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Week Jun 25, 1910

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 rs s iTtfTT'vwTTTm s a svnnn
Just a Little Better
Terry's
Fountain
j.    ALWAYS IN THE LEAD    «j
The
ft British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria,  B. 6.
HALL & WALKER
Agents
WELLINGTON   COLLIERY
COM PANT'S COAL
1232 Goverament St
Telephone 83
__»MimmmoiiiH^
Vol. VII.   No. 21
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 1910
One Dollar Per Annum
The Church and Politics
By DR. ANDREW MACPHAIL
(.Reprinted from 'Toronto Saturday Night)
Church has taken the    Protestantism arc striving for a basis up-
Whenevei' the
sword in its hand it has always perished
by the sword. AVhen it appeared its
mightiest it was at its least. From the
cabinet of politicians the Church lias always emerged discredited in the eyes of
the world, and for the purposes of God.
It took the world a long time, it has
taken the ministers of religion a longer
time, to learn what is their true relation
to tho State. There have beeiV'ttccasioiis,
of course,' when'there was 116 other body
than tho Church which was competent to
carry on the^ government or the ordinary
business of a civilized society. That state
of affairs happened when the Roman Empire went to pieces. It happened again
when the New England colonists found
themselves in a new world, an unorganized
mass of humanity.
The history of the first eighteen centuries of our era is in large part a record
of the attempt of the Church to perform
the duties of government; ancl, when that
failed, of its insistence that it should tell
the rulers and then the people what they
should do and how they ought to do it.
It is only within our own time that the
Church has come to suspect that its proper
business is to deal with every political
event not in relation to the kingdom of
this world but in relation alone to the
kingdom of God. This lesson is even yet
not completely learned, if we can trust
the reports whicli appear of clergymen,
in person or by proxy, thronging the lobbies at Ottawa and Quebec, in support of
this or that particular political measure.
The tradition of the Roman Catholic
Church is conservative. By a confusion
of mind, it is supposed that the Conservative party of Canada was conservative,
too, and that a natural alliance existed
between them on account of this identity
of terms. When the mistake was discovered the bishops issued a mandate, that
there should be no further interference
in politics, and that the Blues and the
Rouges should be treated alike. A country Cure, astonished at the new order and
yet bound to obey, could not refrain from
uttering the oracular advice to his parishioners: 'Le ciel est bleu; l'tafer, c'est
rouge."
Ecclesiastical domination has always
ended in failure by schism within the
Church itself. At the moment of success defeat befel. That movement, which
was inaugurated at the Diet of Worms
April,  1521, is described with some
m
degree of ambiguity as the Reformation
when in reality  it
however,  against  a
was a revolt;   not,
set of ecclesiastical
dogmas but against ecclesiastical interference in the affairs of this world.
In this certainty of division the political safety of the people lay; ancl this
automatic check .upon arrogance has existed clown to our own time. If the
Catholics of Quebec made excessive demands, they were resisted by the Protestants of Ontario; and Orange Ontario was
held in check by Ultramontane Quebec,
so that a safe freedom was assured to all.
The Catholic Church has always been the
champion of freedom of conduct; Protestants have made freedom of thought
their own. Between them a reasonable
middle way of conduct and thought has
been kept open for reasonable men.
But within the past few years a remarkable change has come over these two
bodies.     The  various  denominations   of
on which a working agreement may be
founded. Nearly forty years ago the different sects of Presbyterianism came together in the Presbyterian Church of Canada. The Methodists and Bible Christians subsequently united, and a still
wider union was prevented only by the
logical declaration of the Baptists of the
permanent validity of their principles.
From Saskatoon we hear that the Protestant inhabitants have agreed to cast all
theological distinctions aside ancl unite in
erecting a common place of worship. Ih
Montreal* some years ago two Presbyterian
congregations formed themselves into one,
under the name of Knox Church; arid
now it is' proposed to take the Stanley
Street Church into the fold.
But, stranger still, the Roman Catholic
Church is abandoning its attitude of exclusiveness. In a village of the Eastern
Townships three weeks ago the spectacle
was witnessed of Protestants assembling"in
the Catholic Church to bc addressed by the
Cure, after he had performed the ceremonies of the Mass. The rule it appears,
however, does not work both ways, for two
Catholics were subsequently forbidden to
speak in St. James' Methodist Church in
Montreal at a meeting whicli was largely
advertised.
Behold, Ave may say, how good arid hciw
pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together
in unity; but we must first know the
reason for the assembling of themselves
in one place. If thoso Catholics and Protestants came together in that Eastern
Townships Church with a common desire
to experience that inward change by whicli,.
through the exercise of the will, a man
undergoes a complete ancl radical conversion, wrests himself from the power of sin
ancl puts himself on the side of God, with
a new light in his eyes and fresh courage
in his heart; to obtain, in short, that personal experience by which the individual
escapes from the domination of transitory
things and loses 'himself in the infinite—
that, indeed, would be a spectacle at which
the whole world might well marvel and
rejoice. But—the truth must be admitted
—Protestants ancl Catholics were there to
be told how they should vote in the polling
booths on the morrow.
The measure in regard to which the
Church undertook to tell men how they
should vote had to do with prohibiting the
sale of a particular commodity; and we
shall bo informed at once that the issue
was a "moral" one, in which the Church
might properly convey direct instruction.
But all political issues are moral issues.
When food is dear, hoys are bad; marriages decrease; fecundity is limited; tlie
individual degenerates with the numerical
diminution of the community. If, as some
suspect, a protective tariff increases the
price of food, leads to extravagance in the
few ancl poverty in tlio many, instigates
the corruption of legislatures, and provides occupation for bribers and blackmailers; ancl if, on the other hand, as
some suspect, free-trade brings about a
decrease in wages, and a consequent inability to procure food; then it would appear that tariff reform versus free-trade
is a "moral issue" upon which the Church
might feel itself bound to offer specific
advice to the electors.
Upon the evils produced by alcohol,
for example, all sensible persons arc in
close agreement. The measure which shall
be adopted to mitigate or remove those
evils are a matter for political consider
ation. A man goes to Church as a man,
fdr the saving of his soul, ancl not as an
elector seeking direct instruction in political affairs. It is only by the improvement of his character that the Church
may seek to influence his conduct when
he exercises his franchise. The whole
course of the history of the Church—and
I do not mean the Church whose bishop
is in Rome any more than the churches
which are governed by a General Assembly; a Convocation, or a Conference—attests to the truth of Clarendon's saying,
"that of all men who can read and write,
ecclesiastics possess the least aptitude for
political affairs."
When the ecclesiastic enters 'politics,
the politician has him beaten at the start.
The one may know much about another
world; it is the business of his rival to
know all about this. The politician knows
all about the weaknesses of men, their >pre-
dclietions and prejudices, their desires and
vanities. He kn-ows also the promises
whicli will appeal.to them, ancl the temptations to which they yield most readily.
He understands, too, the nature of the
ecclesiastic, his short-sightedness in an
earthly atmosphere, his stupidity in things
of this world, ancl his deviousness in attaining to political ends. His simplicity
of mind, his innocence of heart, his ignorance of other men's minds, make him a
ready tool in the trained hand of the practical politician.
The astuteness of the ecclesiastic is a
fiction contrived by .those who would use
him for tlieir own purposes. AYhencvcr
he is allowed to operate by political
methods, hc ends in failure. By sheer stupidity he has bungled himself out of
every country in Europe witli the single
exception of Spain. Presbyterianism as
an organized system has lost its hold in
Scotland. France has withdrawn from her
historical position amongst Roman Catholic powers. In the present Chamber there
is quite as large a majority of incorrigibly
anti-clericals as in the last; ancl this in
spite of the brutal severity of its enactments ancl the peculation of the agents
appointed to carry out its will. From
political contest the Church always
emerges with empty hands and with a
heart devoid of religion; and this law applies to Methodists' as well as to Roman
Catholics. If a Church would maintain
its authority ancl dignity in the spiritual
world, it must leave the things of this
world severely and scrupulously alone.
"Man," said .Testis to one who would
entangle him in controversy, "who made
me a judge or a divider over you ?"
AVhen the Church becomes politically
active, it is a sign that it has become
cold at heart and starved in religious temperament. As the spirit decays, its place
is taken by an institution, with political
aims ancl self-interest for its motive. That
is a law. It follows that principle in
physiology, by wliieh we are taught that,
in tlie process of degeneration, the finer
tissues are replaced by a hard, resistant
substance. In a more advanced condition
thc decaying tissue is replaced by a new
growth which, in turn, breaks down and
destroys the organism. This cancer is the
result of deficient vitality and not the
cause.
The history of that organization whicii
was originally designed for the Christianizing of young men, yields an excellent
illustration of this tendency to replace the
spirit by the institution. In the outset
its whole energy was expended upon tlie
spiritual salvation of those to whom it
appealed, and in making thein dissatisfied with their character rather than with
tlieir surroundings. Today its claim for
support is based upon the humanitarian
plea, that it makes young men efficient
not alone by revealing to them the mystery of God and of goodness in the world,
but by making them more accomplished
in tho use of their intelligence ancl of their
muscles, especially with those which have
to do with the operation of a writing
machine. In proof of this, one may cite
the fact that tlie subscription lists which
have been so generously filled for the purpose of these institutions frequently contain the names of persons who are avowed
opponents of Christianity.
Men cannot do without religion, and
religion cannot exist very loug without a
church. If Ave can judge by the number
of new sects and denominations Avhich are
arising in the Avorld, it must be a difficult
matter already for a man to suit his theological .predelictnms. If politics are to
be introduced into* |t*he qhurches, each man
will require* to create a church for himself, according to his particular shade of
opinion, and then tliere will be no Church
at all.
The Avorst enemy of the Church, and of
religion, too, is the itinerant, who has
taken upon himself the business of transforming a congregation into an organization for political action toAvards any given
end,- no matter Iioav laudable in itself that
end may be. The most sinister spectacle
in a free community is a company of
ecclesiastics, in either cassocks or coats, in
the lobbies of a legislative assembly. The
A'ulgar grafter or intimidator can be chased
to prison. The clerical lobbyist escapes
criticism by taking refuge in his sanctuary, Avhere hc is protected by the spirit
of religion Avhich hc has done his best
to destroy.
The most recent invasion of the political
field took place ou April 21, Avhen a band
of "English-speaking and French-Canadian Crusaders," elseAvhere described as
"thc gallant two hundred," wont, to Quebec, and returned "in high spirits" bo-
cause they believed tliat "the government
could not resist." This deputation loft
Montreal one hundred and twenty strong,
ancl included several Roman Catholic
priests. At Quebec it Avas reinforced by
eighty members, Avho included practically
all the Protestant clergy of that city.
Canon Roy, Avho represented Archbishop
Bruchesi, announced to thc Government
that they oavccI it to an alderman in tho
Montreal Council to carry his by-law
"and," he added, "if it is necessary to see
the alderman, one by one, Ave will do so."
It may lie remembered that Mr. Justice
Leinieux and Mi:. Langelier, of Quebec.
Avho had been engaged to speak in St.
James' Methodist Church, were also
"seen" by the bishop, and promptly cancelled tlieir engngement. Thc humorist
of the party proposed that the Dominion
Alliance and tlie Anti-Alcoholic League
might as avcII unite as "Bruchesi-itcs" into
one organization.
