hold  the  one  umbrella,
And get a soaking to the skin—
It barely covers Stella.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Max. J. Cameron,
of Vancouver, Merchant, Intends to apply for a special timber licence over
the following described lands;
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
nlinut (i miles from Ramsay Arm, on the
main Quatham River, S. W. corner;
thenee east 80 chains; thenee north 80
chains; thenee west.80 chains; thence
sonth 80 chnins to point of commencement.
20th December, 1907.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
about G miles from Ramsay Arm, on the
mnln Quntham River; S. E. Corner;
thenee 1(10 chains N.; 40 chnins W.; 100
chnins south; 40 ehains east to point of
commencement.
December 20th, 1907.
No. 3—Commencing at n post plnnted
about one chain distant and ln an easterly direction from Quatham River,
about seven miles east of Ramsay Arm.
thenee west SO chains; thence north 80
chains; thence cast 80 chnins; thence
south  80 chains.
20th December, 1907.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about one chain distant ancl in an easterly direction from Quatham River,
about seven miles east of Ramsay Arm,
thence cast 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains.
21st December,  1907.
No. 5—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains distant and In an easterly direction from cast bank of Quatham River, about eight and one-half
miles east of Ramsay Arm; thence west
80 chnins; tbence north 80 chains; thence
enst SO chnins; thence south 80 chnins.
"1st December, 1907.
No. 0—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains distant and ln an easterly direction from east bank of Quatham River, about nine and one-half
miles east of Ramsny Arm; thence west
80 chains;    thence    north    80  chains;
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that Ed. Brown, of
Vancouver, B.C., Cruiser, intends to apply for a special timber license over the
following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
on south shore of Burke Channel, about
one mile west of Lot No. 241A; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains to shore line of
Burke Channel; thence west along shore
line SO chains more or less, to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated December 16, 1907.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
on south shore of Burke Channel, about
three miles west of Lot No.241 A; thence
south 40 chains', thence east 160 chains;
thence north 40 chains more or less, to
shore line of Burke Chanel; thence west
along shore line 160 chains more or less
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile south of Lot No. 241A,
on bank of Newcomb River, Burke Channel, thence north SO chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 ehains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commeneement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 16th.  1907.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about one mlle south of lot No. 241 A,
Burke Channel, adjoining post of claim
No. 3; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thenee south SO chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 5—Commencing at a post planted
about 2 miles south of Lot No. 241A,
Burke Channel, and one mile south of
corner post of claim No. 3 and 4; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles south of lot No. 241 A.
Burke Channel, and two miles south of
S. W. corner of Claim No. 5; thence
west 40 chains; thence north 160 ehains;
thence east 40 chains; thenee south 160
chains to point of commencement and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 17th,  1907.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
about four and one-half miles south
of lot No. 241A, Burke Channel; on a
bank of a small river about one-half
mile east of claim No. 6; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains', thence
south 80 chains', thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 8—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles east of claim No. 7, on
north bank of unnamed river, emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel, thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thenee
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres more or
less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 9—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile south of Claim No. 8,
on north bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel; thence south 40 chains; thence west
160 chains; thence north 40 chatns;
thence east 160 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile east of claim No. 9,
on north bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel; thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east SO chatns to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more
ov less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 11—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile east of Claim No. 9, and
adjoining corner post of claim No. 10
on north bank of small river emptying
Into Koeye Lake, south of Burke channel; thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains', thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or
less.
Dated December 17, 1907.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted
about 20 chains west of Claims No. 9
and 10, on south bank of small river
emptying into Koeye Lake, south of
Burke Channel, thence north 160 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 160
chains; thence west 40 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
Dated December 17,  1907.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted
about one and one-half miles south of
the head of Koeye Lake, south of Burke
Channel, thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; therice west 80 chains
to shore line of Koeye Lake; thence
south along shore line SO chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
Dated   Decemher   18th,   1907.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted
about one and one-half miles south of
the head of Koeye Lake, south of Burke
Channel, thence east SO chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to shore of Koeye Lake, thence north
along shore 80 chains to pnlnt of commencement, and containing 640 acres.
Dated Decemher 18th, 1907.
No. IB—Commencing at a post planted about one-hnlf mile enst frnm the
font of Kneye Lake, nn the north shnre
of said lake; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; to shore nf Kneye Lake: thence
west aleng shnre nf said lake SO chains
tn point nf enmmeneement, and containing 640 aeres, more or less.
Dated December 18th, 1907.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted
about twn miles snuth of Lot 241 A.
Burke Channel, and about one mlle south
of corner post of claims No. 3 and 4:
thence nnrth SO chains; thence west SO
chains; thence south SO chains; thence
enst 80 chnins to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 17—Commencing at a pnst planl ed
nbout two miles south of Lot No. 241A.
Burke Chnnnel, and nne mile south of
corner post of claims No. 3 and 4; thence
east SO chains; thence snuth 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north SO
chains to point of enmmeneement, and
enntaltilng 640 acres mnre nr less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
Jan. 18 ED. BROWN.
[
TRAVELLERS' GUIDE
VICTOBIA
STRAND HOTEL
VICTORIA
The home of all theatrical and raude-f Ue
artiaU while In thi Capital city, al»o ol
other kindred bohemians.
WRIQHT & FALCONER, Proprietor*.
CAMBORNE
Our Store
HAS A FINE LINE OF HIGH
CLASS TOILET ARTICLES.
We have just imported a fine assortment of French aud English Hair
Brushes.
SEE THE NEW-SHAPED
WHALEBONE BRUSH.
USE BOWES'  BUTTERMILK
TOLIET  LOTION  FOR
CHAPPED HANDS.
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
Government Street, near Yates St.
VICTORIA, B. C.
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining men and
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
BANFF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
Banff's Most Popular $2 a Day Hotel.
Close to Station and Sulphur
Baths.
N. K. LUXTON, Proprietor.
PHOENIX.
BOND SIGN CO.
VANCOUVER
S i g ns
ELECTRIC
BOARD
METAL
BULLETIN
GLASS
COTTON
SHOW CARD
In up-to-date styles.   Estimates and
designs furnished.
SWEDISH
MASSAGE
TURKISH BATHS.
VIBRATOR TREATMENT.
MR.   BJORNFELT,   SWEDISH
MASSEUR.
Special  Massage and Hometreat-
ment by appointments.
Room 2, Vernon Block, Douglas
Street, Victoria.
Hours—11 to 12 a.m.   Phone 1629.
HOLLY TREES
Prim torn as cwU to feu, ieeordiog
to rite.   Write for iced ia* tree eete-
JAY & CO. VICTORIA, B. C.
Pantage's
Theatre
JOHNSON STREET
VICTORIA, B. C.
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE
Matinees (any part of house).... 10c
Evenings, Balcony  10c
Lower Floor  20c
Boxes    10c
Matinees
Every Afternoon
at
3 O'CIock.
Night Performances
8 and 9.15
Deane's Hotel
PHOENIX, B. C.
New. Modern hot water system. Electric
lighted. Tub aad shower batha and laundry la
connection.  The miners' home.
•• DANNY " DEANE, Proprietor
ROSSLAND
Hoffman House
ROSSLAND, B. C.
Rates $1.00 per day and up.   Cafe in
Connection.
GREEN & srilTH. Prop's.
NELSON.
HOTEL HUME
NELSON,   B. C,
Leading Hotel ot tha Kootentyi.
J. FRED HUME,      -      Proprietor.
Silver King Hotel,
NELSON. B. C.
Tht home of the Industrial Workers
olthe Kootenays.
W. E. ricCandlUh,     -      Proprietor
Royal Hotel
NELSON, B. C.
The Best Family Hotol in ths City.
$1.00 ii day.
Mre. Wm. Roberts,
Preprietreeo
BEDDING
PLANTS
Cheap Piices.   Get our price Hat.
Johnston's Seed Store
City Market
VICTORIA
Victoria
FRUIT
and
Farm Lands
Write for "Home List" and
information.
R.   S.   DAY
and
BEAUMONT BOGGS
Realty Broker*,
eao TomT btbsst    ii    viotobxa.
THOHAB OATTXBAX.X.
■slider  and General  Oeatraeter.
Tenders  five,   on  Brick, Stone   an
Frame, Alteration!, Parquetry Floorlni
Office, Bank, Store and Saloon Flttingi
Pile Driving, Wharves and Dock Shed:
conatructed and repaired.
YlOTOmiA. THB WEEK, SATURDAY JANUARY 18, 1908
^^^■^9^^*^^^5i|f«J»94?'?jp *fu> performance of the kind I have
fgf   mm m __\ ?fl?  ever seen'   Apart from this wonder-
X illlSlC   >S.nQ X  ful act there is little t0 choose be-
*T T   tween the boy and the girl, both are
V The     Dr&ITl&f  3_!  Sracefu'> skilful and accomplished to
flr T  a degree,  and no  one who admires
fyfy<fytyfy.fyfy_.<fy9llpfy<fy_%.   the very cleverest work on the wire
The Gingerbread Man. should  miss  seeing them.    Another
There is a gorgeous and happy end- act which pleased me immensely was
ing to the story, not spoiled by the that of Horton and LaFriska, entitled
fact that Carmalita, the Fairy, re- The Messenger Boy and his Doll. It
forms Fudge, the black art exponent, is not too high praise to give to the
Incidental to all the rapid and hu- lady to say that her imitation of a
morous action of the piece are de- doll is equal to that given in La
lightful lyrics, the most catchy music, Poupee, when the popular French skit
and all with a gorgeous costume and was played in London ten years ago.
scenic setting. The cast especially The Middleton Military Singing Girls
selected to present this novel and gave a splendid entertainment, the
musical fantasy would prove a not- soprano and contralto being very suc-
able one in any comic opera. All are cessful in solo as well as quartette
prime favorites, and some of them work. All these girls are much above
individual stars. A glance at a few the average vaudeville singers. The
of the names is sufficient: Evelyn other turns naturally suffer by com-
Kellogg, Nellie Nico, Mabel Day, An- parison, the weakest being that of
nie Dresslor, Fannie Martine, Amy James McDuff, as an imitator and
Thropp, Lulu Borden, Fred. Nice, mimic, but all cannot be stars and
Ross Snow, Garrick Major, James certainly the programme contains
McElhern, Percy Matson, Lute Vroo- three star turns described above. The
man, Bert Lovoy, and a grand beauty house has been packed at every per-
chorus of forty well-trained voices, formance and on Wednesday night.
This with an augmented orchestra I witnessed the unusual occurrence
under the leadership of Fred. Walz, of a large crowd being unable to get
makes a complete organization num- in even for the late performance. It
bering sixty-two. is to be hoped that the slackness of
— business in the East will divert more
Herbert Witherspoon, Basso and     performances   of   this   class to the
Programme Builder. Western circuits.
Herbert Witherspoon, who comes Sunday afternoon, January 19th, at
to this city on January 27 under the 3-30 o'clock, the third band concert
auspices of the Victoria Musical So- given by the Victoria City Band, Sid-
ciety, at the Victoria Theatre is a ney Rogers, Conductor, assisted by
bass singer with an agreeable, flex- Miss Bertha Deaville (soprano), Miss
ible and extensive voice, and pos- Sadie Rattray (elocutionist), Prof. E.
sesses that which is even more essen- Claudio (violinist), accompanist, Mr.
tial to success, intelligence, good taste Geo. Werner,
and correct feeling. 1. March  de  Concert,  "Tthe  Nye-
Witherspoon is perhaps more of a      olion"    Chas.  Sanglear
cosmopolitan in art than any other 2- (a) Sextette fr. "Tricia"..Donizetti
American singer—at least, any male       (b) A Tone Poem A. Roberts
American singer now before the pub- 3- Vocal Solo, "God's Garden"	
lie.    His perfect artistic mastery and          Frank Lambert
the  intensity  and  versatility   of  his Miss Bertha Deaville.
dramatic  force,  give him a  position 4- Grand Selection (No. 1)—"Mari-
at the head of all of the American      tana"   Walace
male singers of today. 5- Serenade, "Drepn-, of Heaven"...
Mr. Witherspoon has a well-defined        F. H. Losey
knowledge of the value of consonants, While this number is being played
and    their    uses    in    rounding    out a collection will be taken up for
phrases,  and the  production  of fine Victoria City Band fund.
dramatic effect.    His diction is per- 6. Violin Solo, "Norma" Belline
feet and his enunciation clear and dis- Prof. E. Claudio.
tinct;   every  word  he   sings  is  per- 7- Overture,   "Rosamunde". .Schubert
fectly understood, whether it be Eng- 8. Clarionet  Solo   (Air  Varie)   fr.,
lish, German or French; he has dra-       "Der   Freischutiz    Foreith
matic in stinct, thorough mastery of Musician, E. Muriset.
the effect of the various tone colors, 9. Reading      Selected
and his  facial expression clearly in- Mr*-* Sadie Rattray.
dicates the thought and emotion con-  10. Paraphrase, "The Palms".. .Faure
veyed   by   the   poet   and   composer.   11. Finale, "All Hail the Power of
All  this  has  much to  do  with the      Jesus Name"  F. A. Pattella
main feature of Mr. Witherspoon's The fourth sacred concert will be
work. given    Sunday   afternoon,   February
There are many excellent singers 9th, for the benefit of the Seamen's
in both Europe and America who Institute. At .this concert the band
hide their excellence as vocalists and will play a request programme. Per-
artists under a cloud, produced by sons wishing favourite numbers
badly selected programmes. Wither- should write the bandmaster, S.
spoon is not one of these. He is Rogers, Orchard Street, not later than
essentially a program builder, and Sunday, 25th inst.
selects his numbers with fine discrim- The week will close with two spe-
ination from among the most famous cial 10-cent children's matinees this
■of the different epochs of musical de- afternoon and the usual performances
velopment. Prodigal in his numbers, tonight. The first matinee will start
he allows them to run riot from a promptly at 2.30, the doors being
portion devoted to operatic and ora- opened at 2 o'clock and the second at
torio   selections,   from   classical   and 3*45*
modern songs in German, modern A big bill of feature acts arranged
songs in English, and modern French for next week will be headed by Vir-
selections as well, closing his pro- ginia Keller's Seven Virginia Belles,
gramme with a group of old melodies a bevy of beautiful girls who have a
from the English and Irish, particu- swinging act of song and dance,
larly arranged and adapted to his Other numbers wil be Zinelle and
voice and style. That is why today Boutelle, comedy operatic duettists;
Herbert Witherspoon is heralded as Paul Stevens, a one-legged acrobat,
America's greatest basso, because his who does marvelous work with a
programmes please the greatest num- pole and on a slack wire; Thos. Glen-
ber of patrons. roy and Marie Russell in a comedy
  sketch  "At  Casey's  Reception";  Joe
The New Grand. Byron and May Blanche in the corn-
It  was  announced  last  week  that edy    playlet,    entitled    "Matrimonial
Manager Jameson would have one of Sweets in Family Jars"; Thos. J.
the best shows of the season at his Price, singing the illustrated song,
popular vaudeville house during the "The Heart You Lost in Maryland
coming week, and he, has certainly You'll Find in Tennessee"; New Mov-
made good. I make bold to say that ing Pictures, "For Peace or War,"
it is the best vaudeville show that has and a new overture by the orchestra
ever been staged in Victoria. Two under the direction of Prof. Nagel.
turns would be a credit to any London or New York House. The first
is the wire performance of the Eddy
family, Rudolph is a marvel and his
backward summersault on thc wire
easily thc most sensational and skil-
good all round show was the general
opinion. Lucretia's trained leopards
and panthers proved a big attraction
and is an act worthy of special mention. Miss Gordon gives a pretty
exhibition in "physical culture," and
displays great ability in this particular line. Chris Magee does some
dancing and sings an Irish song that
goes very well. Cal Stewart & Co.,
in the rural sketch, "Uncle Josh on
the Boweiy," is very good, it is an
amusing comedy and Mr. Stewart is
a good entertainer; his laughing song
is quite a hit. Miss Hebson has a
very pleasing voice and good appearance and makes a good impression.
The Pantagescope has good moving
pictures and are quite interesting. The
bookings for next week are Shed-
man's troupe of the largest and best
trained dogs on the stage. Dan. J.
Harrington the famous ventrilloquist,
one of the very best, with his six
wooden-headed dummies—a wonderful act in ventrilloquism; Caccia and
Amato, fancy and novelty dancers, in
an original conception; the Mixer &
Ward, a very clever team; Phyllis
Allen, the gifted contralto in popular
songs; Miss Crawford sings See-Saw
next week with pretty illustrations
and the Pantagescope will offer something entirely new.
lays all the fault on the present capitalistic system and it does so in language that can only be denominated
rank. The editorial might have been
lifted in its entirety from the Socialist organ, and suggests reminiscences
of the time when D. V. Mott was a
responsible sober-minded citizen. The
contrast between his first pen efforts
in the past ten years ago and the
screeds which are now to be found in
The Ledger is both startling and instructive.
Notes on
Provincial News
Columbia Valley.
The Golden Star is doing good work
in advertising Columbia Valley. The
new head line above the title of the
paper runs "Gateway to the Fertile
Columbia Valley." To keep this before the eyes of its readers is to attract attention to one of the most
fruitful districts of the Province. All
the way from Golden to Canal Flats
will within a few years be under cultivation, all that is needed is a railway and irrigation. The money stringency may postpone railway construction for a little while, but not for
long, the resources of the valley are
well known and as soon as financial
conditions readjust themselves money
will be forthcoming for development.
Progressive Nelson.
S. S. Taylor, K.C, has been for
some years the Chairman of the Progressive party in Nelson. Since the
departure of John Houston to fresh
fields and pastures new, the party of
which John was a member has not
been much in evidence as formerly,
but it has trained its chairman for
higher honours in the civic service,
and he has just been elected Mayor
by acclamation. Mr. Taylor will
make an excellent Chief Magistrate,
in addition to being learned in the
law, he is a man of property and of
exceptional business capacity. His
practice has run largely along the
lines of important commercial interests. As he is the choice of all
parties there is no doubt he will receive that general support without
which no Mayor can make a success.
There are skeins to disentangle, and
knots to untie in connection with
Nelson's Municipal affairs, none of
them will present difficulties to Mr.
Taylor and under his management the
Capital of the Kootenay will undoubtedly prosper even more than
during the last year or two.
To the following appropriate comment clipped from the columns of thc
Moyie Leader, The Week pronounces
a hearty Amen:
"The Cranbrook Prospector has
commended its fourteenth year. Editor
Grace was the trail blazer of journalism in East Kootenay, and is deserving of a lot of credit for the part he
has taken in the development of the
country."
In The Limelight.
According to the Nanaimo Free
Press Comrade Hawthornthwaite is
bent on getting into the limtlight as
early in the session as possible. He
has graciously allowed himself to be
interviewed and has informed his interviewer that it is essential that the
conduct of the Lieutenant-Governor
on the Japanese question should be
looked into and as he anticipates that
the leader of the Opposition will decline to take the matter up he intends
to do so himself in the early hours
of the Session. It was inevitable that
some explanation of His Honor's attitude should be demanded but the
fates are indeed unkind to a man who
has erred more through constitutional
incapacity than deliberate intention
should fall into the hands of a Socialist leader.
Worth Thinking Over.
The Prince Rupert Empire has fallen foul of the C.P.R., time was when
its able Editor was loud in the defence of the great Railway Corporation, now he is exhausting the vials
of his wrath in holding them up to
public condemnation, as indifferent to
public opinion. He declares that it is
managed strictly for "a pound of
flesh," in order that its owners in
Europe shall not have their dividends
cut down on the fictitious value of its
shares. The foundation of this attack
is the employment by the Railway
Company of Japanese coolies in place
of white labour. It is refreshing to
know that this is as great an offence
in the eyes of the Prince Rupert Empire as if perpetrated by the G.T.P.
Epidemic.
The disease from which Mr. Morley
and his chosen organizers arc suffering is evidently epidemic. It has
broken out in Nanaimo where the
pastor of the Haliburton Street Methodist Church has stated from the pulpit that the Coal City is controlled by
the liquor interests. These hair-
brained charges usually emanate from
men of respectable character and
weak judgment. Everyone knows how
baseless was the charge when applied
to Victoria, it does not seem to have
any better foundation in Nanaimo,
for both Mayoral candidates, Alderman Hodgson and Mayor Planta have
indignantly repudiated the charge and
have declared that to their positive
knowledge it has no foundation.
SEEDS, TREES, PLANTS,
for the farm, garden, lawn, boulevard or conservatory. Acclimatised
stock. Oldest established nursery on
the  Mainland.   Catalogue free.
M.  J.   HENRY
3010  Westminster  Road,  Vancouver
Victoria Theatre
The Gingerbread Man
The  Brightest  Musical  Comedy  of
the Day.
Monday, Jan. 20
Pantages Theatre.
The Johnson Street theatre played
to large houses during the week and
the programme that was presented
was all that could be wished for—a
Labour's Uncertain RU.
The Fernie Ledger has struck a
new gait. It is rapidly becoming a
full fledged Socialist organ. In an
editorial in its issue of the nth inst.,
it deals with the present money stringency and slackness of work in what
can only be regarded as an unenlightened and unreasoning manner. It
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle, of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James H.
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Contractor, intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 mlles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the northeast corner post; thence west
SO chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commeneement.
June 14, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan 11. James H. McLauchlan,
LLOYD & CO., chimney sweepel
and house-cleaners, 716 Pandol
St. Satisfaction and cleanline]
guaranteed. All orders by post
otherwise promptly attended tf
Trial respectfully solicited.
PHONE 191.
Will You Take
$500 a Year...
for your spare time. In other
words the man who has a couple
of hours morning and evening
and will employ it in operating
A Cyphers Incubator
at his home can make from $500
in twelve months. We have a
I unique plan to work on and will
be pleased to explain it to any
one  interested.    Call  or write.
Watson &
McGregor
647 Johnson  Street,
VICTORIA, B. C.
British Columbia
Permanent Loan and
Savings Company.
DIVIDEND NO. 19
Notice is hereby given that a
dividend at the rate of NINE
FEB CENT, per annum has this
day been declared on the Permanent Stock of the Company for the
half year ending December 31st,
1907, and that the same will be
payable at the Head Office of the
Company, No. 321 Cambie Street,
Vancouver, B.C., on and after
January 15th, 1908.
By order of the Board,
THOS. J. LANGLOIS,
President.
Vancouver, Jan.  llth,  1908.
DIVIDENDS
In another column will be found
the semi-annual dividend notice
of The B. C. Permanent Loan &
Savings Company, showing that a
dividend at the rate of nine per
cent, per annum upon Class "A"
Permanent Stock has been declared for the past half year.
NEW     WESTMINSTER     LAND     DISTRICT,
District  of New  Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Roman Z. Chandler, of Vancouver, B. C, ocupation
Broker, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
ten chains south of the southeast eorner of D. L. 1413; thence north 160
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 1G0 chains; thence west 40 chains
to place of commencement, and containing 640 aeres, more or less.
December 23, 1907.
Jan  11. ROMAN Z.  CHANDLER.
ONE — WEEK	
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle of
Victoria, B. C Merchant, and James
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Contractor, Intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the southeast corner post; thence north
SO chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
June  11,  1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan. 11. James H. McLauchlan.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle, of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James H.
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, contractor, intend to apply for a special
licence over the following described
lands:
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's
Bight on a small unnamed creek, being
the northeast corner post; thence west
SO chains; thence south 80 chains', thenee
east SO chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement.
June 12, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan. 11. James H. McLauchlan.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle, of
Victoria, B. C Merchant, and James
H. McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Contractor, Intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 mlles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the northwest corner post; thence south
160 chains; thence east 40 chains', thence
north 160 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
June 13, 1907.
Jan 11.
JAMES HASTIE,
James H. McLauchlan. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 1908
5
C ______.__•_ ~_.A. _\ _______ _,._. prising, however, that no mention of
■Ol_lvf rLallSi this incident was made by the referee
in his report to the association.  This
is a matter that should not be over-
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^llooked,   for   if  the  players   are   al-
lowed to do this once, they will cer-
The  result  of  the  Rugby  football  tain.ly take every opportunity to do it
ing
Comment
match at Oak Bay last Saturday, between Victoria and Vancouver, was a
sore disappointment to the many followers of the local team, but there is
again, and once the referee has been
lax, they will have a precedent. That
rowdyism must and will be put down
is easily shown by the rulings of the
association in the Old Country.    We
no complaint, as the game was the ilope for the g00d name of the Van
best that has been played in this city couver Island association and for the
for years, and until within a few min-  welfare of football in general, that in
utes of time it was practically even.
Both teams played good, hard football, but it must be acknowledged
that the visitors showed to beter advantage than the home team, and the
locals had sufficient opportunities
given them to win the match, but they
failed to take advantage of the openings ancl failed to cross the line. The
back division of the visitors outplayed
thc home players, and it is to them
the credit of winning the game   be-
future  such   tactics  on  the   part  of
players will be severely dealt with.
There has been considerable comment recently on the ability of Wat
Adams, of this city, as a boxer, in
which he has been severely criticized.
I have not had the pleasure of ever
seeing Adams in the ring, but I have
watched him very carefully in the two
football matches he has played with
the Victoria team, and I have arrived
at the conclusion that if he boxes as
longs.    The three-quarters especially wc], as 1]e plays footbal]j Victorians
were  overshadowed  by  the  visitors. may havc no hesitancy in calling him
At full-back the players were evenly t|lejr representative.    Hc is going all
matched, both doing their work nicely, the time, and never once did I notice
In the half-back division, Newcombe the least sign of funking.
and Brae were more conspicuous than 	
their opponents and played a much With two matches in sight, the
better game. In this department alone lovers of the manly art in this city
the home players had it over the should within the next few weeks wit-
visitors. In the scrum the visitors ncss some good boxing. The sports
were much heavier and worked better of this city are great believers in box-
together. The locals were without inS* their one °biect> however, is that
the services of Sparks and Bellew,
both of whom played an excellent
game against Stanford, and their loss
it must bc run on the square.   If this
is done, any good match will attract \
sufficient crowd to insure a profitable
_ ,l * 7    ,1"      aiJ "   •   .1"      evening.   It is hoped that those who
was felt considerably.   Although they ,,.,*,        , , ,. ,
are behind the scheme to re-establish
were defeated, the locals have no
cause to be discouraged, and if another game could be arranged, it
might be that the locals would come
out on top.    If, however, thc locals
thc game in this city wil;
success.
meet with
A well-known Victoria athlete takes
^^_^^^^^^_^^_^_^^_^^^^_ exception to some remarks which T
expect to get to the top, they must made 1:ist wcck with refe,-ence to his
practice regularly, especially in tack- declining at the last moment to play
ling and passing the ball. It was in for the Victoria Rugby team against
this line that the Vancouverites show- Stanford. In my defence, I have only
ed to advantage. The combination to say that no paper published at the
work on the part of the visitors was Coast has been more generous in its
good, and if the locals could only get treatment of the athlete in question
to be as proficient as their opponents, than The Week, and assuredly the
there would be no cause for com- paper which awards praise when it is
plaint. In kicking, the locals easily deserved, has a right to blame when
had it on the Mainland players. The a man fails to come to the scratch,
loose scrum formation of the for- A true sport is always willing to place
wards, which was so conspicuous himself in the hands of his club or of
against Stanford was not so noticeable the men responsible for getting the
last Saturday. Whether this was on team together, unless he is absolutely
account of the loss of the forwards too unwell to play or has some other
or better work on the part of Van- sufficient reason. He allows them and
couver, is hard to say. The game has not himself to be the best judges as
demonstrated, however, that Victoria to whether he should take part in a
has a team of which every citizen game. The player in question had
should be proud, and I was partial- been asked to take part in the most
larly pleased to see the large attend- important game of the season, and
ance. Now that it has ben shown until thc day before the match was
that the locals can play the game, it due thc committee understood that
is hoped that the citizens will con- be would play. They counted on him
tinue to support the game as they have aud the splendid form he had shown
done in the past two matches. If this ■" two recent matches made it look as
spirit would prevail all the time, there 'f victory or defeat might depend on
is no reason whatever why Victoria his presence in the field. When he ex-
should not maintain a first-class fif- plained that his left arm and hand had
teen and one which would bring credit been injured, and that he was not in
to the city they represent. Although first-class condition, Meredith offered
the team was defeated, every man on to change sides with him, a very gen-
the line-up played his best, and that emus offer, so that hc would not have
is all that can be asked of any man, to fend off with his left hand; how-
and The Week extends its hearty ever, at the last moment almost, he
congratulations to the team which backed down. But the thing which
put up such a gallant fight against thc strengthened me in commenting ad-
champion team from Vancouver. vcrsely on  his  action  was  that just
  before the match was   due   to   com-
Victorians had a certain amount of mence, he offered to play if required,
satisfaction on Saturday in the defeat This clearly showed that even if not
of the Vancouver intermediates at the '» perfect condition, hc realized that
hands of the local boys.   Although the :'e could play and need not have with-
game was not so important as the sen- drawn his consent.   I have no desire
ior  attraction,   there   is,  however,   ,i to say anything the least bit unkind,
certain    amount    of   satisfaction    in but the true interests of sport demand
knowing   that   the   younger   players plain speaking, and it will be a sorry
from  Victoria are able to take   the day when the Press is not at liberty
Victor-Berliner
Sacred Music
to give an honest opinion even about
champion athletes. In thc present instance, full justification for what I
said is furnished by the fact that I
have been personally thanked by a
The second match in the Vancouver  number of leading footballers and by
measure of the visitors. This is a
matter of congratulation, as it makes
the future of rugby in this city appear very bright.
some of the friends of the player in
question for what I said.
UMPIRE.
Island series was played at Nanaimo
on Saturday last, when the team from
that    city    defeated   thc    Ladysmith
team.    From reports of the game, it
was   a   very   interesting   match,   in
which considerable hard feeling  was       ,^^_^^^^^^^^^^_^^_
shown, and in fact two of thc players  w-" you?
actually came to blows.    It is   sur-     The Maid (absently)—I did, sir
Mr. Borem Wright—I'm sorry, Miss
Kutting isn't in.   Tell her I called,
Wouldn't it be fine
to sit in your home
and hear the Trinity1
Choir sing "Jesus
Lover of My Soul"
and"RockofAges";
or the Haydn Quartet sing, "Where is
My Boy Tonight"
and"0 That Will Be
Glory For Me"; or
to listen to the chants
and other sacred
music by the
Gregorian and
Sistine Choirs ?
That's exactly what you     ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
can do with a Victor or Berliner Gram-o-phone.
The powerful soul-stirring hymns and the magnificent anthems and
oratorios of the masters, sung by noted soloists and famous hoirs, are yours
whenever you want to hear them.
The Victor or Berth r Gram-o-phone plays this music true to the living
voice—you have never kmwn the full beauty of sacred songs until you have
heard them on one of these instruments.
The Victor or Berliner Gram-o-phone not only enables you to have
sacred concerts at home, but puts the best entertainment of every sort at your
command. The magnificent voices of the most famous grand-opera stars, the
world's greatest bands and famous instrumentalists, the latest song-hits, old*
time ballads, side-splitting jokes and comic song:, the liveliest dance music
—all this and more you can have with a Victor or Berliner Gram- / ,
o-phone and only with one of these famous instuments. ' '"'
Ask any Victor or Berliner dealer to plav anv sacred music or anything /a, if^
else you want to hear.  Also ask him to tell you about the e.isy terms ou /y j,-> ry
which you can buy one of these instruments,     /_& rf'^r
Use the coupon aud get free catalogues,      ''■' r$r -v     J
The Berliner Gram-o-phone
Company of Canada, Ltd,
MONTREAL
605
The Gingerbread Man.
On Monday last Mrs. McBride
gave a tea in honor of Mrs. Stewart,
of Mission City, who is her guest.
The tea table was daintily decorated
with pale pink carnations and fern.
The hostess wore a very becoming
gown ol grey silk, elaborately trimmed with rich lace, and Mrs. Stewart
a handsome frock of cream lace.
Among the guests were: Mrs. Cecil
Roberts, Mrs. W. S. Gore, Mrs. Courtney, Mrs. Watson, Mrs. Beauchamp
Tye, Mrs. Matthews, Mrs. Ker, Mrs.
Rochester, Mrs. Jones, Mrs. Grant,
Mrs. Brett, Mrs. Green, Mrs. Spratt,
TIMBER
If you have any
timber for sale
list it with us
We can sell it
BURNETT, SON  & CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,  B. C.
The days are getting Cold.
THE
WILSON BAR
Is Warm and Comfortable.
VISIT IT.
648 Yates St, Victoria B. C.
COAL
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo Collieries.
New Wellington Coal.
The best household coal ln the marke   at
current rates.   Anthracite coal for sale.
34 Broad Street.
VICTORIA
Phone 647
hame, Mrs. Hall, Mrs. Gordon Hun-
Mrs. Ellis, Mrs. Tatlow, Mrs. Grater, Mrs. Higgins, Mrs. C. Todd, Mrs.
Fell, .Mrs. McTavish, and the Misses
Rochester, Fell, G. and B. Irving, I).
Wilson, McTavish, Bowron, and Mary
Lawson.
**.**,
Mr. Kenneth Gillespie and Mr.
Kirkby, of Riverside, Cowichan Lake,
after spending a week in town, went
back on Wednesday.
+   *    *
Miss Dorothy Green, after spending
the Christinas holidays in Victoria,
left for Los Angeles on Wednesday.
Holland French and
Japan Bulbs
For Fall Planting.
SEEDS, TREES, PLANTS
for the  farm, garden, lawn, boulevard   or   conservatory.     Acclimated
stock.   Oldest established nursery on
the Mainland of B. C.   Catalogue free.
M. J. HENRY,
3010 Westminster Rd, Vancouver, B.C
P
HI fciVl S   and Trade Marks
obtained in all countries.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Enjineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville St.
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
Leave Your Baggage Cheeks at the
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.       A. E, KENT, Proprietor
LATEST NUMBERS
English
Magazine
CHUMS
TIT-BITS
THE STRAND
PEARSONS
PUNCH
KNIGHT'S BOOKSTORE
VICTOBIA, B. 0. THE WEEK   SATURDAY, JANUARY 18   1908.
Incorporated 1006
Capital. (500,000.00
Capital increaaed
ln 1907
to  .. 11,000,000.00
Subscribed
Capital,    $560,000
Reserve . . $60,000
Surplus, Jan. If
1907   .  .  $110,000
J. B. MATHERS, Gen. Kan.
IN   CLOSING   UF   ESTATES
either as Executors or Assignees
the Dominion Trust Co., Ltd., Is
never Influenced by ulterior motives. Their entire ambition,
effort, and energy is directed towards securing the best possible
returns for all concerned.
Name this company executor in
your will. Blank will forms furnished free of charge and stored
in our safety deposit vaults,
when we are made your executor.
DOMINION TRUST CO.,
Limited.
328 Hasting! St., West
Vancouver, B. C.
The Week
a Provincial Review and Magailne, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
SIV4  (Government Street. .Victoria,  B.C.
IK   Hastings  St Vancouver,   B.C.
W. BLAKBMORB. .Manager and Bdltsr
A Prophet in Babylon
A few weeks ago The Week made
reference to an epoch-making book,
which has just been published, entitled, "A Prophet in Babylon," by W.
J. Dawson, At that time I had only
taken a cursory glance at it and had
read several eulogistic reviews. Since
then I have carefully read the book,
and as it has attracted universal attention, and will undoubtedly be classed as the book of the season, no
apology is needed for dealing with it
at greater length in this article.
First of all, let me say a few words
about the author. Mr. W. J. Dawson
started life as a student for the Wes-
leyan Methodist ministry. He took
his theological course, I believe, at
Headingly, under the governorship of
Dr. VVaddy, one of the most eminent
Methodist divines of his day, and
father of thc popular and brilliant Q.
C, S. S. VVaddy.
Young Dawson, in his early twenties, gave evidence of extraordinary
ability. There was something about
him which marked him out from his
fellows. He had long black hair,
which he was vain enough to cultivate until it hung in more or less
graceful curls nearly to his shoulders.
He had an aquiline and slightly hooked nose, and what with his black hair
and black eyebrows, his general appearance suggested a Jewish caste, ln
the last year which he spent at college
he attracted the attention of Dr.
Morley Punshon, who had heard him
preach, and who did not hesitate to
express the opinion that he was destined to become an orator.
Unfortunately, this report reached
the cars of Dawson, who was not unnaturally flattered at reciving praise
from so eminent an authority; the result was that for ten or fifteen years
he continued to grow long hair and to
affect mannerisms which were distinctly out of place in the pulpit, and
occasioned much comment on the
platform.
But nothing could obscure thc intellectual brilliance and the oratorical
ability of Dawson, who made headway
in his Church, and at the age of
thirty had been widely marked out as
a coming man.
About this time he commenced to
give a series of popular lectures, and
I heard the first of them in Wolverhampton. He took a subject which
had furnished the greatest pulpit ora
tor of modern times, Dr. Punshon,
with the subject for one of his most
popular lectures, "Savonarola, the
Monk of Venice." At no time did
Dawson suggest a comparison with
Punshon; he was interesting, picturesque, and dramatic, but his deliverances wcre never characterized by
profound thought or originality in
conception or expression. And above
all, there was none of that divine 'afflatus" which was so marked a feature of Dr. Punshon, and which placed
him in a class by himself.
One could admire the skill of Dawson, and take delight in his mastery
of picturesque expresison, and epigrammatic phraseology, but thc power
to move men was absent. 1 have
heard Beecher, Canon Liddon, Bishop
I.ightfoot, Phillips Brooks, and all
the other pulpit orators of thc last
forty years, but with the single exception of Cardinal Newman, whose
motive power was essentially different, not one of them could compare
with Dr. Punshon for what can perhaps best be described as moving influence.
After this Mr. Dawson rapidly
forged ahead, until some sixteen or
seventeen years ago he left the Methodist Church to acept the pastorate
of one of the largest Congregational
churches in London, the Highbury
Quadrant. Here for several years his
popular style enabled him to retain
and possibly to increase his reputation. But there was always an element of unrest about Dawson, and I
was not surprised to learn that a few
years ago he resigned his pastorate to
engage in evangelistic work. He made
a tour of the United States and drew
crowded audiences. His style is essentially American, and there is no
doubt that if he had accepted the pastorate of some big American church,
hc would have found his metier.
Whilst travelling Dawson was observing, and his equipment well fitted
him to appraise the character of
Church work in the New World. His
book, "A Prophet in Babylon," contains the result of his investigations,
and furnishes a vehicle for conveying
his pronounced ideas upon Church
work generally and the present attitude of the World towards revealed
religion.
His book may be criticised with
fairness from several standpoints. For
instance, Dawson has posed as a literary critic, and has written at least
three books on literature, which have
attracted atention: "The Makers of
English Fiction," "The Makers of
English Prose," and "The Makers of
English Poetry." But I doubt if he
will ever be accorded a place among
the recognised critics. He lacks insight and style, and is much more of
a propagandist than a critic.
In the book under review, the interest centres almost entirely in the presentment furnished of the failure of
the Churches to reach the masses. He
deals with the case of a well-known
New York church, of which the Rev.
John Gaunt is pastor. He shows how
its deacons and managers are so imbued with a mercenary spirit that they
have lost all sympathy for the masses,
are intolerant of poor worshippers,
and seek only to maintain their church
as a Sunday club. He depicts the
awakening of John Gaunt's mind to
this fact, and the. workings of his
spirit when he realises that his mission is a failure along orthodox lines.
He then rallies his forces, abandons
his luxurious home, and starts a mission to the poor, devoting the balance
of his life to work in the slums, and
"practical Christianity."
The author graphically depicts the
forces which are arrayed against this
aggressive Christian work, and the
close of the book finds Gaunt rededi-
cating his life to social service after
recovering from an attempt to add
to thc Christian annals the story of
another martyred hero.
Everyone knows that the Church is
out of harmony with the masses of
the people. The outside critic attributes this to lack of adaptation, love
of indolence on the part of thc clergy,
and the demoralising effect of the influence of mammon.
The clergy and some laymen attribute it to the ineradicable enmity between the Church and the World.   A
few wise men within the fold accept
both explanations in part. Mr. Dawson is evidently one of those who
thinks that most of the blame lies at
the door of the Church, and his book
is an impasisoned and insistent plea
for the abandonment of orthodox
methods and the substitution of the
highest type of what is usually called
mission work.
I fail to see that his suggestions
contain any element of originality or
that they differ in any degree from
those which have been so sucessfully
carried out by the Salvation Army.
There is the same element of personal
sacrifice, of consecration, and a perpetual self-denying ordinance. There
is the same sympathetic support of a
devout sisterhood. But can the Salvation Army be called a Church? and
is not the highest fruition of its labours attained when those whom it
plucks as brands from the burning,
become affiliated with Christian
Churches? Surely, there is a deeper
yearning in human nature than can
be satisfied by the so-called services
of the Salvation Army, however religious in tone, which lack the vitalising power of the Sacraments.
Mr. Dawson does not pursue this
subject. He is content to lead his
readers to this point, and to leave
them there. He does not even say
that he looks for the regeneration of
the race through the medium of independent misison halls, although that
is the only logical inference from his
book.
As an arraignment of only too many
of the so-called Christian churches of
to-day, "A Prophet of Babylon" must
be regarded as a notable book. It is
written by a man of force and ability,
who has spent all his life in the Christian Church, and more than half of it
within the fold of the most Evangelical of all such churches. Mr. Dawson at
least knows whereof he speaks, and
while it may be permissible to doubt
his competency as a theologian, no
one can question that he possesses
the equipment of experience and sincerity which entitles his utterances to
thc serious consideration of all thinking men.
I cannot speak very highly of the
literary qualities of his book. It may
be a lack of appreciation on my part,
but I have never been able to discern
style or distinction in Mr. Dawson's
books. He writes too much like a
preacher, and never sinks the character of the propagandist in that of the
writer. I think everyone would do
well to read this book. It has attracted, and will attract, much attention, and might become a force for
good if Mr. Dawson adopted Napoleon's motto, and instead of pointing
the way led it.
I will conclude this already too
lengthy article by quoting a few of
the most striking sentences from 'the
book of the hour":
"What woman ever yet was really
content with the rewards of discretion? What woman in her private
thought does not yearn for the touch
of passion which transfigures life?"
"Adversity leaves only the worthiest
for one's friends."
"Compromise with truth is death;
the only victory is complete sincerity."
"The chief business of life is to
live, not to get a living."
"Flattery is the diplomacy of feebleness."
"People who suppose that a human
character can be altered radically by
a sudden emotional experience, however intense, do not understand human nature."
"Any man may make a mistake, but
the only mistake that is irretrievable
is persisting in a mistake."
"The world reveres its martyrs,
whomsoever else it may despise."
"Any man's power over men will be
in the direct ratio of the conviction
they have of his disinterestedness."
"What the world is always seeking,
and for the most part in vain, is living examples of what self-renunciation means, and Christianity can only
regain its authority by the influence
of such lives."
"The real cause of most unhappy
marriages is that people are able to
sulk in separate rooms by themselves."
*.v,;.,',,,.',*.    ;
Table Silver.
Wear-resisting silver plate to grace the most elaborate
table—plate that can hardly be distinguished from
sterling silver, is a specialty with us. An immense
selection in our showrooms, we may say the finest
display in British Columbia.
Tea and Coffee Services, Entree Disties,
Bake Dishes, Pudding Dishes, Hot Water
Kettles, Trays, Cake Dishes, Breakfast
Cruets, Etc., Etc.	
I I
I      SPECIAL   BARGAINS   IN   HANDBAGS      |
I PRICES CUT IN HALF |
I SEE OUR WINDOW DISPLAY |
CHALLONER & MITCHELL
47 and 49 Government St., Victoria.
"Most rich congregations are suffering from fatty degeneration of the
soul."
"The only way for a man to do any
truly great work in the world is for
him to go straight forward to his goal,
paying no attention to praise or
blame."
"For my part, I would gladly vote
for the total abolition of the Church
in all its existing forms, and begin
right over again, from the foundation.
Anyway, it will have to be done before
long, if the Church is to survive. For
the Church, in its present form, is on
its death-bed, with lights and incense
and moving music, and all that kind
of thing, but the odour of coruption
and decomposition is in the air. The
world knows perfectly well what is
going on. I know nothing more pathetic than the angry wonder so often
expressed by all kinds of eclesiastical
people over the fact that the mass of
the people won't go to church. Surely the inference should be plain; it is
to everyone save the ecclesiastic. It
is that life has gone out of the
Churches. If the Church were alive,
people would not be able to stay
away from it."
