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BC Historical Newspapers

Week May 15, 1909

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 ItrfmmvtTt Mine* *«~*1Q
Try a J
"CLUB HOUSE" SUNDAE
AT OUR FOUNTAIN.
eaah
Chemist
Fort & Douglas
UJUU
Terry
ULtXJULtSUUULtSJUULt UUU
The Week
A British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria,  B. C.
3 ■rmnnre' Te" mnmot it • imnm
HALL & WALKER
Agents
WELLINGTON   COLLIERY
COMPANY'S COAL
r_32.Goven.ment St.        Telephone S3
■Mmjujuli i_u m 11 ■ t tjuuutSl
k VI.   No
VyO
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MAY 15, 1909
One Dollar Per Annum
liada.
Those who fear the Ameri-
canisation of Canada find
little encouragement in the
signs of the times.    Never
. the Imperial sentiment been so much
'evidence, and never have the people re-
pded so spontaneously to suggestions
king to the widening of the horizon, and
p raising of the standard.   Canada has
■etofore rested tinder the ban of commer-
Jism.   The necessity for a steady grind
_ left little time for the consideration
any but the most material interests. The
illions who have flocked to Canada have
ne solely in search of wealth, and most
Ithem have found it in some degree; this
[a demanded concentration of effort, and
the majority of instances the absolute
slusion of secondary interests.   Canada's
owing time has arrived.   The period of
osperity which has been under way with
tie fluctuation for two decades has vastly
;ered the social and economic conditions
the Dominion; there has been a level-'
ig up, a spread of luxury and luxurious
odes, both of life and of thought. , The
suit has been to provide more leisure,
id with it a natural turning to the proteins of the age.   Canada has begun to
[pit beyond her own borders, and to realize
at she can only develop in sympathy with
..e sentiment of the Empire.    Interna-
pnal affairs loom larger on her horizon.
fie policy of foreign nations has begun
attract   her   attention.     Commercial
saties  with  the  United   States,   with
r'ance and with Germany have drawn her
Ito the sphere of diplomacy. . Her fishing
lid boundary interests have necessitated a
jbser acquaintance with international law
Ld although most of these matters have
ien dealt with through the medium of the
^me Government Canada has been repre-.
nted in the negotiations by her own
|atesmen and jurists.   The improvement
; the cable and press services has brought
ie Dominion into closer touch with the
.other Country.    The vastly increased
wei from both sides of the Atlantic, and
... interchange of platform by leaders of
iought from both countries have given
[anada a wider purview.   Its national as-
rations were well outlined by Mr. San-
*d Evans, who adopted the line of argu-
lent so impressively suggested by Lord
lilner, and perhaps after all first pic-
iresquely stated by Mr. Kipling in his
imous phrase "The White Man's Bur-
en."   Mr. Evans' contention that Canada
already proving too small for Canadians
id that, inheriting the instincts and the
,'aditions of the British race, they will
berish the same ideals and ambitions ap-
:aled to everyone who heard him.    To
iiare "the White Man's burden" is the
ice  which  Canada,  in  common  with
ery branch of the Anglo-Saxon family,
1 have to pay for nationhood.     That
den is not a mere percentage of dollars
.i cents, but a share in forming the
iolicy and giving effect to the programme
;hich Imperial interests may demand, and
wolves a' study of International ques-
ons and of world history.   These convic-
[ons are being driven home, ancl are being
ssponded to in a manner, which justifies
most optimistic anticipations coucern-
_5 tlie future.    England has one well
aown motto—"What we have we'll hold."
r. Evans suggests another for Canada—
itVliat we defend we can hold," and the
laxim contains a great truth to which the
[mntry is just becoming alive.   In the ex-
mt of her natural resources and her po-
.ntial wealth Canada can justly compare
ith any portion of the Empire, but this
is the narrowest sense in which she is
capable of achieving Nationhood. It is the
bigger thought, the broader sympathy, and
the loftier ideal which must crown her
ambition, and she is working towards this,
and will attain it.
Mixture
Of Races.
Kid
Herbert   Spencer   was   an
undoubted authority on biology and was a strenuous
opponent of any admixture
of races.   He counselled against amalgamation between races of wider different
characteristic and showed clearly that the
offspring of distinctly different races, or
even individuals is apt to show physical
and moral deterioration and to perpetuate
the faults rather than the better qualities
of both.   A study of the subject during
the last fifty years may tend to raise some
doubt as to the absolute correctness of
Spencer's conclusion, or at any rate, would
lead one to believe that it is possible to
carry the matter too far.   It could hardly
be seriously contended that the whole of
Southern Europe has deteriorated under
the notable admixture of races which have
contributed to its population, although it
still leaves the question open as to whether
a better result would have been achieved
if the original peoples had developed along
the lines of their own race.   Spain and
Portugal present a remarkable admixture
having been bred through the pre-historic
Iberian race mixed in turn with Phoenician, Greek, Roman, Gothic, Frankish and
finally with Arabic blood,, and yet in spite
of this the modern Ibernians are a splendid
race, and are still a distinct type.   France
is  a  mixture   of  Frankish,   Germanic,
Norse, Roman and even British blood.
Tartar hordes over-ran Europe and reached
France.   The Saracens came over the Pyrenees and penetrated to Tours, but no one
would venture to say that the French race
is anything but a highly developed and
intellectual people.   The same process is
going on in America today.   The country
is assimilating peoples of many races and
climes and although there is no American
type, there must be a great admixture and
it is certain that almost without exception,
the people manifest certain traits among
which energy, enterprise, and self reliance
are the most prominent.   As President Elliot well put it, "they are doing things
because they seem to combine all the ability
of many races and to suffer no degeneration because of the mixture."   What America might have been as a purely Spanish,
French, Irish, English, Scotch or German
Colony can only be imagined.   Amalgamation may have produced a crude result,
and may have eliminated, or at any rate
obscured, some of the finer qualities of the
higher types, but it has broadened out the
people who have flung themselves iuto the
crucible, and it has gone a long way to
discount the theorizing of Herbert Spencer.
One thing, however, must be born in mind
—that there has been no admixture witli
the Mongolian.
The correspondence between
Songhees the Hon. William Temple-
Reserve, man, the Hon. Frank Oliver
and the Victoria Board of
Trade on the subject of the Songhees Reserve makes interesting reading and places
the dramatic attitude of the former member for Victoria in. the limelight. It cannot be denied, nor does Mr. Templeman
deny, when he is reminded of liis promise
to the Board of Trade that legislation
would be brought down this session settling
the much vexed question.    He does not
nor eau he deny that three days after his
defeat, at the meeting held on the Reserve,
he stated that he could and would settle
it. A perusal of the correspondence shows
that the honourable gentleman is a past
master in the" art of evasion; he fails to
meet the direct charge or to answer the
direct question of the Board, but gives the
very unsatisfactory reply "I am not able
to say whether the question will be settled
this session." He is not even definite
enough to say that it will not be settled.
On beiug asked whether it would help if a
memorial is addressed to Sir Wilfrid or
the Minister of the Interior, he neither
says yes or no, but ventures the remark
that "it cannot do any harm." If this is
not a shuffling manner of dealing with an
important public question The Week altogether fails to understand the situation. As
a matter of fact the Federal Government
is unwilling to adopt the initiative which
belongs to it alone and Mr. Templeman
is unwilling to bring pressure to bear upon
them. The fact that he is the father of
a number of unredeemed pledges counts
for nothing, neither does the fact so emphatically set forth by the Board of
Trade, viz., That the progress of Victoria
is being seriously delayed. So far as it is
possible to judge a settlement is no nearer
now than when the much vexed topic first
began to agitate the public mind. It has
not been advanced one step, nor will it be
by the Hon. William Templeman.
One of the most tangible
Opening Up evidences of the extent to
The Province, which the Province is being
opened up is found in the
fact that no less than twenty-four survey
parties are being sent out by the Provincial
Government this year. They are nearly
all going North. Their work is of the most
important character, and has already revealed unsuspected areas of fertile land.
That they will make further discoveries
during the coming season is c-ortain, and
an era of settlement may safely be counted
on. There could be no better answer to
the charge that all the remaining cultivable
land is on mountain tops, or in inaccessible
districts. A perusal of the schedule which
shows six hundred and seventy square
miles of good land surveyed last season
will probably come as a surprise to those
who have not taken the trouble to consult
reliable data. With an increased number
of survey parties the present season will
probably record a larger surveyed area.
The opening up of this new country will
entail a vast expenditure of money by the
Provincial Government, and it is not a
little gratifying that the finances of the
Province are in such a condition as to
enable them to grapple so thoroughly with
the task.
The City Council has not
Still Blocking yet moved in the direction
The Way.        0f au agreement with the
B. C. E. R. on the lines suggested in The Week a short time ago. The
matter is revived by the admirable address
delivered by Mr. A. T. Goward to the
Board of Trade this week. Mr. Goward
had no difficulty in showing the advantages
which had accrued to Vancouver from a
more enlightened policy on the part of the
('ity Council than has yet been adopted in
Victoria. The Terminal City enjoys about
the best and the cheapest power and light
system in Canada. If the B. C. E. R.
were encouraged to spend $1,500,000 in
developing the water power at Jordan
River, as they propose, they would have
10,000 H.P. at disposal, and would guarantee Victoria the same rate as Vancouver,
in addition we should have a surplus of
power for every purpose and an immediate
expenditure of $250,000 in the City and
suburbs for the extension of tram-lines.
Surely this ought to be a sufficient inducement to justify the City in accepting such
au agreement as the railway company proposes, the main feature of which is an
undertaking not to enter into competition.
The demand is a reasonable one for it is
impossible to borrow money to expend on
public works, which may be rendered useless, or at any rate unprofitable, by the
extension of the Municipal Ownership
idea. The mere fact that this arrangement
would reduce the lighting charge by more
than 50 per cent, shows how great an advantage the City would derive from the
new arrangement, and that is only one of
the advantages. Altogether the proposal is
a thoroughly business-like one; it is made
on behalf of capitalists who have unlimited
money at their disposal, who spent $11,-
000,000 in ancouver during the last ten
years as a result of the enlightened policy
pursued by that city, and who are prepared
to deal just as generously with Victoria if
the opportunity is afforded.
Grand Jury
Proposals.
Thc Grand Juries of B. C.
are getiug busy and in a
sudden access of zeal are doing a little more than usual
to justify their existence. One at Vancouver brought iu a report which received
high commendation from the Chief Justice, especially that part of it which made
a presentment in favour of a training ship
for the Pacific Coast. The Grand Jury at
Victoria secured the approbation of Mr.
Justice Morrison for a very thorough report on the public institutions and a
special recommendation that petty larcen-
ists should be flogged. The suggestion is
a good one, and will prove both economical
and effective. Every one but the petty
larcenist will hope that it will be given
effect.
Victoria rose to the occasion
Entertaining this week and entertained
The Japanese,   the  representatives  of the
Japanese Navy in a most
hospitable manner. This is as it should
be; whatever differences we may have
had with Japan on economic questions,
there can be nothing but praise for the
manner in which it met the wishes of
Canada. The false position created, and
the friction engendered were not the fault
of England's ally but of the Canadian Government, which failed to understand the
true inwardness of a very serious question,
and consequently failed to give effect to the
wishes of our people. Japan would have
been legally justified in assuming a determined attitude, but yielded to representations, and it must in fairness be admitted,
has since carried out the verbal arrangement in good faith. Apart from this a
brave people must admire the courage and
energy which tlie Nipponese have manifested during tlie last two decades, and
must be willing to pay a tribute to this
spirit by extending hospitality to their representatives. Last, but by 110 means least,
the common courtesy which is due from
every self-respecting nation to the
"Stranger within tlie Gate" and the additional obligation when that stranger is an
ally, determines once for all that every
British subject, whether Canadian or
otherwise, must shout "Banzai" when a
son of Nippon steps ashore. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MAY 15, 1908
X Social and        *
__ Personal. __
if if
if if if 'i' 'i' 'i" '*' v 'l' 'l' '*' '*' 'i'
Mrs. Bowker of Vancouver was
visiting in Victoria during the week.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Fulton spent their
honeymoon at Cowichan Lake.
* *   *
Mr. C. M. Roberts spent a couple
of days last week on Pender Island.
* *   *
Mrs. Harry Pooley left on Friday
for Vancouver, where she will pay a
couple of visits.
* *   *
Mr. Hugh Ashby returned to Kamloops last Tuesday.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Ritchie are
the guests of the latter's parents, Mr.
and  Mrs.   Flumerfelt,  of  Pemberton
Road.
* *   *
Colonel Holmes and the officers 01
the Esquimalt Garrison issued invitations for an "at home" at Work Point
Barracks on Friday, 14th.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Genge left
on Wednesday.via North Coast Limited for New York, sailing from there
by the Allan liner Tunisian, on a
trip to the Old Country.
* *   *
Mrs. Corsan and Mrs. Simpson
gave another of their delightful sud-
scription  dances  on  Friday  evening
at the A.O.U.W. Hall.
* *   *
Mr. A. Burnside of Fernie was in
Victoria during the week.
* *   *
Mrs. Forbes Kirkby of Grand Forks
was the guest of Mrs. H. C. Hanington during the week.
* *   *
A number of Victorians drove out
in a tally-ho to the Colquitz Hall on
Wednesday evening in aid of tlie
Anti-Tuberculosis Society. Among
those who attended the concert weic
Mrs. Herman Robertson, Mrs. rl.
Pooley, Mrs. Bowker (Vancouver)
Miss Tilton, Miss Ethel Tilton, Miss
Monteith, Mr. A. Gore, Captain
Hughes, Mr. Cambell, Madame Pan-
zeau, Mrs. Briggs, Mr. G. Booth, Mr.
Berkeley, Mr. Rolands, Miss Hail,
. Mr. and Mrs. D. M. Eberts, Miss Mabel Eberts. Those who contributed
towards a most attractive programme
were Mrs. Hermann Robertson, piano
solo; Mrs. H. Pooley, Mrs. Briggs,
-Miss Hall delighted the audience
with several vocal solos, while Mr.
Gore, Mr. Booth, Mr. Rolands and
Mr. Berkeley also assisted.
* *   *
Mrs. C. E. Wilson and Miss Sehl
were guests at the Strathcona for a
few days last week.
* *   *
The engagement of the Hon. K. j.
Fulton and Miss Winnifred Davie was
announced during the week. The
marriage took place last Wednesday.
* *■•"*
Mrs. Stewart Robertson entertained
the following at a most delightful tea
last week in honour of Mrs. Crowell
of Berkeley, California: Mrs. Pemberton, Mrs, Heisterman, Mrs. Gibb,
Mrs. G. Wilson, Mrs. J. Irving, Mrs.
Fleet Robertson, Mrs. Watt, Mrs. J.
Raymour, Mrs. B. Wilson, Mrs. C. E.
Wilson, Mrs. Crotty, Mrs. Amberry,
Mrs. McCurdy, Mrs. Alexis Martin,
Mrs. Lugrin, Mrs. Shaw, Mrs. Line--,,
Mrs. Lowe, Mrs. E. A. James, Mrs.