If the Church can succeed in renewing
men's Avills so that they turn away with
hatred from such sins as buying a neAvs-
paper or cigar on the Sabbath; and find no
pleasure in seeing horses run fast; and
look Avith loathing upon a decoction of
alcohol, men will be drawn unto it. If
the Church merely succeeds in making
illegal, actions which reasonable men do
not consider criminal in themselves, men
will continue to perform those actions,
either secretly, with the danger of becoming hypocrites, or openly in defiance of the
laAv, with the result that laAvs against
offences which arc in themselves criminal
will fall into desuetude and then into
disdain.
The common experience is that Ibavs
against factitious offences are seldom enforced. One Avho spends a,day in New
York may without any consciousness of
(CONTINUED OX  PAGE FOUh) THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 1910
King Edward Mines
LIMITED
NON-PERSONAL LIABILITY
PORTLAND CANAL,  B.C.
We are offering the balance
of the first issue of shares
in this Company at ioc per
share. For Prospectus and
full particulars apply to	
KING EDWARD MINES, Limited
Room 8, Mahon Building      P. O. Box 772
Victoria, B.C.
The name on the Label should be SCHMIDT'S, if you
want the best in genuine imported Clarets and Burgundies. They have been on this market for the past
fifteen years and stand for the Popular Choice.
For sale by all liquor dealers.
'RADIGER & JANION
1318 Wharf Street
'British Columbia Agents
The Song and the Man
(By Johnston McGulley)
(Continued from last Issue)
"That's right—to-morrow is payday,'' said MacGuire.
"We each Have-'a twenty-five days,"
Mucia continued. "That est fifty dollars. Es it not so? That was what
Cosetti told us—two dollars for da
day. An' to da board goes twenty.
That remains thirty, Mr. Foreman
Mc-Guire, of whicii we need but a few
pennies. Soon wc will have-a da
riches. Then da wives an' da little
ones will come from Italy. That es
why we are so ver' glad."
"You remember what I told you?"
asked MacGuire. "Well, I'll show
you how to bank your money as soon
as we can get into the town. You
keep it safe until then."
"Thank-a you, Mr. Foreman MacGuire," said Mucia respectfully.
"And you just pass thc word to the
other men to take care of their
money until we get a chance to put it
away. Will you?"
"I tell-a them," replied Mucia.
"And when you get it at the pay-
car be sure you get it yourselves.
Don't let anyone else get it for you.
And be sure you're getting all that's
coming to you. Don't get fooled.
You fellows certainly earn all you
get."
"I be-a careful," said Mucia, turning
to his work.
As MacGuire continued down the
grade he saw Cosetti beating a mule.
For some time the foreman stood and
watched him. "That fellow has a nice
disposition," he mused. "I wonder if
he will be trying some of his old
tricks? He ought to be kicked out of
camp."
On every side MacGuire saw beaming faces, saw happiness shining
through the perspiration and grime
that covered them. The Italians
greeted him as he passed. They looked upon him as a sort of god, feeling that he stood nearer than they to
the font from which flowed the riches.
He stood on a boulder watching the
long procession of scrapers, seeing the
fresh earth turned into the fill, hearing drivers curse and division bosses
scream orders. Far ahead there was
a blast now and then, as the advance
squad made another break in the side
of a hill. MacGuire realized, as he
watched, that it was like a great ma
chine, every part expected to do its
duty. He pitied the simple foreigners, who laboured with hound-like
tenacity. There the simile of the machine came to an end. In a machine
it mattered if the smallest bolt was
gone; here it mattered not if the insignificant parts were cast aside. One
or two caused no untoward results.
Their places were supplied as readily
as possible, and in the meantime the
machine worked on just as well, perhaps, as before. Only this machine
was composed of parts that possessed
hearts and souls, and it was hard for
the small parts that were cast aside.
MacGuire stood on the boulder until Cosetti came up beside him.
"They're doing well today," said he.
"They always do well just before
pay-day," said Cosetti, with a sneer.
"The cattle want to keep their jobs.''
"Well, men are scarce, aren't they?"
"There're plenty more to be had
where these came from."
"You must like the idea of changing forces all the time," said MacGuire.
"I don't mind it," replied Cosetti.
with insinuation.
MacGuire turned his head and
walked away without another word.
He went back along the grade, reached the end of the track, and started
toward headquarters. Mucia was still
tamping earth between the new ties.
Down in the gulch the men were chatting happily as they worked. MacGuire could hear bits of song between
the whistle blasts of the steam-shovel.
"Dey sing," said Mucia proudly, as
MacGuirc passed. "Listen, Mr. Foreman MacGuire."
Below him a wheel scraper dug into
the loose earth, and the driver started
the mules toward the fill. He saw
MacGuire and waved a greeting. Then
he began to sing. MacGuire could
catch the words,
—with  freedom's  holy  light.
"You see!" cried Mucia; "you see!"
Ill
"We'll be through the hill in another week," said MacGuire, "and
then, I suppose, we'll have to move
up thc line a few miles."
"In about a week," Cosetti assented.
They were in the office car: MacGuire was smoking his after-supper
pipe. Cosetti was busy with some
papers.
"You're a little late checking up,"
MacGuire continued. "I finished this
afternoon. That's the only bad part
about pay-day—you have to figure up
Headquarters for Sea Grass Rattan Chairs and Tables
The Cut illustrates exactly three of our small Chairs
for the 'wee ones' modestly priced at	
$1.00
Open daily, 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.
ORIENTAL IMPORTING COMPANY,
510 CORMORANT STREET   •
The White Front Silk House
OFP. E. & N. DEPOT
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Frank McGinn,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
ffibmmencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of Lot 342; thenee
80 chains, more or less to the northwest corner of Lot 342; thence south
65.76 chains more or less to the shore
of Eagle Lake; thence following the
said shore to the south-east corner of
Lot 342; thence north 37.92 chains to
the point of commencement containing
412 acres, more or less, and being Lot
342.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je2B FRANK McGINN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Duncan
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Merchant,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner of Lot 336, thence 40
chains north; thence 40 chains east;
thence 40 chains south to the north
boundary of Lot 336; thence west along
the said north boundary of Lot 336
40 chains to point of commencement and
containing 160 acres more or less.
Dated May 30th,  1910.
je2B CHARLES   DUNCAN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Gustav Bram-
well Etirenborg, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Architect, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the south-west corner
of Lot 333; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, more or less, to
the north-east corner of Lot 333; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
along the north boundary of Lot 334
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, and being Lot 333.
Dated  June  lst,  1910.
GUSTAV BRAMWELL EHRENBORG.
Je 25
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Gonzales,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Fisherman, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 80 chains south of the southeast corner of Lot 331; thence 80 chains
north to the south-east corner of Lot
331; thence west 80 chains along the
south boundary of Lot 331; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated  June  lst,  1910.
je25 JOSEPH GONZALES.
BRITISH     COLUMBIA     ft     ASLAXA
BAILWAY COMPANY
Notice to Stockholder!
The first general meeting of stockholders will be held at the offlce of the
Company, 514 Fort Street, Victoria, British Columbia, on July 20th, 1910, at 2
p.m., to elect a permanent Board of
Directors to consider the acts of the
provisional Board, and transact such
other business as may properly come
before the meeting.
Dated, Victoria. B.C., June 10th, 1910.
HAROLD B. ROBERTSON,
je 18 Secretary.
other people's wages before you get
your own."
"It isn't bad," said Cosetti. He was
smiling again.
"No, it isn't—in some cases," insinuated MacGuire.
Outside there were steps on the
gravel, and presently the door slid
back, and Mucia entered. MacGuire
whirled around in his chair, saw who
it was, then whirled back quickly and
looked at Cosetti. But in Cosetti's
face there was nothing to betray hiin.
"You tell-a me come to office-car
tonight," said Mucia.
"Sit down," Cosetti snapped. "I'll
talk to you as soon as I get through
here."
He turned to his desk and began
(Continued on Page 4)
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New Premises, 1410 Broad Street
Telephone 695 - R. P. CLARK, Manager
Headquarters for choice nursery stock.
Apple, pear, cherry, plum and peach trees
and small fruits, also ornamental trees,
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Telephone 2326 VICTORIA, B.C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 1910
MUSIC
AND  THE   STAGE
I The Victoria Theatre
1 Again it has been proven that Vic-
Itorians cannot approve real artistes.
I Miss May Roberts has been appear-
ling in the local house; she has been
I featuring the "Grass Widow"; she has
I been seeing stalls crowded with noth-
■ ing; she is going away with the same
■ idea of Victoria which  most decent
■ artistes   entertain.    Possibly   a   time
■ will come; some time; some kind of
la time; a time wihch no theatre-goer
lin   Victoria   has   ever   dreamed   of.
■ And when that time comes, we may
I see a really representative audience
I at the  principal opera house  of the
■ Capital City.
I The New Grand
I    The animal show at the above thea-
Itre is the great drawing card of this
■ week. Prettily done, prettily shown,
lit is one of the best things that I
I have ever seen. It is obvious that the
I little dogs are trained entirel by kind-
Iness; there is not the slightest ap-
I pearance of any cruelty in their train-
ling, and for that reason I have no
I hesitation in recommending any lover
■ of  dogs  to  go and witness  a  turn
■ which is in all respects well up to the
I mark of anything which I have seen
■ in London.
■ Pantages' Theatre
I The Johnson Street Vaudeville
I House is once again scoring a big
I success with its current show. Every
I turn is a "top-roller." The Dutch
I Comedians are far and away above
I the average performers of the same
■ class. Foucher, the Talking Cyclist,
I is well worth listening to. The other
I turns are all good, and no patron of
I vaudeville in Victoria should miss go-
I ing down Johnson Street on Saturday
I night.
I The Romano Theatre
I "The Seal of the Church" has been
I the big feature this week. Many good
I pictures have been on the screen and
I crowded  houses  have   had  to   show
"S. R. O."
I The Empress Theatre
It is understood that the line of
Moving Pictures which the Empress
Theatre are going to show tonight
' is something away beyond anything
shown on the canvas before. "The
* Writing on the Wall" is said to be
probably more pathetic and yet more
true to nature than anything whicii
has yet been presented to an expecting public.
The Majestic Theatre
I think that Shakespeare once said
something about history repeating itself. If he did his remarks on the
subjects were not a patch on the Ma-
jestic's Pictures on the same subject.
I don't know for sure whether they
will be on after this paper comes out,
btu if they are I recommend them to
the notice of anyone who enjoys a
good picture show and at the same
time has a sense of the ridiculous.
MOMUS.
Victoria—Next Week
Next week, commencing Monday
27th, there will be an exhibition of
moving pictures of an exceptional
character and one that will be of intense local interest to everyone. A
series of pictures will be shown taken
on the front of a Canadian Pacific
railway engine en route from Calgary
to Vancouver which shows the glorious scenery of the Rockies in a
manner that few persons have been
privileged to see it. The unobstructed view from the front of the engine
makes possible a panoramic that cannot be procured in any other way.
Along with this beautiful scenic
production there are also a number of
interesting views, which are familiar
to all, and yet when seen in this
wonderful series of pictures take on a
fresh interest—Street scenes in Vancouver and Victoria, arrival and departure of trains and boats, noted
buildings and celebrated beauty spots
all go to make this picture a fascinating and charming subject which
should be seen and enjoyed by everyone.   There will be performances each
evening lasting from 8 to io p.m. and
matinees Wednesday and Saturday at
3 p.m. Admission will be io cents as
usual.
New Grand Next Week
Harry Tsuda, the most wonderful
of Oriental features, comes to the
Grand next week. He is making his
second vaudeville tour in this country.