"Christianity has openly become
the Church of the rich, as the inevitable result of a paid ministry."
"The Church constantly retreats before the invasion of poverty."
"It would bc a dreadful world if
those with whom we have to live in
closest bonds, saw all our defects with
a vision never less than accurate."
"A man forgets, when the last parting comes, all the erros in the woman
he has loved, and recalls nothing but
her virtues and her fairness."
"The Church of to-day, instead of
making an effort to capture the sinners, coddles the saints."
"All great men have been dreamers,
who have dreamed true; but the men
who have really moved the world,
have been men who knew how to
make their dreams come true."
"Both France and Italy have been
compelled to disown the Church because it no longer represented and
expressed modern ideas."
"Brilliant men have declined to become the slaves of an institution—
the Church—which robbed them of
the right to think freely, bound them
by antiquated precedents, and ground
out their lives in piffling triviality."
"Prestige is merely the mirage of
false pride."
"The real dynamic of all service for
others lies in the experience of Christ
as a living Saviour."
"It needs a diviner inspiration to
live one day well than to write a gospel."
"It is the impact of personality that
tells most in propaganda."
"To go on asking when we expect
to receive nothing is a much greater
thing than to ask expecting to receive."
"I know a great Western city where
half-a-dozen ministers have been driven from their pastorates for no other
reason than that they, for righteousness' sake, put themselves into opposition against the rich men of their
churches."
"The moral failure of the pulpit lies
in its lack of authority. The preacher
preaches professionally, and therefore
is not taken seriously."
"Social redemption can only be
achieved by the restoration of moral
authority."
"I have one supreme faith, it is that
the great multitude of plain folk are
always on the side of right when they
once know what right is."
"There is an inextinguishable moral
sense in man. As he goes up in the
social scale, he loses it. All revolutions have their birth among the common people. It is from the womb of
labour and hardship that all the
Christs come."
"In the presence of elemental forces
astuteness is a vain thing; it is little      '
better than a child's trick."
"The vice of the pulpit is that it
deals with mankind in the mass, it is
afraid to deal with individuals. It ,
grows eloquent about the tragedy of
the poor man's one ewe lamb, but it
never takes the rich thief by the
throat and says 'Thou art the man.'
"Public opinion is the necessary dynamic for the enforcement of the
law."
"All the wisdom of the ages is enshrined in the Cross."
"A Prophet in Babylon," a story of
social service by W. J. Dawson, publishers Fleming H. Revell Co., London, Edinburgh, New York, Chicago,
Toronto. Price $1.50. Sold by the
Victoria Book and Stationery Co.,
Victoria. THE WEEK, SATURDAY JANUARY 18  1908.
i-ooo-ooooo-ooo-ooo-oo-ooo-ooo-o-oooo-o-o-oo-oo-^
•joo-o-oooo-o-o-oo-o-oo-ooo-o-o-oooo-ooooo-ck)^^
For the Children,
Bring Them Inlj
Here are a few furniture items that
would brighten a whole lot the lives
of the little tots. Every piece of
Juvenile Furniture sold at this shop
is good-—bears the same "superior
quality" marks as does our other
furniture. We give the same guarantee of goodness with these pieces
as backs all other sales. Dozens of
other equally interesting items are
here also.    Bring the children in!
Child's Chair—This chair has table,
similar to tables on high-chairs.
Made of reed.   Price, each.. ..$2.75
Cradles—In English willow. Several
styles.   Prices, each, $4.00 add $3.00
Reed Rockers—For the children we
have this year a very large stock
of pretty little rockers in reed.
They are in handsome designs, and
well and strongly made. Prices
range at, each, $6.00, $5.00, $4.50,
$4.00 and   $3.50
Child's Rockers—In wood rockers for
the little ones we have a large and
varied assortment of styles and a
range of prices that is surprising.
Wc have them with wood seats,
cane seats and cobbler seats. All
are excellent values. Prices range
at, each, $2.50, $2.00, $1.50, $1.25
and  $1.00
Child's High Chairs—Several styles
of these chairs. The superior finish
is noticeable here. They are well
and strongly made. Prices range
at, each, $4.5ofi $2.75, $2.25, $2.00
and   $1.75
We Want You to See Our Unusually Fine Assortment of
The tone and "atmosphere" of a room
are largely determined by its decorations.
The curtains are perhaps the most important item of furnishings.   They stand
before your  guest,  and impress themselves more upon the mind than do even
the carpets or the furniture.   Since they
can either make or mar the beauty of',
your daily surroundings, why not select
the best looking and the best wearing?
And, when buying curtains, visit specialists in this very important work—choose
from   wide   assortments.    If   you   are',
building or just brightening the old place,
don't overlook the importance of "correct" curtains.  The curtain section offers <
you now the handsomest assortment of'
new curtains and curtaining we have ever I
shown.    Many charming and exclusive
patterns are shown in high, medium and {
low-priced varieties.    In the complete-1
ness of this gathering of most worthy'
curtain furnishings, you will surely be
suited.   Then, perhaps, our drapery ex-'
perts may assist you.   Don't you think \
that a firm that makes a specialty of this 1
sort of work, and employs only expert [
decorators,, could help you some in the!
choosing?    And isn't the larger choice
that this firm offers you worth seeing,
too?   Let us assist you.   Won't cost you
a penny.
Some Ladies' Desks.     These Represent the Very Newest Ideas.
Ladies' Desks—In golden oak, highly
polished.    A big range of styles at'
various  pricings.    We  have  them,,
at, each, $40.00, $20.00, $18.00, $16.00, <
$14.00 and  $12.00 '
Ladies' Desks—In mahogany, three ,
handsome styles in this wood are 1
shown. Highly polished. Trim-1
mings very best. Prices range at, 1
each, $25.00, $18.00 and  $16.001
Ladies' Desks—In oak, mission de- J
signs, finished in popular early J
English. We have an unusually
large assortment of styles, and some i
uncommonly pretty designs they J
are, too. The price range runs:
$32.00, $30,00, $25.00, $22.00, $18.00 j
and  $15.00 (
Arabian Lace Curtains—Real Arabian lace, plain
net centre, in ecru. A very handsome curtain,
at a low price. Sizes 3 ft. x 50 in.   Per pair $5.50
Real Lace Curtains—Genuine lace curtains, with
cluny lace edging and Battenburg corners. This
is a curtain style you'll like. They come in
white.   Per pair  $6.50
Antique First Empire—A bold design of Linen
Applique on heavy net, A handsome Curtain
for dining room or library, new champagne
shade, 3 yards x 50 inches. Price, per pair $16.00
Ivory Point Venise—An elegant reproduction of
this famous lace in two tone treatments—ivory
with white embroidery, 3 yds. x 50 in. Price,
per pair  $20.00
Florentine Lace Curtains—Dainty designs in ecru
and white, with hand-worked insertions, at,
Per Pair  $12.00
Ivory Italian Filet—A new design of Filet Insertion, double eagle and crown decorations, interspersed with other motives, 3 yds. x 50 in.
Price, per pair  $18.00
Ivory Irish Point—Handsome floral treatment,
rich border, finished by hand, 3 yds. x 48 in.
Price, per pair, $12.00 and  $9.50
Dainty Curtains, with designs of inverted fleur de
lis and other motives, 3 yds. x 48 in. at per
pair  $10.00
Dainty Muslins
For Pretty Curtains.
We should like very much the op-
; portunity to talk "Casement Curtains"
' These are decidedly "popular" just
\ now,  and in  the  newest  and  nicest
houses you'll  find this style of cur-
| taining  predominates.     Ever  abreast
of the times, we  are prepared with
an unequalled collection of new and
\ beautiful materials.
Come in and let us show you these
' materials, and show you what delight-
1 fully   dainty   "effects"   are   possible.
The advice and knowledge of our ex-
, perts at your disposal, free.
UNFADABLE  MUSLINS
Dainty "Sundour" Madras Muslins, 50
inches wide, ranging in price from,
per yard, $1.75 to    85c
Cruggleton Casement Crepe is a light
material similar to Madras, but
made in small patterns on a plain
ground. The neatest and prettiest
light curtain goods yet placed on
the market. Four patterns only, at,
per yard  $1.25
DAINTY MUSLINS
Swiss Muslins, in striped, spotted and
other effects, 36 inches wide, per
yard 20c
Swiss Broche Muslins, in large and
assorted patterns, 48 inches wide,
per yard 35c and  25c
Swiss Wavel Muslins, in cream and
white stripe effects, embroidered, 46
inches wide, per yard  35c
White and Cream Madras Muslins, in
very light and dainty patterns, 45
inches wide, per yard 50c and..35c
Bobbinet Yard Goods—Plain and
spot, 30 in. wide at, per yard, 25c,
35c, and  40c
42 inches wide, at, per yard 30c,
35c and   55c
* Cream Madras Muslins, very pretty
and attractive designs, 52 inches
wide, per yard   45c
I Madras, in white and ecru shades, 72
inches wide, per yarc'., 85c and 75c
1 Colored Madras Muslins, in very
striking and effective poppy designs,
50 inches wide, per yard  75c
; Colored Madras Muslins, in very
pretty stained glass window effects,
69 inches wide, per yard  $2.50
I Colored Madras Muslins, with pink
floral pattern, ground being mixed
with white and green 70 inches wide
per yard  $2.00
■ CURTAIN DEPARTMENT IS ON
SECOND FLOOR.
A Great Choice of Lower=Priced Curtains Here Also.
■^ooooooo<kkxxx><>ooooooooooooooWk>oo<kxx>oooo
gggoo-tj-ooooooooooo-oooooooooooo.-^^
At The Street   \
Corner        h
tf By THB LOUNOER ff
Although not strictly in my department, I think a few stray remarks in
connection with the municipal campaign will not be out of place. It is
the first real fight I have been in since
a London County Council election
four years ago, when I was pelted
with rotten eggs and rank cabbages
for venturing to interject a few Imperial remarks when a red-hot socialist orator was "tearing passion to
tatters."   But that is another story.
I think the daily press of Victoria
has earned a leather medal, since it
has achieved a result without parallel
in the Capital City, so I am told by
old inhabitants, for more than twenty
years. It has aroused public interest,
forced nearly thirty candidates for
various municipal offices into the field,
and set everybody talking about the
business of the city.
This is all as it should be. The
newspapers may be wrong, they usually are, and their ideas on the public questions of to-day may be worthless, but at any rate they have effected something by arousing the conflicting elements and stirring the citizens up to a sense of their duty.
Victoria has laboured under several reproaches, the worst of which
perhaps is its civic mismanagement,
but undoubtedly next to it ranks the
apathy of the city. Abuses are long-
lived, when the people become indifferent; and effective sanitation, filthy
streets and insufficient water may be
charged against thc City Council, but
only in so far as it has failed to exercise ordinary business acumen in carrying out the mandate of the ratepayers. Let us hope that the present
interest in civic affairs marks a new
departure, and that Victoria has forever laid aside that spirit of apathy
and indifference which is largely responsible for the worst features of
her civic administration.
I have been lounging in committee
rooms and ward meetings during the
present week, and have been intensely amused. The Colonist, with much
more than its usual perspicacity, has
discerned that one of the most promising signs of the times is the discovery that Victoria is the proud
possessor of a replica of the historic
three Graces, in Messrs. Fullerton,
Gleason and Meston, not forgtting the
apotheosis of all grace and virtue, in
their High Priest and leader. All the
same, these Graces are made of thc
same material as other folk, and unquestionably have "fee of clay." At
Spring Ridge, the other night, I was
intensely amused by the assumption
of Mr. Gleason, that only those who
supported Mr. Morley could hope for
salvation. In a conflict between the
world, the Mesh and the devil, the latter would undoubtedly secure all who
are not on the Morley ticket!
Then it was quite interesting to
hear how skilfully Mr. Fullerton demonstrated, to his own satisfaction,
that the condition of civic affairs was
not due to the incompetency of the
late administration, but to the incapacity or or obstinacy of those gentlemen who were behind the Progressive Ticket.
How trivial all these ridiculous assumptions' sounded, to say nothing of
Mr. Fullerton's appeal to class prejudice. Personally, I believe that both
he and Mr. Gleason are estimable
men, in every respect deserving the
good opinion of the community, but
absolutely unfitted, by reason of their
prejudices and limited business capacity, to take part in administering the
affairs of an important city.
My old friend, Phil Smith, has fallen on evil times, lie has my sympathy, because he has ben trying to pull
the chestnuts out of the fire for other
people and has got his fingers burned
in the process. Phil is an excellent
printer and bookbinder, but he made
a mistake when he undertook to be
his own editor. He is too hot-headed
to write without the most careful
censorship. Mr. Morley, in whose interest the People's Progress was published, disclaimed responsibility, but
did not repudiate the malicious and
atrocious slanders" which it contained.
I am writing this letter before the result of the election is known, but I do
not hesitate to say that any man who
could allow such a publication to bc
used in his support without repudiating it, is unfit to* be entrusted with
any public position, and should spend
the balance of his days in a lunatic
asylum. Nothing but a streak of insanity could account for the paragraph which declares that the Progressive Ticket was supported by
"rum and prostitution." When the
matter to which I referred in my last
letter has been fully investigated, it
will be found that the parties responsible for such a statement were
the last who should havc made it.
Several subscribers to The Week
havc asked me to say something
about thc crowded condition of thc
Esquimalt cars at certain hours of thc
day.    I   have   made   enquiries,   and
Cfri
ir**-*^,
found that this occurs only at the time I want to add my quota to the gen-
when workmen are returning home, erally expressed opinion that the pro-
and there is no doubt that at such gramme at thc New Grand this week
times the small cars now running is the very best on record. Two turns,
on the Esquimalt route arc a great that of the Eddy family on thc wire,
disadvantage. The same difficulty, and Horton and La Triska in the doll
however, occurs on those which ply act, which might bc more appropriate-
between the city and Willows, and ly be termed La Poupee, are good
also to a lesser extent to Oak Bay. enough for the Tivoli, and no higher
Passengers should be reasonable and praise could bc given,
should remember that short of running special cars for workmen, there
is no means of avoiding a crush at
such times. Trailers might be run,
but there is a lack of power, and until this is remedied, an inovation of
that kind could not be introduced. 1
hear that in the near future larger 0„ „„. .,,.,.. ,,f ,
cars will be put upon the Esquimalt
line, and probably by then thc desired
reduction in fares will have been
brought ahout.
Readers of The Week are aware
that I have been most persistent in
pointing out defects and inconveniences of thc city streets and sidewalks.
1 am pleased* to know that many of
these have been remedied. The construction of cement sidewalks is rapidly doing away with the stubbing of
toes by projecting nails, but I want
to enter a plea for some of thc outlying portions of thc city which havc
not hitherto received attention. In
Victoria West and Spring Ridge the
sidewalks arc disgraceful
The Cold Gray Dawn.
bed sat a rounder
one morn—
Ach Looey, ach Looey, ach Looey.
His head was athrob, he was feeling
forlorn—
Ach Looey, ach Looey, ach Looey.
Said I  to him: "Chappie, what was
it you tried?
Did ynu go against lobsters or oysters well fried?"
With a shake of his poor aching head
he  replied:
"Chop   sooey,   chop   sooey,   chop
sooey!"
The
Inspired Reports,
outside public should take
more stock in the Vancouver reports
Planks are of the assault upon white men by
broken, in many places there are gaps Japs, if the adjectives used in dc-
in the sidewalk, and the projection of scribing thc affair were of a less
nails is prevalent. I quite agree with sanguinary, not to say gory, charac-
thc criticism of a speaker at the ter, and if thc same despatch did not
Spring Ridge meeting, who declared start out by announcing that British
that however much wc might want to Columbia is to receive a fresh inva-
sec Victoria realize thc ideal of a sion of Japanese from Honolulu,
beautiful city, it is a great error of Cause and effect are too intimately
judgment to spend thousands of dol- associated in this despatch for the
lars on boulevards until we have de- veriest tyro to overlook the connec-
ccnt strcts and sidewalks. tion. 8
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 1908.
-MA ____M ^M *M __li(_i__)__il__l__l___UMitHl_Ll_W
TT'_PTl'ri*v'V,»r,»w**,*,,F'T,*r
* Social and        *
$ Personal. J
On Tuesday afternoon, at St. Paul's,
Esquimalt, the marriage of Mr. Geo.
Gordon Bushby and Miss Violet Carlotta Brae was solemnized by the Rev.
H. St. John Payne.
The bride was beautifully gowned
in a rich cream satin, with long train,
trimmed with Limerick lace, held in
place with orange blossoms and knots
of ribbon. The simple surplice bodice
had a berthe of Limerick and a tucked
chiffon yoke. She wore a tulle veil
and coronet of orange blossoms, and
and carried a shower bouquet of bride
roses ancl lilies of thc valley; her only
ornaments were a very handsome
pearl bracelet, the gift of the groom,
and a pendant of pearls and tendot,
the gift of Dr. and Mrs. J. D. Helmcken.
Miss Elsie Bullen acted as maid of
honor, and wore a very becoming
Princess robe of turquoise blue satin,
with a panel of Duchess lace; her hat
was of the same lace, with knots of
blue velvet, white ostrich plume, and
pale pink roses. The Misses Helmcken
and McTavish were bridesmaids, and
wore very dainty frocks of white mull,
trimmed with Valenciennes and pink
Empire sashes, hats of white chiffon
with pink Bankshire roses, and carried shower bouquets of pale pink
carnations.
Mr. H. Bullen supported thc
groom, while Mr. D. Bullen acted as
usher.
Mrs. Brae, the mother of the bride,
wore a handsome gown of grey crept
cloth, trimmed with Irish crochet hice,
and a toque of velvet with white aigrette and ostrich plumes of pale
mauve.
Mrs. W. L. Bullen, sister of the
groom, \v;is becomingly attired in
periwinkle blue crepe de chene, the
bodice trimmed with white lace, a
smart Gainsborough hat of black satin
with sequin crown, cream osprey and
pale pink crush roses.
The bride's going-away dress was
of grey chiffon cloth, with grey picture hat and white fox furs. After
the ceremony an informal reception
was held at the residence of the
bride's mother, on Dunsmuir Road.
*   *   *
Among the many hostesses during
the week was Mrs. Tatlow, Rockland
Avenue, who entertained her many
fi lends at tea on Wednesday afternoon. The refreshment table looked
extremely pretty, daffodils, asparagus fern, and quaint little candlesticks with pale yellow shades to
match, were the simple but effective
dec orations. Mrs. Tatlow was assisted by Miss Mabel Tatlow in receiving the numerous guests. Among
those present were: Mrs. Cornwall,
Mrs. McBride, Mrs. Mister Robertson, Mrs. B. Tye, Mrs. 0. Grahame,
Mrs. J. Irving, Mrs. B. Heisterman,
Mrs. H. Heisterman, Mrs. Hannington, Mrs. G. Courtney, Mrs. Harold
Robertson, Mrs. Page, Mrs. McCallum, Mrs. R. Dunsmuir, Mrs. J. Harvey, Mrs. McKay, Mrs. C. E. Pooley,
Mrs. Butchart, Mrs. Eliot, Mrs. R. H.
Pooley, Mrs. Holland, Mrs. Nelson,
Mrs. H. Tye, Mrs. Wolfenden, Mrs.
Rocke Robertson, Mrs. Hollyer, Mrs.
Walker. Mrs. A. Gillespie, Mrs. Bodwell, Mrs. L. Pemberton, Mrs. H.
Heisterman, Mrs. Perrin, Mrs. Shallcross, Mrs. Fleet, Mrs. McKenzie,
Mrs. Shaw, Mrs. Lugrin, Mrs. B.
Wilson, Mrs. Rums, Mrs. Higgins,
Mrs. Burton, Mrs. King, Mrs. W. S.
Gore, Mrs. L. S. Gore, Mrs. Brown,
Mrs. II. Barnard M.rs. Tilton, Mrs.
Ker, Mrs. A. Crease, Mrs. A. Bridgman, Mrs. Jones. Mrs. J. Pemberton,
Mrs. Troup, Mrs. Arthur Robertson,
Mrs. Rome, Mrs. Blacklock, the
Misses Jessie Bell, Angus, Pooley,
Tilton, Brown, Hannington, King,
Drake. Gillespie, Filzgibbons, Dupont,
Lawson, Gaudin, Phipps, McKay,
Helmcken, P. Irving, Crease, Foster,
Monteith. Butchart, Page, Perry,
Pitts, Peters, Williams, B. and G.
Irving. Bowron, E. and J. Lawson, P.
Drake, P. Mason, Newcombe, Tuck,
Heyland, Mrs. Laing, Mrs. Worsfold,
Mrs. Angus. Mrs. Church, Mrs. J.
Helmcken, Mrs. Ambery, Mrs. Presley, Mrs. Scholefield, Mrs. J. H. Gillespie, Mrs. Spicer Sinison, Mrs.
Herscll, Mrs. Heyland, Mrs. Grant,
Mrs.   Stuart    Robertson,    Mrs.   Tait
Robertson, Mrs. Hobson.
* *   *
Mrs. Gardttlo and child left on Wednesday  for  Southern   California.
Mr. Rrae, of Vancouver, came over
for his sister's wedding, which took
place last Tuesday.
* *   *
Mrs. Stewart, of Vancouver, is the
guest of Mrs. McBride.
* *   *
Mr. H. L. Wright, Work Point Barracks, left by Wednesday's boat for
Vancouver, en route to England.
* *   *
Mrs. Wolley, of Pier Island, was
registered at thc Balmoral during the
week.
Westward Ho!
Father Caine wrote the following
letter to the Editor of Westward Ho!
As it will be several weeks before
the next issue of that magazine appears, and the publishers are anxious
to remove any wrong impression
which may have been created by the
publication of the story referred to,
The Week has been asked to print
Father Caine's letter and the reply of
Miss McColl. In doing so, they also
wish to assure Father Caine and the
members of the Roman Catholic
Church that in publishing Miss Mc-
Coll's story they had not the slightest intention to reflect upon the Sacraments of that Church, or to allow
anything to appear in their pages
which could give offence to any person. They hope that Father Cair.e
will accept Miss McColl's explanation, together with this assurance.--
(Editor Week).
The  Knights  of  Columbus  and the
Stage Irishman.
Archbishop's House,
Victoria, B.C., Jan. n, 1908.
The Editor Westward Ho!
Dear Sir,—A copy of your Christmas number has been forwarded to
our Catholic paper, Thc Orphan
Friend.
Permit me to congratulate you on
a very bright magazine. Considering
the general merits of Westward Ho!,
I regretfully bring under your notice
one article contained in the Christmas
number and entitled, "Thc Moriarty
Twins' Christening,"
The article was discussed at the last
meting of Victoria Council, Knights
of Columbus, and I havc been deputed
by the said Council to enter our
strong and emphatic protest against
thc publication of such an article.
Of course,'we are not concerned
with the intentions of your contributor nor with the class of readers said
writer may be accustomed to cater
for. We are protesting as members
of a Catholic organization, and are
judging the article from our standpoint, and on thc "written" merits
of the article,
We protest against it for two reasons. It is a gross caricature of the
Irish and a gratuitous insult to Catholics, in the ignorant and painful portrayal of thc Sacrament of Baptism
as it obtains in our Church.
Regarding the "Irish" put on the
lips of the speakers, in this, to us,
pointless story, we would respectfully remind penny-a-liners who attempt to write "Irish dialect," that
such abominations as "phat" (see said
article) and "yez" (meaning you, we
presume), "foive," "belave," etc., are
never uttered by a real Irishman.
In this connection, it may be pointed out that not only in songs, but in
many stories and other writing of the
"Handy Andy" type and purporting to
be Irish, the phraseology is anything
but Irish. The "stuff" thus styled
Irish is of undoubted English origin—
topography, phraseology, rhymes, and
everything else, being un-Irish.
The internal evidence alone convicts their authors. The Irishman
never, for instance, mispronounces the
sound of ie (as the priest in article
says belave). Xo Irishman ever says
"wake" for week. English words
spelled with two e's, such as week,
cheek, seek, etc., are always pronounced correctly by an Irish peasant,
lt is a proper presentation of Irish
brogue to say "wake" for weak, "tay"
for tea, and "mate" for meat—the ea.
Should an Irishman use these, he is
simply conforming to the old and correct English pronunciation, as may
be seen by consulting the older English poets, who always rhymed sea
with day, etc. To this hour thc original sound is preserved ,by English
people in great and break. A proper
presentation of Irish brogue is a difficult matter, for most Irish dialect
writers to understand, but they should
master the rules of Irish brogue before atempting to write it. The written brogue is oftentimes as ignorant
as the attempts of non-Irishmen to
speak it.
The gratuitous insult to the Church
in caricaturing the Sacrament of Baptism is more painful to us. Whoever
heard of an Irish priest speaking the
horrid jargon your article puts on the
lips of the "priest"? We have lived
with the Irish priests not only in the
British Isles and America, but in
France, Italy, Africa and Australia,
and have yet to met the type portrayed in your "Father Gorman."
A priest does not baptize a child
with the words, "I christen," etc., nor
does he 'dip his finger in the christening bowl" (we have no such bowl 111
our Church), nor does he hold the
baby, etc. When conferring baptism,
the god-mother holds the child; the
priest pours the water on the head
of the child, at the same time saying,
"I baptize thee in the name of the
Father, and of the Son, and of the
Lloly Ghost"—information for your
contributor.
Surely, Mr. Editor, there are enough
ex-professo pens maligning the
Church—it was scarcely necessary to
place your non-sectarian scythe into
their "fair pasture-field." But my letter is getting too long.
The "stage Irishman"—or caricature of him, whether on stage, in
drawing-room, or by "penny-a-liners"
—is being killed by all cultured English-speaking people, ancl we regret
to see such a sorry specimen permitted an existence in your magazine, as
"The Moriarty Twins' Chritsening"—
compared to the other articles it is.
to us, as a 'cancerous carbuncle on a
fair face."
With regard to this, and any belittling of our Holy Faith, we, as
Knights of Columbus, demand that
amount of fairness given to others—
and emphatically and firmly enter bur
strong protest against the ridicule
aimed at our Church in the article.
Expunged of such painful, so-called
stories as the "Moriarty Twins' Christening," we sincerely wish Westward
Ho' every success, and this for two
reasons—it is a bright, readable magazine, and it is Canadian.
On behalf of Victoria Council,
Knights of Columbus, I am, dear Sir,
Your faithfully,
CLEMENT CAINE,
Chaplain, K. of C.
W.   Blakemore,   Esq.,
Editor-in-Chief.
Port Moody, Jan. 14, 1908.
To the Editor of Westward Ho!
I am sorry to find that my story,
"The Moriarty Twins' Christening,"
has given offence to some of your
readers, when absolutely none was
meant, and cannot see how a purely
humourous piece of lietion can bc
taken seriously, by anyone, in any
such connection. That it is not even
a true representation of the christening service of any church, should
place it beyond criticism on that score.
It was simply intended as a laugh-
maker, and purported to have no
other object. Certainly no insult was
intended to the Catholic Church.
As to the use of dialect—that is a
privilege accorded authors from time
immemorial. Whether it is the 'genuine article" or "brogue" does not
enter into the question.
I may say that the language used
in the story was studied and taken
from that of Irishmen I have known
—who had no need to be ashamed of
their speech.
So that any offence taken upon
these grounds is without foundation.
Yours very truly,
IRENE M. MacCOLL.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Buffling-
ton Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation Gentleman, intends to apply for
a special timber licence over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted twenty
chains north of the northeast corner of
section 12, thence forty chains north,
one hundred and twenty chains west,
forty chains south and one hundred and
twenty chains east to point of commeneement.
Dated  21st December,  1907.
FRANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
Jan  18 R.  W.  Wilkinson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Bufflngton
Vrooman of Vietoria, B.C., occupation
Gentleman, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of section 21, thence
eighty chains east, eighty chains south,
eighty chains west and eighty chains
north   to point  of commencement.
Dated 21st December, 1907.
FRANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
Jan  IS R. W.  Wilkinson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Bufflngton
Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Gentleman, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described   lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of section 20, thence
eighty chains west, eighty chains south,
eighty chains east and eighty chains
north  to place of commencement.
Dated 21st December,  1907.
FRANK BUFFINGTON  VROOMAN,
Jan  IS R. W. Wilkinson.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District  of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Oresby
Woakes of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Civil Engineer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land—on Porcher Island:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 1292, about 2
miles distant and in a southeasterly direction from Jap Bay; thence north 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thenee
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing
160  acres,  more  or  less.
Dated Dec. 20th, 1907.
Jan 18 ARTHUR WOAKES.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District  of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that W. N. Campbell
of Victoria, occupation Civil Engineer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase  the  following described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of. lot 1294, (J.R.
Cody) one mile west of Jap Inlet, Porcher Island, thence north 40 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east 40 chains, containing  160 acres.
Dated Dec. 16th, 1907.
W. N.  CAMPBELL,
Jan IS J. J. Templeton, Agent.
SKEENA   LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that J. J. Templeton
of Victoria, occupation surveyor, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at tho
southwest enrner of lot 1293, M. S.
McLeod, one-half mile west of Jap Inlet Porcher Island, thence south 20
chains; thence west SO chains; thence
north 20 chains; thence east SO chains
to point of commencement and containing  160 acres,  more or less.
Dated December ICth,  1907.
Jan.  18 J. J. TEMPLETON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 1—Commencing at a post
planted 80 chains west of southwest
corner of Timber Limit No. 3193, thence
north SO chains; thence east SO chains;
thence south SO chains; thence west SO
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th Dec, 1907.
THOMAS  Ml LER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan 18
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation, Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 2—Commencing at a post
planted 80 chains west of southwest corner of Timber Limit No. 13193; thence
north SO chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan  18
Counsel (for the defence)—"And
remember, gentlemen of the jury, that
the accused lived with his mother-in-
law ten whole years before he murdered her."
Instant acquittal.
A Pointed Answer.
Rude Husband—My dear, your nose
gets sharper every day.
Angry Wife—No wonder, the way
you keep it down to the grindstone.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District nf Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruiser, intends to apply fnr a special
timber licence over the following described  lands:
Claim No. 3—Commencing at a post
planted SO chains west of southwest corner of Timber Limit No. 13193; thence
east 160 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence west 60 chains; thence nortli 40
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
planted 40 chains west and 10 cl
south of the southwest corner of
ber limit No. 18546, thence wes
chains; thence north 40 chains; tl
west 80 chains; thence south aboi
chains; thence easterly along shore
chains; thence north about 60 chaii
point of commencement.
Located 9th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIR1
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan. IS
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that William Cr..
of Aldermere,  B.C.,  occupation Far
intends to apply for permission to
chase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at
southwest corner; thence north 20 ch
to McClure Lake; thence along McC
Lake In an east southerly dlrectloi
chains, more or less; thence wesl
chains to place of beginning and r
ing 40 acres more or less, and kn
as the southwest fractional quarter
tlon of 36,  township 5, Range 5.
Dated November 20, 1907.
Jan. IS WILLIAM CROTEA
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Jennie Croi
of Aldermere, B.C., occupation ho
wife, intends to apply for permlssioi
purchase  the following described  1<
Commencing at a post planted at
southwest corner; thence north 40 c
thence east 40 chains; thence south
chains; thence west 40 chains to p
of beginning and known as the no
west quarter section of 30, Tp. 6, I
5, and containing 160 acres, more
less.
Dated  23rd of November,  1907.
Jan. 18 WILLIAM CROTEAI
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird ancl
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 5—Commencing at a post
planted 40 chains west of the northwest eorner of Tlmher Limit No. 18544,
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains; thence
west 40 chains to point of commencement.
Located  Sth December,  1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan IS
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, Intends to apply for a special
tlmher   licence  over  the   following  described  lands:
Claim  No.  6—Commencing at a post
WEEK JANUARY 20TH
The New Granc
SULLIVAN a CONSIDINE,    Proprietor.
Management ot ROBT. JAMIESON.
KELLER'S VIRGINIA BELLE
SEVEN—GIRLS-SEVEN
Singing and Dancing Act.
ZINELLE AND BOUTELLE
Comedy  Operatic  Duo.
PAUL STEVENS
Novelty Wire and Pole Artist.
THOS. MARIE
GLENROY  &  RUSSELL
High  Class  Comedy.
"At Casey's Reception."
JOE MAY
BYRON & BLANCHE
Comedy  Playlet
Matrimonial Sweets in Family Jars
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrator
"The Heart You Lost in Maryland
You'll Find in Tennessee."
NEW MOVING PICTURES
"For Peace or War."
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M. Nagel, Director.
EQUIP YOURSELF
WITH A THOROUGH
BUSINESS COURSE
SHORTHAND
TYPEWRITING
BOOKKEEPING
Day and Night Classes. You oan
enter school any time. Individual
instruction. A diploma from this
school will enable you to secure and
hold a position with the best firms.
Terms reasonable.
For particulars write or call
THE  SHORTHAND  SCHOOL
1109 Broad Street Victoria, B.C.
E. A. MacMllIan.
LADIES        SWEDISH        GENTS
MASSAGE
Turkish Baths
VIBRATOR   TREATMENT
MB.     BJOBNPELT,     SWEDISH
MASSEUB.
Special   Massage and Hometreat-
ment by appointments.
Room 2, Vernon Blk., Douglas St.
Body Development.
Hours 1 to 6. Phone 1629.
Herbert
Witherspoon
(BASSO)
MONDAY,   JANUABY  27TH
PBICES: 92.50, 93.00 and 91-00.
Gallery, 6O0.
The Box Ofllce will be opened at the
Victoria Theatre at 10 a.m. on Friday,
January 24th. r
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANMARY 18, 1908.
rifle my brother brought from India agely, strode from a mud-walled
is not much good for stopping ele- house, his big black fists clenched at
phants, oh master!" his sides.
Belton dismissed him sharply and "Speak out, man!" thundered Da-
turned to me. "This fellow Musoora cey. "What has happened? Who
and his elephant were employed on drove these women from their huts?"
the estate until quite recently. He The kangani pointed to the jungle
is a bad lot, and his animal is no reserves, where several'lanterns flard
better. Like most Tamils, he goes as though a host of coolies were beat-
amok when the taste of whisky is in ing the scrub in quest of a hidden
his mouth.    He has been convicted foe.
three times for driving his beast over     "The elephant, oh master!   It has
cultivated land.   One night, about two taken my little son."
I5 ^l..^.       :?n..t  "g !!.e years ago, he brought a couple of     T kangani's head drooped slightly;
full-grown bull-tuskers up to an over- his breath came in sharp expulsions,
seer's bungalow and drove them at it "My wife came to me a minute ago
Short Story *
1 Elephant Comedy.
By ALBERT DORRINGTON.
Ve   followed   the   baggage-coolie
row mountain-road where the
se-planted para-trees clung tenacity to  the  storm-washed  slopes. under the°goad until they wrecked it crying that the elephant had lifted
fore and aft. If he visits the estate thc babe from beside her. It was
again," continued Dacey, "I'll send the dark, the fires were out, and we
police after him and destroy his ele- could not see the black beast as it
phant." walked back to the forest.    A curse
During the night I was awakened on the marauder that enters the huts
by the mournful barking of an elk to steal our children!"
as it wandered over the mountain-     "You have not been drinking?" The
side.    Later,  my  small  fox terrier, superintendent eyed him frostily, his
r business lay with one of the su
rintendents of the large rubber
mtations at Newara, about fifty
les from Colombo.
I had left the crowded pilgrim-train
the siding, where the engine was
ill visible as it crawled round the
ittle-shaped  summit  towards  Kan-
|tornado had passed during the night.
Dacey turned to me almost apologetically.   "We've been pestered by a
1. The superintendent's bungalow which a,ways accompanies mCi scam. erect figure and flaming eyes. "Have
/crlooked the plantation and the pered up and down ^ bungalow ver. you been smoking opium?"
>mpany s vast jungle reserves-a anda as though in pursuit of geyeral The kangani shrugged his shouiders
ensely wooded tract of country ex- ^ Approaching the window> l per. and indicated the crowd of women
Hiding for several miles through ceiyed a Sf_o._ of black.£aced monkeys huddled together outside the lines,
alleys and roaring torrents. The peering down at the dog from the „Ask these peoplei oh master, u .g
oohe lines were in the valley below, trellis.work overhead; they chattered the sick man and the cripple who take
mere cluster of mud huts thatched and grimaced maiiciously as it leaped afim."
nth straw, and infested with yellow and tHed tQ gain the veranda rail The women now gathered around
Iariah dogs and squalling Tamil chil-     „They  come  {rom  the  {orest   at the   euperintendent,   and   each   ex-
ren' night," explained my bedroom coolie, plained and   dilated upon   the ele-
I was met at the bungalow gate by entering hastily. "They pick up scraps phant's iniquitous act. It had tramp-
ielton Dacey, the superintendent, and 0f bread and fruit, and they will not led into their lines without warning;
fter the usual hospitable formalities go away unless we reach them with a it had trodden on two pariah dogs
'as conducted   over the    estate to whip or shoot one of the mothers."     that obstructed its entrance.  Without
vhere a gang of labourers was  at     1 was not in favour of shooting one warning or noise it had lifted the kan-
rork clearing and burning off a patch 0f the mothers,  especially the  one gani's babe from the mat, and had
if heavily timbered land. that sat on the trellis-edge with the vanished in the darkness.   They were
While  passing  a  thirty-acre   field bald-faced, shiny-eyed   baby   in her sorry their headman had lost his little
_f newly planted trees we came upon arms, son.   The elephant would carry it to
group   of young  para-plants   up-     "But the sinna dorai must not en- the river and drown it for certain,
footed and tossed aside as though a courage them," whispered the coolie,     The    superintendent's    face   grew
"or they will come again and break dark and perplexed as he listened to
the windows." the chatter of the Tamil women. He
About midnight we were awakened had worked in Southern India for
irogue elephant the last week or so. I by a terrific din from the coolie lines, several years, asd he knew the ways
Idon't know why the brute chooses our it seemed as though an army of wo- of drunken mahouts and trained ele-
Iplantation night after night, while men and children were wailing and phants too well to discredit certain
■ others in the district remain untouch- calling to each other from different parts of the story,
led." parts of the estate.   Above all was     We examined the kangani's house
Lower down the valley, where the heard the insistent throbbing of a and the broken threshold where the
Icompany had put in several thousand death tom-tom. huge beast had crushed and torn away
Jcocoa-nut trees, there was further evi- Passing round the veranda, I met the woodwork while effecting an en-
I dence of the rogue's trunk and foot Dacey on the steps, his face whiter trance. In a far corner of the room
Iwork. Many of the young palms had than usual. "Some devil's work going lay a young Tamil woman, her small
Ibeen twisted and wrenched to the on below," he said bitterly. "At day- brown fingers dug into the earthen
Jground and their top stems scattered break they will come up here, six hun- floor. Her face and shoulders were
[broadcast. The brute's footmarks dred strong, and ask me to remove half-concealed by a scarlet sarong,
j were plainly visible in the soft sandy their lines to a more suitable site. A "She allows an elephant to steal my
I soil. man or a woman falls sick suddenly little son."   The kangani spoke behind
Following the spoor leisurely, we and they believe that the devil is in us, and his voice was full of bitterness
halted in a hollow half-concealed by their huts. No amount of argument and suppressed wrath. "She is no
a clump of silver oaks, and examined will convince them that dirt is the longer wife of mine. Tomorrow I
' them more closely. A man's foot- only visible devil. The lines have to will thrash her before her people. The
prints joined the elephant's just here, be shifted and rebuilt on another site tom-toms shall follow her from the
then followed them for a short dis- —at the company's cost of course," lines."
tance,    and   disappeared   altogether, he added bitterly. "You will quit my service, then,"
Sixteen years spent in Australia. Dacey rarely interfered with the do- answered the superintendent coldly,
among the black police and aborigines mestic troubles of his seven or eight "There will be no thrashing either,
had taught me something of the art hundred Tamils unless murder or vio- kangani."
of tracking.   The   dish-shaped   ele- lence justified his presence in the lines     The kangani lowered his head. "The
phant-spoor grew faint and was lost, The kangani or headman settled all dorai  knows I loved my little  son.
as far as Dacey was concerned, the  disputes, and in the majority of cases This beast of Musoora has stolen my
moment we crossed the first gravel he ruled justly and with a rod of iron, life."
ridge. The shouting continued below until     The   superintendent  had given  an
"What do you make of it?" he ask- the valley echoed with the screaming order to a coolie some time before,
cd, halting suddenly. and  wailing  of Tamil  children  and and he now appeared carrying a heavy
"Seems to me as though the brute women huddled together in groups Mannlicher rifle on his shoulder. Da-
had been brought here by its native near the factory door. cey took it and walked from the lines
keeper," I answered. "The man's Dacey shrugged his shoulders and past the sprawling Tamil women and
footprints  disappear  near the  clump beckoned to me.   "Come and see the gaping men.
of silver oaks, which seems to indi- fun; come and see the big black kan- A crowd of boys surrounded us as
cate that he rode the animal here, ganis thrashing a mob of stampeding we moved towards the jungled slopes
and waited until it had trampled and coolies. Tomorrow, if my luck is near the eastern corner of the planta-
uprooted things to his satisfaction, out," he went on slowly, "there won't tion. Dacey turned sharply and
I might go further and say that the be a single Tamil labourer on the snapped out a word to them. In an
unwieldy  creature  was    thrashed or estate." instant they  vanished back towards
goaded into doing the mischief." "Where will they go?"
The superintendent grew thought- "Anywhere. They'll disband and
ful for a moment; then his eyes glit- seek employment on other planta-
tered strangely, as though a sudden tions."
thought  had  fired  his  imagination.     "But your coolies are bound over to down-dripping    moisture    fell
Returning to the bungalow, he sum-  serve the estate for a certain period,  heavy rain upon our garments.
You can always
tell an M. B. cigar
- _      ,g-^   It tastes different
jy\9    r*jt     than others.
Cigar
Made by S. A. Bantly, Victoria, B. C.
Union Made.
Havana Filler
Two Sizes.
Sold Everywhere.
To Our Friends and Patrons;
We publish herewith Customs Statistics showing the
importations of Champagnes for the year 1907, and beg to
call your attention to the figures attained by G. H. MUMM
& CO.'S CHAMPAGNE, being 113,444 cases, or nearly
one-third of the total, which is striking evidence of its
continued great popularity:
G. H. MUMM & CO H3444
Moet & Chandon   78,841
Pommcry & Greno   47,293
Vve. Clicquot  40,147
Krug & Co  16,549
Louis Roederer    12,834
Ruinart Pere & Sons      9,365
Monopole    8,489
Pol Roger & Co     7,159
Due de Montebello     5,829
Various brands   40,383
Grand Total    380,333
Compiled from Custom House Records by S. Y. Allaire.
G. H. MUMM & CO.'S Champagne is universally recommended by all leading physicians because it is not made
dry by the addition of alcohol...No other Champagne in
the world can show such strong proof of its superlative
quality and popular appreciation.
PITHER   &   LEISER
Wholesale Distributors.
the huts.
Faint streaks of dawn appeared in
the distant sky. Banks of white mists
surged over the deep valley, and thc
like
Far
moned the head kangani hurriedly. A You  can  compel the  bolters  to re- away came thc ugly yelp of a jackal,
few  moments later  a grizzled giant turn." and  the  pariahs   in  the  coolie lines
of a man with black Tamil eyes and "Yes, if other planters were honest answered in dismal chorus,
skin stood salaaming in the doorway, and advised me of their whereabouts. "An Australian black tracker would
"You did not tell me, kangani, that But the other planters are always in have picked up the spoor long ago," I
it is  Musoora who drives his beast want of a few extra coolies, and the began  apologetically as the superin-
across our fields at night.   Have you bolters are sheltered and set to work tendent fretted in my wake, wolfing
quarrelled with the man?   He has no with the others." the end of his Burma cheroot,
grievance against the company," said Following the superintendent down "Go on," he said huskily.   "Musoora
the superintendent sternly. thc steep, boulder-strewn path, we ar-
"I know    nothing    of the matter, rived  outside   the   lines,   where  two
. dorai,"  answered the kangani softly, hundred Tamil girls and women lay
"Musoora is a drunkard and a bad crouching in   the tall    lemon-grass, child-stealing beast I'll sec whether
man.   I know not why he comes here spreading out their hands in the di- his   constitution   is   adaptable   to   a
with his animal.   I have dug pits, but rection of the forest reserves. nice clean jail."
the beast passes them by.   The pea- The kangani, his eyes glinting sav- (Continued on Page Twelve)
has a hut on our boundary, also three
wives, six children, and a rogue elephant.    After   I've   disposed  of  his
Big
Reduction
in Clothing
TO-DAY
at
Fit=Reform
Wardrobe
Victoria.