Holyer, Mrs. C. Rhodes, Mrs. Matthews, Mrs. Roberts, Mrs. Lampman,
Mrs. B. Tye, Mrs. Stanley Johnson,
Mrs. Fagan, Mrs. Swinnerton, Mrs.
Key, Mrs. McMicking, Mrs. Brett,
Mrs. Sclater, Mrs. H. Kent, Mrs.
Walker, Mrs. F. Jones, Mrs. Madame
Parizeau, Mrs. Langton, Mrs. Burnell,
Mrs. Leask, Mrs. Fletcher, Mrs.
Mitchner, Mrs, Randell, Mrs. D. Helmcken, Mrs. R. Troupe, Mrs. Hunter.
* *   *
Mrs. J. Wilson entertained a large
number of friends last Tuesday afternoon, among whom were: Mrs. D.
R. Ker, Mrs. C. M. Roberts, Mrs.
Brett, Mrs. S. Robertson, Mrs. Raymour, Mrs. Cross, Mrs. Finlayson,
Mrs. F Jones, Mrs. R. Jones, Mrs.
Swinnerton, Mrs. B. Wilson, Mrs. E.
M. Johnson, Mrs. Arbuthnot, Mrs.
Savage, Mrs. W. S. Gore, Mrs. Gibb,
Mrs. Letter, Mrs. Freeman, Mrs. Erb,
Mrs. H. Todd, Mrs. C. Todd, Mrs.
H. Gillespie, Mrs. Blaiklock, Mrs.
Rowe, Mrs. C. Wilson, Mrs. Hunter,
Mrs. Church, Mrs. Gaudin, Mrs. Wilby, Mrs. Eberts, Mrs. Lugrin, Mrs.
Shaw,   Mrs.   Chambers,   and   many
others.
* *   *
Mrs. Arbuthnot and Mrs. Savage
gave a large tea at the former's residence on Belcher street on Wednesday afternoon. Miss Arbuthnot and
Miss Savage assisted in receiving thc
guests. The tea table was beautifully decorated with red carnations,
red roses and asparagus fern. Among
the guests were: Mrs. Young, Mrs.
C. M. Roberts, Mrs. Gore, Mrs.
Eberts, Mrs. C. Baker, Mrs. A. Gillespie, Mrs. H. Gillespie, Mrs. J. H.
JAMES BUCHANAN & CO.
By Royal Warrants
PURVEYORS TO THE ROYAL FAMILY.
Distillers of the
WORLD-FAMOUS RED SEAL AND BLACK AND WHITE
SCOTCH WHISKIES.
Unsurpassed for AGE, PURITY or FLAVOR.
For Sale by all Dealers.
General Agents for B.C. and the Yukon District
RADIGER ft JANION,
Prince Rupert, B.C.
The first sale of Prince Rupert lots will be held at Vancouver,
British Columbia, May 25th to 29th, 1909. Prince Rupert is the
Western terminus of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway. The
sale will be held in the interests of the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railway Company and the Government of British Columbia; half
of the lots offered being owned by each party. From 2,000 to
2,400 lots will be offered.
The Bale will be held by auction and the terms of payment
will be one-quarter cash and the balance in one, two and three
years, with interest at six per cent. Agreements will be executed
immediately on payment of the first installment, and purchasers
may enter into possession at once.
Titles are  absolutely indefeasible, which means that the
government of British Columbia guarantees all titles.
For maps and further particulars, write,
0. D. RAND,
Agent for Government and Railway,
Vancouver, B.C.
Something New
We are now able to offer to our patrons
A   GUARANTEE
on our splendid line of PLATED KNIVES, FORKS and SPOONS.
Tliis line which ie specially made for us is guaranteed to have
MORE SILVER than any other standard make and we GUARANTEE to replace
Free of Charge
any of these goods which, after use, do not prove satisfactory. This
condition we believe accompanies no other flatware made.
Prices as follows:—
COFFEE SPOONS  per do*. $2.70
TEASPOONS..! .'. " 3-iS
DESSERTSPOONS   " 4-95
TABLESPOONS  " S*S
DESSERT FORKS   " 4-95
TABLE FORKS   " 5*5
DESSERT KNIVES    " 4«95
TABLE KNIVES  " 5-4°
Challoner & Mitchell
Diamond Merchants and Silversmiths
1017 Qovernment Street Victoria, B. C
Todd, Mrs. C. Todd, Mrs. H. Heisterman, Mrs. McCallum, Mrs. Heisterman, Mrs. Wilby, Mrs. Blackwooa,
Mrs. Erb, Mrs. Chambers, Mrs.
Troupe, Mrs. S. Robertsan, Mrs. Sclater, Mrs. Roy Troupe, Mrs. Blaiklock.
Mrs. Rome, Mrs. Freeman, Mrs. Little, Mrs. Love, Mrs. Furlonger, Mrs.
Ker, Mrs. Brett, Mrs. C. Wilson, Mrs.
J. Wilson, Mrs. B Tye, Mrs. Batty,
Mrs. Lugrin, Mrs. Shaw, and the
Misses Eberts, Mason, D. Mason, T.
Wark, Rome, Blackwood, Drake, and
many others.
*   *   *
Mrs. George L. Courtney and children arrived from Southern California
early in the week.
The Silent Life.
We live two lives: the outer seeming
fair,
And only laughter on the surface
lies;
Our  inner  life—no  one  may   enter
there,
Where   thoughts   and   hopes   arc
hidden from all eyes.
The .lonely days of wild revolt and
pain,
Then—resignation    for   the    dear
dreams gone;
The  heart-hopes,  half defined,  then
crushed again,
Make  up  the  silent  life  we  live
alone.
Maclaren's Famous Imperial
Cheese.
We have just received  another consignment of this  splendid1
Cheese.   Many people find there is nothing else so
tasty and handy to keep in the house:
IMPERIAL CHEESE, large jar 50e
IMPERIAL CHEESE, small jar 25c
IMPERIAL CHEESE, individual jar 15c
CANADA CREAM CHEESE, each  10c
GORGONZOLA CHEESE, per pound  50c
ROQUEFORT CHEESE, per pound  60o
PEA'ATIT BUTTER, large bottle 35c, small bottle  20c
DIXI H. ROSS CO.
INDEPENDENT GROCERS. 1317 GOVERNMENT ST.
Tels. 5a, 1052 and 1590.
Victoria Fuel Co.
PHONE 1377
You want the best Coal, the "Burn all" kind, absolutely free
from Slate, Stones and Klinkers.
We are Sole Agents for The South Wellington Coal Mines'
Company (Ltd.).
THIS COAL is admitted by all to be the finest Domestic Coal
mined.
Let us know if you want it quick.
YICTORia FUEL eeMPHNY
PHONE 1377 618 TROUNCE AVE.
I       Everybody Works But Mother
She won't shovel coal, carry
out cinders or clear dirty
grates or stoves.
SHE COOKS WITH GAS
Has a fine Gas Range in the
kitchen, a Gas Grate in the
parlor and a Gas Radiator in
the dining-room. You should
do likewise. Call here and
we'll explain the economy of
Gas Cooking and Heating.
I Victoria Gas Company, Limited
g Oorner Fort and Langley Streets.
THE   UNDERWOOD  LEADS
OTHERS FOLLOW.
CASH REGISTERS,    SAFES,     DESKS,
FILING CABINETS,    OFFICE FURNITURE,
TYPEWRITINGG PAPER,     CARBONS.
BAXTER & JOHNSON      809 Qoveraaent Street
A well furnished office is a good advertisement.
Wedding
Breakfasts
Lunches
Tea Parties
You cannot do better than place your orders with us for
Wedding Cakes.
Very choice Confectionery, loose, by the pound, and also
put up in neat fancy boxes, suitable for gifts.
©lay's
619 Port St. Phone 101
___ THE WEEK  SATURDAY MAY 15, 1909
By  BABETTE.
'ififipififififififipif
if
\k Lady's Letter *
- V
It
t if ip if *f *f if if ifif if if
|r Madge:
is the girl who does things in
world who is attractive, both to
I and to her own sex, which last
its a little, too, in the long run.
may not be able to  do  great
gs, to paint great pictures, or to
in grand opera, but you can learn
lake bright little things for your-
and your friends, and perhaps to
' the light, "catchy" airs of the
so that your friends will enjoy
n, and if you can't do anything
j cultivate the art of talking bright-
Bnd of being sympathetic.   Every
f can do one thing well if she will
take   the  treuble   to  find  out
It that thing is.   The difficulty is
she often looks in the opposite
Iction.   She wants to do something
it and showy or nothing at all.
there  are  other  talents  within
th if she will only look, and these
Ints may be a great  comfort to
Jin her dark hours.   How the world
Is   a   cheerful, plucky   girl    who
l-ces  a brave fight and hides hei
lleton in   a   cupboard   instead of
hing her hands and whining be-
lise things don't come her way—
J girl who puts her own griefs as
Ich as possible aside—who takes a
lolesome interest in life,
kn American   paper    states   that
but a hundred women are engaged
I detective work in New York and
neighbourhood, and a dozen or
[Jre of them are employed in* the
stores, where shop-lifting is so
|nmonly practised, even by ladies of
od position, that the head of one.
tablishment  said,   "We  could  no
ire do without a detective in this
re  than  we  could  do without  a
del to show off our gowns." The
dges of the shop-lifters are innum-
lible.    Some wear long capes, and
ks lengths of silk or passementerie,
thers   and   handkerchiefs,   under
:ir arms; others wear outer skirts
th long    slits    concealed   by the
Ithers, so that they can slip their
J_fts into pockets in an under-dress
■own as a "kick-skirt."    Handker-
liefs and   gloves   are   tucked into
liffs and bodices, and, worse than
I, children are pressed into the ser-
\e.    One  successful woman thief
Jcks lace and embroidery and any
lick-knacks she can lay hands on
Iwn the backs of her two children,
I10 are exquisitely dressed;   others
Jstruct their small daughters to take
lything that is put in their way.
nildren of eight   and   nine make
lever shop-lifters.    Sometimes  two
■omen work together, and then it is
j:ry  difficult for the detectives to
lap  them.    Women  detectives  are
llued, and well paid when they are
Idlful.
*    *    *
IThe men in South America hold
.eir women in highest respect. Not
lily do they accord them the polite
stinction of outward deference, but
ley guard them with an earnest solitude that protects them from every
ire, and they bear for them every
irden that man can carry for wean. The chivalry of the olden times
irvives amongst these people, and
tat is doubtless one reason why the
omen are so contented with their
it. After marriage, the woman is as
ie lost to the world.   Her career is
iiished so far as matters outside her
jmestic affairs are concerned. Her
•here of influence is henceforth en-
psed within the triple courts of her
lsband's house, and consists in
•inging up her children and in exer-
sing a mild sovereignty in her do-
estic domain. There are no married
flirts in South America, no scandals
caused by unfaithful wives, no ambitious women pining in their secluded
homes, so far as is known. There are
no woman's rights conventions, no
woman's whist club in the whole
country. The wife knows nothing of
the family finances, and she is not
consulted in the consideration of her
husband's serious affairs. The question may well be asked by the women
of England, "What in the world do
these women do with their time?"
And the answer is, that their days
are quite as full of activities—mental
and physical—as they wish them to
be. South American women do not
crave the freedom and the publicity of
life they see enjoyed by their sisters
in other countries. They prefer the
seclusion,, with the protection, of
their own method of life. They are
very charitable, too, and are kindness
itself to the poor people in their
neighbourhood, as they send portions
of bread and meat every day to their
poor neighbours.
*     *     *
In Norway married couples are
charged a fare and a half when travelling on the railway, this being one
of the privileges conferred on married
people there. There are nearly a
thousand miles of railway in that
country, which, with the exception of
forty-two miles, all belong to the
State. In Austria and Hungary, where
the zone system of railway travelling
was first introduced, a wife who is
accompanied by her husband can travel at half fare; children of the
same family from six to twelve travel
at one-third fare; if more than two
only one-fourth rate is charged; from
twelve to twenty they travel at half
fare.
The Vicar of Burstwick, near Hull,
told an interesting story about the
Queen and a Yorkshire baby at a
church gathering. Recently he had
spent seventeen nights in making personal investigation of the sorrows of
the waifs of London. One night on
the Embankment, near Cleopatra's
Needle, he spoke to a woman, who
turned out to be a Yorkshire woman,
from Leeds.
She told him her husband and several children had died of consumption.
Her baby had been taken into Bromp-
ton Hospital, where it attracted the
attention of the Queen. The Hon.
Charlotte Knollys, who was with her
Majesty, made notes of the child's
history, and a private detective was
sent to Leeds to substantiate the
story. "The Queen," added the woman, "sent me a letter to Leeds, saying, T will save the life of your baby
if possible, and am going to send
it to the South of France.'" The
mother showed the vicar a letter
from Miss Knollys thanking her for
a bunch of primroses she had sent to
the Queen, and saying that her Majesty trusted the change would save
the child's life. The child is still in
France.
Oriental Cream
•*» HMtOAi asAinaam
BEAUTY THAT LASTS.
Where is the woman who has not
the praiseworthy desire to enhance
her personal charms and preserve as
long as possible her delightful power
of enchantment, which lasts as long
as her beauty? The Oriental Cream,
prepared by Dr. T. Felix Gouraud, of
New York City, is a harmless preparation for preserving the delicacy
of the complexion and removing
blemishes. It is the favorite toilet
article of the leading professional
artists, who owe so much of their
popularity to their personal charms.
Scarcely a star .dressing room in the
land is without Gouraud's Oriental
Cream, which is the most wholesome
and perfect beautifier known. Druggists will supply you. No. 8.
JALLAND BROS.
Fine Groceries
FRESH  FRUIT DAILY.
623 Yates St.    ■    VICTORIA, B.C
f^ts^si^t^ii^^i^^^i'.ssii^ii^^
\\ Prepare  yourself  against  Jack
if Frost.
I    See BOLDEN
||     THE CARPENTER AND
P BUILDER,
8 For your weather strips,  etc.,
g 760  Yates   St.   Op.   Dominion
Hotel.   Phones: House, A.1125;
Shop, B1828. ■MHH
1
.'-mW^-mt-m*
The Unattainable.
(By Charlotte Becker)
The years may teach us to endure
Our allotted dower of pain;
To find in paths that tears obscure,
Some knowledge that is sorrow's
gain.
Yet, though our hearts cry out to
share
And stay the agonies thereof,
One grief we cannot learn to bear:
The suffering of those we love.
Explained.
"That chap must be a reformer."
"Why?"
"He is so bitter against the 'Salome' craze."
"Oh, he's in the clothing business."
Solace for the Obscure.
Though I pursue a lowly plan,
For me one comfort can not fail.
I know no secret service man
Is grimly camping on my trail.
—Washington Star.
I Empire Hotel and |
i     Restaurant
if
if
I For 20c.
You get a good meal at 568
Johnson Street.
WINES, LIQUORS AND
CIGARS.