Tsuda is a marvelous equilibrist, performing feats that are astounding for
style and grace. In private life this
wonderful little athlete is one of the
best educated, well groomed and da-
per looking young men on the modern
stage. He was recently a common
topic of admiration in New York,
Boston, Philadelphia and Chicago.
It is by mere chance that Murry K.
Hill, the songologist and monologue
favorite, is to appear here next week,
which is due to his contracts with the
Edison and Victor Phonograph Company, limiting his vaudeville tour. Mr.
Hill needs little or no introduction to
the Grand audiences, for his amusing
ditties and laughable tales are always
to be heard. Murray K. Hill is a
household word all over the world,
for his phonograph records are without exception the best and most distinct on the market. Mr. Hill has
the advantage of the voice and the
ability to produce, which are the most
essential qualifications in the production of sound. His appearance will afford patrons an opportunity to hear
Mr. Hill's records reproduced and as
a special benefit for those interested
in this occurrence, the management
will accept requests for any special records. For his vaudeville tour Mr.
Hill has arranged an entirely new
programme, whicii consists of his best
accomplishments.
The Gordon Highlanders, who appear at the Grand next week are wonderfully achieved instrumentalists.
They will offer an exquisite repertoire
of selections on nearly every instrument known to this country and introduce several musical - creations,
from Bonnie Scotland. These artists
come direct from leading foreign halls
where they have achieved remarkable
success and there is little doubt that
they will duplicate their triumphs.
A revelation in vocal acts are Zi-
nell and Boutelle, who wil present
their delightful musical comedy, "237
Miles from New York." Mr. Zinelle
portrays the character of a stranded
actor and Miss Boutelle that of a disconsolate actress. There is some dialogues which serves to introduce the
musical numbers. Miss Boutelle renders several selections, which show to
advantage her highly cultivated voice.
The act is abounding in splendid comedy, making it a most pleasing feature.
James Toney and Antoinette Norman are an exceedingly clever and
jolly pair and their offering is full of
life and ginger. Their particular di-
vertisement consisting of eccentric
dances and new surprises in wit ancl
humor. This duo will be one of the
pleasing features of the bill next week.
The regular song and pictures are
billed also.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICB that (Mrs.) Eleanor
Mary Crofts, of Vanoouver, B.C., occupation Married Woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at
1 post planted at the north-east corner
of Lot 338; thence west 80 ohalns;
thence south 78.38 chains to the shore
of Eagle Lake; thence following the said
shore to the south-east comer of Lot
33S; thence north 84.110 chains to point
of commencement, containing G40 acres,
more or less, and being Lot 33S.
Dated  June  2nd.  1!110.
(MRS.) ELEANOR MARY CROFTS
je 25
"With This Ring
I Thee Wed"
Beauty of finish and perfection
of quality mark our
WEDDING
RINGS
Made  in our  own  factory.
Prices the lowest.
Come in and see our unrivalled stock of new goods
suitable for Bridal Gifts,
presents to Bridesmaids and
Groomsman, etc. You are
cordially welcome if only as
a "looker."
W. H. WILKERSON
The Jeweler
915 Government Street
Tel 1606
*  ''«&USm
SATUBDAY    MATINEE    AND
EVENING
MAY ROBERTS
And   Her   Company   in
The Judge and the Girl
Prices 25o, 35c and 50c
Next Week
MOVING PICTURES
Victoria to Calgary
A Magnificent Scenic Production of
Local Interest
ADMISSION 10 CENTS
YAK ATHA TOMBOLA
Good Prizes
Where?   Why?
DOWN at the GORGE
JAPANESE ICE
CREAM PARLORS
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Burroug
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Burroughs Webster, of Vancouver, B.C.,
occupation Accountant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the west bank of the
Chilco River, about SO chains nortli of
the northeast corner of 4347; thence
west 40 chains; thence soutli to the
north boundary of Lot 347 (being 80
chains more or less); thence east along
the north boundary of L. 347 to the
riyer bank, being 35 chains more or
less; thence following the said river
bank northerly 80 chains more or less
to point of commencement and containing 300 acres more or less.
Dated   June   4th,   11110.
ROBERT BURROUGHS WEBSTER
,1e 25
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Frances Dunlop
of Vancouver, occupation Stepographer.
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of Lot 330; thence SO
chains east; thence 80 chains north;
thence 80 chains west to the northeast
corner of Lnt. 330; thence 80 chains
snuth along the east boundary of said
Lot 330 to point of commeneement and
containing 040 acres more or less.
Dated   June   lst,   1910.
je 25 PRANCES  DUNLOP.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that (Mrs.) Catherine
Blair, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Married Woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the north-west corner of
Charles Skinner's pre-emption (Lot 32!));
thence east 80 chains; thence north 40
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 40 chains to point of commencement and containing 320 acres, more or
less.
Dated May 31st, 1910.
je 25        (MRS.) CATHERINE BLAIR.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Caroline B.
Barnes, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Stenographer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted ahout 135 chains north of thc
northeast corner of Lot 347 on the west
bank of the Chilco River (being about
50 chains north of the N. E. corner of
R. B. Webster's application to purchase); thence west 50 chains; thence
south to the north boundary of R. B.
Webster's application to purchase, being
50 chains more or less; thence east 35
chains more or less to the river; thence
following the river bank northerly to
point of commencement and containing
200 acres more or less.
Dated June 4th.  1910.
je2B CAROLINE B.  BARNES.
IUIEJTK
THEATRE
Yates Street, Just Below Government
WHERE EVERYBODY GOES
If you are dull and get the blues,
And do not know the place to choose
Come to the Majestic on Yates Street
Bring the friends you are apt to meet
And if on pleasure you are bent,
You won't regret the Dime you spent.
WE CATER TO LADIES AND  CHILDREN
CHANGE OF PROGRAMME
Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Katie Gibson, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupntion Stenographer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing nt a post planted
on the west hnnk of the Chilco River,
about 55 chains north of where the said
river flows out of Chilco Lake, and being at the north-east corner of R. H.
W. Edmond's application to purchase;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chnins; thence east SO chains more or
less to river bank; thence following
the west shore of the river southerly to
point of commencement nnd containing
640 acres more or less.
Dated June 3rd, 1910.
je 25 KATIE GIBSON.
THE
New Grand
Week of June 27
THREE GORDON HIGHLANDERS
Scotland's Supreme Instrumentalists
MURRAY K. HILL
The Jolly Monologist
HARRY TSUDA
Marvelous Jajpanese Equilibrist
William Adelaide
ZINELLE and BOUTELLE
Tn their Merry Musical Comedy
"237 Miles  From  New  York"
James Antoinette
TONEY and NORMAN
In  Droll  Diversions  and
Amusing Capers
THOS. J. PRICE
NEW MOVINC PICTURES
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
PANTAGES
THEATRE
Week of June 27
Lewis & Lake's
Musical Comedy
Company
Direct from Baa Pranclico
PBETTY   SINGING  AUS
DANCING GIBLS
MERRY COMEDIANS
In a Repertoire of
MUSICAL CREATIONS
Interesting
Instructive
ROMAN©
THEATRE
CHANGE OF PROGRAMME THREE TIMES A WEEK
We are securing Pictures now which are absolutely new
releases. Never been shown any place before wc get them. Will
have Pictures of our late King's funeral in a few days. Watch all
the papers closely.
COOLEST AND MOST POPULAR THEATRE IN THE CITY
ADMISSION—TEN CENTS
Open afternoons 2 to 5-30, evenings 7 to 11
EMPRESS
THEATRE
GOVERNMENT ST., NORTH OF JOHNSON
GEO. A. LEVELLE, Mgr.
ONLY FIRST CLASS
Motion Pictures and Illustrated Songs
Matinee every day from 2 to 5 p.m.   Evenings from 7 to 11 p.m.
Admission
10 Cents THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 2 5, 19x0
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
•THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
iao8   Government St.,  Victoria, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE, Editor
The Church and Politics
(COXTIXL'ED FROM PAGE 0X1*:)
guilt commit offences against fantastical laws, which make him liable to
several thousand dollars in lines and
not more than a year's imprisonment. There are more laws in the
United States against artificial offences than in any country in the
world, and in no country in the world i1"11
are the laws against real offences,
such as murder, so openly set at defiance and so flagrantly violated.
To the argument from experience
that fanciful laws are not enforced,
the common retort is that laws
against murder can be made effective,
and other laws could be made effective too, if only'the "government"
were sufficiently goaded into action.
At this point the community rebels
passively, because it has an instinct
that tliere is an essential difference
between murder, oi- pir#6y, and buying a cigar on the Sabbath. But even
if the Church succeeded by political
action in stopping every wheel, every
horse race or bet, and every sale or
consumption of alcohol, it would yet
have lost its cause by abdicating its
real function df changing the hearts
before changing the habits of men.
When the Church becomes a political party it will contain only
"good" men, and it will have closed
its doors against those who really
need its services most. It will then
be calling only the righteous to repentance, and it will end as a voice
crying in the wilderness. The Church
retains its influence because men are
by nature religious. When the
Church itself becomes irreligious by
engaging in non-religious operations,
it will have cast away its authority.
From , high aims, Protestant
churches have turned aside to engage
iu such occupations as are set forth
in the last report of the Lord's Day
Alliance, an association which has
amongst its officers ministers representing the Presbyterian, Methodist,
the Congregational, and Baptist
churches, and the Churches of Scotland and of England. There is a
curious infelicity in the title, as it involves an assumption which has to be
qualified, and the use of the Holy
Name for controversial purposes. "If
the 'Day of Rest' were employed, the
term would be free from offence,
and would be more clearly definitive
to many Christians and to all Jews,
as anyone with a dictionary in his
hand may discover. In this report
much satisfaction is expressed over
the progress which has been made;
though, I fear, if the Lord's Day Alliance were free to work its perfect
work, one would be compelled to cry
out with the herdsmen of Tekoa,
"When will the Sabbath be g6ne?"
or even take into his "mouth that
word of a greater prophecy, "Thy
Sabbath I cannot away with."
offence, punishable by a fine, for a
well-grown lad to procure at a shop
a piece of tobacco for his father who
may have come home and was too
wearied by the labours of the day to
adventure forth upon that errand of
relief on his own behalf. And yet,
who shall say that the Sabbath is
better kept, or that more men and
boys are deprived of the sanative
weed, than was the case before the
enactment of these measures?
The "Act to amend the Criminal
Code" has a fearsome sound, as one
reads that "everyone is liable to one
year's imprisonment, and to a fine
not exceeding one thousand dollars
who"—informs a neighbour that a
"horse-trot" had taken place upon
the result of whicli he had bet a shilling. When one reads the list of
persons to whom the drastic provisions of this Act shall not apply, he
is disposed to wonder why the ecclesiastics who instigated it should have
midoned tlie substance without having received even the shadow in return. And this emasculated thing
commonly called the "Miller Bill"
was the sole result of efforts which
kept the churches in a turmoil for a
year.
If anything considerable were accomplished by this ecclesiastico-
political alliance one might not so
bitterly lament the loss to religion;
but the concessions which governments make to amiable enthusiasts
are little more than elaborate pieces
of hypocrisy. Tlie "Act respecting
the Lord's Day," 6 Ed. VII, c. 27,
will serve as an illustration. It
makes a great parade of the "prohibitions," of the things "whicii
shall not be lawful." For example:
"It shall not be lawful for any person on the Lord's Day to shoot with
or use any gun, rifle, or other similar
engine in such a manner as to disturb other persons in attendance at
public worship in attendance at public worship." Tliat looks very well,
but the contingency provided for must
be a very remote one. Then follows
a list of twenty-four series of works
of "necessity and mercy" which may
be performed; and these include nearly every form of human activity
which may readily be imagined.