1
;
*
New House to Rent, or
For Sale.
I have for immediate possession to
rent or will sell on very easy terms
—small cash payment—one of the
best built dwellings in the city. Only
15 minutes' walk from Post Office,
and one block from car line. Situated in one of the best residential
sections.
Bungalow, with large balcony,
seven-roomed house, absolutely new,
with full sized cement basement, concrete floor; electric light in every
room in the house. Hot and cold
water equipment; heavy porcelain
wash bowl and bath, also separate
toilet in basement. Laundry in the
basement equipped with latest concrete tubs and hot and cold water.
Walk has been laid in extra heavy
concrete from street to verandah
steps. This is a proposition that will
be snapped up quickly. Call or
phone 1543.
G. W. DEAN
Adelphi Block   -   VICTORIA, B.C.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that William Rose, ot
Ingersol, Ont., Merchant, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following descrlhed land:
Commencing at a post planted ahout
two miles south of Refuge Bay, on the
west coast of Porcher Island and at the
northwest corner of lot 12S2, Cassiar
district; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 20 chains; thence wost 80 chains;
thence south following coast line to
point of commencement, containing 100
acres.
WILLIAM  ROSS.
Jan 11. A. O. Noalce, Agent.
Most
Particular
Smokers
Experience little or no difficulty
in finding a cigar or blend of
smoking mixture that fits their
taste.
Our Manila or Havana
Cigars can't be beaten.
We carry a most complete line of smokers'
sundries.
The Army
and Navy
(ligar Store.
Richardson
Phone 345
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that Francis Joseph
Alma Green, of Quatsino, B. C, occupation Prospector, intends to apply for
a special tlmher licence over the following descrlhed lands:
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
and Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C., timber dealers, Intend to apply for the
right to purchase the following de-
.,.,., scribed lands in Kildalla Bay, Rivers
Commencing at a post planted at tbe Inlet:—Commencing at a post planted
northwest corner of Lot 192, at the 0n the east side of the bay, about one-
Narrows, Quatsino Sound, thenee east third of a ml'e from the point at the
ahout 35 chains to northeast corner of mouth of the bay, being the southwest
Lot 192; thence north about 120 chains corner post; thence east 20 chains'
to the southern boundary of the Indian thence north 20 chains; thence wost 20
reserve; thenee west to the shore of chains to beach; thenco south along
Narrows; thence south along the shore beach to point of commencement; con-
to point of commencement; 6*10 acres, taining 40 acres, more or less,
more or less. Staked November 26th, 1907.
•Ian 11 GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL.
FRANCIS JOSEPH ALMA GREEN.     I Jan. 11 George Young, Agent 10
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 1908
NEW     WESTMINSTER     LAND     DISTRICT.
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Roman Z. Chandler, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
timber broker, intends to apply for a
special timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
at northwest corner of T. L. 18187;
thence east 80 chains along the north
line of T. L. 18187; thence north 80
chains along the west line of T. L.
12502; thence east 80 chains along the
north line of T. L. 12502; thence north
80 chains along the west line of T. L.
12503; thence in a southwesterly course
along the line of the Capilano Water Reserve to place of commencement, and
containing 640 acres of land, more or
less.
December 23, 1907.
Jan 11. ROMAN Z. CHANDLER.
NOTICE is hereby given that I, George
French, prospector, of Skidegate, B.C.,
intend to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over 640
acres, bounded as follows:—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast
corner of Section 21, Township 4, Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Group;
thence running 80 chains north; thence
80 chains east; thence 80 chains south
to shore line; thence following shore
line to point of commencement, eontalnlng 6*10 acres.
Located   December   12th.   1907.
GEORGE FRENCH,  Locator.
Jan. 4 John Simister, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that I, Benjamin Kromp, of Skidegate, B. C,
rancher, intend to apply for a licence
to prospect for coal and vetroleum over
610 acres of land bounded as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted near the
beach at the southeast corner of Section 20, Township 4, Graham Island,
Queen Charlotte Group; thence 80 chains
north; thence 80 chains east; thence 80
chains south and over and under water;
thence 80 chains west over and under
water to point of commencement; con
taining 010 acres, more or less.
Located  November  30th,   1907.
BENJAMIN KROMP, Locator.
Jan. 4 John Simister, Agent.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 61, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. W. C; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains, more or less to River; thence
southerly 80 ehains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more
or less
Staked December 7.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
Intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank of Kimsquit River, about 4
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 61, and marked T. H. Taylor's S. W. C; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to p*- nt
of commencement, containing 640 ■_. is,
more or less.
Staked December 9.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. Cor. of B. C. Dev. Co.'s Lot 50 and
marked the N. E. Cor.; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains, more or less, to south
boundary of lot 50; thence east 80
chains along said boundary to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Staked December 6.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
Intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
40 chains east of the N. E. Cor. of B.
C. Dev. Co.'s Lot 50, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. W. Cor.; thence east 40
chains; therice north 160 chains; thence
40 chains to bank of Salmon River;
thence south 160 chains to point of eommeneement, containing 640 acres.
Staked December 6.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast. Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
Intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank of Salmon River, about 2
miles north of the N. E. C. of Lot 60
and marked T. H. Taylor's S. W. C;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains, more or
less, to bank of river; thence southerly
80 chains along bank of river to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Staked December 6.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
Intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Salmon River, about 6
miles north of the N. E. C. of Lot 50
and marked T. H. Taylor's S. E. C.|
thence west 40 chains; thence north 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 40 chains; thonce east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence east 40
chains, moro or less, to River; thence
southerly along river 160 chains to point
of commencement.
Staked  December  7.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3,
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank of Kimsquit River, about 2
mlles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. W. C; thenee east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to bank of river; thence south 80
chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Staked  December   9.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
T'VKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
Intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank of Kimsqult River, about 3
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
Intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Kimsqult River, about 1%
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. E. C.J thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Staked December 10.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Kimsqult River, about 2*1*2
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. E. C; thenee west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Staked December 10,
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains; I
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80'
chains  to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
10. Commencing at a post planted
about one mlle distant ln a northerly
direction from claim No. 9, marked S.E.
Corner, Section 19, Township 36; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
11. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile distant ln a northerly
direction from claim No. 10, marked S.E.
Corner, Section 30, Township 36; thenee
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
12. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile distant in a northerly
direction from claim No. 11, marked S.E.
corner, Section 81, Township 36; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
T. S. McPHERSON.
Dee. 28 Per Geo. H. Jaekson.
COAST LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that F. S. Buck of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation lumberman,
intends to apply for a special timber
license over the following described
lands:
1. Commencing at a post planted on
Gilford Island, 40 chains in southerly direction from the N.E. corner of surveyed Lot 626 on north shore of lake;
thence north 80 chains more or less to
the south line of T. L. 7714; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to this post,
FRED. S. BUCK.
2. Commencing at a post planted
about about 40 chains south and 80
chains east of N. E. corner of surveyed
lot 625, thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to this post.
Staked Dec. lst.
Dee. 28 FRED. S. BUCK.
NOTICE is hereby given that I, James
Alfred Owens, prospector, Skidegate, B.
C, intend to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over 640
acres of land bounded as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted northeast corner, near the beach on south
shore of Skidegate Inlet, B.C.; Graham
Island, Queen Charlotte Group, supposed to be Section 5, Township 1;
thence running 80 chains south; thence
80 chains west; thence 80 chains north
to shore line; thence following shore line
to point of commencement; containing
640 acres, more or less.
Located   November  29th,   1907.
JAMES ALFRED OWENS,
Jan. 4 Locator.
NOTICE is hereby given that I, Emily
Margaret Johnston, of Victoria, B.C., intend to apply for a licence to prospect
for coal and petroleum over 640 acres
of land bounded as follows:—Commencing at a post planted at the south-east
corner of section 33, township one (1),
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Group;
thence running 80 chains north; thence
80 chains east; thence 80 chains south;
thence 80 chains west to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Located December 6th,  1907.
EMILY MARGARET JOHNSTON,
Loeator.
Jan. 4. Christopher Johnson, Agent.
DISTRICT   OF  RUPERT.
TAKE NOTICE that I, T. S. McPherson, agent of Victoria, B.C.,  intend to
apply  for  special   timber  license  over
the following described lands:
1. Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles distant in a northwesterly
direction from the head of west arm of
Quatsino sound and marked N.E. Cor.
section 25, township 37, thence south 80
chatns; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
2. Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles and in a northwesterly
direction from the head of west arm,
Quatsino Sound, marked S.E. Cor. Section 36, Township 37, thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Staked  December Sth,  1907.
3. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile In a westerly direction
Claim No. 2, marked N.E. Cor., Section
26, Township 37; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to point
of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
4. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile in a westerly direction
from Claim No. 2, marked S. E. Cor.,
Section 35, Township 37; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Staked December Sth,  1907.
5. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile ln a northwesterly direction from claim No. 4. marked N.E.
Corner, Section 34, Township 87; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Commencing at a post planted one
mile distant in a northwesterly direction from claim No. 4, marked S. E.
Corner, Section 3, Township 36; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains  to  point  of  commeneement.
Staked December Sth, 1907.
7. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile distant and ln a northwest direction from claim No. 6, marked
S.E. corner, Section 9, Township 36;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thenee
east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 6th, 1907.
8. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile in a northwesterly direction from claim No. 7, marked S. E.
corner, section 17, township 36; thence
north 80 chains; thenee west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
9. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile distant ln a westerly
direction from claim No. 8, marked S. E.
Corner, Section 18, Township 36; thence
COAST LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range One.
TAKE NOTICE that F. S. Buck of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation lumberman,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:
No. 3. Commencing at a post planted
on Gilford Island, at the head of a lake,
and at N.E. end of said lake, and about
40 chains south and about 50 chains
east from N.E. corner of surveyed lot
626, thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 2n, 1907.
No. 4. Commencing at a post planted
on Gilford Island, about 40 chains south
and 130 chains east from N.E. corner
of surveyed lot 626, thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Staked December 3rd, 1907.
No. 5. Commencing at a post planted
on Gilford Island, about 40 chains south
and 210 chains east from N.E. eorner of
surveyed lot 625, thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 6. Commencing at a post planted
on Gilford Island, at the S.E. corner
of T.L. 15806; thence west 80 chains to
the S.W. of T. L. 15806, thenee north 40
chains; thence west 20 chains; thence
south 80 chains (more or less) to north
shore of lake; thence east along shore
of lake 100 chains; thence north 40
chains (more or less) to point of commencement.
Staked December 2nd, 1907.
Dec. 28 F. S. BUCK.
No. 34—Commencing at a post planted
10 chains east of the N.W. corner of
No. 32, being about 10 chains east of
Young's River and about three miles
north of Blanked Bluff, being the S.W.
corner; thence north 160 chains; thence
east 40 chains; thence south 160 chains;
thence west 40 chains to point of commencement.
November  24th,   1907.
No. 35—Commencing at a post planted
at the S.E. corner, opposite No. 34 post,
being about 10 chains east of Young's
River, and about three miles north of
Blanket Bluff; thence north 160 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 160
chains; thence east 40 ehains to point
of commencement.
Nov.   24th,   1907.
No. 36—Commencing at a post planted
at the S.E. corner about 10 chains east
of the N.E. corner, 34 and 45 chains
east of Young's River, being flve miles
northerly from Blanket Bluff; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains  to  point  of  commencement.
November 24th,  1907.
GEORGE YOUNG,
Dec. 28 J. W. Radly, Agent.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Superstructure of Swing Span.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
time for receiving tenders for the
Superstructure Metal for Swing Bridge,
North Arm, Fraser River, has been extended up to and including Friday, the
31st day of January, 1908.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., December 17th, 1907.
Dec. 28
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast.  Range  2.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young,
of Victoria, B.C., Timber Cruiser, in
tends to apply for special timber licences over the following described
lands:
No. 26—Commencing at a post planted
at the S.E. corner, near Clyak River,
being 6 miles N.E. from the Junction
of Young and Clyak Rivers and opposite the N.E. corner of No. 16, thence
north 100 chains; thence west 64 chains;
thence south 100 chains; thence east 64
chains   to  point  of  commeneement.
November  27th,   1907.
No. 27—Commencing at a post planted
at the S.W. corner, opposite the N. W.
Corner of N. 17, being about 5 chains
east of Clyak River and about 7 miles
N.E. from the Junction of Young and
Clyak River, thence north 100 chains;
thence east 64 chains; thence south 100
chains; thence west 64 chains to point
of commencement.
November 27th, 1907.
No. 28—Commencing at a post planted
on the river bank at the S.W. corner
and opposite the N.W. corner of No.
27, being one-half mile northerly from
Bever Rapids, Clyak River; thence north
100 chains; thence east 64 chains; thence
south 100 chains; thence west 64 chains
to point of commencement.
November 27th,  1907.
No. 29—Commencing at a post planted
on the river bank at the S.E. corner
and opposite the N.E. corner of No.
26, being one-half mile south of Bever
Rapids, Clyak River; thence north SO
chains; thence west 80 chains: thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
November 27th, 1907.
No. 30—Commencing at a post planted
on the bank at the S. E. corner and
opposite No. 28, being one-half mile
north of Bever Rapids, Clyak River,
thence north 100 chains; thence west 64
chains; thence south 100 chains; thenco
east 64 chains to point of commencement.
November 27th, 1907.
No. 31—Commencing at a post planted
at the S. E. corner about 10 chains
west from the N.E. corner of No. 28,
on the river bank, about one and three-
quarter miles north of Bever Rapids on
Clyak River; thence north 80 ehains;
thence west 80 ehains; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains to
point  of  commencement.
November   27th,   1907.
No. 32—Commencing at a post planted
at the S. W. corner, about flve (5)
chains east of Young's River, being
about nine and one-quarter miles from
its Junction with Clyak River, and opposite the N. W. corner of No. 25; thence
north 100 chains; thence east 64 chains;
thence south 100 chains; thence west
64 chains to point of commencement,
November 24th, 1907.
No. 33—Commencing at a post planted
at the S.E. corner about 5 chains east
of Young's River, being about nine and
one-quarter mlles from tho Junction of
Young and Clyak Rivers and opposite
No. 32; thence north 100 chains; thence
west 64 chains; thence south 100 chains;
thence east 64 chains to point of commencement.
November 24th, 1907.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that J. A. Johnson, of
Vancouver, cruiser, intends to apply for
a special timber licence over the following described lands:—
1. Commencing at a post planted on
the southwest corner of Leose No. 2;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 ehains; thence
west along south boundary of said lease
80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated  December   27th,   1907.
District of Rupert.
2. Commencing at a post planted on
the south bank of river running into
Beaver Cove, and on the west boundary
of Lease No. 2; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains along bank
of said river to point of commencement.
Dated  December  27th,   1907.
District of Rupert.
3. Commencing at a post planted
about 80 chains west of west boundary
of Lerse No. 2, and on south bank of
a river running into Beaver Cove; thence
south 160 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east
40 chains along bank of said river to
point of commencement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
District of Rupert.
4. Commencing at a post planted
about the southeast corner of T. L. No.
11,596; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
District of Rupert.
5. Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains east of the south-east
corner of T. L. 11,395; thence east 160
chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
west 160 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commeneement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
District of Rupert.
6. Commencing at a post planted
about 20 chains south of the southwest
corner of Lease No. 2; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
Jan 4. J. A. JOHNSON.
AH
l&M
NOTICE  TO  LOGGERS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
HIM.
ALTERNATIVE   sealed   tenders,   s**J
perscrlbed   "Tender   for   Piles,   Brid|*l
North Arm, Fraser River," will be rM
ceived   by   the   Honourable   the   Chief
Commissioner   of   Lands    and   Wor1 '
Victoria,    B.   C,   up   to   and    lncludtri.l
Tuesday,   the   31st   of   December,   19071
for   furnishing  and   delivering  at   tl_T
bridge  site  on  the  North  Arm  of  thd
Fraser River, on the line of the Cemej
tery Road, fir and cedar piles.
About six hundred  (600)  will be re
quired, varying In length  from twenty
(20) to forty-five (46) feet.   They must!
be  straight,  sound,  and  not  less  than!
ten   (10  inches  at  the  small  end.   No|
butts will be accepted.
Further printed particulars can be obtained on application to the undersigned.
Tenderers must state the price per
lineal fo t for piles delivered.
The su cessful tenderer will be furnished with a list giving the number
of piles required and the length of each.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certificate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Ca-_
nada, made payable to the order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, In
the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars ($250), which shall be forfeited
if the party tendering decline or neglect
to enter Into contract when, called upon
to do so, or fail to complete the work
contracted for. The cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful ten-.
tenderers will be returned to them upon  the  execution  of  the  contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the form supplied, signed
with the actual signatures of the tenderers, and enclosed in the envelope furnished.
The lowest or any tender not neces-\
sarlly accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE, ,
Nov. 30 Public Works Engineer.
LAND REGISTRY ACT.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that Roland D. Craig,
of Vancouver, occupation Forester, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted one (1)
mile south and 20 chains west from
the southwest corner of L. 222, West
Fork of Adams River; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains,
December  20th,   1907.
Jan. 4 ROLAND D. CRAIG.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that M. J. Kinney, of
Portland, Ore., occupation Lumberman,
intends to apply for permission to lease
the  following  described  land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Rupert
District, where the said line Intersects
the shore line of the east side of Marble
Bay; thence northerly following the
shore line a distance of about 200
chains to the northeast corner of lot
316.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907
M. J. KINNEY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that The Quatsino
Power and Puly Company, of Victoria,
B.C., occupation, A Pulp Company, intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Marble
Cove, Rupert District, where the said
line intersects the shore line on the
east side of Marble Bay; thence southerly following the shore line a distance
of about 120 chains to a point intersecting the mouth of Marble Creek.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907.
THE QUATSINO POWER
&  PULP COMPANY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert. Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that Enoch A. White,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Lumberman, intends to apply for permission to
lease the following described foreshore:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of an Indian Reserve
at the head of Quatsino Narrows, Rupert
District, thence southerly following the
shore line a distance of about 160 chains
to a point intersecting the mouth of
Marble Creek, Including small Island on
north  line of  section   10.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
In the matter of an application for a
Duplicate   Certificate   of   Title   to
Lot 6 of Lot 7 of Section 10, (Map
280),   Esquimalt   District,   Vietoria
City.
Notice is hereby given that it is my
intention at the expiration of one month
from the first publication hereof to Issue
a Duplicate of the Certificate of Title
to said lot,  Issued  to George A.  Cold-
well on the 6th day of June, 1899, and
numbered 6296C.
Land   Registry  Office,   Victoria,   B.C.,
the 21st day of November, 1907.
S.  Y.  WOOTTON,
Nov. 23 Registrar-General.
*.-
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm. Fraser River.
Supentructure of Swing1 Span.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Superstructure Metal for
Swing Bridge, North Arm, Fraser
River," will be received by the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works, Victoria, B.C., up to and including Tuesday, the 31st of December,
1907, for manufacturing and delivering,
f. o. b., scow at Vancouver or New
Westminster, all the metal work required for the superstructure of a steel
swing span.
Drawings, specifications, condition of
contract and tender may be seen by
Intending tenderers on and after Tuesday, the 26th of November, 1907, at
the office of the Public Works Engineer,
Lands and Works Department, and at
the office of the Provincial Timber In
spector, Court House, Vancouver, B.C.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certlflcate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner in
the sum of two hundred and fifty ($250)
dollars, which shall be forfeited If the
party tendering decline or neglect to
enter into contract when called upon
to do so. The cheques or certificates
of deposit of successful tenderers will
be returned to them upon the execution
of the contract.
The successful tenderer will be
called upon to furnish a bond, himself
and two securities, satisfactory to the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, in
the sum of $1,000 each, or to furnish a
bond of a Guarantee Company satisfactory to the Honourable the Chief
Commissioner in the sum of $3,000 for
the due fulfilment of the work contracted for.
Upon the execution of the contract
and a satisfactory bond being supplied,
signed with the actual signatures of the
tenderers and enclosed in the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 30 Public Works Engineer..
DISTRICT OF CASSIAR.
TAKE   NOTICE    that    The   Hidden*
Creek Mining Co., of Vancouver, occupation,  , intends to apply for
permission   to   purchase   the   following
described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of Lot 308, Cassiar
District; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 40 chains; thence south to shore
line of Goose Bay; thence easterly along
shore line to the south boundary of
Lot 308 and thence west to point of
commencement, containing about 200*
acres.
Date Nov. llth, 1907.
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Nov. 16 Per J. H. McGregor
George Young, Agent,
TAKE NOTICB that George Young
and Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C., Timber Dealers, Intend to apply for the
rito to purchase the following described
lands in Kildalla Bay, Rivers Inlet; commencing at this post planted' on the east
side of the Bay about one-third of a
mile from the point at the mouth of the
Bay, being the southwest corner post;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 90 chains to beaeh;
thence south along beach to point of
commencement; containing 40 acres,
more or less.
Staked Nov. 25, 190T.
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL,.
Dec. 7 George* Young, Agent. THE WKtiK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 18   1908.
11
LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
Private Bills.
I'lhe time limited by the rules of the
l.use for the presentation of petitions
|r leave to introduce private bills ex-
res on Monday, 27 January, 1908.
J Bills must be presented to the house
1/ Thursday, 6th February, 1908.
" Reports on bills will not be received
liter Thursday, 13th February, 1908.
" Copies of the bill, petition and no-
Ices must be deposited with the un-
lersigned, and the house fees paid, not
later than Wednesday, 8th January,
|9o8.
Dated this 2nd day of December,
1Q07-
THORNTON FELL,
Clerk of the Legislative Assembly.
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north along shore of Lake Yakoun 80 chains more or less; thence
east about 70 chains more or less, to
point of commencement, containing 640
acres more or less.
Dated November 27th, 10.42 a.m., 1907.
DAN DONALD.
Dec. 21 J. B. Doyen, Agent.
TAKE NOTICE that M. Brennan, of
Jotso Lake, occupation Farmer, intends
(to apply for permission to lease the
following  described   land:
Commencing at a post marked M. B.
Southeast Corner, situated about 40
chains north and 40 chains east of Lot
N.E. Cor.; thence 40 chains north;
Ithence 40 chains west; thence 40 chains
Isouth; thence 60 chains east to point
lof commencemnent, containing 240 aeres.
1 Dated November IB, 1907.
|De. 14 MARK BRENNAN.
SKEENA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
days after date, I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to prospect for coal upon the following described land, situate on Graham Island,
Queen Charlotte Group, In the Province
of British Columbia:
Commencing at a post planted W. A.
R.'s N.E. corner post, placed at the
N.E. corner of seotion 11, township 10,
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated November 27th, 11.50 a.m., 1907.
W. A. ROBERTSON.
Dec. 21 J. E. Doyen, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 80 days mouth of Evelyn River; thence east 120
after  date,   I   Intend   to  apply  to  the chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and west SO chains; thenoe south 40 chains;
Works for a licence to prospect for coal thence west 40 chains; thence north 80
and   petroleum   on   the   following   de- chains to point of commencement,
scribed  lands,  situated ln  the District Nov. Sth, 1907.
of Skeena, Graham Island, Province of No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
British   Columbia:—Commencing   at   a on the south bank of the Sheemahantz
post marked "Robert G. Johnston's N. River,  five  chains  west of  the mouth
W. corner," and planted at the north- of Marvel  Creek,  being the  southeast
west corner of section 12, township 10; corner,  thence west  64  chains;  thence
thence 80 chains east; thence 80 chains north 100 chains; thence east 64 chains;
south;   thence   80  chains   west;   thence thence   south   100   chains   to   point   of
80 chains  north to the voint of com- commencement,
mencement.
Staked Nov. 28th, 9.30 a.m., 1907.
Dec. 21 ROBERT G. JOHNSTON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Kathleen Lake.
TAKE NOTICE that Enoch A. White,
Fof Victoria, B.C., lumberman, intends
jjto apply for a special timber license
[over the following described lands:
8. Commencing at a post planted at
lthe southwest corner of T. L. 16,381, on
I Kathleen Lake, marked "E. A. W.'s N.W.
kcorner post to Claim No. 8"; thence
fsouth 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
Ithence north 80 chains; thence west 80
(chains  to commencement.
Staked November 30th, 1907.
District of Rupert, Kathleen Lake.
1. Commencing at a post planted at
lthe southeast corner of T. L. 13,045, on
I Kathleen Lake, marked "E. A. W.'s S.W.
I corner post to Claim No. 1"; thence
Feast 40 chains', thence north 80 chains;
Ithence west 140 chains; thence south
120 chains to T. L. 13,046; thence fol*
llowing north line of T. L. 13,046 easl
I and south to commencement.
Staked November 30th, 1907.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
1 Dec. 21 T. D. Harris, Agent,
SKEENA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
NOTICE is hereDy given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to
the Hon, Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to prospect for coal on tho following described
land, situate on Graham Island, Queen
Charlotte Group, in the Province of
British Columbia.
Commencing at a post marked J. R.
S.'s N.W. corner post, placed at the
N.W. corner of section 12, township 10,
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chainB-, thence
north 80 chains to point of commence*
ment,   containing   640  acres,   more  or
Dated November 27th, 11.65 a.m., 1907.
J. R. STEWART,
Dec. 21 J. E. Doyen, Agent.
Nov. 8th, 1907.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
10 chains east of the southeast corner
of T. It, 14065, and about one and one-
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days half miles west of the Neechantz River
after date, I intend to apply to the being the northeast corner post; thence
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and south 100 chains; thence west 64 chains;
Works for a licence to prospect for coal thonce north 100 chains; thence west 64
and petroleum on the following de- chains to point of commencement,
scribed lands, situated in the District of GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL,
Skeena,   Graham   Island,   Provinee   of   Dec. 14 George Young, Agent.
British   Columbia:—Commencing   at   a
north 80 chains; west 80 chains; south
80 chains; east 80 chains back to the
place of commencement, containing 640
acres.
G. A. FRASER,
Dec. 14 A. A. McPhail, Agent.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
(c) Commencing at a post planted at
the northeast corner of P. H. 1,745, on
Marble Creek, marked "E. A. W.'s N.W.
corner post to Claim C"; thence south
40 chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 20 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
east 20 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 120 chains to commencement.
Staked December 5th, 1907.
Dated Victoria, B.C., Dec. 10th, 1907.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
(d) Commencing at a post planted at
the northwest corner of Lot 192, on
Quatsino Narrows, marked "E. A. W.'s
S. W. corner post to Claim D."; thence
east about 30 chains to T. L. 14,467;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
about 80 chains to Marble Creek; thence
north and west along shore to Indian
Reserve; thence south and west along
line of Indian Reserve to Quatsino Narrows; thence following shore of said
narrows southwesterly to commencement.
Dated Victoria, December 10th, 1907.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Dec. 21 Thomas D. Harris, Agent.
SKEENA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
NOTICE ls hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works, for a special license to prospect
for coal upon the following described
land, situate on Graham Island, Queen
Charlotte Group, In the Province of
British Columbia:
Commencing at a post marked J. E.
D.'s N. E. corner post, placed at the
N. E. corner of section 2, township 10,
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains', thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated November 27th, 12.65 p.m., 1907.
Dec.21 J. E. DOYEN, Locator.
post marked "George B. Baillie's N.W| NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
corner," and planted  at the northwest District of New Westminster,
corner of section 1, township 11; thence TAKE NOTICE that Harry McMlcken
80 chains east; thence 80 chains south; Keefer of Vancouver, occupation Broker,
thence 80 chains west; thence 80 chains intends to apply for permission to lease
north to the point of commencement.      the following described land:
Staked Nov. 28th,  11.30 a.m., 1907. Commencing at a post planted on the
GEORGE B. BAILLIE. N. E. Coast of Savary Island and about
Dee. 21 Robert G. Johnston, Agent.  25 chains from the easterly end of the
• —   Island,   thence  west  20  chains  to  low
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days water mark; thence south 400 chains
after date, I Intend to apply to the along low water mark; thence east 20
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and chains to high water mark; thence north
Works for a licence to prospect for coal 400 chains to point of commencement,
and petroleum on the following de- and containing eight hundred acres,
scribed lands, situated in the District more or less,
of Skeena, Graham Island, Province of Dated Dec. 2nd, 1907.
British   Columbia:—Commencing   at   a   Dec 14      HARRY McMICKENKEEFER.
post marked "Sarah C. Johnston's N.E. ——.  . 	
corner,"   and planted  at  the  northeast  NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
NOTICE ls hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner,of Landa and
Works for a licence to prospect for
coal on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
miles west of the northwest corner of
the claim ot John A. McMaster. being
about twenty miles west of McCoy's
Cove, on the north side of Cumshewa
Inlet, Moresby Island, Queen Charlotte
Islands Group; thence south 80 chains;
east 80 chatns; north 80 chains; west
80 chains back to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
C. J. SPRATT,
Dec. 14 A. A. McPhail, Agent.
corner of section 2, township 11; thence
80 chains south; thence 80 chains west;
thence 80 chains north; thence 80 chains
east to the point of commencement.
Staked Nov.  28th,  11,30  a.m.,  1907.
SARAH C. JOHNSTON.
Dec. 21 Robert G. Johnston, Agent.
SKEENA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
NOTICE ls hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to ap '
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of
and Works for a special license ti
pect for coal on the following dei
land, situate on Graham Island, Queen
Charlotte Group, in the Province of
British Columbia:
Commencing at a post marked J. T.
J.'s N.W. corner post, placed at the
N.W. corner of section 1, township 10;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated November 27th, 1.05 p.m., 1507.
JOHN T. JOHNSTON,
Dec. 21 J. E. Doyen, Agent.
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick Patrick Rogers of Vancouver, occupation
carpenter, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days % ™m™™? * tJ$. 13t4^ncGe' lj£_l
after date, I intend to apply to the S*?„?.-^hSIoll„Irth,'s0chains- thenoe
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and  f}f™', thence north 20.chains, thence
Works   for   a   licence   to   prospect   for  fo   noint  of  commencement   contain ng
coal  and  petroleum   on   the   foUowing  l°  P°>"t of commencement,  containing
described lands situated in the District   4° *"e.s -?°™   w  o«th    iqn7
of Skeena, Graham Island, Province of      Dat^iFI^^r PATRICK ROGERS
British   Columbia:     Commencing   at   a FREDERICK PA1RICK KUW-.KS.
post  planted  at   the   northeast  corner  -uec.ie
of  section  10,  township  10;  thence  80 _,_.,,_
chains   south;   thence   80  chains  west;      NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
thence 80 chains north; thence 80 chains  days  after date  I  Intend  to  apply  to
east to the point of commencement.        the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
Staked November 27th, 11.46 a.m., 1907  and Works for a licence to prospect for
JOHN G. JOHNSTON. coal on the following described  lands:
Dec. 21 Robert G. Johnston, Agent.      Commencing at a post planted at the
NOTICE ls nereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply U
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a licence to prospect for
coal on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the claim of C. J.
Spratt, being about twenty mlles west
of McCoy's Cove, on the north side
of Cumshewa Inlet, Moresby Island,
Queen Charlotte Islands Group; thence
north 80 chains; east 80 chains; south
80 chains; west 80 chains back to the
place of commencement, containing 640
acres.
Located this 4th day of December,
A.D.   1907.
J. W. RUTLEDGE,
Dec. 14 A. A. McPhail, Agent.
Arthur Gore
Manager
TIMBER MAPS
Orrice Phone 153^
Residence 4-38   '
pos fed up to date  every day.
ELECTRIC BLUE PRINT&. MAP CO.
VICTORIA.BC.
CHANCERY     CHAMBERS,
BLUEPRINTING
SZ LANGLEY   STREET.
DRAUGHTING OFFICE.
SKEENA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast,
NOTICE is nereoy given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to
prospect for coal upon the following
described land, situate on Graham
Island, Queen Charlotte Group, In the
Province of British Columbia.
Commencing at a post marked M. B.'s
S. W. Corner post, placed at the S. W.
corner of section 24, township 10, thence
east 40 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
Dated November 27th, 10.30 a.m., 1907.
MURRAY BROWN.
Dec. 21 J. E. Doyen, Agent.
NOTICE ls hereDy given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for
coal and petroleum on the following described lands, situated ln the District
of Skeena, Graham Island, Province of
British Columbia:—Commencing at a
post marked "Thomas Franklin's N.W.
corner," and planted at the northwest
corner of section 13, township 16 thence
80 chains east; thence 80 chains south;
thence 80 chains west; thence 80 chains
north to the point of commencement.
Staked November 27th, 1.45 p.m., 1907.
THOS. FRANKLIN.
Dec. 21 Robert G. Johnston, Agent.
Complete    set of Maps shoirv/ng all
TIMBER   LICENCES
and other Lands  taken  up in Br iti"sh Columbia.
Blue  Prints  can be   obtained at short no rice.
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal on  the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at thu
northwest corner of the claim of C. J.
Spratt, being about twenty miles west
of McCoy's Cove on the north side of
Cumshewa Inlet, Moresby Island, Queen
Charlotte Islands Group; thence south
80 chains; west 80 chains; north 80
chains; east 80 chains back to the place
of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located this 4th day of December,
A.D. 1907.
D. C. McDONALD,
Dec.  14 A. A. McPhail, Agent.
NOTICE ls hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a licence to prospect for
coal on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
miles north of the northwest corner
of the claim of Robert Hamilton, being
about six miles north of the Cowgltz
mines on the north shore of Skiedgate
Inlet on Slate Chuck Creek, Graham
Island, Queen Charlotte Islands Group;
thence south 80 chains; east 80 chains;
north 80 chains; west 80 chains back to
the place of commencement, containing
640 acres.
Located this 26th day of November,
A.D. 1907.
J. H. YOUNG,
Dec.14 A. A. McPhail, Agent.
SKEENA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to prospect for coal upon the following described land, situate on Graham Island,
Queen Charlotte Group, ln the Province
of British Columbia:
Commencing at a post marked Z. M.
H.'s S.E. Corner post, placed at the
S.E. corner of section 23, township 10,
thence north 160 chains; thence west
about 30 chains; thence south following shore line of Lake Yakoun 100
chains more or less; thence east about
40 chains to point of commencement,
containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated November 27th, 10.30 a.m., 1907.
Z.   M.  HAMILTON,
Dec.  21 J. E. Doyen, Agent.
SKEENA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days
after date I intend ^ply to the Hon.
Chief Commlsslone ds and Works
for  a  special   licen prospect  for
coal upon the follown. described land,
situate on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Group, in the Province of British
Columbia. ,
Commencing at a post marked L. B.
V.D.'s N.W. Corner post placed at the
N. W. corner of section 13, township 10,
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated November 27th, 10.38 a.m., 1907.
L. B. VAN DECAR.
Dec. 21 J. E, Doyen, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend tl apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for
coal and petroleum on the following
described lands, situated in the District of Skeena, Graham Island, Province of British Columbia:—Commencing
at a post marked "James Scott's N.E.
corner," and planted at the northeast
corner of section 14, township 10; thence
80 chains south; thence 80 chains west;
thence 80 chains north; thence 80 chains
east to place of commencement.
Staked November 27th, 1.30 p.m., 1907.
JAMES SCOTT,
Dec. 21 Robert G. Johnston, Agent.
LICENCE TO AN EXTRA-PROVINCIAL northwest corner of the claim of S. A.
COMPANY Ramsay, being about sixteen miles west
    ' of McCoy's Cove on the north side of
"Companies Act, 1897." Sl!m!.h.e.wa,I'.leti M°resby Island. Queen
  Charlotte  Islands Group;  thence  north
Canada' 8"   chains;   west   80   chains;   south   80
Province of British Columbia. cliains; east SO chains back to the place
jj0   417 of commeneement, containing 640 acres.
THIS' Is  to  certify  that  "The  New Ji00?^?  tnls   4th  day  ot  December,
Zealand Insurance  Company"   Is  auth- AU' lau7
NOTICE ls hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for
coal on  the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at tho
northwest corner of the claim ot J. H.
Young, being about six miles north of
the Cowgltz mines on the north shore
of Skidegate Inlet, on Slate Chuck Creek,
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence south 80 chains; west 80
chains', north 80 chains; east 80 chains
back to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located this 26th day of November,
A.D.   1907.
J. F. YOUNG,
Dec 14 A. A. McPhail, Agent.
WALTER  B.  PITFIELD.
A. A. McPhail, Agent.
NOTICE ls hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lands, situated in the District of
Skeena, Graham Island, Province of
British Columbia:—Commencing at a
post marked "Amos Adslt's S.W. corner,"
and planted at the southwest corner of
section 24, township 10; thence 40
ehains north; thence 40 chains west;
thence 40 chains south to the place of
commencement.
Staked November 27th, 1.15 p.m., 1907.
AMOS ADSIT.
Dec. 21 Robert G. Johnston, Agent.
orised and licensed to carry on business
within the Province of British Colum-   Dec' 14
bla, and to carry out or effect all or any
of the objects of the Company to which      NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
the legislative authority of the Legisla-   clays after date I Intend to apply to the
ture of British Columbia extends. Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
The  head  office  of  the Company  is  Works for a license to prospect for coal
situate at the City of Auckland, in the  on  the following described lands:
Colony of New Zealand. Commencing   at  a  post   planted   two
The amount of the capital of the miles west of the northwest corner of
Company is one million pounds, divided the claim of S. A. Ramsay, being about
into ten thousand shares of one hun- eighteen miles west of McCoy's Cove
dred pounds each. on the north side of Cumshewa Inlet,
The head office of the Company In Moresby Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
this Province is situate at Victoria, and Group; thence south SO chains; east 80
James Hill Lawson, merchant, whose ehains; north 80 chains; west 80 chains
address Is Victoria ,B.C, Is the attorney back to the place of commencement, con-
for the Company. taining 640 acres.
Given under my hand and seal of Located this 4th day of December,
office  at  Victoria,   Province  of  British   A.D.   1907.
Columbia,  this   28th  day  of November, JOHN A. McMASTER,
one thousand  nine hundred and seven.  Dec.  14 A.  A.  McPhail,  Agent.
(L. S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,	
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.      NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
The objects for which this Company days after date I Intend to apply to
has been established and licensed are:   the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
To carry on the business of fire and and Works for a licence to prospect for
marine Insurance ln all Its branches or coal on the following described lands:
such of those branches as the Com- Commencing at a post planted at the
pany shall from time to time determine, northwest corner of the claim of John
and to do all such other things as nre John A. McMaster, being about eighteen
Incidental  or  conducive  to the attain-   miles   west   of  McCoy's   Cove   on   the
ment of those objects.
Dec.  14.
SKEENA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works, for a special license to prospect for coal upon the following described land, situate on Graham Island,
Queen Charlotte Group, in the Provinee
of British Columbia:
Commenolng at a post marked D. D.'s
N.E. corner post, placed at the N.E.
Corner of section 14, township 10, thence
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lands, situated in the District
of Skeena, Graham Island, Province of
British Columbia:—Commencing at a
post marked "Alfred Carey's S.E. corner," and planted at the southeast corner of section 23, township 10; thence
80 chains north; thence 80 chains west;
thence 80 chains south; thence 80 ehains
east  to  the point of commencement.
Staked Nov. 27th, 1 p.m.,  1907.
ALFRED CAREY,
Dec. 21 Robert G. Johnston, Agent.
NOTICE ls herebp given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to vrospect for
coal and petroleum on the following described lands, situated ln the District
of Skeena, Graham Island, Province of
British Columbia:—Commencing at a
post marked "Ellen J. Baillie's northeast corner," and planted at the northeast corner of section 11, township 10,
thence 80 chains south', thence 80 ehains
west; thence 80 ehains north; thence 80
chains east to the point of commencement.
Staked Nov. 28th, 9.30 a.m., 1907.
ELLEN J. BAILLIE.
Dee. 21
B.C.
Timber Maps
north side of Cumshewa Inlet, Moresby
Island, Queen Charlotte Islands Group,
thenee north SO chains; east SO chains;
south 80 chains; west 80 chains back
to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located   this   4th   day   of   December,
A.D.   1907.
J. A. HINTON,
Dec. 14 A. A. McPhail, Agent.
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon, Chief Commissioner of lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal
on the following described lands:
Commencing at the post planted at
the northwest corner of the claim of
J. H. Young, being about six miles north
of the Cowgitz Mines on the north shore
of Skidegate Inlet, on Slate Chuck Creek,
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence north 80 chains; east 80
chains; south 80 chains; west 80 chains
back to the place of commencement,
containing 640 acres.
Located this 26th day of November,
A.D. 1907.
FRED. YOUNG,
Dec.14 A.  A.   McPhail,   Agent.
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a licence to prospect
for coal on    the    following    described
nf All District* lands:
ui /-ill LMMiiv-is Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the claim of John
  A. McMaster. being about eighteen miles
west of McCoy's Cove on the north side
VANCOUVER MAP and BLUE-PRINT CO.  of  Cumshewa    Inlet,    Moresby  Island.
Queen Charlotte Islands Group; thence
south 80 chains; west SO chains; north
80 chains; east 80 chains back to the
place of commencement, containing 640
acres.
Located this 4th day of December,
A.D.  1907.
THOMAS COOPER,
Dec.14 A.   A.   McPhail,   Agent.
Suite 20-ai Crowe ancl Wilson
Chambers.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for coal
on   the   following  described   lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the claim of J.
H. Young, being about six miles north
of the Cowglts Mines on the north
shore of Skidegate Inlet, on Slate Chuck
Creek, Graham Island, Queen Charlotte
Islands Group; thence north 80 chains;
west 80 chains; south 80 chains; east
80 chains back to the place of commencement containing 640 acres.
Located this 26th day of November,
A. D. 1907.
ROBERT YOUNG,
Dec.14 A. A.  McPhail, Agent.
DISTRICT  OF  CASSAIR.
TAKE NOTICE that The Hidden Creek
Mining   Co.,   of  Vancouver,   occupation.
Intends to apply for permission
to   lease  the   following  described  land,
about 40 acres:
Commencing at a post plnnted at the
southeast corner of Lot 479; thence following high water mark south nnd
west to the southeast corner of Lot 308;
thence east five chains; thence north
and east following a line parallel to
high water mark ahout 80 chains to a
point 6 chains south of point of commencement and thenee to said point of
commencement.
Dated Nov. 25th, 1907.
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Dec. 7 Per J. Herrick MacGregor.
NOTICE  is hereby given  that thirty
TAKE   NOTICE   that   George Young   days after date I Intend to apply to the
and Arthur Bell of Victoria, B.C., Tim-   Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
ber Dealers, intend to apply for special  Works for a license to prospect for coal
license over    the    following    described   on   the   following  described   lands:
lands on the Sheemahantz River, Rivers      Commencing at a post planted at the
Inlet: northwest corner of the claim of John
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted   A. McMaster, being about eighteen miles
on the south bank of the Sheemahantz   west of McCoy's Cove on the north side
River at the northwest corner, being one   of   Cumshewa   Inlet,   Moresby   Islands,
Robert G  Johnston, Agent. | mile  east  ancl   10  chains  south  of  the   Queen Charlotte Islands Group;  thence
DISTRICT OB  CASSIAR.
TAKE NOTICE that The Hidden
Creek Mining Co., or Vancouver, occupation,  , intends to apply for permission to leaRe the following described
land, about 3 acres:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south east corner post of Lot 479; thence
north one chain; thence southwesterly
parollel to high water mark, about 30
chains to west boundary of Lot 479;
thence south about one chain forty links
to high water mark and thence along
high water mark to point of commencement.
Dated Nov. 26th, 1907.
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Dec. 7 Per J. Herrick MacGregor.
V i a
THE WEEK, SATURDAY JANUARY 18, 1908,
AN ELEPHANT COMEDY
(Continued from Page Nine)
The day broke with startling suddenness. A belt of saffron spread like
a fiery cloud across the naked east;
the sun-illumined peaks seemed to
flower and redden in the yellow flares
of light. Groups of tiny black apes
watched us from the high-stemmed
silver oaks as we plunged across the
gully into the scrub where the spoor
showed in the creek slime. Behind us
stalked the kangani, his sheeted garments drawn tightly about his face
and head. Again we crossed the man's
footprints that joined the elephant's
higher up the gully. We were soon
panting along the edge of the gravel
range, and here the spoor disappeared mysteriously. The hard, stonelike surface of the ground refused to
retain the slightest impression of man
or beast's footprint.
"Let us go to his hut," said Dacey.