Family trade catered to.
Rooms, 35c and up.
Telephone 841.
A. LIPSKY, Proprietor,
Milne Block
568 Johnson Street,
VICTORIA, B.C.
-$S3Stt*tS3t*tt*!S>tS3S8S8S3$ttSS3>S3S3SS8SSSS3Snetl.
Are You
Acquainted
With Janice?
It is  one  of  the  newest and  very
nicest   of   Perfumes   we   have   just
received.   Come in and see it.
AN INTRODUCTION WILL COST
YOU NOTHING.
All    refined    people    like   "Janice."
You'll deem it one of the finest odor3
for summer use.
GYRUS H BOWES.
CHEMIST
Govt St, Near Yates.
Telephones 425 and 450.
IB. C. Funeral Furnishing Co'y
1016 Government Street, Victoria, B. C
Chas. Hayward, Pres.
R. Hayward, Sec.
F, Caselton, Manager
Oldest and most up-to-date
Undertaking Establishment
in B. 0.
Established 1867
Telephones—48,   594,   1905,   305,   or   404.
L.,.*-£.a^..'&...;.LM_y.,«y.'..«**4;^
Headquarters for choice nursery stock.
Apple, pear, cherry, plum and peach trees
and small fruits, also ornamental trees,
shrubs, roses, evergreens, etc. Largest and
best assorted  stock in  British Columbia.
Ten per cent, cash  discount on all orders
above $10.00.
PRICE LIST AND CATALOGUE ON
APPLICATION.
MEN, WOMEN AND CHILDREN
Can learn many a lesson by seeing Moving Pictures which are of a good
class both comic and melo-dramatic. Complete change of programme on
MONDAYS, WEDNESDAYS AND FRIDAYS.
Continuous performance, 3:00 to 5:30—7:00 to 10:30 p.m.
ADMISSION TEN CENTS
EMPRESS THEATRE
Children's Matinees-Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday-Five Cents. THE WEEK, SATURDAY MAY 15, 194.9
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
•IHE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
1208 Government St., Victoria, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE, Editor.
A Canadian
Thinker.
By BOHEMIAN.
I know the title of this article will
create a feeling of astonishment, and
even of incredulity in the minds of
my readers, but I cannot help that,
and do not propose to alter it. I adhere to it with a full knowledge of
the fact that hitherto Canada has only
claimed to hold one "thinker" within
her borders, Goldwin Smith, and he is
an importation albeit fondly dubbed
"the Sage of Toronto" in feeble imitation of the sobriquet which fond
Scotsmen applied to another dour importation, "the Sage of Chelsea."
But Canada has a son of her own
who is essentially a thinker, who possesses the reflective mind, the introspective faculty, the gift of vision and
who adds to all the gift of speech.
However Mr. Sanford Evans left
his first love, journalism, to engage
in business will forever be a mystery
to me. As Editor of the Winnipeg
Telegram he was just beginning to
impress his personality on Western
Canada when oiie fine morning his
name disappeared from the title page
and journalism knew him no more.
New Canada could make no better
investment than to subscribe half a
million dollars, hand it to Mr. Sanford
Evans, and tell him to start a daily
and run it to suit himself. It would
be a paper of lofty ideals, of definite
purpose, of high intelligence and of
incorruptibility. It would have no
politics, but it would be the finest and
the fittest contribution to the transformation of the scattered provinces
of the Prairie country into an integral
part of a great nation. His work
would not end there, for such a voice
would reach far beyond the confines
of the west and would be a clarion
call resounding throughout the whole
Dominion.
The man is impressive apart from
his utterances. Tall, slender, graceful, with a high dome-shaped head,
light blue eyes and mobile mouth;
with hair prematurely grey and yet
plentiful, carefully arranged and parted in the middle he distinctly resembles the Arthur James Balfour of fifteen years ago.
He has a touch of the same insoni-
cance, at times the same far away
look as though seeking the thought,
the same precise, measured utterance,
the same philosophic strain, and the
same suggestion of gentleness which
once earned for the illustrious Conservative leader the nickname of
"Lady Balfour."
Since then England has learned that
in reality there is no effeminacy in
the make-up of Mr. Balfour, and that
if blue eyes can melt they can also
glitter like steel.
But it would be unfair to dismiss
Mr. Evans with a mere pen and Ink
picture sketch. The man was not
more interesting than his message.
For the ' first time Victorians heard
that "Canada is not big enough for
Canadians"—a fine thought underlying
the germ idea of nationhood. Paraphrased he meant that to attain our
full stature we must look to the bigger interests than merely our own
material well-being and not only realize but share Imperial responsibilities.
He discoursed on Canada's opportunities, the dignity of pioneer work,
the unity of sentiment as evidenced
by public buildings, churches and
schools, the solidarity of the people.
He passed on to a profound analysis
of the favourable intellectual, moral
and psychological conditions now being developed, and the national type
of character which must result; and
led to his final conclusion that Canada
to attain that measure of self respect
which alone could entitle her to the
claim of nationhood "must be prepared to make the sea her sea as the
land is her land."
This is the briefest summary of the
message brought from the Prairies by
a scholar, a thinker and a leader. He
sowed good seed, and there is no reason to doubt that it fell on good
ground.
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Belinda's Night Out.
How Her Brothers Provided for It.
(By E. M. Jameson)
"Seems jolly hard lines," agreed
Dick in his slow, stolid way, "though,
unless you'd told me, I shouldn't
have supposed you were old enough
to go to balls."
Belinda balanced herself on thc
curved end of the old horse-hair sofa,
turning her face away from the light.
She imagined that Dick despised the
emotions, whether of joy or sorrow.
At all events, he went through life
himself with the stoicism of a Red
Indian.
"Not old enough?" she asked impatiently, "not old enough! I shall be
seventeen in another month, let me
tell you. It's a fiendish shame I'm
not going, when Hetty Maitland is.
She's only five weeks older, and this
is her second dance. She showed me
her frock yesterday, s—simply 1—
lovely."
She swallowed a lump iu her throat,
and then cast a rapid glance at Dick.
But he only went on chipping away
at a bit of wood, and never by the
flicker of an eyelid did he show
knowledge of her lachrymose condition. She passed a resolute hand
across her eyes, and pulled herself
together.
"Queer how girls like that sort of
thing," remarked Dick, surveying his
handiwork critically. "What fun can
there be in dressing up and twirling
round to a band, with chaps you've
never met before, and are never likely to meet again? It is a rum notion
now, isn't it?"
"I've never thought of it in that
way," Belinda looked at him ponder
ingly, "and if you liked dancing you
wouldn't either. It isn't the separate
things that matter, it's the whole thing
—the lights and the flowers, and the
music and the slippery floor, and the
pretty frocks, and even the shiny
white shirt fronts—" she paused out
of breath, | her hands clasped, her
eyes dilated. "Even if I knew I
should be a wallflower, I'd love to go,
Dick, just to see everything."
"You wouldn't be a wallflower,"
said Dick, with the same stoical air.
"You'd knock spots off Hetty, that's
certain. Won't Aunt Laura let you
go?"
"No, she says father wouldn't like
it. Knowing quite well that as he's
several thousand miles away she's not
likely to be contradicted. It's just
because she doesn't want to get me a
new frock.   He wouldn't mind."
"Well, hang it all, why should hc?
What's the usual age for going out?
Seventeen, you say?"
"Well, of course, it varies"—Belinda was naturally honest—"and it
mostly depends on the mothers. Sev-
enteen's quite usual."
"Got anything to go in?"
Belinda shook her head disconsolately.
"That's the worst of it—not a rag.
You should just see Hetty's frock;
chiffon over silk, with dear little "
Dick raised a hand in protest; he
regarded feminine apparel with all the
intolerance of fifteen.
"Could you stump up anything towards a frock?" he asked, after a moment's rumination.
"I'm at my last half crown," said
Belinda gloomily, "and anyway my
quarter's allowance intact wouldn't
run to a frock like Hetty's. Don't
you worry about it, Dick. It's nothing new. I can't go, so there's an
end of it. As a matter of fact, I never
have fun like other girls."
"Seems to me girls have rather a
rotten time," remarked Dick, with
more force than elegance.
"Some girls—girls brought up by
Aunt Lauras. She never lets me go
anywhere."
Dick paced up and down the room,
his hands in his pockets, his shoulders
hunched up to his ears. He was an
ugly boy, with deep-set eyes and a
clever face. Belinda watched him,
though hope was dead within her.
"I wish I'd been born a boy, then I
shouldn't have wanted to go. I wish
there were such things as fairy godmothers.   I wish "
Dick groaned.
"I say, you know, just shut up for
a bit, and give a. chap time to think."
"What's the use of thinking?" Belinda spoke scornfully. "No thinking
will see me in a new frock, even the
plainest frock, at the Ridgways' dance.
Miracles don't happen nowadays,
worse luck! Yes, yes, I will shut up,
but you can't imagine what it is to
have someone to let off steam to.
Tommy isn't a bit of good. He says:
'What do you want to go for, anyway?' "
Belinda found herself again on the
brink of emotion. She rushed from
the room, passing Tommy in the hall.
That youth, his mouth full of toffee,
proceeded towards the sanctum where
Dick still brooded over ways and
means.
"Anything up with Belinda? Seems
a bit waxy."
Dick came out of his ruminations.
"I say, Tommy, got any of Uncle
Roger's tip left?"
"Got any yourself?" demanded
Tommy, with instant suspicion.
"Thirty bob. Wish to goodness I
hadn't bought those stamps from Pin-
kert'on."
"You're not going to have any of
mine," said Tommy with increasing
distrust; "haven't been so palmy for
ages. It's all booked, though. Uncle
Roger's off for another three years,
so it's no use hoping for more. What
do you want to know for?"
Dick fumbled in his pocket and pro*
duced a dingy paper-backed book.
Tommy recognised it as a savings
bank deposit book. Dick spread it
open upon the table.
"I've got four pounds seventeen in
the Post Office, and thirty bob of
Uncle Roger's tip. But I can't get the
savings bank money out in time."
"Time for what?" asked Tommy,
curiosity mingled with suspicion.
"You seem to be going it if you
want more than that.   I know jolly
well "
* "You don't know a thing about it,
you silly owl; you're just talking
through your hat."
Tommy, the soul of good-nature,
took no offence.
"You're not going to endow an orphanage, I suppose, or start a Home
for Disreputable Cats?"
He burst into loud laughter at his
own wit, and Dick's face cleared. He
rarely smiled, but his expression had
Mumm's Champagne is always found at the best banquets.
"The Feast of Reason," Testimonial Dinner to Hon. Herman A. Ml
Comptroller of the City of New York, at the Academy of Music, A|
15th, 1909, tendered by the Civic Workers and Taxpayers of Brookly
recognition of his services to the city as comptroller, and of his efforts
place its finances on a business basis and to protect the interest of the 1
payers, had the following
flENU
Brooklyn
Cocktail
Sauterne
St. Julien
White Rock
Cigarettes
Cigars
G. H. Mumm
& Co.'s
Extra Dry
Coffee
Crackers
Olives
Boiled
Cheese
Oyster Cocktail
SOUP
Chicken Gumbo With Okra
RELISHES
Celery Almonds Radishes
FISH
Kennebec  Salmon,     Sauce  Hollandaise I
ENTREE
Sweetbread Croquettes Green Peas 1
Fillet of Beef Maitre d'Hotel
Fresh Mushrooms
New String Beans   . Roast Potatoes ,
Sorbet Roman Punch
ROAST
Squab Chicken
DESSERT
Ice Cream in Forms
Macaroons Bonbons
Escarole Salad
Fancy Cake
Chocolate
been known to vary slightly on occasions. This was one of them. He
squared his shoulders and faced his
cousin across the table.
"Are you going to join in a plot?"
"Rather, if there's any fun to be got
out of it, and if it doesn't cost too
much."
"It won't cost you anything but a
little trouble."
"I'm your man," said Tommy genially.
There was something in the plot
that appealed to Tommy's sense of
humour, and Dick could hardly have
found a more capable fellow-conspirator.
That very afternoon Tommy might
have been seen dismounting from his
bicycle at the chief drapery emporium
of the town. He strode in at the door,
and was instantly intercepted by the
polite shop-walker.
"I want to see the head milliner,"
said Tommy in his loud voice; "at
least, she has to do with hats, hasn't
she? I mean the head dressmaker,
then."
"This way, sir." The shop-walker
showed no surprise. "Third turning
to the right, and up the staircase, if
you please."
The object of many surprised
glances, Tommy stumbled up the
stairs, his boots ringing noisily on
the brass-clamped carpet.
He had no great liking for his task,,
one which a stouter heart might well
have shirked. The head dressmaker
sailed forward in a beautiful, trained
gown. Her manners, like those of the
shop-walker; were too perfect to allow of any symptom of surprise.
"You wish to see me?" she began,
when Tommy plunged into his subject.
"I say, d'you ever make frocks for
people that you've never seen, and
can't see?"
The dressmaker bowed.
"Frequently, if careful measurements are given."
Tommy showed signs of agitation.
"But don't you without?"
"It would be very difficult indeed."
"Then we're stumped," said Tommy,
more to himself than to her; "you
never do? Can't you make an exception when a thing's wanted as a dead
secret?"
Tommy's face, though freckled, was
distinctly engaging. The head dressmaker's curiosity arose. She had never
before been interviewed in her
ness capacity by a schoolboy, andj
so entirely in earnest.
"If I knew a little more "
"Sit down for half a jiffy and ]
shall.    You look a good sort."
The  head  dressmaker indulge^
the novelty of a smile, and then,
she heard the   details,   unbent
further.
"The young lady is nearly se
teen?    Then she will want a
skirt?   Tall?"
"Five feet four and a bit," rejj
Tommy.   "We all got measured j
other   day.   I   say,   wasn't   it
lucky?"
"It simplifies matters a good
certainly," remarked the head drl
maker, pencil on lip.   "And slig|
This was a poser.   Tommy rub
his chin distractedly, then, as ifl
inspiration, he searched his poet
finally producing a battered card.
."Eight stone, three pounds,
ounces exactly. Got weighed one
at the Franco-British. Anything (
beside age, height, weight? Siz(
hands and feet? How shouU
know?   Just ordinary, I suppose.'
The head dressmaker, whose st
of humour had grown somewhat ru
was busy making abstruse calc
tions in a notebook.
"One moment, she remarked, g
ing away to an alcove where she 1
parley with a magnificent person
in black silk and spangles. A
what seemed an interminable time
came  back.
"We can do the whole thing
£4 19s n^d," she said; "that will
elude shoes and stockings to ma
gown. And we think if you leav
entirely to us that there will not
a prettier frock at the dance."
"Right-o." Tommy dived into ■
pocket and brought forth a wa
leather bag intrusted to his care
Dick. "We want her to knock sp
off the other girls, if it's to be do
she isn't bad-looking, though she's
sister. We'll pay half now and 1
when the things come home, and
just keep it dark."
