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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Dec 29, 1906

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Bank of Hamilton
Capital >j,5«),ooo
Jtewrre $2,500,000
Total Assets, $29,000,000
Interest paid half-yearly on deposits of
$1 and upwards in Savings Department.
Drafts and Money Orders on all parts of
the world. Vancauver tranches, cor.
of Hasting and Hamilton Sts., Powell St.
Cedar Grove. :
SJUUISiJLAJlJIJI&SLA»AS)JlJiJLSO
UtSJUl
The Week
TL British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vancouver B. &.
rstvrmmn
y
Stewart Williams
""3
R. C. Janion
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION AND
REAL ESTATE ACENTS
.    51 FORT ST. VICTORIA, B. C.   •
(jUUUUUUUUUUUUl<JUUJLM^
Vol. III.   No. 48.
DECEMBER 29, 1906
One Dollar Pe* Annum
The Editor's Review
Of Current Topics.
The Honourable R. F. Green
A Losing has resigned the position of
Transaction.   Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works which he has held
since the accession to power of the McBride
Administration. The news was received last
week end, with mingled feelings of jubilation
and regret. The Week does not envy any
who shared in the former, and unless we are
very greatly mistaken their rejoicing will be
short lived. Those party organs which for a
year have waged a campaign of slander and
abuse against Mr. Green have well maintained
their reputation by refusing to accept his own
statement and that of the Premier, that his
resignation was voluntary. They prefer to
assert, they can hardly believe, that he was
dismissed. If this were true it would require
a greater stretch of imagination than even
the charitable spirit of the season would jus-
tfy, to believe that Mr. Green would he prepared to enter the electoral campaign and to
fight the battles of the Government which had
dismissed him. But such logical deductions
as these do not trouble the papers which have
been persecuting Mr. Green. The whole attack has been scandalous in the extreme, it was
not aimed at Mr. Green but, through him, at
the Government. It matters not that the
serious charges brought against the ex-Commissioner have been pronounced false by independent Commissions. The policy was to
damage the Government, and by a persistent
course of slander against the most important
spending Department to weaken public confidence in the whole Administration. The attack has failed as thoroughly in this as in its
personal aspect, and havng regard to the unfair method which has been adopted and the
unprincipled line of action pursued, no reasonable man can doubt that there will be a
revulsion of feeling throughout the Province
in favour of the Minister who has been maligned. The personal charges having failed,
public attention will be centered upon the
manner in which the ex-Commissioner has
administered his Department, and not even
the most vindictive of his critics has been
able to point to a weak spot in his administration. The business of the Department
was never as well looked after. Mr. Greeu
has been the hardest worked servant in the
pay of the Government. The one man always
to be found in his office attending to the
arduous details which most ministers delegate
to their subordinates. The enormous expansion of the lumbering, mining and agricultural industries has increased ths work far
beyond anything with which his predecessors
had to grapple. Mr. Green has risen to its
requirements. He has brought business experience, special knowledge, intelligence and
laborious industry to bear upon the many
problems with which he has had to deal. The
result is that from a purely business standpoint everything is in first-class shape, there
are no arrears of work, every industry has
been stimulated and strengthened by his contact, and his successor, whoever he may be,
will step into a well-ordered House. Public
men in Canada have to endure a measure of
abuse unknown in any other country.   Almost
the only weapon recognised for general use
by political parties of the Dominion is the
mud-sling. As a rule politicians are able to
appraise this kind of attack at its true value,
but here and there, heedless of the experience
of those who have gone before, a man with
special gifts for public service allows himself
to be enticed into the arena, and, when there,
deludes himself with the idea that he may
still retain a little of his natural sensitiveness.
Such an one is quickly disillusionised, and as
a rule withdraws at the first opportunity. The
experience of Mr. Greeu is not as far removed from this as his critics imagine, and
in his retirement the Government loses a
capable minister, the public service an able
and efficient officer, and the Department a
man whom every one of his subordinates respects, and whose departure they signalised
by a recognition which was as well merited as
it was unexpected.
A fortnight ago The Week gave
Sparring the first intimation to the Prov-
For Wind,   ince that the Honourable W. B.
Mclnnes was to re-enter political
life and lead the Liberal Party in the forthcoming electoral campaign. Our information
was precise and authoritative. This, however,
did not prevent the leading Liberal organs from
denying its accuracy, which adds not a little
to our satisfaction in seeing them endorse it
this week. Just why the Victoria Times and
the Vancouver World should see fit to deny
when they do not ignore the utterances of
The Week today and to confirm them tomorrow is a little puzzling to ordinary intelligence. But let that pass. The Nelson News,
which knows that The Week is not in the
habit of publishing unreliable statements, at
once conceded the probability of our story,
but, in common with the- leading Liberal organs, denied in the most emphatic terms that
Mr. Mclnnes was to lead the party, and in
a well-reasoned editorial distinctly reflects the
attitude of the Liberal Party in the Kootenay
when it declares that somebody else besides
the Ottawa machine will have a say in electing the leader of the Liberal Party in this
Provinco. Editor Deane not unnaturally winds
up with a vigorous defence of Mr. J. A. Macdonald, the present leader, who is a Kootenay
man, and according to the News—and indeed
all the Liberal organs—is in every respect
admirable. Thc Victoria Times, when reluctantly admitting that the forecast of The
Week was correct, gave great prominence to
the statement that Mr. Mclnnes would go
into the fight not as leader but as supporter
of the present leader. Might it not be a
matter of interest to know what Mr. Mclnnes
himself has to say ou this subject? Is the
Governor of the Yukon a gentleman of such
modesty and so addicted to self-effacement
that he would hanker after a subordinate position in Provincial politics? No doubt the
patriotism, self-denial and unselfish devotion
of the House of Mclnnes to the public service
might naturally lead the Liberal Party to
conclude that the present scion of the House
despises loaves and fishes and is quite ready
to sacrifice a splendid position for the empty
honour of playing second fiddle to Mr. J. A.
Macdonald, and the remote possibility of helping Mi*. J. A. Macdonald to the Premiership
of B. C. No doubt, if Mr. Mclnnes bad any
such unselfish promptings, they would manifest themselves in precisely this manner. Mr.
Macdonald is the very first man whom he
would wish to help into that honourable position. The treatment which he received at
the hands of the member for Rossland four
years ago must have left an indellible impression upon the mind of the boy from Alberni,
and in thinking of it with gratitude the leaders of the Liberal Party seem to think that
it is natural that he should wish to repay
Mr. Macdonald in the generous manner which
they have outlined. The Week is irresistibly
driven to this conception of Mr. Mclnnes'
character and attitude because to suggest that
other considerations could influence him at
such a crisis in the affairs of his party would
be out of keeping at any rate with "the
Christmas spirit," and even the Victoria
Times has declared that its promptings must
be observed. Alas, however, for all these
charitable conclusions. There is one staggering fact which the Ottawa machine as well as
the Provincial leaders of the party have sedulously concealed, but for the accuracy of which
The Week vouches. It is that up to the time
of going to press the Honourable W. B. Mclnnes, Governor of the Yukon, and scion of
the House of self-sacrifice and unselfishness,
has positively refused both to resign the Governorship and to enter Provincial politics unless he is to play the first fiddle. In diplomatic but unmistakable phraseology he has
made it clear that he will not follow the lead
of Mr. J. A. Macdonald or any other man, and
that the price, The Week does not say the
only price, of his acquiescence, is the position
at the head of the party to which by universal consent he was entitled four years ago.
The absolute proof of this statement is at the
moment of writing in the hands of the leaders
of the party in Victoria and the Times is
cognizant of the fact. That the impasse will
be cleared there is little doubt, but it will be
in the manner predicted by The Week. The
member for Rossland will gracefully resign
his position as leader to make way for thc
Honourable W. B. Mclnnes, who, at the earnest
solicitation of the Liberal Party, the Ottawa
machine, and the Grand Trunk Pacific interests, will attempt to lead the Liberal Party
to victory and to dethrone the Administration
which is an effective obstacle to the realisation
of their land grab policy. Two things arc
certain. The one is that the vast mining district of the Kootenays will resent the suppression of Mr. J. A. Macdonald and the other
is that the Province as a whole will resent thc
advent of the Ottawa machine in Provincial
polities.
The announcement of dissolution
Municipal and an early Provincial election
Politics. has to some extent diminished public interest in Victoria in Municipal politics. When, however, the first excitement has subsided a little, the local matter
will conic to the front and will receive the
attention which it deserves. As it is not yet
known positively who the candidates for the
Mayoralty will be, The Week withholds any
lengthy observations on the subject beyond
premising that the coming year will bc one of
special importance to the Capital City, and
that the gentleman who is elected to the office
of Mayor will require to devote the whole of
his time to the duties of the position. Important questions await settlement and urgency is the watchword. A water supply, railway facilities, street extension, tramway extension, and thc subdivision of new suburban
districts are all on the programme.   Victoria
has suffered during the last year especially,
and more or less for many years, from the
lack of a mau strong enough to lead. At the
present crisis such a man is the most urgent
need of Victoria. The work ready to his hand
is worthy the power of any man seeking distinction, in the public service, and the citizens have a right, whicli they will no doubt
exercise, to select one who has the natural
qualifications aud who will lay aside every
other public duty in order that he may render
the service which Victoria requires, in the
most decisive moment of her history.
It is rather amusing to read the
What Is editorials in certain Liberal pa-
The Issue? pers, which are seeking to determine for Premier McBride what
his platform shall be, and also to instruct the
electors as to what is the real issue in the
forthcoming contest. This attitude is amusing because neither Premier McBride nor his
critics have anything to do with determining
the issue. Either might try to obscure it;
neither can create it. The issue has been determined by circumstances. It is entirely oi*.<?
of record. At election times no one takes
much notice of promises, whether made by
Conservative or Liberal, and for the purpose
of argument, it may not unfairly be conceded
that both will promise many things that will
never he fulfilled. But neither can erase the
record of four years' administration. That
record is made up of concrete facts and it is
upon them and their bearing that the electors
will pronounce a verdict. The sooner the
critics of the Government get down to business on these lines and eliminate superfluous
comment upon non-essential matters the better for a clear understanding and, let ns hope,
an intelligent discussion of the real issue—
record.
Mr. Bullen, president of the B. C.
Good Marine Railway Company, has gone
News, to England. The daily press has informed the public that the object of
his trip is to conclude certain contracts for
ship-building. The Week has pleasure in informing its readers that the purpose of Mr.
Bullen's trip is a very different one, and of
far more interest to tho Province. He has
gone to put the finishing touches to the transaction upon which The Week has commented
recently, and by whicli the Vancouver Foundry and the B. C. Marine Railway Company
will pass into the hands of a London syndicate. At the head of this new corporation is
Mr. R. W. Perks, a partner in the eminent
law firm of which Sir Henry Fowler is the
head. Mr. Perks has himself been a member
of the British House of Commons for many
years, and has a world-wide reputation as one
of the most eloquent leaders of non-conformity. He is related by marriage to the
Thorneycroft family, the founder of which,
G. R. Thorneycroft, was the first Mayor of
Wolverhampton, and the father of the iron
and steel trade of that great industrial centre.
The new company will have unlimited capital
and its acquisition of existing industries will
not he confined to the two mentioned. But its
most important work will be the development
of an iron and steel industry on Vancouver
Island. There is no doubt that when M<*
Bullen returns a detailed announcement will
bc made.
Readers of The Week will
A New Real learn  today   for   the first
Estate Company, time that the Phoenix Association of London, England, has opened an office in this city for the
transaction of real estate and general investment business. This is an important move
and one whicli may fairly be regarded as a
sign of the times. Much Victoria property is
still held in London and this move is in line
with the historic association between the Capital of the Mother Land and the Capital of
British Columbia. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 1906.
NOTES ON PROVINCIAL NEWS
Nicola Valley Coal Company.
This  company has just issued its
prospectus with a long list of influ
ential  names  attached.    The  president is  Mr. John Hendry, the well-
known lumber man.    The vice-president is  Mr. W.  H.  Armstrong, the
railway contractor of Vancouver.   In
fact, every one of the directors and
officers hails from the Terminal City.
An experienced and competent mining engineer has been retained in the
person  of    Mr.    Alexander  Faulds,
whose reputation stands high at the
coast.   The concern is a genuine one
and   not   in   any   sense   a   wildcat
scheme.   Thc company owns a large
area  of coal lands near Nicola and
has already located several valuable
seams.    Dr. Ells, of the    Dominion
Government Survey, has reported favourably  upon  the  holding and  declares the coal to be a high-grade
steam and domestic fuel    As this is
the first property to be developed in
the Nicola Valley the company will
have   early  access    to  a  large  and
growing market.   In fact, it will for
a  time  at any rate monopolize  the
trade in the Nicola and Similkameen
Valleys and thence to the coast. The
capitalization   of   $1,500,000   is   not
excessive and compares most favorably with that of other mining companies.    There is little doubt that a
successful and profitable future is in
store  for the  Nicola Coal  & Coke
Company, Limited.
"No one disputes the fact that the
Province is prosperous and no doubt
the financial showing is to some extent due to this prosperity. But it
is only necessary to point to the fact
that even in prosperous times there
have been deficits, to realise' that
something else is required besides
prosperity, and that a stable administration, with a finance minister who
thoroughly understands finance in its
truest sense, is as necessary to the
well-being and prosperity of the
Province as are good times and an
increasing population."
BRITISH AMERICAN TRUST CO., Med
tMCTORIA OFFICES
Cor. Broad and View  Sts.
A. C. McCALLUM,
Mgr. Real Estate Department.
A New Post Office.
The Zoological Enterprise has unearthed a fossil and is chuckling over
it pretty much in the same way in
which history declares that the Emu
chuckles when once in a hundred
years it lays an egg. Its fossil is
the petrified remains of a promise
made in antedileuvian times by Mr.
William Sloan, M. P., that Cumberland should have a new post office.
It is rather singular that the curiosity should have been unearthed just
about the time of the Provincial elections. Of course this may only be a
coincidence, or it may mean that the
Zoological editor has been pretemat-
urally actively of late. It may also
mean that Mr. William Sloan knew
or thought he knew that the opportune moment for stimulating the Enterprise to activity had arrived. At
any rate, the editor got to work and
made the wonderful discovery. The
good people of Cumberland will hope
that this time it is not a cry of "wolf"
and that Mr. Sloane will find it inconvenient to break his oft-repeated
promise. All that matters is that
Cumberland gets its post office, for
that luxury it will even continue to
tolerate a zoological specimen.
Cranbrook's Choice.
No constituency in the Province
will have a worthier or more capable
representative after the election than
Cranbrook. The Conservative Convention has wisely nominated Mr. J.
A. Harvey, a gentleman respected by
every one who knows him; a pioneer
Kootenaian, a sound lawyer, a man
of wide experience, of sober judgment, and of the highest integrity.
For many years he was the uncrowned king of Fort Steele, but more
recently has taken a hand in the development of Cranbrook and the tributary country. If Premier McBride
wishes to pay a compliment to East
Kootenay, which is one of the wealthiest and most progressive sections of
the Province, and which has not yet
enjoyed the distinction of Cabinet
representation, he could not do better than nominate Mr. Harvey to one
of the vacant portfolios. He would
discharge the duties of either with
ability and credit to himself and the
Government, and there are many
loyal Conservatives who think that
the time has come to recognise East
Kootenay, which is one of the largest
revenue producers in British Columbia.
FOR SALE
One of the few remaining good Cattle Ranches left
in B. C. This property controls some 300 square
miles of Range and will carry 2000 head of cattle
and 300 horses. Full particulars on application.
Price $45,000.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, sixty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for permission to purchase
the following described land on Porcher
Island, about flve miles east of Refuge
Bay, commencing at a post marked Eugene Wacker, northwest oorner; thenee
east SO chains; thence south 20 chains
to McKay's northeast corner; thence
west SO chains; thence north 20 chains
to point of commencement containing
one hundred and sixty acres.
EUGENE WACKER, Locater.
F. A. HUDSON, Agent.
Located Nov. 17, 1906. Dec.22
NOTICE is hereby given that, sixty
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land on Porcher
Island, about flve miles east of Refuge
Bay, commencing at a post marked Arthur McKay, southwest corner; thence
running north 20 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 20 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing one hundred and
sixty acres.
ARTHUR McKAT, Locator. '
P. A. HUDSON, Agent.    [
Located Nov. 17, 1906. Dec.22
Fernie Jubilant.
Fernie has waited a long time for
a Provincial Government Building.
During last session an appropriation
of $5,000 was made for preliminary
work upon the new building, and at
the coming session it is thc intention
of the Government to make a further
appropriation of $20,000, which should
give Fernie an up-to-date building
properly equipped for thc discharge
of public business in the coal capital.
Fernie is in luck, for although it has
waited ten years, it is now to get a
post office and Government building
at the same time.
A Popular Candidate.
In spite of the attempts of the opposition press to belittle thc person
and political prospects of Mr. Price
Ellison, it is obvious from the result
of the recent nominating convention
that he is still one of the most popular men in thc Okanagan. Thc grand
rally was large and enthusiastic. Mr.
Ellison made a capital speech and
was supported by the Premier. His
nomination was unanimous. It is not
likely that any opponent will come
within measurable distance of Mr.
Ellison's vote.
Significant.
A straw shows which way the wind
blows, and the reproduction in a supplement of the Fernie Free Press of
an editorial from the Toronto Globe
on the subject of "Wise Men from
the East" shows whence the Free
Press now derives its ' inspiration.
There are few people who have any
sympathy with the Western policy of
the Toronto Globe. It is directed by
men devoid of public spirit, who have
prostituted a once reputable organ to
personal uses. They have endeavoured on several occasions during thc
last seven years, to obtain control of
the Kootenay press to advocate
schemes in which they were largely
interested and for which they were
seeking Government aid. In every
instance they have failed. Their last
attempt with the Nelson News was
the most discreditable of all, and although they still retain financial control, the limelight has been turned
upon their policy and public opinion
has discounted their influence. They
have now declined upon the Fernie
Free Press, which for seven years
has resisted every attempt to bring
it under the domination of the Toronto octopus. Further resistance
meant extinguishment, and today one
witnesses the sorry spectacle of the
sturdy and hitherto independent little
organ passing into the hands of Cox
& Company. It is the duty of the
public press to make this fact known
so that the future utterances of the
Fernie Free Press may be appraised
at their true value and accredited to
their inspirers.
Well Put.
The Nicola Herald in a brief but
forcible editorial admirably states the
case for thc McBride administration.
Its concluding remarks are worth
quoting:
Among the Islands.
The Vancouver World undertakes
to sympathise with Mr. A. E. McPhillips because that gentleman has
received the Conservative nomination
for the Islands. Just why this circumstance should be considered sufficient to entitle to commiseration at
the hands of the World is not very
obvious, and coming at this time the
attitude of thc journal that "prints
the ff-ts only" is questionable, to say
the least of it. The man in the
street will be apt to believe that the
interest of the Vancouver organ is
aroused on behalf of Mr. T. W. Paterson rather than Mr. McPhillips, for
it is just on the cards that the former gentleman may fall between two
stools—the mayoralty of Victoria and
the representation of the Island. If
any man can bring this about it is
Mr. McPhillips, whose sterling character and high qualifications render
him a formidable opponent even for
the redoubtable Mr. Paterson. Perhaps it would be well for the World
pathy until after the election and then
distribute them as circumstances may
require.
Revelstoke Satisfied.
The Mail Herald item speaking of
the recent visit of the Premier to
Revelstoke has the following to say:
"Both the Liberal and Conservative
factions in Revelstoke will plainly see
that Mr. McBride had the welfare of
our city at heart, and, as the head of
the Government thinks only of what
is just and right for individual cities
throughout the Province and for British Columbia as a whole. Therefore,
it is only in justice to the Premier to
have confidence in him, and both
Conservatives and Liberals will share
that confidence when it so closely effects our homes and our city's welfare and development."