"He will come home sooner or later."
The smoke of Musoora's household
wound skyward in the clear morning
air, and as we crossed the ridge overlooking the valley we beheld a squat,
mud-walled house half-concealed in a
tangle of lianas and scrub.
Three women who had been cook
ing rice inside apptared suddenly at
the door. A couple of yellow pariahs
yelped savagely from the evil-looking
interior. At that moment a terrifk
thrashing of brushwood came up from
the jungled hollow below; the rasping voice of a man broke thc morning
silence.
"Tull, tull, thou! Walk, beast, or
the factory dogs will eat thy feet. Up,
Binam, up!"
Thc head and tusks of a full-grown
elephant appeared from the jungle-
shadow; a moment afterwards beast
and man swung into the open, glistening from head to heel with moisture from the overhanging forest. The
man, turbaned like an Indian mahout,
plied his thin iron goad on the head
of his beast mercilessly. A sudden
turn in the path brought him into line
with the superintendent's rifle.
The elephant trumpeted hoarsely,
then halted and remained stamping
and rocking in front of us, its small
intelligent eyes fixed on the immovable rifle-barrel.
The driver raised his head suddenly
and his jaw hung at sight of the
angry suyerintendent standing in the
path.
"Get down!" commanded Dacey
sharply. "And if you address a single
word to that—that meegra elephant,
I'll shoot you without mercy, Musoora."
Musoora made no movement; his
slack month expanded until the fat
creases under his chin seemed to fold
over his greasy vestments.
The kangani, standing behind, called out in a quivering voice, his left
hand indicating something tucked
away between thc tusks and trunk of
the stamping elephant, "My little son,
oh master! Alive—by the gods! Let
us talk reasonably with Musoora; no
harm has yet been done."
At first glance it was almost impossible to see the dusky infant rolled
away so cunningly in the folds of the
great trunk. Musoora held his goad
aloft half-threateningly, as though^n-
tending to drive his beast over us.
Thc superintendent's rifle came suddenly into line with thc elephant's
blinking eyes. "Deliver the child to
its father, Musoora. We'll talk afterwards concerning the trampling down
of No. 9 field. No monkey-tricks,"
hc continued, "or I'll present you with
a dead elephant in ten seconds."
"Shoot, dorai! shoot!" laughed Musoora from above. "Your bullet will
not save the kangani's brat; the dying beast will crush it as it falls."
"There is something behind this
foolery," said the superintendent
sharply. Speak out Musoora, I
will listen."
The mahout leaned from the beast's
shoulder and pointed with his goad at
the stiff-limbed kangani standing in
our rear.
"The headman of thine, oh dorai!
has swindled me out of fifty rupees.
I have waited a year for thc money-
money for lifting timber from the old
lines, money the company paid him
for my work and the work of my ele
phant. Let him pay me now, or there
will be no son to take over his debts
when he is dead."
"It is a lie!" shouted the kangani.
"It was thirty rupees—no more. The
dog lies, oh master! He shall not
threaten my son's life for money owing.   It is against the law."
The superintendent's face grew dark
as he glanced swiftly at the gesticulating headman. "I will give you both
sixty seconds to make up your minds."
He spoke slowly along the barrel of
his rifle, his eyes fixed on the watchful mahout. "The three of you shall
suffer—the elephant first.    Now"	
It seemed as though the uneasy
brute understood the superintendent's
threat. The great trunk swept up and
down trumpeting shrilly, while its
huge body rocked to and fro in fearful expectation.
"Shoot, oh master!" whispered the
kangani. "Let my brat take its
chance. I will not pay Musoora fifty
rupees. The elephant will fall on its
side, not head first. Believe me, dorai,
it will fal lon its side.   Let the child"
Something wet and dripping flashed
out of the jungle. A scarlet sarong
and a woman's burning eyes confronted us. It was the kangani's young
wife, and her mouth was drawn, her
cheeks sunken, as though the sharp
misery she had endured had unhinged
her mind. The mountain mists had
matted the long black hair, and the
wind had blown it mask-like about
her low, broad forehead. She crouched forward under cover of the superintendent's rifle until she stood in
front of the fear-stricken elephant.
"Back, Nouranal" screamed the
kangani. "The beast will strike thee
dead!"
Without turning or heeding his
words, she gripped the near tusk with
her left hand and smote the great
blinking face above her.
"Thou beast! was there no other
child but mine to steal? Was the
trampled fruit of our garden not
enough—the banyans and sweet herbs
—that thou takest the blood of my
heart, thou evil one?"
The elephant seemed to relax, and
its trunk unfolded suddenly; the
brown brat slipped from its resting-
place into the woman's arms. Pushing it across her broad hips, she took
a stick from the ground and again
darted forward.
The elephant retreated, its small
red eyes watching her anxiously. Her
lithe body quivered as she smote it
fiercely on the lip and trunk, stooping
in her fury to belabour the flinching
brute on its soft round toes.
"Remember, thou eater of swine,
not to enter my house again. The
taste of thee will be on my child until it dies.   Beast!"
The elephant nosed the air in its
pain, and, with a sudden heave and
shake of the head, crashed into the
jungle on our left. Musoora turned
and shook his goad at the trembling
kangani as the elephant bore him unwillingly from the scene.
"The affair is settled for the present," said the superintendent, shouldering his rifle. "I must admit," he
added to me, "that the woman's
promptness saved the situation. These
Indian mahouts are dcticedly awkward fellows to deal with."
Thc kangani hurried back to the
lines, followed by the shrill-voiced
Tamil woman carrying her child. Wc
returned to the bungalow, feeling
that cur sleep had been unnecessarily
disturbed.
A few weeks later I heard that the
notorious Musoora had been arrested
and put in jail. There were many
charges against him, but the one
preferred was for driving his animal
full tilt at a motor-car on the outskirts of Colombo. East of Aden thc
inebriated chauffeur is never so dangerous as the drunken driver of an
elephant.
Angell
Engraving Co.
PHOTO-ENGRAVERS
and DESIGNERS
In All Branches
518 Hastings St.
Vancouver, B. C.
a million dollars have already been
expended on development, and half a
million more will be spent during the
next year or two. The latest addition
to the Company's property is a new
steam heated, electric-lighted hotel
and accommodation without which no
mining town is complete, and which
will fill an important niche in the
economy of Hillcrest.
Blue Ruin.
The Westminster Daily News in a
final word to new comers says: "avoid
the blue ruin man as you would a
viper." This is rather hard on its
regular readers.
Wife—Our daughter is 20, and she
ought to be married.
Hubby—Oh, she has plenty of time.
Let her wait till the right sort of man
comes along.
"Not at all. I didn't wait for the
right sort of man!"
A Coa 1 Baron.
The East Kootenay Press has been
working off another of its periodical
eulogiums on C. P. Hill, the coal
baron of Hillcrest. Mr. Hill's interviews always make interesting reading. Thc speed of developing recently has been phenomenal, the output
having jumped from 100 to 700 tons
a day in less than three months. Half
A muscular woman in Massachusetts tied her husband to the kitchen
door so that he should not bother her
while she did her work. This is what
mere man has come to in a state
peppered all over with woman's clubs.
VICTORIA  LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE, that.I, Frank Kelly,
of Victoria, B.C., timber cruiser, intend
to   apply for a special   timber   license
over the following described  lands:
1. Commenolng at a post planted at
southeast corner of Section 29, Township 32, Rupert District; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated Dee. 16, 1907.
2. Commencing at post planted about
one-half mile west of southeast corner
of Section 32, Township 32; thence west
40 chains; thence north 160 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 160
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
3. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16196, Section
5, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 ehains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
4. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16196, Section
4, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
thenje north 160 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
f>. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
4, Township 33; thence west 40 ehains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
6. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
4, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thenee south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 610
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
6. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
3, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thonce north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
7. Commencing at a post planted at
northeast corner of T. L. 161S6, Section
3, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
hains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated  Dec.  17, 1907.
8. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 161H4, Section
2, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
9. Commencing at a post planted at
northeast corner of T. L. 16194, Section
2, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 610
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
10. Commencing ,u a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16195, Section
1, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
tiience north 160 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
FRANK KELLY.
Jan 1S. George H. Jackson, Agent.
DAMP DAYS TALK "COCOA"
Because the fatty matter contained therein in small quantities'
what one  needs  during damp  or cold weather.   Nothing mor_|
nourishing than these pure brands:
Leman's Swiss Cocoa, per tin, 25c, 45c and 8$'!
Suchard's, per tin, 25c, 45c and  85M
Van Houten's, 35c, 65c and  $i.(
Fry's Cocoa, per package   icsJ
Cowan's Cocoa, 15c and  30c!
Ralston's Cocoa  351!
Baker's Cocoa   35c ]
Loose Cocoa, per lb 25c I
Ghirardelli's Chocolate, per tin   45c 1
Ghirardelli's Chocolate, per bar  35c '
Huyler's Chocolate Powder, per tin  40c
Beaver Chocolate, per bar  35c
Cowan's Chocolate, per bar   20c
Cowan's Unsweetened Chocolate, per bar,  15c and 25c
Baker's Unsweetened Chocolate, per bar   30c .*
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
INDEPENDENT GROCERS, 1316 GOVERNMENT ST.
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO ooOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOol
The
SMITH & SHAUGHNESSY
Proprietors
Yates Street, Victoria, B. C.
00000000000000000000000000c
When You Know
Where To Go
for your work, you find that well
made clothes cost no more than
most poorly made ones. We employ only the most thoroughly
trained union operators. We use
only the best materials and
charge only living prices.
SCOTLAND WOOLEN MILLS
29 Johnson Street,
VICTORIA.
538 Hastings Street,
VANCOUVER.
nr e©KE *•*
A FORECAST FOR ECONOMY.
If you havc never tried burning Coke with coal in grate or cook
stove, we'd like you to make the experiment—truly an economical
one,
$6.00 PER TON ONLY
DELIVERED WITHIN CITY LIMITS.
Only $5.00 if you can send here for it. Why not try it, 'twill more
than cut your coal bill in half.
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, Ltd.
CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS. f
j isrrrt-vnpri__Ts__i___ir_Ts^
Is Kingsford Smith & Co.
Stock and General
AUCTIONEERS
[ o    Commission and Real Estate Agents.
"t 860 Qranville, Vancouver. I
■JUUJULJUUJUUUUIJIAJUUUUUUUIJU
Vancouver Edition
The Week
H British Columbia Review,
Published at Vietoria and Vancouver B. C.
Vol. IV.   No. 51
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 1908
=| unnnnf _is__~vvKK__-f%»-»»«
Stewart WilU«__n R.C. Union
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION AMD
REAL ESTATE ACENTS
fi POST ST. VICTORIA, S. C.
One Dollar Per Annum
I On    Thursday    last is the reform of the Civil  Service pension.   Only those who have been capable  Minister, and  the Province ment was disposed even to consider
' )pening of the   the Provincial Legis- with   the  foreshadowed  division  of brought into daily contact with the will benefit enormously by the pro- the matter.   The Week recommended
Legislature.       lature   was   opened tlle Lan(ls ami Works Department and Civil Servants of British Columbia posed change.   It is to be hoped that that Ministers'salaries should be in-
with the usual cere-   the oreation °f a nBW Portfolio- These  know how wel1 they deserve of the a man of business capacity wiU be creased to $6,000, and the Sessional
reforms have been expected for the  Province. chosen for the position, one who has .   .
monial by  the Lieutenant-Governor.   iast two years, and are now ripe for      With reference to the creation of been accustomed to direct and con-  y'demnity to $V0U.   it is now un-
His speech contained nothing sensa-   adoption. The improved financial con-  a new portfolio, there is no doubt that trol large enterprises,-and one who is tleist00cl     a     le su8,Ses e S
dition of the Province enables the this is fully justified by the increase completely "au fait" with the re- will be made, and that these actual
Government  to  reorganize  the  ser- in the work of the department due to quirements of the Province.   Just a  figures will be adopted.    The Week
advocated that   the   stipend   of the
Premier should be $10,000 to enable
tional, but it discounted the anticipations of the Liberal Press that the
Session would be brief and barren.
In the early stages of the address the
announcement   was   made    that   a
measure  would  be  laid  before  the
I House with a view to the restriction
I of the   immigration   of   undesirable
[ipersons.    Mr.   McBride  thus  vindicates the position he has always held
Ion  this  important  subject.    Whilst
I Asiatic Leagues and Liberal papers
[have been engaged in a wordy warfare, the Premier of British Columbia
[correctly interpreting the wishes of
lthe Province has stood by his guns
land has shown that he has more faith
legal enactments than in "verbal
I assurances."   This is the attitude of
[a statesman, not of a politician or a
[time server.   In pursuance of his promises, Mr. McBride will see that in
lthe early hours of the Session, Mr.
(Bowser's Test Act is re-enacted. Just
■what the attitude of the Lieutenant-
Governor will be remains to be seen,
(but it can make no difference, on this
pccasion, the Bill will go to Ottawa,
either with or without the Lieutenant-
Governor's consent, and it will be for
■the Federal Government  to  declare
■their intentions in respect to it.   So far
ISir Wilfred Laurier has announced
Ithat he does not share the sentiments
lof this Province on the subject of
(Oriental Immigration, but as a saving
plause he added that "its wishes must
be respected."   In a very short time
Jthe  Provinee  will  learn   the  exact
(measure of Sir Wilfred Laurier's re-
|spect for its wishes.   This is not a
party question in British Columbia,
(whatever it may be at Ottawa.   The
(probability is that the measure will
(pass by the unanimous vote of the
local House.   If it does not, which is
(almost inconceivable, then that vote
|will not register the wishes of the
(Province.  There are some reasons to
(believe that the Federal Government
(will disallow the Act.   Those reasons
(are based upon various considerations,
[such as the previous attitude of that
(Government, the express lack of sym-
Ipathy with this Province, and the re-
Icent   declaration   of   Sir   Wilfred
Laurier that he is perfectly satisfied
with the verbal assurances given to
i Mr. Lemieux by the Japanese Govern-
Iment.   This is a great question, in-
Ivolving tremendous issues.   The Week
[repeats and it cannot be repeated too
[often, that in its consideration, prejudice must play no part, but that the
[final settlement must be upon a broad
[imperial   basis.     If   Sir   Wilfred
(Laurier, by any means at his disposal,
ensures British  Columbia immunity
(from undesirable immigrants, his attitude will be satisfactory. The means
Inust undoubtedly be furnished by the
(Federal Government, upon whom the
(responsibility rests, but if Sir Wil-
|fred should be so ill-advised as to veto
Mr. Bowser's Bill, it will be incumbent upon   him to   show    that Mr.
Chamberlain's advice was either unconstitutional  or impracticable,  and
Ithat is a large order even for the
'remier of Canada.
vice, and to provide for an adequate the   expansion   of   development   of year ago The Week advocated an in-
———JMmkmj mmm\_m______mmKM_umum_mm_mmtmt__mm
:it'
-W
y-^^o--'-
<r%__.
\ff.
V:
_•?■
• /_'•'
y**r.
. .in _.       •***•_• w..•*-
■*£_*:
Ml
-':»,
■ v.\:
;•— *   •".•'_   ■
W:.
him to meet the large demands made
upon his purse in the public service,
also that he should be relieved from
Departmental work. These latter
changes are not foreshadowed in the
proposed alterations, but they will
yet come. It should be a matter of
congratulation to men of all parties
that the financial condition of the
Province is such that these changes
can be made at the present time. The
contention of The Week has always
been that men who devote tlieir lives
to the public service should be remunerated to an extent which renders
them independent and to enable them
to make provision for a modest competency when they retire.
There is little in the speech to
indicate what will be the general
policy of the Government during the
present Session with respect to Bail-
way construction, but Premier McBride's attitude towards land grants
and subsidies is so well known that
it is hardly necessary to say that
he is entirely in accord with the determination of the people of British
Columbia not to make any new land
grant or to assume any financial responsibilities in connection with railways already chartered. In considering any new proposals no doubt local
conditions will have to be taken into
account, and in connection with
branch lines to open up country which
would otherwise remain without the
means of transportation for many
years it may be found necessary to
render assistance, but there will be
no departure from the general policy
already laid down and so consistently
maintained by the McBride Administration.
The paragraph relating to the establishment of a Provincial University will be read with interest. It is
a project which is growing in popular
favour and which may be nearer of
attainment than was thought by those
who so vigorously opposed Ihe land
grant made last session. Only one
thing is necessary to insure the early
construction of at any rate a portion
of the necessary buildings, and tliat is
that the gentlemen who have talked
so glibly in favour of a University
should put their hands in their
pockets. Men proud to have (heir
name associated with educational
schemes and well able to contribute
liberally have been appealed to again
and again to raise something like a
superannuation allowance. This is every kind. The late incumbent of crease in the stipends of the Ministers reasonable amount to start the pro-
due  to  men  whose  services  to  the the oflice urged the adoption of this nnd in the Members' indemnity, also ject |mt without success
STILL   IN   THE   ASCENDANT.
Province are invaluable, whose duties policy two years ago, and by common lhe payment of a stipend to the
if not always onerous are monotonous consent he was one of the most effl- Leader of the Oposition. The sug-
and responsible, and whose remuner-   cient and hardest worked Ministers gestion was made without oonsulta-
Among the other measures fore-
Ishadowcd in the speech from the
I Throne   one   of the most important be not supplemented by a reasonable  mands the undivided attention of a   slightest knowledge that the Govern- ance.
When they
are willing to "put up" there will be
little delay in supplementing private
ation is altogether inadequate, if it   who ever filled it.   Public Works de- tion with  anyone,  and without  the benevolence with Government assist- 1'4
THR   WJPtfV-     Ct-rnnn,
THE WKKK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 1908.
Western Society
Notes.
Mr. F. J. Crowe, formerly of Vancouver, will now reside in Kamloops.
* *   *
Mr. W. Roberts of Winnipeg is
spending a few weeks in Vancouver.
* *   »
Mrs. J. Shafer of Kamloops is
spending the winter in Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. A. L. Whitworth of Edmonton
is on a trip to Montreal.    ,
* *   *
Mr. Justice Martin has returned to
Vancouver from the interior.
* *   *
Mr. F. S. C. Lee of Calgary is
spending some time in Winnipeg.
* *   *
Mr. J. B. Wood of Victoria, B.C., is
registered at the Winnipeg Hotel in
that city.
* *   *
Mr. A. P. Basher of Tacoma returned home this week after spending a couple of weeks in Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. A. J. Witherspoon of Vancou-
veris registered at the King Edward
in Toronto.
* *   *
Mr. J. J. Binns of Vancouver spent
the holiday season with Mrs. Binns
in Alabama.
* *   *
Miss Susie McRae of Bellingham
spent Xmas and New Year's with the
Misses McConnell in Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Shain and son
of Vancouver spent the last three
weeks in the Sound cities.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Olaf Housens Strand
are expected in Vancouver from their
wedding tour on February ist.
* *   *
Mrs. Neill of Kamloops has returned home after a visit to friends in
Vancouver.
* *   *
Miss Evelyn Marchant of Victoria
spent the holidays with Mrs. P. H.
McEwen of Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Still have returned
to their home in Vancouver after a
delightful three months in the east.
* *   *
Mr. Frank Waring is visiting his
mother, Mrs. Waring of Haro street,
Vancouver.
* *   *
Miss St. Clare of Vancouver has returned home from Nanaimo where she
spent  the  holidays.
* *   *
Mr. Milloy of Kilmarnock, Scotland, is on a business trip to Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. J. Harper of Toronto, Ont., is
at present in Vancouver. He spent
some days recently in Victoria.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. E. 0. S. Scholefield
of Victoria have returned from New
Westminster.
* *   *
Mr. L. H. Levi of Vancouver registered at the Astor. House in New
York this week.
* .    *
Dr. C. M. Kingston of Grand Forks
is registered at the Hotel Vancouver
in the last named city.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. W. Lossee of Victoria
are spending the New Year's festivities with friends in Toronto, Ont.
* *   *
Mr. L. James and wife of Calgary
are registered at the King Edward in
Edmonton.
* *   *
Mr. John Zoroski of Vancouver is
registered at the St. James in Edmonton.
* *   *
Mr. A. L. Berdoe of Vancouver is
on a trip to New York and registered
at the York.
* *   *
Mrs. Rolph, Richards street, Vancouver, has Mr. Black, a well-known
lumberman of Winnipeg, visiting her.
* *   *
Mr. W. Paul, a well-known business
man of Edmonton, spent New Year's
with his friends in Spokane.     He is
now in Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. W. J. Millchamp, a prominent
business man of Toronto, is at the
Coast and is registered at Hotel Vancouver.
* *   *
Mrs. William H. Horn of Agassiz
B.C., had Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Flummerfelt ancl family of Vancouver visiting her for New Year's.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Lantz and Mr.
Harry Cripps of Vancouver arc now
in the Nicola Valley on a visit to the
new coal mines.
* *   *
Mr. H. Barnes of Kelowna who has
accepted an engineering position in
Vancouver, will reside there in future.
* »   *
Mr. Lawrence Macrae, private secretary to the Hon. Richard McBride,
has returned to the Capital, after a
pleasant trip to Dewdney.
Mr. A. Prescott and family of
"Glenwood," Vancouver, have returned home after spending the holiday
season in Seattle.
* *   *
Mr. Owen McKay died at Edmonton on Tuesday, Dec. 30th. He was
a brother of Mrs. Shannon of Pembroke, Ont.
* *   *
Miss Jessie Carlaw and Mr. William Carlaw spent Xmas with their
brother in Victoria. They returned
to Fairview this week.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. J. Saint are down
from the north to spend a month
with Mr. Saint's parents on Westminster Ave., Vancouver.
* *   *
Mrs. Curtis of Ninth avenue, has
spent the past three weeks in Ed
monton.    She  returns  to Vancouver
this week.
* *   *
Mr. Donald McLaurin of the Rev*
elstoke High School staff, has returned after spending the New Year's
holiday with friends in Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. G. P. Carter, who
were guests at the Howitt-Currie wed*
ding in Vancouver, have returned to
their home  in Victoria.
* *   *
Mrs. Bertram Skuse, a new arrival
from England, has taken up residence
on Keefer street, Vancouver. Mr.
Skuse arrived a couple of months ago.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Roblin, formerly
of California, have taken a house on
Hawkes Ave., Vancouver and will reside there in future.
it      .       .
Mrs. Horace S. Hulme of Edmonton returned home this week after a
very pleasant visit to her sister, Mrs.
D. McNair, Nelson St., Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. C. E. E. Ussher of Winnipeg,
assistant passenger traffic manager of
the C. P. R., spent the holiday season
in Victoria with his family who are
wintering there.
* *   *
On the return journey home to
Tacoma, Wash., from Australia, where
a pleasant three months was spent,
Dr. and Mrs. Wagner spent some time
in Vancouver last week.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Ha rry Finnie, (nee
Miss Lois Beetz of Vancouver) are
spending the honeymoon in Spokane
and on their return this week will take
up residence in Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. G. F. Hardy, a prominent pulp
expert of New York, accompanied by
his wife, have been spending some
time in Vancouver and Victoria and
are this week in Seattle.
* *   *
Mr. A. Williams of Calgary is registered at the Metropole, Vancouver.
Mr. W. Sandhoff and family of
Manitoba are now settled in their
home on Seventh Ave. west, Vancouver, where they will reside.
* *   *
At the parsonage of t ehMount
Pleasant Methodist church, Vancouver, on Tuesday, Dec. 24th, Mr. Ellsworth Mustard was married to Miss
Sarah Jane Wood by the Wev. J. P.
Westman.
* *   *
Mrs. Goddard of Kamloops spent
the festive days with her parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Savage, Fifth Ave., Fairview,
Vancouver. She is now on a short
stay with relatives in  Ladner.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. James J. Wright are
now settled in their home at 1138
Cardero St., Vancouver. Mrs. Wright
was Miss Camilla Avery of St. Louis,
Mo.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. J. R. McDonald have
returned from a short trip to thc
Island this week. They have been
on a tour of the Coast cities and
coming recently from Portage la
Prairie,  have  decided  to  make  their
home in Vancouver.
* *   *
Mrs. Frank Harrison of Vancouver,
who spent New Years with Mr. and
Mrs. Fred Colson, Ottawa, is now
in Stratford, Ont., on thc return journey.
«   *   *
The marriage was solemnized on
Tuesday, Dec. 24th, at 400 Cordova
street, Vancouver, of Miss Margaret
Fordyce to Mr. James Wilkie. Miss
Annie Spence and Mr. J. Meldrum
assisted.
* *   »
Miss Clara Chadwick who has spent
the past term teaching school at
Tynehead, spent the holiday season
with her parents on Pender street,
Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. I. Clugson, who has been north
for some time, and recently spent
some time in Victoria, is now visiting relatives in Eburne.
* *   »
Mr. Duncan Macl.ean of Cranbrook
B. C, has the deep sympathy of a
large circle of friends in thc death of
his father, Mr. Hector Mayne Mac-
Lean, who passed away at the family
residence, 108 Strathcona Ave., Ottawa, on January 2nd, in thc 66th year
of his age.
The Merchants Bank
Canada
Established 1864.
Capital, fully paid $6,000,000
Reserve Funds   4,000,000
Head Office: Montreal
Banking By Mail.
Deposits and withdrawals can
be made by mail; no delay, and
will receive prompt attention.
Savings Bank Department.
Interest allowed quarterly at
highest current rate.
Victoria Branch: R. F. TAYLOR,
Manager.
Y. W. C. A.
1208 Government Street
VICTORIA.
Reading and rest rooms, lunch and
tea rooms. Instruction in English,
French, Music, Physical Culture,
Needlework, Domestic Science, etc.
Bible Class.' Social evening every
Wednesday.
Y. M. C. A.
A home for young men away from
home. Comfortable Reading Room,
Library, Game Room, Billiards, Hot
and Cold Shower Baths, Gymnasium
and efficient instruction.
Manitoba Free Press on file for
Middle West visitors.
40 BROAD STREET
VICTORIA
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
Best Buy.
BEST  BUT  IN  VICTORIA  OP  BUSINESS PROPERTY. WITH WATER
FRONTAGE ON JAMES BAT.
Double Corner on Wharf and Government streets, with 100 feet water
frontage on James Bay. This property
has the Post Ofllce to the North, the
C. P. R. Hotel to the East, Parliament
Buildings to the South, and a Steamship Company's wharf to the West of It.
Ab an Hotel Site the situation of these
lots Is unrivaled ln the City of Victoria,
hundred of thousands of dollars have
been spent ln valuable Improvements on
all sides of them by the Provincial Government, the City Council and the
C. P. R.   Price $52,600.
Easy terms can be arranged with deferred payments bearing Interest at 7
per cent.
For further particulars apply to
A O. P. FRANCIS, Broker,
510 Pender Street,
VANCOUVER. B. C.
ST. ANDREW'S
COLLEGE
TORONTO
A R.siri.atl.l »d D.y School ior Boy.
Handsome New Buildings, Larg*
Athletic Field. Carelul Oversight in
Bvery Department. First Class Staff.
Lower and Upper School. Boys prepared for the Universities and Business.
Calendar sent on Request.
Rev. D. Bruce Macdonald, M.A„LL.D>
Principal
Re-opens after Xmas on Jan. 8th, 190S.
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OF
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture
PHONE 893. VICTOR I*
WHY   NOT   HAVE   THE   BEST
THE REPUTATION OF
James Buchanan & Co'sSCOTCH   WHISKIES
It world-wide, and stands for the BEST that can be produced.
The following brands are for sale by all the leading dealers:
RED SEAL BLACK AND WHITE
ROYAL HOUSEHOLD      VERY OLD LIQUEUR SCOTCH
RADIGER & JANION, Sole Agent* for B.C.
CHRISTMAS
GOODS
Ward's Safety Razors
Curley Ideal Safety Razors
Whiltt's Razor Strops
I. X. L. Carving Sets
I. X. L. Pocket Cutlery
Boker's Pocket Cutlery
I. X. L. Table Cutlery
All in great variety and at right prices
FOR SALE BY
E. G.PRIORi& eo..
VICTORIA, VANCOUVER, KAMLOOPS, VERNON
LTO.
LTY.
Established 1867
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Cu.
52 Uovernment St., Victoria, B. C.
Charles Hayward, President. F. Caselton, Manager.
We make a specialty of Undertaking and Embalming,
An experienced certificated staff available at all times, day
and night.
Phones Nos. 48, 305, 404 or 594, Victoria.
The Y. B. 6. Novelty Works
Kim  AKTIQUB,  ABTIBTIO    AMD    AMHWlBHm»r.
DMIOina WOBX MADS TO OBDEB. ^^
I am now ready to fulfil any orders for all kinds of Banks, Stores
Offices, Churches. Barber Shops and Hotel Bar Fixtures and Furniture'
1000 Oianvllla StiMt     11     ::     11 11      VABOOUVSB  B  8
T.   L-tOATB,   Proprietor.
Investigate the
"Cushman" Harine Hotor
As good as the best.   Cheaper than the rest.
BAXTER & JOHNSON 811 Qovernment Street
Victoria, B. C. -.-.        .   .
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 1908
Western Society Notes.
Mr. and Mrs. Sweet and Mr. Wal-
I ter Sweet returned this week to their
home in Kennewick, Washington, af-
I ter a delightful holiday in Vancouver.
* ♦   »
The engagement is announced of
Miss Dorothy Robillard, youngest
daughter of Dr. Adolphe Robillard of
Ottawa to Mr. A. Maynard Bezanson
, 'f Edmonton, Alberta.
* *   *
Mr. Thomas Wylie Carleton and
Miss Eva Marvin Bolensky, both of
Vancouver, were married on Tuesday,
December 24th, in that city by Rev.
Dr.  Fraser.    They will reside there.
* *   *
On December 30th in St. Andrew's
church, Vancouver, Miss Edna Mac-
Quarrie was married to Mr. R. C.
Gosse  by  Rev.  R. J. Wilson.    The
honeymoon is being spent in Seattle.
* _    .
Mr. Malcolm McCannell, formerlv
of Glengarry, Ont., but who has recently spent some time in Manitoba,
is now on a visit to Mrs. E. Mc-
Cannel on Princess street, Vancouver.
* *   *
Mrs. Ledger, widow of the late A.
Kitt Ledger, who was formerly a
resident of Vancouver, but who died
recently in London, England, is visiting in the city of Vancouver, the
guest of Mr. and Mrs. McLachlan,
Ninth Ave., Fairview.
Mr. W. 1? Shatford of Penticton,
who spent last week in Vancouver, is
en route to Halifax. Hc will then
visit  the   West   Indies   and  Jamaica
before returning.
* *    *
On Christmas Day the Rev. Father
Naisens married in St. Joachim's, Mr.
Lome T. Murray of Edmonton to
Miss Anna Coffey of Toronto. They
will reside in Edmonton.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. MacFarlane
and baby Lorna have returned to
their home in Vancouver from a visit
of three months to Mrs. McFarlane's
cousins in Carleton Place, Ont. She
also visited her old home in Niagara
Falls and took  a  side trip to  New
York.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Potter of Winnipeg are spending some time with
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Potter, 1144
Pacilic street, Vancouver. Mrs. Edgar Potter was one of last summer's
Vancouver brides, and her many
friends are glad to welcome her back.
* *   *
Mr. James R. Hamilton, Jr., of
Vancouver, has the sympathy of
many friends in the death of his
father, which took place in Ottawa
on January 4th. Mr. James R. Hamilton, Sr., was very much respected by
a large circle of friends.
Miss Maud I. Cawley and Miss
M. Cawley spent the holiday season
at their home in Chilliwack, Miss
Maud returns to the Normal in January, while Miss Ethel is engaged as
teacher in the Fairfield Island school.
* *   *
Mr. Harry L. Webb and Mr. A.
Chapman of Chilliwack have returned
to their homes after attending the
preliminary session of the Normal
school in Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. R. Gorman, who has spent the
past six months in Vancouver, returned to Ottawa for the merry Christmas season. He is largely interested
in the British Columbia Tie and Timber Company.
Mr. and Mrs. N. Raines (nee Lillian May Wright, of Cloverdale), are
ensconced in their cosy new home on
Seymour street, Vancouver, and will
be at home to their friends shortly.
They spent the honeymoon in Portland.
* *   *
At St. Paul's church, Regina, Sask.,
on Thursday, Jan. 2nd, the Rev. E.
P. Selby Spencer, M.A., brother of
the bride, assisted by the rector of
St. Paul's church, married Miss Mabel
Harriet, second daughter of Rev. Canon Spencer of Mount Forest, Out.,
to Mr, Albert Seymour Maxwell,
manager of the Merchants Bank of
Canada, Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta.
* *   *
On December 23rd the Rev. C. C.
Owen united in marriage Mr. Evans
Holmes Goodfellow and Miss Edith
Victoria Thornley of Vancouver in
that city. The bride has a numerous
host of friends who testified in a
tangible manner with handsome
tokens of good-will and gifts of artistic merit.
_    .    .
On Dec. 23rd, at the residence of
Mr. Morice Wright, 1051 Hare St.,
Vancouver, Miss Edith L. Jost, formerly of Halifax, N.S., was married
to Mr. E. F. Roach of St. Ives, Cornwall, England, by the Rev. Robert
Milliken, B.A., pastor of the Wesley
Methodist church. After thc honeymoon spent in Calgary and Red Deer-
Albcrta, they will reside at 1070 Haro
St., Vancouver.
* *   *
At the manse of the First Presbyterian  church,  Vancouver,  on  Tues
day, December 24th, Rev. Dr. Fraser
united in wedlock Miss M. J. Bag-
ley of Aylwin, P.Q., and Mr. C. B.
Albert Corder. The hippy couple
will reside in Vancouver. The groom
is the only son of Abraham C. Corder of Brisbane, Australia.
* *   »
On the morning of the same date,
Dr. Fraser also united in matrimony
Mr. R. H. Baxter and Miss Amy
Gedge. Miss Edith Vicers was bridesmaid and Mr. J. Woolhead Griffin
was best man. They are at home to
their many friends on January 21st.
* *   *
Mr. G. W. Gallagher of Edmonton
is a guest at the Royal Alexander,
Winnipeg.
Mr. and Mrs. Bowker, who were
married in St. Luke's church, Ottawa,
on Jan. 4th, will arrive at their future
home in Rimby, Alberta, this week.
Mrs. Bowker, who was Miss Mabel H.
J. Bond, is a niece of (Hon.) Mrs.
William Templeman, of Victoria, B.
C, and youngest daughter of the late
Joseph Bond of Almonte.
* *   *
On Christmas Day at the residence
of Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Carman, 1999
Beach avenue, Vancouver, B.C., Miss
Ruby Akin, their niece, and the
daughter of the late A. C. Akin of
Cornwall, Ont., was married to Dr.
Albert Victor Summers of New Lis-
keard, Ont. The happy couple will
make their future home in New Lis-
keard.
* *   *
Another of the weddings taking
place on Xmas day in Fairview, Vancouver, was Mr. F. J. Mayers, principal of the Fairview public school, to
Miss Pearl Lloyd of Wapella, Sask.
Rev. H. Beachem was the officiating
clergyman. The newly married couple
will reside in Fairview.
At. St. Andrew's church, December
30th, in Vancouver, Mr. Harold Payn
LeSueur of Calgary and Miss Beatrice
Norton of Victoria were married.
They will reside in Victoria for the
winter and later make their home in
Calgary.
Miss Elsie Sparrow of Victoria
spent the past two weeks with Mrs.
Lester in Vancouver.
.    .    .
On Christmas day a double wedding
was solemnized at the residence of
the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. G.
H. Connor, 21 Thirteenth Ave., Vancouver, when Miss Norma A. was
wed to Mr. Harry Neely and Miss
Nora M. was married to Mr. Wilbur
A. Paul, both young men being from
Saskatchewan. The brides are twin
sisters and very popular and will
therefore be much missed as they go
to make their home in the near-by
province. They each in turn acted as
bridesmaid for the other and during
the ceremony stood under a white
wedding bell which was suspended
from an arch of ferns and holly, everything partaking of thc Xmas color
scheme, crimson, except the bridal
bouquets and wedding bell which were
composed of white roses. They were
both gowned alike in cream silk eolienne and their veils were caught up
with little coronets of roses. Guests
to the number of 75 or thereabouts
were in evidence and the gifts were
costly and handsome, some beautiful
specimens of cut glass and art pieces
being particularly noticed.
thence east 80 ehains;  thence south 80
chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains distant and in an easterly direction from east bank of Quatham River, about ten and one-half miles
east of Ramsy Arm; thenee west 80
ehains; thence north 80 chains; thenee
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains.
21st December,  1907.
MAX. J. CAMERON,
Jan 18 L. W. Kingsley, Agent.
In   courtship's  happy  days  gone  by
Before I married Stelle,
We used to sit upon the beach
Behind the same umbrella,
Now if it rains your humble friend
Must hold the one umbrella,
And get a soaking to the skin—
It barely covers Stella.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Max. J. Cameron,
of Vancouver, Merchant, intends to apply for a special timber licence over
the following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
about <i miles from Ramsay Arm, on the
main Quatham River, S. W. corner;
thence east SO chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west SO chains; thence
south 80 chains to point of commencement.
20th December, 1907.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
about 6 miles from Ramsay Arm, on the
main Quatham River; S. E. Corner;
thenoe 160 ohains N.; 40 chains W.; 160
ohains south; 10 ohalns east to point of
commencement.
December 20th, 1907.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about one chain distant and In an easterly direction from Quatham River,
about seven miles east of Ramsay Arm,
thenoe west SO ohalns; thence north SO
ohalns; thenoe east 80 chains; tnence
south  80 chains.
20th December, 1907.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about one chain distant and In an easterly direction from Quatham River,
about seven mlles east of Ramsay Arm,
thenoe east 80 chains; thenoe north 80
cliains; thenoe west JO chains; thence
south 80 chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 5—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains distant and In an easterly direction from east bank of Quatham River, about eight and one-half
miles east of Ramsay Arm; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east SO ohains; thenoe south 80 chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
about 10 chains distant and ln an easterly direction from east bank of Quatham River, about nine and one-half
miles east of Ramsay Arm; thence west
80   chains;    thence    north     80   chains;
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that Ed. Brown, of
Vancouver, B.C., Cruiser, intends to apply for a special timber license over the
following described  lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
on south shore of Burke Channel, about
one mile west of Lot No. 24IA; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains to shore line of
Burke Channel; thence west along shore
llne 80 chains more or less, to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated December 16, 1907.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
on south shore of Burke Channel, about
three miles west of Lot No.241 A; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 160 chains;
thence north 40 chains more or less, to
shore line of Burke Chanel; thence west
along shore line 160 chains more or less
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile south of Lot No. 241A,
on bank of Newcomb River, Burke Channel, thence north SO chains; thence west
80 chains', thence south 80 chains;
thence east SO chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 16th,  1907.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile south of lot No. 241A,
Burke Channel, adjoining post of claim
No. 3; thence north 80 chains; thence
east SO chains; thence south 80 chains;
thenee west SO chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 5—Commencing at a post planted
about 2 miles south of Lot No. 241A,
Burke Channel, and one mile south of
corner post of claim No. 3 and 4; thenoe
north 80 chains; thence east SO chains',
thence south SO chains; thenoe west SO
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles south of lot No. 241A.
Burke Channel, and two miles south of
S. W. corner of Claim No. 5; thence
west 40 chains; thence north 160 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thenoe south 160
chains to point of commencement and
containing 6*10 acres, more or less.
Dated December 17th,  1907.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
about four and one-half miles south
of lot No. 241A. Burke Channel; on a
bank of a small river about one-half
mile east of claim No. 6; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south SO chains; thence west SO chains
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated December 17th,  1907.
No. 8—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles east of claim No. 7, on
north hank of unnamed river, emptying
Into Koeye Lake, soutli of Burke Channel, thence north 80 chains', thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thenoe
east SO chatns to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres more or
less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 9—Commencing at a post planted
ahout one mlle south of Claim No. 8.
on north bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, soutli of Burke Channel; thenoe south 40 chains; thence west
160 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thenco east 160 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile east of claim No. 9,
on north bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel; thence north SO chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thenoe
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 11—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile east of Claim No. 9, and
adjoining corner post of claim No, 10
on north bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke channel; thence west 80 chains; thence south
SO chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or
less.
Dated December 17,  1907.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted
about 20 chains west of Claims No. 9
and 10, on south bank of small river
emptying Into Koeye Lake, south of
Burke Channel, thence north 160 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 160
chains; thence west 40 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
Dated December 17,  1907.
No. 13—Commenolng at a post planted
about one and one-half miles south ot
the head of Koeye Lake, south of Burke
Channel, thenoe east 80 chains; thenco
north SO chains; thenoe west SO chains
to shore line of Koeye Lake; thenoe
south along shore line SO ohalns to point
of commencement and containing 640
nores more or less.
Dated   December   18th,   1907.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted
nbont one and one-half miles south of
the head of Koeye Lake, south of Burke
Channel, thenoe east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to shore of Koeye Lake, thence north
along shore SO chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres.
Dated December 18th, 1907.
No. 16—Commenolng at a post planted about one-half mlle east from the
foot of Koeye Lake, on the north shore
of said lake; thenoe north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
ohalns; to shore of Koeye Lake; thence
west along shore of said lake SO chains
to point of commencement, and containing 640 aores, more or less.
Dated December 18th, 1907.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles south of Lot 241 A,
Burke Channel, and about one mile south
of corner post of claims No. 3 and 4:
thenoe nnrth 80 ohalns: thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 17—Commencing at a post planted
ahout two miles south of Lot No. 241A,
Burke Channel, and nne mile south of
corner post of claims No. 3 and 4; thenoe
east 80 chains; thenoe south 80 chains;
thenoe west SO chains; thence north SO
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
Jan.  18 ED. BROWN.
Our Store
HAS A FINE LINE OF HIGH
CLASS TOILET ARTICLES.
We have just imported a fine assortment of French and English Hair
Brushes.
SEE THE NEW-SHAPED
WHALEBONE BRUSH.
USE  BOWES*  BUTTERMILK
TOLIET  LOTION  FOR
CHAPPED HANDS.
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
Government Street, near Yates St.
VICTORIA, B. C.
r
TRAVELLERS' GUIDE
]
VICTORIA
STRAND HOTEL
VICTORIA
The home oi nil theatrical and raudt? Uc
artists while in the Capital city, alw ol
other kindred bohemlans.
WRIQHT & FALCONER, Proprietor..
CAMBORNE
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining men and
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
BANFF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
Banff's Most Popular fa a Day Hotel.
Close to Station and Sulphur
Bath.-..
N. K. LUXTON, Proprietor.
PHOENIX.
BOND SIGN CO.
VANCOUVER
S i g ns
ELECTRIC
BOARD
METAL
BULLETIN
GLASS
COTTON
SHOW CARD
In up-to-date alylss.  Estimates and
designs furnished.
SWEDISH
MASSAGE
TURKISH BATHS.
VIBRATOR TREATMENT.
MR.   BJORNFELT,   SWEDISH
MASSEUR.
Special   Massage  and  Hometreat-
ment by appointments.
Room 2,  Vernon  Block,  Douglas
Street, Victoria.
Hours—1 r to 12 a.m.   Phone 1629.
HOLLY TREES
Prim from ag <*"ta to I5.00, according
to tite.   Writa for teed aad trw cata-
JAY & CO. VICTORIA, B. C.
Pantage's
Theatre
JOHNSON STREET
VICTORIA, B. C.
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE
Matinees (any part of house),... 10c
Evening!, Balcony  10c
Lower Floor  10c
Boxes    lOo
Matinees
Every Afternoon
at
3 0'CIock.
Night Performances
8 and 9.15
Deane's Hotel
PHOENIX, B. C.
New. Modern hot water system. Electric
lighted. Tub and shower baths aud laundry In
connection.   The miners' home.
" DANNY " DEANE, Proprietor
ROSSLAND
Hoffman House
ROSSLAND, B. C.
Rates $i.oo per day and up.   Cafe in
Connection.
QREEN & SrilTH. Prop's.
NELSON.
HOTEL HUME
NELSON,   B. C,
Leading Hotel of the Kootonaya.
J. FRED HUME,       ■       Proprietor.
Silver King Hotel,
NELSON. B. C.
The home ol the Industrial Workers
of the Kootenays.
W. E. HcCandllsh,     •      Proprietor
Royal Hotel
NELSON, B. C.
Tho Beet Family Hotol in tha City.
$1.00 a day.
Mr*. Wm. Roberts,       Proprietress
BEDDING
PLANTS
Cheap Prices.   Get our price list.