♦   .**■"*'*
"If there had been time to have
frock made for you I should have
ceded to Mrs. Ridgway's request;
seems so very desirous that y
should go, Belinda. You have no
ing you could wear? The white m
lin you had for best last summer?
i J THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MAY 15, 1909
Four Very Attractive Dressers
and Stands
Four moderately priced Dressers and Stands are listed here—but a
[sample of the many offerings of our furniture floors. These are picked
I at random from an extensive stock of such bedroom requirements. We
[don't think there is an equal showing elsewhere, or superior values of-
(fered anywhere.  You are welcome to come in any time.
DRESSER AND STAND.
[A low-priced style of excellent design. Made of Golden Surface
Oak. Dresser has large, oval
bevel mirror and three drawers.
Washstand to match with drawer
and cupboard. Well made
throughout. Price for the two
pieces   $37-50
DRESSER AND STAND.
[■Another splendid low-priced offering. This dresser has a large
sized square-shaped bevel mirror and three drawers. Wash-
stand to match with large
drawer and cupboard. Made ol
Golden Surface Oak. Price for
the two pieces  $37-50
DRESSER AND STAND.
Here is a very handsome style in
Golden Quartered Oak, highly
finished. The dresser is of very
attractive design with round,
bevel mirror and four drawers.
Stand to match with drawer and
cupboard. The finish is superior.
Price for two pieces $45.00
DRESSER AND STAND.
This is another attractive style in
Golden Quartered Oak, and is
finished in a superior manner.
. Stylish dresser with oval bevel
mirror of first quality and three
drawers. Washstand has one
large and two small drawers and
cupboard. Price for !the two
pieces  $60.00
A Half Dozen Stylish Dressing
Tables
—Prices Ranging at $14 to $25.
Come up to our third floor and see the row of excellent dressing
table styles we are showing.   Six attractive tables are offered you at
.interesting prices.   These tables come in Early English, Golden Oak
' or Mahogany finish.    Each has a large sized bevel mirror of best quality, and large drawer.   Finish and workmanship is of the superior sort.
Prices Range at from $14 to $25.
Other dressing tables at other prices are shown—by far the largest
offering in this furniture style in the city.   Pleased to have you come
, in and see our offerings.
WEDDING GIFTS  OF
"LIBBEY" CUT GLASS.
They're a problem, aren't they?
—to some. There's an easy
solution to the difficulty of
choosing a gift that'll be appreciated if you but make your
selection from this stock oi
Libbey Cut Glass.
A bride cannot have too
much and when she see the
name of "Libbey" graven in
the glass she'll know that you
have sent her the very best.
Come in and see the grand
display in a specially lighted
room. Pleased to show you this
glistening crystal.
__%>
J
SEND FOR OUR GO-CART
CIRCULAR SHOWING OUR
NEW "WHITNEY" 1909 CARTS.
A New Buffet at $50
If you want to add an attractive piece of furniture to your dining-
room place this new arrival in butfets in it. Here is one of the most
attractive buffet styles we have shown. It is one of those popular
"small" styles in golden quartered oak, highly finished. Has three small
and one large drawers, and two cupboards with satin finished brass
pulls, a large bevel plate mirror of first quality. This is a very handsome style and one we would greatly like to show you.   Priced at $50
A Pretty Music Cabinet
We are offering a new style in a Mahogany finished music cabinet
just received. A plain design but very attractive. Finish is very tine
and at this price is excellent value. Other styles : at other prices
shown on third floor, but see this new arrival priced at  $12
roe makim
corric on
THC HANOI
Get the Real Flavor
from your Coffee
The fact that sometimes your coffee is
better than others, shows that something
is wrong with the process of making and
that some flavor-destroying element is
present in greater or smaller quantities.
The  __
Manning-
Bowman
iMeteofCofiee Percolator
gives yon the Seal Ftavor from your coffee, the
Bitter injurious principle is entirely eliminated.tuak-
Ingt.iecoC'ce always t'.ie same—always delicious,
clear and _Va_;:*ant. The hot water is forced up
throu^.i t'.'.c cc-trr.l tube by the automatic circulate
Ingproce:^ _■:._ f..tcr'.r.__ through the grounds extracts all thecood of lhe cofice, leaving the tannic
acid and bitter properties iu the grounds above the
liquid. Use one.third less ccfke than by Other
methods, for there is no waste.
Over loo styles and sizes to select tram,
A NEW SHIPMENT JUST IN
Prices ranging from $5.00 to $12.50.
con
MAKING
coffee on
thc taoli
I TO RETAILERS
, Isn't it poor business to
carry a large stock in your
little town when the quantities you require may be purchased from us on short
notice. We help you. Prompt
i and satisfactory service guaranteed.
WEILER BROS.
Complete Home Furnishers
VICTORIA, B. C.
TO DEALERS
We solicit correspondence
from dealers who are not
already acquainted with us
and who wish to get
acquainted with the largest
wholesalers of Homefurnish-
ings in the West. Try furniture as a "side-line"—we
help you.
r'And the summer before," inter-
tsed Belinda. "I wouldn't be found
lad in it." Aunt Laura made her
|e bitter with "might-have-beens."
wish you had agreed a little ear-
lr, Aunt Laura; we could have man-
Led to get a frock if we had known
ren a few days ago."
IShe went up to her room, groping
br way in the darkness to the bed
[order to indulge comfortably in her
lief. Her arm encountered some-
ling hard. She felt it all over. It
bvered a large surface. She felt
gain. It was a box, a cardboard box,
ed securely with cord.
Her woes forgotten, she sprang up
lid struck a light. As the wick of
|'.e candle flared up she saw that the
bx was addressed to her. It seemed
£es before she could find the scissors
cut the string. Her hands trembled
she drew off the lid, and thrust
liide the interminable wrappings of
Issue paper.
(.Something   white   and   soft   and
jieeny lay beneath.    As  she shook
out Belinda caught a long breath.
1 was an evening frock, dainty
lough for a   princess,   but simple
■•'thai and girlish, as befitting a first
■ill.   White shoes and silk stockings
{id a pair of long gloves were tucked
vay in a corner of the box.
|"A grown-up skirt," said Belinda in
[hushed whisper, as she stood with
ave.    "Could   it   be Aunt   Laura?
jo, the idea's absurd.   But who?"
IShe heard a movement outside,
lened her door.   It was the hou:
|aid, giggling, yet mysterious.
'Rose, do you know anything
lis?"
|Rose  surveyed  the   f-rpek
7
admiration.   Then, as Belinda'repeated the question, she came to herself.
"All I know, miss, is that Master
Tommy's had a hand in it. Leastways he came and told me when a
box came for you to keep it dark."
"Tommy!" exclaimed Belinda, her
mind full of fairy godmothers, "Tommy!"
"Aren't you going to try it on,
Miss Belinda?   I'll help you."
"Yes, yes, of course, and you can
do up my hair, Rose. You're awfully
good at making curls and twirly-
twists. Only be quick; I must show
it to the boys."
In place of the dejected young person, with rather brief skirts and her
hair down, who had entered the room,
there presently emerged a grown-up
vision in white, with flushed cheeks
and eyes that shone radiantly. The
brown hair was piled up picturesquely; Belinda was hardly recognisable.
Like a mushroom she had grown up
in a single hour.
Downstairs she sped, the housemaid
leaning over the banisters to look
after her.
From the sanctum proceeded voices.
Belinda paused an instant to adjust a
curl that threatened to break bounds.
Then she threw the door wide with a
swing, and stood before them.
They looked at her aghast. For
once Dick's stoicism took wings. He
was frankly thunderstruck at the re-
Tommy took her
icer, another fellow's sister;
hat she was indeed his
ed approval,
ed to the soul in self-
ivolved   slowly   before
-*• *<af his outlay.
"It's really me," she said breathlessly: "somehow—some way—this
has come—a miracle has happened. I
found it on the bed. How do you
like it, boys?"
"Ripping," said Tommy.
Dick made no comment.
"It seems impossible, but Rose said
you had a hand in it, Tommy."
"Doesn't it fit, just?" said that
youth, walking round her and evading
the question. "They've made a jolly
good job of it without measurements.
Lucky I had your height and fighting
weight."
Belinda turned her puzzled eyes towards Dick.
"What does he mean? Had he
anything to do with it?"
"Five bob for gloves," interposed
Tommy, "and bearding the dressmaker in her den. Think that was
equal to several quid. It was Dick's
idea; he paid the piper down to the
last miserable three farthings. Said
he wanted you for once to have a
real, slap-up night out, just to spite
Aunt Laura."
Belinda looked down the snowy
lengths of her skirt, and then at Dick.
Something blurred her vision.
"Oh, Dick!" was all she could say.
Dick stood forbiddingly on the
hearthrug, his shoulders hunched up
to his ears.
"Knew you'd knock spots off Hetty
if you'd half a chance," was his sole
comment.
Military Display and Band Concert.
At Drill Hall, on Friday and Saturday evenings, May 21 and 22, 8.30 p.m.
A very successful meeting was held
at the Drill Hall on Monday evening
last after   the    Regimental    parade.
Col. J. A. Hall was in the chair and
all the officers and sergeants of the
Fifth Regiment were present, together
with the Assault-at-Arms Committee.
The proposed programme was up
for discussion and completion and this
happy collaboration of all the seniors
resulted in some capital items being
decided upon.
The principal features of the exhibition will be: Fancy Marching Squads,
Lance exercises by Sergeants of Fifth
Regiment; 13 Pdr. Gun Drill and Dismounting competitions; Bayonet Exercises; Balaclava Melee, Semaphore
Squad of Signallers under Sergt.
Selfe; Tugs of War, Fifth Regiment
vs. Garrison vs. Navy; Cavalry Sword
Exercises by Officers of Fifth Regiment; Bayonet Fighting; Physical
Drill with Arms to the full Band;
Burlesque Team of six Comic Artists
led by Gnr. G. Muir is being rapidly
put into shape under the coaching of
C. S. M. Harry Nesbitt, an old time
favourite.
The whole display will be concluded
with a grand finale and tableaux,
"Forces of the Empire," in which representatives of every part of His
Majesty's Dominions will be included.
The boys of the Regiment are taking a very keen interest in the show
and are bent on making it the best
ever put on at the Drill Hall and are
working hard every day to achieve
their ambition.
Bandmaster Rumsby has prepared
an excellent' programme for his share
of the entertainment which will ensure its success.
Seating accommodation is being
provided for over two thousand peo
ple and the comfort and convenience
of the public is receiving every consideration by the committee in charge.
Where to Look for It
An Oklahoma man fell suddenly ill
and a'collar button was found in his
appendix which a wise surgeon cut
out. Now you can see where the
darned thing goes to when it drops
out of sight.
A Tip.
Dusty Rhodes—I wouldn't have to
ask for help, but I've a lot of real
estate on me hands that I can't get
rid of.
Mrs. Rurall—Try soft soap and
boiling water.
Where the Trouble Was.
"Old Chap, why don't you make up
your mind to marry and settle down?"
"You chump, it takes two minds
to do that, and I haven't quite got
Freda's mind made up yet."
His Boy Not Missing.
Indignant Citizen—Your boy threw
a snowball at me just now.
"Did he hit you."
"No;  but "
"Then it wasn't my boy."
Fond Mother (to eye specialism-
Doctor, one of Ralph's eyes is ever
so much stronger than thc other.
How do you account for that?
Specialist—Knothole in the baseball fence last summer, madam.
A Missouri man has named his
wife Gasoline because she flares up
so easily. THE WEEK, SATURDAY MAY 15, 1909
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
1208 Government St., Victoria, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE, Editor.
A Canadian
Thinker.
By BOHEMIAN.
I know the title of this article will
create a feeling of astonishment, and
even of incredulity in the minds of
my readers, but I cannot help that,
and do not propose to alter it. I adhere to it with a full knowledge of
the fact that hitherto Canada has only
claimed to hold one "thinker" within
her borders, Goldwin Smith, and he is
an importation albeit fondly dubbed
"the Sage of Toronto" in feeble imitation of the sobriquet which fond
Scotsmen applied to another dour importation, "the Sage of Chelsea."
But Canada has a son of her own
who is essentially a thinker, who possesses the reflective mind, the introspective faculty, the gift of vision and
who adds to all the gift of speech.
However Mr. Sanford Evans left
his first love, journalism, to engage
in business will forever be a mystery
to me. As Editor of the Winnipeg
Telegram he was just beginning to
impress his personality on Western
Canada when ohe fine morning his
name disappeared from the title page
and journalism knew him no more.
New Canada could make no better
investment than to subscribe half a
million dollars, hand it to Mr. Sanford
Evans, and tell him to start a daily
and run it to suit himself. It would
be a paper of lofty ideals, of definite
purpose, of high intelligence and of
incorruptibility. It would have no
politics, but it would be the finest and
the fittest contribution to the transformation of the scattered provinces
of the Prairie country into an integral
part of a great nation. His work
would not end there, for such a voice
would reach far beyond the confines
of the west and would be a clarion
call resounding throughout the whole
Dominion.
The man is impressive apart from
his utterances. Tall, slender, graceful, with a high dome-shaped head,
light blue eyes and mobile mouth;
with hair prematurely grey and yet
plentiful, carefully arranged and parted in the middle he distinctly resembles the Arthur James Balfour of fifteen years ago.
He has a touch of the same insoni-
cance, at times the same far away
look as though seeking the thought,
the same precise, measured utterance,
the same philosophic strain, and the
same suggestion of gentleness which
once earned for the illustrious Conservative leader the nickname of
"Lady Balfour."
Since then England has learned that
in reality there is no effeminacy in
the make-up of Mr. Balfour, and that
if blue eyes can melt they can also
glitter like steel.
But it would be unfair to dismiss
Mr. Evans with a mere pen and ink
picture sketch. The man was not
more interesting than his message.
For the 'first time Victorians heard
that "Canada is not big enough for
Canadians"—a fine thought underlying
the germ idea of nationhood. Paraphrased he meant that to attain our
full stature we must look to the bigger interests than merely our own
material well-being and not only realize but share Imperial responsibilities.
He discoursed on Canada's opportunities, the dignity of pioneer work,
the unity of sentiment as evidenced
by public buildings, churches and
schools, the solidarity of the people.
He passed on to a profound analysis
of the favourable intellectual, moral
and psychological conditions now being developed, and the national type
of character which must result; and
led to his final conclusion that Canada
to attain that measure of self respect
which alone could entitle her to the
claim of nationhood "must be prepared to make the sea her sea as the
land is her land."
This is the briefest summary of the
message brought from the Prairies by
a scholar, a thinker and a leader. He
sowed good seed, and there is no reason to doubt that it fell on good
ground.
_i _.
if Short Story  if
if J   if
Belinda's Night Out.
How Her Brothers Provided for It.
(By E. M. Jameson)
"Seems jolly hard lines," agreed
Dick in his slow, stolid way, "though,
unless you'd told me, I shouldn't
have supposed you were old enough
to go to balls."
Belinda balanced herself on thc
curved end of the old horse-hair sofa,
turning her face away from the light.
She imagined that Dick despised the
emotions, whether of joy or sorrow.