Up to Deane.
Editor Deane, of the Nelson News,
is very fond of making extravagant
assertions and equally fond of furnishing the minimum of truth. In
the Kootenay this peculiar characteristic is well known and understood,
as the following extract from the
Lardeau Mining Review, also endorsed by the Slocan Mining Review,
will show. The challenge was issued
nearly a fortnight ago, but up to date
has elicited no response from Editor
Deane, and yet he has the assurance
to apply the term "extreme" to
others:
"If Editor Deane, of the Nelson
News, will 'make good' the assertion
made in the issue of the nth that
the Hon. R. F. Green kept secret the
Kaien Island deal so that a number
of his particular friends could get in
and make a clean-up, and will publish the names of any or one of such
parties, we will support the Liberal
candidate in the next election. Now,
News, you have made a statement;
if there is any good in you, 'make
good'—or cat dirt.—Lardeau Mining
Review."
For New Year's Day
WATSON'S SCOTCH WHISKEY, per bottle $1.00
CANADIAN CLUB, per bottle  1.00
GLENLIVET SCOTCH, perbottle  85
OLD TAWNEY PORT, per bottle   1.00
FINE PALE SHERRY, per bottle   1.00
OLD FRENCH BRANDY, per bottle   1.00
FRENCH CLARET, per bottle  35c and   .50
SAUTERNE, per bottle 50
CARNEGIE'S SWEDISH PORTER, per dozen bottles    2.25
JACOB'S XMAS FRUIT CAKES $1.25, $1.50, $2.00 and $2.25
CHRISTIE'S SPECIAL MIXED BISCUITS, large tins  1.00
JACOB'S IRISH BISCUITS, per lb 30
HUNTLEY & PALMER'S BISCUITS, per lb... .15c, 25c and   .35
HUNTLEY & PALMER'S BISCUITS, in decorated tins 50
"The tins alone are worth the money."
JAP ORANGES, per box 75
FANCY NAVEL ORANGES, per dozen   30
LARGE NAVEL ORANGES, per dozen  50
ASSORTED CRYSTALIZED FRUITS, per box..25c, 50c, 75c, 1.50
FINE TABLE FIGS, 2-lb. boxes, each  25
TABLE RAISINS, clusters, 2-lb. boxes, each 50
TABLE RAISINS, clusters, 5-lb. boxes, each 1.00
FANCY MALAGA CLUSTER RAISINS, per lb 35c and   .60
CAPE COD CRANBERRIES, per lb 20
IF YOU HAVE NOT YET RECEIVED ONE OF OUR PRICE
LISTS DROP US A POST CARD WITH YOUR ADDRESS AND
WE WILL MAIL ONE TO YOU IMMEDIATELY.
DIXI H. ROSS & e®
Wine and Spirit Merchants 111 Government Street, Victoria
Fresh and Dried Fruit Importers. R.2123.
rrrrr
rr^rrrrrrrrrrrfr
Could Not Help It.
The Vancouver World declares that
the Province has gone ahead and
prospered not because of any assistance from the McBride administration or from Mr. R. F. Green, the
late Commissioner of Lands and
Works, but "because Mr. Green and
his colleagues could not help it."
Even on this showing it would appear
to be a pretty good thing to have
people in office whose greatest demerit is that they cannot hinder the
prosperity of the Province. Some
governments might even manage that.
What about the Government of '99
to 1900?
DOUBLING DOWN A PAGE ARD
TUBBING OVEB A NEW LEAF.
It being reported that Lady Caroline
Lamb had, In a moment of passion,
knocked down one of her pages with a
stool, the poet, Moore, to whom this
was told by Lord Strangford, observed:
"O! Nothing is more natural for a
literary lady than to double down a
page." "I would rather," replied his
Lordship, "advise Lady Caroline to turn
over a new leaf."
Reservoir Pens.
One of the most appropriate gifts for
your lady or gentleman friends
will be a
Waterman Ideal
Fountain Pen.
We can supply you with a variety, ranging
in price from $1.75 to $7.50 each.
T.N. Hibben&Qo
Government St.,, Victoria, B. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY DEC. 29, 1906.
THE GREAT SALE
COMMENCES JANUARY 2nd.
VERY LADY is interested in this sale; every line in this advertisement is of interest, and every article purchased is capital well invested.
You are buying the finest and most fashionable materials at very considerable reductions on regular prices, in many cases at less than
cost, for the reason that we never carry over goods from one season to another.
Yours faithfully,
HENRY YOUNG & CO.
QUILTS
In latest designs, Turkey Chintz
and Art Sateen Covers; every Quilt is
a wonderful bargain.
Regular Sale
Price. Price.
$1.60 (4 only) $0.75 each
2.00   1.00   "
2.50   1.25   "
300   1.50   "
3-25  I.7S   "
4-So  2.50   "
MARCELLA QUILTS
These are finest English white Mar-
cella Quilts; you need not fear the
quality, just examine the prices:
Regular      Sale
Size. Price.      Price.
9-4  $1.25 $0.85
9-4   1*75 1.20
9-4   2.2s 1.65
10-4   2.25 1.65
10-4   2.50 1.90
10-4   2-7S -M5
10-4   3*5° 2.6s
11-4 (1 only)  2.7s 2.15
11-4 (1 only)  3.00 2.20
11-4 (1 only)  4.00 3.15
12-4   3-25 2.55
12-4   3.50 2.6s
12-4 (1 only)  4.25 3.40
12-4   5.00 3.50
BLANKETS
These are our regular fine quality;
they are pure white wool, but are very
slightly shop-soiled, being sample
pairs:
Per pair.
Regular $6.25.   Sale price $4.75
Regular   7.25.   Sale price  5.35
Regular   8.25.   Sale price  6.25
Also a line of factory samples from
one of the most celebrated factories,
slightly soiled, will be sold at the following reduced prices:
Per pair.
A quality, 7-4 size. Sale price...$3.25
A quality, 8-4 size. Sale price... 3.75
B quality, 7-4 size. Sale price... 5.00
B quality, 8-4 size.   Sale price... 5.00
HONEYCOMB QUILTS
These fashionable White Quilts are
all very excellent quality goods:
Regular Sale
Size.                            Price. Price.
9-4  $1.00 $0.65
9-4   1*25 .85
10-4   1.50 .95
10-4   2.25 1.60
10-4   2.7s 1.95
11-4 (3 only)  2.7S 1-95
12-4 (1 only)  375 2.85
TOWELS
During the January Sale all our
Towels, including White Linen, Turkish bleached and unbleached; Bath
Towels, Bath Mats and Bath Sheets
will be reduced 15 PER CENT.
N. B.—Owing to lack of space only
one-third of the articles included
in our great sale have been mentioned herein. Keep your eyes on
our publicity during this month and
you will save stacks of money by
taking advantage of the tremendous
reductions we are making.
CURTAINS
We pride ourselves on the high-
class quality, durability and fashionable designs of our Curtains and Curtain materials. A careful perusal of
this list will assist you to recurtain
your home at very little over half the
ordinary cost:
WHITE LACE
Sale
Per pair.
3    yds. by 52 in. Reg. $1.25... .$0.75
ZV2 yds. by 52 in. Reg.   1.50 95
3^ yds. by 52 in. Reg.   1.65— 1.00
3*4 yds. by 52 in. Reg.   1.75.... 1.15
WHITE BOBBINET
Per pair
Regular $3.50.   Sale price $2.75
Regular   5.00.   Sale price  4.00
Regular   6.75.   Sale price  4.75
FRILLED MADRAS
Perpair.
Regular $3.85.   Sale price $2.00
Regular   5.00.   Sale price  3.90
IRISH POINT LACE.
Per pair.
Regular $9.00.   Sale price $5.00
Regular 12.00.   Sale price  7.50
The Irish Point Lace Curtains are
the very best quality in white and
ecru, very slightly shop-soiled.
ART MUSLINS
In the piece for Curtains and Draperies, Liberty and other art designs,
regular I2j^c and 15c per yard, will
be all cleared at, per yard TAc
CURTAIN FRILLINGS
A fine selection, regular ioc. Sale
price, per yard 5c
4 FANCY LINENS
In Beautiful Drawn Work, Table
Centres, Sideboard Covers, Tray
Cloths, Doylies; also Battenberg Centres, Sideboard Covers, Tablecloths,
etc., are all reduced 20 per cent.
FANCY FLANNELETTES
Regular Sale
Prices. Prices.
15c per yd  9C
20c per yd i2lAc
25c (Kimona) per yd 15c
35c (French designs) per yd—25c
PRINTS
The whole of our excellent stock of
ioc and I2j4c prints reduced to, per
yard    5c
FRENCH DIMITY MUSLINS
Price will be cut right in two. Regular 35c.   Sale price, per yd 17'Ac
BASKET CLOTHS
All Fancy White Basket Cloths and
Brilliantines will be reduced from
25c per yd. to, sale price 15c
CEYLON BLOUSE FLANNEL
An excellent opportunity to secure
35c Blouse Flannels at our sale
price of, per yard 25c
ALL WOOL FRENCH FLANNELS
In fashionable colors, reduced from
50c per yard to, sale price 30c
RIBBONS
Silk and Satin Ribbons in all colors.
Regular ioc to 15c per yard. Sale
price 2^c
Satin and Velvet Ribbons in all colors. Regular 15c to 25c per yard.
Sale price  5c
Fancy Dresden Ribbons. Regular 15c
per yard.   Sale price 9c
Fancy Silk and Satin Ribbons. Regular 20c to 30c per yard. Sale price.9c
WOOLS
All odd shades in Saxony, Cachemire,
Carlottas, Berlins, Beehive, during
January Sale will be cleared at, per
skein    5c
LACES
A splendid lot in the latest designs—
note the reductions:
All at ioc to 20c per yd. Sale price 5c
All at 25c to 60c per yd. Sale price ioc
BELTS
These are new goods just received:
Black Silk. Reg. 35c. Sale price.. 25c
Black Silk. Reg. 75c. Sale price. 50c
Fancy Silk. Reg. $2.50. Sale price.$i.so
Fancy Silk. Reg. 2.25. Sale price. 1.25
Fancy Silk. Reg.   1.75. Sale price. 1.00
GLOVE SPECIAL
A number of odd sizes in silk and
kid will be cleared at, per pair.. .25c
LISLE and CASHMERE GLOVES
Ladies' and children's sizes.   Regular
25c.   Sale price, per pair ioc
HOSIERY
Phenomenal Values
Sale
Reg. Price.
Ladies' Tan Cashmere.... $0.45   $0.25
Children's    Tan    Ribbed
Cashmere   45      .25
Boys' Heavy Rib Woollen   .50      .25
Ladies' Heavy Rib 45      .25
Ladies' Silk Hose  3.50    1.00
Ladies' Black Spun Silk.. 1.25      .75
HANDKERCHIEFS
Children's White School Handkerchiefs, per dozen 40c
Children's Fancy Picture Handkerchiefs, per dozen 35c
Boys' Colored Border Handkerchiefs,
per dozen  40c
Children's   Handkerchiefs   in   fancy
boxes, per box... 25c
Ladies'    Fancy    Embroidered    and
Drawn Work Handkerchiefs-
All at 25c and 30c each reduced to 15c
All at 35c and 40c each reduced to 20c
UNDERWEAR
Boys' Ribbed Fleece Lined Vests and
Drawers. Regular 35c to 60c. Sale
price, per garment 20c
Ladies' Ribbed Vests, high neck, long
sleeves.   Sale price 30c
Ladies' White Fleece Lined Vests,
high neck, long sleeves. Sale
price   35c
Ladies' Perfect Fitting Pure Wool
Vests, high neck, long sleeves. Regular $1.35.   Sale price 65c
Ladies' Grey Wool Vests. Regular
$1.00.   Sale price 60c
Ladies' Grey Wool, Unshrinkable.
Regular 85c.   Sale price 45c
See our table of all odd garments and
broken lines at HALF PRICE
CORSETS
Genuine P. D. Corsets. Regular $2.75.
Sale  price 65c
Crompton's  Victoria,  odd    sizes  in
white and grey.   Regular $1.25. Sale
price   50c
Crompton's   Style   B,  odd  sizes  in
white and grey.   Regular $1.25. Sale
price   50c
Crompton's  Alexander,  all  sizes  in
white   and   grey.     Regular    $1.00.
Sale price  75c
Crompton's New Style No. 484, odd
sizes.   Reg. $2.00.   Sale price. .$1.00
WHITE WEAR
For particulars of White Sale watch
future publicity.
BLOUSES
In Mohair and Cashmere:
Reg. $1.50.   Sale $0.75
Reg.   2.25.   Sale  1.15
Reg.   2.75.   Sale  1.40
Reg.   3.25.   Sale  1.65
Reg.   3.00.   Sale  1.50
BEAUTIFUL SILK BLOUSES
All at $3.75, $4.00, $4.25.   Srle price.
 $2.00 each
All at $4.50, $4.75, $5.00.   Sale price.
 $2.50 each
All at $5.50, $650. Sale price $3.50 each
DRESS GOODS AND SILKS
Tremendous Reductions
Lining Silk, all shades. Regular 65c.
Sale price  25c
Short ends of Silks, in Bengalines,
Peau-de-Soie, Louisine, Taffeta, etc.
Regular 75c to $1.25 per yard. Sale
Price  25c per yard
Plushes, all shades. Reg. $1.50, for 35c
Velvets, all shades. Reg. $1.50, for 35c
Velveteens all shades, Reg. 75c, for 35c
Six pieces 44-inch Imported Tweeds,
in broken checks and plaids. Reg.
60c.   Sale price, per yard 25c
Eight pieces light weight English
Meltons, several shades. Reg. 60c.
Sale price, per yard 25c
Four pieces Pin Check Tweeds. Reg.
75c   Sale price, per yard 25c
Twelve pieces Fancy Mohair in latest
spots and checks. Reg. 65c to $1.
Sale price, per yard 25c
Short ends Cream Cashmeres, Nun's
Veilings.   Sale price, per yard..25c
Eighteen pieces Evening Dress Goods
in delicate shades of Eoliennes and
Crepe-de-Chine. Reg. 85c to $1.00.
Sale price, per yard 45c
English Tweeds, 54 inches wide, in
very latest checks and plaids. Reg.
$1.00.   Sale price 45c
Ladies' Cloths and Chiffon Broadcloths. Reg. $1.35 to $1.75. Sale
price, per yard $1.00
Scotch Panamas, 54 inches wide, in
Myrtle and Reseda. Reg. $1.50.
Sale price, per yard Soc
Five pieces Heavy English Shepherds'
Plaids, 54 inches wide. P.cg. $1.50
to $1.75.   Sale price, per yard.. .90c
Cheviot, Serges, Homespuns and English Tweeds, 54 inches wide, all colors.    Reg. $1.00, $1.25 and $1.50.
Sale price, per yard 50c
One piece English Panamas, 44 inches
wide. Reg. $1.00. Sale price, per
y»rd    3Sc
MILLINERY
Every article in this department, including Feathers, Flowers, Motor
Caps, Hats, trimmed and untrim-
med, is included in our January
Sale and marked down to phenomenally low prices. Call and inspect
and save money.
FURS
ALL FURS AT HALF PRICE
REMNANTS
Do not fail to visit our Remnant
Tabic containing the greatest bargains in Victoria. An assortment
from all departments*.
ALL ARE INVITED TO THE   GREAT SALE AT
HENRY YOUNG & COMPANY
GOVERNMENT STREET, VICTORIA, B. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 1906.
Vancouver
Notes.
With the definite announcement of
the forthcoming elections, party leaders, "spell-binders" and the rank and
file of the several political faiths are
buckling on their armour and preparing for a campaign which, at even
this early stage, gives promise of being one of the most torrid ever witnessed in the Terminal City. The
electors will undoubtedly have a host
of candidates to choose from, embracing the faiths of Conservatism, Liberalism, Socialism, Labourism and
Martinism—thc last "ism" as enunciated by the Guardian. At the time
of writing little to whet the public
appetite has transpired. A central
executive meeting of the Conservatives was held on Wednesday, when
January 2nd was thc date selected for
holding the primaries and thc day
after for the convention. It is fairly
safe to predict that Vancouver's quintet will be unanimously re-nominated,
though it is possible that Charles Wilson, K. C, may accept a Cariboo nomination, in which event it is also
certain that Dr. G. A. McGuire will
receive the endorsation of thc convention to run with Hon. R. G. Tatlow, A. H. B. McGowan, W. J. Bowser and James F. Garden, the present city representatives in the House.
Thc names of Mayor Fred Buscombe
and George H. Cowan are also mentioned as possibilities, but it is a
foregone conclusion that thc convention will unanimously nominate the
present sitting members.
Regarding the Liberal ticket, nothing definite has been forecasted, except—if the World can be termed the
party mouthpiece—Commissioner Mclnnes, of thc Yukon, is to be invited
to contest one of the seats for Vancouver, and to resume his old position of chief lieutenant to J. A. Macdonald, the party leader. But this
announcement from "the paper that
prints thc facts" must, for obvious
reasons, as already pointed out in
The Week, bc taken cum grano salis.
The Governor of the northern gold
fields is hardly likely, so his friends
say, to play second fiddle for the
party cause, when he is already "it"
in the North.
Thc Labor Party is also making
up a ticket which will receive the
serious consideration of the union
man, unattached to cither of the older
political parties, and the Socialists
have called their convention for Monday night. Truly there is to be some
vigorous campaigning and any number of candidates in the running for
a seat in the stately pile across the
James Bay embankment at the Capital.
Reports from "up-country" points
tell of conventions and political gossip that is rife as to the candidates to
be chosen in the various constituencies. In the Grand Forks riding th*;
Socialists have selected John Mclnnis, of Phoenix, as their standard-
bearer. The names of Ernest Miller
(son of the Vancouver Postmaster),
of Grand Forks, and Mayor George
Rumbergcr, of Phoenix, are mentioned by Conservatives as possible candidates. Down in the Similkameen
L. W. Shatford, the present membc**,
is likely to have Smith Curtis, of
Rossland, as his opponent. In the
Slocan riding, Mr. Davidson is not
to have his own way, as both tlie
Conservatives and Liberals will make
vigorous efforts to oust him. William Hunter, a pioneer merchant and
mining operator of Silverton, will
likely bc nominated by the Conservatives, and A. B. Dockstcader is thc
Liberal choice. In the Cranbrook
riding Dr. King, the popular opposition whip, is to be opposed by J. A.
Harvey, who is to carry thc Conser
vative banner. Mr. Harvey is a well-
known lawyer and has the confidence
and respect of a large section of thc
community.
Tonight at Ashcroft the convention
of the Conservative Party is to he
held. From the Nicola country a
substantial delegation will place the
name of Rec. A. Frazcr, editor of thc
Nicola Herald, in nomination, and it
is also rumoured that Charles F. Law,
of Vancouver, a mining operator interested in the lower section of the
constituency, will come before thc
convention at the request of the Ashcroft delegation. Meanwhile Stuart
Henderson has left no stone unturned
to keep himself in favour for renomi-
nation by the Liberals.
Coming nearer home Hon. F. J.
Fulton is promised an easy victory
over J. D. Swanson, the Liberal nominee in the Kamloops constituency.
In fact the gossip hath it that the
Liberals are split—one wing wanting
Dr. Wade, the other Mayor Marsh
Gordon, and that Swanson's name was
brought before the convention merely
as a peace offering.
J. W. Weart, for the past twelve
years a resident of Richmond, has
thrown down the gauntlet and will
oppose F. Carter-Cotton in that constituency. In Frank Oliver's ridinp*,
Delta, S. F. Mackenzie is the choice
of the Conservatives. According to
a telegram received from Ottawa .t
is known for a certainty that the
"sordid seven" will come West at
once to help the political fortunes of
the member for Rossland and his party
in the forthcoming struggle.