Johnston's Seed Store
City Market
VICTORIA
Victoria
FRUIT
and
Farm Lands
Write for "Home List" and
information.
R   S.   DAY
and
BEAUMONT BOGGS
Realty Brokers.
830 PORT  BTSEBT      I:      VICTORIA.
THOMAS OATTIBAU,
Builder  and  Oeneral  Contractor.
Tandera give* on Brick, Stone an
Frame, Alterations, Parquetry rioorlm
Office, Bank, Store and Baloon Flttlngi
Pile Driving, Wharfei and Deck Shed;
constructed and repaired.
noimu. 1
13
THR     VUVOV        CyA-TT-rrr.
THE WEEK, SATURDAY JANUARY i8, 1908
fyfyfyfyfyfytyTJfcfy'fyfy'ljfc'ty  ful  performance of the kind  I  have
a|s t ojlg ever seen.   Apart from this wonder-
X iiusic &nd      X ful act there is little tocno°se be_
*?? ?T  tween the boy and the girl, both are
The     Df-Smfl. graceful, skilful and accomplished to
*llr TP  a degree,  and no  one who admires
V§?^^^^^^^^^?fr^?it?  the very cleverest work on the wire
The Gingerbread Man. should  miss   seeing  them.    Another
There is a gorgeous and happy end- act which pleased me immensely was
ing to the story, not spoiled by the that of Horton and LaFriska, entitled
fact that Carmalita, thc Fairy, re- The Messenger Boy and his Doll. It
forms Fudge, the black art exponent, is not too high praise to give to the
Incidental to all the rapid and hu- lady to say that her imitation of a
morous action of the piece are de- doll is equal to that given in La
lightful lyrics, the most catchy music, Poupee, when the popular French skit
and all with a gorgeous costume and was played in London ten years ago.
scenic setting. The cast especially The Middleton Military Singing Girls
selected to present this novel and gave a splendid entertainment, the
musical fantasy would prove a not- soprano and contralto being very suc-
able one in any comic opera. All are cessful in solo as well as quartette
prime favorites, and some of them work. All these girls are much above
individual stars. A glance at a few the average vaudeville singers. The
of the names is sufficient: Evelyn other turns naturally suffer by com-
Kellogg, Nellie Nico, Mabel Day, An- parison, the weakest being that of
nie Dresslor, Fannie Martine, Amy James McDuff, as an imitator and
Thropp, Lulu Borden, Fred. Nice, mimic, but all cannot be stars and
Ross Snow, Garrick Major, James certainly the programme contains
McElhern, Percy Matson, Lute Vroo- three star turns described above. The
man, Bert Lovoy, and a grand beauty house has been packed at every per-
chorus of forty well-trained voices, formance and on Wednesday night.
This with an augmented orchestra I witnessed the unusual occurrence
under the leadership of Fred. Walz, of a large crowd being unable to get
makes a complete organization num- in even for the late performance. It
bering sixty-two. is to be hoped that the slackness of
_— business in the East will divert more
Herbert Witherspoon, Basso and     performances   of   this   class to the
Programme Builder. Western circuits.
Herbert Witherspoon, who comes Sunday afternoon, January 19th, at
to this city on January 27 under the 3'30 o'clock, the third band concert
auspices of the Victoria Musical So- given by the Victoria City Band, Sid-
ciety, at the Victoria Theatre is a ney Rogers, Conductor, assisted by
bass singer with _an agreeable, flex- Miss Bertha Deaville (soprano), Miss
ible and extensive voice, and pos- Sadie Rattray (elocutionist), Prof. E.
sesses that which is even more essen- Claudio (violinist), accompanist, Mr.
tial to success, intelligence, good taste Geo. Werner,
and correct feeling. 1. March  de  Concert,  "Tthe   Nye-
Witherspoon is perhaps more of a      olion"    Chas.   Sanglear
cosmopolitan in art than any other 2. (a) Sextette fr. "Tricia". .Donizetti
American singer—at least, any male       (b) A Tone Poem A. Roberts
American singer now before the pub- 3- Vocal Solo, "God's Garden"	
lie.    His perfect artistic mastery and          Frank Lambert
the   intensity   and   versatility   of   his Miss Bertha Deaville.
dramatic  force,  give  him a  position 4- Grand Selection (No. 1)—"Mari-
at the head of all  of the American      tana"   Walace
male singers of today. 5- Serenade, "Dream of Heaven"...
Mr. Witherspoon has a well-defined        F. H. Losey
knowledge of the value of consonants, While this number is being played
and    their    uses    in    rounding    out a collection will be taken up for
phrases,  and the  production  of  fine Victoria City Band fund.
dramatic effect.    His  diction is  per.  6. Violin Solo, "Norma" Belline
feet and his enunciation clear and dis- Prof. E. Claudio.
tinct;   every  word   he   sings  is   per- 7. Overture,   "Rosamunde". .Schubert
fectly understood, whether it be Eng- 8. Clarionet  Solo  (Air Varie)   fr.,
lish, German or French; he has dra-       "Der   Freischutiz    Foreith
matic in stinct, thorough mastery of Musician, E. Muriset.
the effect of the various tone colors, 9. Reading      Selected
and his  facial  expression clearly in- Miss Sadie Rattray.
dicates the thought and emotion con-  10. Paraphrase, "The Palms"... Faure
veyed   by   the   poet   and   composer.   11. Finale, "All Hail the Power of
All   this  has  much  to  do  with   the      Jesus Name"  F. A. Pattella
main feature of Mr. Witherspoon's The fourth sacred concert will be
work. given    Sunday   afternoon,    February
There are many excellent singers 9th, for the benefit of the Seamen's
in both Europe and America who Institute. At this concert the band
hide their excellence as vocalists and will play a request programme. Per-
artists under a cloud, produced by sons wishing favourite numbers
badly selected programmes. Wither- should write the bandmaster, S.
spoon is not one of these. He is Rogers, Orchard Street, not later than
essentially a program builder, and Sunday, 25th inst.
selects his numbers with fine discrim- The week will close with two spe-
ination from among thc most famous cial 10-cent children's matinees this
of thc different epochs of musical de- afternoon and the usual performances
velopment. Prodigal in his numbers, tonight. The first matinee will start
he allows them to run riot from a promptly at 2.30, the doors being
portion devoted to operatic and ora- opened at 2 o'clock and the second at
torio   selections,   from   classical   and 3-45-
modern songs in German, modern A big bill of feature acts arranged
songs in English, and modern French for next week will be headed by Vir-
selections as well, closing his pro- ginia Keller's Seven Virginia Belles,
gramme with a group of old melodies a bevy of beautiful girls who have a
from the English and Irish, partial- swinging act of song and dance,
larly arranged and adapted to his Other numbers wil be Zinelle and
voice and style. That is why today Boutcllc, comedy operatic duettists;
Herbert Witherspoon is heralded as Paul Stevens, a one-legged acrobat,
America's greatest basso, because his who docs marvelous work with a
programmes please the greatest num- pole and on a slack wire; Thos. Glen-
ber of patrons. roy and  Marie Russell in a  comedy
  sketch  "At  Casey's Reception"; Joe
The New Grand, Byron and May Blanche in the com-
It was announced last week that edy playlet, entitled "Matrimonial
Manager Jameson would have one of Sweets in Family Jars"; Thos. J.
the best shows of the season at his Price, singing the illustrated song,
popular vaudeville house during the "The Heart You Lost in Maryland
coming week, and lie has certainly You'll Find in Tennessee"; New Mov-
made good. I make bold to say that, ing Pictures, "For Peace or War,"
it is the best vaudeville show that has and a new overture by the orchestra
ever been staged in Victoria. Two under the direction of Prof. Nagel.
turns would be a credit to any London or New York House. The first
is the wire performance of the Eddy
family, Rudolph is a marvel and his
backward summersault on the wire
easily the most sensational and skil-
good all round show was the general
opinion. Lucretia's trained leopards
and panthers proved a big attraction
and is an act worthy of special mention. Miss Gordon gives a pretty
exhibition in "physical culture," and
displays great ability in this particular line. Chris Magee does some
dancing and sings an Irish song that
goes very well. Cal Stewart & Co.,
in the rural sketch, "Uncle Josh on
the Boweiy," is very good, it is an
amusing comedy and Mr. Stewart is
a good entertainer; his laughing song
is quite a hit. Miss Hebson has a
very pleasing voice and good appearance and makes a good impression.
The Pantagescope has good moving
pictures and arc quite interesting. The
bookings for next week are Shed-
man's troupe of the largest and best
trained dogs on the stage. Dan. J.
Harrington the famous ventrilloquist,
one of the very best, with his six
wooden-headed dummies—a wonderful act in ventrilloquism; Caccia and
Amato, fancy and novelty dancers, in
an original conception; the Mixer &
Ward, a very clever team; Phyllis
Allen, the gifted contralto in popular
songs; Miss Crawford sings See-Saw
next week with pretty illustrations
and the Pantagescope will offer something entirely  new.
lays all the fault on the present capitalistic system and it does so in language that can only be denominated
rank. The editorial might have been
lifted in its entirety from the Socialist organ, and suggests reminiscences
of the time when D. V. Mott was a
responsible sober-minded citizen. The
contrast between his first pen efforts
in the past ten years ago and the
screeds which arc now to be found in
The Ledger is both startling and instructive.
Notes on
Provincial News
Columbia Valley.
The Golden Star is doing good work
in advertising Columbia Valley. The
new head line above the title of the
paper runs "Gateway to the Fertile
Columbia Valley." To keep this before the eyes of its readers is to attract attention to one of the most
fruitful districts of the Province. All
the way from Golden to Canal Flats
will within a few years be under cultivation, all that is needed is a railway and irrigation. The money stringency may postpone railway construction for a little while, but not for
long, the resources of the valley are
well known and as soon as financial
conditions readjust themselves money
will be forthcoming for development.
Progressive Nelson.
S. S. Taylor, K.C, has been for
some years the Chairman of the Progressive party in Nelson. Since the
departure of John Houston to fresh
fields and pastures new, the party of
which John was a member has not
been much in evidence as formerly,
but it has trained its chairman for
higher honours in the civic service,
and he has just been elected Mayor
by acclamation. Mr. Taylor will
make an excellent Chief Magistrate,
in addition to being learned in the
law, he is a man of property and of
exceptional business capacity. His
practice has run largely along the
lines of important commercial interests. As he is the choice of all
parties there is no doubt he will receive that general support without
which no Mayor can make a success.
There are skeins to disentangle, and
knots to untie in connection with
Nelson's Municipal affairs, none of
them will present difficulties to Mr.
Taylor and under his management the
Capital of the Kootenay will undoubtedly prosper even more than
during the last year or two.
LLOYD & CO., chimney sweepers!
and house-cleaners, 716 Pandoral
St. Satisfaction and cleanliness!
guaranteed. All orders by post orl
otherwise promptly attended to.|
Trial respectfully solicited.
PHONE 191.
To the following appropriate comment clipped from the columns of thc
Moyie Leader, The Week pronounces
a hearty Amen:
"The Cranbrook Prospector has
commended its fourteenth year. Editor
Grace was the trail blazer of journalism in East Kootenay, and is deserving of a lot of credit for the part he
has taken in thc development of the
country."
Will You Take
$500 a Year...
for your spare time. In other
words the man who has a couple
of hours morning and evening
and will employ it in operating
A Cyphers Incubator
at his home can make from $500
in twelve months. We have a
unique plan to work on and will
be pleased to explain it to any
one  interested.    Call  or  write.
Watson &
McGregor
647 Johnson  Street,
VICTORIA, B. C.
In The Limelight.
According to the Nanaimo Free
Press Comrade Hawthornthwaite is
bent on getting into the limtlight as
early in the session as possible. He
has graciously allowed himself to be
interviewed and has informed his interviewer that it is essential that the
conduct of the Lieutenant-Governor
on the Japanese question should be
looked into and as he anticipates that
the leader of the Opposition will decline to take the matter up he intends
to do so himself in the early hours
of the Session. It was inevitable that
some explanation of His Honor's attitude should be demanded but the
fates are indeed unkind to a man who
has erred more through constitutional
incapacity than deliberate intention
should fall into the hands of a Socialist leader.
Worth Thinking Over.
The Prince Rupert Empire has fallen foul of the C.P.R., time was when
its able Editor was loud in the defence of the great Railway Corporation, now he is exhausting the vials
of his wrath in holding them up to
public condemnation, as indifferent to
public opinion. He declares that it is
managed strictly for "a pound of
flesh," in order that its owners in
Europe shall not have their dividends
cut down on the fictitious value of its
shares. The foundation of this attack
is the employment by the Railway
Company of Japanese coolies in place
of white labour. It is refreshing to
know that this is as great an offence
in the eyes of the Prince Rupert Empire as if perpetrated by the G.T.P.
Epidemic.
The disease from which Mr. Morley
and his chosen organizers are suffering is evidently epidemic. It has
broken out in Nanaimo where the
pastor of the Haliburton Street Methodist Church has stated from the pulpit that the Coal City is controlled by
thc liquor interests. These hair-
brained charges usually emanate from
men of respectable character and
weak judgment. Everyone knows how
baseless was the charge when applied
to Victoria, it does not seem to have
any better foundation in Nanaimo,
for both Mayoral candidates, Alderman Hodgson and Mayor Planta havc
indignantly repudiated the charge and
have declared that to their positive
knowledge it has no foundation.
SEEDS, TREES, PLANTS,
for the farm, garden, lawn, boulevard or conservatory. Acclimatised
stock. Oldest established nursery on
thc Mainland.   Catalogue free.
M.   J.   HENRY
3010  Westminster  Road,   Vancouver
Victoria Theatre
The Gingerbread Man
The  Brightest  Musical  Comedy of
the Day.
Monday, Jan. 20
Pantages Theatre.
The Johnson Street theatre played
to large houses during the week and
the programme that was presented
was all that could be wished for—a
Labour's Uncertain Rlit,
The Fernie Ledger has struck a
new gait. It is rapidly becoming a
full fledged Socialist organ. In an
editorial in its issue of the nth inst.,
it deals with the present money stringency and slackness of work in what
can only be regarded as an unenlightened and unreasoning manner. It
VICTOBIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle, of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James H.
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Contractor, Intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 mlles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the northeast corner post; thence west
SO chains', thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement.
June 14,  1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan 11. James H. McLauchlan.
British Columbia
Permanent Loan and
Savings Company.
DIVIDEND NO. 19
Notice is hereby given that a
dividend at the rate of NINE
FEB CENT, per annum has this
day been declared on the Permanent Stock of the Company for the
half year ending December 31st,
1S0T, and that the same will be
payable at the Head Office of the
Company, No. 321 Cambie Street,
Vancouver, B.C., on and after
January 15th, 1908.
By order of the Board,
THOS. X LANGLOIS,
President.
Vancouver,  Jan.  llth,  1908.
DIVIDENDS
In another column will be found
the semi-annual dividend notice
of The B. C. Permanent Loan &
Savings Company, showing that a
dividend at the rate of nine per
cent, per annum upon Class "A"
Permanent Stock has been declared for the past half year.
NEW    WESTMINSTER    LAND     DISTRICT.
District  of  New  Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Roman Z. Chandler, of Vancouver, B. C, ocupation
Broker, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
ten chains south of the southeast corner of D. L. 1413; thenee north 160
chains; thence east 40 ehains; thence
south 160 ehains; thence west 40 chatns
to place of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
December 23, 1907.
Jan  11. ROMAN Z.  CHANDLER.
ONE — WEEK   	
VICTORIA   LAND  DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle of
Victoria, B. C.„ Merchant, and James
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Contractor, intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the southeast corner post; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
June 11,  1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan. 11. James H. McLauchlan.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastie, of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James H.
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, contractor, intend to apply for a special
licence over the following described
lands:
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west, of Robinson's
Bight on a small unnamed creek, being
the northeast corner post; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 ehains
to point of commencement.
June 12, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan. 11. James H. McLauchlan.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle, of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James
H. McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Contractor, intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the northwest corner post; thence south
160 chains; thence east 40 ehains; thence
north 160 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
June 13, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan 11. James H. McLauchlan. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 1908.
Sporting
Comment
The result of the Rugby football
match at Oak Bay last Saturday, between Victoria and Vancouver, was n
sore disappointment to the many followers of the local team, but there is
no complaint, as the game was the
best that has been played in this city
for years, and until within a few minutes of time it was practically even.
Both teams played good, hard football, but it must be acknowledged
that the visitors showed to beter advantage than the home team, and the
locals had sufficient opportunities
given them to win the match, but they
failed to take advantage of the openings and failed to cross the line. The
back division of the visitors outplayed
the home players, and it is to them
the credit of winning the game belongs. The three-quarters especially
were overshadowed by the visitors.
At full-back the players were evenly
matched, both doing their work nicely.
In the half-back division, Newcombe
and Brae were more conspicuous than
their opponents and played a much
better game. In this department alone
the home players had it over the
visitors. In the scrum the visitors
were much heavier and worked better
together. The locals were without
the services of Sparks and Bellew,
both of whom played an excellent
game against Stanford, and their loss
was felt considerably. Although they
were defeated, the locals have no
cause to bc discouraged, and if another game could be arranged, it
might be that the locals would come
out on top. If, however, the locals
expect to get to the top, they must
practice regularly, especially in tackling and passing the ball. It was in
this line that the Vancouverites showed to advantage. Thc combination
work on the part of thc visitors was
good, and if the locals could only get
to be as proficient as their opponents,
there would be no cause for complaint. In kicking, the locals easily
had it on the Mainland players. The
loose scrum formation of the forwards, which was so conspicuous
against Stanford was not so noticeable
last Saturday. Whether this was on
account of the loss of the forwards
or better work on the part of Vancouver, is hard to say. The game has
demonstrated, however, that Victoria
has a team of which every citizen
should be proud, and I was particularly pleased to see the large attendance. Now that it has ben shown
that the locals can play the game, it
is hoped that the citizens will continue to support the game as they have
done in the past two matches. If this
spirit would prevail all the time, there
is no reason whatever why Victoria
should not maintain a first-class fifteen and one which would bring credit
to the city they represent. Although
the team was defeated, every man on
the line-up played his best, and that
is all that can be asked of any man,
and The Week extends its hearty
congratulations to the team which
put up such a gallant fight against the
champion team from Vancouver.
prising, however, that no mention of
this incident was made by the referee
in his report to the association. This
is a matter that should not be overlooked, for if the players are allowed to do this once, they will certainly take every opportunity to do it
again, and once the referee has been'
lax, they will have a precedent. That
rowdyism must and will be put down
is easily shown by the rulings of the
association in the Old Country. We
hope for the good name of the Vancouver Island association and for the
welfare of football in general, that in
future such tactics on the part of
players will be severely dealt with.
There has been considerable comment recently on the ability of Wat
Adams, of this city, as a boxer, in
which he has been severely criticized.
I have not had the pleasure of ever
seeing Adams in the ring, but I have
watched him very carefully in the two
football matches he has played with
the Victoria team, and I have arrived
at the conclusion that if he boxes as
well as he plays football, Victorians
may have no hesitancy in calling him
their representative. He is going all
the time, and never once did I notice
the least sign of funking.
With two matches in sight, the
lovers of the manly art in this city
should within the next few weeks witness some good boxing. The sports
of this city are great believers in boxing; their one object, however, is that
it must be run on the square. If this
is done, any good match will attract t
sufficient crowd to insure a profitable
evening. It is hoped that those who
are behind the scheme to re-establish
thc game in this city will meet with
success.
Victorians had a certain amount of
satisfaction on Saturday in the defeat
of the Vancouver intermediates at the
hands of the local boys. Although tin-
game was not so important as the senior attraction, there is, however, .1
certain amount of satisfaction in
knowing that the younger players
from Victoria are able to take thc
measure of the visitors. This is a
matter of congratulation, as it makes
the future of rugby in this city appear very bright.
Thc second match in the Vancouver
Tsland series was played at Nanaimo
on Saturday last, when the team from
that city defeated the Ladysmith
team. From reports of the game, it
was a very interesting match, in
which considerable hard feeling was
shown, and in fact two of the players
actually came to blows.    It is   sur-
A well-known Victoria athlete takes
exception to some remarks which I
made last week with reference to his
declining at the last moment to play
for the Victoria Rugby team against
Stanford. In my defence, I have only
to say that no paper published at the
Coast has been more generous in its
treatment of the athlete in question
than The Week, and assuredly the
paper which awards praise when it is
deserved, has a right to blame when
a man fails to come to the scratch.
A true sport is always willing to place
himself in thc hands of his club or of
the men responsible for getting the
team together, unless he is absolutely
too unwell to play or has some other
sufficient reason. He allows them and
not himself to be the best judges as
to whether he should take part in a
game. The player in question had
been asked to take part in the most
important game of the season, and
until the day before the match was
due the committee understood that
he would play. They counted on him
and the splendid form hc had shown
in two recent matches made it look as
if victory or defeat might depend on
his presence in the field. When he explained that his left arm and hand had
been injured, and that he was not in
first-class condition, Meredith offered
to change sides with him, a very generous offer, so that he would not have
to fend off with his left hand; however, at the last moment almost, he
backed down. But lhe thing which
strengthened me in commenting adversely on his action was that just
before the match was due to commence, he offered to play if required.
This clearly showed that even if not
in perfect condition, he realized that
he could play and need not have withdrawn his consent. I have no desire
to say anything the least bit unkind,
but the true interests of sport demand
plain speaking, and it will be a sorry
day when the Press is not at liberty
to give an honest opinion even about
champion athletes. In the present instance, full justification for what I
said is furnished by the fact that I
have been personally thanked by a
number of leading footballers and by
some of the friends of the player in
question for what I said.
UMPIRE.
Victor-Berliner firam=o=phone
Sacred Music
Mr. Borem Wright—I'm sorry, Miss
Kutting isn't in. Tell her I called,
will you?
The Maid (absently)*—I did, sir.
Wouldn't it be fine
to sit in your home
and hear the Trinity1
Choir sing "Jesus
Lover of My Soul"
and"RoclcofAges";
or the Haydn Quartet sing, "Where is
My Boy Tonight"
and"0 That Will Be
Glory For Me"; or
to listen to the chants
and other sacred
music by the
Gregorian and
Sistine Choirs?
That's exacdy what you
can do v/ith a Victor or Berliner Gram-o-phone.
The powerful soul-stirring hymns and the magnificent anthems and
oratorios of the masters, sung by noted soloists and famous hoirs, are yours
whenever you want to hear them.
The Victor or Berli.. r Gram-o-phone plays this music true to the living
voice—you have never lunwn the full beauty of sacred songs until you have
heard them on one of these instruments.
The Victor or Be/liner Gram-o-phone not only enables you to have
sacred concerts at home, but puts the best entertainment of every sort at your
command. The magnificent voices of the most famous«grand-opera stars, the
world's greatest bands and famous instrumentalists, the latest song-hits, old-
time ballads, side-splitting jokes and comic song:, the liveliest dance music
—all this and more you can have with a Victor or Berliner Gram-
o-phone and only with one of these famous instilments.
Ask any Victor or Berliner dealer to plav anv sacred music or anything
Also ask him to tell you about the eisy terms on /_y_,
else you want to hear.
whicli you can buy one of these Instruments,
Use the coupon aud get free catalogues.
The Berliner Gram-o-phone
Company of Canada, Ltd.
HONTHEAU
1111
r$t4iY
" .->
The Gingerbread Man.
TIMBER
If you have any
timber for sale
list it with us
We can sell it
BURNETT, SON  & CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,   B. C.
The days are getting Cold.
THE
WILSON BAR
Is Warm and Comfortable.
VISIT IT.
648 Yates St., Victoria B. C.
COAL
J. KINGHAM __ CO.,
f ictoria Agents for the Nanaimo Collieries.
New Wellington Coal.
The best household coal in tha marke   at
Current rates.   Anthracite coal for sale.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA
On Monday last Mrs. McBride
gave a tea in honor of Mrs. Stewart,
of Mission City, who is her guest.
The tea table was daintily decorated
with pale pink carnations and fern.
The hostess wore a very becoming
gown ol grey silk, elaborately trimmed with rich lace, and Mrs. Stewart
a handsome frock of cream lace.
Among thc guests were: Mrs. Cecil
Roberts, Mrs. W. S. Gore, Mrs. Courtney, Mrs. Watson, Mrs. Beauchamp
Tye, Mrs. Matthews, Mrs. Ker, Mrs.
Rochester, Mrs. Jones, Mrs. Grant,
Mrs.  Brett, Mrs. Green, Mrs. Spratt,
hame, Mrs. Hall, Mrs. Gordon Hun-
Mrs, Ellis, Mrs. Tatlow, Mrs. Grater, Mrs. Higgins, Mrs. C. Todd, Mrs.
Fell, Mrs. McTavish, and the Misses
Rochester, Fell, G. and B. Irving, D.
Wilson, McTavish, Bowron, and Mary
Lawson.
*   *   *
Mr. Kenneth Gillespie and Mr.
Kirkby. of Riverside, Cowichan Lake,
aft-j'.' spending a week in town, went
back on Wednesday.
.    *   +
Miss Dorothy Green, after spending
the Christmas holidays in Victoria,
left for Los Angeles on Wednesday.
Holland French and
Japan Bulbs
For Fall Planting.
SEEDS, TREES, PLANTS
for the farm, garden, lawn, boulevard   or   conservatory.    Acclimated
stock.   Oldest established nursery oa
the Mainland of B. C.   Catalogue free.
M. J. HENRY,
3010 Westminster Rd, Vancouver, B.C
P
|/n t IV I S   and Trade Marke
obtained in all countriei.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Enjineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville St.
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
Leave Your Baggage Checks at thc
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.       A. E, KENT, Proprietor
LATEST NUMBERS
English
Magazine
CHUMS
TIT-BITS
THE STRAND
PEARSONS
PUNCH
KNIGHT'S BOOKSTORE
TIOTOBIA, B. 0. Vi
THR wxtav
—I A  -n-TIT-. ■-»••.-
THE WEEK   SATURDAY, JANUARY 18   1908.
Incorporated HOB
Capital, (600,000.00
Capital Increased
in 1807
to ...12,000,000.00
Subscribed
Capital,    J550.000
Reserve . . »B0,000
Surplus, Jan. M.
1907   .  .  $110,000
3. B. UATHEBS, Gen. Has.
IN   CLOSING   UP   ESTATES
either as Executors or Assignees
the Dominion Trust Co., Ltd., is
never influenced by ulterior motives. Their entire ambition,
efTort, and energy ls directed towards securing the best possible
returns for all concerned.
Name this company executor ln
your will. Blank will forms furnished free of charge and stored
in our safety deposit vaults,
when we are made your executor.
DOMINION TRUST CO.,
Limited.
338 Haatingi St., Weat
Vancouver, B. C.
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
MM  Government Street. .Victoria, B.C.
IM  Hastings  St Vancouver,  B.C.
W. BLAKBMORB. .Manager and Bdltor
A Prophet in Babylon
A few weeks ago The Week made
reference to an epoch-making book,
which has just been published, entitled, "A Prophet in Babylon," by W.
J. Dawson, At that time I had only
taken a cursory glance at it and had
read several eulogistic reviews. Since
then I have carefully read thc book,
and as it has attracted universal attention, and will undoubtedly be classed as the book of the season, no
apology is needed for dealing with it
at greater length in this article.
First of all, let me say a few words
about thc author. Mr. W. J. Dawson
started life as a student for the Wes-
leyan Methodist ministry. He took
his theological course, I believe, at
Headingly, under the governorship of
Dr. Waddy, one of the most eminent
Methodist divines of his day, and
father of the popular and brilliant Q.
C.,' S. S. Waddy.
Young Dawson, in his early twenties, gave evidence of extraordinary
ability. There was something about
him which marked him out from his
fellows. He had long black hair,
which hc was vain enough to cultivate until it hung in more or less
graceful curls nearly to his shoulders.
He had an aquiline and slightly hooked nose, and what with his black hair
and black eyebrows, his general appearance suggested a Jewish caste, ln
the last year which he spent at college
he attracted the attention of Dr.
Morley Punshon, who had heard him
preach, and who did not hesitate to
express the opinion that he was destined to become an orator.
Unfortunately, this report reached
the ears of Dawson, who was not unnaturally flattered at reciving praise
from so eminent an authority; the result was that for ten or fifteen years
he continued to grow long hair and to
affect mannerisms which were distinctly out of place in the pulpit, and
occasioned much comment on the
platform.
But nothing could obscure the iri-
icllcctual brilliance and thc oratorical
ability of Dawson, who made headway
in his Church, and at the age of
thirty had been widely marked out as
a coming man.
About this time he commenced to
give a series of popular lectures, and
I heard the first of them in Wolverhampton. He took a subject which
had furnished the greatest pulpit ora
tor of modern times, Dr. Punshon,
with the subject for one of his most
popular lectures, "Savonarola, the
Monk of Venice." At no time did
Dawson suggest a comparison with
Punshon; he was interesting, picturesque, and dramatic, but his deliverances were never. characterized by
profound thought or originality in
conception or expression. And above
all, there was none of that divine 'afflatus" which was so marked a feature of Dr. Punshon, and which placed
him in a class by himself.
One could admire the skill of Dawson, and take delight in his mastery
of picturesque expresison, and epigrammatic phraseology, but the power
to move men was absent. 1 have
heard Beecher, Canon Liddon, Bishop
l.ightfoot, Phillips Brooks, and al!
the other pulpit orators of the last
forty years, but with the single exception of Cardinal Newman, whose
motive power was essentially different, not one of them could compare
with Dr. Punshon for what can perhaps best be described as moving influence.
After this Mr. Dawson rapidly
forged ahead, until some sixteen or
seventeen years ago he left the Methodist Church to acept the pastorate
of one of the largest Congregational
churches in London, the Highbury
Quadrant. Here for several years his
popular style enabled, him to retain
and possibly to increase his reputation. But there was always an element of unrest about Dawson, and I
was not surprised to learn that a few
years ago he resigned his pastorate to
engage in evangelistic work. He made
a tour of the United States and drew
crowded audiences. His style is essentially American, and there is no
doubt that if he had accepted the pastorate of some big American church,
he would have found his metier.
Whilst travelling Dawson was observing, and his equipment well fitted
him to appraise the character of
Church work in the New World. His
book, "A Prophet in Babylon," contains the result of his investigations,
and furnishes a vehicle for conveying
his pronounced ideas upon Church
work generally and the present attitude of the World towards revealed
religion.
His book may be criticised with
fairness from several standpoints. For
instance, Dawson has posed as a literary critic, and has written at least
three books on literature, which have
attracted atention: "The Makers of
English Fiction," "The Makers of
English Prose," and "The Makers of
English Poetry." But I doubt if he
will ever be accorded a place among
the recognised critics. He lacks insight and style, and is much more of
a propagandist than a critic.
In the book under review, the interest centres almost entirely in the presentment furnished of the failure of
the Churches to reach the masses. He
deals with the case of a well-known
New York church, of which the Rev.
John Gaunt is pastor. He shows how
its deacons and managers are so imbued with a mercenary spirit that they
have lost all sympathy for the masses,
are intolerant of poor worshippers,
and seek only to maintain their church
as a Sunday club. He depicts the
awakening of John Gaunt's mind to
this fact, and the workings of his
spirit when he realises that his mission is a failure along orthodox lines.
Hc then rallies his forces, abandons
his luxurious home, and starts a mission to the poor, devoting the balance
of his life to work in the slums, and
"practical Christianity."
The author graphically depicts the
forces which are arrayed against this
aggressive Christian work, and the
close of the book finds Gaunt rededi-
cating his life to social service after
recovering from an attempt to add
to the Christian annals the story of
another martyred hero.
Everyone knows that the Church is
out of harmony with the masses of
the people. The outside critic attributes this to lack of adaptation, love
of indolence on thc part of the clergy,
and the demoralising effect of the influence of mammon.
The clergy and some laymen attribute it to the ineradicable enmity between the .Church and the World.   A
few wise men within the fold accept
both explanations in part. Mr. Dawson is evidently one of those who
thinks that most of the blame lies at
the door of the Church, and his book
is an impasisoned and insistent plea
for the abandonment of orthodox
methods and the substitution of the
highest type of what is usually called
mission work.
I fail to see that his suggestions
contain any element of originality or
that they differ in any degree from
those which have been so sucessfully
carried out by the Salvation Army.
There is the same element of personal
sacrifice, of consecration, and a perpetual self-denying ordinance. There
is the same sympathetic support of a
devout sisterhood. But can the Salvation Army be called a Church? and
is not the highest fruition of its labours attained when those whom it
plucks as brands from the burning,
become affiliated with Christian
Churches? Surely, there is a deeper
yearning in human nature than can
be satisfied by the so-called services
of the Salvation Army, however religious in tone, which lack the vitalising power of the Sacraments.
Mr. Dawson does not pursue this
subject. He is content to lead his
readers to this point, and to leave
them there. He does not even say
that he looks for the regeneration of
the race through the medium of independent misison halls, although that
is the only logical inference from his
book.
As an arraignment of only too many
of the so-called Christian churches of
to-day, "A Prophet of Babylon" must
bc regarded as a notable book. It is
written by a man of force and ability,
who has spent all his life in the Christian Church, and more than half of it
within the fold of the most Evangelical of all such churches. Mr. Dawson at
least knows whereof he speaks, and
while it may be permissible to doubt
his competency as a theologian, no
one can question that he possesses
the equipment of experience and sincerity which entitles his utterances to
the serious consideration of all thinking men.
I cannot speak very highly of the
literary qualities of his book. It may
be a lack of appreciation on my part,
but I have never been able to discern
style or distinction in Mr. Dawson's
books. He writes too much like a
preacher, and never sinks the character of the propagandist in that of the
writer. I think everyone would do
well to read this book. It has attracted, and will attract, much attention, and might become a force for
good if Mr. Dawson adopted Napoleon's motto, and instead of pointing
the way led it.
I will conclude this already too
lengthy article by quoting a few of
the most striking sentences from 'the
book of the hour":
"What woman ever yet was really
content with the rewards of discretion? What woman in her private
thought does not yearn for the touch
of passion which transfigures life?"
"Adversity leaves only the worthiest
for one's friends."
"Compromise with truth is death;
the only victory is complete sincerity."
"The chief business of life is to
live, not to get a living."
"Flattery is the diplomacy of feebleness."
"People who suppose that a human
character can be altered radically by
a sudden emotional experience, however intense, do not understand human nature."
"Any man may make a mistake, but
the only mistake that is irretrievable
is persisting in"a mistake."
"The world reveres its martyrs,
whomsoever else it may despise."
"Any man's power over men will be
in the direct ratio of the conviction
they have of his disinterestedness."
"What the world is always seeking,
and for the most part in vain, is living examples of what self-renunciation means, and Christianity can only
regain its authority by the influence
of such lives,"
"The real cause of most unhappy
marriages is that people are able to
sulk in separate rooms by themselves."
Table Silver.
Wear-resisting silver plate to grace the most elaborate
table—plate that can hardly be distinguished from
sterling silver, is a specialty with us. An immense
selection in our showrooms, we may say the finest
display in British Columbia.
Tea and Coffee Services, Entree DisTies,
Bake Dishes, Pudding Dishes, Hot Water
Kettles, Trays, Cake Dishes, Breakfast
Cruets, Etc., Etc.	
I SPECIAL BARGAINS IN HANDBAGS |
I PRICES CUT IN HALF |
j SEE OUR WINDOW DISPLAY |
CHALLONER & MITCHELL
47 and 49 Qovernment St., Victoria.
"Most rich congregations are suffering from fatty degeneration of the
soul."
"The only way for a man to do any
truly great work in the world is for
him to go straight forward to his goal,
paying no attention to praise or
blame."
"For my part, I would gladly vote
for the total abolition of the Church
in all its existing forms, and begin
right over again, from the foundation.
Anyway, it will have to be done before
long, if the Church is to survive. For
the Church, in its present form, is on
its death-bed, with lights and incense
and moving music, and all that kind
of thing, but the odour of coruption
and decomposition is in the air. The
world knows perfectly well what is
going on. I know nothing more pathetic than the angry wonder so often
expressed by all kinds of eclesiastical
people over the fact that the mass of
the people won't go to church. Surely the inference should be plain; it is
to everyone save the ecclesiastic. It
is that life has gone out of the
Churches. If the Church were alive,
people would not be able to stay
away from it."
"Christianity has openly become
the Church of the rich, as the inevitable result of a paid ministry."
"The Church constantly retreats before the invasion of poverty."
"It would be a dreadful world if
those with whom we have to live In
closest bonds, saw all our defects with
a vision never less than accurate."
"A man forgets, when the last parting comes, all thc erros in the woman
hc has loved, and recalls nothing but
her virtues and her fairness."
"The Church of to-day, instead of
making an effort to capture the sinners, coddles the saints."
"All great men have been dreamers,
who have dreamed true; but the men
who have really moved the world,
have been men who knew how to
make their dreams come true."
"Both France ruid Italy have been
compelled to disown the Church because it no longer represented and
expressed modern ideas."
"Brilliant men have declined to become the slaves of an institution—
the Church—which robbed them of
the right to think freely, bound them
by antiquated precedents, and ground
out their lives in piffling triviality."
"Prestige is merely the mirage of
false pride."
"The real dynamic of all service for
others lies in the experience of Christ |
as a living Saviour."
"It needs a diviner inspiration tol
live one day well than to write a gos-J
pel."
"It is the impact of personality that]
tells most in propaganda."
"To go on asking when we expectl
to receive nothing is a much greater|
thing than to ask expecting to re-j
ceive."
"I know a great Western city wherel
half-a-dozen ministers have been driv-l
en from their pastorates for no other!
reason than that they, for righteous-]
ness' sake, put themselves into opposition against the rich men of their|
churches."
"The moral failure of the pulpit lies]
in its lack of authority. The preacher]
preaches professionally, and therefore]
is not taken seriously."
"Social redemption can only bel
achieved by the restoration of moral |
authority."
"I have one supreme faith, it is thatl
the great multitude of plain folk are [
always on the side of right when they ]
once know what right is."
"There is an inextinguishable moral I
sense in man. As he goes up in the ]
social scale, hc loses it. All revolutions have their birth among the common people. It is from the womb of
labour and hardship that all the
Christs come."
"In the presence of elemental forces
astuteness is a vain thing; it is little
better than a child's trick."
"The vice of the pulpit is that it
deals with mankind in the mass, it is ,
afraid to deal with individuals. It |
grows eloquent about the tragedy of |
the poor man's one ewe lamb, but it j
never takes the rich thief by the]
throat and says 'Thou art the man.'
"Public opinion is the necessary dynamic   for   the   enforcement   of   the ]
law."
"All the wisdom of the ages is enshrined in the Cross."
"A Prophet in Babylon," a story of]
social service by W. J. Dawson, pub-1
Ushers Fleming H, Rcvell Co., London, Edinburgh, New York, Chicago,
Toronto.   Price  $1.50.   Sold   by   the !
Victoria Book   and   Stationery   Co.,
Victoria. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY ii, 1908
DISTRICT  OF  RUPERT. S.W., No.  23, which is seven and one-  west  SO  chains;  north  80 chains',   east
TAKE NOTICE I. T. S. McPherson, half miles in a northerly direction from SO chains to point of commencement.
Agent of Victoria, B. C„ Intend to apply Crown Mountain and on Bank of Upper No. 35—Commencing at a post planted
for a special timber license over the Salmon River; thence north 80 chains; at the northeast corner No. 35, which
foUowing described lands: east  80  chains;   south  80  chains;  west  is  marked  W.E.S.,  N.E.' which
No. 10—Commencing at a post plant- 80 chains to point of commencement. is five miles distant in a northerly died at the southeast corner section 3, No. 24—Commencing at a post planted rection from Crown Mountain; thence
township 25, marked T. S. McP., No. at the southeast corner No. 24, marked south 80 chains; west 80 chains; north
10, which is two and one-quarter miles W.E.S., S.E., No. 24, which is eight and 80 chains; east 80 chains; to point of
northerly  from  west arm  of Quatsino  one-half  miles   distant  in  a  northerly  commencement.
Sound, thence north SO chains; west 80 direction from Crown Mountain and one No. 36—Commencing at a post planted
chains, south 80 chains; east SO chains mile north of the Upper Salmon River; at the northeast corner marked W.E.S.,
to point of commencement. thence west 80 chains; north 80 chains;  N.E. No. 38, which is six miles distant
Dec.  19th,  1907. east 80 chains; south 80 chains to point  in   a   northerly   direction   from   Crown
No. 11—Commencing at a post plant-  of commencement. Mountain and one-half a mile south of
ed at the southwest corner of section 2, No. 25—Commencing at a post planted Upper Salmon River; thence west 80
township 25, marked McP. P., No. 11, at the northwest eorner marked W.E.S., chains; south 80 chains; east SO chains;
which is two and one-quarter miles N.W., No. 25, which is seven and one- north 80 chains to point of commence-
northerly    from    west    Arm    Quatsino *half miles distant in a northerly direc-  ment.
Sound, thence east 160 ehains; north 40  tion from Crown Mountain and on the      Staked  Dec.   20th,   1907.
chains, west 160 chains; south  40 chs.,  Bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence      No. 37—Commencing at a post planted
to point of commencement. south SO chains; thence east 80 chains;   at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
Geo. H. Jackson, Agent,   north SO chains; west 80 chains to point  No.   37,   S.E.,   which  is  flve  miles   dis-
Staked Dec. 19,  1907. of commencement. tant In a southwesterly direction from
No. 12—Commencing at a post plant-      No. 26—Commencing at a post planted  West Lake,    Sayward    District; thenco
ed  one  ancl  one-half  mile  In  a  north-  at the northeast corner marked W.E.S.,   west  80  chains;   north  SO  chains;   east
westerly  direction  from   the  west  end  N.E., No.  26,  which  is seven and one-  80  chains; south 80 chains to point of
of Nah-Wl-Ti  Lake,  and  one-half mile  half miles distant in a northerly direc-   commencement.
west of S. E. Corner section 1, town- tion from Crown Mountain and on the No. 38—Commencing at a post planted
ship 33, thence west 40 chains; thence bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
north 160 chains; thence east 40 chains; south 80 chains; west 80 chains; north S.W. No. 38, which is flve miles distant
thenee south 160 chains to point of 80 chains; east 80 chains to point of in a southwesterly direction from West
commencement,    containing    640    acres  commencement. Lake, Sayward District; thence east SO
more or less. No, 27—Commencing at a post planted  chains;  north 80 chains; west 80 chains;
Staked Dec. 20, 1907. at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,   south SO chains to point of commence-
No. 13—Commencing at a post plant- S.E. No. 27, which is seven and one- ment.
ed one mile in northwesterly direction half miles distant in a northerly direc- No. 39—Commencing at a post planted
from west end of Nah-Wl-Ti Lake, and tlon from Crown Mountain and on the at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
at N. W. corner section 31, township Bank of the Upper Salmon River; thenee S.E., No. 39, which is three and one-half
25, thence south SO chains; thence east north 80 chains; west 80 chains; south miles distant from the south end of
80 chains; thence north SO chains; 80 chains; east 80 chains to point of West Lake, where it joins the line of
thence west 80 chains to point of com-   commencement. Lot  110;  thence north  80  chains;  west
mencement. No. 28—Commencing at a post planted   80   chains;   south   80   chains;   east   80
Staked Dec. 20, 1907. at the northeast corner which is marked  chains  to point of commencement.