At all events, he went through life
himself with the stoicism of a Red
Indian.
"Not old enough?" she asked impatiently, "not old enoughl I shall be
seventeen in another month, let me
tell you. It's a fiendish shame I'm
not going, when Hetty Maitland is.
She's only five weeks older, and this
is her second dance. She showed me
her frock yesterday, s—simply 1—
lovely."
She swallowed a lump in her throat,
and then cast a rapid glance at Dick.
But he only went on chipping away
at a bit of wood, and never by the
flicker of an eyelid did he show
knowledge of her lachrymose condition. She passed a resolute hand
across her eyes, and pulled herself
together.
"Queer how girls like that sort of
thing," remarked Dick, surveying his
handiwork critically. "What fun can
there be in dressing up and twirling
round to a band, with chaps you've
never met before, and are never likely to meet again? It is a rum notion
now, isn't it?"
"I've never thought of it in that
way," Belinda looked at him ponder-
ingly, "and if you liked dancing you
wouldn't either. It isn't the separate
things that matter, it's the whole thing
—the lights and the flowers, and the
music and the slippery floor, and the
pretty frocks, and even the shiny
white shirt fronts—" she paused out
of breath, J her hands clasped, her
eyes dilated. "Even if I knew I
should be a wallflower, I'd love to go,
Dick, just to see everything."
"You wouldn't be a wallflower,"
said Dick, with the same stoical air.
"You'd knock spots off Hetty, that's
certain. Won't Aunt Laura let you
go?"
"No, she says father wouldn't like
it. Knowing quite well that as he's
several thousand miles away she's not
likely to be contradicted. It's just
because she doesn't want to get me a
new frock.   He wouldn't mind."
"Well, hang it all, why should he?
What's the usual age for going out?
Seventeen, you say?"
"Well,   of  course,  it  varies"—Belinda  was  naturally  honest—"and  it
mostly depends on the mothers.   Sev-
enteen's quite usual."
"Got anything to go in?"
Belinda shook her head disconsolately.
"That's the worst of it—not a rag.
You should just see Hetty's frock;
chiffon over silk, with dear little "
Dick raised a hand in protest; he
regarded feminine apparel with all the
intolerance of fifteen.
"Could you stump up anything towards a frock?" he asked, after a moment's rumination.
"I'm at my last half crown," said
Belinda gloomily, "and anyway my
quarter's allowance intact wouldn't
run to a frock like Hetty's. Don't
you worry about it, Dick. It's nothing new. I can't go, so there's an
end of it. As a matter of fact, I never
have fun like other girls."
"Seems to me girls have rather a
rotten time," remarked Dick, with
more force than elegance.
"Some girls—girls brought up by
Aunt Lauras. She never lets me go
anywhere."
Dick paced up and down the room,
his hands in his pockets, his shoulders
hunched up to his ears. He was an
ugly boy, with deep-set eyes and a
clever face. Belinda watched him,
though hope was dead within her.
"I wish I'd been born a boy, then I
shouldn't have wanted to go. I wish
there were such things as fairy godmothers.   I wish "
Dick groaned.
"I say, you know, just shut up for
a bit, and give a. chap time to think."
"What's the use of thinking?" Belinda spoke scornfully. "No thinking
will see me in a new frock, even the
plainest frock, at the Ridgways' dance.
Miracles don't happen nowadays,
worse luck I Yes, yes, I will shut up,
but you can't imagine what it is to
have someone to let off steam to.
Tommy isn't a bit of good. He says:
'What do you want to go for, anyway?' "
Belinda found herself again on the
brink of emotion, She rushed from
the room, passing Tommy in the hall.
That youth, his mouth full of toffee,
proceeded towards the sanctum where
Dick still brooded over ways and
means.
"Anything up with Belinda? Seems
a bit waxy."
Dick came out of his ruminations.
"I say, Tommy, got any of Uncle
Roger's tip left?"
"Got any yourself?" demanded
Tommy, with instant suspicion.
"Thirty bob. Wish to goodness I
hadn't bought those stamps from Pin-
kert'on."
"You're not going to have any of
mine," said Tommy with increasing
distrust; "haven't been so palmy for
ages. It's all booked, though. Uncle
Roger's off for another three years,
so it's no use hoping for more. What
do you want to know for?"
Dick fumbled in his pocket and produced a dingy paper-backed book.
Tommy recognised it as a savings
bank deposit book. Dick spread it
open upon the table.
"I've got four pounds seventeen in
the Post Office, and thirty bob of
Uncle Roger's tip. But I can't get the
savings bank money out in time."
"Time for what?" asked Tommy,
curiosity mingled with suspicion,
"You seem to be going it if you
want more than that.    I know jolly
well "
* "You don't know a thing about it,
you silly owl; you're just talking
through your hat."
Tommy, the soul of good-nature,
took no offence.
"You're not going to endow an orphanage, I suppose, or start a Home
for Disreputable Cats?"
He burst into loud laughter at his
own wit, and Dick's face cleared. He
rarely smiled, but his expression had
Mumm's Champagne is always found at the best banquets.
"The Feast of Reason," Testimonial Dinner to Hon. Herman A. M
Comptroller of the City of New York, at the Academy of Music, A
15th, 1909, tendered by the Civic Workers and Taxpayers of Brooklyn
recognition of his services to the city as comptroller, and of his effort!
place its finances on a business basis and to protect the interest of the
payers, had the following
flENU
Brooklyn
Cocktail
Sauterne
St. Julien
White Rock
Cigarettes
Cigars
G. H. Mumm
& Co.'s
Extra Dry
Coffee
Crackers
Olives
Cheese
Oyster Cocktail
SOUP
Chicken Gumbo With Okra
RELISHES
Celery Almonds Radishes
FISH
Boiled   Kennebec  Salmon,     Sauce  Hollandaise
ENTREE
Sweetbread Croquettes Green Peas
Fillet of Beef Maitre d'Hotel
Fresh Mushrooms
New String Beans   . Roast Potatoes
Sorbet Roman Punch
ROAST
Squab Chicken
DESSERT
Ice Cream in Forms
Macaroons Bonbons
Escarole Salad
Fancy Cake
Chocolate
been known to vary slightly on occasions. This was one of them. He
squared his shoulders and faced his
cousin across the table.
"Are you going to join in a plot?"
"Rather, if there's any fun to be got
out of it, and if it doesn't cost too
much."
"It won't cost you anything but a
little trouble."
"I'm your man," said Tommy genially.
There was something in the plot
that appealed to Tommy's sense of
humour, and Dick could hardly have
found a more capable fellow-conspirator.
That very afternoon Tommy might
have been seen dismounting from his
bicycle at the chief drapery emporium
of the town. He strode in at the door,
and was instantly intercepted by the
polite shop-walker.
"I want to see the head milliner,"
said Tommy in his loud voice; "at
least, she has to do with hats, hasn't
she? I mean the head dressmaker,
then."
"This way, sir." The shop-walker
showed no surprise. "Third turning
to the right, and up the staircase, if
you please."
The object of • many surprised
glances, Tommy stumbled up the
stairs, his boots ringing noisily on
the brass-clamped carpet.
He had no great liking for his task,,
one which a stouter heart might well
have shirked. The head dressmaker
sailed forward in a beautiful, trained
gown. Her manners, like those of the
shop-walker; were too perfect to allow of any symptom of surprise.
"You wish to see me?" she began,
when Tommy plunged into his subject.
"I say, d'you ever make frocks for
people that you've never seen, and
can't see?"
The dressmaker bowed.
"Frequently, if careful measurements are given."
Tommy showed signs of agitation.
"But don't you without?"
"It would be very difficult indeed."
"Then we're stumped," said Tommy,
more to himself than to her; "you
never do? Can't you make an exception when a thing's wanted as a dead
secret?"
Tommy's face, though freckled, was
distinctly engaging. The head dressmaker's curiosity arose. She had never
before been interviewed in her 1
ness capacity by a schoolboy, and,
so entirely in earnest.
"If I knew a little more "
"Sit down for half a jiffy and
shall.   You look a good sort."
The  head  dressmaker indulge!
the novelty of a smile, and then, w
she heard the   details,   unbent
further.
"The young lady is nearly se"
teen? Then she will want a 1
-,kirt?  Tall?"
"Five feet four and a bit," rej
Tommy. "We all got measured
other day. I say, wasn't it j
lucky?"
"It simplifies matters a good '
certainly," remarked the head di
maker, pencil on lip.   "And slig
This was a poser. Tommy rub
his chin distractedly, then, as if
inspiration, he searchou his pock
finally producing a battered card.
."Eight stone, three pounds, |
ounces exactly. Got weighed one
at the Franco-British. Anything
beside age, height, weight? Size
hands and feet? How shouli;
know?   Just ordinary, I suppose.'
The head dressmaker, whose s<
of humour had grown somewhat ru
was busy making abstruse calc
tions in a notebook.
"One moment, she remarked, t
ing away to an alcove where she 1
parley with a magnificent person
in black silk and spangles. A
what seemed an interminable time
came  back.
"We can do the whole thing
£4 19s iiJ4d," she said; "that will
elude shoes and stockings to m:
gown. And we think if you leav
entirely to us that there will not
a prettier frock at the dance."
"Right-o." Tommy dived into
pocket and brought forth a wi
leather bag intrusted to his care
Dick. "We want her to knock sj
off the other girls, if it's to be dc
she isn't bad-looking, though she's
sister. We'll pay half now and ;
when the things come home, and
just keep it dark."
*     *     *     *     *
"If there had been time to hav
frock made for you I should have
ceded to Mrs. Ridgway's request;
seems so very desirous that ;
should go, Belinda. You have nc
ing you could wear? The white n
lin you had for best last summeri
1 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MAY 15, 1909
Four Very Attractive Dressers
and Stands
Four moderately priced Dressers and Stands are listed here—but a
I sample of the many offerings of our furniture floors. These are picked
I at random from an extensive stock of such bedroom requirements. We
I don't think there is an equal showing elsewhere, or superior values of-
j fered anywhere.  You are welcome to come in any time.
DRESSER AND STAND.
^A low-priced style of excellent design. Made of Golden Surface
Oak. Dresser has large, oval
bevel mirror and three drawers.
Washstand to match with drawer
and cupboard. Well made
throughout. Price for the two
pieces    $37-50
DRESSER AND STAND.
^Another splendid low-priced offering. This dresser has a large
sized square-shaped bevel mirror and three drawers. Wash-
stand to match with large
drawer and cupboard. Made ol
Golden Surface Oak. Price for
the two pieces  $37-50
DRESSER AND STAND.
Here is a very handsome style in
Golden Quartered Oak, highly
finished. The dresser is of very
attractive design with round,
bevel mirror and four drawers.
Stand to match with drawer and
cupboard. The finish is superior.
Price for two pieces $45.00
DRESSER AND STAND.
This is another attractive style in
Golden Quartered Oak, and is
finished in a superior manner.
. Stylish dresser with oval bevel
mirror of first quality and three
drawers. Washstand has one
large and two small drawers and
cupboard. Price for the two
pieces  $60.00
A Half Dozen Stylish Dressing
Tables
—Prices Ranging at $14 to $25.
Come up to our third floor and see the row of excellent dressing
I* table styles we are showing.   Six attractive tables are offered you at
l interesting prices.   These tables come in Early English, Golden Oak
' or Mahogany finish.   Each has a large sized bevel mirror of best quality, and large drawer.   Finish and workmanship is of the superior sort.
Prices Range at from $14 to $35.
Other dressing tables at other prices are shown—by far the largesi
offering in this furniture style in the city.   Pleased to have you come
. in and see our offerings.
I"
WEDDING GIFTS  OF
"LIBBEY" CUT GLASS.
They're a problem, aren't they?
—to some. There's an easy
solution to the difficulty of
choosing a gift that'll be appreciated if you but make your
selection from this stock 01
Libbey Cut Glass.
A bride cannot have too
much and when she see the
name of "Libbey" graven in
the glass she'll know that you
have sent her the very best.
Come in and see the grand
display in a specially lighted
room. Pleased to show you this
glistening crystal.
A New Buifet at $50
If you want to add an attractive piece of furniture to your dining-
room place this new arrival in butfets in it. Here is one of the most
attractive buffet styles we have shown. It is one of those popular
"small" styles in golden quartered oak, highly finished. Has three small
and one large drawers, and two cupboards with satin finished brass
pulls, a large bevel plate mirror of first quality. This is a very handsome style and one we would greatly like to show you.   Priced at $50
A Pretty Music Cabinet
We are offering a new style in a Mahogany finished music cabinet
just received. A plain design but very attractive. Finish is very tine
and at this price is excellent value. Other styles at other prices
shown on third floor, but see this new arrival priced at  $ia
<_%_.
J
SEND FOR OUR GO-CART
CIRCULAR SHOWING OUR
NEW "WHITNEY" 1909 CARTS.
Get the Real Flavor
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The fact that sometimes your coffee is
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Over 100 styles and sizes to select from,
A NEW SHIPMENT JUST IN
Prices ranging from $5.00 to $13.50.
TO RETAILERS
Isn't it poor business  to
carry a large stock in your
little town when the quanti-
v ties you require may be purchased from   us   on   short
notice. We help you. Prompt
' and satisfactory service guar-
I anteed.
WEILER BROS.
Complete Home Furnishers
VICTORIA, B. C.
TO DEALERS
We solicit correspondence
from dealers who are not
already acquainted with us
and who wish to get
acquainted with the largest
wholesalers of Homefurnlsh-
ings in the West. Try furni*
ture as a "side-line"—_
help you.
Zl
I'Aud the summer before," interred Belinda. "I wouldn't be found
lad in it." Aunt Laura made her
|e bitter with "might-have-beens."
wish you had agreed a little ear-
Ir, Aunt Laura; we could have man-
ted to get a frock if we had known
fen a few days ago."
IShe went up to her room, groping
tr way in the darkness to the bed
Lorder to indulge comfortably in her
tief. Her arm encountered some-
ling hard. She felt it all over. It
pvered a iarge surface. She felt
tain. It was a box, a cardboard box,
fed securely with cord.
[Her woes forgotten,, she sprang up
lid struck a light. As the wick of
|e candle flared up she saw that the
bx was addressed to her. It seemed
tes before she could find the scissors
|i cut the string.   Her hands trembled
she drew off the lid, and thrust
lide the interminable wrappings of
nsue paper.
ISomething   white   and   soft   and
peeny lay beneath.    As she shook
out Belinda caught a long breath.
1 was an evening frock, dainty
hough for a princess, but simple
fithal and girlish, as befitting a first
nil.   White shoes and silk stockings
[id a pair of long gloves were tucked
vay in a corner of the box.
|"A grown-up skirt," said Belinda in
I hushed whisper, as she stood with
■ove.    "Could   it   be Aunt   Laura?
Io, the idea's absurd.   But who?"
IShe heard a movement outside, and
lened her door.   It was the house-'
laid, giggling, yet mysterious.
['Rose, do you know anything about
lis?"
[Rose  surveyed the  frock  in  rapt
admiration.   Then, as Belinda'repeated the question, she came to herself.