A Progressive Bank.
Canada's youngest financial institution, the Northern Bank, has innovated a new department by the installation in the Vancouver branch of
a Chinese interpreter to facilitate the
transaction of business with its Celestial customers. Previous to and
on thc departures of the China mail
steamers, all the city banks are
crowded with their slant-eyed customers clamourous to send away remittances to their own country. As
a result regular patrons are often inconvenienced, and so Manager J. C.
Roberts took the bull by the horns
and secured Yip Gow, a son of a
prominent Chinese merchant, and
added him to the local staff, which
will hereafter obviate overcrowding
the teller's wicket and greatly facili-
ttae the ordinary business, especially
on the occasions referred to. The
Northern Bank besides has provided
a special waiting room for the gentler
sex, where the yean in privacy and
at case do their banking business.
Another Big Block.
Building operations in the business
section of Vancouver are keeping
apace and another five-story block is
to bc erected on Pender street, running north to Seaton street. The
building site was purchased this week
by the Canadian General Electric
Company and in the early, spring construction work will start.
"Our Western business has grown
to such proportions that it is now
necessary to carry increasing stocks,"
said Manager H. Pun, "and with this
in view the company is having plans
prepareu for a five-story building and
basement for warehouse and office.
It will be the largest electrical and
machinery depot in the West," he
concluded.
Visitors to Vancouver, especially
from Interior points, will be pleased
to learn that the Terminal City at
lasts boasts of a modern restaurant.
The Bismark Cafe, at 106 Hastings
street, has been opened by A. A. McKinnon and P. Bancroft, two well-
known coast restauranteurs. A splendid service is maintained and during
the lunch and dinner hours and
throughout the evening, the pretty
cafe is made doubly attractive by the
presence of an excellent orchestra.
The proprietors are men of experience, Mr. McKinnon having been
successfully engaged in :he restaurant business in Vancouver for a
number of years, and Mr. Bancroft
is also well known in business circles
in both Victoria and thc Terminal
City.
QUEEN ELIZABETH.
She was the most accomplished woman of her age, and often spoke with
as much spirit and dignity as she acted.
She evaded giving a direct answer to
a   theological   question   respecting   the
sacrament of the Lord's Supper, with
admirable address.    On being asked by
a Popish priest If she allowed the real
presence, she replied:
"Christ was the word that spake lt;
He took the bread and brake lt;
And what that word did make lt,
That I believe and take lt."
YOUR GROCER SELLS
HUNTLEY
AND
PALMER'S
BISCUITS
TO HOUSEKEEPERS.
WHEN YOU BUY FOOD,
naturally you desire pure
food, especially in jams, marmalades, pickles and flavouring essences.    The name of
CROSSE & BLACKWELL
on a jar, bottle or tin of jams,
jellies, marmalade, pickles or
flavouring essences is a guarantee of the ABSOLUTE
purity of the contents; all respectable grocers sell Crosse
&    Blackwell's    productions.
Sea & Gowen's
1907
GENTLEMEN'S
HATWEAR
S. ti G. have just received
the new blocks and shapes
for 1907 in Men's Derby,
Felt and Silk Hats. Chris-
tys and all the leading
makers are well represented.
S. & G. keep a record of
your size and fit, to save
you trouble.
Mail Orders Promptly
Attended To.
Sea & Gowen's
The Gentlemen's Store
64 Government St.
Victoria, B. C.
A Great Sale.
Henry Young & Co. have arranged
for a sale to commence on January
2nd, which will interest every lady in
Victoria and from many other cities
and towns in the Province. The range
of articles covered in this sale includes everything which a lady requires for dainty wear. The quality
is of the finest and most fashionable
and the reductions are genuine, as it
is the policy of Messrs. Young to
clear out their stock at the end of
every season. There is a special line
of underwear, half price, and quilts
and blankets can be purchased to
great advantage. A special feature of
the sale is an immense counter with
assortments from all departments and
snaps to every purchaser. Mail orders will receive prompt attention.
This is one of thc most genuine and
high-class sales to which I have had
the pleasure of calling my readers'
attention. BABETTE.
O<^*l^+l^l**»***hV**l*^kki**0**»i****l**l*****i^l^fSl
RETIRING FROM BUSINESS
XMAS EVE SPECIALS
8 do?. Motor Caps, were $1.00 to $1.50     75c
3 Tea Gowns, were $13.50 $6 75
3 Children's Evening Cloaks, were $5.00  3 00
: -
Mrs. W. Bickford, 61-63 Fort Street
%**-£)
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OP
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
PHONE 893. VICTORIA
I*
Your Object
and Ours
YOU have three things which you expect to attain by being in business!.
And you must attain all three if you
expect to stay there. The lirst is to make
money—the second, to make friends, and the
third, to sell the kind of Clothing that will
enable you to make both.
You can temporarily accomplish the
first two without the aid of the latter. Nevertheless, you can figure out as well as we can
about how long you can keep things going
on that plan.
The right kind of Clothing is essential
to permanent success—and our object is to
see that you get it.
"Picadilly Brand" Clothes fit, wear and
hold their perfect shape in a manner which
tells any man plainly enough that he will go
far and look long before he will find anything
of a like quality at a lower price.
We would like your trade, and we know
you will like the trade that the selling of
"Picadilly Brand" will bring you.
Our salesmen are out now with the new
line. Don't place your orders for Spring
until you have seen our samples.
H. E. BOND & CO.
LIMITED
Manufacturers - - - TORONTO
No. 23. Beginning at a post planted on the north boundary, about 20
chains west of the northeast corner
of application No. 7, on the cast bank
of the Kaowinch River; thence east
20 chains; north 160 chains; west 40
chains; south 160 chains; east 20
chains to point of commencement;
containing 640 acres, more or less.
JOHN HIRSCH.
Kyuquot Sound, Sept. 29, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special licence to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands:
No. 2. Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner of Timber Licence No. 866i, at the north end of
Sechelt Peninsula, New Westminster
District; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to the shore; thence following the shore to the point of commencement.
No. 3.   Commencing at a post planted
near the shore on the east side of.
Agamennon Channel, New Westminster
District, thence E. about 60 chains;
thence N. to the S. boundary of No. 2
claim, at the N. end of Sechelt Peninsula ; thence E. about 60 chains to shore
of Long Lake; thence following the
shore southerly about 100 chains; tihence
W. to shore; thence following the shore
to point of commencement.
No. 5. Commencing at a post at N.W.
corner of Lot 672, N. end of Sech<-,L
Peninsula, New Westminster District;
thence N. 40 chains; W. 80 chains to the
shore; thence S. following the east
boundary of T. L. 8661 to S.E. corner
thereof; thence E. 40 chains to S.W.
corner of Lot 672; thence N. 40 chains
to lake; thence following the lake shore
easterly and northerly to point of commencement.
M. GREEN.
JOHN WEST, Agent.
When Milton was blind lilTmarried a
shrew. The Duke of Buckingham called
her a rose. "I am no judge ot colors,"
replied Milton, "and lt may be so, for
I feel the thorns dally." THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 1906
General Assortments Are the
Features in All Departments
We draw special attention to our unique and pleasing furniture, which is made from the best selected wood peculiarly adapted to special treatment by the use of preservative stains, which produce a remarkably rich effect, showing the natural grain of the wood, cunningly brought out in
rare shades, which give a beautiful and effective glow to the surface. The utility and comfort of every piece of furniture purchased here, is an
important consideration.    Its construction insures its durability, and the pleasing colors make it the most tasteful furniture to bc had.
Our upholstering and cushion work is of the very highest order, none but the best materials procurable being used. Our Mission furniture
is something beautiful, and is finished in many different colors, Weathered Oak being the most popular. There is no more appropriate furniture
for the city and country home, clubs and hotels than this style. We are just showing a few of our superb values, so that you may judge for
youreslf.
MISSION ROCKERS
These are very comfortable to sit in
and make a handsome addition to
any home; finished in Weathered
Oak.   Price  $13.00
And a large assortment to select from.
MORRIS CHAIR
We have some beautiful Morris
Chairs, made of Australian Redwood, almost equal to Mahogany;
highly finished, with tapestry cushions, these are ideal chairs. Prices
ranging from  $10.00 up
DRAWING ROOM FURNITURE
LADIES WRITING DESKS
What is more suitable tor the
drawing room than a nice Lady's
Writing Desk. We have them
at all prices. Tiny nice ones in
Golden Elm, highly finished,
stand 36 in. high.    Price.. .$6.00
MUSIC CABINETS
If you arc a lover of music and
have an instrument in the house
wc are sure you need a place
for your sheet music ,etc. Wc
have some very nice ones, made
of Solid Quartered Golden Oak,
stands 36 in. high, has five adjustable shelves, and hihgly hand
polished.    Price    $12.00
3-PIECE PARLOR SUITES
We have a nice line of these goods.
Mere is one, made of Birch, Mahogany finish, fancy green tapestry cushions.    Price $40.00
Here is another one, made of Mahogany, silk tapestry cushions,
highly polished.    Price $55.00
And a great many odd Settees to
pick from, ranging in prices
from  $20.00 up
A FREE GIFT—Every lady leaving her name and address at our office from now on till New Vear
will receive Free a handsome Xeedle Calendar containing forty assorted Sharpe's Needles.
You Are
Always
Welcome
Weiler Bros.
Complete Home, Hotel, dub and Office Furnishers,
SHOWROOMS:
33 GOVERNMENT STREET
Corner of Brouehton and Government Streeti, Vietoria, B. C
You Are
Always
Welcome THE WEEK, SATURDAY DECEMBER 29, 1906.
THE  MOTHERLAND.
Exchanges With Our Kindred.
Mr. Carnegie's Errors.
"Scots today are better employed
and better off than ever, and Scotland
has ceased to be a recruiting-ground
for the British army. The young men
realise that they are fitted for something better than being food for powder. Less than a thousand Scots enlisted in the British army last year."
Thus spoke Mr. Andrew Carnegie at
a St. Andrew's Day banquet in New
York.
Sir Mortimer Durand, the retiring
British Ambassador, in reply begged
to differ from Mr. Carnegie, and
thanked God that there were at home
Scots who did not consider themselves too good to be British soldiers.
Hc thought that the Scottish soldier
was one of the noblest works of God.
A reference to the current report
of the Inspector of Recruiting absolutely disposes of Mr. Carnegie's declaration that less than 1,000 Scots
enlisted in thc army last year.
There entered the territorial regiments 1,050, other infantry corps i,-
634, other corps 1,158—a total of
3,842, besides 3,424 who joined the
militia.
sion—they seem to be lacking in a
sense of humour. The proprietors of
a celebrated Swadeshi toilet preparation have been collecting testimonials
from the leaders of Indian society.
One learned justice ingenuously offers the following surprising testimony: "Very efficacious for weakness of the brain. I use it daily."—
Pioneer, Allahabad.
A Tribute to the Primate.
The Archbishop has been simply
splendid all through the struggle of
the last few weeks. He is not a professional politicial or a mere party
man, and he has consequently been
able to treat the whole subject in a
large-minded, statesmanlike manner—
using the word "statesmanlike" in the
proper sense of that much-abused
term—with the single object of securing a permanent, rational, national
settlement.—National Review.
Cape to Cairo Progress.
Lord Milner, presiding at the reading of a paper by Sir Lewis Michell
before the Society of Arts on the
Cape to Cairo Railway, on Tuesday,
paid an eloquent tribute to the genius
of Mr. Rhodes, and dwelt on the enormous benefit which the whole ot
Africa will derive from the line when
it is at last completed. Sir Lewis
Michell had mentioned that the line
from the north completed or contemplated* is about 1,600 miles, and that
from the south over 2,000 miles.
Lord Milner said that there were
three stages in the growth of such
great projects—enthusiasm following
the first scheme of some great genius,
dejection when that scheme was only
half carried through, and final and
complete triumph in the end. Thc
Canadian Pacific Railway had reached
the third stage, and he was convinced
that within a short time the Cape to
Cairo line also would bring great material reward to those who had so
freely expended on it their courage,
their ingenuity, and their devotion.
Duchesses' Anxieties.
In an age when high-born girls
marry chauffeurs, grooms, bookmakers, and others of a similar social
grade, it may be forgiven to mothers
if they are extremely particular as to
what acquaintances their girls may
make.—"Duchess," in The Throne.
The Collapsed Trust.
We arc interested in registering the
failure of thc first attempt on a great
scale to introduce thc American trust
system into this country. The unequal, the almost hopeless, fight which
has been waged against this system in
the United States has read Englishmen a lesson, and we rejoice to see
that they have so quickly and so thoroughly mastered it.—The Spectator.
Women's Kisses.
With real friends an affectionate
kiss now and then is all very well,
but why should one's nice, fresh
echeks be annoyed by the promiscuous osculation of a crowd of girls and
women? And thc worst of it is that
they only do it because they think it
civil, not because they like it!—Lady
D , in The Throne.
Britain's Pillars.
Apart from Australia, one can say
that in India and Egypt stand thc two
pillars upon which rest Great Britain's economic power, and consequent her military and political power,
now and in thc future.—France Mili-
tairc, Paris.
The Honourable Justice's Admission.
There is one flaw in thc wonderful
facility our Indian friends have of
acquiring  British   modes   of  cxpres-
Plays and Puritanism.
When the time comes, if it ever
does come, when the history of the
decline and fall of human stupidity
can be written, an interesting chapter
of the work will be devoted to the
attitude of Puritanism towards the
theatre in England.—St. John Han-
kin, in Fortnightly Review.
The Queen's Favourite Romance.
Queen Alexandra's favourite romance is "John Inglesant," and the
slender volume, says the "Reader,"
figures among the row of books,
which include the works of Shakespeare, Shelley, and Byron, introduced into the highly ornate design
which makes her Majesty's book-plate
one of the most original and suggestive owned by a modern book-lover.
The Queen's favourite story-teller is
Hans Andersen—"The Little Match
Girl" and "The Swineherd" being her
Majesty's favourites.
Tiny Human Skull.
About the size of a hen's egg, a
man's skull, said to be a relic of a
race of pigmies who inhabited Northern Mexico hundreds of years before
thc Axtecs were conquered by Cortes,
has just been sold at Stevens' Auction Rooms, London.
Telephone Company's Claims.
Thc London telephone area would
hold Paris and Berlin ten times over,
and most of its variegated collection
of local authorities have obstructed
telephone work at every opportunity.
Yet in spite of these natural and unnatural difficulties the London telephone system is far in advance, technically and administratively, of those
of Paris and Berlin.—National Telephone Journal.
Latest "Smart" Offence.
It is a curious trait in thc British
chaarcter that a fool commands a
great deal of popularity and affection
of a certain sort, and I consider it a
grave offence on thc part of certain
smart women that they encourage the
friendship of men who do not fulfil
thc most elementary conditions of
manliness.—A Frenchman, in The
World.
LOVE'S MIRACLE.
'Tis not tlio touch of hands, 'tis not the
Hght
Shining  from  eyes  that  ardently  do
gaze
On   tlie   beloved   face,   'tis   not   the
praise
Of   spoken   words   or   sung,   that   may
aright
Rove.al the spirit's worship; these give
sight
Of Love's fair flower and tender leafy
sprays;
But Love's fruition must be found in
ways
More  subtly  sought,   and   moods   more
recondite.
'Tis rather in the hours when far apart
From  the  dear  sight  of  her  whose
very thought
Hallows   the  soul,   thc    hours    with
memories fraught,
With yearnings filled, when to the eyelids start
Unbidden  tears;  Love's  miracle  then
wrought
Touches with Hre the altar of the heart.
—William   Morton  Payne,   in  the  January Atlantic.
The Fur business is done better in Victoria than almost anywhere else on the
continent. We set the pace with hand=
some displays of
Persian Lamb Jackets
Canadian Hink Coats
Handsome
Sealskin Coats
Labrador Mink Stoles
in qualities that are absolutely dependable, and at the lowest prices that really
high-grade Furs ever sell for. We know
the market and we know your needs.
Out-of-town customers should write for our catalogue.
THE B. C. FUR MANFG COMPNY
VICTORIA, B.C.
CIQARi
for the Christmas trade are being received daily
also presents for the most fastidious devotee of
Lady   Nicotine.
Now Be Had in Perfect Condition.
I
Your Favorite Brand Can
If you smoke Havanas we shall be pleased to show aud quote low prices for fine cigars.
The Old Post Office Cigar Store
J.   A.   WORTHINGTON, PROP. VICTORIA. B. C.
A FEW OF THE
New
Books
seasonable as Christmas Gifts are:
The Doctor (Ralph Connor) $1.25
Jane Cable  (Geo. Barr McCutcheon)  $1.25
Daniel   Sweetland    (Eden    Phill-
potts)  $1.25'
House of Defence (C. F. Benson) .$1.25
The Man Between (Amelia Barr). .$1,251
Puck of Pook's Hill (Rudyard Kip-       j
ling)  $1.50
Billy Topsail (Norman Duncan).. .$1.50'
Sir Nigel (Conan Doyle) $1.25
The  Treasure of Heaven  (Marie
Corelli)  $1.25
The Silver Maple (Marian Keith).$1.25
Call of the Blood (Robt. Hickens).$i.2S
Benita (Rider Haggard) $1.25
In the Van (Price Brown) $1.25
The  Heart Tliat Knows   (Charles
Roberts)   $1.25
The Fighting Chance   (Robert  W.
Chambers)   $1.25
Tive      Undertow      (Robert      C.
Knowles)   $1.25
For the up-to-date in literature go to
the
THOMSON
STATIONERY CO.
325 Hastings St.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
A Great
Convenience
Gentlemen living in the country
frequently have difficulty in obtaining
the articles of dress to which they
have been accustomed. For instance,
Burberry's Equipede and Shooting
Coats, so famous throughout England, or Lincoln Bennett's Hats and
Caps. Then, too, a man who has
been used to wearing Fox's Puttees
can never accommodate himself to
ordinary makes. What country gentleman docs not often wonder where
he can secure R. Atkinson's Royal
Irish Poplin Ties, or the "Empire"
Linen Mesh Underwear (guaranteed
every thread pure linen). Then, too,
Cartwright & Warner's Underwear,
Dent's Gloves, perfect fitting Riding
Breeches, etc., arc often difficult to
procure.
To all in this predicament thc news
that E. Chapman, Davis Chambers,
Vancouver, B. C, handles all the
above named goods and will fill orders for any of them by return mail,
will prove very welcome. Write to
this Exclusive Men's Outfitter for
prices and particulars.
M. J. HENRY'S
NURSERIES and SEED HOUSES
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Headquarters for Pacific Coast grown
Garden, Field and Flower Seeds for
Spring planting.
A large stock of home grown Fruit
and Ornamental Trees uow matured
for the Spring trade.
No expense, loss or delay of fumigation or inspection.
We do business on our own grounds
—no rent to pay—and are prepared
to meet all competition.
Let me price your list before placing your order. Greenhouse plants,
floral work, bee supplies, fruit packages, fertilizers, spraying material,
etc.   Catalogue free.
M. J. HENRY
SOK) Westminster Road, Vancouver
JOHN COOPER
Taxidermist and Fur Dresser
Mounting Large Game Heads
a Specialty.
826 PENDER STREET,
VANCOUVER.
The B. C. Assay &
Chemical Supply
Company, Ltd.
Importers and Dealers in
Assayers' and
Chemists' Supplies
513 Pender St.
VANCOUVER,  B.  C. THE WEKK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 1906.
OLLA P0DR1DA
Is Pigs Pigs?