Again, much was made of the success in securing an "Act to restrain
the use of tobacco by young persons," which was assented to July
20, 1008, whereby it was made an
I have said that the Roman Catholic Church has always stood for freedom of conduct. It tolerates a moderate recreation on the first clay of
the week, after the ceremonial of religion is at an end. To its flock it
permits a diversion by those trivial
games which are commonly played in
the Province of Quebec with a number
of cards bearing fantastic figures of
kings, queen's, knaves, hearts, spades,
diamonds ancl trefoils. It does not
discourage the movement of the-fpet
to the accompaniment of sounds; nor
does it forbicl attendance upon scenic
representations, so long as they are
neither obscene nor profane. Nor
were the sellers of alcoholic beverages put without the pale, so long
as they observed the laws under
which tlieir business might be carried
on. But the Catholic Church, at least
in the diocese of Montreal, is becoming Puritan; and Archbishop Brn-
chesi has already gone a long way towards meeting those who hold these
diversions as anathema, and an abstinence from the theatre and the
dance as a sign and seal of an effectual Christian calling.
The spirit of Puritanism has been
of incalculable good in the world,
when it was kept in due relation with
the other elements which go to make
up a normal life. Unchecked, it falls
into excess ancl is its own undoing.
That is why I do not welcome without reserve Archbishop Bruchesi to
the ranks of the Puritans. By his
connivance we may come to mistake
a meticulous observance of the Sabbath for religion, and make the fatal
error of attempting, to force that
falacy upon our children. We may
forget that it is what comes out of
the mouth that defiles a man, rather
than what enters iu.
A political party within the Church
with its paid organizers, or travelling
secretaries, even if it have for its
avowed purpose the excellent object
of prohibiting the sale of alcohol, or
the desecration of the Sabbath, or
betting on horses, differs nothing in
principle from a political party without the Church, with its paid organ-*
ize);s. Both are devised for the same
pappose, which is to put the government in a position "where it cannot
resist."
Not* from France alone comes a
despairing cry that the spirit of religion has declined. It declines in
every community where it is not adequately ministered unto. When the
minister abandons the sanctuary for
the political arena or the social
world, he loses his influence, and religion suffers, as surely as the woman
loses her influence, and domestic life
suffers, when she forsakes the duties
of the home to engage in public
affairs.
Rejected
Gerald—I'd like to be your father's
son-in-law.
Geraldine—I don't know how it can
be arranged; I haven't any sister.
How to Land Him in a Week
Monday—Be pretty.   Smile once.
Tuesday—Bc prettier. Frown at
him.
Wednesday—Be pensive. Sigh once.
Thursday—Confess your regard for
him.
Friday—Laugh at him.
Saturday—Be "out."
To Get the
Best Service
Prom Your Watch
Have it cleaned regularly, every
12 or 18 months. Drying oil
and small particles of grit collecting around the fine points
wear out thc delicate pivots, so
that, while a watch may go for
years without attention, when it
does break down it is beyond
repair.
Our charges are moderate.
Redfern & Sons
1009 Government Street
VICTORIA, B.C.
Baxter & Johnson Co., Ltd.
There's Only One Best
and that One Best is
THE
UNDERWOOD
TYPEWRITER
Tlie  new  model  is ' a  marvellous
piece of reliable machinery
Baxter & Johnson Co., Ltd.
REMEMBER
We   are   the   olily  firm  that
can please in
ARTISTIC DECORATING,
PAINTING,
PAPER-HANGING or
SIGN WORK
C. H. Tite & Co.
Phone 2050   - 620 Johnston St.
SWEDISH MASSAGE
MEDICAL GYMNASTICS
VIBRATORY TREATMENT
S. Bjornfelt, S.M.
Phone 1856
821 Fort St.
DEPARTMENT   OF   PUBLIC   WORKS
Supervising Architect
Applications will be received by the
Minister  of Public Works  up  to  Monday, the 27th day of June, 1910, for the
position of Supervising Architect at a
salary of $168.33 per month.
F. C. GAMBLE,
je 18 Public Works Engineer
Order These Fish "Fancies"
To be delivered at your summer cottage or camp
—just the appetizing niceties you should stock:
Lobster in Glass  85c, 75c, 50c and 35c
Prawns in Glass   50c
D. & G. Sardines in Glass, in Oil or Tomato  60c
Lobster in Tins   60c, 40c, 25c and 15c
Codfish Balls, per tin   25c
Trout in Jelly, per tin   50c
Spiced Herring, per tin 25c
Herrings in Tomato Sauce, per tin  50c and 25c
Herrings with Anchovy Sauce, per tin    25c
Devilled   Herring,  per  tin    25c
Golden Haddies, 2 tins for  25c
Fresh Mackerel, per tin  25c
Devilled Crab Meat, per tin   25c
Fresh Crab, per tin    25c
Tunno Fish in Oil, per tin  35c
Bismarck Herrings, per tin   35c
Anchovies, per keg  50c
DIXI H. ROSS &. CO.
Tels.
Independent Grocers and Wine Merchants
50, 51, 52 and 1590 1317 Government Street
Farm, 34 acres cleared, the best of soil, excellent buildings, considerable stock, close to city, only $15,000.   Good terms.
13 acres, very good soil, nearly all cleared, new house well built,
large and good outbuildings, .4 miles from city, only $8,500.
500 acres on "Hardy Bay," the coming great industrial and shipping center of Vancouver Island! ""•*'
A. WILLIAMS & CO., Limited
„,,.. ESTABLISHED 1885
Real Estate and Financial Agents 704 Yates Street
SNAP!
Four Miles From Town
ELEVEN ACRES—All in high state of cultivation, and fenced,
with a vegetable farm; connected with City water; fine large
8-roomed house, barn and stables $7,800
"IDEAL"_ MODEL FARM—Happy Valley road, 26 acres, 12
acres in cultivation, balance easily worked, good new house of
five rooms, outbuildings, etc.; stock and implements $4,500
ALBERT TOLLER
Phone 2046
Room 5 Imperial Bank Chambers
Photographic
Supplies
Amateurs' printing and developing done at shortest
notice.
_______
A. H. MAYNARD,, 715 Faiidbra St.
"LAND   REGISTRY  ACT"
In the matter of an application for a
Duplicate Certificate of Title to
Subdivisions Nos. 3, 53 and 54 of
Section XXV (Richmond Estate)
Victoria District.
NOTICE is hereby given that it is
my intention at the expiration of one
month from the date of the first publication hereof, to issue a Duplicate
Certificate of Title to above land issued
to Robert Paterson Rithet on the 23rd
day of August, 1882, and numbered
4016A.
Land   Registry  Office,   Victoria,   B.C.,
the 9th day of June, 1910.
J.  P.  McLEOD,
je 11 Deputy Registrar-General
FURNITURE PACKING BY EXRERTS
For shipment to any part of the world.
Good Clean Materials.       Satisfaction Guaranteed.      Estimates Given.
Special Care taken witb Glass and China.
A Special  feature of our business   is   re-upholstering   and   restoring
Furniture of all descriptions
STYLES & SHARP
PHONE 3149
805 FOBT STREET
Subscribe for the Week
PARLIAMENT BIULDINGS
Office  Annex
Sealed Tenders, superscribed tenders
for "Alterations, Offlce Annex, Parliament Buildings," will be received by the
Hon. the Minister of Public Works up
to noon of Thursday, the 30th inst, for
certain alterations and repairs to a
frame building situated in the grounds
of the Parliament Buildings, Vietoria.
Drawing, specifications, contract form,
and form of tender may be seen on and
after Tuesday, the 14th inst., at the
offlce of the Department of Public
Works,  Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank
of Canada, made payable to the Hon.
the Minister of Public Works, in a sum
of $600, which shall be forfeited if the
party tendering decline to enter into
contract when called upon to do so, or
when he fails to complete the work contracted for.
The cheques or certificates of deposit
of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them upon the execution of
the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the form supplied, signed
by the actual signature of the tenderer,
and enclosed in the envelope furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F.  C.  GAMBLE,
]el8 Public Works Engineer THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 25,   191-1
Beautiful Curtains and Drapes
EASILY SECURED THROUGH THE USE OF THESE NEW MATERIALS
We have received this week a big shipment of curtain and drapery materials that includes some of the newest ideas in late Summer and early Fall draperies—
the newest creations of Liberty Art.
Through the use of these and the splendid assortment of trimmings we are now showing, some remarkably artistic "effects" may be produced in home decoration,
They represent what is "correct" in London and Paris and the other fashion centres.
Don't overlook the importance of having the curtains correct—if you would have the home correct. We can help you—let us show you how. First come and see
these new arrivals.
^M LIBERTY  ART  CRETONNES
In cretonnes the Liberty Art productions have been recognized as tlie leaders for
a long time. These latest arrivals live up to the Liberty reputation in both
design and qualitq. There's a great choice of patterns and colorings offered
now.   Prices start at, per yard  20c
ART   LINEN  TAFFETAS
These taffetas come in the new Fruit, Verdure ancl Vine patterns. Well covered
designs—making this a very serviceable covering for furniture and willow
chairs.   Liberty effects, 50 inches wide, from, per yard $1.00
ART  TISSUE  LINEN
This is an unsurpassed, inexpensive furniture covering. Come in those pleasing
French floral patterns. Try this superior fabric on some of your furniture.
50 inches wide, at, per yard $1.25
LLAMA  CLOTHS—NEW  SHADES
We have a.}} the new ^hadps in these Llama Cloths—so desirable for inner and
casement curtains. Pleasing, solid colors. Most attractive windows possible
through use of these.   52 inches wide, at, per yard $1.00, 90c, 80c
LIBERTY  ART  CHINTZES
Liberty Art Chintzes have a world-wide reputation for style and quality. We
have just received some that are fully up to the standard, and we invite you
to inspect these latest arrivals.   Excellent choice offered in these most useful
materials.   Priced from, pet- yard   30c
CREPE GLORIA AT 65c
Crepe Gloria is a soft, silky, easily draped material, that comes in solid colors.
It is excellent for drapes because of its texture. We have dainty shades of
rose, green, blue, gold and crimson; 50 inches wide, and priced at, per yd.. .65c
IMPRESSION DE  CHINE
Impression de Chine and Shadow Cloths are rich materials and ideal for those
looking for something unusually nice.   We have these in those new Bird of
Paradise and Pheasant designs.   Priced at, per yard $3.00
NEWEST  CURTAIN TRIMMINGS
We have just received a big stock of the very newest in curtain trimmings—
bandings, edgings, insertion, etc. Combining th0s<f with the dainty materials,
you can produce wonderfully attractive creatio.isJ. Something for,,.every
requirement.
We Are Showing the Newest in Art Serges
We have just received a big shipment of the very newest in Art Serges.   Not only are the colorings the very latest and newest, but the weave is also the latest idea—,
called the Hopsack.   This weave adds greatly to the artistic possibilities of this favored material.   Come in ahd see the new shades in DARK GREEN, OLIVE GREEN,
CRIMSON, BROWN, GOLD, BLUE.   These are new Liberty Art Serges and represent the very latest fabric for bungalow and Arts and Crafts furnishings.   Come in and
let us show you some of these materials and explain some of their decorative possibilities.
50-inch., at, per yard 65c 72-inch., at, per yard $1.25
FURNISHERS OF
CHURCHES
SCHOOLS
BOATS
SINCE 1862
AT VICTORIA, B.O.
1 mU
Complete Home Furnishers
Victoria, B.C.