"All I know, miss, is that Master
Tommy's had a hand in it. Leastways he came and told me when a
box came for you to keep it dark."
"Tommy!" exclaimed Belinda, her
mind full of fairy godmothers, "Tom-
myl"
"Aren't you going to try it on,
Miss Belinda?   I'll help you."
"Yes, yes, of course, and you can
do up my hair, Rose. You're awfully
good at making curls and twirly-
twists. Only be quick; I must show
it to the boys."
In place of the dejected young person, with rather brief skirts and her
hair down, who had entered the room,
there presently emerged a grown-up
vision in white, with flushed cheeks
and eyes that shone radiantly. The
brown hair was piled up picturesquely; Belinda was hardly recognisable.
Like a mushroom she had grown up
in a single hour.
Downstairs she sped, the housemaid
leaning over the banisters to look
after her.
From the sanctum proceeded voices.
Belinda paused an instant to adjust a
curl that threatened to break bounds.
Then she threw the door wide with a
swing, and stood before them.
They looked at her aghast. For
once Dick's stoicism took wings. He
was frankly thunderstruck at the result of his outlay. Tommy took her
for a stranger, another fellow's sister;
then seeing that she was indeed his
own he whistled approval.
Belinda, steeped to the soul in self-
satisfaction, revolved slowly before
them.
"It's really me," she said breathlessly: "somehow—some way—this
has come—a miracle has happened. I
found it on the bed. How do you
like it, boys?"
"Ripping," said Tommy.
Dick made no comment.
"It seems impossible, but Rose said
you had a hand in it, Tommy."
"Doesn't it fit, just?" said that
youth, walking round her and evading
the question. "They've made a jolly
good job of it without measurements.
Lucky I had your height and fighting
weight."
Belinda turned her puzzled eyes towards Dick.
"What does he mean? Had he
anything to do with it?"
"Five bob for gloves," interposed
Tommy, "and bearding the dressmaker in her den. Think that was
equal to several quid. It was Dick's
idea; he paid the piper down to the
last miserable three farthings. Said
he wanted you for once to have a
real, slap-up night out, just to spite
Aunt Laura."
Belinda looked down the snowy
lengths of her skirt, and then at Dick.
Something blurred her vision.
"Oh, Dick!" was all she could say.
Dick stood forbiddingly on the
hearthrug, his shoulders hunched up
to his ears.
"Knew you'd knock spots off Hetty
if you'd half a chance," was his sole
comment.
Military Display and Band Concert.
At Drill Hall, on Friday and Saturday evenings, May 21 and 22, 8.30 p.m.
A very successful meeting was held
at the Drill Hall on Monday evening
last after    the    Regimental    parade.
Col. J. A. Hall was in the chair and
all the officers and sergeants of the
Fifth Regiment were present, together
with the Assault-at-Arms Committee.
The proposed programme was up
for discussion and completion and this
happy collaboration of all the seniors
resulted in some capital items being
decided upon.
The principal features of the exhibition will be: Fancy Marching Squads,
Lance exercises by Sergeants of Fifth
Regiment; 13 Pdr. Gun Drill and Dismounting competitions; Bayonet Exercises; Balaclava Melee, Semaphore
Squad of Signallers under Sergt.
Selfe; Tugs of War, Fifth Regiment
vs. Garrison vs. Navy; Cavalry Sword
Exercises by Officers of Fifth Regiment; Bayonet Fighting; Physical
Drill with Arms to the full Band;
Burlesque Team of six Comic Artists
led by Gnr. G. Muir is being rapidly
put iuto shape under the coaching of
C. S. M. Harry Nesbitt, an old time
favourite.
The whole display will bc concluded
with a grand finale and tableaux,
"Forces of the Empire," in which representatives of every part of His
Majesty's Dominions will be included.
The boys of the Regiment are taking a very keen interest in the show
and are bent on making it the best
ever put on at the Drill Hall and are
working hard every day to achieve
their ambition.
Bandmaster Rumsby has prepared
an excellent" programme for his share
of tlie entertainment which will ensure its success.
Seating accommodation is being
provided for over two thousand peo
pie and the comfort and convenience
of the public is receiving every consideration by the committee in charge.
Where to Look for It
An Oklahoma man fell suddenly ill
and a'collar button was found in his
appendix which a wise surgeon cut
out. Now you can see where the
darned thing goes to when it drops
out of sight.
A Tip.
Dusty Rhodes—I wouldn't have to
ask for help, but I've a lot of real
estate on me hands that I can't get
rid of.
Mrs. Rurall—Try soft soap and
boiling water.
Where the Trouble Was.
"Old Chap, why don't you make up
your mind to marry and settle down?"
"You chump, it takes two minds
to do that, and I haven't quite got
Freda's mind made up yet."
His Boy Not Missing.
Indignant Citizen—Your boy threw
a snowball at me just now.
"Did lie hit you."
"No;  but "
"Then it wasn't my boy."
Fond Mother (to eye specialist)—
Doctor, one of Ralph's eyes is ever
so much stronger than the other.
How do you account for that?
Specialist—Knothole in the baseball fence last summer, madam.
A Missouri man has named his
wife Gasoline because she flares up
so easily. I I
! THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MAY 15, 1909
SAVE MONEY,
Time and Trouble
Why waste your time in starting coal and wood fires? Why put up with the inconvenience, the dirt, dust, worry and work of old-
fashioned methods of cooking when you can cook with gas easily and economically and have lots of time on hand for making calls,
reading and recreation.
The warm weather will soon be here and your kitchen would feel as cool and comfortable as any other part of the house if you cook
with gas. You would be spared the heat and work attendant upon coal fires and escape the awful danger of an oil stove. Tou would
find that Gas for cooking purposes is positively unsurpassed.
Install a good gas range in your kitchen and no ghost of a doubt will disturb your after-purchase thoughts. On the contrary you
will feel an absolute certainty of having received your money's worth.
Gas is cheaper to cook with than either wood or coal and how much easier and more comfortable you would soon determine if you
tried it.
You are welcome to our Showrooms whether to purchase or merely to look. Just now we have some exceptionally fine new Ranges
and Stoves.   Prices would please we feel sure.   Oome and see.   We will gladly demonstrate the merits of Gas for culinary purposes.
te VICTORIA GAS COMFY
Limited
Cor. Fort and Langley Streets, Victoria, B. C.
Sporting Comment
The baseball season in Victoria will
be opened this afternoon when the
local nine will line up against the
Bonnie Braes of Seattle at the Royal
Athletic Park. The local tossers have
been working overtime the last couple
of weeks and are in good fettle to
meet their opponents and all lovers
of the good old game are urged to
turn out this afternoon.
The accident that attended the
Marathon race in Seattle last week is
regretted by all, not only because it
spoiled a good race but mainly to the
fact that the number of spectators
who were injured was very large.
While indoor sports are very good
every effort should be made to have
them out doors and especially at
this time of the year there is absolutely no reason why this should not
be. Running at night out of doors is
not a fair test to outside competitors
and I have been creditably informed
that Coleman would have finished
much better than third had he followed the proper course, but after
running about eight miles he found
he had been on the wron_. track for
about fifteen minutes. This is very
unsatisfactory and the officials of the
Seattle Club should endeavour to hold
their meets during the day.
In connection with long distance
running, Coleman is now in training
for the ten-mile race at Nanaimo in
connection with the Victoria day celebration in that city and with any luck
should be able to show his opponents
his heels.
I am pleased to see that a peaceful
arrangement has been arranged between the Victoria lacrosse team and
the Victoria Wests. I do not want
the Wests to run away with the idea
that I am against the Victoria West
team, for I would have been as well
pleased if the application of theirs
had been accepted provided the other
players would    have  'poined forces. $1,000—Frame building, Constance St.,
With a combination of the two teams
there is no reason why Victoria
should not be well up towards the top
of the league at the finish of the season. There is material in this city at
present to form a strong twelve and
J. A. Sayward, ownerffi; G. Meyer,
architect; W. A. Gleason, contractor.
$1,800—Frame building, Haughton St.,
A. J. Rinso, owner; H. A. Gleason, contractor.
if the players will only attend to $3,200—Frame building, Yates St.,
business the Mainland teams will run J. League, owner; D. C. Frame,
up against a snag when they meet architect; Parfett Bros., contrac-
Victoria. tors.
The attention of lovers of good $1,800—Frame building, King's Road,
sport is at present directed towards R. E. Blakeway, owner and con-
the horse races which will be held in        tractor.
this   city   commencing  next  month. $2,100—Frame  building, Speed Ave.,
The prospects are very bright for a        Alice Budd, owner; D. H. Bale,
very favourable meeting there is no        architect and contractor,
reason why the meeting should not be $1,900—Frame building, Crescent St.,
Exasperating.
From the dark kitchen there emanated a series of thumps and angry
exclamations. Jones was looking for
the cat.
"Pa!" called the son from the stairway.
"Go to bed and .let me alone,"
blurted Jones. "I've just barked my
shins."
"Pa!" insisted Tommy, after a moment's silence.
"Well, what is it? Didn't I tell you
to keep quiet?"   '
"I—I didn't hear your shins bark."
And the next moment Tommy was
being pursued by an angry sire with
a hard hairbrush.
riage, was a worse indictment ei
than that made by the rich old m
who was being importuned to mar
"Why?" she asked sharply. "I fy
three pets as it is: a parrot tl
swears all the morning, a dog tl
growls all the afternoon, and a <
that stays out all night." The <
lady, though, spoke under great pi
vocation, as the lecturer admSti
amid laughter.
a huge success. A little firmness on
the part of the officials will put racing on a good footing in this city
and the directors are determined that
the officials shall be firm.
Town Smith, owner; D. H. Bale,
architect and contractor.
Nerve.
He was only a trapm, but he was
there with the nerve.    Entering the
.     ^ .,,.       _. r      j fashionable lunch parlor he pompous-
Victoria   Budding   Permits,   I»«»«l ly seated himself at a table> devoured
From May 6th to 13th Inclusive.
$800—Frame  building,  Fifth  St.; J.
a pickle and dropped seven lumps of
sugar into his coat pocket.   Then he
Meybrew, owner and contractor. sampied the  horse radish, drank  a
$1,600—Frame building, Maple St., A. giass  0f water and glanced at the
F. Preston, owner and cont'r. menu.
$2,500—Frame building, Comason St., "Well?" snapped the tall waiter in
A. W. McMarran, owner; A. M. the low-cut waistcoat.
McCammon, architect. "Wel1'   howdy-   Pard>"   called   the
$4,Soo-Frame building, Pandora St., «™S" *«M*-   "What ?<>" «et t0
G. A. Porter, owner; A. McCammon, architect and contractor.
$3,000—Frame building, Fort St., A.
B. McNeil, owner; A. McCammon, architect and contractor.
$3,000—Frame building, Pandora and
Menzies Sts., A. B. McNeil, own;
A. McCammon, architect and
contractor.
$2,300—Frame buildingfi (Vancouver
St., A. Wilson, owner; G. Cady,
contractor.
$1,650—Frame building, Shakespeare
St., E. J. Smith, owner and contractor.
eat!"
"Everything," responded the waiter
in icy tones.
"On my word I Got any Welsh rabbit?"
"Yes."
"How do you serve it?"
"Any way you want!"
The tramp edged his chair out a
little. "Well, give me the left hind
foot, old sport.    I want it for luck.'
And helping himself to another biscuit the tramp dodged a saucer and
vanished into the night.
Just the Ordinary Kind.
"Have you any alarm clocks?" inquired a customer.
"Yes, ma'am," said the man behind
the counter. "About what price do
you wish to pay for one?"
"The price is no object, if I can
get the kind that I am after. What I
want is one that will rouse the hired
girl without waking the whole family."
"I don't know of any such alarm
clock as that, ma'am," said the man.
"We just keep the ordinary kind—
the kind that will wake the whole
family without disturbing the hired
girl."
Not So Easy a Problem.
The traveller met an old colou
man with a balky mule.
"What's   the   matter   with   li
uncle?" asked the traveller.
"Full of pure cussedness, sah. H
stay right in dat same position
two or three houahs sah."
"That so?   Why don't you built
fire under him?"
"What?    A fire under dat mt
Lands, mister, if Ah built a fire
der dat mule he'd stay here all (
en wahm hisself."
"Ah, Miss   Pert,"   exclaimed   Mr.
Sapley, "when I gaze into your glor-
$800—Frame building, Quadra St., C. j0us eyes   I see   my   fate   written
Bremer, owner and contractor.      there."
Some Feminine Wit.
Miss Elizabeth Robins, in the course
of her recent lecture on "Shall Women Work?" related an amusing conversation held by her with a learned
man of science who opposed the women's vote on the ground that it
would make them take well-paid pror
fessional posts and neglect their one
duty—marriage. In answer to her
surprised demand for a reason he said
ingenuously: "They won't marry because they will prefer to enjoy themselves." As Miss Robins whimsically
added, this, from an advocate of mar-
Betrayed.
He was very, very young, but
tremely desirous   of   appearing
pink of sophistication.   So he strol
into the gay safe and stood noncl
antly before the bar, like a gem
man of the world.
"Do you—er—keep cocktails?"'
inquired airly.
He did   not   join   in the   ensu
laugh.
"Never kick a live wire when.
down."
At the Market.
Mrs. C Good morning, Brid
I hope your master and mistress h
not forgotten that they are com
to dine with me tonight.
Cook: Indade and they've n<
they've ordered a good hearty t\
at home at six o'clock. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MAY 15, 1908
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Public School, Prince Rupert.
ialed Tenders, superscribed "Tender
Public School, Prince Rupert," will
•eceived by the Honourable the Min-
r of Public Works up to noon on
rsday, the 27th day of May, 1909, for
erection and completion of a two-
ey and basement frame school at
ce Rupert, B.C. ...
ans, Specifications, Contract and
ns of Tender may be seen on ana
r the 26th day of April, 1909, at
offices of the Government Agent at
ce Rupert, of the* Provincial Timber
ector, Vancouver, and at tho Public
ks Department, Victoria, B.C.
ich proposal must be accompanied
in accepted bank cheque or certifl-
of deposit on* a chartered bank of
Ida, made payable to the Hon. the
ister of Public Works for a sum
valent to ten per cent, of the
unt of the tender, which shall be
elted If the party tendering decline
nter Into contract when called upon
o so, or if he fall to complete the
& contracted for. The cheques or
Hflcates of deposit of unsuccessful
•srers will be returned to them upon
execution of the contract.
snders will not be considered unless
e out on the forms supplied, signed
the actual signature of the ten-
r, and enclosed ln tho envelopes
ished.
tie lowest or any tender not necen-
ly accepted.
EVERED CRIDDLE,
Supervising Architect.
lie Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., 20th April, 1909.
24
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve existing on lands on the Black-
water and Euchiniko Rivers, in Cariboo
District, and Range -4, Coast District,
notice of which was published ln the
British Columbia Gazette of July 2nd,
1908, and bearing date of June 30th,
1908, is cancelled.