A certain well-known clergyman
was preaching a touching sermon on
the parable of the Prodigal Son. "Picture to yourselves, my brethren," he
said, "how the dissipated companions
of his fortunate days would come and
jeer at him as he sat watching the
swine and eating the wretched husks.
And, since human nature is unchanging, wc may be sure that ridicule was
harder for thc young man to bear
than hunger or misery. Why, the
very pigs were laughing at him up
their sleeves."
Forbidden Meat.
It was a crowded street car, and a
rabbi arose to give his seat to a lady,
when an ill-mannered, uncouth member if the sterner sex, promptly slid
into it. The rabbi glared his displeasure, until the man became uncomfortable, and said: "You stare at me as
though you would like to eat me."
"Oh, no," said the good man, "I
am a Jew, and we have a special law
against it."
Working It Out.
During a prolonged rainy spell of
weather in the Ohio Valley, when live
stock of every kind had been driven
to high ground and had to be fed, a
Kentuckian arranged with his neighbor to care for two calves. When
the bill for their feed was presented
he said to the neighbir: "The bill is
larger than the calves." "True," said
the feeder, "but here is a list of what
they consumed. But if you care to
I will keep the calves and give you a
clear receipt." The owner thought
a moment and said: "John, if you
will keep them two weeks longer it
is a trade."
Only Extravagant.
The earning of Sandy Mcintosh
amounted to a pound a week, and,
like a good husband, when hc was
paid on Saturday he went straight
home and gave that pound to his
better half. One Saturday, however,
he handed her over only nineteen
shillings and tenpence. Mrs. Sandy
looked at the coins sadly, but offered
no remark.
On thc following Saturday entered
Sandy once more with thc same
amount. Mrs. Sandy took the proffered coins without a word. The
third Saturday, however, it was too
much for her, and on receiving the
same amount she burst into tears.
"O, Sandy, Sandy!" she wailed,
"what hae ye ben doin'?"
"Weel," said Sandy, "aie met auld
Donald, and we had drinks."
"O, Sandy," she sobbed, "I'm sae
glad I dinna mind yer extravagance
so much, but I was afraid ye were
keeping up twa establishments."
Rock Bottom Board.
One day recently a Jew bought a
horse in one of the Boston auction
stables. Having no stable of his own
he took the animal to that of another
man and asked the price per week for
boarding him. Hc was told that it
would bc $4. He threw up his hands
and went out. At the second place
they told him that the charge would
be $3. This did not satisfy him, and
he was advised to go to a stable kept
by one of his own race. This hc did,
telling the man what the others had
charged.
"I vill board him for two tollars,"
said thc man.
Thc owner of the horse thought a
moment, then said: "That is better,
but how much vill you allow me for
thc manure?"
"At two tollars a veek there von't
be any manure," was thc answer.
Adam or Eve?
It happened in our High School
Literary Society. She was a clever
little freshman, and when our president called on her for an impromptu
speech, she showed all the shyness
and embarrassment that belong to her
kind. "You will please discuss the
question," said the president, " 'Did
Adam or Eve have the greatest influence on the human race?'" The
blushing freshman stammeringly repeated the question and then there
was an awkward silence. Suddenly a
queer little smile broke over our
freshman's face, "Of course," she
said, "there can inly be one ipinion
about this matter. Most certainly
Adam had the most influence on the
human race, as Eve was merely a
side issue."
Simplified (?) Spelling.
Thc present discussion about simplified spelling recalls a story I read
many years ago.
A school-teacher in Australia received thc following note: "Cur, ass,
you are a man of no legs. I wish to
inter my bowie in your skull." Rather
mystified by this apparent thirst for
his blood, the teacher laid the matter
before the Board of Trustees, who
summoned the writer and demanded
an explanation. The writer of the
note, an illiterate sheepman, was as
much perplexed by the summons as
the teacher had been by the note, for
the sheepman had intended to be
quite complimentary and could scc no
reason why his innocent little missive
should have stirred up such a commotion. This is the way he read it:
"Sir, as you arc a man of knowledge,
I wish to enter my boy in your
school."
As Bridget Heard It.
A fashionable woman had a bit of
stationery bearing thc inscription
"Kismet." A housemaid dusting the
room asked the mistress: "Shore,
ma'am, what's thc m'anin' of thc 'ritin'
on the bottom of this?"
"Oh, you mean 'Kismet.' It means
'fate,'" replied thc mistress.
Bridget was limping painfully when
out with her sweetheart not long afterward, and hc asked, "What's thc
matter, Bridget?"
"Foith," was the answer, "I have
the most terrible corns on me kismet."
THE END OF THE QUEST.
Justified Alarm.
Very much excited and out of
breath, a young man who could not
have been married very long rushed
up to an attendant at ine of the city
hospitals' and inquired after Mrs.
Brown, explaining between breaths
that it was his wife, whom he felt
anxious about.
The attendant looked at the register and replied that there was no Mrs.
Brown in the hospital.
"My God! Don't keep me waiting
in this manner," said the excited
young man. "I must know how she
is."
"Well, she isn't here," again said
the attendant.
"She must be," broke in the visitor, "for here is a note I found on
the kitchen table when I came home
frim work."
The note read:
"Dear Jack: Have gone to have my
kimono cut out.—Annie."
Unarm him here.    Now wish him rest,
His was tho fate of those who fall;
Who never end the knightly quest,
Nor ever find the Holy Grail.
He was the fiercest lance In all
That virgin honor called to dare;
The courtliest of the knights in hall,
The boldest at the barrlere.
Joyful he took the sacred Task
That led him far by flood and field:
His lady's favour at his casque,
God's cross upon his argent shield.
See where the Paynim point has cleft
The crimson cross that could not save!
See where the scimitar has reft
Tlie favour that his lady gave!
For this poor fate he rode so far
With faith untouched by toil or time;
A perfect knight in press of war,
Stainless before the Mystic Shrine.
One finds the Rose and one the rod;
The weak achieve, the mighty fall.
None knows  the dark design  but  God,
Who made the Knight and made the
Grail.
The single eye, the steadfast heart,
The strong endurance of the day,
The patience under wound and smart—
Shall all these utterly decay?
The Ions adventure resteth here;
His was the lot of those who fall,
Who ride unfouled by sin or fear,
Yet never find the Holy Grail.
—Frank  L.   Pollock  ln  the September
Atlantic.
CAMPBELL'S SALE
Will Commence
Wednesday, Jan'y 2
,/*"V>4 rtftf t, -v£L;
:?-?;i'^^.*&.
v~ nil
When the largest and
most exclusive selection
of this season's hand-
tailored coats, skirts,
costumes and raincoats,
neckwear, underwear,
hosiery, belts, etc., supplemented by many
special purchases of
choice samples will be
offered at very considerably reduced prices.
THE LADIES' STORE
Promis Block, Government St., Victoria.
\
Just This
Difference
THERE IS just this difference between
B. & K. Rolled Oats and all others. Oats
milled in the B. & K. way are the pur=
est and most nourishing on the American continent, as is abundantly proven by the recent
report of the Inland Revenue Department—see
official Bulletin No. 127. This superiority arises
from the fact that they are milled by the B.& IC
process entirely from the finest white oats in
the world, and are delivered to your grocer fresh
and sweet every day. They are the National
Oats and are building up a great nation,
B K 19W THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 1906.
The Week
▲ Pnvlnelal Revtew and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMP/VNY, LIMITED.
Offlew:
88*4 G.y.rnm.Bt Street .... Victoria B. C.
Empire Block   Vancouver, B. C.
W. BI.AKEMORE...Manager and Editor
CHRISTMAS.
By BOHEMIAN.
The Christmas spirit has even infected The Week. I say "even," because some of the daily journals
which stand for high party and political principles, do not concede existence to a journal which once a week
rakes over the coals or makes fun of
their peccadilloes. With a superior
air not altogether in keeping with the
season most of them ignore The
Week, which, since it really does exist and says things, is one of the
highest compliments they could pay
it. However, for reasons which need
not be too closely inquired into, the
editor has been celebrating and indeed only one member of the regular
staff (always excepting our lady contributors) has been on hand this
week, and by a strange irony of fate
that one is Bohemian. It therefore
devolves upon me to wind up the
festive season with a few observations
which will have to do duty for the
whole staff, and perhaps I cannot do
better than narrate a few incidents
which have come under my notice,
and which in diverse ways illustrate
phases of human experience which
are apt to appeal to us at this time.
I was crossing from Vancouver to
Victoria on Christmas Eve. and
formed one of thc large and jovial
company who dined on board. Seated opposite me was a man who would
attract attention anywhere. He had
three distinguishing characteristics—a
thoroughbred face, an old mackinaw
suit, and a gold signet ring. I was
particularly struck by his shirt, which
accentuated even more than his suit
the level to which his wardrobe had
sunk. He looked thin, wire-drawn,
and distinctly under thc weather. Hc
spoke with the accent of an English
gentleman, and 1 at once sized him
up as a waif of the aristocracy who
had drifted to British Columbia as
so many younger sons have done, to
attempt thc impossible task of reconciling blue blood with thc red earth.
He was scanning the bill of fare when
a big, fine athletic fellow entered, and
slapping him on thc back exclaimed:
"Hello, Joe!    What thc d  brings
you here?" Thc newcomer was the
very antipodes of his friend in every
respect. Stout, well-groomed, with a
beaming face and a devil-may-care
look. One could see at a glance that
things had gone well with him. Hc
sat down and insisted on his friend
dining with him, and paid particular
attention to thc wine list. After a
glass or two Joe loosened up a little,
and in response to numerous inquiries,
sympathetically expressed, he admitted that he had drifted from one thing
to another until recently he had been
labouring. He started with a ranch
in the Okanagan. That disappeared
acre by acre. Then hc went into
stock-raising, and was frozen out by
his partners. Latterly he chummed
with another Englishman upon the
latter's ranch, until now, said hc, "1
earn a few dollars where I can. at
casual work."
"My God!" exclaimed his friend.
"Do you mean to tell mc you've come
to that, Joe? Do thc people at home
know about it?"
"No. And don't you let them. T'd
rather die than the old man should
hear of it."
"Well," pursued his friend, "what
about your allowance. Doesn't that
:comc regularly?"
"Oh," replied Joe, "I commuted
that for cash three years ago, and it
all went in stock."
"But man, you can't stand labouring work. It's ridiculous. It'll kill
you."
"No, it won't, old man, I'm beginning to get tough."
"But what about the wife and
kids?"
Joe looked down and a spasm of
pain flitted across his pathetic face
as he said: "She died last year, and
the children are at Jack Cecil's."
The well-to-do man could not restrain a sigh. Even his ruddy Christmas optimism was not proof against
a recital such as this. The dinner
was continued in comparative silence;
but half an hour later, when they
left the saloon, the elder man walked
behind Joe with an air of protection
which was good to see, and when
they emerged in the corridor I heard
him say in firm but gentle tones:
"Joe, you're coming with me. No
more of this. There's plenty for you
to do up at Dawson, and you'd better freeze to death than starve to
death, but you'll never do that, for it's
one of the jolliest and most prosperous little cities in Canada today. I
was never so well in my life and it's
just far enough away for a fellow to
shake ranching and stock-raising."
I was startled from a perusal of
my Christmas mail by the sight of
a large square package marked "Photograph only" and bearing the Johannesburg post-mark. I knew what
that meant, and leaving everything
else I cut the string and released the
photograph. It showed a tall, handsome man bordering on thirty. He
was in uniform, and the front of the
photograph bore the inscription
"Natal-Zululand War, 1906." "At it
again," was my comment. "When
will these boys have done lighting."
Not until the Empire has done calling for them. This one was in Victoria in January, 1900, when the call
to arms came. He enlisted with the
Strathconas, marched and fought with
them, was at Magersfontein, and
marched to the relief of Pretoria;
spent a year on Lord Kitchener's
staff attached to the Intelligence Department and finally became Aide.
Was raised to the rank of Lieutenant,
and afterwards Captain; carried the
dispatches to De Wet and his colleagues when the Treaty of Veren-
iging was signed. Settled down as
Deputy Commissioner of the Orange
River Colony, under Sir Gould Adams. Undertook a huge colonisation
scheme near Heilbron for the purpose of settling British born people in
thc new colony to leaven the Boer
sentiment. Now up in arms again
against the fierce Zulus to come unscathed through a brief but bloody
campaign. One would think it was
about time that he came home. He
says that nearly all the Canadians
have returned and he may do so some
day, but he has given hostages to the
new, great, marvellous continent which
Livingstone discovered and which
Rhodes exploited. He tells a sorry
story of the general condition of affairs in Rhodesia. Since the present
Government came to power in England and Mr. Chamberlain vacated
the Colonial office, disaster has "followed fast and followed faster," and
that feeling of unrest and disquiet
which always accompanies feeble
Government lias seized upon thc land.
Thc scarcity of unskilled labour hampers thc operations of every mining
eompany, and by curtailing the output
has necessitated a general reduction
of staff, and has thrown thousands
of English people out of employment.
Thc climate and general conditions
are such as to render life a burden to
all who h..vc not steady occupation,
and, in his opinion, nothing but a
reversal of the policy of thc present
Government on thc labour question
will bring prosperity. Meanwhile
Rhodes' great dream of the Cape to
Cairo Railway is rapidly being realised. It is now but a holiday trip to
the great Victoria Falls, before which
the Wizard of Africa stood in awe
and amazement forty years ago.
Swamp and jungle, which have buried
for interminable months and even
years every adventurer who penetrated to the interior, are now yielding
their secrets and unfolding their
riches to thc companies of commercial adventurers who are doing for
Africa what the Hudson's Bay Company did for Canada 300 years ago,
but are doing it with all thc aids and
advantages of twentieth century civilisation. And the last thing to be
civilised will  be  thc same European
corporations
"BOHEMIAN."
An Open
Letter
During the past twelve months there
have been three distinct rises in the price
of Diamonds, aggregating a total advance
of about 20 per cent. Our government
has also added a duty of 5 per cent. Up
to the present we have made no advance
in our retail prices, which still remain at
the original figures, but we beg to advise
all those who meditate purchases of Diamond Jewelry that at the close of the year
we shall have to seriously consider the
above facts, and it is obvious we cannot,
much longer, persist in our present prices,
in view of having, sooner or later, to replenish our stock at much enhanced
wholesale values.
Yours faithfully,
Challoner <* Mitchell
DIAMOND MERCHANTS
47 & 49 Government St., Victoria.
E.G.PRI0R&C0.,Ld
Are Sole Agents in B. 6. for
MASSEY-HARRIS IMPLEMENTS
PLANET, JR.. CULTIVATORS
MELOTTE CREAM SEPARATORS
PAGE WOVEN WIRE FENCING
THE DE LOACH SAW MILLS
WHITMAN HAY BALING PRESS
HENDEE WIRE BRUSHES
MORTON'S B.C. DRILL STEEL
DICK'S PATENT BELTING
SARGENT'S ARTISTIC HARDWARE
MYERSPUMPS.   COOK'S WIRE ROPES
E. G. PRI0R & CO.. Ld.
V
Hardware, Iron and Steel Merchants,
123 Government Street, Victoria, B. 6.
Also at Vancouver, Kamloops and Vernon.
p. R.1911
Ladies and
Geutlemen
We give you au opportunity
to buy a nice Xmas Gift at a
low cost. See our line of English Cowhide Travelling Bags,
Rugs, etc., Fancy Vests. We
can make the vests from an
old one and guarantee a fit.
We are. making special reductions in all these lines,
Peden's
TAILORING PARLORS
31   FORT   STREET
J
Qo to
FRASER'S
Drug Store
and see the latest
Perfumes
Phone 542
30=32 Government St.
COAL.
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo Collierlei.
New Wellington Coal.
The best household coal in the tnarke   at
current ratei.   Anthracite coal for sale.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
HOLLY TREES
Prices from 25 cents to $5.00, according
to size. Write for seed and tree cata-'
log.
JAY & CO.
VICTORIA, B. C.
VERY NICE
GIFTS
For Christmas or New Years, how
would a Hand Bag do?
MIRROR
EBONY HAIR BRUSH
PERFUMES
PERFUME ATOMIZERS
SHAVING OUTFIT, ETC.
EVERYTHING AS YOU DESIRE,
THAT'S THE WAY WE TREAT A
BUYER.
CYRUS H. BOWES
CHEHIST
98 Government St., near Yates St.
Leave Your Baggage Checks at the
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 240.      A. E, KENT, Proprietor
?vv .?•   ,::\s,r... . ,:■: ■_.....
. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 1906
TO THE
LICENSED
VITUALLERS
OF WESTERN CANADA
AND     THE     YUKON.
On behalf of the various Vintners, Distillers, Brewers and Cigar Manufacturers whom we have the honor
to represent, and from ourselves, we have very great
pleasure in thanking the licensed victuallers and grocers for their continued and extended patronage during
the year, and to wish
ONE AND ALL A
MOST PROSPEROUS
NEW YEAR
PITHER & LEISER
Wholesale Wine,   Beer, Spirit and Cigar Merchants.
Victoria and Vancouver.
I     ^
Established 1867
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
52 Uovernment St., Victoria, B. C.
Charles Hayward, President. F. Caselton, Manager.
We make a specialty ot Undertaking and Embalming,
An experienced certificated staff available at all times, day
and night.
Phones Nos. 48, 305, 404 or 594, Victoria.
Established 1856
M. R. SMITH & CO.
Factoiy and Head Office:
VICTORIA
Manufacturers of
Warehouse and Offices:
VANCOUVER
BISCUITS - CONFECTIONERY
Note Our Leader   -   SMITH'S SWISS CREAflS
The True Test of Merit
Is proved by the constantly increasing demand for
BUCHANAN'S Scotch Whiskies
Due entirely lo their purity, old age and fine flavor.
Ask your wine merchant for Red Seal, at |il per bottle; Black & White,
at $1.25 per bottle; Royal Household at $1.50 per bottle;
Liqueur Scotch, at $1.75 per bottle.
JAMES BUCHANAN & CO., by Royal Warradt Purveyors to Roy«l family
♦''"'■•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*'1",*''"f*'^**^*'^'*^ M
Your memory sometimes fulls  you-
the Macey Desk File never
MACEY DESK FILE
For following up Inquiries Received, Orders iu Prospect, Remittances
Promised, Shipments Delayed, Advertisements to be Placed,
Engagements, Appointments, Reports, Collections.
BAXTER & JOHNSON, Government Street,  VICTORIA.
MODERN OFFICE APPLIANCES
Phone 730 Opp. Post Office.
MORNING  AND  EVENING  OP  LIFE.
The following Is an inscription on a
tombstone    in    Massachusetts.      It    is
beautiful:
"I came in Hie morning—it was spring,
And I smiled;
I walked out at noon—lt was summer,
And I was glad;
I sat down at even—it was autumn,
And I was sad;
I laid down at night—it was winter,
And I slept."
POPE'S PARODY.
"You know," said Pope, "I love short
inscriptions, and that may be tlio reason
why 1 like the epitaph on the Count of
Mirundole so well. Some time ago I
made a parody on it for a man of very
opposite character:
"Here lies Lord Conlngsby; be civil.
Tho rest God knows, perhaps the devil."
We still have a few boxes of choice apples
at $1.50, $1.75 and $2 a box.
Figs, dates, oranges and nuts of all kinds
Also Chestnuts.
THE WEST END
GROCERY.
42 Government Street, Victoria
Fine Art Dealers
32 Fort St., Victoria.
|lt^*4*|^<**^lt*V-«*»t*t»4-*t*)>*<^^
Chinese- made bhirts ^Overalls
MUST GO J
<#>», \^
UNION-MADE
RN BRAND
BUTTING AHEAD. 10
THE WEEK   SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 190b-
31. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 34,
Township 12, Range S. Poudrier Survey ; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence ziutii 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement; 640 acres.