FURNISHERS OF
HOMES
HOTELS
CLUBS
SINCE 1862
AT VIOTORIA, B.O.
On Wednesday, June 23rd, one pf
tite prettiest wdddiirgsijof the seaisdn
as    celebrated    at    Christ    Church
Cathedral, when Miss J'ban Olive BrjJ"
den, only daughter of Mr. John Bryden   and   the   late   Mrs.   Bryden,   of
Head  Street,  Esquimalt, was  united
in   marriage   with   Captain   Douglas
Macdonald.    The  bride, who looked
very charming, wore a beautiful white
satin gown artistically draped with old
rose point lace, with a real lace veil
(held in place with a coronet of orange
ossoms.     The    bridesmaids,    who
numbered   eight,   were   gowned   in
iquaint costumes of Charles II period
Jcarried out in pale green _ satin over
Ibrocaded   pink   silk   petticoats   and
"[wearing little  tight  fitting real  lace
Kaps.   They were: Miss Muriel Dunsinuir,  Miss  Kathleen   Dunsmuir,  the
Kittle   Miss   Brydens   (nieces   of   the
|bride), Miss Betty Kirk, Miss Kath-
ine   Oliver,   Miss   Burns   and   Miss
Pemberton.   Master   Jimmy   Audain
made a very charming little page. The
_room was supported by Captain El-
iston of Work Point Barracks.   After
he ceremony the party drove to the
[iome the bride's father where a large
eception was held.   Mrs. Henry Croft
(vho wore a very handsome gown of
Iue with hat and feathers to match,
ssisted her brother-in-law, Mr. Bry-
en,  in   receiving  the   guests.     The
ouse was beautifully  decorated  for
■lie occasion with hot-house  flowers
nd     greenery.      Some     of     those
niongst the many guests who were
resent    were:      Mrs.     Macdonald,
Ir. and Mrs. Henry Croft, Mr. and
Blrs. Jack Bryden, Mr. and Mrs. Ga-
"in  Hamilton  Burns,   Mr.  and  Mrs.
Kirk, Hon. James and Mrs. Dunsmuir,
the Misses Dunsmuir, Mr. ancl Mrs.
Fred. Pemberton, Colonel and Mrs.
"E. GG. Prior, Mr. and Mrs. A. Ritchie,
Colonel and Mrs. Arthur Jones, Col.
and Mrs. Peters, Miss Peters, Mr. ancl
Mrs. Flummerfelt, Messrs. E. and H,
Peters, Mrs. Little, Miss Little, Hon.
C. E. and Mrs. Pooley, Misses Pooley, Col. and  Mrs. Wolfenden,  Hon.
D. M. and Mrs. Eberts, Misses Eberts, Col. and Mrs. Curry, Mr. ancl
Mrs. P. T. Johnston, Maj. and Mrs.
Napier Hibben, Miss Macdonald, Dr.
and Mrs. Hannington, Miss Hannington, Mrs. D. R. Harris, Mr. ancl Mrs.
Dewar, Mrs. Mowan, Miss Newton,
Mr. ancl Mrs. E. B. Mackay, Mr. and
Mrs. Edgar Fawcett, Mr. S. J. Pitts,
Misses Pitts, Mr. ancl Mrs. Geo. Gillespie, Mr. D. Gillespie, Mr. S. Gillespie Mrs. Alexander Gillespie, Mrs.
H. Gillespie, Mrs. Charles Todd, Mr.
W. Todd, Mr. ancl Mrs. Butchart,
Misses Butchart, Miss G. Perry, Miss
Combe, Mrs. Rome, Mrs. Blaiklock,
Miss Rome, Mr. and Mrs. R. Jones,
Mr. and Mrs. F. Barnard, Mr. and
Mrs. H. Barnard, Maj. ancl Mrs. Audain and Master Audain, Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Pooley, Judge ancl Mrs. Lamp-
man, Mrs. Devereaux, and thc Misses
Devereaux, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Monteith ancl the Misses Monteith, Mr.
and Mrs. A. S. Gore, Mr. ancl Mrs.
Laundyj Mr. and Mrs. Jacob, Miss
Archbutt, Mr. and Mrs. Ambrey, Mr.
ancl Mrs. Alexis Martin, Mr. Justice
and Mrs. Martin, Mr. ancl Mrs. Luxton, Mrs. King, Miss King, Captain
ancl Mrs. J. .Irving ancl the Misses
Irving, Mrs. Atkins, Mrs. E. Bro-
thero, Mr. and Mrs. Kirk, Captain ancl
Mrs. Gaudin, the Misses Gaudin, Miss
Greet, Miss K. Bennett, Mr. ancl Mrs.
J. Harvey, Captain Elliston, Captain
Gillian, Lieut. Colburn, Mr. and Mrs.
Beresford-Hogg, and Mr. C. Hogg,
Mr. and Mrs. Blackwood, and the
Misses Blackwood, thc Misses Tolmie,
Captain and Mrs..Musgrave, Mr. and
Miss Musgrave, Hcv. C. E. and Mrs.
Cooper, Mr. ancl Mrs. D. Dewar, Miss
Davie, Mr. and Mrs. Fitzherbert Bullen, Dr. and Mrs. IIelmcken, and Miss
Helmcken, Mrs. Heyland and Miss
Heyland, Dr. and Mrs. Hasell, Mr.
ami Mrs. VV. E. Oliver, Dr. and Mrs.
Watt, Mr. ancl Mrs. Curtis Sampson,
Mr. ancl Mrs. A. W. McCurdy, Mr.
and Mrs. Hugo Beavan, Mr. ancl Mrs.
J. R. Anderson, Mr. and Mrs. Phillips,
Mr. ancl Mrs. G. F. Matthews, Mr.
and Mrs. Trcwartha James, Miss
James, Mr. J. James, Dr. and Mrs.
Fagan, Mr.,and Mrs. Robert Beavan,
Mrs. Stevenson, and the Misses Mason, Mrs. J. D. Pemberton, Mr. and
Mrs. R. S. Day, and thc Misses Day,
Miss Dupont, Mr. ancl Mrs. F. B.
Pemberton, Miss Macdowell, Mr. and
Mrs. Roger Wilby, Rev. W. BfUlgll-
Allan ancl Mrs. Allan, Miss Allan ancl
many others.
* *   *
Mrs. W. C. Berkeley has returned
from a most enjoyable visit spent in
Southern California.
* *   *
Mrs. D. 11. Patton from Winnipeg
is visiting relatives in the city.
* *   *
Mrs. P. Hickey ancl her daughters,
Mrs. A. W. Harvey ancl Miss j. Hickey arc staying at' Glencoe Uodgc,
Vancouver.
Mr. and Mrs. Guy P. Goddard arrived in Victoria last week and are
staying at thc Dallas Hotel.
A very pretty wedding was solemnized on Wednesday, June 15th, at
Christ Church Cathedral, when Miss
Elfrida Allison, niece of the Hon.
Edgar Dewdney, was united in marriage with Lieut. Graham Holmes,
lirst officer on R.M.S. Empress of India. The ceremony was performed by
the Bishop of Columbia. Miss Allison, who made a very charming bride,
was,.attended by Miss Kathrine Oliver, while the groom was supported
by Mr. Edward Dewdney. Afterwards
a reception was held at ^hc residence
of the Hon. Edgar Dewdney, Cook
street, only thc intimate friends and
relatives of the young couple being
present. Mr. and Mrs. Grahanl*
Holmes arc spending their honciju
moon in Winnipeg, but will later leave
for the Old Country, where tlicy will
reside in future.
* *   *
Miss Ernestine Mason, Burdette
avenue, spent the week-end as thc
guest of Dr. ancl  Mrs.  Nelson,  Oak
Bay.
# *   *
The marriage of Mrs. C. V.. Stephens, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
L. Young of Victoria, to Mr. R. Emerson lllakeiiay, formerly of Chcslcy,
Out., and recently of Winnipeg, Man.,
was solemnized on Wednesday. June
22nd, at thc residence of the bride's
parents, ;afi Russell street, the Rev.
A. E. Roberts officiating. The bride,
who was given away by her father,
was attired in a beautiful princess
gown of old rose silk. A sumptuous
repast with the usual display of exquisite flowers made the affair complete. Her going-away gown was a
tailor-made suit of grey cloth with
hat to match. Many beautiful presents were received. The happy
couple left on thc afternoon boat for
Seattle, Tacoma and Portland. Ou
their return they will reside at their
new home, 129 Medina Street.
Yachting News
Thc date of the International Regatta will soon bc here, but the Victoria Yacht Club arc well ahead with
all arrangements for thc occasion.
Thc  many  handsome  prizes  are  on
view in Wilson's store on Government
Street, and judging from the number
of entries coming in, there will be a
notable number of contcstors for each
race.
A large number of entries are to
hand in the Long Distance Power
Boat Race. The course will bc from
Tacoma to a stake boat in English
Bay, Vancouver, and from thence by
an optional route to Victoria. This
race is under the auspices of the Pacific International Power Boat Association in conjunction with the annual
regatta of the North-West International ^acht Racing..Association, ancl
.Victoria, Yacht Club of Victoria, B.C.
The contesting boats will be essentially cruising launches, having sleeping
and eating accommodations for not
less than four persons. They will leave
Tacomo on the morning of July 2nd.
The entertainment committee have
been hard at work, leaving no stone
unturned to provide for the pleasure
and comfort of the anticipated guests.
The Union Club have lent their aid
in making arrangements for a marquee to be erected on the water front
where their friends and guests on
shore will have a full view of the
races and bc provided with refreshments. A band will also bc in attendance.
The members of the Alexandra
Club (ladies) have also graciously
come forward and have extended the
privileges of their Club to visiting
ladies whom they will cordially welcome to Victoria. The great interest
which is being shown by the Victoria
ladies in the forthcoming yacht meet
is likely to establish a precedent on
this coast, and it is the wish of both
the officers ancl members of the Victoria Yacht Club to elevate the sport
of yachting to its proper level, especially as they desire to obtain that
coveted privilege, namely, a Royal
Charter for their Club. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 1910
to sr.Rvn quick-
For a Wedding
=Present=
What could be better than something to lighten the wife's labors and help to build up the husband's bank account, too with
A Modern Gas Cooking Apparatus
Solve the difficult problem of June Wedding Gift-
giving by calling here to select one of these
Excellent Gas Ranges
We offer a handsome, nickle-plated, single-oven GURNEY SUCCESS GAS RANGE, with 164 inch bake oven
4 hole and one simmering burner, set up in your
kitchen ready to burn for only $20.00
Victoria Gas Company, Limited
Cor. Fort and Langley Sts., Victoria, B.C.
Telephone J 609
lt/^ft^^_}/»»mw/\fm/^f__^
At The Street   ^
Corner i
p By THe LOUNORR &
By THe LOUNORR
What wonderful things animals are!
I suppose that all of us in our childhood read stories regarding the sagacity of the dumb creation; and most
of us probably thought them all very
far-fetched. I know I did, and I
don't think that I am very different
from the common run of humanity.
But I have found out my mistake, and
my teacher has been a sheep, of all
creatures in the world. Although the
donkey has been generally accepted as
the epitome of stupidity, and most
erroneously too, most people look
on the sheep as the dumb type of folly. Even in the Bible we are told
that "All we like sheep have gone
astray." But I have found a sheep
which showed sense, which showed
a happy aptitude for accommodating
himself to circumstances and which,
finally, proved that even in a sheep's
brain there exists a due regard for
the proprieties. On Monday last a
flock of sheep were being driven up
Johnson Street, presumably on the
way to the butcher's. But one little
"mutton," probably scenting trouble
in the near future, came to the conclusion that it would be well to get
out of the crowd. It got out; it
was chased, and it took refuge—in a
feed store. Tt broke through a window in Bannerman & Home's place
and was finally rescued before it had
time to break out again. Pretty good
for a sheep, eh what? I wish I had
sufficient gall to break through windows in my eating houses. And to
think that we humble mortals talk
about the dumb creation as though
it was born with less brains than we
were.