ROBERT A, RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Department of Lands, .
Victoria, B.C., May 1st, 1909.
may 8
Ail
&M
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
ake notice that George Edward Wil-
»on, of Victoria, gardner, intends to
ly  for  permission  to  purchase the
owing described lands:—Commencing
i post planted at the south east cor-
of Lot 26, near Anaham Lake; thence
th 40 chains; thence east 20 chains;
nee south 40 chains; thence west 20
Ins to point of commencement, con-
ilng 80 acres, more or less,
ated  February  16th,   1909.
QEORGE EDWARD WILKERSON.
27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
CANCELLATION  OF  RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve existing on lands on Mud River,
in Cariboo District, and Range 4, Coast
District, notice of which was published
in the British Columbia Gazette of July
2nd, 1908, and bearing date of June
30th,  1908,  is  cancelled.
ROBERT A, RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., May lst, 1909.
may 8
COAL PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Tumbo Island.
NOTICE ls hereby given that Arthur
E. Hepburn will within 30 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a license to' prospect for coal under the
area described as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
extreme easterly end of Tumbo Island
at high water mark; thence north one
mile; thence east one mlle; thence south
one mile; thence west one mile to place
of beginning.
Dated  27  April,  1909.
may 8
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Trite School,
ealed Tenders, superscribed "Tender
School-house," will be received by
Hon. the Minister of Public Works
to noon of Wednesday, the 2nd day
Tune, 1909, for the erection and common of a large one-room frame
ool-house on Lulu Island, Richmond
icipality.
lans,    specifications,    contract    and
of tender may be seen on and
r -the  10th  day  of May,   1909,   at
offices of the Government Agent
New Westminster; of W. T. Easter-
ok, Esq., Secretary of the School
,rd, Eburne; and at the Public Works
iartment, Victoria, B.C.
ach proposal must be accompanied
an accepted bank cheque or certifl-
s of deposit on a chartered bank of
lada, made payable to the Hon. the
lister of Public Works, for a sum
ivalent to ten per cent, of the amouni
the tender, which shall be forfeited
the party tendering decline to enter
i contract when called upon to do
or if he fall to complete the work
tracted for. The cheques or certl-
tes of deposit of unsuccessful toners will be returned to them upon
execution of the contract,
enders will not be considered unless
out on the forms supplied, signed
h the actual signature of the lened, and enclosed In the envelopes
nished.
he lowest or any tender not neces-
lly accepted.
.    F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer,
lie Works Department,
/ictoria, B.C., May 4th, 1909.    may 8
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Court House,  Fernie.
ealed Tenders, superscribed "Tender
Court House, Fernie, B.C.," will
received by the Hon. the Minister
Public Works up to noon of Wednes-
the 9th day of June, 1909, for the
ction and completion of a Concrete
Brick Court House at Fernie, B.C.
lans, specifications, contract and
ns of tender may be seen on and
er the 10th day of May, 1909, at the
of the Government Agent at
*nie; the Government Agent at Nel-
; the Government Agent at Revel-
ce, and at the Public Works Depart-
lt, Victoria, B.C.
ach proposal must be accompanied
an accepted bank cheque or certifl-
S of deposit on a chartered bank of
lada, made payable to the Hon. the
lister of Public Works, for a sum
Ivalent to ten per cent, of the
rant of the tender, which shall be
'eited if the party tendering decline
jnter into contract when called upon
do so, or if he fall to complete the
•k contracted for. The cheques or
iflcates of deposit of unsuccessful
lerers will be returned to them upon
execution of the contract,
enders will not be considered unless
ie out on the forms supplied, signed
i the actual signature of the ten-
Br, and enclosed ln the envelopes
ilshed.
he lowest or any tender not neces-
ly accepted. __,
EVERED CRIDDLE,
Supervising Architect,
ille Works Department,
Ictoria, B.C., May 4th, 1909.    may 8
COAL  PROSPECTING  NOTICE.
Tumbo Island.
NOTICE is hereby given that Harry
Mclvor Hepburn will within 30 days
from this date apply to the Assistant
Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for
a license to prospect for coal under
the area described as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
extreme westerly end of Tumbo Island
at high water mark; thence north one
mile; thence west one mile; thence
south one mile; thence east one mile
to place of beginning.
Dated 27 April, 1909. may 8
Commencing at a post on the N. W.
corner of section 18, township 27, thence
east one mile, thence south one mile,
thence west one mile, thence north one
mile to place of beginning.
Dated 22 March, 1909. may 8
COAL   PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Rupert District.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Chris
Nordstrom will within 30 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
license to prospect for coal on the land
and under the area described as follows:
Commencing at a post on the N. W.
corner of section 18, township 27; thence
east one mile, thence south one mile;
thence west one mile; thence north one
mile to place of beginning.
Dated 22 March, 1909. may 8
COAL   PROSPECTING  NOTICB.
Rupert District.
NOTICE is hereby given that Philip
Nordstrom will within 30 days from this
date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a license to prospect for coal on the land
and under the area described as follows:
Commencing at a post on the N. E.
corner of section 13, township 30; thence
south one mile; thence west one mile;
thence north one mile; thence east one
mile to place of beginning.
Dated 22 March,  1909. may 8
NOTICE ls hereby given that H. Teb-
but will, after the expiration of thirty
days from this date, apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands and
Works, at Victoria, for a Coal ProB-
pectlng License over the following described area on Saturna Island:
Commencing at the northwest corner
of section 11, thence north one mile;
thence east one mlle; thence south one
mile; thence west one mile to place of
commencement.
Dated April lst, 1909.
may 16
NOTICE is hereby given that C. C. L.
Alexander will, after the expiration of
thirty days from.this date, apply to the
Assistant Commissioner of Lands and
Works, at Victoria, for a Coal Prospecting License over the following described
area on Saturna Island.
Commencing at the northeast corner
of the southeast quarter of section IT,
thence south one mile and eaBt one
mile, and north one mile and west one
mile to the place of beginning.
Dated April 1st,' 1909.
may 16
and petroleum under the foreshore and
under the water on the lands in and
opposite  Denman  Island,   Comox  District, and described as  follows:—Commencing at a post planted on the sea
beach near the Intersection of the centre line of section 20 and High Water
Mark, Denman Island; thence west 40
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 30 chains, more or less, to High
Water Mark; thence southerly along sea
beach to place of commencement
Dated this 26th day of March, 1909.
G. C. CAREW GIBSON,
may 16 E. Priest, Agent
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days
after date I intend to apply to the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum under the foreshore and
under the water on the lands in and
opposite Denman Island, Comox District,
and described as follows:—Commencing
at a post planted on the sea beach, at
a point about 10 chains north from the
post between sections 11 and 12, Denman Island; thence west 60 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence east 80
chains to High Water Mark on Denman
Island-; thence northerly along shore line
to place of commencement.
Dated this 26th day of March, 1909.
M. A. GREEN,
may 15 E. Priest, Agent.
NOTICE ls hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum under the foreshore
and under the water on the lands in and
opposite Denman Island, Comox District, and described as follows :---Oom-
menclng at a post planted on the sea
beach near the Intersection of the line
between sections 3 and 4, Denman Island
and High Water Mark; thence west 60
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 60 chains, more or less, to High
Water Mark on Denman Island; thence
northerly along shore line to place of
commencement.
Dated this 26th day of March, 1909.
F. CAREW GIBSON,
may 16 E. Priest, Agent.
COAL  PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Tumbo Island.
NOTICE is hereby given that Frank
H. Hepburn will within 30 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
license to prospect for coal under the
area described as follows:—
Commencing at a post made on a
stump at the centre of the north shore
of Tumbo Island at high water mark.
Thence north one mile; thence west one
mile; thence south one mile; thence east
one mile to place of beginning.
Dated 27 April, 1909. may 8
COAL  PROSPECTING  NOTICE.
Tumbo Island.
NOTICE is hereby given that Barbara
G. Hepburn will within 30 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
license to prospect for coal under the
area described as follows:—
Commencing at a post made on a
stump at the centre of the north shore
of Tumbo Island, at high water mark;
thence north one mile; thence east one
mile; thence south one mile; thence
west one mile to place of bglnning.
Dated 27 April, 1909. may 8
COAL  PROSPECTING  NOTICE.
Rupert District.
NOTICE ls hereby given that Theresa
Elliott Pilling will within 30 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
license to prospect for coal on the land
and under the area described as follows:
Commencing at a post on the S. W.
corner of section 3, in township 31;
thence north one mile; thence east one
mile; thence south one mile; thence west
one mile to place of beginning.
Dated 22 March, 1909. may 8
COAL  PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Rupert District.
NOTICE is hereDy given that E.
Miles will within 30 days from this date
apply to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands at Victoria, for a license to
prospect for coal on the land and under
the area described as follows:
Commencing at a post on the S. E.
corner of section 4, ln township 31,
thence north one mlle, thence west one
mile, thence south one mile, thence east
one mile to place of beginning.
Dated 22 March, 1909.- may 8
COAL  PROSPECTING  NOTICE.
Rupert District.
NOTICE is hereby given that George
Nordstrom will within 30 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
license to prospect for coal on the land
and under the area described as follows:
Commencing at a post on the N. W.
corner of section 26 ln township 30;
thence south one mile; thence east one
mile; thence north one mile; thence west
one mile to place of beginning.
Dated 22 March, 1909. may 8
COAL   PROSPECTING  NOTICE.
Rupert District.
NOTICB is hereby given that A. E.
Pilling will, within 30 days from this
date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a license to prospect for coal on the land
and under the area described as follows:
Commencing at a post on the N. E.
corner of section 23, township 30, thence
south one mile, thence west one mile;
thenee north one mile; thence east one
mile to place of beginning.
Dated 22 March, 1909. may 8
COAL PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Rupert District.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Charlie
Nordstrom will within 30 days from this
date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a license to prospect for coal on the land
and under the area described as follows:—
NOTICE is hereby given that E. M.
King will, after the expiration of thirty
days from this date, apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands and
Works, at Victoria, for a Coal Prospecting License over the following described area on Saturna Island.
Commencing at the northeast corner
of the southeast quarter of section 17;
thence west one mile; thence north one
mile; thence east one mile, and one mlle
south to place of commencement.
Dated April 1st, 1909.
may 16
NOTICE ls hereby given that L. Alexander will, after the expiration of 30
days from this date, apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands and
Works, at Victoria, for a Coal Prospecting License over the following described area on Saturna Island.
Commencing at the northeast corner
of the southeast quarter of section 17,
thence south one mile, and west one
mile, and north one mile, and east one
mile to the place of beginning.
Dated April lst, 1909.
may 16
NOTICE Is hereby given that H. M.
King will, after the expiration of thirty
days from this date, apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands and
Works, at Victoria, for a Coal Prospecting License over the following described
area on Saturna Island.
Commencing at the northeast corner
of the southeast quarter of section 17;
thence east one mlle; thence north one
mile; thence west one mile, and one
mile south to place of commencement.
Dated April lst, 1909.
may 16
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect
for coal and petroleum under the foreshore and under the water on the landa
ln and opposite Denman Island, Comox
District, and described as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted on the sea
beach near the Intersection of the line
between sections 28 and 27, Denman
Island and High Water Mark; thence
west 65 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence eaat 66 chains, more or less, to
High Water Mark on Denman Island;
thence northerly along shore line to
place of commencement.
Dated this 25th day of March, 1909.
E. CAREW GIBSON,
may 16 E. Priest, Agent.
NOTICE ls hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to
the Hon. the Chief Commissioner ot
Lands and Works for a license to pros*
pect for coal and petroleum under the
foreshore and under the water on the
lands ln and opposite Denman Island,
Comox District, and described as follows:—Commencing at a post planted on
the sea beach near the intersection of
the line between sections 28 and 27t
Denman Island and High Water Mark
on Baynes Sound; thence west 65 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 74
chains, more or less, to High Water
Mark on Denman Island; thence southerly along shore line to place of commencement.
Dated this 26th day of March, 1909.
T. A. CAREW GIBSON,
may 16 E. Priest, Agent.
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum under the foreshore
and under the water on the lands ln and
opposite Denman Island, Comox District,
and described as follows:—Commencing
at a post planted on the sea beach near
the Intersection of the line between sections 6 and 10, Denman Island and High
Water Mark; thence west 60 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 30 chains, more or
less, to High Water Mark, on Denman
Island; thence northerly along shore
line to place of commencement.
Dated this 26th day of March, 1909.
A. D. BARCLAY,
may 16 E. Priest, Agent.
NOTICE Is hereby given that 30 days
after date I Intend to apply to the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for coal
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Hon. the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum under the
foreshore and under the water on the
lands in and opposite Denman Island,
Comox District, and described as follows:—Commencing at a post planted
on the sea beach, near the Intersection
of the line between sections 5 and 10,
Denman Island and High Water Mark;
thence west 60 chains; thence north 60
chains, more or less, to High Water
Mark on Denman Island; thence southerly along shore line to place of commencement.
Dated this 25th day of March, 1909.
A. R. GREEN,
may 15 E. Priest, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to
the Hon. the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum under the
foreshore and under the water on the
lands ln and' opposite Denman Island,
Comox District, and described as follows:—Commencing at a post planted on
the sea beach near the intersection of
the line between sections 3 and 4, Denman Island and High Water Mark;
thence west 40 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains or less
to High Water Mark on Denman Island;
thence southerly along shore line to
place of commencement.
Dated this 25th day of March, 1909.
F. W. GREEN,
may 16 E. Priest, Agent.
Dr. W. F. Fraser
DENTIST
Has Established Himself At
723 Yates Street,
Garesche Block
Where he is prepared to perform
dental operation according to the
latest scientific methods. Specialist
in Crown and Bridgework.
Phone 261. Hours: 9 a.m., 4 p.m.
NOTICE ls hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to
the Hon. the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum under the
foreshore and under the water on the
lands in and opposite Denman Island,
Comox District, and described as follows:—Commencing at a post planted
on the sea beach at a point about 10
chains north from the post between sections 12a and 18, Denman Island; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 30 chains, more or less, to
High Water Mark, on Denman Island;
thence southerly along shore line to
place of commencement
Dated this 26th day of March, 1909.
may 16 E. PRIEST.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Hon. the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum under the
foreshore and under the water on the
lands in and opposite Denman Island,
Comox District, and described as follows:—Commencing at a post planted on
the sea beach, at a point about 10 chains
north from the post between sections
12a and 18, Denman Island; thence
south 80 chatns; thence east 80 chains
to High Water Mark on Denman Island;
thence northerly along shore line to
place of commencement.
Dated this 26th day of March, 1909.
P. LE POER TRENCH,
may 16 E. Priest Agent.
"LAND REGISTRY ACT."
In the matter of an application for a
Duplicate Certlflcate of Title to part
of section 20, range 8, Quamichan
District, and part of section 1, range
8, Somenos District, containing ln
all 35 1-3 acres.
NOTICE ls hereby given that It Is my
Intention at the expiration of one month
from the date of the first publication
hereof to issue a Duplicate Certificate of
Title to said lands Issued to James
Robertson on the 12th August, 1899, and
numbered 6446C.