J. J. TEETZEL.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 17th, 1906.
32. Commencing at a post planted at I
the   south-east  corner   of  Section   IS,
Township  12, Range 5, Pouarier Sur-1
vey; thence south 40   cnains;   thence
east 80 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being the north half of j
Section 8 .Township  12,  Range  5,  of
said survey.
BENJAMIN WERDEN,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 20th, 1906.
No. 10.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated on the north
side of San Juan River, Renfrew District, adjoining E. J. Palmer's northeast
corner: Commencing at a post marked
"A. Young, Southeast Corner," thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew this sth day
of November, 1906.
ALEXR. YOUNG.
Nov. 24.
No. 11.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated on the north
side of San Juan River, Renfrew District, adjoining A. Young's east boundary of limit No. 10: Commencing at a
post marked "A. Young, Southeast
Corner," thence north 160 chaini,
thence west 40 chains, thence south 160
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
south 160 ch.ains, thence east 40 chains
to place of commencement, containing
640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew this 5th day
of November, 1906.
ALEX. YOUNG.
Nov. 24.
No. 12.
■ NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special, license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated on the north
side of San Juan River, Renfrew District, adjoining A. Young's timber limit
No. 11, on the east boundary: Commencing at a post marked "J. Young,
Southeast Corner," thence north 160
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
south 160 chains, thence west 40 chains
to place of commencement, containing
640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew on thc 5th
day of November, 1906.
JOHN YOUNG.
Nov. 24.
No. 13.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated on the north
side of San Juan River, Renfrew District, adjoining J. Young's east boundary of limit No. 12: Commencing at a
post marked "A. Young, Southeast Corner," thence north 160 chains, tiience
east 40 chains, thence south 160 chains,
thence west 40 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew on the 5th
day of November, 1906.
ALEXR. YOUNG.
Nov. 24.
No. 14.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirly
days after date I inttnd fo apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated on the north
side of San Juan River, Renfrew District, adjoining A. Young's east boundary of limit No. 13: Commencing at a
post marked "J. Young, Southwest Corner," thence north 160 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 160 chains,
thence west 40 chains to place of commencement.
Dated at Port Renfrew on the 5th
day of November, 1906.
JOHN YOUNG.
Nov. 24./
28. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 17. Tp.
10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains:
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement, and
being said Section 17 of said survey.
BERTHA FISHLEIGH,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 15th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated on the
south side of Camelia inlet, about 18
miles from the mouth of the Skeena
River, commencing at a post marked C.
l?'s N.W. cor. purchase claim, tnence
running south 80 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 3o chains, thence
east 40 chains to point of commencement, containing 320 acres more or less.
C. TAKADA.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Cliie Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission o purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the N. E. corner of L.
June's purchase claim marked C. W.
Peck, S. E. corner, thence running 40
chains west, thence 40 chains north,
thence 40 chains east, thence .to chains
south to post of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
Located 26th October, 1906.
C. W. PECK,
Locator.
F. W. BOHLER,
Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated on the
south bank of the Skeena River adjoining H .A. Draper's preemption claim,
south boundary line, at a post marked
M. V. Wadham's N. W. corner post,
thence east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west to bank of river,
following the river bank north to post
of commencement, containing one hundred and sixty acres more or less.
Located 26th October, iqo6.
M. V. WADHAMS,
Locator.
H. DRAPER,
Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the N. E. corner of L.
L. Watson's purchase claim, marked D.
M .Moore, S. E. corner, thence running
40 chains west, thence 40 chains north,
thence 40 chains east, thence 40 chains
south to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less. Located
October 26th, 1906.
D. M. MOORE,
Locator.
F. W. BOHLER,
Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
clays after date 1 intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the S. W. corner of D.
Menard's purchase claim marked J.
Curther's S. E. corner, thence running
40 chains west, thence 40 chains nortli,
thence 40 chains east, thence 40 chains
south to post of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less,
Located 26th October, 1906.
J. CURTHERS,
Locator.
D. MENARD,
Agent.
Dec. _>-'.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the N. W. corner of D.
Menard's purchase claim, marked W.
Bruce, S. E. corner, thence running 40
chains north, thence 40 chains east,
ihence 40 chains south to post of commencement, cintaining 160 acres more or
less.
Located 26th October, 1906.
W. BRUCE,
Locator.
D. MENARD,
Agent
Dec. -'-'.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief 1 Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, commencing
at a post planted on the right bank of
thc Skeena River about 20 chains below the Yamoqotitiy and at the N. E.
corner of Indian Reserve and marked
L. S. H., S. E. corner post, thence west
40 chains.thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40 chains to
place of commencement, containing i6d
acres more or less.
Located Oct. ist, 1006.
L, S. HUTCHESON,
Locator.
J. E. BATEMAN,
Agent,
Pec. -'-'.
following described land rituated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the S. E. corner marked
L .L. Watson, theuce running 40 chains
west to N. E. corner of E. A. Wadham's
purchase claim, thence north 40 chains,
thence east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
L. L. WATSON,
Locator.
F. W. BOHLER,
, Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE .is hereby given that sixty
daysafter date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the N. W. comer of W.
Bruce's purchase claim, marked E. A.
Wadham's S. E. corner, thence running
40 chains west, thence 40 chains north,
ihence 40 chains east, thence 40 chains
south to post of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
Located 26th October, 1906.
E. A. WADHAMS,
Locator,
F. W. BOHLER,
Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTTCE is hereby (riven that sixty
days after date T intend to anply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated near
Camelia Inlet about 18 miles from the
mouth of the Skeena River, and adjoining C. Takuda's purchase claim, commencing at a post marked G. li. vv.'s
N.W. cor. purchase claim, thence running west 40 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chainsh t opost of commencement, containing 320 acres more or less.
November 2nd, 1906.
GORDON B. WADHAMS,
Locator.
W. A. WADHAMS,
Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60
days from date, we intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for permission to purchase
the following described lands in the Nechaco Valley, Coast District:
1. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 25,
Township I, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said section 25 of said
survey.
W. H. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 5th, 1906.
2. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 26,
Township I, Range 4.. Poudrier Survey;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
nortii 80 chains to poi it of commencement, and being said Section 26 of said
survey.
EDWARD E. HARVEY.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 5th, 1906.
TAKE NOTICE that, 60 days from
date, I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following described laud, commencing at
a poat planted on thc bank of the
Skeena River two and a half miles
below Kitwangat, at the N.W. corner
of A. E. Price's purchase claim;
thenee S. 22 chains, more or less, to
the S.W. corner of A. E. Price's purchase claim; thence W. 40 chains to
the S.E. comer of Elizabeth Price's
purchase claim; thence N. 31 chains,
more or less, to the Skeena River,
containing tod r.crcs, more or less.
F. PRICE.
A. W. HARVEY, Agent.
Dec.15
NOTICE is hereby given ihat ixty
sd.iys after date I intend to apply to lhe
Honorable thc Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for permission to
purchase the following described lands,
situate on the north shore of Stuart
Lake about 2'/2 miles inland and about
half way between Pinchi and Tacher
Rivers, in the Coast District of the
Province of British Columbia, viz.:
Commencing at a post marked "R. S.
C," placed at the northeast comer of
lot 331; Ihence atsronomica"- north 40
chains; thence astronomically east 80
chains; thence astronomically south 80
chains; thence astronomically west 80
chains, and thence astronomically north
40 chains to the point of commence
ment, and containing 640 acres, more or
less.
ROBERT SENIOR.
J. A. Hickey, Agent.
August 24, 1906.
Decemher 8.
NOTICE is hereby given that, sixty
tlrys (fin) after dnte. I intend to apply tn t'-e Chief Commissioner of
Lands nnd Works, Victoria, B. C,
fnr permission to purchase the southwest miarter nf S-'ftinn Twentv-tbrec
(23) Township Eitrht (8.. Rnn<-*e
Five (s), Cn-st District, Bulklcv Valley, containing one hundred and
sixty (160) acres, more nr less.
.11 F.. WILDM-VN.
ist Decemher. 1006. Dec.15
4. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner ot Section 36,
Township 1, Range 4, .foudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north Bo chains;
thence west So chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 36
of said survey.
E. A. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 5th, 1906.
6. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 4,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 4 of
said survey.
EMMA HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 5th, 1906.
7. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 34,
Township 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 34 of said
survey.
ISABEL HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 5th, 1906.
8. Commencing at a post planted at
tne north-east corner of Section 33,
Townshpi 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thtnee south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 33 of said
survey.
MAGGIE B. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 5th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a lease of the
foreshore abutting fhe entire Pacheena
Indian Reserve, lot two (2), Renfrew
District, which said foreshore includes
the islands belonging to the said reserve: Commencing at a post marked
"A. Young, Southeast Comer." placed
on the foreshore at the southwest corner of the said Pacheena Indian Reserve, thence running north along the
entire reservation.
Victoria, B. C, 30th day of October,
1006.
ALEXANDER YOUNG.
Notice is hereby given that sixty days
.ifter date I intende to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, situated in
range 5. Skeena River district, about
one mile from Little Canyon, commencing at a post planted on the southeast
corner, marked 'R. Braun," thence running west So chains to Turner's southeast corner,, thence north 40 chains to
Frank's northeast corner, thence east
40 .chain'!, thence north 40 chains to
Johnson's southeast corner, thence east
40 chains, thence south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing 480
acres (more or less).
Located September ist, 1906.
R. BRAUN.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, situated in
range 5, Skeena River district, about
one miles from Little Canyon, commencing at a post planted on the southeast
corner, marked "R. Braun." thence running west 80 chains to Turner's southeast corner, thence north 40 chains to
Frank's southeast corner, thence east
40 chains, thence north 40 chains to
Johnson's southeast corner, thence east
40 chains, thence south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing 80
acres (more or less).
Located September ist, 1906.
R. BRAUN.
20. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 36, Tp.
12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains,
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement; 640
acres.
C. A. PORTER.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 16th, 1906.
30. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east comer of Section 36,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to place of commencement; 640 acres.
G. M. BIRKETT.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 16th, 1906.
3. Commencing at apos t planted at
the north-east comer of Section 35.
Township I, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence south 80 chains: thence west 80
chains, thence north 80 chains; thence
cast 80 rh*>i"s tn nnint nf commencement and being said Section 35 of said
survey.
C. W. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 5th, 1906.
9. Commencing at a post planted at
thc south-east comer of Section 9,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey, thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to place of commencement, and being Section 9 of said
survey.
D. M. LINEHAM,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 6th, 1906.
10. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of   Section   10,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80   chains;   thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains; ,
thence west 80 chains to point of com- [
mencement, and being said Section 10 ;
of said survey.
LILLIAN HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent
.uigut 6th, 1906.
11. Commencing at a pot planted at
the outh-eat corner of Section 8, Town-   ™
10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains: tnence
east 80 chains to point of commencement; and being said Section 8 of said
survey.
GEORGE CURRIE,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 6th, 1906.
12. Commencing at a post planted at
tne north-east corner of Section 5,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains: thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 5
of said survey.
MARY E. LINEHAM,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 6th, 1906.
17. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 16,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey ; thence north 80 chains;. thence
west 80 choins; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 16
of said survey.
ANDREW F. WElR,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
18. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Section 15,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; tbence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 15
of said survey.
CLARA WEIR,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August Sth ,1906.
19. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner   of   Section   6,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Sur- ,
vey; thence south 80 chains, thence east j
80   chains;   thence   north 80 chains;!
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 6 of
said survey.
MINNIE BOWDEN,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August Sth, 1906.
20. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 1,
township 11, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section I
of said survey.
E. H. BOWDEN,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
21. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of   Section   7,'
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey ; thence north 80 cnains; thence east !t
80 chains; thence   south   80   chains;'
thence west 80 chains to point of com-t
mencement, and being said Section 7 of'
said survey.
THOMAS SHOPLAND,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 8th, 1906.
22. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east comer of Section 12,,
Township 11, Range S, Poudrier Survey ; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains; j
tnence east 80 chains to point of com-
mencement, and being said Section ia
of said survey.
MABEL BOWDEN,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
23. Commencing at a post planted at.
the north-west corner of Section 11, j
Township 11, Range 5, Poudrier Sur-(
vey; thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;!
thence west 80 chains to point of com-;
mencement, and being said Section 111
of said survey.
WM. STANLEY BATT,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August ioth, 1906. '
  _~"i THE WEEK, SATURDAY DECEMBER 39, 1906.
n
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special licence to cut and carry away timber
from the following described lands:
1. Commencing at a post on the
east side of the North Fork of Coeur
d'Alene River, about 7 miles from its
outlet into Effingham Inlet, Clayoquot District; thence 80 chains north;
80 chains west; 80 chains south; 80
chains east to point of commencement.
2. Commencing at a post by the
southeast corner of No. 1; thence 160
chains north; thence 40 chains east;
thence 160 chains south; thence 40
chains west to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
d'Alene River, about 100 chains S. of
No. 2; thence 100 chains N.; thence
80 W., along boundary No. 2; thence
60 S.;  thence 40  E.; thence 40 S.;
thence E. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
4. Commencing at a post on Coeur
d'Alene River, near and south of the
S. E. corner of No. 3; thence 100
chains N.; thence 40 W., to E. boundary of No. 3; thence 40 S., to S.E.
corner of No. 3; thence 40 W.; thence
60 S.; thence 80 E. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
5. Commencing at a post by the S.
E. corner of No. 4; thence 80 chains
N.; thence 80 E.; thence 80 S.; thence
W. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
6. Commencing at a post by the S.
W. corner of No. 5; thence 40 chains
W.; thence 80 S.; thence 80 E., along
N. boundary of Coeur d'Alene Mineral Claims; thence 80 N., to S.
boundary of No. 5; thence 40 W. to
point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
7. Commencing at a post by the
N.E. corner of the Coeur d'Alene
Mineral Claims; thence 80 N., along
E. boundary of No. 6; thence 80 E.;
thence 80 S.; thence 80 W. to point
of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 21st, 1006.
8. Commencing at a post by the N.
E. corner of the Coeur d'Alene Mineral Claims; thence 80 chains S.;
tiience 80 E.; thence 80 N.; thence 80
W. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
. W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 21st. 1006.
9. Commencing at a post by the W.
boundary of the Coeur d'Alene Mineral Claims, about 40 chains S. of
S. boundary of No. 6; thence N. 40
chains; thence W. 40 chains; thence
S. 160; thence E. 40; thence N. to
point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 21st, 1906.
10. Commencing at a post by the S.
W. corner of No. 8, and about 10
chains E. of Coeur d'Alene River;
thence 40 chains S.; thence 40 W.;
thence 60 S.; thence 80 E.; thence 100
N., to S. boundary of No. 8; thence
40 W. lo point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 21st, 1906. Dcc.15
Notice is hereby given that sixty days
after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described lands, Range V.,
Skeena River District, about 1 mile
from the Little Canyon.
Commencing at a post planted on the
South-west coiner, inarked A. 0. Cunningham's S. W. Corner, thence North
40 (forty) chains( thence East 40
(forty) chains, thence South 40 (forty)
chains to Little's Southwest corner,
thence West 40 (forty) chains, to point
of commencement, and containing 160
(one hundred and sixty) acres more or
less.
Located October 1st, 1906.
A. C. CUNNINGHAM, Locator.
S. C. WEEKS, Agent
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Land and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land: Commencing
at a post planted on the left bank of
Skeena River, about 31/2 miles above
the Lakelse River, and joining John
Neidhart's northeast corner, and marked
"L. W. S.'s Northwest Corner," and
running south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; ther-ce north 80 chains, more or
less, to lefl bank of Skeena River;
thence westwardly along Skeena River
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres, more or less.
L. W. SLOAN, Locator.
J. E. BATEMAN, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Worka for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, in Alberni District: 4.
Commencing at a post situate on or near
the northwest corner of Lot 79, Muck-
toosh; thence 40 chains east; thence 40
north; thence 100 west; thence 80 south;
thence 60 east; thence 40 north, to point
of commencement
C. F. PARK, ffl
W. B. GARRARD, Agent
Oct 22d, 1906.
Commencing at a post by the southeast 1
boundary of Lot 77, Nahmint Bay;;
uicnee oj cnains west; thence 20 north; 1
thence 90 west; thence 50 sout..; tbence j
east to the waterfront, thence folluwi.,g j
the shore line to point of commence-
ment.
C. LUTK1N,
W. B. GARRARD. Agent
UCt.  2/tll,  I9OO.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands: 1. Starting at a post
10 chains east of the mouth of Handy
Creek, on the north shore of Alberni
Canal; thence 160 chains north; tbence
40 chains west; thence south to the
shore line; thence following the shore
line to point of commencement
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, .Agent
November 4th, 1906.
60. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of J. A. .uarvey's
land, thence north do chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
theuce east 80 chains to point of com-
meuctment
HARRIET NELSON,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September ioth, 1906.
2. Starting at a post 40 chains north
of the initial post of No. 1, near Handy
Creek, Alberni Canal; thence 40 chains
east; thence 160 chains north; thence 40
chains west; thence 160 chains south to
point of commencement
W. B. GARRARD.
Clayoquot District, Nov. 4th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date we intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands: Commencing at a
post by the southeast corner post of Lot
79, on Uchucklesit Harbour; thenee
north 40 chains; thence east 100 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west to
waterfront; thence along waterfront to
point of commencement; excepting
thereout the lands covered by existing
mineral claims.
W. E. GREEN.
W. B. GARRARD.
Clayoquot District, Oct 29th, 1906.
30. Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of Section 16, Township 12, Range 5. Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thenct south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 21, Township
12, Range 5, of said survey.
CHAS. LEVE'l a,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 20th, 1906.
43- Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of the north-east
quarterof Section 22, Township 4,
Range 4, Poudrier Survey; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains, thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement, and being
the north half of Section 23 and south
half of Section 26, Townhsip 4, Range
4, of said survey.   •
EMMA BATEMAN,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 17th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days atter date, I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special licence to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands, situated on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Group:
Commenging at a post planted In the
northeast corner, and marked "C. D. IS.,
N. E. corner"; thence south SO chains;
thenee west SO chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to place
of commencement; containing 040 acres.
Dated  November  7th,   1900.
Dec.22 C. D. EMMONS.
44. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section •*"*,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chanis; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 27 of said
survey.
J. S. McEACHERN,
A. T. Clark, Agent
September 17th, 1906.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, sixty
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land on Porcher
Island, about live miles east of Refuge
Bay, commencing at a post marked Mrs.
Mary Odgers, northwest corner; thence
running south 40 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence north 40 chains; thenco
west 40 chains to McKay's southwest
corner and point of commencement, containing one hundred and sixty acres.
MRS. MARY ODGERS, Locater.
R. BRAUN, Agent.
Located Nov. 9, 1900. Dec.22
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apnlv to the
Chief Commissioner of Land and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land: Commencing
at a post planted on the left bank of
Skeena River, about four miles above
Lakelse River, adjoining L. W.' northwest corner, and marked "N. M. J.s* N.
W. Corner." thence running south 80
chains: thence east 80 chains: thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres, more or less.
N. M. JOSEPH, Locator.
J. E. BATEMAN, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands in Alberni District: 1.
Commencing at a post situated 80 choins
west and 20 south of southeast boundary
post of Lot 658; thence 80 chains west;
thence 80 south; thence 80 east thence
80 north, to place of commencement.
E. CURTIT,
Per W. B. Garrard, Agent.
Oct. 19th, 1906.
61. Commencing at a ; 1st planted at
the north-west corner of J. A. narvey's
land; ihence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thtnee west 80 chains to point of commencement
CAROLINE HAINES,
G. B. Wtason, Agent.
September iotb, 1906.
62. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of G. M. Birkett's
laud; thence north 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement
MARGARET INGLES,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September ioth, 1906.
6k. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Hubert Haines'
land; thence north 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains to point of commencement
MAXWELL Si INGLES,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September ioth, 1906?
66. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of. Knignts leaes;
land; thence,north 80 chains; thence
chains; thence souht 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement
ROSABELLA GOODWYN,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September nth, 1906.
75. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of E. L. Blake's
lease; thence west 80 chains; south 80
chains; east 80 chains to bank of Nechaco River; thence following bank .of
said river to point of commencement,
640 acres, more or less.
MARY BLAKE,
A. T. CLARK, Agent
September 12th, 1906.
76. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner, of Mary Blake's
lease; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains,
more or less, to the Nechaco River;
thence following the bank of said river
to point of commencement; 640 acres,
more or less.
GEORGE BATEMAN,
A. T. Clark, .Agent
September 12th, 1906.
77. Commencing at the south-east cor-
near of George Bateman's lease; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, more or less, to
the Nechaco Rvier; thence following
the bank of said river to point of commencement; 640 acres, more or less.
B. P. COOK,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 13th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for permission to purchase
section 24, township 8, range 5, Coast
District
EMMA HOWE
JOHN DORSEY, Agent
67. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of E. Knight's
land; thence north So clams; thence
west 80 chain's; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement.
CHAS. KNIGHT,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September nth, 1906.
37- Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 16,
Township 12, Range 5. Poudrier Survey: thence south 80 chains; thence east
So chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 15, Township 12, Range 5, of said survey.
W. VAN ARSDALEN,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 20th, 1906.
46. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 36,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 36 of said
survey.
S. L. TEETZEL.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 17th, 1906.
48. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 24,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains: thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 25, Township 4,
Range 4, of said survey .
M. A. MACDONALD.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 17th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissi f Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands in Alberni District: 2.
Commencing at a post situate 80 chains
west and 20 south ofsoutheast boundnry
post of Lot 658; thence 80 chains west":
thence 80 north: thence 80 east; thence
80 south, to point of commencement.
J. T. BUCKLEY,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Oct. 19th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, in Alberni District: 3.
Commencing at a post by the shore of
Alberni Canal, near the southeast boundary post of Lot 658; thence west 80
chains; thence south to the north boundary line, or the same produced of Lot
69; thence east to Alberni Canal; tnence
following the shore line to point of commencement
W. C. RALEIGH,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Oct. 20th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, in Alberni District:   5.
55. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 15.
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
(hence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 22, Township
4, Range 4, of said survey.
LILIAN CAMPBELL,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 15th, 1906.
68. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Chas. Knight's
land; thence north 80 cbui s; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement
W. H. GOODWIN,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September nth, 1906.
69. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Chas. Knight's
the north-east corner of Knight's land;
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains,
thence north 80 chain sto point of commencement
E. N. MacBETH,
A. T. Clark, Agent
September nth, 1906.
70. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 35,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier survey; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
M. WERDEN,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 17th, 1906.
71. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of the south-west
quarter of Section 14, Townshin 12,
Range 5, Poudrier survey; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement, and being
the south half of Section 14 and north
half of Section 11, Township 12, Range
5, of said survey.
H. RENNIE,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 19th, 1906.
56. Commencing at a post planted on
the north-east corner of Section 15,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence west 80 chains; thenee south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 15 of said
survey.
GLEN CAMPBELL,
A. T. Uark, Agen.t
September 15th, 1906.
57. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Lot 547;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement; 640 acres.
KATE CLARK,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September ioth, 1906.
72. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of B. P. Cook's
lease; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 cnains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement; 640 acres.
WILLIAM MEREDITH,
A. T. Clark, Agent,
September 13th, 1906.
73. Commencing at a post planted at
Ihe south-west corner of Maxwell S.
Ingles' lease; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, more or less, to
the Nechaco River: Ihence following
bank of said river to the south line of
Maxwell S. Ingles' lease; thence west
80 chains, more or less, to point of commencement.
MINNIE CURRIE,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 12th, 1906.
Located July U'tli.  1000.
27. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 18, Tp.
10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence
soutn 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
tnence north 80 chains; thence thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 18 of said
survey.
J. C. PORTER.
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 15th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days
after date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following described land, viz. :
Commencing at the south-west corner
of Lot 9, Cassiar District, situated on
ihe Skeena River; thence east 40 chains
to the south-east corner of Lot 9,
thence south 20 chains, thence west 40
chains more or less to the Skeena River,
thence northerly along the Skeena River
to the point of commencement, containing 80 ncres more or less.
December i, 1906.
 e. f. g. McGregor.
NOTICE is hereby given that 60
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situate in Cassiar District, viz.:
Commencing at the North-East corner of Lot 9. Cassiar District on the
Hawilghet River—thence south 46
chains and 26 links to the south-cast
corner nf Lot 0, thence east 20 chains,
thence norih 40 chains more or less to
the Hnffwilghet River, thence following
the river in a westerly direction tn lhe
ooint of commencement, conlninrg !"o
acres more nr less.
Pcccnihcr 1   tono?
G. P. ROBERTS.
58. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Lot 547; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
J. A. HARVEY,
A .T .Clark, Agent.
September ioth, 1906.
74. Commencing, at a post planted at
a point on the west side of the Upper
Nechaco River, opposite tlie south-west
corner of Lot 545; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, more or less, to the bank
of the Nechaco River: thence following
bnnk of said river to point of commencement; 640 acres, more or less.
EDGAR L BLAKE.
A. T. Clark, Agent
September 12th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60
days after dnte, I intend to apply to
thc Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchnse the
following described land un the right
bank of the Skeenn River, Rnnge V,
Coast District: Commencing at a
post marked "James McGown, initial
post," at the N.E, corner of the New
Town Indian Reserve; thence west,
nliing the Indian Reserve line, 40
chains; thence north 40 chnins; thence
cast 40 chains; tiience south along
thc Skeenn River to point of commencement, containing 150 acres,
more or less.
JAMES  McGOWN.
December 1,1th, 1906. Dcc.15
TAKE NOTICE that, 60 dnys from
date, I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lnnds and Works
for permission to purchase thc following described lands, situated on
the left bank of the Skeena River,
nbout one mile below thc Little
Canon and commencing at Ed. Midland's N.E, comer post on the bank
of thc Skeena. Thence S, 40 chains;
thence E. 40 chains; thence N. 42
chains, more or less, to Sousic's S.
boundary; thence W. 38 chains, more
or less, to the Skeena River; thence
N. 3 chnins, more or less, to point of
commencement, containing 170 acres,
more or less.
N. GOWEN.
A. W. HARVEY, Agent.
Dcc.15 12
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 1906.
The Pacific Coast
Realty Co, Ltd.
Have an exclusive list ol specially selected ACREAGE, ESTATE and FARM
PROPERTIES for sole at prices which
will attract purchasers.
NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY
Victoria Property is the safest and best
investment to be found in Real Estate on
the Pacific Coast.   There will be a
60 PER CENT. INCREASE
IN VALUES IN 1907.
You cannot make a mistake in buying
Business,
Residence, or
Acreage
Property.
Write or call on us for particulars.   We
can show you how to make money.
The Pacific Coast
Realty Co., Ltd.
12 MacQregor Bl'k, Victoria, B.C.
(Opposite Driard Hotel)
I**-******************* *** **£
REAL
ESTATE
S= RE, LIFE and ACCIDENT
INSURANCE.
¥
Victoria Real Estate today is the
best investment in the Province.
Prices advancing rapidly.   I advise immediate investment.
Consult me,
J S. Murray
46 FORT STREET
VICTORIA,   B. C.
P. O. BOX 77 PHONE 1279  *
] ^^,4,.»»»»»»-»»»-»-»*t»***»»|-*»l
The Home
y
; Seekers
Goal.
ii
Special   Bargains  to
Wind Up An  Estate.
6*4 acres in the North
End, only 20 minutes walk
to Post Office, with southern aspect, $600 per acre,
5 acres is all cleared and in
high state of cultivation.
Seaview lots from $50 to
$100 each, chiefly cleared,
and ready for building on.
Easy terms if necessary.
The B. C. Land & Investment
Agency, Ltd.
Real Estate, Financial and
Insurance Audits,
VICTORIA, B. C.
Money
Properly invested
leads on to
Fortune.
We are the medium
through which this
happy result can be
ACHIEVED, therefore invest in
Vancouver Realty.
BURNETT, SON & CO.
Pender St.,
Vancouver,  B. C.
I
Navy-
Sale
Having bought up all the
large 8}£ lb. brass shells
curio collectors and others
will find them highly desirable for umbrella stands,
flower pots, jardinieres,
etc. They are 4£ in. in diameter and cannot tumble
over. Nice for Christmas presents.    To be had at
H. STADTHAGENo
THE INDIAN TRADER
79 Johnson St. VICTORIA
MAIL ORDEHS SOLICITED
IDEAL
CLIMATE
. SOIL
and
LOCATION
FOR FRUIT
Plots.
That is what I can offer orchardists
on the shores of beautiful Kootenay
Lake.   Write for literature and maps
J. E* ANNABLE,
The Land Man,
NELSON, B. C.
!%
THE   PHCENIX
LAND, TRUST AND INVESTMENT
ASSOCIATION
0
UR EXCLUSIVE LIST of moderately priced farms, Agricultural, Mining and Timber
Lands, Residential Estates. Suburban Homes, Business Blocks and City Real Estate,
will be mailed to you free, when and where desired.
SPECIAL  OPPORTUNITIES
^
Comer business block within two
minutes' walk of postoffice, Government street, and docks, Victoria.
Three-story brick, double frontage,
45x78 ft. Two years of present lease
to run, but can be terminated at any
time if required for owner's own use;
rental pays full 5 per cent on present
price asked, and several offers have
recently been made at higher rentals.
Price $25,000, portion can remain on
mortgage.
Five town lots, Alberni new town-
site, centrally situated, $150 per lot.
This investment is bound to increase
very rapidly in value.
Well built 10-room house, stone
foundation, on Dallas road, facing sea,
fitted with all modern conveniences;
large garden, well laid out and planted; very healthy situation; magnificent view.   $6,500.
For further
particulars  write
to or call en the
PHOENIX LAND,
TRUST &
INVESTriENT
ASSOCIATION,
Rooms II and 9
Macgregor Block
VICTORIA,   B. C.
The finest residential site in Victoria, comprising 12 acres on the sea
front close to golf links and tram;
very suitable for large residence, having one of the most magnificent panoramic views in the world, overlooking Mount Baker, Cascade and Olympic ranges, or could be subdivided for
building a number of Swiss chalet
residences. This is absolutely the
most beautiful and picturesque building site  obtainable.    Price $850 per
385 acres fruit land within 12 miles
of City of Victoria. To an investor
with capital at command this presents
an unique opportnuity to secure large
profits by subdividing into five and
ten-acre tracts. Portion of purchase
money can remain on mortgage.
We will buy, subject to
confirmation
100 Dominion Copper     6.25
1000 Eva Gold Mines 20
5000 Nicola Coal Mines 07
2000 Diamond Vale 24
2000 Sullivan    08
3000 Aurora Cons 07^
We will sell, subject to
prior sale
2750 Alta. Coal, pooled reps.     .25
10000 American Boy 03*^
1000 International   Coal 68
1000 B.C. Amalgamated Coal.       Bid
2000 Rambler  WA
35 Cons. Smelters 145-00
If vou will buy or sell at prices
above named, kindly wire us at our
expense.
B.B. MIGHTON & CO.
Mining and Investment Brokers.
Drawer 1089. Nelson, B. C.
FOR SALE
In a good Kootenay town, splendid newspaper outfit and job
plant.
Au opportunity for a live man
with small capital.
Address "The Week," Victoria.
FRUIT
LANDS
On Kootenay Lake and West Aim.
Lake and River frontage. We
have large and small tracts of
good land anl prices to salt all.
Also several partly improved
ranches. Full particulars willingly given.
;:fi
H. E. CROASDAILE &  CO.
Nelson, B.C.
<y
o
o
o
o
Nelson Iron Works
Machinery of all kinds built,
erected and repaired.
Complete Mining Plants
Cammell Laird Steel, Etc.
R'.W.Hinton     NelSOfl, 6. C.
Collectors!
I carry an assortment of 400
subjects of
Genuine
Photographic
Post Cards
of Banff and the Canadian National
Park, also of Northwest Indians,
Mountain and Game Scenes.
PRICE 60c. PER DOZEN.
FOR THE TRADE ONLY.
My quotations by the hundred are
the lowest in Canada. Photo post
cards made from auy subject you
may send me.
Write for particulars.
Byron Harmon
Photographic Artist,
Banff, Alberta.
Two Shares, B. C. Permanent
Loan and Savings Co.,
"A" Stock, for $275.
This (A) stock pays 9 per cent
on par value of shares, now quoted at $148. Purchaser participates in dividend payable on 15th
January next.
Westminster Avenue
and Dufferin Street
88 by 132 feet; brick block on
corner; store and 17 rooms; 8-
room house to south and 9-room
house in rear of brick block;
$31,000; half cash; will arrange
for balance.
A. 0. P. Francis & Co.
510 Pender Street
VANCOUVER, B. C.
C. S. BAKER
Assayer,
Chemist
and Ore Shippers' Agent.
GRAND FORKS, B. C.
ASSAY CHARGES.
$1.00
1.00
1-25
1.25
I.JO
2.00
Gold  	
Silver 	
Copper 	
Lead 	
Iron 	
Zinc 	
Gold and  Silver      1,50
Gold and Copper     2.00
Gold, Silver and Copper     2.50
Gold, Silver and Lead     2.50
Other metals on application.
A discount allowed to regular customers.
Subscribe for The Week.
W.B.Smith
WndtrtaUr
35 YATES S
PHONE.     892
YMIR Is a thriving mintnir
town, situated 18 miles
south ol Nelson in thc rich
mineral district of West Koo-
tenav. It is essentially a
(ruo-mlllin-icamii, nnd there
areslxstnmp-mlllsopcratln-t
in the vicinity—one of them
(thc Ymir) bclnst thc Invest
in Canada, wilh itsSOstamps
eonsiamly dropping. There
are numerous mines in active
onemlion In thc camp, and
reliable Information Is nl-
wnys nvallablc in Ymir.
Waldorf Hotel
Headquarters for Mining and Commercial Men.
Sample Rooms in Connection.
YMIR, B. 6.
G. S   eOLBMHN.
Proprietor.
YMIR enjoys every facility
for minim; operations.
Timber and Water are abund-
nnt, the roads and trails ure
In good condition in the
main, and new ones arc being opened up. There ls direct railway communication
with three smelters, all within fifty miles of lhe town
The climate Is congenial and
every necessary and luxury
of life can be scored in tho
camp snd nt prices thnt compare favourably with those
of any other disirlet. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29 1906.
»3'
[
TRAVELLERS' GUIDE
-   	
I
VICTOBIA
STRAND HOTEL
VICTORIA
The home ot all theatrical and vaudeville
artists while in the Capital city, alto of
other kindred bohemiaus.
WRIQHT & FALCONER, Proprietors.
CAMBORNE
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining men and
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
REVELSTOKE
Hotel Victoria
REVELSTOKE, B. C.
Headquarters ior miners and
lumbermen.
ROBT. LAUQHTON, Prop'r.
BANFF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
Banff's Most Popular $2 a Day Hotel.
Close to Station and SulphurJ
Baths.
i.      N. K. LUXTON, Proprietor.
PHOENIX.
Dearie's Hotel
PHOENIX, B. C.
New. Modern hot water system. Electric
lighted. Tub and shower baths and laundry in
connection.  The miners'home.
« DANNY " DEANE, Proprietor
GREENWOOD,
The Windsor Hote
(IREENWOOD, B. C.
American and European Plan.
Cafe in Connection.
ERNEST J. CARTIER, Prop.
ROSSLAND
Hoffman House
ROSSLAND, B. C.
Rates $1.00 per day and up.   Cafe
Connection.
QREBN & SniTH. Prop's.
NELSON.
HOTEL HUME
NELSON,   B. C,
Leading Hotel ot tht Kootenays.
. J. FRED HUME,
Proprietor.
Silver King Hotel,
NELSON. B. C.
Tbe home of the Industrial Worker!
of the Kootenays.
W. E. ncCandilfh,
Proprietor
r
Royal Hotel
NELSON, B. C.
Tbe Best Family Hotel in the City.
II a da>.
Mrs. Wm. Roberts,        Prtprletress
CBANBBOOE.
Cranbrook Hotel
Cranbrook, B. C.
Rates $2 per day.   Opposite the C.P.R.
depot.
Hogarth & Rollins, Proprietors.
CARLTON SALOON
AND LOUNGE
(Late Vernon Hotel.)
THE FIRST-CLASS BAR
R. P. CLARK, Proprietor,
(Late of Dawson City and South Africa)
Cor. Douglas and View Sts.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for permission to
purchase the following described lands,
situate on the north shore of Stuart
Lake, about half way between Pinchi
and Tac*ier Rivers and about 3J4 miles
inland in the Coast Distritc oi the
Province of British Columbia, viz.:
Commencing at a post marked "E. F.
S. W.," placed near the north boundary
of Walter J. Friedlander's purchase,
about 40 chains from the northeast corner; thence astronomically north 80
chains^ thence astronomically east 80
chains; thence astronomically soutli 80
chains, and thence astronomically west!
80 chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acre.*:, more or less.
EDGAR FRIEDLANDER.
J. A. Hickey, Agent.
August 24, 1906.
December 8.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away timber from the following described land, beginning at a post situate
at the mouth of Kitsonschultz River, on
the north bank of the Skeena River,
marked "S. W. Cor. Wilfred Loiselle's
Timber Claim;" thence north 40 chains;
thence east 160 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence west 160 chains to point
of beginning.
Dated Nover 17th, 1906.
WILFRED LOISELLE, Locator.
December 8.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on the
southwest shore of Stuart Lake, about
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty] ten miles from Fort St. James, in the
days after date I intend to apply to the Coast District of the Province of Brit*
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of 1 ish Columbia, viz.:   Commencing at a
Lands and Works for a special license | post   marked  "E. J. M. S.   E," and
to cut and carry away timber from the, placed about 10 chains west from the
to shore; thence westerly along shore
to point of commencement.
W. E.  GREEN,
W. B. Garrard, Agnet.
Clayoquot District. noao
her^^lrai that  tiNXtf
NOTICB la hereby given that SO daya
from date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Worka for permission to purchase Che following described
land, adjoining Lot 646, Skeena Diatrlct:
Commencing at a post inarked "A C.'a N.
W. Corner"; thence eaat 40 chalna along
sooth bonudary of T. Flewln's claim; thence
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains, along east bonudary
of Lot 646 to point of commencement, containing 160 acres mart or leas.
ANNUS COPELAND.
following described lands, situate on the
southwest shore of Stuart Lake, about
nine miles from Fort St. Jmes, in the
Coast Distrjct of the Province, of British Columbia, viz.: Commencing at a
post marked "E. J. M. N. E.," and
placed about 10 chains west from the
lake shore, thence astronomically west
80 chains; thence astronomically south
40 chains; thence astronomically east 40
chains, thence astronomically south 40
chains; thence astronomically west 40
chains; thence astronomically south 40
chains; thence astronomically east 40
chains; thence astronomiclly north 40
chains; thence astronomically east 40
chains; thence astronomically north 80
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres.
E. J. MATHEWS.
J. A. Hickey, Agent.
August 30, 1906. December 8
lake shore; thence astronomically west
40 chains; thence astronomically north
40 chains; thence astronomically west
40 chains; thence astronomically north
40 chains, more or less, to said southwest shore at a point near the head of
what is known as the Big Bay; thence
following said shore in southeasterly direction for about 60 chains; and thence
astronomically south for about 20 chains
to point of commencement, and containing about 400 acres, more or less.