I
Has it ever occurred to you that for
every man or woman of your acquaintance who has the least presumption to having brains, there are at
least a hundred dumb animals who
have a far better claim to consideration when grey material is in the question. Does an animal ever drink
more than is good for him? Does
he over-eat? Does he lose his temper
without due cause? No, when God
made the dumb creation He made
something to be a lesson to a man.
I could cheerfully kiil a fellow whom
I saw ill-treating a dumb animal, and
T shouldn't consider myself a criminal for doing it. Of course I should
I should be hanged, which would be
an uncomfortable experience, but I
should die as a martyr and would do
my very best to put on the face of an
angel.
*     *     *
It is not often that I lind myself
lounging round silks, but it so happened thc other clay that I needed
something in .that line, and 1 dropped
into thc Oriental Importing Company's place on Cormorant Street, just
opposite the E. & N. Depot. I was
amazed at that display, and I have
absolutely no hesitation in mentioning
them in my column, though I object,
as a rule, to say anything which might
bc translated as free advertising. I
was so interested that I took a look
over the whole place. It may not bc
generally known that this house is
the biggest importer of silk in the
Dominion. Their stock is immense;
pongee silk; silk for underwear; silk
for kimonas; silk for bath-robes. The
place is full of silk. Another specialty
of this house is garden chairs; these
are to be had in all shapes, sizes and
qualities. Good rattan and sea-grass
chairs. What really drew me into the
place was the clean white aspect. I
was wandering about needing some
underclothing, and the store attracted
me. It is one of the most attractive
houses  of business  in  Victoria,  and
has  been   in  existence  for  forty-six
years.
*     *     *
What about the weather?   We people in Victoria rather "kid" ourselves
as a rule during the summer months.
I haven't made any complaint up to
the  present  because  I  put  the  dull
skies  down  to  Halley's   Comet,  but
when it conies to a prominent parson
stopping me in the street and asking
me, because I am "The Lounger" and
therefore the recognized "kicker" for
the Province, that I should exert my
persuasive powers on the Clerk of the
Weather,  I  begin  to  think  that  we '
don't  have  all   the   fine  weather  to i
which we are entitled.   I remarked to '
the gentleman    in    question    that it ]
would  be  far  better  if  he  were   to I
exercise himself in prayer as to the !
matter, but he seemed to think that |
a few words in print would be more
effective.    So I will have to say that
the weather in Victoria this summer
has not been up to the mark, and to
beg the  gentleman  who  has  charge
of  that   department   to  try   and   do
better in future.
*     *     *
1 can't help thinking that there has
been a general lack of real respect
with regard to the funeral of the late
King. I have had papers sent to me
from home; I have seen representations on the screens at the theatres
here in town; I have read odd cuttings which have been forwarded mc
from the Old Country. And I don't
like any of them. There is too much
yellow journalism in connection with
the whole proceeding. When I heard
of the King's death I appreciated the
loss it would be to the Empire; I
mourned his loss as well as a fellow
can, who is staying right away from
real civilization, because at that time
[ was in the bush. But I do think
that thc theatrical display, as depicted
by the various moving-picture artists,
and as shown by the leading weekly
illustrated pictures in London, is
(Continued on Page 7)
PITHER
Sole Agents for
&   LEISER
British Columbia
TAKE NOTICE that Louis De Voin
of Hazelton, B.C., Publisher, Intends to
apply for a licence to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the north side of Salmon
Creek, about 3% miles from the Skeena
River and about 8 miles in a northerly
direction from Hazelton, thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated 23 April,  1910.
my 28 LOUIS   DE  VOIN.
LIQUOR   LICENSE   ACT,   1900
I,  Richard Price,  hereby give notlci
that one month from date hereof, I wll
apply to the Superintendent of Provln
cial Police at Victoria for a renewal o
my license to sell Intoxicating liquor
at the premises known as the Parson
Bridge Hotel, situated at Parsons Brldg
in  the District of Esquimau, to com
mence on the lst day of July, 1910.
Dated this eleventh day of May, 191i
(Signed) RICHARD PRICE.
my 14 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 35, 1910
WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF KEEPING
HIGH CLASS AND FANCY GROCERIES
We also Keep Our Store Clean and Sanitary
Genuine Indian Chutney, bottle 40c, 60c and 75c
Spanish Rimientos, tin 35c
Dusseldorf Mustard, jar     35c
Tunno Fish in Oil, tin  35c
Pate de Foies Gras, tin  35c and 65c
Caviar Genuine Russian, tin  50c and 75c
Hors de O'uvres, jar  50c
Anchovies in Oil, bottle  50c
H. 0. KIRKHAM
Phone 178
INDEPENDENT GROCER
Corner Fort and Douglas Street
DO YOU KNOW that there are more fatal diseases contracted
from the dust you sweep off your floors and carpets, than
from any other source? '
AND YET at the cost of a few cents a week, by using our sweeping compound, Dustless Waxine, you need run no such risk.
WAXINE collects all dirt and dust as you sweep it across your
rooms and saves you the necessity of dusting.
WAXINE contains a disinfectant that is sure destruction to germs
and microbes.
WAXINE also contains an expensive essence that will drive away
fleas and other pests.
WAXINE will keep an oiled floor, or oilcloth, always bright and
glossy, and carpets sweet and clean.
WAXINE leaves a refreshing odor in your rooms.
WAXINE is cheaper than anything else of its kind on the market.
WAXINE is used by many of the principal stores, offices, banks,
theatres and private houses of Victoria and Vancouver.
WAXINE is manufactured in Victoria by Victoria people, who
spend their money in Victoria.
Prices:
25-lb box, $1.00; 50-lb box, $2.00; 100-lb box, $3.75; 250-lb box, $7.50
AMBERINE FLOOR OIL—Our Floor Oil will stand the test as
against any other make, in fact it is the best floor oil made.
Use it.   Per gallon  $1.00
ACME METAL POLISH—Our Metal Polish, which is unequalled,
should be used by everybody.
IMPERIAL WAXINE CO.
PHONE 1968
1602 DOUGLAS STREET
At the Street Corner
By THE LOUNGER
(Continued from Page 6)
rongly to be deprecated. It was
ie passing of a great Monarch; it
as the passing of the greatest man
ho has directed British affairs since
ie time of Oliver Cromwell. I know
lat there are many people who will
ever agree with me on this state-
lent. But I can't help that; I have
lways held that, though I should
ave been a Royalist, if I had lived
those days, still I should have real-
agreed with the Parliamentarians,
ut now a man passes away, a man
ho was in the eyes of the world a
reat man, and his funeral is made a
jectacle for the eyes of the same
orld. It was only right that he
lould be buried with all the pomp
d majesty which he deserved; but
hy portray it; why make it a dis-
tay advertisement for papers? I may
wrong, and this kind of thing may
all right, but I only hope that I
before I  change my own  senti-
ents.
*     *     *
There are quite a lot of people who
e getting more and more annoyed
ery day at the way in which side-
alks are being taken up by delivery
aggons. We all of us know that the
holesale houses have to receive their
ods. We all, all of us, know that
e the consigners have to arrange to
,ve them delivered; we also know
at the horrible service we have in
ctoria makes it hard to deliver
ods at times which are convenient
the public. Still, that all being ad-
tted, isn't it up to the various com-
nies to make different arrange-
:nts? I don't want to mention any
mes just yet, but  I  could  give  a
dozen, who are all harassing common
or garden civilians by keeping delivery waggons outside their establishments.
* *     #
There is a boot up in the Beacon
Hill district. It belongs to some gentleman well-known round town, but I
am not going to give his name away.
I happened to meet the man in question as I was on the way home. I
don't know him from Adam and
should never recognize him if I should
come across him in the future. This
sounds rather apocryphal, but then a
man in my line of business knows all
kinds of people to whom he could
not put a name. At any rate this
unfortunate person, having looked too
long on the wine when it was red,
was having some trouble with his feet;
this happened to occur just near
where a hoarding abutted on the sidewalk. The conclusion is obvious.
Given a man struggling with a refractory boot; given the same man
in that state of mind which will meet
with no opposition; grant him the disposition which endures not any chance
of arguing with a boot, and you will
find the boot where the argument
took place. And you will find it. I
have been up and had a look at it;
I have met the same man in town
since, and we have passed with a
stony stare, but I gazed downwards,
and I saw new shoes on his feet. Did
I follow him? Well, I don't think-
so.   Not much.
* *    *
Now, if I had my way, which I
don't suppose that I shall ever have,
I should "cut out" the card proposition throughout the entire Province.
I am an offender myself, and I have
not the slightest hesitation in admitting it. But my contention is this.
Why, just because a mad King of
France   once   invented  cards   should
Cold Storage
Vancouver Island
Cold Storage and
Ice Company
VICTORIA, B.C.
Goods received at all hours.
Expert attention given.
Consignments solicited
Phone 2282    P.O. Box 875
Bevan,Gore& Eliot
LIMITED
Members Vancouver, Victoria, Spokane and
Stewart Stock Exchanges
PRIVATE WIRE TO VANCOUVER
DAILY TELEGRAPHIC QUOTATIONS
ALL ACTIVE STOCKS BOUGHT AND SOLD ON
COMMISION
LISTED STOCKS SOLD ON MARGIN
STEWART TOWNSITE LOTS FOR SALE
Room 1-4, Hibben Block
1122 Government St.       =       Victoria, B.C.
P. 0. Box 249
Phones 163 and 2124
Phone R 313 Hand Made Goods a Specialty
LADIES' SHIRT WAISTS, UNDERWEAR, ETC
THE BON TON
.-.MRS. J. E. ELLIOTT.*.
LADIES' AND CHILDRENS' OUTFITTERS
AN UP-TO-DATE PLACE TO BUY NECKWEAR, ETC.
730 YATES STREET
VICTORIA, B.C.
young fools throughout all ages take
advantage of his invention? It isn't
right; everybody knows that it isn't
right; nobbdy knows that it is right.
But card-playing is allowed. People
do take advantage of fools, young
fools, and that is the worst of it.
Personally I am old enough and ugly
enough to protect myself; when I do
get into a game and "get soaked"
I feel that I have only myself to
blame. But I have seen mere kids
brought in, and just because they have
a dollar or so, they are run in to play
some game of which they know nothing, but which they think they ought
to play just to show their manlihood;
and they find themselves just mere
"suckers." Parents could do a lot
more in their business than they arc
doing at present.
(&l
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Buildiag Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 664
North Qovernment St., Victoria
This Weather
Is Hard
On Feet
Nothing so good to banish foot-
fatigue or cure hot, swollen,
aching feet as
Bowes'
Foot
Powder
25c Per Package
jj.Try -it   o^ce   and  we   predict
" you'll never be without it.   Get
it for your children, it will keep
them in a good humor.
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
1228 Government Street
Near Yates
Satisfaction
We guarantee quality and satisfaction with every purchase of
Groceries.
Phone orders Carefully attended to.
A. POOL
623 Yates St. Phone 448
Watson's Old Stand
BLUE PRINTS
Any Length in One Piece
Six Cents per foot
TIMBER AND LAND
MAPS
DRAUGHTING
Electric Blue Print &
Map Co.