Land Registry Offlce, Victoria, B.C.,
the 8th day of April, 1909.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
may 16 Registrar-General of Titles.
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
Y. M. C. A.
40 BROAD STREET.
Make Some
Money on
the Side
CYPHERS
INCUBATORS AND
BROODERS
Will enable you to do this without trouble. Call and see us or
write.
WATSON &
McGregor
647 Johnson St.
J
1 Prompt, Careful.!
if
I Leave Your
g Baggage Checks at
I  The Pacific
it
I    Transfer
I       Co.
I No. 4 FORT ST.
H VICTORIA
0 A. E. KENT, Freprietar
1 Phase 249.
MAPS
OP
Timber and Land.
The   kind   that   show   what's
taken  up  and   what's  vacant.
Electric Blue Print & Map Co.
1218 Langley Street
Victoria. B. C.
"
Houses Built
ON THE
Instalment
Plan
d. hTbale
Contractor and Builder.
Phone 1140.
Cor. Fort and Stadacona Streets THE WEEK, SATURDAY MAY 15, 1909,
4_\ ^jt/tmi i\Jkft ir i» •^jmt'SiiQ  one decline to believe that they will
r"	
t
At The Street
Corner
By THE LOUNOBK
The opinion freely expressed where
men do congregate—that is men who
think—is that the City Council is riding for a fall. Their action in turn
ing down the financial proposals of
the Parks Committee can have but
one result, to lower them still further
in the public estimation. The Parks
Committee have done good work—
they are public spirited men. The
Chairman is a man of substance and
great executive ability. His only
fault seems to be that he is a newcomer, but that fault is lessening
every year. Few, if any, men of his
means and position have hitherto been
willing to take time from their multifarious business interests to sit on
Civic Committees and try to bring
chaos out of confusion. Never has
the business controlled by the Parks
Board been half as well done as under
the present regime. To say that the
Committee presided over by such a
Chairman is not to be allowed to fix
the pay of a superintendent is ridiculous. I suppose some musty fusty
legal document will be unearthed
from the City Archives to the effect
that as the Council is the elected body
it alone is responsible to the ratepayers, etc., etc. We have heard all
this before, and technically it may be
true, but in practice the Council retains its control by endorsing the recommendations of its Board—by failing to do this in the present instance
it has stultified its own action in
creating the Board and has proved
once more that "Bumble" is an ass.
It is obvious that the City Council
is unable to live up to the progressive
programme Which the citizens of Victoria have initiated—at least this is
the opinion of those who look on.
Judged by results the highest paid
servants on the civic roll are the aldermen.
*    *     *
The Race Meet is the one topic of
conversation, wherever I go. At the
moment Victoria is divided into two
camps—those who favour the meet
and those who declare that it may
bring upon us the doom of the cities
of the Plain. For my part I want "to
see the horses go round." I want to
see some fun in what has been the
sleepiest city on the Continent and is
only just waking up. I want to see
some one on our streets other than
on Saturday night, as well as in our
stores. For God's sake let us have
a little excitement or we shall go
mad! Ar occasional tilt between a
revered ecclesiatic and a veteran journalist on the colour of Ireland's flag
may make an Irishman's blood flow
a little faster, but it is a very mild
form of dissipation for the average
man. Neither does a Japanese reception or a once in a while Chinese
funeral furnish the champagne of life.
Perhaps wc are expected to find its
sparkle in the maypole dance and
sports on the village green of which
signalize the 24th—revered and ancient memory. But I must confess
that these, albeit encrusted with thc
respectability of age, stir not my
pulses and 1 crave for the crowding,
and the yelling, and the vivacity and
the abandon and the "joi de vivre"
which reaches its apotheosis on the
race-course. It may be unfashionable—at least in Victoria—but is justified of many honoured precedents
and in spite of the hostility of well-
meaning but all too exacting "reformers" I imagine that Directors of
the Status of Dave Ker, Gouldie Wilson and George Fraser will be allowed
to show what they can do and I for
* * *
Banzai,—Banzai—once to a Japanese Prince, Fushimi, now to a Japanese Admiral and his attendant naval
officers British Columbia has, or at
any rate had a quarrel with Nippon
over the immigration question, that
has been adjusted, or at any rate
patched up, whichever way you look
at it. British Columbia never had a
quarrel with the navy of a friendly
power and ally of England. If the
visitors were Hottentots they would
be entitled to courteous treatment as
"strangers within our gates." That
they will receive this in Victoria is
assured. No man is entitled to be regarded as a Canadian who is too
small to shout Banzai.
The new tram cars have arrived;
they are a vast improvement on the
old in two respects—they furnish
legalized standing room on the platform and they will accelerate the service by travelling one way, with no
reverse. It will take people some
time to get used to the single entrance, especially when it is on the
off-side on muddy streets, but then
someday we are going to have no
muddy streets in Victoria, so that
need not be taken into account. Let
the City concede the request of the
B. C. E. R .and then Jordan River
will be developed; we shall have plenty of power, plenty of light, and small
bills; everyone will wear a smile that
will not come off and Rip Van Winkle
will wake up, rub his eyes and say
"Nobody knows me but my dog Snider—and where is Snider?"
Talking of tram cars reminds me of
an amusing incident which occurred
on a Fort Street car on Thursday
evening, lt was about 8:15, the theatre car was pretty full, at any rate
there were no vacant seats. A recent arrival—a lady—boarded the car
at Cook St. As she moved in through
the crowd on the platform a man
moved along on his seat and made
just enough room for her to sit by
him, but a smart boy had been waiting some time for just such an opportunity and slipped into the vacant
place. The man said nothing, the
lady blushed a brick-dust red and
stridently remarked "If I wasn't such
a puffect lady I'd slap your face." At
Vancouver Street she left the car with
many indignant tosses of her plumes,
and in the odour of—patchonli.
Ofa**m4&*
A. Y. P. E.
Seattle, Wash., May 14.—The Art
Exhibit of the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific
Exposition is now covered by insurance to the amount of $1,500,000.
This first policy was negotiated
through the Lloyd's of London and
covers the principal part of the collection secured from European galleries.
Thc adjustment of insurance rates
is satisfactorily determined, and insures the appearance of a number of
rare and valuable art specimens which
have not previously been exhibited
in the United States. The Oriental
art displays which are to appear in
the Art Exhibit Hall of the Exposition, will require the placing of other
policies nearly equalling the European amount, and these will be taken
out as fast as the exhibits are installed.
The Fine Arts Exhibit Building of
the Exposition is a building of brick
and steel construction, and is as near
fireproof as is possible to erect. It is
one of the permanent structures, and
at the close of the exposition will be
used as the chemistry school of the
State University of Washington.
Victoria Theatre.
One of the most attractive offerings
of the present season will be heard,
when Shakespeare's "A Midsummer
Night's Dream" is to be presented by
the Ben Greet Company and the well
known Russian Symphony Orchestra
of New York City will play Mendelsohn's musical setting to the 1 work.
This combination has proved to be
one of the best drawing and most entertaining affairs all through the East
and its production here, if one may
judge from the great interest being
taken by students and music lovers,
will be an important event.
CASCADE MINERAL CLAIM.
Situate in the Alberni Mining Division
of the Alberni District.
Where located—On Uchucklesit Harbour, Alberni Canal.
TAKE NOTICE that we the Cascade Mining Company, Limited, Non-
Personal Liability, Free Miner's Certificate No. B23151, intend, 60 days
from the date hereof, to apply to the
Mining Recorder for a Certificate of
Improvements for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of the above
claim.
And further take notice that action
under section 37 must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated this 18th day of March, 1909.
THE CASCADE COPPER
MINING COMPANY, LIMITED
mch 13       , Non-Personal Liability.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
North Dairy School House.
COAL  PROSPECTING NOTICB.
Rupert District.
NOTICE ls hereby given that Ole
Strandwald will within 30 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
license to prospect for coal on the land
and under the area described as follows:
Commencing at a post on the S. E.
corner of section 19, township 21, thence
north one mile, thence west one mile,
thence south one mile, thence east one
mile to place of beginning.
Dated 22 March, 1909. may 8
COAL  PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Rupert District.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Olaf
Strandwald will within 30 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
license to prospect for coal on the land
and under the area described as follows.-
Commencing at a post on the S. W.
corner of section 21, township 27, thence
north one mlle, thence east one mile,
thence south one mile, thence west one
mile to place of beginning.
Dated 22 March, 1909. may 8
Sealed Tenders, superscribed "Tenders
for School-house," will be received by
the Hon. the Minister of Public Works
up to noon of Thursday, the 20th day
of May, 1909, for the erection and completion of a two-room frame School-
house, situated near the Pumping Station on the Quadra Street extension,
in-the Saanich Municipality.
Plans, specifications, contract anu
forms of tender may be seen on ana
after the 26th day of April, 1909, at
the Public Works Department, Victoria,
B. C.
Each proposal must be accompanleu
by an accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank of
Canada, made payable to the Hon. the
Minister of Public Works, for a sum
equivalent to ten per cent, of tne
amount of the tender, which shall De
forfeited if the party tendering decline
to enter Into contract when called upon
to do so, or if he fail to complete tne
work contracted for. The cheques or
certificates of deposit of unsuccessful
tenderers will be returned to them upon
the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the forms supplied, signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed In the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
EVERED CRIDDLE,
Supervising Aichitect.
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., 20th.April, 1909.
apl 24
NOTICE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that the Reserve existing on Lot 223, Rupert District, ls cancelled.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Department of  Lands,
Victoria, B.C., March 17th, 1909.
WEEK MONDAY, MAY 1
The New Qrar
•VUlfM a CSMIIIII,    fr.-jrl.t
■ anBt.in.iit •( MIT. JAM I ISS
COOKE AND MISS ROTHE
Eccentric Acrobatic Dancing
Comedy and the First Prese
tion in Victoria of the "Apac
dance "V Amour De L' Apac
(The Dance of the Underwoi
Direct from the Moulin Ro
Paris, a Sensational Parislai
Novelty.
ALI    BEN    HASSAN
The Hindu Brothers
First Appearance, Magicians, (
Spinners, Sword Fighters.
CLARA THROPP
The Somewhat Different
Comedienne.
HERBERT BRENNAN AN
HELEN DOWNING.
In a Farcical Staire
"The Intruders."
FRANCES McAULEY
Operatic Soloist.
THOMAS J. PRICE
In Pictured Melody.
FRANCH MOVING PICTU1
Grand Peerless Orchestra.
NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the Reserve on Lot 29a, Range 4, Coast District, is cancelled.
R. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of
Lands and Works.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., 16th October, 1908.
3m
mmmmw%m&
COAL  PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Rupert District.
NOTICE is hereby given that Harold
Strandwald will within 30 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Com*
missioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
license to prospect for coal on the land
and under the area described as follows
Commencing at a post on the N. W.
corner of section 15, township 27, thence
south one mile, thence east one mlle,
thence north one mile, thence west one
mile to place of beginning.
Dated 22 March, 1909. may 8
COAL PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Rupert District.
NOTICE is hereby given that C. D.
Johnson will within 30 days from this
date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a license to prospect for coal on the land
and under the area described as follows:
Commencing at a post on the S. W.
corner of section 22, township 27, thence
north one mile, thence east one mile,
thence south one mlle, thence west one
mile to place of beginning.
Dated 22 March, 1909. may 8
WING ON
Employment Agent.
Wood and Coal for Sale.
Also Scavenging.
1709 Government St. Phone 43
VICTORIA, B.C.
'Phone 112.
Monday, May 17th, Only.
THE RUSSIAN SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
and
THE BEN GREET PLAYERS
In Shakespeare's
A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM
Prices—$2.00, $1.50, $1.00, 75c, 50c.
Now Selling Seats.
19 0 9
Tennis
Goods
1
w
I
I
1
1
1 RACQUETS.             S
__ -$
I Doherty   $10.00 &
I Ward & Wright      900 g
H Slazenger     9.00 p
H Longwood       4-SO *
$ Pastime     6.00 |
& Surprise     2.00 *.«
4 Also other styles at all        j|
|j weights.
I BALLS.
_   Slazenger, 1909  $4.50 g
$j Slazenger, 1908  4.00 %
Practice     3.50
Nets,  Poles, Tapes,  Presses, <^
Markers and everything needed ^
for Tennis outfits. S|
1
REFLECTIONS
The fact is Dudleigh, the m
ment a man takes to a pipe,
becomes a philosopher. It's t
poor man's friend; it calms t
mind, soothes the tender, ai
makes a man patient under d
Acuities. It has made more go<
men, good husbands, kind ma
ters, indulgent fathers than ai
other blessed thing on this ui
versal earth. This.is not a je
but a truth, solved only
Dudleigh's mixture.
1
The Army
and Navy
Cigar Store.
Richardso
Phone 346
Mrs. Melville Pari
SOPRANO
CONCERT,
ORATORIO,
OPI
VOICE PRODUCTION AND
EXPRESSION IN SINGI
Pupils Received at Residence
1645 OAK BAY AVENUE,
(Near Terrace Ave.)
I M. W. WAITT & CO., Limited
|j HERBERT KENT, Mjr.
1 1004 Qovernment  Street, p
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that I, William Siml-
son, of Seattle, Washington, intend to
apply for permission to prospect 101
coal over the following described lands:
—Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner of E. Moore's location; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated November 10th, 1908.
WILLIAM SIMISON,
may 8 F. B. Allard, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Richard Gi-
guere, of Everett, Washington, hotel-
keeper, intend to apply for permission
to prospect for coal over the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the north-west corner of Arcadus Giguere's licence; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 10th, 1908.
RICHARD GIGUBRB,
may 8 F. B. Allard, Agent.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS,
Hospital for Insane, Coquitlam Fa
Alternative Sealed Tenders, su
scribed "Tender for Chronic Bull,
Hospital for Insane, Coquitlam Fa
will be received by the Hon. the
lster of Public Works up to nooi
Monday, the 31st day of May, 1909:
1. For the erection and comple
of a reinforced concrete and brick bi
ing.
2. For the erection and part con;
tion of a re-inforced concrete and b
building.
Plans, specifications, contract
forms of tender may be seen on
after the 26th day of April, 1909.
the offices of the Government Af
New Westminster; of the Provli
Timber Inspector, Vancouver, and al
Public Works Department, Victoria,
Each proposal must be acoempa
by an accepted bank cheque or ce
cate of deposit on a chartered ban
Canada, made payable to the Hon.
Minister of Public Works, for a
equivalent to ten per cent, of
amount of the tender, which shal
forfeited if the party tendering dec
to enter into contract when called 1
to do so, or if he fail to complete
work contracted for. The chequei
certificates of deposit of unsucces
tenderers will be returned to them
on the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered ur
made out on the forms supplied, sii
with  the actual signature of the
derer,   and   enclosed   in   the  envel
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not ni
sarlly accepted.
EVERED  CRIDDLE.
Supervising Archite
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., 20th April, 1909.
apl 24

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