E. J. MATHEWS.
J. A. Hickey, Agent. .
August 30, 1906.
December 8.
DEPARTMENT   OF   MINES.
COAL, MINES REGULATION ACT.
BOARDS   OF  EXAMINERS.
NOTICE is hereby given that the following constitute the Boards of Examiners for the various Collieries during
the year 1S07:—
CUMBERLAND  COLLIERY.
Appointed   by   the  Owners — Charles
Matthews.
Alternates—David Walker, David Nel-
list.
Appointed by the Lieut.-Governor In
Council—John Kesley.
Elected by the Miners—Thomas Ripley.
Alternates — John Horbury, Daniel
Stewart.
All persons interested may obtain full
Information by applying to the Secretary of the Board, Mr. John Kesley, of
Cumberland, B. C.
EXTENSION  COLLIERY.
Appointed    by    the    Owners—James
Sharp.
Alternates—Alex. Bryden, Alex. Shaw.
Appointed by the Lieut.-Governor in
Council—W. G. Simpson.
Elected by the Miners—Thomas Do-
herty.
Alternates—William Anderson, Benjamin Berto.
All persons interested may obtain full
information by applying to the Secretary of the Board, Mr. W. G. Simpson,
of Ladysmith,  B. C.
NANAIMO COLLIERY.
Appointed   by   the   Owners—Thomas
Mills.
Alternates—George Wilkinson, Charles
Graham.
Appointed by the Lieut.-Governor ln
Council—Thomas Budge.
Elected by the Miners—John Carr.
Alternates—Thomas C. Piper, George
Moore.
All persons interested may obtain full
Information by applying to the Secretary of the Board, Mr. Thomas Budge,
of Nanaimo, B. C.
MICHEL COLLIERY.
Appointed    by    the    Owners—Robert
Strachan.
Alternates—John John, James Derbyshire.
Appointed by the Lieut.-Governor in
Council—Evan Evans.
Elected by the Miners—Sidney Birt.
Alternates — Joseph    Thomas,    John
Laurenson.
All persons interested may obtain full
Information by applying to the Secretary of tlie Board, Mr. Evan Evans, of
Michel, B. C.
COAL CREEK COLLIERY.
Appointed by the Owners—David Martin.
Alternates—John Hunt. Henry Miard.
Appointed  by  the Lieut.-Governor  in
Council—John McCliment.
Elected by the Miners—W. H. Moore.
Alternates—Charles Webber, Abraham
Brown.
All persons interested may obtain full
Information by applying to the Secretary of the Board, Mr. John McCliment,
of Fernie, B. C.
Note.—Alternates act as members of
the Board in the absence of those regularly appointed or elected to act thereon.
Dated this 20th day of December, 190b.
RICHARD McBRIDE,
Dec.22 Minister of Mines.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for permission to
purchase the following described lands,
situate on the north shore of Stuart
Lake, about half wy between Pinchi
and Tacher Rivers and about 2lA miles
inlands in the Coast District of the
Province of British Columbia, viz.:
Commencing at a post marked "W. J.
I F. S. E.," and placed at the northeast
corner of lot 331; thence astronomically
west 80 chains; thence astronomically
north 80 chains; thence astronomically
east 80 chains; thence astronomically
south 80 chains to the point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
WALTER J. FRIEDLANDER.
J. A. Hickey, Agent.
August 24, 1006.
December 8.
NOTICE) la hereby given that 60 day*
after date I intend to apply to the Ohlef
Commissioner of Lands and Worka for permission to purchase tlhe tallowing described
land situated ln tiie Kitsumkalum Valley,
Range 5, Coast District: Commencing at
a stake planted at the N. E. comer of N.
T. Cunningham purchase claim, marked
W. A. Wadhams' No. 1 Initial Post; thence
running 40 ohains west; thence 40 chains
north; thence 40 chains east; thenoe 40
chains south to post of commencement,
containing 160 acres more or lees.
W. A. WADHAMS, Locator.
F. W. BOHLER, Agent.
Located October 1st, 1906.
NOTICE la hereby given that 60 daya
after date I intend1 to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to purchase the following described
tend situated ln thej Kitsumkalum Valley,
Range 6, Coast District: Commencing at
a stake planted at the N. E. earner of
W» A. Wevdhams' purchase claim, marked L.
Gune No. 1 Initial Post; thenee running
40 chains west; thence 40 chains north;
thence 40 chains east; thence 40 chains
south to post of commencement, containing
160 tveree more or less.
L. GUNE,  Locator.
F. W. BOHLER, Agent.
Located October 1st,  1906.
NOTICE la hereby given that two months
after date I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special licence to cot and carry away
timber from the following described lands,
commencing at a poet planted about three
fourths of a mile west of tbe Elk river,
thence north 80 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence south 40 chains, thencs weat
40 chains, thence south 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40 chains,
thence east along the beach of Kennedy
lake, thence north to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or leas.
aJjUn
Sept. Mt, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissi-ner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, in Alberni District:
Commencing at a post on the Alberni
Canal, about 30 chains   S.   of   Hayes
No. 9—
NOTICE   Is     _^_ .
days after date I Intend to apply to tM
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Wort*
for a special license to cut and carnr away
timber from the following described lands,
situated on the north side of flan Jtoaa
River, Renfrew District, adjoining iB. J.
Palmer's southwest corner No. 2: Coae-
mencing at a post marked "J. Young,
Southwest Corner," thenee north flu
chains; tiience east 80 chains; thencs aouttV
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to place
of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew on the 1st day
ot November, 1908.
JOHN YOUNG.
November 17, 1906.
THIRTY DAYS AFTER DATE I la-
tend to make application to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for per.
mission to out and carry away timber from
the following   described   lands,   situated
No. 1. Starting at a post ln Bay on west
side of extreme end of the lake sad ran*
ning 80 chains west; 80 chains north:; 80
chains more or less, east back to shots
and following shore back to point of commencement.
No. 2. Starting at the southwest corner
of No. 1 running west 106 chains; running
north 60 chains; running east 106 chains,
and south 60 chains back to point of comimencement.
No. 3. Beginning 10 chains south of the
northwest corner of No. 2 and running «l
chains south; 106 chains west; 60 chains
north and 106 chains east back .to point of
commeucement.
No. 4. (Beginning at a post 10 chains
from the northwest corner of No, 3 running
south 60 chains; west 106 ohains; north 89
ohains and east 106 chains back to point
of commencement.
ALBERT   FRASER.
Vietoria, B. C, November 11, 1908.
November 17, 1908
NOTICE Is hereby given that 60 dan
after date, I Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following land,
adjoining Lot 487 on Portland Canal:
Starting -from a post marked "W. P. B**e.
N. W. Corner"; thence 20 chains south;
thence 40 chains east; thence 40 chains
north; thence 40 cbalns, more or less, west
to shore Une; thence southerly along shore
line to point of commencement, containing
120 acres, more or less.
W. P. FLEWIN.
November 17, 1006.
NOTICE ls hereby given tbat 60 daya
after date, I Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of iLands and Works for
permission to purchase the following land,
situate on Observatory Inlet, adjoining
Lot 479: Starting from a post marked
"W. G. P's. S. W. Cor."; thence north 20
chains; tiience east 20 chains; theaes
south 20 chains, more or less, to shore
line; thence along the shore line westerly
to point of commencement, containing 40
acres, more or less.
November 17, 1906.
W. G. (PINIDBR.
NOTICE ls hereby given that sixty (60)
days after date we Intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase tiie following
described land situated near Graveyard
Point, commencing at a post on the North
bank of tbe Skeena river,   tbence   In   a
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works ior a special licence to cut and
carry away timber from the following
..-•■,med  lands, in Alberni District:
No. 1.—Commencing at a post on the
east side of Silver Lake, about 40 chains
from the outlet; thence 40 chains E;
80 chains N.; thenee west to Silver
Lake; thence following the shore line
to point of commencement.
No. 2.—Commencing S. W. corner of
No. 1, on east shore of Silver Lake;
thence 40 chains E. 40 chains N.; 60
chains E.; 80 chains S.; thence west to
outlet of lake; thence following the
shore line to point of commencement.
No. 3.—Commencing at a post at the
outlet of Silver Lake; thence 40 chains
S.; thence 40 chains W.; thence 40
chains N.; thence 100 chains W.; thence
N. to Silver Lake; thence following
shore line to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. Garrard, Agent
31st October, 1906. no20
Landing; thence W. 40 chains; thence westerly direction 40 chains; thence north-
S. 160 chains; thence E? to water front; I 3}T J° d,»iM*. thence easterly 40 chains:
thence following the water    front   to ^to^^otZ^iScaSS? £&£
point of commencement. iue 160 acres, more or iSSs            wnl"n
W. E. GREEN, Located October 16, 1008.
W. B. Garrard, Agent.
October 29, 1906. no29
64. Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner of Hubert
Haines' land, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
ELIZABETH KNIGHT.
G. B. Watson, Agent.
Sept. 10th, 1906.
B.  BUY AND 8.
November 17, 1906.
McKENZIE,
Locators.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special licence to cut and
carry away timber, exclusive of hemlock, from the following described
lands:
1. Commencing at a post by the N.
E. boundary post of the Indian Reserve, on the shore of Nahmint Bay by
the mouth of the river; thence 80 chains
N.; thence 80 chains W.; thence S. to
Nahmint River following same to N.
boundary of I. R.; thence E. to point of
commencement.
2. Commencing at a post by the N. E.
boundary post of the Indian Reserve
and at the S. E. corner of No. 1;
tlienc* No chains N.; thence E. to W.
boundary of Lot 79; thence S. to shore
line; thence following the shore to E
boundary of I. R.; thence to point of
commencement.
Located October 28th, 1906.
W. B. GARRARD.
Alberni District. no2g
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30
days atter date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special licence to cut and
carry _ away timber from the following
described lands: Commencing at a nost
on the N. shore of Uchucklesit Harbour, on the W. boundary of Loe 699,
'-•"le" Mineral Claim; thence N.
nnd E. along boundary of "Cascade"
M. C. tn the W. boundary of Lot 70;
thence N'. and E. alnnp 70 to Fern M.
C„ thence N. and E. alone boundaries
nf "Pern " "Waso" and "Sunshine" Nn.
2 Mi*"*ral Claims, to the N. E. corner
n* "Sunshine"" M. C; thence N. tn
chains; thence W. 100 chains; thence S.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away timber from the following described land, situate on Hastings Arm
of Observatory Inlet: Commencing at
a, post planted on east shore of Hastings Arm, marked "E. D.'s S. W. Corner," thence east 40 chains, thence north
160 chains, thence west 40 chains to
shore line, thence southerly along shore
line to point 0' commencement.
E. DONEHUE.
December 8.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away (limber from the following described land, situated at Kum-ea-lon Inlet, Skeena District: Commencing at
a stake marked "W. R. F.'s Initial
Post," planted near shore of Inlet,
thence north 40 chains, thence east 6b
chains, thence south too chains, thence
west 40 chains to shore line, thence
westerly alon gshore line to point of
commencement.
WALTER R. FLEWIN.
December 8.
NOTICE Is hereby given that sixty (60)
•jays after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase tht
following described land situated near
Graveyard Point: Commencing at a pott on
the North bank of the Skeena Tlver; tbence
ln a westerly direction 40 chains; thence
southerly 40 chains; thence easterly 40
chains; thence northerly 40 chains along
bank of river to point of commencement,
containing 160 acres, more or less.
Located October 16, 1006.
H. McKBNKIB, Locator.
8.   McKENZIE, ' Agent.
November 17, 1908.
NOTICE Is hereby given that sixty (60)
its after date I fntend to apply to tht
Hon.  Chief Commissioner of  Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the following described land situated near
Graveyard Point: Commencing at a pott on
the North bank of the Skeena liver; thencs
In a westerly direction 40 ohains; thence
northerly 40 cbalns; tbence easterly 40
ohains; thence southerly 40 chains following bank of river to point of commencement, containing 16o acres, more or leu.
Located October 16, 1906.
G. B. BAILLIB, Locator.
B. BBY,   Agent.
November 17, 1906.
No, 1-
NOTICB Is hereby given that thirty
daya after date I Intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry away
timber from the following described lands,
situated on the south side of flan Joss
River, Renfrew District, Joining Parkinson's southeast corner: Commencing at a
post marked "A. Young, Northeast Corner," thenee south 160 chains; thence west
40 chains: thence north 160 ohains, thencs
east 40 chains to place of commencement,
containing 640 acres.
Dated at Fort Renfrew on the Uth day
of October, 1906.
November 17, 1906.
ALBXR.   YOUNG.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
dajjs after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away timber from the following lands:
Commencing at a stake marked "G. A.
B. No. 1," planted on the east bank of
Mammon River, thence north 16b
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
south ifio chains, thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
GEO. A. BIGELOW.
December 8.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands, situated on the east bank
of Marmon River, Graham Island:
Commencing at a post marked "G. A.
B.'s No. 2 Claim;" thence south 160
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 160 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
GEO. A. BIGELOW.
December 8.
No. 2-
NOTICE ls hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to tht
Ohlef Commissioner of 'Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry away
timber from the following described lands,
situated on the south side of San Joan
Rlrer, Renfrew District: Commencing at
a post marked "J. Young, N. B. Corner,"
adjoining Mrs. J. S. Toung's south boundary, thence south 120 chains: thence west
80 ohaina: thence north 40 chains; thencs
cast 40 chains; thence nortli 80 chains;
thence east 40 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew, this 2Bth day of
October,  1906.
November 17, 1906.
JOHN  YOUNG.
NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days
after date I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner ot Lands and Works
for permission to purchsse the following
described land, situated tn the Coast District, Range 5: Beginning at a pott plaited on the north hank of the Skeena river
about one mile southwest of Zymqettts
river at the southeast corner of J. B. Bate-
man's pre-emption claim and saarktd E B.'s
Northeast Corner; thence running west 120
cbalns; thence south about SO chains, mors
or less, to bank of Skeena river: thence In
a northen.«tcrly direction following meandering of the Skeeoa river to post of commencement, containing about 820 acres of
land more or less.
BMMA BATilMAN.
1. B. BATEMAN, Agent.
Located September 20th, 1906. 15
THE WEEK, SATURDAY DECEMBER 29, 1906.
JUST TO HAND
At the SEfll-READY WARDROBE
DRESS SUITS
TUXEDO JACKETS
$25 and $30
$15 to $20
B. WILLIAMS & CO.
Sole Agents for Semi-Ready Tailoring.
68-70 YATES STREET.
VICTORIA, B. C.
Kootenay Pioneering.
By Martin Burrell.
(Written for The Week.)
Mr. Burrell, the popular editor of tbe
Grand Forks Gazette, has contributed to the
Christmas number of The Week a breezy
sketch on the history of the Boundary country.
"Tis neither wealth, nor rank, nor state,
But (jet up and get that makes men great."
Eminently characteristic of Western energy, Western restlessness, and Western success are those words of Kipling's, "Wealth,
turned to noble uses and honestly earned, offends none, and benefits many." High office
and rank are well enough when they fitly
express the inward quality of tbe man. but
in the last analysis it is the untiring energy,
the faith, the "get-up-and-get" spirit of the
men themselves which has made British Columbia what it is to-day. In every district
there have been those who have cleared the
land, prospected the hills, tramped the forests, and in season and out of season have
kept burning within them the fires of a strong
faith in ultimate success.  All honour to them.
Gradually but surely the Province is coming to her own, and as a good-humoured spirit
of boasting is natural to each district, it is
not out of order to put in a vigorous word
for Grand Forks, which, in common with the
tributary country, has "made good" in a
manner which is not eclipsed by any other
section of British Columbia.
Settled in 1884, during the following decade
the valley witnessed the gradual advent of
land seekers and prospectors, who, in spite
of isolation and occasional discouragement,
determined to stay with a country which in
every respect looked good. In 1894 a post
office was established at Grand Forks, and the
nucleus of a town began to show itself. It
was not until the advent of the C. P. R.,
however, in 1899, and the building of the
Granby smelter in the same year, that expansion on a broader scale began to take
place. Since that date progress has been
steady and wonderful, and happily it is a
progress marked by no relapses, but based
on the solid and enduring resources of the
district, permanent in character, and rich in
promise.
The great mainstay of the place has, of
course, been the Granby smelter. This institution has been so often described that only
a few details need be chronicled here. The
first furnace was blown in on August 21,
1900. Only a short time was needed to demonstrate to a somewhat sceptical world that,
by economical management and skilled metallurgical processes, the vast low-grade ore
bodies of the Boundary could be successfully
treated. From that time to this it has been
a history of steady enlargement and advance.
The Granby now ranks as one of the best-
managed and largest copper smelters on the
continent. When the full battery of eight
furnaces was completed, the high price of
copper, and   the  further  assurance  of  the
tremendous size of the Phoenix ore bodies
warranted the taking of another step, to-wit,
the enlargement of the furnaces. Two of the
eight were already of the big type with a
capacity of some 500 tons per day. It was
determined to bring the others up to this
standard. Work was commenced on number
one, and, the success of the experiment being
established, the enlargement of number two
followed, and at the moment of writing number three is being finished. This only leaves
three out of the eight of the smaller size and
the work of increasing the size of these will
gradually be proceeded with. The ores at
the present time are somewhat more siliceous
than they were a few years ago, but when
the furnaces are all enlarged and things are
running smoothly the total daily tonnage
smelted will be some 3,000 tons. Not a bad
record when one considers that seven short
years ago the site of the smelter was a barren bench below the big hills.
The enlargement of the furnaces has, of
course, entailed heavy and expensive work in
other directions. Additional blowers, motors,
converters, pumps, and so on, have been installed, and at the present time there is being
erected a new furnace building of steel, the
dimensions of which are 289 feet by 85 feet.
Naturally, so immense a plant, notwithstanding the use of the most modern machinery,
implies a large force of men, and a correspondingly substantial payroll. The number
of employees lately has averaged from 300 to
325, and a considerable percentage of these
have built homes, and take a keen and active
part in all that makes for the welfare and
advancement of the community.
Night and day the smoke curls from the
two huge 150-foot stacks and drifts to the
hills. Summer and winter, week day and
Sunday, the ore and coke trains rattle their
contents into the huge bins. Hour after hour
the electric motors push the "charge" cars
into the yawning furnaces, and out on the
big slag dump, now half a mile long, the
little engines snort along with their train of
slag pots, each one, as it is tilted, pouring the
motlen stream over the edge, and in the winter nights lighting up the adjacent snow-
covered hills with a weird and fiery glow.
Type of the higher forms of industry, transmuting the useless metals of the hills into
something of high value to the world of commerce, the big copper smelter at Grand Forks
is an institution of which her people are
justly proud.
Trailing its devious course over the divide
from the Columbia, the C. P. R. road from
this point to Robson affords one of the finest
scenic views in the whole Province. The big
road, however, was but the herald of other
transportation companies, and at this moment
Grand Forks is perhaps better served in this
respect than any other section of the Province. Served daily by two transcontinental
railways, it has in addition the Kettle Valley
Railway which rims from here to Republic,
and which is at the present time extending
its system up the North Fork of the Kettle
to Franklin cnmp, a mining district of extraordinary promise, and a district also with
a wealth of timber which is beginning to
receive the attention which its merits justify.
Practically in the city itself are the mill and
factory of tbe Kettle River Lumber Company,
and operating in the district is the Yale-
Columbia Lumber Company, whose mill at
Cascade cuts 50,000 feet per day, and whose
present plans involve a large, rapid development of the lumber industry of this well-
timbered section.
Valuable as all these things are, however,
there is another great source of wealth in the
shap of the rich lands of the valley which
surrounds the city. Here again there has
been no boom, but a quiet and steady advance.