No. 14—Commencing at a post plant- W.E.S. N.E. No. 28, which ls eight and No. 40—Commencing at a post planted
ed one mile from west end of Nah-Wi- one-quarter miles distant in a nortli- at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
Ti Lake in northerly direction, half westerly direction from Crown Moun- s.W. No. 40, which is three and one-half
mile north of N. W. corner section 32, tain, and on the south bank of Upper miles in a southwesterly direction from
township 25; thence south 80 chains; Salmon River; thence west 80 chains; the south end of West Lake, where it
thence east following shore line 80 south 80 chains; east 80 chains; north joins line of Block UO; thence north 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence 80 ehains to point of commencement. chains; east SO ehains; south SO chains;
west SO chains to point of commence- No. 29—Commencing at a post planted west 80 chains to point of commencement, at the southeast corner marked W.E.S., ment.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907. S.E. No. 29, which is eight and one- No. 41—Commencing at a post plant-
No. 16—Commencing at a post plant- quarter mlles distant in a northwesterly ed at the southeast cor. marked W.E.S.,
ed one-half mile north of T. L. 13222, direction from Crown Mountain and on s.E. No. 41, which is four miles distant
and ai N. E. corner section 36, town- bank of Upper Salmon River; thence jn an easterly direction from south end
ship 26, thonce west 160 chains; thence west 80 chains; north 80 chains; east 0f West Lake, on line of Block 110;
south 10 chains; thence east 160 chains; 80 chains; south 80 chains to point of thence west 80 chains; north SO chains;
thenc* north 40 chains to point of commencement. east SO chains; south SO ehains to point
commencement. No. 30—Commencing at a post planted 0f commencement.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907. at the northeast eorner marked W.E.S., No. 42—Commencing at a post planted
No. 17—Commencing at a post plant- N.E. No. 30. which is ten miles distant at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
ed 'one-half mile north of T. L. 13222, In a northwesterly direction from Crown s.W. No. 42, which is four miles distant
ot W. Corner section 31, township 19, Mountain and on bank of Upper Salmon jn an easterly direction from south end
thence east SO chains; thence south SO River; thenee 80 chains south; 80 chains 0f West Lake, on line Block 110; thence
chains; thenee west 80 chains; thence west; 80 chains north; SO chains east east 80 chains; north 80 chains; west
north SO ehains to point of commence- to point of commencement. 80 chains; south SO chains to point of
ment containing 640 acres, more or less.      No. 31—Commencing at a post planted  commencement.
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S., No. 43—Commencing at a post planted
S.E. No. 31, which is ten and one-half at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
miles distant in a northwesterly direc- s.E. No. 43, which is one ancl one-half
tion frrm Crown Mountain and on the miies distant in a westerly direction
bank of the Upper balmon River; thence from the south end of West Lake, where
"" chains north; ^S0_ chains^ westj^ 80 it joins the line of Block 110, thence
"' "       ' '" '  "    north 80 chains; west SO chains;  south
I   TRAVELLERS' GUIDE   j
Our Store
HAS A FINE LINE OF HIGH
CLASS TOILET ARTICLES.
We have just imported a fine assortment of French and English Hair
Brushes.
SEE THE NEW-SHAPED
WHALEBONE BRUSH.
USE BOWES' BUTTERMILK
TOLIET  LOTION   FOR
CHAPPED HANDS.
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
Government Street, near Yates St.
VICTORIA, B. C.
Stnk.-d Dec. 20, 1907.
Jan. 11. T. S. McPHERSON
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Sayward.
TAKE  NOTICE  that W.  E.  Simpson ohaini"south,r80'ehains"east"to'point of
of Iowa Falls, Banker, intends to apply commencement,
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Staked Dec.  19,  1907.
Works for a special timber licence over w,  e.  SIMPSON.                  «
the   following   described   lands   thirty jan,  _\_     Tnomas S. McPher
clays after date.  ■	
at^^^lfe^SS'^g VICT»c*WXRICT-
S.E. No. 12, which is seven and one-half niMnct ot .Mootita.
miles distant and in a northerly direc-
80 chains; east 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 46—Commencing at a post planted
Agent. at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 45, which is one and one-half
mlles distant from the south end of
West Lake, where it joins the line of
TAKE NOTICE that W. E. Simpson of Block UO; thence north SO chains; east
l?rVomTmwTMountX"JSd,onrth_; Iowa Falls. Iowa, Banker, intends to ap- 80   chains;   south   SO   chUns;   west   80
R,nk   nf  iSn      Salmon   Rlvo," Whence Plv t0 tne Cllief Commissioner of Lands chains to point of commencement,
north 40 chains' wesTlMChains' soSth and Wo,'ks for a sPecial tlmoer licence No' "-Commencing at a post planted
40  chnins*  east'160 ^chainsi tonoint of °ver  H"  following  described  lands   30 at the southwest corner which is mark-
JJLmSn^LSnt                              P days af * .ir date. ed  W.E.S.,  S.W.,  No.  46,  which  Is  one
commencement, »T„   .   _ n_A.-,_-.__-..inn. „.  „ r____,t ni.nt._ r*,.i_, .Hot,,,..   *__*
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted mile distant and in a southeasterly di
at tho southwest corner marked W.E.S., rection from West Lake adjoining Block
S.W. No.  1, which is on the southeast UO;   thence  north  160  chains;  east  40
bank  of  Upper  Campbell  Lake,   where chains; south 160 chains; west 40 chains
it   cuts   the   C.P.R.   line;   thence   east to  point of commencement,
following the C.P.R.   line  100  chains;      No. 47—Commencing at a post planted
nnr-.h  <;n Mi-Hn**** enst 80 "ch-iln's- ^'niith   north s0 chains; thence following shore at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
80 ctalns to point of commencement       »»e of said lake topolnt of commence- S.W,, No. 47, which. Is two miles north-
No. 14—Commend
at the southwest co
fa^t'l^a northCTlvhairectlonfromeCrown  S'W' No' 3* whicn ls 20 chalns alstant south s0 clmins; west S0 chains to point
tant in a nortneriy oirecuon nom crown „„„,i.,_,.i„ _i,_.n__  f.nn. n.a cn,,th __<* ,,„,r,m_.„n_,m_.r,t
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 13, which is eight miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and one mile north of Upper
Salmon   River;   thence   west   SO  chains
 VICTORIA
STRAND HOTEL"
VICTORIA
The home ol all theatrical and vaude-t Ue
artists while in the Capital city, alto of
other kindred bohemiana.
WRIQHT & FALCONER, Proprietor*.
CAMBORNE
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining men and
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
BANFF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
Banff's Most Popular $2 a Day Hotel.
Close to Station and Sulphur
Baths.
N. K. LUXTON, Proprietor.
PHOENIX.
BOND SIGN CO.
VANCOUVER
Signs
ELECTRIC
BOARD
METAL
BULLETIN
QLASS
COTTON
SHOW CARD
In up-to-date styles.   Estimates and
desigtii furnished,
iTpmSi ment, containing 640 acres more or less, westerly from south end of West lake,
nmnr™?K w & <•!        N°. 3—Commencing at a post planted where  it  joins  the  line  of  Block   110;
. to  «{,Ji _t mii»o' riu.' at the southwest corner marked WE..S., thenee north SO chains; east 80 chains;
awtiS Vrnm, nJTwn S.W. No. 3, which is 20 chains distant south SO ehains; west SO chains to point
wSunTam'and'^ne  milewrthrfban£ '» a northerly direction from the south of eommeneement,
of  Tinner  Salmon  River-   thence  norl'- east cornor  of T'  L'   14sc4  aml  thret"      No' 4S-Commencing at a post planted
So Yfi??*,.   „„?   »i\   phnins-   south   R(i quarters of a mile fro mUpper Campbell at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
^01-nln^alwPWll0SVhi0insehtoino\ntOofthcom°-  Lake? thence east  80  chains;  north  80 S.E,, No. 48, which is two miles distant
iiSmnt                                                      chains; west SO chains; south 80 chains and  in a northwesterly direction  from
Wo  15—rvimmenclntr at a nost nlanted  t0 Polnt ot commencement. the south end of West Lake,  where it
atThe LuuSecSrnIr?marPk°ed TTs.      No. 4-Commencing at a post planted Joins; line of Block .110; thence north SO
S.E. No. 15, which is eight and one-half  at the southeast corner marked W.E.S., cha ns   west 80 chains, south 80 ehains,
miles distant from Crown mountain and  S.E.  No.  4,  which  is one mile distant eust  80  chains  to  point  of  commence-
15  chains  west of Island Power Com-   in   a   northerly   direction   from   Upper ment.
pony's line near bank of Upper Salmon  Campbell  Lake,   ancl  one  mile  east  of No. 49—Commencing at a post planted
River;   thence  north .100  chains;   west  T. L. 14S64, thence west 80 chains; north at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
64   chains;   south   100   chains;   east   64   80   chains;   east   80   chains;   south   80 S.W. No. 49, which is three ancl one-half
chains   to  point  of  commencement.         chains  to  point of commencement. miles  distant  in  an  easterly  direction
No. 16—Commencing at a post, plant-      No. 5—Commencing at a post planted from centre of shore line of West Lake,
ed  at  the southeast corner marked W.  at the southwest corner marked W.E.S., thence east SO chains; north SO chains;
E   S.,  S.E. No. 16, which is nine miles  S.W. No. 5, which is one mile distant In west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains
distant  in  a  northerly  direction  from a northerly direction from Upper Camp- to point of commencement.
Crown  Mountain  and one and  one-half bell  Lake,  and  one mile  east of T. L. No. 50—Commencing at a post planted
miles  north of stake  12,  on  the Bank  14864; thence 80 chains north; 80 chains t the souti,east corner, marked W.E.S.,
of   the   Upper   Salmon   River;   thence  east;   80  chains  south;   80  c.ains  west SB  n0. 50, which is three and one-half
north 40 chains; west 160 chains; south  to point of commencement. mileg  aistant  in  an  easterly   direction
40 chains;  east 160 chains to point of      No. 6—Commencing at a post Planted from the centl.e 0f shore line on West
commencement.                            ....  a' the southeast corner marked W.E.S., La,      thence vest  80  chains;  north  80
No. 17—Commencing at a post planted  S.E.   No    6,   which  is   situated  on   the chalns. east 80 chains; south SO chains
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S..  north   shore  of Upper  Campbell   Lake, .    noint of commencement
S. E. No. 17, which is nine and one-half  on  the  C.P.R.    line;    thenoe    west  40 t0J01",    „   ™7°„   „*m,. ni_,nt_u.
miles   distant  In   a  northerly  direction  ehains; north 160 ehains; east 40 chains; No. 51—Commencing at 1apost phanted
from Crown Mountain and two ancl one- south 160 chains to point of commence- at„the, souct,heasi1°,or"f n™  ™ii__.  finm
half   miles   north   of   bank   of   Upper  ment.
Salmon River; thence west 80 chains; No 7_Commenclng at a post planted
north 80 chains; east 80 chains; sonth at tl)e southeast eorner marked W.E.S.,
80 chains to point of commencement.      s K  No   7| -vvhjoh is about four mlles ln
No. 18—Commencing at a post plant-  a  northwesterly  direction  from  Crown
ed at the southwest corner marked W.  Mountain; thenee north 80 chains; west
E.  S„  S.W., No.  18,  which  is nine and   80   (,ha|ns;   snuth   go   chains;   east   SO
one-half miles In a northerly direction  c]ia-ns  to point of commencement,
frnm Crown Mountain and two and one- ,-,.„..,„,,,,.„ nt . _,... „i„nt<>a
half miles north of Upper Salmon River.     .N"* "~V.0u™?i?"'„"L! «5 S I "•*•'■*. «"• *->-. "
See east SO chains north 80 chains;  at' « o   S   whiohMs flvT m les distent from tne Boutn end ot West Lake where
west 80 chains; south SO ehains to point fn\NnVti.e?Iy0VlctioS   frem  cfown '« ^a- line of Block 110; thence north
0fNo0mirnCommenclng at a post planted ^^Si.^uS.^ XlS^tWM  " - "'»
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S..   ■>» ,cha ns'_,„f°fut'l   ,°   „al"i.'   £? ' mencement.
S.W   No. 19, which Is ten and one-half  <*n •« to Point of eommencement. Nq  63_c
miles  distant  in  a  northerly  direction      n„   9—Commenc ing at a post nlanted at th'e southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
from  Crown Mountain and  three miles  JS™Xo»»mWW S.W.  No.   53,  which   is  six  miles   ln  a
northerly and westerly from post No. ^V No   9   which "sfourmiles distant westerly direction  from the south end
It   °£  SHfc s°o£ chains" eaastmS0 chUns-   In   a   northerly "direction ?,"m   Crown of  West  Jake,  where  it  joins   line  of
thence north 80 chains   east bo cnains,          ntaln- thence north 160 chains' west Lot  110;  thence  north  80  chains:   east
south 80 chains; west 80 chains to point  M™"s;   south  °60   chah.steast   40 80   chains;   south   SO   chains;   west   80
ofiw00ni,??en<5nmmILnpi-nr. nt the southeast  chains to point of commeneement. chains to point of commencement.
__?°«,Z^IS    w wl        F      No   20       No. 10-Commoncing at a post planted No. 54-Commenclng at a post planted
T.T i_??_£eL_i^Eh_.if mu'es rtNtant ^ Hie southeast corner marked W.E.S., at the southeast corner marked W.E.S
which is ten and one-half miles distant                                          t         ,        , SK   No   u_ wl lch ls tw? and one-half
In   a   northerly   direction   from   Crown         ■       th   ',    direction from where the miles  distant    n  an  easterly  direction
Mountain and three miles northwesterly  g> aR"O Ure.ly lirect on t om wneie uie ^^         _{ ^^           ^^
from stake 12   on the bank of the Up-  JjV Campbell   Lake;   thence   west   80 west  80  chains;   north  80  chains;   east
Ti^1™?* «Kl,.hS SO chains    chalnsfZS SO chains   east 80 chains; SO  ehains;  south  80 chains  to point of
chains' west 80 ehains   south 8 >-^Mns,        t,   '80    h ,na t&      ,^ o£ commenoe. commencement.
east   SO  chains  to  point  of commence-  mmt_ " no. 55—Commencing at a post planted
ment.                                              .    .        ,      No.'11—Commencing at a post planted at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
.N.?' 21T,HTnTncnrnnSe,atn,nrrked WFS    at the southeast cor ner marked W.E.S., S.W. No. 50, which is two and one-half
gt the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,                            ,, ,   ,   fl         d 0ne-c|iiar- miles  distant  westerly from  the  north
?-h. !;« ,\.fn nt In n northerh" direc    ter   miles   distant   In   a   northerly   and end of West lake; thence east 100 chains;
IV11* "?-iI™   rrnwn   Lmtsln   nn/fou    westerly   direction   from   where   C.P.R. north 40 chains; west 40 chains; north
l1"'™ 2„S?d rection from  line cuts north shore of Upper Campbell 40   chains;   west   60   chains;   south   SO
"l"?l   "   nn thP Rank nf T nner Salmo^  Lake;  thence north  80 chains;  west  80 chains to point of commencement.
^r^the^^rT 0°obK  we& r8„  <*lu,n, south 80 chains; east 80 chains Staked December    4th   1907.
S.E. No. 51, which is flve miles from
the south end of West lake, where it
joins the line of Block 110; thence north
80 chains; west SO ehains; south SO
chains; east 80 chains to point of commeneement.
Staked Dec. 15, 1907.
No. 62—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 52, which Is six miles westerly
80   chains;   west   SO   chains;   south   80
chains; east 80 chains to point of com-
-Commenclng at a post planted
SWEDISH
-MASSAGE
TURKISH BATHS.
VIBRATOR TREATMENT.
MR.   BJORNFELT,   SWEDISH
MASSEUR.
Special   Massage  and   Hometreat-
ment by appointments.
Room 2, Vernon Block, Douglas
Street, Victoria.
Hours—n to i2 a.m.   Phone 1629.
Deane's Hotel
PHOENIX, B. C.
New. Modern hot water system. ElectrU
lighted. Tub aad shower bathi aud laundry la
connection.   The miners' home.
•' DANNY " DEANE, Proprietor
 ROSSLAND
Hoffman House
ROSSLAND, B. C.
Rates (1.00 per day and up.   Cafe ia
Connection.
GREEN & sniTH. Prop's.
NELSON.
HOTEL HUME
NELSON,   B. C,
Leading Hotel ot tha Kootcniyi.
J. FRED HUME,       -       Proprietor.
Silver King Hotel,
NELSON. B. C.
The home ol the Induatrial Worker!
olthe Kootenayi.
W. E. HcCandllsh,
Proprietor
Royal Hotel
NELSON, B. C.
The Best Family Hntol in U19 City.
$1.00 a day.
Mrs. Wm. Roberts,        Proprietress
HOLLY TREES
Prieas from jj cemts to fcoo, aceonkag
to sue. Write for teed ts4 tree catalog.
JAY & CO.
VICTORIA, B. C.
No. 32—Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner marked W.E.S.,
N.W. No. 32, which ls six miles distant
W. E. SIMPSON,.
Jan. 11. Thos. S. McPherson, Agent.
Chains; south 80 chains; east 80 chains  to point of commencement,
to point of commencement. staked Dec. 1/, 1,101.
No. 22—Commencing at a post planted
nt the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S W. No. 22, which ls eleven and one-   , , ■ ,	
ii_.\r miles distant In a northerly direc-   ln   a   northerly   direction   from   Crown
Hon ?rnm   Crown   Mountain  and  four  Mountain,  and  one-half mile  south  of  _     .
Ssina northwesterly direoUon from  Upper   Salmon   River,   thence  east   80  s.E.  No.  2.  situate on the west Bank
"take   12.   on   the  Bank  of  the  Tipper  chains^ south SO chains; west 80 ehains,   Upper Campbell Lake, where the C.P.R.
Salmon River;  thence north  80  chains;   north
east  SO  chains;   south  80  chains;  west  """<■
80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 18th, 1907.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Nootka.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
it the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
chains to point of commence-   nne cuts snme;  thence west  80 chains.
north 120 chains; east 40 chains; south
No. 34—Commencing at a post planted   80   chains;   cast   40   chains;   south   40
at the northeast corner No. 24, marked   chains   to   point   of   commencement.
W.E.S., N.E. No. 34, which is three miles      Staked December 16th,  1907.
Mn  9H—Commencing at a post planted distant   In   a   northerly   direction   from WILLIAM E. SIMPSON,
Pantage's
Theatre
JOHNSON STREET
VICTORIA, B. C.
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE
Matinees (any part of house).... 10c
Evening a, Balcony  lte
Lowtr Floor  JOc
Boxes    10c
Matinees
Every Afternoon
at
3 O'CIock.
Night Performances
8 and 9.15
BEDDING
PLANTS
Cheap Prices.   Get our price list.
Johnston's Seed Store
City Market
VICTORIA
Victoria
FRUIT
and
Farm Lands
Write for "Home  List" and
information.
R.   S.   DAV
and
BEAUMONT BOGGS
Realty Brokers.
VOBT STMET      II      TIOTOBIA.
THOMAS OATTZ_M_U
■slider sad Sm_*h_i  Ooatmetoi.
Tenders cWea on Brick, Ston* an
Frame, Alterations, Parquetry Floorlnt
Ofllce, Bank, Store and Saloon Flttlngi
Pile Driving, Wharves and Dock Shed:
constructed and repaired. IK
T\tt *■»   ui ■—• — —      —
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY n, 1908
NEW
WESTMINSTER
TRICT.
LAND     DIS-
District of New Westminster. ,
TAKE NOTICE that Roman Z. Chandler, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
timber broker, intends to apply tor a
special timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
at northwest corner of T. L. 1S1S7;
thence east 80 chains along the north
line of T. U 1S1S7; thence north SO
chains along the west line of T. L.
12502; thence east 80 chains along the
north line of T. L. 12502; thenee north
80 chains along the west line of T. It.
12603; thence in a southwesterly course
along the line of the Capilano Water Reserve to place of commencement, and
containing  640  acres  of  land,  more  or
December 23, 1907.
Jan 11. ROMAN Z. CHANDLER.
NOTICE is hereby given that I, George
French, prospector, of Skidegate, B.C.,
Intend to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over 640
acres, bounded as follows:—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast
corner of Section 21, Township 4, Graham Island. Queen Charlotte Group;
thence running 80 chains north; thence
80 chains east; thence 80 chains south
to shore line; thence following shore
line to point of commencement, containing  640  acres.
Located  December  12th.   1907.
GEORGE FRENCH,  Locator.
Jan. 4 John Simister, Agent.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. W. O; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains, more or less to River; thence
southerly 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more
or less
Staked December 7.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast. Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank of Kimsquit River, about 4
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H. Taylor's S. W. C; thence east 80 chains',
thence no'.h 80 chains; thence west SO
chains; tiience south 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Staked  December  9.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that I, Ben
jamin Kromp, of Skidegate, B. C.
rancher, intend to apply for a licence
to prospect for coal and vetroleum over
640 acres of land bounded as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted near the
beach at the southeast corner of Section 20, Township 4, Graham Island,
Queen Charlotte Group; thence 80 ehains
north; thence 80 chains east; thence 80
chains south and over and under water;
thence 80 ehains west over and under
water to point of commencement; containing 640 acres, more or less.
Located  November  30th,   1907.
BENJAMIN KROMP, Locator.
Jan. 4 John Simister, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
Intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. Cor. of B. C. Dev. Co.'s Lot 50 and
marked the N. E. Cor.; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains, more or less, to south
boundary of lot 50; thence east SO
chains along said boundary to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Staked December 6.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Kimsqult River, about 1%
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. E. C; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south SO chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Staked December 10.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
40 chains east of the N. E. Cor. of B.
C. Dev. Co.'s Lot 50, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. W. Cor.; thence east 40
chains; thence north 160 chains; thence
40 chains to bank of Salmon River;
thence south 160 chains to point of commencement,  containing 640 acres.
Staked December 6.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast. Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—•
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank of Salmon River, about 2
mlles north of the N. E. C. of Lot 50
and marked T. H. Taylor's S. W. C;
thence east SO chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west SO chains, more or
less, to bank of river; thence southerly
80 chains along bank of river to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Staked December 6.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
Intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
wost bank of Salmon River, ahout 5
miles north of the N. E. C. of Lot 50
and marked T. H. Taylor's S. E. C;
thence west 40 chains; thence north 40
chnins; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence east 40
chains, more or less, to River; thence
southerly along river 160 chains to point
of commencement.
Staked  December 7.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
Intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Kimsquit River, about _\_
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. E. C.j thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Staked December 10.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains;  thence east 80
chains  to  point of  commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
10. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile distant in a northerly
direction from claim No. 9, marked S.E.
Corner, Section 19, Township 36; thence
north SO chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thenee east 80
chains to point ot  commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
11. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile distant in a northerly
direction from claim No. 10, marked S.E.
Corner, Section 30, Township 36; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
12. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile distant in a northerly
direction from claim No. 11, marked S.E.
corner, Section 31, Township 36; thence
north 80 ehains; thence west 80 ehains;
thence south 80 chains', thence east SO
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
T. S. McPHERSON.
Dec. 28 Per Geo. H. Jackson.
COAST LAND DISTRICT. *
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that P. S. Buck of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation lumberman,
intends to apply for a special timber
license over the following described
lands:
1, Commencing at a post planted on
Gilford Island, 40 chains in southerly direction from the N.E. corner of surveyed Lot 625 on north shore of lake;
thence nortli 80 chains more or less to
the south line of T. L. 7714; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west SO chains to this post.
FRED.  S.  BUCK.
2. Commencing at a post planted
about about 40 chains south and 80
chains east of N. E. corner of surveyed
lot 625, thence north 80 chains; thence
east SO chains; thence south 80 chains',
thence west SO  chains  to this post.
Staked Dec. lst.
Dec. 28 FRED. S. BUCK.
NOTICE is hereby given that I, James
Alfred Owens, prospector, Skidegate, B.
C, Intend to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over 640
acres of land bounded as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted northeast corner, near the beach on south
shore of Skidegate Inlet, B.C.; Graham
Island, Queen Charlotte Group, supposed to be Section 5, Township 1;
thence running 80 ehains south; thence
SO chains west; thence 80 chains north
to shora line; thence following shore line
to point of commencement; containing
640 acres, more or less.
Located  November  29th,   1907.
JAMES ALFRED OWENS,
Jan. 4 Locator.
NOTICE is hereby given that I, Emily
Margaret Johnston, of Victoria, B.C., intend to apply for a licence to prospect
for coal and petroleum over 640 acres
of land bounded as follows:—Commencing at a post planted at the south-east
corner of section 33, township one (1),
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Group;
thence running 80 chains north; thence
80 chains east; thence SO chains south;
thence 80 chains west to point of commencement, containing 640 aeres, more
or  less.
Located December  6th,  1907.
EMILY MARGARET JOHNSTON,
Locator.
Jan. 4. Christopher Johnson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank of Kimsqult River, about 2
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. W. C; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to bank of river; thence south 80
chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Staked   December  9.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
Intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank of Kimsqult River, about 3
miles  north  of the N.  W.  C.  of  B.  C.
DISTRICT   OF   RUPERT.
TAKE NOTICE that I, T. S. McPherson,  agent of Victoria,  B.C.,  intend  to
apply   for   special   timber   license   over
the following described lands:
1. Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles distant In a northwesterly
direction from the head of west arm of
Quatsino sound and marked N.E. Cor.
section 25, township 37, thence south 80
chains', thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains', thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
2. Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles and In a northwesterly
direction from the head of west arm,
Quatsino Sound, marked S.E. Cor. Section 36, Township 37, thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east SO chains
to point of commencement.
Staked  December Sth,  1907.
3. Commencing at a post planted
about one mlle In a westerly direction
Claim No. 2, marked N.E. Cor., Section
26, Township 37; thence south 80 chains;
thence west SO chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east SO chains to point
of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
4. Commencing at a post planted
about one mlle ln a westerly direction
from Claim No. 2, marked S. E. Cor.,
Section 36, Township 37; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Staked December 5th,  1907.
5. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile in a northwesterly direction from claim No. 4, marked N.E.
Corner. Section 34, Township 37; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains', thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Commencing at a post planted one
mile distant In a northwesterly direction from claim No. 4, marked S. E.
Corner, Section 3, Township 36; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains',
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains  to  point  of  commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
7. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile distant and ln a northwest direction from claim No. 6, marked
S.E. corner, Section 9, Township 36;
thonce north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 6th, 1907.
8. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile in a northwesterly direction from claim No. 7, marked S. E.
corner, section 17, township 36; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th,  1907.
9. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile distant In a westerly
direction from claim No. 8, marked S. E.
Corner, Section 18, Township 36; thence
COAST  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range One.
TAKE NOTICE that F. S. Buck of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation lumberman,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:
No. 3. Commencing at a post planted
on Gilford Island, at the head of a lake,
and at N.E. end of said lake, and about
40 chains south and about 50 chains
east from N.E. corner of surveyed lot
625, thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west SO ehains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 2n, 1907.
No. 4. Commencing at a post planted
on Gilford Island, about 40 chains south
and 130 chains east from N.E. eorner
of surveyed lot 625, thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Staked December 3rd, 1907.
No. 5. Commencing at a post planted
on Gilford Island, about 40 chains south
and 210 chains east from N.E. corner of
surveyed lot 625, thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west SO
chains; thence north 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 6. Commencing at a post planted
on Gilford Island, at the S.E. corner
of T.L. 15806; thence west SO chains to
the S.W. of T. L. 16806, thence north 40
chains; thence west 20 chains; thence
south 80 chains (more or less) to north
shore of lake; thence east along shore
of lake 100 chains; thence north 40
chains (more or less) to point of commencement.
Staked December 2nd, 1907.
Dec. 2S F. S. BUCK.
No. 34—Commencing at a post planted
10 chains east of the N.W. corner of
No. 32, being about 10 chains east of
Young's River and about three miles
north of Blanked Bluff, being the S.W.
corner; thence north 160 chains; thence
east 40 chains; thence south 160 chains;
thence west 40 chains to point of commeneement.
November  24th,   1907.
No. 35—Commencing at a post planted
at the S.E. corner, opposite No. 34 post,
being about 10 chains east of Young's
River, and about three miles north of
Blanket Bluff; thence north 160 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 160
chains; thence east 40 chains to point
of  commencement.
Nov.   24th,   1907.
No. 36—Commencing at a post planted
at the S.E. corner about 10 chains east
of the N.E. corner, 34 and 45 chains
east of Young's River, being flve miles
northerly from Blanket Bluff; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 ehains; thence east 80
chains   to   point  of  commencement.
November 24th,  1907.
GEORGE YOUNG,
Dec. 28 J. W. Radly, Agent.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Superstructure of Swing Span.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
time for receiving tenders for the
Superstructure Metal for Swing Bridge,
North Arm, Fraser River, has been extended up to and including Friday, the
31st day of January, 1908.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., December 17th, 1907.
Dec. 28
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast.   Range  2.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young,
of Victoria, B.C., Timber Cruiser, in
tends to apply for special timber licences over the following described
lands:
No. 26—Commencing at a post planted
at the S.E. corner, near Clyak River,
being 6 miles N.E. from the Junction
of Young and Clyak Rivers and opposite the N.E. corner of No. 16, thence
north 100 chains; thence west 64 chains;
thence south 100 chains; thence east 64
chains   to   point  of   commencement.
November  27th,   1907.
No. 27—Commencing at a post planted
at the S.W. corner, opposite the N. W.
Corner of N. 17, being about 5 ehains
east of Clyak River and about 7 miles
N.E. from the Junction of Young and
Clyak River, thence north 100 chains;
thence east 64 chains; thence south 100'
chains; thence west 64 chains to point
of commencement.
November 27th, 1907.
No. 28—Commencing at a post planted
on the river bank at the S.W. corner
and opposite the N.W. corner of No.
27, being one-half mile northerly from
Bever Rapids. Clyak River; thence north
100 ehains; thence east 64 chains; thence
south 100 chains; thence west 64 chains
to  point  of commencement.
November 27th,  1907.
No. 29—Commencing at a post planted
on the river bank at the S.E. corner
and opposite the N.E. corner of No.
26, being one-half mile south of Bever
Rapids, Clyak River; thence north 80
chains; thence west SO chains: thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
November 27th,  1907.
No. 30—Commencing at a post planted
on the bank at the S. E. corner and
opposite No. 28, being one-half mile
north of Bever Rapids, Clyak River,
thence north 100 chains; thence west 64
chains; thence south 100 chains; thence
east 64 chains to point of commencement.
November 27th,  1907.
No. 31—Commencing at a post planted
at the S. E. corner about 10 chains
west from the N.E. corner of No. 28,
on the river bank, about one and three-
quarter miles north of Bever Rapids on
Clyak River; thence north 80 ohalns;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains to
point  of commencement.
November   27th,   1907.
No. 32—Commencing at a post planted
at the S. W. corner, about flve (5)
chains east of Young's River, being
about nine and one-quarter miles from
Its junction with Clyak River, and opposite the N. W. corner of No. 25; thence
north 100 chains; thence east 64 chains',
thence south 100 chains; thence west
64 chains to point of commencement.
November 24th, 1907.
No. 33—Commencing at a post planted
at the S.E. corner about 6 chains east
of Young's River, being about nine and
one-quarter mlles from the junction of
Young and Clyak Rivers and opposite
No. 32; thence north 100 chains; thence
west 64 chains', thence south 100 chains;
thence east 64 chains to point of commencement.
November 24th, 1907.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that J. A. Johnson, of
Vancouver, cruiser, intends to apply for
a special timber licence over the following described lands:—
1. Commencing at a post planted on
the southwest corner of Leose No. 2;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west along south boundary of said lease
80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated  December  27th,   1907.
District of Rupert.
2. Commencing at a post planted on
the south bank of river running into
Beaver Cove, and on the west boundary
of Lease No. 2; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north SO
chains; thence east 80 chains along bank
of said river to point of coiuraence-
ment.
Dated  December   27th,   1907.
District of Rupert.
3. Commencing at a post planted
about 80 chains west of west boundary
of Lease No. 2, and on south bank of
a river running into Beaver Cove; thence
south 160 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thenee east
40 chains along bank of said river to
point of commencement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
District of Rupert.
4. Commencing at a post planted
about the southeast corner of T. L. No.
11,596; thence south 80 chains', thence
west SO chains; thence north 80 chains
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
District of Rupert.
5. Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains east of the south-east
corner of T. L. 11,396; thence east 160
chains; thence south 40 chains; thenee
west 160 chains; thence north 40 chains
to  point of commencement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
District of Rupert.
6. Commencing at a post planted
about 20 chains south of the southwest
corner of Lease No. 2; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north SO chains
to point of commencement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
Jan 4. J. A. JOHNSON.
NOTICE  TO  LOGGERS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Piles.
ALTERNATIVE sealed tenders, superscribed "Tender for Piles, Bridge,
North Arm, Fraser River," will be received by the Honourable the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works,
Victoria, B. C, up to and including
Tuesday, the 31st of December, 1907,
for furnishing and delivering at the
bridge site on the North Arm of the
Fraser River, on the line of the Cemetery Road, fir and cedar piles.
About six hundred (600) will be required, varying in length from twenty
(20) to forty-five (45) feet. They must
be straight, sound, and not less than
ten (10 inches at the small end. No
butts  will be accepted.
Further printed particulars can be obtained on application to the undersigned.
Tenderers must state the price per
lineal foot for piles delivered.
The successful tenderer will be furnished with a list giving the number
of piles required and the length of each.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certhlcate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, in
the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars ($250), which shall be forfeited
If the party tendering decline or neglect
to enter Into contract when called upon
to do so, or fail to complete the work
contracted for. The cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful ten-
tenderers will be returned to them upon   the  execution  of  the  contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the form supplied, signed
with the actual signatures of the tenderers, and enclosed ln the envelope furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 30 Public Works Engineer.
LAND REGISTRY ACT.
In the matter of an application for a
Duplicate   Certificate   of   Title   to
Lot 6 of Lot 7 of Section 10, (Map
280),   Esquimalt   District,   Victoria
City.
Notice is hereby given that it ls my
Intention at the expiration of one month
from the first publication hereof to Issue
a Duplicate of the Certificate of Title
to said  lot,  issued  to  George A.  Cold-
well on the 6th day of June, 1899, and
numbered 6296C.
Land  Registry  Offlce,   Victoria,   B.C.,
the 21st day of November, 1907.
S.  Y.  WOOTTON,
Nov. 23 Registrar-General.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that Roland D. Craig,
of Vancouver, occupation Forester, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted one (1)
mile south and 20 chains west from
the southwest corner of L. 222, West
Fork of Adams River; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains.
December   20th,   1907.
Jan. 4 ROLAND D. CRAIG.
VICTORIA LANn DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that M. J. Kinney, of
Portland, Ore., occupation Lumberman,
Intends to apply for permission to lease
the   following  described   land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Rupert
District, where the said line intersects
the shore lino of the east side of Marble
Bay; thence northerly following the
shore llne a distance of about 200
chatns to the northeast corner of lot
315.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907
M. J. KINNEY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that The Quatsino
Power and Puly Company, of Victoria,
B.C., occupation, A Pulp Company, Intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Marble
Cove, Rupert District, where the said
line intersects the shore line on the
east side of Marble Bay; thence southerly following the shore line a distance
of about 120 chains to a point Intersecting the mouth of Marble Creek.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907.
THE QUATSINO POWER
&   PULP  COMPANY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert. Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that Enoch A. White,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Lumberman, Intends to apply for permission to
lease the following described foreshore:
Commercing at a, post planted at the
northeast corner of an Indian Reserve
at the hend of Quatsino Narrows, Rupert
District, thence southerly following the
shore line a distance of about 160 chains
to a point Intersecting the mouth of
Marble Creek. Including small Island on
north   line  of  section   10.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Superstructure of Swing Span.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Superstructure Metal for
Swing Bridge, North Arm, Fraser
River," will be received by the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works, Victoria, B.C., up to and Including Tuesday, the 31st of December,
1907, for manufacturing and delivering,
f. o. b., scow at Vancouver or New
Westminster, all the metal work required for the superstructure of a steel
swing span.
Drawings, specifications, condition of
contract and tender may be seen by
Intending tenderers on and after Tuesday, the 26th of November, 1907, at
the ofllce of the Public Works Engineer,
Lands and Works Department, and at
the offlce of the Provincial Timber In
spector, Court House, Vancouver, B.C.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certlflcate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner In
the sum of two hundred and fifty ($260)
dollars, which shall be forfeited if the
party tendering decline or neglect to*
enter Into contract when called upon
to do so. The cheques or certificates
of deposit of successful tenderers will
be returned to them upon the execution*
of the contract.
The successful tenderer will be
called upon to furnish a bond, himself
and two securities, satisfactory to the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, ln
the sum of $1,000 each, or to furnish a
bond of a Guarantee Company satisfactory to the Honourable the Chief
Commissioner In the sum of $3,000 for
the due fulfilment of the work contracted for.
Upon the execution of the contract
and a satisfactory bond being supplied,
signed with the actual signatures of the
tenderers and enclosed in the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Nov. 30
DISTRICT  OF  CASSAIR.
TAKE NOTICE that The Hidden Creek
Mining  Co.,   of  Vancouver,   occupation,
 , Intends to apply for permission
to  lease  the following described  land,
about 40 acres:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of Lot 479; thence following high water mark south and
west to the southeast corner of Lot 808;
thence east flve chains; thence north
and east following a line parallel to
high water mark about 80 chains to a
point 6 chains south of point of commencement and thence to said point of
commencement.
Dated Nov. 25th, 1907.
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Dec. 7 Per J. Herrick MacGregor.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
and Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C., Timber Dealers, Intend to apply for the
rite to purchase the following described
lands in Kildalla Bay, Rivers Inlet; commencing at this post planted on the east
side of the Bay about one-third of a
mlle from the point at the mouth of the
Bay, being the southwest corner post;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 90 chains to beach;
thence aouth along beach to point of
commencement; containing 40 acres,
more or less.
Staked Nov.  25,  1907.
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL.
Dec. 7 George Young, Agent. THE WEEK, SATURDAY JANUARY 18  1908.
|ooSooooooooSooooo^^
For the Children,
Bring Them Ini j
Here are a few furniture items that
would brighten a whole lot the lives
of the little tots. Every piece of
Juvenile Furniture sold at this shop
is good—bears the same "superior
quality" marks as does our other
furniture. We give the same guarantee of goodness with these pieces
as backs all other sales. Dozens of
other equally interesting items are
here also.    Bring the children in!
Child's Chair—This chair has table,
similar to tables on high-chairs.
Made of reed.   Price, each $2.75
Cradles—In English willow. Several
styles.   Prices, each, $4.00 add $3.00
Reed Rockers—For the children we
have this year a very large stock
of pretty little rockers in reed.
They are in handsome designs, and
well and strongly made. Prices
range at, each, $6.00, $5.00, $4.50,
$4.00 and   $3.50
Child's Rockers—In wood rockers for
the little ones we have a large and
varied assortment of styles and a
range of prices that is surprising.
We have them with wood seats,
cane seats and cobbler seats. All
are excellent values. Prices range
at, each, $2.50, $2.00, $1.50, $1.25
and  $1.00
Child's High Chairs—Several styles
of these chairs. The superior finish
is noticeable here. They are well
and strongly made. Prices range
at, each, $4.50(1 $2.75, $2.25, $2.00
and    §j||mHHf $i-7S
We Want You to See Our Unusually Fine Assortment of
The tone and "atmosphere" of a room
are largely determined by its decorations.
The curtains are perhaps the most important item of furnishings. They stand
before your guest, and impress themselves more upon the mind than do even
the carpets or the furniture. Since they
can either make or mar the beauty of
your daily surroundings, why not select
the best looking and the best wearing?
And, when buying curtains, visit specialists in this very important work—choose
from wide assortments. If you are
building or just brightening the old place,
don't overlook the importance of "correct" curtains. The curtain section offers
you now the handsomest assortment of
new curtains and curtaining we have ever
shown. Many charming and exclusive
patterns are shown in high, medium and,
low-priced varieties. In the completeness of this gathering of most worthy
curtain furnishings, you will surely be
suited. Then, perhaps, our drapery experts may assist you. Don't you think
that a firm that makes a specialty of this
sort of work, and employs only expert
decorators, could help you some in the
choosing? - And isn't the larger choice
that this firm offers you worth seeing,
too? Let us assist you. Won't cost you
a penny.
Some Ladies' Desksj    These Represent the Very Newest Ideas.
Ladies' Desks—In golden oak, highly
polished.   A big range of styles at
various  pricings.    We  have  them, \
at, each, $40.00, $20.00, $18.00, $16.00,
$14.00 and $12.00 '
Ladies' Desks—In mahogany, three ]
handsome styles in this wood are 1
shown. Highly polished. Trim- J
mings very best. Prices range at, t
each, $25.00, $18.00 and  $16.00 ]
Ladies' Desks—In oak, mission de- i
signs, finished in popular early [
English. We have an unusually <
large assortment of styles, and some 1
uncommonly pretty designs they J
are, too. The price range runs:
$32.00, $30,00, $25.00, $22.00, $18.00 j
and $15.00 1
Arabian Lace Curtains—Real Arabian lace, plain
net centre, in ecru. A very handsome curtain,
at a low price. Sizes 3 ft. x 50 in.   Per pair $5.50
Real Lace Curtains—Genuine lace curtains, with
cluny lace edging and Battenburg corners. This
is a curtain style you'll like. They come in
white.   Per pair  $6.50
Antique First Empire—A bold design of Linen
Applique on heavy net. A handsome Curtain
for dining room or library, new champagne
shade, 3 yards x 50 inches. Price, per pair $16.00
Ivory Point Venise—An elegant reproduction of
this famous lace in two tone treatments—ivory
with white embroidery, 3 yds. x 50 in. Price,
per pair  $20.00
Florentine Lace Curtains—Dainty designs in ecru
and white, with hand-worked insertions, at,
per pair  $12.00
Ivory Italian Filet—A new design of Filet Insertion, double eagle and crown decorations, interspersed with other motives, 3 yds. x 50 in.
Price, per pair  $18.00
Ivory Irish Point—Handsome floral treatment,
rich border, finished by hand, 3 yds. x 48 in.
Price, per pair, $12.00 and  $9.50
Dainty Curtains, with designs of inverted fleur de
lis and other motives, 3 yds. x 48 in. at per
pair  $10.00
A Great Choice of Lower-Priced Curtains Here Also.
; Dainty Muslins
For Pretty Curtains.
We should like very much the op-
', portuhity to talk "Casement Curtains''
1 These are decidedly "popular" just
now, and in the newest and nicest
1 houses you'll find this style of cur-
' taining predominates. Ever abreast
1 of the times, we are prepared with
1 an unequalled collection of new and
j beautiful materials.
Come in and let us show you these
' materials, and show you what delight-
1 fully dainty "effects" arc possible.
> The advice and knowledge of our ex-
| perts at your disposal, free.
UNFADABLE  MUSLINS
Dainty "Sundour" Madras Muslins, 50
inches wide, ranging in price from,
per yard, $1.75 to   85c
Cruggleton Casement Crepe is a light
material similar to Madras, but
made in small patterns on a plain
ground. The neatest and prettiest
light curtain goods yet placed on
the market. Four patterns only, at,
per yard  $1.25
DAINTY MUSLINS
Swiss Muslins, in striped, spotted and
other effects, 36 inches wide, per
yard  20c
Swiss Broche Muslins, in large and
assorted patterns, 48 inches wide,
per yard 35c and  25c
Swiss Wavel Muslins, in cream and
white stripe effects, embroidered, 46
inches wide, per yard  35c
, White and Cream Madras Muslins, in
very light and dainty patterns, 45
inches wide, per yard 50c and..35c
Bobbinet Yard Goods—Plain and
spot, 30 in. wide at, per yard, 25c,
35c and   40c
42 inches wide, at, per yard 30c,
35c and   55c
i Cream Madras Muslins, very pretty
and attractive designs, 52 inches
wide, per yard    45c
! Madras, in white and ecru shades, 72
inches wide, per yard, 85c and 75c
' Colored Madras Muslins, in very
striking and effective poppy designs,
50 inches wide, per yard  75c
! Colored Madras Muslins, in very
pretty stained glass window effects,
69 inches wide, per yard  $2.50
I Colored Madras Muslins, with pink
floral pattern, ground being mixed
with white and green 70 inches wide
per yard  $2.00
1 CURTAIN DEPARTMENT IS ON
SECOND FLOOR
>ooooooooo^^
At The Street
Corner
tf By THB LOUNdBR f
^_ei^^^^Wf^^fr—^ ^^-aMMf-anp-fpr^^^v^j
Although not strictly in my department, I think a few stray remarks in
connection with the municipal campaign will not be out of place. It is
thc first real fight I have been in since
a London County Council election
four years ago, when I was pelted
with rotten eggs and rank cabbages
for venturing to interject a few Imperial remarks when a red-hot socialist orator was "tearing passion to
tatters."   But that is another story.
I think the daily press of Victoria
has earned a leather medal, since it
has achieved a result without parallel
in the Capital City, so I am told by
old inhabitants, for more than twenty
years. It has aroused public interest,
forced nearly thirty candidates for
various municipal offices into the field,
and set everybody talking about the
business of'the city.
This is all as it should be. The
newspapers may be wrong, they usually are, and their ideas on the public questions of to-day may be worthless, but at any rate they have effected something by arousing the conflicting elements and stirring the citizens up to a sense of their duty.