1218 Langley St. - Victoria, 'B.C.
There's
Nothing half
So Sweet
In Life as
Love and
Dudleigh's
Mixture
\__SL Richardson
sf Phon* 346
Mmmmmmmmtm
NOTICE! la hereby riven that tha
waters of Shoo-wah-tlans and Wood-
worth Lakes, ln Range 5, Coaat District,
and the waters of all stream! flowing
Into said lakes, and all stream* flowing
therefrom, are reserved, subject to the
rights of existing records only, for th*
use of the Crown.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commiaaioner of Land*
Lands Department,
Victoria, B.C., April llth, lilt.
apr IS 8i
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 1910
DEPARTMENT   OF   PUBLIC   WORKS
PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS
Steel Fittings—Vaults
NOTICE is hereby given that the time
for receiving tenders for "Steel Fittings,
Vaults, Parliament Buildings," is extended up to-noon of Saturday, the 25th
day of June,  1910.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B. C, 17th June, 1910.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE Is hereby given that the Reserve existing on Crown Lands in the
vicinity of Babine Lake, situate In
Range 5, Coast District, notice of whicii
was published in the British Columbia
Gazette, dated December 17th, 190S, Is
cancelled in so far as said Reserve relates to lots numbered 1519, 1518, 1517,
151(1, 1515, 1510, 1507, 1500 1506A, 1503,
1501, 1502, 1512, 1511, 1505, 1604, 1513,
1514, 1509, 1508, 1530, 1527, 1528, 1529,
1531, 1532, 1533, 1534, 1535, 1537, 1539.
1530, 153S, 1540, 1541, 1544, 1543, 1545,
1546, 1542, 1547, 1548, 1549, 1550, 1520,
1521, 1522, 1523, 1524, 1525, 1526 and
1551.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands
Lands Department,
Victoria, B.C., June 16th, 1910.
je 25
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that (Mrs.) Sarah
Catherine Coles, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Married Woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at
a post planted at the south-east corner
of Lot 345 on the shore of Eagle Lake;
thence north 44.23 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 99.57 chains,
more or less, to the north shore of Eagle
Lake; thence following the said shore in
an easterly direction to point of commencement, and containing 56S acres,
more or less, and being Lot 345.
Dated June 2nd,  1910.
(MRS.) SARAH CATHERINE COLES
je 25
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that William R. Blind
of Vancouver, B.C., Real Estate Agent
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands;—
CommencinK at a post planted on thc
west bank of the Chilco River about 135
cliains north from where the said river
Hows out of Chilco Lake (being at or
near the N. E. corner of Katie Gibson's
application to purchase; tiience SO chains
west; thence SO chains north; thence 80
chains east more or less to river bank
thence following the west shore of river
southerlv to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated June Srd, 1910.
je  25 WILLIAM  R.  BLIND
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the Reserve existing on Crown Lands in the
vicinity of Babine Lake, and situate in
Cassiar District, notice of which bearing
date June 30th, 190S, was published in
the British Columbia Gazette, dated July
2nd,  1908, is cancelled.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands
Lands Department,
Victoria, B.C., June 16th, 1910.
je 25
MINEEAL ACE
Form F
Certificate of Improvements
NOTICE
"Jacob"  Mineral  Claim,  situate  in  the
Victoria Mining Division of Renfrew
District.     Where   located—Bugaboo
TAKE NOTICE that I, C. R. Carter,
acting as agent for John Binkley, Free
Miner's Certificate No. 45076B, L. N. Anderson, Free Miner's Certificate No.
44913B; Carl Stromgren, Executor, and
H. M. Shore, Executrix of the Sstate of
Sidney Shore, deceased, Free Miner's
Certificate No. 40864B, Wm. Harrison,
Free Miner's Certificate No. 41007B,
John H. Smith, Free Miner's Certificate
No. 40S23B, E. J. Smith, Free Miner's
Certificate No. 450S3B, Elizabeth Bury-
mnn, Free Miner's Certificate No, 45066B
and Oliver Smith, Free Miner's Certificate No. 4493SB., Intend, sixty days from
the date hereof, to apply to the Mining
Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a
Crown Grant of the above claim.
And further take notice that action,
under section 37, must be e«i.nieneed
before the Issuance of such Certificate
of  Improvements.
Dated this Sixteenth day of June, A.D.
1910.
je 25 C. R. CARTER.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Gibson, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Clerk, in
tends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west eorner of Lot 337 and the
south-east corner of Lot 334; thence
80 chains west along the south boundary of Lot 334; thence south 60 chains
thence east to the shore of Eagle Lake
thence following the shore of Eagle-
Lake in a northerly and easterly direction to the south-west corner of Lot
337; thence north 46.49 chains, more or
less, to point of commencement, and
containing 400 acres, more or less.
Dated  June  2nd,   1910.
je 25 JOSEPH   GIBSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that David Blair of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Architect,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of Lot 32S; thence west
10 chains to the north-west corner of
Lot 32S; thence south 40 chains to the
south-west corner of Lot 32S; thence
west 40 ehains; thenee north SO chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 4 SO acres,
more or less.
Dated May 31st, 1910.
je 25 DAVID BLAIR.
A'ICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Stanley Street,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner of Lot 332; thence
north SO chains; thence west SO chains
to the north-west corner of Lot 332.
(being the north-east corner of Lot
217); thence south along the east boundary of Lot 217 eighty chains to the
south-west corner of Lot 332; thence
east SO chains, more or iess, to point
of commencement, (excepting any part
of Lot 332 that may not be at present
Crown lands), and containing 600 acres,
more or less, and being Lot 332.
Dated June 1st, 1910.
je 25 STANLEY STREET.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Reginald Foulkes
Cottrell of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Clerk, Intends to appty for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the south-east corner of Lot 336;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south SO chains, more
or less, to the south-west eorner of Lot
336; thence east SO chains to point of
commencement, and containing 606 acres
of land, more or less, and being Lot 336.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je    REGINALD FOULKES COTTRELL
VICTORIA: LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast. Range 2      I
TAKE NOTICE thati* John AnqueteV
Norman, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Gentleman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the foUowing described
lands:—Commencing at n post planted
on the west hank of Chilco River about
15 chains north of where the Chilco
River flows out of Chilco Lake; thence
west 20 chains; thence south to the low-
water mark on the shore of Chilco Lake
being 40 cliains (more or less); thence
following the sinuosities of the shore
northerly to point of commencement and
containing 40 acres more or less.
Dated June 3rd, 1910.
je25 JOHN  ANCJUETEL NORMAN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Richards
Brown, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Accountant, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lnnds:—Commencing nt a post planted
about 5 chains south of the confluence
of Llngfield Creek and the Chilco River
on the west bank of the Chilco River,
being about one nnd one-half miles north
of the N. E. corner of W. R. Blind's
application to purchase; thence west 80
chains; thence north SO chains; thence
east 80 chains more or less to the west
shore of the Chilco River; thence follow the said shore southerly to point
of commencement and containing 040
acres more or less.
Dated June 3rd. 1910.
je 25     CHARLES RICHARDS BROWN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that John Simons, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation'Accountant,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following desci*ed lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner of Lot 343; thenco N. 80
chains; thence W. 80 chains; thence S.
80 chains to the N. W. corner of Lot
343; thencp E. along the north boundary of Lot 343 eighty chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres, i more or less.
Dated May 30th, 1910. ;,; -,.*•
je 26 JOHN SIMONS.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Edward Arthur
Morris, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Tobacconist, Intends to apply for per
mission to purchase the following tie
scribed lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-west corner of Lot
335; thence east SO chains; thence north
SO chains more or less along the west
boundarv of Lot 330 to the north-east
boundarv of Lot 335: thence west 80
chains; thence south SO chains to point
of commencement, and containing 520
acres of land more or less and being
Lot. 335.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je 25     EDWARD ARTHUR MORRIS
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTTCE that Mary Gibison, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Stenographer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at* -V post planted
about SO chains south of the south-east
corner of Lot 331; thence SO chains east;
thence 80 chains east; thence SO chains
south; thence SO chains west: thence SO
chains north to point of commencement,
and  containing 640 acres,  more or less.
Dnted June lst, 1910.
je 25 MARY GIBSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast. Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Fred Gibson, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Clerk, intends tn npply for permission to purchase the following descrlhed lands:—
CommencinK at a post planted nt the
N. W. corner nf Lot 332, thence 40
chnins west to the north-west corner of
Tot 217; thence 40 chnins south; thence
10 chains west; thence SO chains north;
thence SO chains enst to point of commencement and containing 4S0 acres,
more or less.
Dated Jue lst.  1910.
je FRED GIBSON.
VTCTORTA LAND DISTRICT
District nf Const, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Maurice Gintz-
burger. of Vancouver. B.C., occupation
Real Estate Agent, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
nlnnted at the north-east corner of Lot
331. thence 80 chains east; thence 80
chains south; thence SO chains west to
the south-east corner of Lot 331; thence
80 cbnlns north along the east boundnry
nf said T.ot 331 tn point of commencement, nnd containing 640 acres, more or
less.
Dnted June 1st.  1910.
je 25 MAURICE  GINTZBURGER.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast. Range 2
TAKE NOTTCE that John Chnrles
Thurston Crofts of Vancouver, occupation Cvtll Engineer. Intends to nnply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing nt n
nost nlanted at the south-west oor'w of
Lot 830- thence east SO chnln-3; thence
north SO e'-nln-**: thence west 80 chains;
thenc1 sonth so chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 ncres. be-
Iflir Lot  339.
Doted June 2nd. 1910.
je 25     John diaries Thurston Crofts.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that James Ross, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation, Accountant,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of the Chilco River, about 2
miles northerly from the confluence of
Lingfield Creek with the Chilco River
and about one mile northerly from the
N.E. corner of Chas. R. Brown's application to purchase; thence west 80
chains; thence south SO chains more or
less to the north boundary of Chas. R.
Brown's application to purchase; thenee
east 80 chains more or less along the
north boundary of Brown's application
to purchase to the Chilco River; thence
following the west bank of the Chilco
River northerly to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres more or
Dated June 4th, ,1910.
je 25 JAMES ROSS.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range '__
TAKE NOTICE that George William
Hobson, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
insurance Agent, intends to appiy for
permission to purchase the loiluwing
iands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the south-east corner of Lot 334,
thence north la.53 chains to the southeast corner of Lot 343; thence east along
tne south boundary of Lot 343 eighty
chains to the east boundary of Lot 34-.;
tiience soutn along the eastern boundaries of Lots 341 anu 342 to the shore
of nagle Lake; thence following the sam
snore northerly and easterly to point
of commencement, and containing 3yo
acres, and being Lot 344.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
jc26        GEORGE ;WILLIAM HOBSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of poast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Jonathan Rogers,
of Vancouver, B.C,, occupation Contractor, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a. post planted at the
south-east corner of Lot 347; thence
east 61.40 chains; thence north so
chains; thence east 90.91 chains to the
bank of Chilco River; thence following
the river bank southerly to point oi
commencement and containing 5SS acres,
more or less, and being Lot 347.
Dated June 2nd,  1910.
je25 JONATHAN  ROGERS.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE'that George William
Coles, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the south-east' corner of Lot 346;
thence north 80 chains; thence west SO
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east SO chains to point of commencement, and containing 492 acres of land
and being Lot 346:
Dated June 2ndi  1910.
je25        GEORGE'WILLIAM COLES.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Cecil Croker
Fox, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Architect, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the south-east corner of Lot 334;
thence north SO chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south SO chains, more or
less, to the south-rwest corner of Lot
334; thence east .'*0 chains to point of
commencement, a:.,!'containing 640 acres
and being Lot 334.