Victoria has laboured under several reproaches, the worst of which
perhaps is its civic mismanagement,
but undoubtedly next to it ranks the
apathy of the city. Abuses are long-
lived, when the people become indifferent; and effective sanitation, filthy
streets and insufficient water may be
charged against the City Council, but
only in so far as it has failed to exercise ordinary business acumen in carrying out the mandate of the ratepayers. Let us hope that the present
interest in civic affairs marks a new
departure, and that Victoria has forever laid aside that spirit of apathy
and indifference which is largely responsible for the worst features of
her civic administration,
I have been lounging in committee
rooms and ward meetings during the
present week, and have been intensely amused. The Colonist, with much
more than its usual perspicacity, has
discerned that one of the most promising signs of the times is the discovery that Vietoria is thc proud
possessor of a replica of the historic
three Graces, in Messrs. Fullerton,
Gleason and Meston, not forgtting the
apotheosis of all grace and V'rtue, in
their High Priest and leader. All the
same, these Graces are made of the
same material as other folk, and unquestionably have "fee of clay." At
Spring Ridge, the other night, I was
intensely amused by the assumption
of Mr. Gleason, that only those who
supported Mr. Morley could hope for
salvation. In a conflict between the
world, the flesh and the devil, the latter would undoubtedly secure all who
are not on the Morley ticket!
Then it was quite interesting to
hear how skilfully Mr. Fullerton demonstrated, to his own satisfaction,
that the condition of civic affairs was
not due to the incompetency of the
late administration, but to the incapacity or or obstinacy of those gentlemen who were behind thc Progressive Ticket.
How trivial all these ridiculous assumptions sounded, to say nothing of
Mr. Fullerton's appeal to class prejudice. Personally, I believe that both
he and Mr. Gleason are estimable
men, in every respect deserving the
good opinion of the community, but
absolutely unfitted, by reason of their
prejudices and limited business capacity, to take part in administering the
affairs of an important city.
My old friend, Phil Smith, has fallen on evil times. He has my sympathy, because he has ben trying to pull
the chestnuts out of thc fire for other
people and has got his lingers burned
in the process. Phil is an excellent
printer and bookbinder, but he made
a mistake when he undertook to be
his own editor. He is too hot-headed
to write without the most careful
censorship. Mr. Morley, in whose interest the People's Progress was published, disclaimed responsibility, but
did not repudiate the malicious and
atrocious slanders which it contained.
I am writing this letter before the result of the election is known, but I do
not hesitate to say that any man who
could allow such a publication to bc
used in his support without repudiating it, is unfit to be entrusted with
any public position, and should spend
thc balance of his days in a lunatic
asylum. Nothing but 11 streak of insanity could account for the paragraph which declares that the Progressive Ticket was supported by
"rum and prostitution." When the
matter to which 1 referred in my last
letter has been fully investigated, it
will be found thnt the parlies responsible for such a statement were
the last who should have made it.
Several subscribers to The Week
have asked me to say something
about the crowded condition of the
Esquimalt cars at certain hours of thc
day.    I   have   made   enquiries,   and
found that this occurs only at the time
when workmen are returning home,
and there is no doubt that at such
times the small cars now running
on the Esquimalt route are a great
disadvantage. The same difficulty,
however, occurs on those which ply
between the city and Willows, and
also to a lesser extent to Oak Bay.
Passengers should be reasonable and
should remember that short of running special cars for workmen, there
is no means of avoiding a crush at
such times. Trailers might be run,
but there is a lack of power, and until this is remedied, an inovation of
that kind could not bc introduced. I
hear that in the near future larger
cars will be put upon thc Esquimalt
line, and probably by then thc desired
reduction in fares will havc been
brought about.
Readers of The Week are aware
that I have been most persistent in
pointing out defects ancl inconveniences of the city streets and sidewalks.
I am pleased to know that many of
these have been remedied. Thc construction of cement sidewalks is rapidly doing away with the stubbing of
toes by projecting nails, but I want
to enter a plea for some of thc outlying portions of the city which have
not hitherto received attention. In
Victoria West and Spring Ridge thc
sidewalks arc disgraceful. Planks arc
broken, in many places there are gaps
in thc sidewalk, and thc projection of
nails is prevalent. I quite agree with
the criticism of a speaker at the
Spring Ridge meeting, who declared
that however much wc might want to
see Victoria realize the ideal of a
beautiful city, it is a great error of
judgment to spend thousands of dollars on boulevards until we havc decent strcts and sidewalks.
I want to add my quota to the generally expressed opinion that the programme at the New Grand this week
is the very best on record. Two turns,
that of the Eddy family on the wire,
and Morton and La Triska in the doll
act, which might bc more appropriately be termed La Poupee, are good
enough for the Tivoli, and no higher
praise could bc given.
a£i
°~u~-£t*.
The Cold Gray Dawn.
On the edge of a bed sat a rounder
one  morn—
Ach Looey, ach Looey, ach Looey.
Mis head was athrob, he was feeling
forlorn—
Ach Looey, ach Looey, ach Looey.
Said  1   to him;  "Chappie, what was
it you tried?
Did you go against lobsters or oysters well fried?"
With a shake of his poor aching head
hc replied:
"Chop   sooey,   chop   sooey,   chop
sooey!"
Inspired Reports.
The outside public should take
more stock in the Vancouver reports
of thc assault upon white men by
Japs, if the adjectives used in describing thc affair were of a less
sanguinary, not to say gory, character, and if thc same despatch did not
start out by announcing that British
Columbia is to receive a fresh invasion of Japanese from Honolulu.
Cause and effect are too intimately
associated in this despatch for the
veriest tyro to overlook thc connection. Vi
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 1908.
•_M *m _*-_m •£• tA* ^lo -aA* cue *^ *Aa aA* _^L. aA*
* Social and        *
J Personal. $
^_m_i ____i __m_\ _m_— __m_l _____ _____ ____\^____ ___W_A_% ^mt^MmVU
'V V '*' '*' '*' '*' '*' IT tt V '*' '** TT
Ou Tuesday afternoon, at St. Paul's,
Esquimalt, the marriage of Mr. Geo.
Gordon Bushby and Miss Violet Carlotta Brae was solemnized by the Rev.
H. St. John Payne.
The bride was beautifully gowned
in a rich cream satin, with long train,
trimmed with Limerick lace, held in
place with orange blossoms and knots
of ribbon. The simple surplice bodice
had a bcrthc of Limerick and a tucked
chiffon yoke. She wore a tulle veil
and coronet of orange blossoms, and
and carried a shower bouquet of bride
roses and lilies of the valley; her only
ornaments were a very handsome
pearl bracelet, the gift of the groom,
and a pendant of pearls and tendot,
the gift of Dr. and Mrs. J. D. Helmcken.
Miss Elsie Bullen acted as maid of
. honor, and wore a very becoming
Princess robe of turquoise blue satin,
with a panel of Duchess lace; her hat
was of the same lace, with knots of
blue velvet, white ostrich plume, and
pale pink roses. The Misses Helmcken
and McTavish wcre bridesmaids, and
wore very dainty frocks of white mull,
trimmed with Valenciennes and pink
Empire sashes, hats of white chiffon
with pink Bankshire roses, and carried shower bouquets of pale pink
carnations.
.Mr. H. Bullen supported thc
groom, while Mr. D. Bullen acted as
usher.
Mrs. Brae, the mother of the bride,
wore a handsome gown of grey crept
cloth, trimmed with Irish crochet lace,
and a toque of velvet with white aigrette and ostrich plumes of pale
mauve.
Mrs. W. L, Bullen, sister of the
groom, was becomingly attired in
periwinkle blue crepe de chene, the
bodice trimmed with white lace, a
smart Gainsborough hat of black satin
with sequin crown, cream osprey and
pale pink crush roses.
Thc bride's going-away dress was
of grey chiffon cloth, with grey picture hat and white fox furs. After
the ceremony an informal reception
was held at the residence of the
bride's mother, on Dunsmuir Road.
* *   *
Among thc many hostesses during
the week was Mrs. Tatlow, Rockland
Avenue, who entertained her many
friends at tea on Wednesday afternoon. The refreshment table looked
extremely pretty, daffodils, asparagus fern,, and quaint little candlesticks with pale yellow shades to
match, were the simple but effective
decorations. Mrs. Tatlow was assisted by Miss Mabel Tatlow in receiving the numerous guests. Among
those present were: Mrs. Cornwall,
Mrs. McBride, Mrs. Alister Robertson, Mrs. B. Tye, Mrs. 0. Grahame,
Mrs. J. Irving, Mrs. B. Heisterman,
Mrs. H. Heisterman, Mrs. Hannington, Mrs. G. Courtney, Mrs. Harold
Robertson, Mrs. Page, Mrs. McCallum, Mrs. R. Dunsmuir, Mrs. J. Harvey, Mrs. McKay, Mrs. C. E. Pooley,
Mrs. Butchart, Mrs. Eliot, Mrs. R. H.
Pooley, Mrs. Holland, Mrs. Nelson,
Mrs. H. Tye, Mrs. Wolfenden, Mrs.
Rocke Robertson, Mrs. Hollyer, Mrs.
Walker, Mrs. A. Gillespie, Mrs. Bodwell, Mrs. L, Pemberton, Mrs. H.
Heisterman, Mrs. Perrin, Mrs. Shallcross, Mrs. Fleet, Mrs. McKenzie,
Mrs. Shaw, Mrs. Lugrin, Mrs. B.
Wilson, Mrs. Burns, Mrs. Higgins,
Mrs. Burton, Mrs. King, Mrs. W. S.
Gore, Mrs. L. S. Gore, Mrs. Brown.
Mrs. 11. Barnard M,rs. Tilton, Mrs.
Ker, Mrs. A, Crease, Mrs. A. Bridgman, Mrs. Jones, Mrs. J. Pemberton,
Mrs. Troup, Mrs. Arthur Robertson,
Mrs. Rome, Mrs. Blacklock, the
Misses Jessie Bell, Angus, Pooley,
Tilton, Brown, Hannington, King,
Drake. Gillespie, Fitzgibbons, Dupont,
Lawson, Gaudin. Phipps, McKay,
Helmcken, P. Irving, Crease, Foster,
Monteith, Butchart, Page, Perry,
Pitts, Peters, Williams, B. and G.
Irving. Bowron, E. and J. Lawson, P.
Drake, P. Mason, Newcombe, Tuck,
Heyland, Mrs, Laing, Mrs. Worsfold.
Mrs. Angus, Mrs. Church, Mrs. J.
Helmcken, Mrs. Ambery, Mrs. Presley, Mrs. Scholefield. Mrs. J. H. Gillespie, Mrs. Spicer Simson, Mrs.
Herscll, Mrs. Heyland, Mrs. Grant,
Mrs.   Stuart    Robertson,    Mrs.   Tait
Robertson, Mrs. Hobson.
* *    *
Mrs. Gardulo and child left on Wednesday  for  Southern   California.
* *    *
Mr. Brae, of Vancouver, came over
for his sister's wedding, which took
place last Tuesday.
* '*    *
Mrs. Stewart, of Vancouver, is the
guest of Mrs. McBride.
* *   *
Mr. H, L. Wright, Work Point Barracks, left by Wednesday's boat for
Vancouver, en route to England.
* *   *
Mrs. Wolley, of Pier Island, was
registered at the Balmoral during the
week.
Westward Ho!
Father Caine wrote the following
letter to the Editor of Westward Ho!
As it will be several weeks before
the next issue of that magazine appears, and the publishers are anxious
to remove any wrong impression
which may have been created by the
publication of the story referred to,
The Week has been asked to print
Father Caine's letter and the reply of
Miss McColl. In doing so, they also
wish to assure Father Caine and the
members of the Roman Catholic
Church that in publishing Miss Mc-
Coll's story they had not the slightest intention to reflect upon thc Sacraments of that Church, or to allow
anything to appear in their pages
which could give offence to any person. They hope that Father Cair.c
will accept Miss McColl's explanation, together with this assurance-*
(Editor Week).
The  Knights  of Columbus and  the
Stage Irishman.
Archbishop's House,
Victoria, B.C., Jan. u, 1908.
The Editor Westward Ho!
Dear Sir,—A copy of your Christmas number has been forwarded to
our Catholic paper, The Orphan
Friend.
Permit me to congratulate you on
a very bright magazine. Considering
the general merits of Westward Ho!,
I regretfully bring under your notice
one article contained in the Christmas
number and entitled, "The Moriarty
Twins' Christening."
The article was discussed at the last
meting of Victoria Council, Knights
of Columbus, and I have been deputed
by thc said Council to enter our
strong and emphatic protest against
the publication of such an article.
Of course, we are not concerned
with the intentions of your contributor nor with the class of readers said
writer may be accustomed to cater
for. We are protesting as members
of a Catholic organization, and are
judging the article from our standpoint, and on thc "written" merits
of the article.
We protest against it for two reasons. It is a gross caricature of the
Irish and a gratuitous insult to Catholics, in the ignorant and painful portrayal of the Sacrament of Baptism
as it obtains in our Church.
Regarding the "Irish" put on the
lips of the speakers, in this, to us,
pointless story, we would respectfully remind penny-a-liners who attempt to write "Irish dialect," that
such abominations as "phat" (see said
article) and "yez" (meaning you, we
presume), "foive," "belave," etc., are
never uttered by a real Irishman.
In this connection, it may be pointed out that not only in songs, but in
many stories and other writing of the
"Handy Andy" type and purporting to
be Irish, the phraseology is anything
but Irish. Thc "stuff" thus styled
Irish is of undoubted English origin—
topography, phraseology, rhymes, and
everything else, being un-Irish.
The internal evidence alone convicts their authors. The Irishman
never, for instance, mispronounces the
sound of ie (as thc priest in article
says belave). No Irishman ever says
"wake" for week. English words
spelled with two e's, such as week,
cheek, seek, etc., are always pronounced correctly by an Irish peasant.
It is a proper presentation of Irish
brogue to say "wake" for weak, "tay"
for tea, and "mate" for meat—the ea.
Should an Irishman use these, he is
simply conforming to the old and correct English pronunciation, as may
be seen by consulting thc older English poets, who always rhymed sea
with day, etc. To this hour thc original sound is preserved by English
people in great and break. A proper
presentation of Irish brogue is a difficult matter, for most Irish dialect
writers to understand, but they should
master the rules of Irish brogue before atempting to write it. The written brogue is oftentimes as ignorant
as the attempts of non-Irishmen to
speak it.
The gratuitous insult to the Church
in caricaturing the Sacrament of Baptism is more painful to us. Whoever
heard of an Irish priest speaking the
horrid jargon your article puts on the
lips of the "priest"? We have lived
with the Irish priests not only in the
British Isles and America, but in
France, Italy, Africa and Australia,
and have yet to met the type portrayed in your "Father Gorman."
A priest does not baptize a child
with the words, "I christen," etc., nor
does he 'dip his finger in the christening bowl" (we have no such bowl in
our Church), nor does he hold the
baby, etc. When conferring baptism,
the god-mother holds the child; tht
priest pours the water on the head
of the child, at the same time saying,
"I baptize thee in the name of the
Father, and of the Son, and of the
Holy Ghost"—information for your
contributor.
Surely, Mr. Editor, there are enough
ex-professo pens maligning the
Church—it was scarcely necessary to
place your non-sectarian scythe into
their "fair pasture-field." But my letter is getting too long.
The "stage Irishman"—or caricature of him, whether on stage, in
drawing-room, or by "penny-a-liners"
—is being killed by all cultured English-speaking people, and we regret
to see such a sorry specimen permitted an existence in your magazine, as
"The Moriarty Twins' Chritsening"—
compared to the other articles it is.
to us, as a 'cancerous carbuncle on a
fair face."
With regard to this, and any belittling of our Holy Faith, we, as
Knights of Columbus, demand that
amount of fairness given to others—
and emphatically and firmly enter our
strong protest against the ridicule
aimed at our Chinch in the article.
Expunged of such painful, so-called
stories as the "Moriarty Twins' Christening," we sincerely wish Westward
Ho' every success, and this for two
reasons—it is a bright, readable magazine, and it is Canadian.
On behalf of Victoria Council,
Knights of Columbus, I am, dear Sir,
Your faithfully,
CLEMENT CAINE,
Chaplain, K. of C.
W.   Blakemore,   Esq.,
Editor-in-Chief.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Buffilng-
ton Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation Gentleman, intends to apply for
a special timber licence over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted twenty
chains north of the northeast corner of
section 12, thence forty chains north,
one hundred and twenty chains west,
forty chains south and one hundred and
twenty chains east to point of com*
mencement.
Dated  21st December,  1907.
FRANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
Jan  18 R. W. Wilkinson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Bufflngton
Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Gentleman, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of section ,21, thence
eighty chains east, eighty chains south,
eighty chains west and eighty chains
north   to pnlnt  of  commencement.
Dated 21st December, 11107.
FRANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
Jan  IS R. W. Wilkinson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Bufflngton
Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Gentleman, Intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described   lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of section 20, thence
eighty chains west, eighty chains south,
eighty chains east and eighty chains
north  to place of commencement.
Dated 21st December,  1907.
FRANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
Jan 18 R. W. Wilkinson.
SKEENA   LAND  DISTRICT.
District  of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Oresby
Woakes of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Civil Engineer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following*
described land—on Porcher Island:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest cornor of Lot 1292, about 2
miles distant and in a southeasterly direction from Jap Bay; tiience north 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thenco
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing
160  acres,   more  or  less.
Dated Dec. 20th, 1907.
Jan IS ARTHUR WOAKES.
Port Moody, Jan. 14, 1908.
To the Editor of Westward Hoi
I am sorry to find that my story,
"The , Moriarty Twins' Christening,"
has given offence to some of your
readers, when absolutely none was
meant, and cannot see how a purely
humourous piece of fiction can bc
taken seriously, by anyone, in any
such connection. That it is not even
a true representation of the christening service of any church, should
place it beyond criticism on that score.
It was simply intended as a laugh-
maker, and purported to have no
other object. Certainly no insult was
intended to the Catholic Church.
As to the use of dialect—that is a
privilege accorded authors from time
immemorial. Whether it is the genuine article" or "brogue" docs not
enter into the question.
I may say that the language used
in the story was studied and taken
from that of Irishmen I have known
—who had no need to be ashamed of
their speech.
So that any offence taken upon
these grounds is without foundation.
Yours very truly,
IRENE M. MacCOLL.
Counsel (for the defence)—"And
remember, gentlemen of the jury, that
the accused lived with his mother-in-
law ten whole years before he murdered her."
Instant acquittal.
A Pointed Answer.
Rude Husband—My dear, your nose
gets sharper every day.
Angry Wife—No wonder, the way
you keep it down to the grindstone.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District  of  Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that W. N. Campbell
of Victoria, occupation Civil Engineer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase  the  following described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of. lot 1294, (J.R.
Cody) one mile west of Jap Inlet, Porcher Island, thence north 40 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east 40 chains, containing 160 acres.
Dated Dec. 16th, 1907.
W.  N.  CAMPBELL,
Jan 18 J. J. Templeton, Agent.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that J. J. Templeton
of Victoria, occupation surveyor, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of Jot 1293, M. S.
McLeod, one-half mile west of Jap Inlet Porcher Island, thence south 20
chains; thenee west SO chains; thence
north 20 chains; thence east SO chains
to point of commencement and containing  160  acres,   more  or  less.
Dated December 16th,  1907.
Jan. IS J. J.  TEMPLETON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
' Claim No. 1—Commencing at a post
planted 80 chains west of southwest
corner of Timber Limit No. 3193, thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south SO chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th Dec, 1907.
THOMAS MILER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan 18
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTTCE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation, Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 2—Commencing at a post
planted 80 chains west of southwest corner of Timber Limit No. 13193; thence
north 80 chains; thence west SO chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan  IS
VICTORIA LAND DTSTRTCT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupntion Timber
Cruiser, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 3—Commencing at a post
planted SO chains west of southwest corner of Timber Limit No. 13193; thence
east 160 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thonce west 60 chains; thence north 40
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th December. 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY  WOOD.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 5—Commencing at a post
planted 40 chains west of the northwest corner of Timber Limit No. 18544,
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains', thence
west 40 chains to point of commencement.
Located  Sth  December,  1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan IS
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers. Intends to apply for a special
timber  licence   over   the   following  described  lands:
Claim  No.  6—Commencing at  a post
planted 40 chains west and 10 chains
south of the southwest corner of timber limit No. 18646, thence west 40
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thenee south about 60
chains; thence easterly along shore 120
chains; thence north about 60 chains to
point of commencement.
Located 9th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan. 18
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that William Croteau
of Aldermere, B.C., occupation Farmer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner; thence north 20 chains
to McClure Lake; thence along McClure
Lake in an east southerly direction 43
chains, more or less; thence west 40
chains to place of beginning and making 40 acres more or less, and known
as the southwest fractional quarter section  of 36,  township 5,  Range 5.
Dated November 20,  1907.
Jan. IS WILLIAM CROTEAU.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Jennie Croteau
of Aldermere, B.C., occupation housewife, Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described  land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner; thenee north 40 chs.;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence west 40 chains to place
of beginning and known as the northwest quarter section of 30, Tp. 6, Rge.
5, and containing 160 acres, more or
less.
Dated  23rd of November,  1907.
Jan. 18 WILLIAM CROTEAU.
WEEK JANUARY 20TH
The New Grand
SULLIVAN a COMSIDINI,    Pronrl.tors.
Nanai.mont of DOIT. JAMItSON.
KELLER'S VIRGINIA BELLES
SEVEN—GIRLS—SEVEN
Singing and Dancing Act.
ZINELLE AND BOUTELLE
Comedy  Operatic  Duo.
PAUL STEVENS
Novelty Wire and Pole Artist.
THOS. MARIE
GLENROY  &  RUSSELL
High  Class  Comedy.
"At Casey's Reception."
JOE MAY
BYRON & BLANCHE
Comedy  Playlet
Matrimonial Sweets in Family Jars
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrator
"The Heart You Lost in Maryland
You'll Find in Tennessee."
NEW MOVING PICTURES
"For Peace or War."
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M. Nagel, Director.
EQUIP YOURSELF
WITH  A  THOROUGH
BUSINESS COURSE
SHORTHAND
TYPEWRITING
BOOKKEEPING
Day and Night Classes. You can
enter school any time. Individual
instruction. A diploma from this
school will enable you to secure and
hold a position with the best firms.
Terms reasonable.
For particulars write or call
THE   SHORTHAND   SCHOOL
1109 Broad Street Victoria, B.C.
E. A. MaeMlUan.
LADIES        SWEDISH        GENTS
MASSAGE
Turkish Baths
VIBRATOR  TREATMENT
UR.      BJORNFELT,      SWEDISH
MASSEUR.
Special   Massage and Hometreat-
ment by appointments.
Room 2, Vernon Blk., Douglas St.
Body Development.
Hours 1 to 6. Phone 1629.
Herbert
Witherspoon
(BASSO)
MONDAY,   JANUARY  37TH
PRICES: $3.50, 92.00 and $1.00.
Gallery, SOe.
The Box Offlce will be opened at the
Victoria Theatre at 10 a.m. on Friday,
January 24th. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANMARY 18, 1908.
* Short Story  *
An Elephant Comedy.
By ALBERT DORRINGTON.
We followed the baggage-coolie
and his tiny bullock-cart along the
narrow mountain-road where the
close-planted para-trees clung tenaciously to the storm-washed slopes.
My business lay with one of the superintendents of the large, rubber
plantations at Newara, about fifty
miles from Colombo.
I had left the crowded pilgrim-train
at the siding, where the engine was
still visible as it crawled round the
bottle-shaped   summit  towards   Kan-
dy.    The  superintendent's  bungalow
overlooked the    plantation    and  the
company's    vast    jungle  reserves—a
densely wooded tract of country extending   for   several   miles   through
valleys   and   roaring   torrents.     The
coolie lines were in the valley bdow,
a mere cluster of mud huts thatched
I with straw, and infested with yellow
I pariah dogs and squalling Tamil chil-
|dren.
I was met at the bungalow gate by
iBelton Dacey, the superintendent, and
(after the usual hospitable formalities
Iwas conducted over the estate to
(where a gang of labourers was at
(work clearing and burning off a patch
|of heavily timbered land.
While passing a thirty-acre field
lof newly planted trees we came upon
la group of young para-plants up-
Ifootcd and tossed aside as though a
|tornado had passed during the night.
Dacey turned to me almost apologetically. "We've been pestered by a
(rogue elephant the last week or so. I
(don't know why the brute chooses our
(plantation night after night, while
(others in the district remain untouch-
|ed."
Lower down the valley, where the
(company had put in several thousand
cocoa-nut trees, there was further evidence of the rogue's trunk and foot
tvvork. Many of the young palms had
|been twisted and wrenched to the
[ground and their top stems scattered
■broadcast. The brute's footmarks
(were plainly visible in the soft sandy
■soil.
Following the spoor leisurely, we
(halted in a hollow half-concealed by
li clump of silver oaks, and examined
(them more closely. A man's foot-
(prints joined the elephant's just here,
(then followed them for a short distance, and disappeared altogether.
(Sixteen years spent in Australia
among the black police and aborigines
(had taught me something of the art
of tracking. The dish-shaped ele-
(phant-spoor grew faint and was lost,
(as far as Dacey was concerned, the
[moment we crossed the first gravel
(ridge.
"What do you make of it?" he ask-
|ed, halting suddenly.
"Seems to me as though the brute
Jhad been brought here by its native
keeper," I answered. "The man's
(footprints disappear near the clump
I of silver oaks, which seems to indi-
Icate that he rode the animal here,
land waited until it had trampled and
• uprooted things to his satisfaction.
]T might go further and say that the
(unwieldy creature was thrashed or
|goaded  into  doing the  mischief."
The superintendent grew thoughtful for a moment; then his eyes glittered strangely, as though a sudden
(thought had fired his imagination.
(Returning to the bungalow, he summoned the head kangani hurriedly. A
r'ew moments later a grizzled giant
lif a man with black Tamil eyes and
(•skin stood salaaming in the doorway.
"You did not tell me, kangani, that
|'t is Musoora who drives his beast
icross our fields at night. Have you
||tiarrelled with the man? He has no
(grievance against the company," said
I he superintendent sternly.
"I know    nothing    of the  matter,
lorai," answered the kangani  softly.
'Musoora is a drunkard and a bad
(man.   I know not why he comes here
(with his animal.   I have dug pits, but
[the beast passes them by.    The pea-
rifle my brother brought from India
is not much good for stopping elephants, oh master!"
Belton dismissed him sharply and
turned to me. "This fellow Musoora
and his elephant were employed on
the estate until quite recently. He
is a bad lot, and his animal is no
better. Like most Tamils, he goes
amok when the taste of whisky is in
his mouth. He has been convicted
three times for driving his beast over
cultivated land. One night, about two
years ago, he brought a couple of
full-grown bull-tuskers up to an overseer's bungalow and drove them at it
under the goad until they wrecked it
fore and aft. If he visits the estate
again," continued Dacey, "I'll send the
police after him and destroy his elephant,"
During the night I was awakened
by the mournful barking of an elk
as it wandered over the mountainside. Later, my small fox terrier,
which always accompanies me, scampered up and down the bungalow veranda as though in pursuit of several
cats. Approaching the window, I perceived a score of black-faced monkeys
peering down at the dog from the
trellis-work overhead; they chattered
and grimaced maliciously as it leaped
and tried to gain the veranda rail.
"They come from the forest at
night," explained my bedroom coolie,
entering hastily. "They pick up scraps
of bread and fruit, and they will not
go away unless we reach them with a
whip or shoot one of the mothers,"
I was not in favour of shooting one
of the mothers, especially the one
that sat on the trellis-edge with the
bald-faced, shiny-eyed baby in her
arms.
"But the sinna dorai must not encourage them," whispered the coolie,
"or they will come again and break
the windows."
About midnight we were awakened
by a terrific din from the coolie lines.
It seemed as though an army of women and children were wailing and
calling to each other from different
parts of the estate. Above all was
heard the insistent throbbing of a
death tom-tom.
Passing round the veranda, I met
Dacey on the steps, his face whiter
than usual. "Some devil's work going
on below," he said bitterly. "At daybreak they will come up here, six hundred strong, and ask me to remove
their lines to a more suitable site. A
man or a woman falls sick suddenly
and they believe that the devil is in
their huts. No amount of argument
will convince them that dirt is the
only visible devil. The lines have to
be shifted and rebuilt on another site
—at the company's cost of course,"
he added bitterly.
Dacey rarely interfered with the domestic troubles of his seven or eight
hundred Tamils unless murder or violence justified his presence in the lines
The kangani or headman settled all
disputes, and in the majority of cases
he ruled justly and with a rod of iron.
The shouting continued below until
the valley echoed with the screaming
and wailing of Tamil children and
women huddled together in groups
near the factory door.
Dacey shrugged his shoulders and
beckoned to nie. "Come and see the
fun; come and see the big black kan-
ganis thrashing a mob of stampeding
coolies. Tomorrow, if my luck is
out," he went on slowly, "there won't
be a single Tamil labourer on the
estate."
"Where will they go?"
"Anywhere. They'll disband and
seek employment on other plantations."
"But your coolies are bound over to
serve the estate for a certain period.
You can compel the bolters to return."
"Yes, if other planters were honest
and advised me of their whereabouts.
But the other planters are always in
want of a few extra coolies, and the
bolters are sheltered and set to work
with the others."
Following the superintendent down
the steep, boulder-strewn path, we arrived outside the lines, where two
hundred Tamil girls and women lay
crouching in the tall lemon-grass,
spreading out their hands in the direction of the forest reserves.
The kangani, his eyes glinting sav
agely, strode from a mud-walled
house, his big black fists clenched at
his sides.
"Speak out, man!" thundered Dacey. "What has happened? Who
drove these women from their huts?"
The kangani pointed to the jungle
reserves, where several lanterns flard
as though a host of coolies were beating the scrub in quest of a hidden
foe.
"The elephant, oh master! It has
taken my little son."
T kangani's head drooped slightly;
his breath came in sharp expulsions.
"My wife came to me a minute ago
crying that the elephant had lifted
the babe from beside her. It was
dark, the fires were out, and we
could not see the black beast as it
walked back to the forest. A curse
on the marauder that enters the huts
to  steal  our  children!"
"You have not been drinking?" The
superintendent eyed him frostily, his
erect figure and flaming eyes. "Have
you been smoking opium?"
The kangani shrugged his shoulders
and indicated the crowd of women
huddled together outside the lines.
"Ask these people, oh master! It is
the sick man and the cripple who take
afim."
The women now gathered around
the euperintendent, and each explained and dilated upon the elephant's iniquitous act. 'It had trampled into their lines without warning;
it had trodden on two pariah dogs
that obstructed its entrance. Without
warning or noise it had lifted the kangani's babe from the mat, and had
vanished in the darkness. They were
sorry their headman had lost his little
son. The elephant would carry it to
the river and drown it for certain.
The superintendent's face grew
dark and perplexed as he listened to
the chatter of the Tamil women. He
had worked in Southern India for
several years, asd he knew the ways
of drunken mahouts and trained elephants too well to discredit certain
parts of the story.
We examined the kangani's house
and the broken threshold where the
huge beast had crushed and torn away
the woodwork while effecting an entrance. In a far corner of the room
lay a young Tamil woman, her small
brown fingers dug into the earthen
floor. Her face and shoulders were
half-concealed by a scarlet sarong.
"She allows an elephant to steal my
little son." The kangani spoke behind
us, and his voice was full of bitterness
and suppressed wrath. "She is no
longer wife of mine. Tomorrow I
will thrash her before her people. The
tom-toms shall follow her from the
lines."
"You will quit my service, then,"
answered the superintendent coldly.
"There will be no thrashing either,
kangani."
The kangani lowered his head. "The
dorai knows I loved my little sou.
This beast of Musoora has stolen my
life."
The superintendent had given an
order to a coolie some time before,
and he now appeared carrying a heavy
Mannlicher rifle on his shoulder. Dacey took it and walked from the lines
past the sprawling Tamil women and
gaping men.
A crowd of boys surrounded us as
we moved towards the jungled slopes
near the eastern corner of the plantation. Dacey turned sharply and
snapped out a word to them. In an
instant they vanished back towards
the huts.
Faint streaks of dawn appeared in
the distant sky. Banks of white mists
surged over the deep valley, and the
down-dripping moisture fell like
heavy rain upon our garments. Far
away came the ugly yelp of a jackal,
and the pariahs in the coolie lines
answered in dismal chorus.
"An Australian black tracker would
have picked up the spoor long ago," I
began apologetically as the superintendent fretted in my wake, wolfing
thc end of his Burma cheroot.
"Go on," hc said huskily. "Musoora
has a hut on our boundary, also three
wives, six children, and a rogue elephant. After T've disposed of his
child-stealing beast I'll sec whether
his constitution is adaptable to a
nice clean jail."
(Continued on Page Twelve)
You can always      *__*      ^-^   It tastes different
tell an M. B. cigar n\m   Yjm     than others.
Union Made. (D IflsW
Havana Filler.       WlJfClI
Made by S. A. Bantly, Victoria, B. C.
Two Sizes.
Sold Everywhere.
To Our Friends and Patrons;
We publish herewith Customs Statistics showing the
importations of Champagnes for the year 1907, and beg to
call your attention to the figures attained by G. H. MUMM
& CO.'S CHAMPAGNE, being 113,444 cases, or nearly
one-third of the total, which is striking evidence of its
continued great popularity:
G. H. MUMM & CO 113,444
Moet & Chandon   78,841
Pommery & Greno   47,293
Vve. Clicquot    40,147
Krug & Co  16,549
Louis Roederer     12,834
Ruinart Pere & Sons   9,365
Monopole  8,489
Pol Roger & Co  7,159
Due de Montebello   5,829
Various brands   40,383
Grand Total    380,333
Compiled from Custom House Records by S. Y. Allaire.
G. H. MUMM & CO.'S Champagne is universally recommended by all leading physicians because it is not made
dry by the addition of alcohol... No other Champagne in
the world can show such strong proof of its superlative
quality and popular appreciation.
PITHER   &   LEISER
Wholesale Distributors.
Qtm1*^+**+>^»**+W*f
Reduction
in Clothing
TO-DAY
at
Fit=Reform
Wardrobe
Victoria,
New House to Rent, or
For Sale.
I have for immediate possession to
rent or will sell on very easy terms
—small cash payment—one of the
best built dwellings in the city. Only
15 minutes' walk from Post Office,
and one block from car line. Situated in one of the best residential
sections.
Bungalow,    with    large    balcony,
seven-roomed house, absolutely new,
with full sized cement basement, concrete   floor;   electric   light   in   every
I room  in  the  house.    Hot  and  cold
water   equipment;    heavy    porcelain
wash  bowl  and  bath,  also  separate
toilet in basement.    Laundry  in the
basement  equipped  with  latest  concrete tubs and  hot and cold water.
i Walk has  been  laid  in  extra  heavy
1 concrete   from   street   to   verandah
steps.   This is a proposition that will
be   snapped   up   quickly.     Call   or
phone 1543.
G. W. DEAN
Adelphi Block   -   VICTORIA, B.C.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that William Rose, of
Ingersol, Ont., Merchant, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted about
two miles south of Refuge Bay, on the
west coast of Porcher island and at the
northwest corner -of lot 1282, Cassiar
district; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 20 chains; thence wost SO chains;
thence south following coast line to
point of commencement, containing 100
acres.
WILLIAM  ROSS.
Jan 11. A. O. Noal.e, Agent.
Most
Particular
Smokers
Experience little or no difficulty
in finding a cigar or blend of
smoking mixture that fits their
taste.
Our Manila or Havana
Cigars can't be beaten.
We carry a most complete line of smokers'
sundries.
The Army
und Navy
Cigar Store.
Richardson
Phone 345
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT. \
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that Francis Joseph
Alma Green, of Quatsino, B. C, occupation Prospector, intends to apply for
a special timber licence over the following described lands:
Commonclng at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 102, at tho
Narrows, Quatsino Sound, thence east
about 35 chains to northeast corner of
Lot 192; thence north about 120 chains
to the southern boundary of the Indian
reserve; thence west to the shore of
Narrows; thence south along the shore
to point of commencement; 640 acres,
more or less,
Jan 11
FRANCIS JOSEPH ALMA GREEN.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
! District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
and Arthur Roll, of Victoria, B.C., timber dealers, intend to applv for tho
right to purchase the following described lands In Kildalla Bay, Rivers
Inlet:—Commencing nt a post planted
on the oast side of the bay, about one-
third of a mile from the point at the
mouth of tho bay, being the southwest
corner post; thenco oast 20 chains;
thence north 20 chains; thence west 20
chains to beach; thence south along
beach to point of commencement; containing 10 acres, more or less.
Staked November 26th, 1907.
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL,
Jan. 11 George Young, Agent. li
IMtih    ».—>_.____
10
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 1908.
NEW    WESTMINSTER     LAND    DISTRICT.
Distriot of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Roman Z. Chandler, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
timber broker, intends to apply for a
special timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
at northwest corner of T. L. 1S187;
thence east 80 chains along the north
line of T. L. 18187; thenee north 80
chains along the west line of T. L.
12502; thence east 80 chains along the
north line of T. L. 12502; thence north
80 chains along the west line of T. L.
12503; thence in a southwesterly course
along the line of the Capilano Water Reserve to place of commencement, and
containing 640 acres of land, more or
December 23, 1907.
Jan 11. ROMAN Z. CHANDLER.
■ NOTICE is hereby given that I, George
French, prospector, of Skidegate, B.C.,
intend to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over 640
acres, bounded as follows:—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast
eorner of Section 21, Township 4, Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Group;
thence running 80 chains north; thence
80 chains east; thence 80 chains south
to shore line; thence following shore
line to point of commencement, containing 640  acres.
Located  December   12th.   1907.
GEORGE FRENCH, Locator.
Jan. 4 John Simister, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that I, Benjamin Kromp, of Skidegate, B. C,
rancher, Intend to apply for a licence
to prospect for coal and vetroleum over
610 acres of land bounded as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted near the
beach at the southeast corner of Section 20, Township 4, Graham Island,
Queen Charlotte Group; thence 80 ehains
north; thence 80 chains east; thence 80
chains south and over and under water;
thence 80 chains west over and under
water to point of commencement; containing 6*10 acres, more or less.
Located  November  30th,   1907.
BENJAMIN KROMP, Locator.
Jan. 4 John Simister, Agent
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. W. C; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thenoe west 80
chains, more or less to River; thence
southerly 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more
or less
Staked December 7.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast. Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank of Kimsquit River, about 4
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H. Taylor's S. W. G; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Staked December  9.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. Cor. of B. C. Dev. Co.'s Lot 50 and
marked the N. E. Cor.; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains, more or less, to south
boundary of lot 50; thence east 80
chains along said boundary to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Staked December 6.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
Intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
40 chains east of the N. E. Cor. of B.
C. Dev. Co.'s Lot 50, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. W. Cor.; thence east 40
chains; thence north 160 chains; thence
40 chains to bank of Salmon River;
thence south 160 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Staked December 6.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast. Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank of Salmon River, about 2
miles north of the N. E. C. of Lot 50
and marked T. H. Taylor's S. W. C,;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains, more or
less, to bank of river; thence southerly
80 chains along bank of river to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Staked December 6.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
Intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Salmon River, about 5
miles north of the N. E. C. of Lot 50
and marked T. H. Taylor's S. E. C;
thence west 40 chains; thence north 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 40 cbalns; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence east 40
chains, more or less, to River; thence
southerly along river 160 chains to point
of commencement.
Staked  December 7.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
Intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank of Kimsqult River, about 2
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. W. C; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to bank of river; thence south 80
chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Staked  December  9.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
Intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank of Kimsqult River, about 3
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Kimsquit River, about 1%
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. E. C; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 aeres,
more or less.
Staked December 10.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Kimsquit River, about __
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. E. C; thence west SO chains;
tbence north 80 chains: thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Staked December 10.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains;  thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
10. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile distant in a northerly
direction from claim No. 9, marked S.E.
Corner, Section 19, Township 36; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 ohalns;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
11. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile distant ln a northerly
direction from claim No. 10, marked S.E.
Corner, Section 30, Township 36; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
12. Commencing at a post planted
about one mlle distant In a northerly
direction from claim No. 11, marked S.E.
corner, Section 31, Township 36; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
T. S. McPHERSON.
Dec. 28 Per Geo. H. Jackson.
COAST   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that F. S. Buck of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation lumberman,
intends to apply for a special timber
license over the following described
lands:
1. Commencing at a post planted on
Gilford Island, 40 chains in southerly direction from the N.E. corner of surveyed Lot 625 on north shore of lake;
thence north 80 ehains more or less to
the south line of T. L. 7714; thenee
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to this post.
FRED.  S. BUCK.
2. Commencing at a post planted
about about 40 chains south and 80
chains east of N. E. corner of surveyed
lot 625, thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west  80 chains  to this post.
Staked Dec. lst.
Dec. 28 FRED. S. BUCK.
NOTICE is hereby given that I, James
Alfred Owens, prospector, Skidegate, B.
C, intend to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over 640
acres of land bounded as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted northeast corner, near the beach on south
shore of Skidegate Inlet, B.C.; Graham
Island, Queen Charlotte Group, supposed to be Section 5, Township 1;
thence running 80 ohains south; thenee
80 chains west; thence 80 chains north
to shore line; thence following shore line
to point of commencement; containing
640 acres, more or less.
Located  November  29th,  1907.
JAMES ALFRED OWENS,
Jan. 4 Locator.
NOTICE is hereby given that I, Emily
Margaret Johnston, of Victoria, B.C., intend to apply for a licence to prospect
for coal and petroleum over 640 acres
of land bounded as follows:—Commencing at a post planted at the south-east
corner of section 33, township one (1),
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Group;
thence running 80 chains north; thertce
80 chains east; thence 80 chains south;
thence 80 chains west to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Located December 6th, 1907.
EMILY MARGARET JOHNSTON,
Locator.
Jan. 4. Christopher Johnson, Agent.
COAST LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range One.
TAKE NOTICE that F. S. Buck of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation lumberman,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:
No. 3. Commencing at a post planted
on Gilford Island, at the head of a lake,
and at N.E. end of said lake, and about
40 chains south and about 50 chains
east from N.E. corner of surveyed lot
625, thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 2n, 1907.
No. 4. Commencing at a post planted
on Gilford Island, about 40 chains south
and 130 chains east from N.E. corner
of surveyed lot 625, thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thenee
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Staked December 3rd, 1907.
No. 5. Commencing at a post planted
on Gilford Island, about 40 chains south
and 210 chains east from N.E. corner of
surveyed lot 625, thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains', thence north 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 6. Commencing at a post planted
on Gilford Island, at the S.E. corner
of T.L. 16806; thence west 80 chains to
the S.W. of T. L. 15806, thence north 40
chains; thence west 20 chains; thence
south 80 chains (more or less) to north
shore of lake; thence east along shore
of lake 100 chains; thence north 40
chains (more or less) to point of commencement.
Staked December 2nd, 1907.
Dec. 28 F. S. BUCK.
No. 34—Commencing at a post planted
10 chains east of the N.W. corner of
No. 32, being about 10 chains east of
Young's River and about three miles
north of Blanked Bluff, being the S.W.
corner; thence north 160 chains; thence
east 40 chains; thence south 160 chains;
thence west 40 chains to point of commencement.
November  24th,   1907.
No. 35—Commencing at a post planted
at the S.E. corner, opposite No. 34 post,
being about 10 chains east of Young's
River, and about three miles north of
Blanket Bluff; thence north 160 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 160
chains; thence east 40 chains to point
of commencement,
Nov,   24th,   1907.
No. 36—Commencing at a post planted
at the S.E. corner about 10 chains east
of the N.E. corner, 34 and 45 chains
east of Young's River, being five miles
northerly from Blanket Bluff; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains  to  point of  commencement.
November 24th,  1907.
GEORGE YOUNG,
Dec. 28 J. W. Radly, Agent.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Superstructure of Swing Span.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
time for receiving tenders for the
Superstructure Metal for Swing Bridge,
North Arm, Fraser River, has been extended up to and including Friday, the
31st day of January, 1908.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer,
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., December 17th, 1907.
Dec. 28
NOTICE  TO  LOGGERS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Piles.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
DISTRICT   OF  RUPERT.
TAKE NOTICE that I, T. S. McPherson, agent of Viotoria, B.C.,  Intend to
apply for  special  timber license  over
the following described lands:
1. Commencing at a post planted
about 4 mlles distant ln a northwesterly
direction from the head of west arm of
Quatsino sound and marked N.E. Cor.
section 25, township 37, thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
2. Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles and In a northwesterly
direction from the head of west arm,
Quatsino Sound, marked S.E. Cor. Section 36, Township 37, thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence, east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Staked December 5th,  1907.
3. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile In a westerly direction
Claim No. 2. marked N.E. Cor., Section
26, Township 37; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 ehains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to point
of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
4. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile in a westerly direction
from Claim No. 2, marked S. E. Cor.,
Section 35, Township 37; thence north
80 chains; thence weat 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
5. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile ln a northwesterly direction from claim No. 4, marked N.E.
Corner, Section 34, Township 37; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Commencing at a post planted one
mile distant in a northwesterly direction from claim No. 4, marked S. E.
Corner, Section 3, Township 36; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains  to  point  of commencement.
Staked December Sth, 1907.
7. Commencing at a post planted
about one mlle distant and in a northwest direction from claim No. 6, marked
S.E. corner, Section 9, Township 36;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 6th, 1907.
8. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile in a northwesterly direction from claim No. 7, marked S. E.
corner, seotlon 17, township 36; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 ehains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
9. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile distant In a westerly
direction from claim No. 8, marked S. B.
Corner, Section 18, Township 36; thence
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.  Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young,
of Victoria, B.C., Timber Cruiser, ln
tends to apply for special timber licences over the following desoribed
lands:
No. 26—Commencing at a post planted
at the S.E. corner, near Clyak River,
being 6 miles N.E. from the Junction
of Young and Clyak Rivers and opposite the N.E. corner of No. 16, thence
north 100 chains; thence west 64 ehains;
thence south 100 ehains; thence east 64
chains  to  point of  commencement.
November  27th,   1907.
No. 27—Commencing at a post planted
at the S.W. corner, opposite the N. W.
Corner of N. 17, being about 6 chains
east of Clyak River and about 7 miles
N.E. from the Junction of Young and
Clyak River, thence north 100 chains;
thence east 64 chains; thence south 100
chains; thence west 64 chains to point
of commencement.
November 27th, 1907.
No. 28—Commencing at a post planted
on the river bank at the S.W. corner
and opposite the N.W. corner of No.
27, being one-half mlle northerly from
Bever Rapids, Clyak River; thence north
100 chains; thence east 64 chains; thence
south 100 chains; thence west 64 chains
to point of commencement.
November 27th,  1907.
No. 29—Commencing at a post planted
on the river bank at the S.E. corner
and opposite the N.E. corner of No.
26, being one-half mile south of Bever
Rapids, Clyak River; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
November 27th,  1907.
No. 30—Commencing at a post planted
on the bank at the S. E. corner and
opposite No. 28, being one-half mlle
north of Bever Rapids, Clyak River,
thence north 100 ehains; thence west 64
chains; thence south 100 chains; thence
east 64 chains to point of commencement.
November 27th,  1907.
No. 31—Commencing at a post planted
at the S. E. corner about 10 chains
west from the N.E. corner of No. 28.
on the river bank, about one and three-
quarter miles north of Bever Rapids on
Clyak River; thence north 80 ohains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
30 chains; thence east 80 chains to
point of commencement.
November   27th,   1907.
No. 32—Commencing at a post planted
at the S. W. corner, about flve (6)
chains east of Young's River, being
about nine and one-quarter miles from
Its Junction with Clyak River, and opposite the N. W. corner of No. 26; thenco
north 100 chains; thence east 64 chains;
thence south 100 chains; thence west
64 chains to point of commencement.
November 24th, 1907.
No. 33—Commencing at a post planted
at the S.E. eorner about 5 chains east
of Young's River, being about nine and
one-quarter miles from the Junction of
Young and Clyak Rivers and opposite
No. 32; thence north 100 chains; thence
west 64 chains; thence south 100 chains;
thence east 64 chains to point of commencement.
November 24th, 1907.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that J. A. Johnson, of
Vancouver, cruiser, intends to apply for
a special timber licence over the following described lands:—
1. Commencing at a post planted on
the southwest corner of Leose No. 2;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west along south boundary of said lease
80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated  December  27th,   1907.
District of Rupert.
2. Commencing at a post planted on
the south bank of river running into
Beaver Cove, and on the west boundary
of Lease No. 2; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains along bank
of said river to point of commencement.
Dated  December  27th,   1907.
District of Rupert.
3. Commencing at a post planted
about 80 chains west of west boundary
of Lease No. 2, and on south bank of
a river running into Beaver Cove; thence
south 160 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east
40 ohalns along bank of said river to
point of commencement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
District of Rupert.
4. Commencing at a post planted
about the southeast corner of T. L. No.
11,596; thence south 80 chains; thenee
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
District of Rupert.
5. Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains east of the south-east
corner of T. L. 11,395; thence east 160
chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
west 160 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commeneement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
District of Rupert.
6. Commencing at a post planted
about 20 chains south of the southwest
corner of Lease No. 2; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
Jan 4. J. A. JOHNSON.
ALTERNATIVE sealed tenders, superscribed "Tender for Piles, Bridge,
North Arm, Fraser River," will be received by the Honourable the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works,
Victoria, B. C, up to and Including
Tuesday, the 31st of December, 1907,
for furnishing and delivering at the
bridge site on the North Arm of the
Fraser River, on the line of the Cemetery Road, fir and cedar piles.
About six hundred (600) will be required, varying In length from twenty
(20) to forty-flve (46) feet. They must
be straight, sound, and not less than
ten (10 inches at the small end. No
butts  will be accepted.
Further printed particulars can be obtained on application to the undersigned.
Tenderers must state the price per
lineal foot for piles delivered.
The successful tenderer will be furnished with a list giving the number
of piles required and the length of each.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certificate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, In
the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars ({260), which shall be forfeited
If the party tendering decline or neglect
to enter Into contract when called upon
to do so, or fail to complete the work
contracted for. The cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful ten-
tenderers will be returned to them upon  the  execution  of  the  contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the form supplied, signed
with the actual signatures of the tenderers, and enclosed ln the envelope furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 30 Public Works Engineer.
LAND REGISTRY ACT.
In the matter of an application for a
Duplicate   Certificate   of   Title   to
Lot 6 of Lot 7 of Section 10,  (Map
280),   Esquimalt   District,   Victoria
City.
Notice ls hereby given that It ls my
Intention at the expiration of one month
from the first publication hereof to issue
a Duplicate of the Certificate of  Title
to said lot,  issued to  George A.  Cold-
well on the 6th day of June, 1899, and
numbered 6296C.
Land  Registry   Offlce,  Victoria,   B.C.,
the 21st day of November, 1907.
S,  Y.  WOOTTON,
Nov. 23 Registrar-General.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that Roland D. Craig,
of Vancouver, occupation Forester, Intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following described lands:
Commonclng at a post planted one (1)
mlle south and 20 chains west from
the southwest corner of L. 222, West
Fork of Adams River; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains.
December  20th,   1907.
Jan. 4 ROLAND D. CRAIG.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that M. J. Kinney, of
Portland, Ore., occupation Lumberman,
Intends to apply for permission to lease
the  following described  land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Rupert
District, where the said line intersects
the shore line of the east side of Marble
Bay; thence northerly following the
shore line a distance of about 200
chains to the northeast corner of lot
315.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907
M. J. KINNEY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that The Quatsino
Power and Puly Company, of Victoria,
B.C., occupation, A Pulp Company, intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Marble
Cove, Rupert District, where the said
line intersects the shore line on the
east side of Marble Bay; thence southerly following the shore line a distance
of about 120 chains to a point Intersecting the mouth of Marble Creek.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907.
THE QUATSINO POWER
&  PULP  COMPANY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT,
District of Rupert. Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that Enoch A. White,
of  Victoria,   B.C.,   occupation  Lumberman, Intends to apply for permission to
lease the following described foreshore:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of an Indian Reserve
at the head of Quatsino Narrows, Rupert
District, thence southerly following the
shore line a distance of about 160 chains
to  a point Intersecting the mouth  of
Marble Creek, Including small Island on
north  line of section  10.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
Superstructure of Swing Span.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Superstructure Metal for
Swing Bridge, North Arm, Fraser
River," will bo received by the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works, Victoria, B.C., up to and Including Tuesday, the 3tst of December,
1907, for manufacturing and delivering,
f. o. b., scow at Vancouver or New
Westminster, all the metal work required for the superstructure of a steel
swing span.
Drawings, specifications, condition of
contract and tender may be seen by
Intending tenderers on and after Tuesday, the 26th of November, 1907, at
the offlce of the Public Works Engineer,
Lands and Works Department, and at
the offlce of the Provincial Timber In
spector, Court House, Vancouver, B.C.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certificate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner in
the sum of two hundred and fifty ($250)
dollars, which shall be forfeited If the
party tendering decline or neglect to
enter Into contract when called upon
to do so. The cheques or certificates
of deposit of successful tenderers will
be returned to them upon the execution
of the contract.
The successful tenderer will be
called upon to furnish a bond, himself
and two securities, satisfactory to the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, In
the sum of $1,000 each, or to furnish a
bond of a Guarantee Company satisfactory to the Honourable the Chief
Commissioner in the sum of $3,000 for
the due fulfilment of the work contracted for.
Upon the execution of the contract
and a satisfactory bond being supplied,
signed with the actual signatures of the
tenderers and enclosed in the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 30 Public Works Engineer.
DISTRICT OF CASSIAR.
TAKE NOTICE that The Hidden
Creek Mining Co., of Vancouver, occupation,  , Intends to apply for
permission   to  purchase  the  following
described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of Lot S08, Cassiar
District; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 40 chains; thence south to shore
line of Goose Bay; thence easterly along
shore line to the south boundary of
Lot 308 and thence west to point of
commencement, containing about 200
acres.
Date Nov. llth, 1907.
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Nov. 16 Per J. H. McGregor
George Young, Agent,
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
and Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C., Timber Dealers, intend to apply for the
rite to purchase the following described
lands ln Kildalla Bay, Rivers Inlet; commencing at this post planted on the east
side of the Bay about one-third of a
mlle from the point at the mouth of the
Bay, being the southwest corner post;
thence east 80 chains; thenee north 80
chains; thence west 90 chains to beach;
thence south along beach to point of
commencement; containing 40 acres,
more or less.
Staked Nov. 26, 1907.
GEORGE YOUNG A ARTHUR BELL.
Dec. 7 George Young, Agent. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 18 19.-8.
11
LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
Private Bills.
The time limited by the rules of the
house for the presentation of petitions
for leave to introduce private bills expires on Monday, 27 January, 1908.
Bills must be presented to the house
by Thursday, 6th February, 1908.
Reports on bills will not be received
after Thursday, 13th February, 1908.
Copies of the bill, petition and notices must be deposited with the undersigned, and the house fees paid, not
later than Wednesday, 8th January,
1908.
Dated this 2nd day of December,
1907.
THORNTON FELL,
Clerk of the Legislative Assembly.
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north along shore of Lake Yakoun 80 chains more or less; thence
east about 70 chains more or less, to
point of commencement, containing 640
acres more or less.
Dated November 27th, 10.42 a.m., 1907.
DAN DONALD.
Dec. 21 J. E. Doyen, Agent.
TAKE NOTICE that M. Brennan, of
Ootso Lake, occupation Farmer, Intends
to apply for permission to lease the
following  described   land:
Commencing at a post marked M. B.
Southeast Corner, situated about 40
chains north and 40 chains east of Lot
325, N.E. Cor.; thence 40 chains north;
thence 40 ohains west; thenco 40 chains
south', thence 60 chains east to paint
of commencemnent, containing 240 acres.
Dated November 15,  1907.
De. 14 MARK BRENNAN.
SKEENA- LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to prospect for coal upon the following described land, situate on Graham Island,
Queen Charlotte Group, in the Province
of British Columbia:
Commencing at a post planted W. A.
R.'s N.E. corner post, placed at the
N.E. corner of section 11, township 10,
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated November 27th, 11.50 a.m., 1907.
W. A. ROBERTSON.
Dec. 21 J. E. Doyen, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days mouth of Evelyn River; thence east 120
after  date,   I  Intend  to apply  to  the chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and west 80 chains; thence south 40 chains;
Works for a licence to prospect for coal thence west 40 chains; thence north 80
and   petroleum   on   the   following   de- chains to point of commencement,
scribed  lands,  situated in the District Nov. Sth, 1907.
of Skeena, Graham Island, Province of No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
British   Columbia:—Commencing   at   a on the south bank of the Sheemahantz
post marked "Robert G. Johnston's N. River,  flve chains  west of the  mouth
W. corner," and planted at the north- of Marvel  Creek,  being the  southeast
west corner of section 12, township 10; corner,  thence  west  64  chains;   thenca
thence 80 chains east; thence 80 chains north 100 chains; thence east 64 chains;
south;  thence  80  chains  west;  thence thence  south   100  chains   to  point  of
80  chains  north to the voint of com- commencement,
north 80 chains; west 80 chains; south
80 chains; east 80 chains back to the
place of commencement, containing 640
acres.
G. A. FRASER,
Dec. 14 A. A. McPhail, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Kathleen Lake.
TAKE NOTICE that Enoch A. White,
of Victoria, B.C., lumberman, intends
to apply for a special timber license
over the following described lands:
8. Commencing at a post planted at
the southwest corner of T. L. 16,381, on
Kathleen Lake, marked "E. A. W.'s N.W.
corner post to Claim No. 8"; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains  to  commencement.
Staked November 30th, 1907.
District of Rupert, Kathleen Lake.
1. Commencing at a post planted at
the southeast corner of T. L. 13,045, on
Kathleen Lake, marked "E. A. W.'s S.W.
corner post to Claim No. 1"; thence
east 40 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 140 chains; thence south
20 chains to T. L. 13,045; thence following north line of T. L. 13,046 east
and south to commencement.
Staked November 30th, 1907.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Dec. 21 T. D. Harris, Agent.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
(c) Commencing at a post planted at
the northeast corner of P. R. 1,746, on
Marble Creek, marked "E. A. W.'s N.W.
corner post to Claim G"; thence south
40 chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 20 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
east 20 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 120 chatns to commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
Dated Victoria, B.C., Dec. 10th, 1907.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
(d) Commencing at a post planted at
the northwest corner of Lot 192, on
Quatsino Narrows, marked "E. A. W.'s
S. W. corner post to Claim D."; thence
east about 30 chains to T. L. 14,467;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
about 80 chains to Marble Creek; thence
north and west along shore to Indian
Reserve; thence south and west along
line of Indian Reserve to Quatsino Narrows; thence following shore of said
narrows southwesterly to commencement.
Dated Victoria, December 10th, 1907.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Dec. 21 Thomas D. Harris, Agent.
SKEENA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
NOTICE is hereoy given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to prospect for coal on the following described
land, situate on Graham Island, Queen
Charlotte Group, in the Province of
British Columbia.
Commencing at a post marked J. R.
S.'s N.W. corner post, placed at the
N.W. corner of section 12, township 10,
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chatns; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commence*
ment,   containing   640  acres,   more   or
Dated November 27th, 11.55 a.m., 1907.
J. R. STEWART,
Dec. 21 J. E. Doyen, Agent,
mencement.
Staked Nov. 28th, 9.30 a.m., 1907.
Dee, 21 ROBERT G. JOHNSTON.
Nov. 8th, 1907.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
10 chains east of the southeast corner
    of T. L. 14065, and about one and one-
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days half mlles west of the Neechantz River
after date, I Intend to apply to the being the northeast corner post; thence
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and south 100 chains; thence west 64 chains;
Works for a licence to prospect for coal thence north 100 chains; thence west 64
and petroleum oh the following de- chains to point of commencement,
scribed lands, situated In the District of GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL,
Skeena,   Graham   Island,   Province   of   Dec. 14 George Young, Agent.
British   Columbia:—Commencing   at   a
SKEENA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works, for a special license to prospect
for coal upon the following described
land, situate on Graham Island, Queen
Charlotte Group, in the Province of
British Columbia:
Commencing at a post marked J. E.
D.'s N. E. corner post, placed at the
N. E. corner of section 2, township 10,
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated November 27th, 12.55 p.m., 1907.
Dec.21 J. E. DOYEN, Locator.
SKEENA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
NOTICE is nereoy given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to
prospect for coal upon the following
described land, situate on Graham
Island, Queen Charlotte Group, ln the
Province of British Columbia.
Commencing at a post marked M. B.'s
S. W. Corner post, placed at the S. W.
corner of section 24, township 10, thenoe
east 40 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
Dated November 27th, 10.30 a.m., 1907.
MURRAY BROWN.
Dec. 21 J. E. Doyen, Agent.
SKEENA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coaat.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to prospect for coal on the following des.ribed
land, situate on Graham Ialand, Queen
Charlotte Group, in the Provinee of
British Columbia:
Commencing at a post marked J. T.
J.'s N.W. corner post, placed at the
N.W. corner of section 1, township 10;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated November 27th, 1.05 p.m., 1507.
JOHN T. JOHNSTON,
Dec. 21 J. E. Doyen, Agent.
post marked "George B. Baillie's N.W| NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
corner," and planted at the northwest District of New Westminster,
eorner of section 1, township 11; thence TAKE NOTICE that Harry McMicken
80 chains east; thence 80 chaina south; Keefer of Vancouver, occupation Broker,
thence SO chains west; thence 80 chains intends to apply for permission to lease
north to the point of commencement.      the following described land:
Staked Nov. 28th, 11.30 a.m., 1907. Commencing at a post planted on the
GEORGE B. BAILLIE. N. E. Coast of Savary Island and about
Dec. 21 Robert G. Johnston, Agent. 25 chains from the easterly end of the
   Island,  thence  west  20  chains  to  low
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days water mark; thence aouth 400 chains
after date, I Intend to apply to the along low water mark; thence east 20
Hon. Chief Commiaaioner of Landa and chains to high water mark; thence north
Works for a licence to prospect for coal 400 chains to point of commencement,
and petroleum on the following de- and containing eight hundred acres,
scribed lands, situated in the District more or less.
of Skeena, Graham Island, Province of Dated Dec. 2nd, 1907.
British Columbia:—Commencing at a Dec 14 HARRY McMICKENKEEFER.
post marked "Sarah C. Johnston's N.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Landa and
Works for a licence to prospect for
coal on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
miles west of the northwest corner of
the claim of John A. McMaster, being
about twenty miles west of McCoy's
Cove, on the north side of Cumshewa
Inlet, Moresby Island, Queen Charlotte
Islands Group; thence south 80 chains;
east 80 chains; north 80 chains; west
80 chains back to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
G J. SPRATT,
Dec.  14 A. A. McPhail, Agent.
corner,"  and planted  at  the  northeaat  NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
corner of section 2, township 11; thence
80 chains south; thence 80 chains west
District of New Westminster.
thence 80 chaina north; thence 80 chains  «l^"™2\^*™y*£J&
east to .the point of commencement,       Xv«^Zt£^™Z' foT^
sion to purchase the following described
land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
Staked Nov.  28th,  11.30 a.m.,  1907.
SARAH C. JOHNSTON.
Dec. 21 Robert G. Johnston, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days &W-  corner of Lot 18«,Q.  U  New
after  date,  I  intend  to  apply  to  the v?e"m.ln(S,tJ! „dls*'i£V^L- thi,™
Hon. Chief Commiasioner of Lands and "»     ">«"«« "°,"k 2 .™»h "ft *£!?£
Works   for  a  licence   to  prospect   for °ast_J° chains; thence south 20 chains
coal  and  petroleum  on  the  following \°_ J0'"1 £' f°™, ,,,«         '  contalni"S
described lands situated in the District 4° a "   ff°™ ?1, Sl'th   1007
of Skeena, Graham Island, Province of DatSVnEnTrK p^rick ROGERS
British   Columbia:    Commencing  at  a FREDERICK PAfRiCK KUUfcKS.
post  planted  at  the   northeaat   corner ■uec'14	
of section 10, township  10;  thence  80
chains  south;  thence  80  chains  west; NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
thence 80 chaina north; thence 80 chains days after date  I  intend to  apply  to
eaat to the point of commencement. the Hon. Chief Commiaaioner of Landa
Staked November 27th, 11.45 a.m., 1907 and Worka for a licence to prospect for
JOHN G. JOHNSTON. coal on the following described lands:
Dec. 21          Robert G. Johnston, Agent. Commencing at a post planted at the
Arthur Gore. TIA/IBCD   HA A DC  °"r'« pHONe I534-.
Manager     * i/ri-OjGfT /17__H__I    O   Residence 4-38
posted up to date every day.
ELECTRIC BLUE PRINT&, MAP CO.
VICTORIA. B.C.
NOTICE ls nereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a licence to prospect for
coal on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the claim of G J.
Spratt, being about twenty mllea west
of McCoy's Cove, on the north side
of Cumshewa Inlet, Moresby Island,
Queen Charlotte Islands Group; thence
north 80 chains; east 80 chains; aouth
80 chains; west 80 chains back to the
place of commencement, containing 640
acres.
Located this 4th day of December,
A.D.   1907.
J. W.  RUTLEDGE,
Dec.  14 A. A.  McPhail, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Landa
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the claim of C. J,
Spratt, being about twenty mlles west
of McCoy's Cove on the north side of
Cumshewa Inlet, Moresby Ialand, Queen
Charlotte Islands Group; thence aouth
80 chaina; weat 80 chaina; north 80
chains; east 80 chains back to the place
of commencement, containing 640 acrea.
Located this 4th day of December,
A.D. 1907.
D. C. McDONALD,
Dec.  14 A. A.  McPhail, Agent.
CHANCERY    CHAMBERS.
BLUEPRINTING
SZ LANGLEY   STREET.
DRAUGHTING OFFICE.
NOTICE is hereDy given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for
coal and petroleum on the following described lands, situated in the District
of Skeena, Graham Island, Province of
British Columbia:—Commencing at a
post marked "Thomas Franklin's N.W.
corner," and planted at the northwest
corner of section 13, townahip 16 thence
80 chains east; thence 80 chains south;
thence 80 chains weat; thence 80 chaina
north to the point of commencement.
Staked November 27th, 1.46 p.m., 1907.
THOS. FRANKLIN.
Dec. 21 Robert G. Johnston, Agent.
SKEENA   LAND   DISTRICT.
Diatrlct of Coaat.
NOTICE ia hereby given that thirty
■days after date I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to prospect for coal upon the foUowing described land, situate on Graham Island,
Queen Charlotte Group, in the Province
of British Columbia:
Commencing at a post marked Z. M.
H.'s S.E. Corner post, placed at the
S.E. corner of section 23, township 10,
thence north 160 chains; thence west
about 30 chalna; thence aouth following shore line of Lake Yakoun 160
ehains more or less; thence east about
40 chains to point of commencement,
containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated November 2'ith, 10.30 a.m., 1907.
Z.  M.  HAMILTON,
Dec. 21 J. E, Doyen, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I Intend tl apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to proapect for
coal and petroleum on the following
deacrlbed lands, situated in the District of Skeena, Graham Ialand, Province of Britlah Columbia:—Commencing
at a post marked "Jamea Scott's N.E.
corner," and planted at the northeast
corner of section 14, township 10; thence
80 chains south; thence 80 chains west;
thence 80 chaina north; thence 80 chains
eaat to place of commencement.
Staked November 27th, 1.30 p.m., 1907.
JAMES SCOTT,
Dec. 21 Robert G. Johnaton, Agent.
Complete    set of Maps show/ny alt
TIMBER   LICENCES
and other Lands   taken  up in Br iti sh Columbia.
Blue  Prints  can be   obtained at short notice.
COMPANY.
"Companiea Act, 1897."
LICENCE TO AN EXTRA-PROVINCIAL  northwest corner of the claim of S. A.
Ramsay, being about sixteen miles west
of McCoy's Cove on the north side of
Cumshewa Inlet, Moresby Island, Queen
Charlotte Islands Group; thence north
SO chains; west 80 chains; south 80
chains; east 80 chains back to the place
of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located this 4 th day of December,
A.D. 1907.
WALTER B.  PITFIELD.
Dec. 14 A. A. McPhail, Agent.
Canada:
Province of British Columbia.
No.  417.
THIS is to certify that "The New
Zealand Insurance Company" is authorised and licensed to carry on business
within the Province of British Columbia, and to carry out or effect all or any
of the objects of the Company to which
the legislative authority of the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
NOTICE ia hereby given that thirty
daya after date I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commiasioner of Lands
and Works for a licence to prospect for
coal on the following described landa:
Commencing at a poat planted two
miles north of the northwest corner
of the claim of Robert Hamilton, being
' out six miles  north of the Cowgltz
nes on the north shore of Skledgate
let on Slate   Chuck   Creek,   Graham
land, Queen Charlotte Islands Group;
ence south 80 chains; east 80 chains;
rth 80 chains; west 80 chains back to
e place of commencement, containing
0 acres.
Located thia  26th day of November,
D. 1907.
J. H.  YOUNG,
c. 14 A. A. McPhail, Agent.
NOTICE 18 hereby given that thirty
daya atter date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commiasioner of Landa and
Works for a licence to prospect for
coal on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at tho
northwest corner of the claim of J. H.
Young, being about six mlles north of
the Cowgitz mines on the north shore
of Skidegate Inlet, on Slate Chuck Creek,
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence south 80 chains; west 80
chains; north 80 chains; east 80 chains
back to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located this 26th day of November,
A.D.  1907.
J. F. YOUNG,
Dee 14 A. A. McPhail, Agent.
SKEENA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
NOTICE is hereby given that 80 days
after date I intend ~>ply to the Hon.
•Chief Commlsslone ds and Works
for  a  apeclal  licen proapect  for
coal upon the followu. deacrlbed land,
situate on Graham iBland, Queen Charlotte Group, in the Province of British
Columbia.
Commencing at a post marked L. B.
V.D.'s N.W. Corner post placed at the
N. W. corner of section 13, township 10,
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated November 27th, 10.38 a.m., 1907.
L. B. VAN DECAR.
Dec. 21 J. E. Doyen, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
NOTICE ia hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works, for a apeclal Hcen8e to prospect for coal upon the following described land, situate on Graham Island,
Queen Charlotte Group, In the Province
of British Columbia:
Commencing at a post marked D. D.'s
N.E. corner post, placed at the N.E.
■Corner of section 14, township 10, thence
NOTICE ls hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lands, situated in the District of
Skeena, Graham Island, Province of
British Columbia:—Commencing at a
post marked "Amos Adslt's S.W. corner,"
and planted at tho southwest corner of
section 24, township 10; thence 40
chains north; thence 40 ehains west;
thence 40 chains south to the place of
commencement.
Staked November 27th, 1.15 p.m., 1907.
AMOS ADSIT.
Dec. 21 Robert G. Johnston, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after dau, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lands, situated in the District
of Skeena, Graham Island, Province of
British Columbia:—Commencing at a
post marked "Alfred Carey's S.E. corner," and planted at the southeast corner of section 23, township 10; thence
80 chains north; thence 80 chains west;
thence 80 chains south; thence 80 chains
east to the point of commencement.
Staked Nov. 27th, 1 p.m., 1907.
ALFRED CAREY,
Dec. 21 Robert G. Johnston, Agent.
NOTICE ls herebp given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to vrospect for
coal and petroleum on the following described lands, situated ln the District
of Skeena, Graham Island, Province of
British Coljmbla:—Commencing at a
post marked "Ellen J. Baillie's no.-th-
eaBt corner," and planted at the northeaat Corner of section 11, township 10,
thence 80 chains south; thence 80 chains
weat; thence 80 chalna north; thence 80
chalna eaat to the point of commencement.
Staked Nov. 28th, 9.30 a.m., 1907.
ELLEN J. BAILLIE.
Dec, 21 Robert G. Johnston, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
clays after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
The  head  offlce of the Company  is Worka for a license to proapect for coal
situate at the City of Auckland, in the  on the following described lands:
Colony of New Zealand. Commencing at  a poat planted  two
The amount of the capital of the miles west of the northweat corner of
Company is one million pounds, divided the claim of S. A. Ramsay, being about
Into ten thousand shares of one nun- eighteen miles weat of McCoy's Cove
dred pounds each. on the north side of Cumshewa Inlet,
The head office of the Company ln Moresby Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
this Province Is sttuate at Victoria, and Group; thence south 80 chains; eaat 80
Jamea Hill Lawson, merchant, whose chains; north 80 chains; west 80 chains
address is Victoria ,B.C„ Is the attorney back to the place of commencement, con-
for the Company. taining 640 acres.
Given under my hand and seal of Located this 4th day of December,
offlce  at  Victoria,   Province  of  British  A.D.   1907.
Columbia,  this  28th  day  of  November, JOHN A. McMASTER,
one thousand nine hundred and aeven.  Dec.  14 A.  A.  McPhail, Agent.
(L. S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,	
Registrar of Joint Stock Companiea.      NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
The objects for which this Company days after date I Intend to apply to
has been established and  licensed are:   the Hon. Chlof Commissioner of Lands
To carry on the business of fire and and Works for a licence to prospect for
marine insurance in all its branches or coal on the following described lands:
such of those branches as the Com- Commencing at a rost planted at the
pany shall from time to time determine, northwest corner of tho claim of John
and to do all such other things as are John A. McMaster, being about eighteen
Incidental  or  conducive  to  the  attain-   miles   west   of   McCoy's   Cove   011   the
NOTICE Is hereby given that L'.lrty
days after date 1 intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal
on the following described lands:
Commencing at the post planted at
the northwest corner of tho claim of
J. H. Young, being about six miles north
of the Cowgltz Mlnea on the north shore
of Skidegate Inlet, on Slate Chuck Creek,
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence north 80 chains; east 80
chalna; south 80 chains; west 80 chains
back to the place of commencement
containing 640 acres.
Located this 26th day of November,
A.D. 1907.
FRED. YOUNG.
Dec. 14 A.  A.  McPhail,  Agent.
ment of those objects.
Dee.   14
B.C.
Timber Maps
north side of Cumshewa Inlet, Moresby
Island, Queen Charlotte Islands Group;
thence north 80 chains; east 80 chains;
south 80 chains; west 80 chains back
to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located  this   4th  day  of  December.
A.D.   1907.
J. A. HINTON,
Dec. 14 A. A. McPhail, Agent.
NOTICE ls hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a licence to prospect
for coal on the following described
nf All Districts landa:  .
ui nu LMsuivio Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the claim of John
—— A. McMaster, being about eighteen miles
west of McCoy's Cove on the north side
VANCOUVER MAP and BLUE-PR1NT CO. of Cumshewa    Inlet,    Moresby Island,
Queen  Charlotte Islands  Group;  thence
Suite 20-ii Crowe and Wilson
Chambers.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
south 80 chains; west 80 chains; north
80 chains', east 80 chains back to the
place of commencement, containing 640
acres.
Located   this   4th   day   of   December,
A.D. 1907.
THOMAS COOPER,
 ■ Dec. 14 A.   A.   McPhail,   Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT  	
District of Coast, Range 2. NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
TAKE NOTICE that George Young days after date I intend to apply to the
and Arthur Bell of Victoria, B.C., Tim- Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
ber Dealers. Intend to apply for special Works for a license to prospect for coal
license over the following described on the following described lands:
lands on the Sheemahantz River, Rivers Commencing at a post planted at the
Inlet: northweat corner of the claim of John
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted A. McMaster, being about eighteen mllea
on the aouth bank of the Sheemahantz weat of McCoy's Cove on tho north aide
River at the northwest corner, being one of Cumshewa Inlet, Moresby Islands,
mlle east and  10 chains  south of the  Queen Charlotte Islands Group; thence
NOTICE ls hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Worka for a license to prospect for coal
on   the  following  described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the claim of J.
H. Young, being about six miles north
of the Cowglta Mines on the north
shore of Skidegate Inlet, on Slate Chuck
Creek, Grahnm Island, Queen Charlotte
Islands Group; thence north 80 chains;
west 80 chains; south SO chains; east
80 chains back to the place of commencement containing 040 acrea.
Located this 26th day of November,
A. D. 1907.
ROBERT  YOUNG,
Dec.14 A.  A.  McPhail, Agent.
DISTRICT   OF  CASSAIR.
TAKE NOTICE that Tho Hidden Creek
Mining  Co.,   of  Vancouver,   occupation,
Intends to apply for permission
to  lease  the  following deacrlbed  land,
about 40 acrea:
Commencing at a post planted at tho
Boutlieast corner of Lot 479; thence following high water mark south and
wost to the southeas* corner of Lot 308;
thence east flve chains; thence north
and east following a line parallel to
high water mark about 80 chains to a
point 5 chains aouth of point of commencement and thence to said point of
commencement.
Dated Nov. 25th, 1907.
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Dec. 7 Per J. Herrick MacGregor.
DISTRICT OI  CASSIAR.
TAKE NOTICE that The Hidden
Creek Mining Co., or Vancouver, occupation,  , Intends to apply for permission to lease the following described
land, about 3 acres:
Commencing at a poat planted at the
south east corner post of Lot 479; thence
north one chain; thence southwesterly
parallel to high water mark, about 30
chains to west boundary of Lot 479;
thence south about one chain forty links
to high water mark and thence along
high water mark to point of commencement.
Dated Nov. 26th, 1907.
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Dec. 7 Per J. Herrick MacGregor. Vi
THE WEEK, SATURDAY JANUARY 18, 1908,
AN ELEPHANT COMEDY
(Continued from Page Nine)
The day broke with startling suddenness. A belt of saffron spread like
a fiery cloud across the naked east;
the sun-illumined peaks seemed to
flower and redden in the yellow flares
of light. Groups of tiny black apes
watched us from the high-stemmed
silver oaks as we plunged across the
gully into the scrub where the spoor
showed in the creek slime. Behind us
stalked the kangani, his sheeted garments drawn tightly about his face
and head. Again we crossed the man's
footprints that joined the elephant's
higher up the gully. We were soon
panting along the edge of the gravel
range, and here the spoor disappeared mysteriously. The hard, stonelike surface of the ground refused to
retain the slightest impression of man
or beast's footprint.
"Let us go to his hut," said Dacey.
"He will come home sooner or later."
The smoke of Musoora's household
wound skyward in the clear morning-
air, and as we crossed the ridge overlooking the valley we beheld a squat,
mud-walled house half-concealed in a
tangle of lianas and scrub.
Three women who had been cooking rice inside appeared suddenly at
the door. A couple of yellow pariahs
yelped savagely from the evil-looking
interior. At that moment a terrific
thrashing of brushwood came up from
the junglcd hollow below; thc rasping voice of a man broke the morning
silence.
"Tull, tull, thou! Walk, beast, or
the factory dogs will eat thy feet. Up,
Binam, up!"
The head and tusks of a full-grown
elephant appeared from the jungle-
shadow; a moment afterwards beast
and man swung into the open, glistening from head to heel with moisture from the overhanging forest. The
man, turbaned like an Indian mahout,
plied his thin iron goad on the head
of his beast mercilessly. A sudden
turn in the path brought him into line
with the superintendent's rifle.
The elephant trumpeted hoarsely,
then halted and remained stamping
and rocking in front of us, its small
intelligent eyes fixed on the immovable rifle-barrel.
The driver raised his head suddenly
and his jaw hung at sight of the
angry suyerintendent standing in the
path.
"Get down!" commanded Dacey
sharply. "And if you address a single
word to that—that meegra elephant,
I'll shoot you without mercy, Musoora."
Musoora made no movement; his
slack mouth expanded until thc fat
creases under his chin seemed to fold
over his greasy vestments.
The kangani, standing behind, called out in a quivering voice, his left
hand indicating something tucked
away between the tusks and trunk of
the stamping elephant, "My little son,
oh master! Alive—by the gods! Let
us talk reasonably with Musoora; no
harm has yet been done."
At first glance it was almost impossible to see the dusky infant rolled
away so cunningly in the folds of the
great trunk. Musoora held his goad
aloft half-threateningly, as though intending to drive his beast over us.
Thc superintendent's rifle came suddenly into line with the elephant's
blinking eyes. "Deliver the child to
its father, Musoora. We'll talk afterwards concerning the trampling down
of No. 9 field. No monkey-tricks,"
he continued, "or I'll present you with
a dead elephant in ten seconds."
"Shoot, dorai! shoot!" laughed Musoora from above. "Your bullet will
not save the kangani's brat; the dying beast will crush it as it falls."'
"There is something behind this
foolery," said thc superintendent
sharply. Speak out Musoora, I
will listen."
The mahout leaned from the beast's
shoulder and pointed with his goad at
the stiff-limbed kangani standing in
our rear.
"The headman of thine, oh dorai!
has swindled mc out of fifty rupees.
I have waited a year for tlie money—
money for lifting timber from the old
lines, money the company paid him
for my work and the work of my ele
phant. Let him pay me now, or there
will be no son to take over his debts
when he is dead."
"It is a lie!" shouted the kangani.
"It was thirty rupees—no more. The
dog lies, oh master! He shall not
threaten my son's life for money owing,    lt is against the law."
The superintendent's face grew dark
as he glanced swiftly at the gesticulating headman. "I will give you both
sixty seconds to make up your minds."
He spoke slowly along the barrel of
his rifle, his eyes fixed on the watchful mahout. "The three of you shall
suffer—the elephant first.    Now"	
It seemed as though, the uneasy
brute understood the superintendent's
threat. The great trunk swept up and
down trumpeting shrilly, while its
huge body rocked to and fro in fearful expectation.
"Shoot, oh master!" whispered the
kangani. "Let my brat take its
chance. I will not pay Musoora fifty
rupees. The elephant will fall on its
side, not head first. Believe me, dorai,
it will fal lon its side.   Let the child"
Something wet and dripping flashed
out of the jungle. A scarlet sarong
and a woman's burning eyes confronted us. It was the kangani's young
wife, and her mouth was drawn, her
cheeks sunken, as though the sharp
misery she had endured had unhinged
her mind. The mountain mists had
matted the long black hair, and the
wind had blown it mask-like about
her low, broad forehead. She crouched forward under cover of the superintendent's rifle until she stood in
front of the fear-stricken elephant.
"Back, Nourana!" screamed the
kangani. "The beast will strike thee
dead!"
Without turning or heeding his
words, she gripped the near tusk with
her left hand and smote the great
blinking face above her.
"Thou beast! was there no other
child but mine to steal? Was the
trampled fruit of our garden not
enough—the banyans and sweet herbs
—that thou takest the blood of my
heart, thou evil one?"
The elephant seemed to relax, ancl
its trunk unfolded suddenly; the
brown brat slipped from its resting-
place into the woman's arms. Pushing it across her broad hips, she took
a stick from the ground and again
darted forward.
The elephant retreated, its small
red eyes watching her anxiously. Her
lithe body quivered as she smote it
fiercely on the lip and trunk, stooping
in her fury to belabour the flinching
brute on its soft round toes.
"Remember, thou eater of swine,
not to enter my house again. The
taste of thee will be on my child until it dies.   Beast!"
The elephant nosed the air in its
pain, and, with a sudden heave and
shake of the head, crashed into the
jungle on our left. Musoora turned
and shook his goad at the trembling
kangani as the elephant bore him unwillingly from the scene.
"The affair is settled for the present," said the superintendent, shouldering his rifle. "I must admit," he
added to me, "that the woman's
promptness saved the situation. These
Indian mahouts are dcucedly awkward fellows to deal with."
The kangani hurried back to the
lines, followed by the shrill-voiced
Tamil woman carrying her child. We
returned to the bungalow, feeling
that our sleep had been unnecessarily
disturbed.
A few weeks later I heard that the
notorious Musoora had been arrested
and put in jail. There were many
charges against him, but the one
preferred was for driving his animal
full tilt at a motor-car on the outskirts of Colombo. East of Aden the
inebriated chauffeur is never so dangerous as the drunken driver of an
elephant.
Angell
Engraving Co.
PHOTO-ENGRAVERS
and DESIGNERS
In All Branches
518 Hastings St.
Vancouver, B.C.
a million dollars have already been
expended on development, and half a
million more will be spent during the
next year or two. The latest addition
to the Company's property is a new
steam heated, electric-lighted hotel
and accommodation without which no
mining town is complete, and which
will fill an important niche in the
economy of Hillcrest.
Blue Ruin.
The Westminster Daily News in a
final word to new comers says: "avoid
the blue ruin man as you would a
viper." This is rather hard on its
regular readers.
Sorry He Spoke.
Wife—Our daughter is 20, and she
ought to be married.
Hubby—Oh, she has plenty of time.
Let her wait till the right sort of man
comes along.
"Not at all. I didn't wait for the
right sort of man!"
A Card of Warning.
"Did Mr. Borem ever call upon
you?" asked Miss Knox.
"Yes, he called last evening," said
Miss Wise. "I was quite delighted
when the girl brought up his card."
"Delighted?"
"Yes; you see if she hadn't
brought up his card I might have
gone down to him, thinking he was
some one else."
A Fine Point.
"It's thc little things that count,"
remarked the man with mouse-colored whiskers.
"How now?"
"Once I wrote a book and called it
"How to Grow Beautiful.'"
"Well?"
"We didn't sell a copy. After some
cogitation I changed the title to 'How
to Remain Beautiful,' and the ladies
swamped us with orders. You've got
to study woman nature if you want
to get rich."
A Coa I Baron.
The East Kootenay Press has been
working off another of its periodical
culogiums on C. P. Hill, the coal
baron of Hillcrest. Mr. Hill's interviews always make interesting reading. Thc speed of developing recently has been phenomenal, the output
having jumped from 100 to 700 tons
a day in less than three months. Half
Him—I consulted a fortune teller
today and she told me that I was in
love with a pretty girl, but she would
never marry. It looks like I am up
against it.
She—Oh, not necessarily. No fortune teller is authorized to speak for
me.
A muscular woman in Massachusetts tied her husband to the kitchen
door so that he should not bother her
while she did her work. This is what
mere man has come to in a state
peppered all over with woman's clubs.
DAMd DAYS TALK "COCOA"
Because the fatty matter contained therein in small quantities is
what  one  needs  during  damp  or  cold weather.   Nothing  more
nourishing than these pure brands:
Leman's Swiss Cocoa, per tin, 25c, 45c and 85c
Suchard's, per tin, 25c, 45c and 85c
Van Houten's, 35c, 65c and  $1.00
Fry's Cocoa, per package   ioc
Cowan's Cocoa, 15c and  30c
Ralston's Cocoa  35c
Baker's Cocoa 35c
Loose Cocoa, per lb 25c
Ghirardelli's Chocolate, per tin    45c
Ghirardelli's Chocolate, per bar  35c
Huyler's Chocolate Powder, per tin  40c
Beaver Chocolate, per bar   35c
Cowan's  Chocolate,  per  bar    20c
Cowan's Unsweetened Chocolate, per bar,  15c and 25c
Baker's Unsweetened Chocolate, per bar  30c
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
INDEPENDENT GROCERS, 1316 GOVERNMENT ST.
00000000000000000000000000 00000000000000000000000000
The
Poodle
Dog
Grill
Yates Street
Victoria, B. C, is
The only real
Grill in British
Columbia—the
only place
where you can
actually obtain
your choice of
meats and all
the delicaciea of
te   season.
SMITH & SHAUGHNESSY
Proprietors
Yates Street, Victoria, B. C.
0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
The Uncongenial Pump.
"That famous temperance reformer, the late Francis Murphy," said a
Pittsburg man, "had many an odd
adventure in the course of his very
useful life.
"He once told me of a case where
n drinking man with a neat joke got
for the moment a little the beter of
him in an argument.
"The man was a clubman, a bon
vivant, famous for his wine cellar,
and Mr. Murphy read him a strong
lecture on the drink evil.
"But the bon vivant only smiled,
shook his head and said:
" 'Well, Mr. Murphy, I have seen
many a pleasant party round a table,
but I have never seen one round a
pump.'"
When You Know
Where To Go
for your work, you find that well
made clothes cost no more than
most poorly made ones. We employ only the most thoroughly
trained union operators. We use
only the best materials and
charge only living prices.
SCOTLAND WOOLEN MILLS
39 Johnson Street,
VICTORIA.
538 Hastings Street,
VANCOUVER.
§•" eOKE '•I
A FORECAST FOR ECONOMY.
If you have never tried burning Coke with coal in grate or cook
stove, we'd like you to make the experiment—truly an economical
one.
$6.00 PER TON ONLY
DELIVERED WITHIN CITY LIMITS.
Only $5.00 if you can send here for it. Why not try it, 'twill more
than cut your coal bill in half.
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, Ltd.
CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.pwv.1-0344107/manifest

Comment

Related Items