Dated  June 2nd,  1910.
je25 CECIL   CROKER   FOX,
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Harlow
W. Edmond, of Vancouver, B.C., occu
pation, Gentleman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the west bank of the Chilco
River about 55 chains north of where
the said river flows out of Chilco Lake;
tiience west 20 chains; thence south 40
chains more or less to the north boundary of John A. Norman's application
to purchase; thence following the said
north boundary in an easterly direction
to low water of the river a distance of
10 chains more or less; thence following the west shore of the river northerly to point of commencement and containing 40 acres more or less.
Dated June 3rd,  1910.
je5      ROBERT HARLOW W. EDMOND
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that William Ralph
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Merchant,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of Lot 34S; thence
south SO chains; thence west 49.61
chains to the shore of Eagle Lake;
thence following tbe said shore northerly to the south boundary of Lot 346;
thence following the said boundary east
53.15 chains to point of commencement
and containing 40S acres and being Lot
348.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je 25 WILLIAM RALPH.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that George Phillip
Carr, of Vancouver, B..C, occupation
Postman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing nt a post
planted at the intersection of the N. W.
corner of, L. 330 and the east boundary
or Charles Skinner's pre-emption (Lot
329); thence north 40 chains more or
less to the north-east corner of said
pre-emption; tbence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 80 chains to the
north-east corner of ___. 330; thence
west SO chains more or less along the
north boundary of said Lot 330 to point
of commencement and containing 4S0
ncres  more or less.
Dated May 31st, 1910.
je 25 GGEORGE PHILIP CARR.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Colin C. McLennan, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Hotel Clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-east corner of Lot
341; thence north SO chains, more or
less, to the north-east corner of Lot
341; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less and being
Lot 341.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je 25 COLIN  C.  McLENNAN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that George Henry
Lawrence Hobson, of Vancouver, B.C.,
occupation Insurance Agent, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted at the south-east corner of Lot 343; thence north 40.04
chains; tiience west SO chains; thence
south 40.04 chains to the north-west
corner of Lot 344; thence east SO chains
to point of commencement and containing 320 acres, more or less, and being
Lot 343.
Dated June  2nd,  1910.
je 25     George Henry Lawrence Hobson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Alfred Gonzales,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Fisherman, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about SO chains south of the southeast corner of Lot 331; thence 80 chains
west; thence 80 chains south; thence 80
chains east; thence SO chains north to
point of commencement and containing
640 acres more or less.
Dated June  lst,   1910.
je25 ALFRED  GONZALES.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Joseph
Sharp, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following describea
lands:*—Commencing at a post planted
about SO chains south of the southeast
corner of L6t 331 and adjoining Mary
Gibson's, Joseph Gonzales' and Alfred
Gonzales' locations; thence 80 chains
north to the southeast corner of Lot
331; thence SO chains east; thence 80
chains south; thence 80 chains west to
point of commencement, and containing
640  acres  more  or  less.
Dated June  lst,  1910.
je25 HENRY   JOSEPH   SHARP.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Minnie Livingstone of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Spinster, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the north-east corner of Lot 349;
thenee west 61.40 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence east to the banks of
Chilco River, being 85 chains, more or
less; thence northerly to point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less, and being Lot 349.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je 25 MINNIE  LIVINGSTONE.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick Hems-
ley Shanks, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Secretary, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the northeast corner of Lot
345; thence north 40 chains; thence
west SO chains; thence south 40 chains
to the north-west corner of Lot 345;
thence along the north boundary of Lot
345 eighty chains to point of commencement, and containing 320 acres, more
or  less.
Dated  May   30th,   1910.
je25 FREDERICK HEMSLEY SHANKS
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur W. Jarvis
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Bank
Manager, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the north-west corner of Lot 337;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 78.38
chains along the north boundary of Lot
33S to the shore of Eagle Lake; thence
following the said shore in a westerly
direction to the south-west corner of
Lot 337; thence north 45.49 chains to
the point of commencement, and containing 462  acres and being Lot  337.
Dated June  2nd,  1910.
je25 ARTHUR   W.   JARVIS.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that David M. Robinson, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
School Superintendent, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the folibky-,
Ing described lands :-i—Commencing at! #,
post planted at the north-west corner
of Lot 340: thence east SO chains; thence
south 65.76 chains, more or less, to the
shore of Eagle Lake; thence following
the said shore to the south-west corner
of Lot 340; thence north 84.60 chains,
more or less, to tbe point of commencement, and containing 607 acres, more
or less, and being Lot 340.
Dated  June   2nd,   1910.
je 25 DAVID M. ROBINSON.
PROVINCIAL TAXE
Special Notice to  Taxpayel
TAXPAYERS   are   hereby    remindl
that Thursday, 30th June, 1910, Is tl
last day on whicii taxes must be ptf
to tlie collector in order to be allo-a
a discount.    By an  amendment  to
Assessment Act   passed   after   all
tax   notices   were  issued  an  alteratll
of   the   rate of discount   is  permilt|
namely, 25 per cent, discount is allow
on   improved   real    property,    persoi
property   and   income   for   the   curr<|
year in place of the 10 per cent shol
on  the   notices.     When   sending   ycl
lax to the collector do not deduct frl
the net amount shown on Form Nol
an  additional   15  per  cent,  but  dedi
only 25 per cent from the total tal
on  improved   real   property,    persoi
property and income.   There Is no altr
ation  on  the  discount  of  ten  per  c|
on wild land, coal land and timber la
See that   the   correct   amount   is   si
early,  so  that unnecessary  eorrespol
ence may  be  avoided.    No  discount!
allowed on arrears.
E. E. LEASON,
Assessor and Collector,
Victoria Assessment Distfl
Victoria, lst June, 1910.
je4
PARLIAMENT   BUILDINGS
Steel Fittings—Vaults
Sealed Tenders, indorsed "Steel
tings, Vaults!' Parliament Buildinl
accompanied by plans and speclficatll
addressed to the Minister of Pul
Works, will be received up to noorT
Saturday, the llth day of June nl
for furnishing and setting in place, si
shelving, etc., required for the val
of the Department of Public W<f
and Department of Lands in the Pai|
ment  Buildings,  Victoria,  B.C.
Intending  tenderers  shall  take  t|
own   measurements  of  the  vaults,
upon  application   to   the  Deputy
missioner of Lands  and  to the unl
signed will be given information al
the requirements of each Departmerf
Each tender shall have enclosed th
with an accepted bank cheque or :
ficate  of  deposit on   a  chartered
of  Canada,   made  payable  to  the
ister  of  Public Works,  in  the  sun
two   thousand   dollars   ($2,000),   wl
shall be forfeited if the party tende|
decline   to   enter   into   contract
called  upon  to do  so,  or if he fai|
complete the work contracted for.
Tenders will not be considered url
complying with the terms above st_|
made out on the form supplied, si_|
with  the  actual  signature  of the
derer,   and   enclosed   in   the   envej
furnished.
F. C. GAMBLE,
my 2S Public Works Engined
COAST LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1
TAKE NOTICE that I, William
son Draper, agent for T. J. Sullil
of Cloverdale, occupation Manufacttf
intends to apply for permission to
chase the following described lanl
Commencing at a post planted one cB
from the shore of a small cove all
one mile easterly from Boulder Pq
Knight's Inlet; thence easterly
sixty chains; thence northerly
twenty chains; thence westerly
sixty chains; thence southerly
twenty chains to point of commeil
ment.
Dated 3rd May, 1910.
T. J. SULLIVAN,
my 14 By W. N. Drapel
TAKE  NOTICE that Louis  De
of Hazelton, B.C., Publisher, intendsl
apply for a licence to prospect for
and   petroleum   on   the   following
scribed   lands:—Commencing  at  a ]
planted   on  the  north   side  of  Salrl
Creek about 3% mlles from the Ski
River and about 8 miles in a northl
direction from Hazelton, thence easl
chains;  thence south 80  chains;  tha
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chq
to point of commencement.
Dated 23 April, 1910.
my2S LOUIS DE VOlK
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that John David
Breese, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Insurance Agent, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-west corner of Lot
330 on the shore of Cochin Lake; thence
east along the nortli boundary of Lot
331, 63.8S chnins; tiience north 80
chains to the north-east corner of Lot
330; thence west to the east boundary
of Charles Skinner's pre-emption (Lot
No. 329); thence south nlong the said
boundary 27.01 chnins to the shore of
Cochin Lake; thence following the said
shore southerly and easterly to noint of
commencement and containing 559 acres
and being Lot 330.
Dated Mny 31st, 1910.
je*25 JOHN  DAVID BREESE.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Hillman
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Florist,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner of Lot 331 on the
shore of Cochin Lake; thence east 53.88
chains along the north boundary of
Lot 331 and the south boundary of Lot
330 to the north-east corner of Lot 331;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 53.91 chains, more
or less, to the shore of Cochin Lake;
thence following the shore of Cochin
Lake in a north-easterly direction to
point of commencement and containing
5S2.8 acres, and being Lot 331.
Dated  May  31st,  1910.
je 25 CHARLES  HILLMAN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Alexander Mo-
gee, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Gentleman, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands;—Commencing at a post planted
on the west bank of the Chilco River
about two and one-half miles north of
the north-east corner of Lot 347; thence
west 50 chains; thence south 80 chains,
thence enst to the river, being 35 chains
more or less; thence following the said
river In a northerly direction to point
of commencement and containing 300
acres more or less.
Dated  June 4th.  1910.
je 25 ALEXANDER  MOGEE.
RENFREW LAND DISTRICT
District of Vietoria
TAKE NOTICE that Roderick ,
Donald,., of Port Renfrew, occupan
Farmer, intends to apply for permisi
to purchase the following descril
lands:—Commencing at a post planl
20 to 25 chains north of N.W. corl
of lot 204; thence north 80 chai
thence west 10 chains; thence sol
about 15 chains; thence west 40 chaf
thence south 40 chains; thence west!
chains; thence north 40 chains; thej
west 10 chains; thence south 60 chai
thence east 40 chains; thence sof
about 10 chains; thence east 40 chq
to point of commencement.
Dated April 9. 1910.
ROBERT ELLIOTT,
my 14 Agent for Roderick McDor]
COAST RANGE III
TAKE NOTICE that Lewis HindJ
Victoria,   B.C.,   occupation   Mining
glneer, intends to apply for permisi
to   purchase   the   following   descrl
lands—Commencing at a post plantei
a point about twenty (20) chains dls|
in an  easterly direction from the
let   of   the   Salmon   River   into
Channel, thence north forty (40) chaL
thence west twenty (20) ehains; tha
following the south bank of the 1
mon River and shore of Dean ChaJ
to   point   of  commencement,   and
taining eighty (80) acres, more or
Dated 3rd May, 1910.
my 7 LEWIS HINl
COAST RANGE III
TAKE  NOTICE that Arthur Fell
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Gentle}
intends to apply for permission to
chase the following described lanq
Commencing  at  a  post  planted
point   about   twenty   (20)   chains
tant ln an easterly direction fromj
outlet  of the Salmon River into
Channel,    thence    north    twenty
chains; thence east twenty (20) chi
thence south twenty (20) chains; tir
following the shore of Dean Channl
point of commencement, and contaf
forty (40) acres more or less.
Dated 3rd May, 1910.
my 7    ' '" ARTHUR FELLOV

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