The splendid crops of fruit which have been
taken from the orchards of the valley this
year, and the successful work accomplished
at Riverside Nurseries have amply demonstrated the climatic and horticultural advantages possessed by this district. In few, if
any, sections of the Province is there so large
an acreage free from the expensive problems
of clearing which confront other districts.
Hundreds of acres lie ready for the plough,
and hundreds more can be made ready at a
comparatively slight expense. Even now six
carloads of fruit have been this year shipped
to the Northwest, and it is but a matter of
time, and a short time, when the valley will
count ten settlers to where one exists now,
and when carload after carload of the choice
apples which grow to perfection here will
wend their way to the prairie markets. Few,
even of our own people, realise how rich a
heritage theer is at thir doors, or that in the
long stretch of land through which winds and
twists the Kettle River they have a source of
wealth and prosperity which properly developed would equal in importance the combined industries of the city and immediate
district.
As a natural consequence of the mining and
smelting development of the district has come
the establishment of allied industries. In the
earlier years of its history the Granby and
the other Boundary smelters got practically
all their supplies in the way of castings, furnace jackets, and so on, at Spokane. Messrs.
Brown and McKie saw the opening, and some
years ago established an iron works and foundry at this point, which a year ago had grown
to such proportions that large extensions became necessary, and the business was reorganised as a limited liability company. Such
things as the huge slag pots used at the
smelters were successfully turned out, and
once more a home industry ousted the products of the foreign manufacturer, and ocn-
tributed its share to the upbuilding of the
community. Unfortunately during the past
summer fire made a clean sweep of the whole
institution, and had the prospects been otherwise than they are the foundry might have
ended then and there. The upshot has been
that the original owners of the establishment
have gone ahead with greater confidence than
ever and have lately completed the erection
of a new establishment, still better equipped
and on a seal which ennbles the company to
employ a large force of men and successfully
fill a large portion of the orders which are
constantly being placed by such firms as the
Granby, the B. C. Copper Company of Greenwood and the Dominion Copper Company.
This year, too, has witnessed the successful
establishment of another large industry in the
shape of the Grand Forks Machine and Structural Iron Works. At the head of this is
Mr. J. C. MacDonald, long master mechanic
of the Granby smelter. With him is associated Angus MacDonald, and, from the moment the firm had its fine steel building erected and its machinery installed, all hands have i
been busy with contracts. The biggest of
these was the construction of the huge steel
furnace building at the Granby smelter which
Messrs. MacDonald are at this moment engaged in erecting. Equipped with air compressors, electric power, and every modern
tool used in iron and steel work, the future
of the machine works was never a moment in
doubt, and here also the result has been a
cutting out of foreign manufacturers in favour of the man at home, greatly to the
advantage of the city and district.
Time and space will not permit one to
touch on the marvellous development of the
mining resources of the North Fork of the
Kettle River, a district which is entirely tributary to Grand Forks. It must suffice to say
that outside capital has heavily interested
itself in this section, and that thousands of
dollars have been expended this year with
results gratifying to all those who have long
known that this section would prove itself to
be one of the rich mining districts of the
province. By next year the Kettle Valley
Railway will have brought the long-needed
transportation facilities to the camps up the
river, and "things will be doing."
As to the city itself a little boasting is
eminently in place. Five churches, a live and
up-to-date lot of merchants, a Twenty Thousand Club, what more could one have? The
city owns its own water and electric light
systems, and with all due apologies to the
city in which The Week has its headquarters,
one may frankly say that Grand Forks is the
best-lighted burgh in the Province, not excepting Victoria, which, by the bye, is none
too good. The population here is about 2,500, <
and it will be admitted that the estimate is
a conservative one when the fact is stated
that the enrollment of pupils at the school is
297. No better educational facilities exist
anywhere. There is a high school, and a
splendid public school over which Principal
May has presided efficiently for a number of
years. The building stands in spacious
grounds surrounded with young shade trees,
and the work is carried on with an exceptionally strong staff of eight teachers.
But it is essentially as a city ot homes that
Grand Forks is becoming known to all strangers and travellers.   With a favourable climate, a level and admirable townsite, and
any amount of children in the place, why
shouldn't Grand Forks be a place of beautiful homes?   And it is.   Always the good
work spreads.   Each man emulates his neighbor, and the pleasant sight is now seen of
one fine lawn and pretty garden and tasteful     \
residence after another, and the net rsult is     ■.
an increasing   pride   of   citizenship, and a    .,'
firmer belief than ever that Grand Forks is
just about the best place in the best Province
of this great country.   With this mild and      i
perfectly justifiable boast I may fitly end. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 1906.
M
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REVIEW.
A seasonable book for all who love
their country and who desire to make
closer acquaintance with one of the
greatest of our Empire builders, is
the Life of William Pitt, by Charles
Whibley, which has just been issued
from the presses of Blackwood &
Son. Pitt's position in the estimate
of English speaking peoples is steadily rising and it is doubtful whether
at the present moment any statesman
of the last 150 years disputes with
him the position of supremacy. His
great achievements in diplomacy, the
success of his foreign policy and the
effect on the House of Commons and
the country of his commanding eloquence are well known to every student of English history. Mr. Whib-
ley's book carries the subject further
and gives an incisive and sympathetic analysis of his personal character and bearing. Probably no
higher praise could be awarded to
any public servant than that which
Mr. Whibley ascribes to Pitt for his
lofty unselfishness. He says: "Dispensing for nearly twenty years the
favours of the Crown, he lived without ostentation and he died poor.'
The remarkable resemblance which
existed between Mr. Pitt and Abraham Lincoln is emphasized in Mr.
Whibley's book. Both were big,
bony men, of tremendous nerve
force, of incorruptible character and
of tender sympathy. But the appearance of both belied the possession of
these high qualities. Of Pitt it is
said that "while his chin receded, his
forehead was not ample, and his nose,
thrust into the air, suggested a pert-
ness which was wholly alien to him.
His oratorical style was not unlike
Lincoln's: "He aimed always at conviction rather than at ornament. His
style was plain in its neatness. Clear
in tone, lucid in thought, his speeches
were economical in diction without
being parsimonious."
Mr. Whibley's summing up is "the
epithet which best describes Pitt's
statesmanship is 'practical.'" Not a
few people have compared Mr. Chamberlain to Pitt and have commented
upon the striking resemblance between Mr. Chamberlain's face in profile and the Pitt statue in the lobby
of the House. In any case it is not
a little remarkable that in the closing
chapter of his book Mr. Whibley
should have summarized the work and
especially the isolation of Pitt in
words which apply with singular appropriateness to the illustrious statesman who is now Hearing the end of
his career. Hc says: "Like all heroes, he fought the battle alone. As
he could place but slight dependence
upon friends, so he was indifferent to
the insolence of enemies.   In the days
of his fiercest conflict he saw himself deserted by colleagues, and attacked with all the fury of success
by exulting opponents. But he neither
wavered in his purpose nor changed
his policy a jot." The book is extremely interesting and gives in brief
form a sketch which will be appreciated by all lovers of Pitt.
William Pitt, by Charles Whibley.
Published by William Blackwood &
Sons, Edinburgh and London, is on
sale by the Victoria Book and Stationery Co., Limited, Victoria, B. C.
The Week has for some time been
receiving through the exchange medium, a pamphlet entitled "Physical
Culture," published by the Physical
Culture Publishing Co., New Jersey.
Any copies that may reach us hereafter will be refused at the post office.
This publication should be denied
the use of the Canadian mails. Its
tendency is distinctly immoral, and
all the more pernicious because it
masquerades under the pretence of
inculcating high moral principles and
demonstrating the intimate connection between religion and morality.
Thc publishers are evidently aware
that they are sailing very near the
wind as from time to time they resort
to various devices in order to prevent
refusal by the postal authorities. At
one time the magazine owed its circulation to a varied assortment of
studies in the nude. These are now
omitted, but there is a substitute
which in many respects is more objectionable, in the form of shadow
pictures. The morality and religion
literature is accentuated, but behind
it is a mass of rubbish which if published under any other auspices would
promptly land Bemarr Macfadden, editor and proprietor, in the nearest
jail. It is not the intention of The
Week to give a free advertisement to
any of these publications by naming
them, but the titles are sufficiently
suggestive and the synopsis of contents both disgusting and repulsive.
The Week respectfully directs the attention of the Canadian postal authorities to this gross abuse of the
mailing privileges.
Activity at Princeton.
It is good news to learn that Mr.
E. F. Voigt, who has been mining
on Copper Mountain for many years,
and who has expended a large sum
of money, has just been successful in
interesting sufficient capital to insure
the development of his claims upon
Copper Mountain. The Dominion
Copper Company, so well known
throughout the Boundary District, are
going to take the property in hand,
and if the result of exploration is satisfactory Mr. Voigt will have effected
a notable deal.
WE
HAVE
Fruit Lands
Timber Limits
Range Land
and
Mineral Claims
Throughout the
BOUNDARY
DISTRICT
UNRIVALLED OPPORTUNITIES FOR
FRUIT CULTURE
IN THE KETTLE
RIVER VALLEY.
Before Locating Send   Us  Particular* of What You
Require
A.
Erskine
i Smith &
Co.
REALTY and MINING
I VESTMENTS
Reference:  Eastern Townships Bunk.
Grand Forks, B.C.
I
i
Th Sanitarium Hotol, which is boautlfully situated, overlooking the Bow Itiver and its lovely and
lonmnlie valley, is a largo 5-story building elegantly
ntted with ovory appointment calculated to brine
ploHsure and comfort to the tourist or invalid.
A private hospital, which, though isolated, is in
c, •?? P.roxlmity to tlio Sanitarium, is prosidod over by
skilfully trained nurses and is also fitted out with
every appliance necessary to a lirst class institution
or its kind.
„,hJf% Ci0Jn.mtJ'?fo".s >»th-houso adjoins tho hotel,
whore Turkish, Russian, plunge, shower and douche
oaths ore givon under modlcal supervision, with
water .direct from the colobrotod hot sulphur springs.
A first class) very 111 connection so that rides and
drives through tho magniflcant scenery may bo enjoyed.   Excollont cuisine.
Terms: M.m a day upwards. Special rates by wook
or month.  Opon all tlie year.
A. C, THOMPSON, Manager.
Medical Staff:
lt G. Brett, m.d ;   G. M. Atkin, M.n.;
It. H. Bkett, ii. a., m n.
If you love your wife
BUY  HER  A  GAS:STOVE
It will save her a lot of extra work and
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Cook Your Roast, Do Not Roast Your Cook,
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, LIMITED.
« i6
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29 1906
-^-^-^^ <$i?i?i?itiii?
% Husic and      *
I   The Drama. |
&ififi?i!ifififif'iiifipip
ID'
At the Victoria Theatre on Xmas
Eve a full house greeted a full New
York company in "The Yankee Consul."
* *   *
On Thursday evening the old favourite, "Kerry Gow," drew a large
and well pleased audience to the Victoria Theatre. The wholesome comedy, sound philosophy and stirring
incident of the play were as attractive as ever.    Allen Doone was first
class.
* *   *
New York theatre-goers laughed
over two novelties last season, Bernard Shaw's comedy, "Man and Superman," and a new comedy by Paul
Armstrong which bore the weird
title, "The Heir to the Hoorah." Both
had tremendous vogue and the Armstrong play ran at the Hudson Theatre well along into the hot summer
days, and now the Victoria Theatre
announces "The Heir to the Hoorah"
for Thursday, January 3rd.
It is a four-act comedy with the
scene laid in a gold mining camp in
the West, and with miners, cow-
punchers, Japanese, English and
Eastern society people included in
its personnel. The piece was produced and staged by the late Kirke
LaShelle, who had previously given
the stage such shining successes as
"The Virginian," "Arizona," etc. All
the principals who had part in the
last metropolitan engagement will be
seen in the play in this city.
* *   *
"The Strollers" will be the attraction at the Victoria Theatre on Saturday, January 5th. The amusement
that this much-talked-of company will
appear in this city will doubtless be
hailde with delight by all thinking
music-lovers. Few, if any, organisations possess the number of sterling
operatic artists that this organisation
does, and "The Strollers" is acknowledged the peer of all musical comedies and comic operas. Aida Hemmi
in the part of Bertha, "Teddy" Webb
as August Lump, the wandering philosopher; Francis Carrier as Kamfer,
Joseph W. Smith as Roland, the magistrate; Aimee Leicester as Anna,
Frank Bertrand as Muggenheim,
"Brownie" Browning as Rudy, Geo.
Kunkel as De Bomsky, are some of
the well-known people that will appear in the production,
His Honour tha Lieutenant-Governor
will hold a reception at Government
House on Hew Year's Day, from three
to six F .M.
THE PICTURE IN MT HEART.
In each man's soul there lives a dream,
Lit by a woman's eyes,
Whose glance is like the tender gleam
That fills the evening skies.
It is a dream that never faints,
Tnough weal or woe befalls,
But haunts the heart, and softly paints
A picture on its walls.
It Is my dream at mfdnfght,
And in the crowded mart,
That darling face
With gentle grace—
The picture in my heart.
In each man's heart there floats a voice
That speaks to him alone,
The voice of her, his spirit's choice,
He longs  to  call  his own.
The days may hasten like the wind,
Or lag with sullen feet,
Some day his wandering heart shall find
The face he longs to meet.
It is my dream at midnight,
Its dear eyes ne'er depart,
O, where is she,
My bride to be—
The picture in my heart?
O, some hearts search the wide world
through,
And through to find their mate,
And some amid the darkness rue
That they have met too late.
A wistful glance betrays to each
What neither dares to sigh;
A wedded bond forbids the speech
That's uttered by the eye.
It ls my dream at midnight,
It makes my pulses start;
O, fate be kind,
And let me find
The picture in my heart.
rULLER'S EARTH.
Fuller, the well-known author of
"British Worthies," wrote his own epitaph as it appears in Westminster Abbey. It consists of but four words, but
it speaks volumes:
"Here lies Fuller's earth."
A HAPPY
NEW YEAR
TO ALL
And may prosperity and health be
yours throughout the year,
is the wish of
FLETCHER BROS.
SUPERIOR QUALITY   MUSIC  HOUSE
93 GOVERNMENT STREET
Social and
Personal.
Mr. Furlonger, Quamichan, is
spending his holidays with friends in
the city.
* *   *
Mr. and Miss Mara sailed on
Christmas Day for the Orient, where
they will make an extended tour.
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Lamb spent
Christmas week in the city the guests
of Major and Mrs. Mutter.
* *   *
Mr. Bernard Walker, of Grand
Prairie, is spending a few weeks in
Victoria with his brother, Mr. de Noe
Walker.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Scott, of Ganges Harbour, are in town for the holidays the
guests of Mrs. Croft, "Mount Adelaide."
* *   *
Dr. and Mrs. Fagan have returned
from Vancouver, where they spent
Christmas with Mrs. Fagan's sister,
Mrs. Thompson.
* *   *
Mrs. Croft has issued invitations
for a small dance to be given in
honour of her niece, Miss Olive Bryden, on New Year's Eve, 1906, at her
residence, "Mount Adelaide."
* #    *
Mr. and Mrs. Beauchamp Tye left
on Monday night for Vancouver,,
where they will spend the Christmas
holidays the guests of Mrs. Thompson.
* *   *
Mrs. Tatlow's many friends will be
pleased to hear that she has sufficiently recovered from her recent illness to return from the hospital in
time to spend Christmas with her
family.
* *   *
Miss MacNamara, of St. Winifred's
Hospital, San Francisco, who has
been spending the past two months
in Victoria, left last Wednesday to
resume her duties.
* *   *
C. L. Dudley, who has been spending the Christmas holidays in this
city, returned on Thursday to Spence's
Bridge, where he is in charge of the
branch line of the C. P. R. which is
in course of construction.
* *   *
A bridge tournament has been arranged to take place next week at the
residence of Mrs. Tye, "Aloha," Douglas street, in aid of the Anti-Tuberculosis Society. Tea will be served
by different members of the society
during the week.
* *   *
The third of the popular guest days
was held at the Alexandra Club on
Thursday last. The hostesses for the
occasion were Mrs. Galletly, Mrs.
Hugo Beavan and Mrs. Burton. A
large number of members and their
guests were present, though the holiday season perhaps accounted for a
smaller attendance than usual.
* *   *
The invitations are out for a small
dance to be given at Government
House in honour of Miss Marion
Dunsmuir, who has unfortunately
been prevented by her recent illness
from taking part in the many previous gayeties of the season. The
dance will take place on Jan. 2, 1907,
and is being eagerly anticipated by
the many young people who are invited.
* *   *
Mrs. B. Norton will give the fourth
of her popular subscription dances on
Friday of next week. Being early in
the New Year the decorations will
be of a holiday nature and the ladies
are requested to wear white gowns
and holly. It will be a "bal poudre"
and during the evening there will be
a snow dance and confetti carnival,
which it is expected will prove both
novel and interesting.
* *   *
"Mont Joy," the charming residence
of Mr. and Mrs. F. B. Pemberton,
was the scene of a delightful dinner
and dance on Christmas Eve. The
house was profusely decorated with
evergreens, holly and mistletoe, while
the table, in shape a double "T," was
dainty in white chrysanthemums, pink
tulle and pink candle shades. During
the evening all the old Christmas
customs were observed, and the
guests all took part in dancing Sir
Roger de Coverly.
Some of those invited were: Mrs.
Pemberton, Miss Susie Pemberton,
Canon and Mrs. Beanlands, Mr. and
Mrs. Hugo Beaven, Mr. and Mrs. W.
H. Beaven, Mrs. and Miss Bell, Mrs.
and thc Misses Tilton, Commander
and Mrs. Thorpe-Dubble, the Misses
Dupont, Miss Nellie Dupont, Miss
Perry, Miss Norah and Miss Alice
Bell, Miss Crease, Miss Gladys Green,
Miss Bryden, Miss Gillespie, Miss
Paula Irving, Miss Helen Peters, Miss
Keefer, the Messrs. Gillespie, Beth-
une, F. Foster, Cobbet, Kingscotc,
Foote, Williams, Morgan, Schofield,
P. Keefer and others.
* *   *
On Christmas Day Mrs. Dunsmuir
gave a large Christmas tree in honour
of her small daughter, Miss Dola,
Only children under eight were eligible, so the party, though not
"small," was  "early," the invitations
A Cosy Corner Ht the Poodle Dog.
f
\y
o
Poodle Dog!I
\
1
Yates St.,
Victoria. B. C, is
The
Grill,
the only real
"grill" in British
Columbia—the
only place where
you can
•\CTUALIV
obtain your
choice of meats
and all the deli*
cacies of the
season.
W. S. D. SMITH
Proprietor
New Year's Greeting to AIL
The BISMARK CAFE
106 HASTINGS STREET
Solicits a share of your patronage. Vancouver's new cafe, under the
management of A. A. McKinnon and P. Bancroft, is entirely new.
Orchestra plays at lunch, dinner, and in the evening. Up-country
visitors' patronage is specially solicited.
THE BISMARK CAFE,     VANCOUVER.
being from four to seven. Before
viewing the tree refreshments were
served to thc little people and the
various "grown-ups" who accompanied them.
The long table was a veritable picture of Xmas cheer, scarlet naturally
predominating. Scarlet carnations,
favours and candle shades made a
perfect blaze of color, and as far as
possible the various bon-bons and
goodies were of the same cheerful
shade. After tea the children were
all ushered into the ballroom, where
stood the most gorgeous of trees,
blazing with electric lights and fairly
laden down with gifts. Col. Gregory
made a capital Santa Claus and distributed the presents to the many
eager little people present. Afterwards games of all kinds were indulged in until many sleepy little
faces and heavy eyelids gave warning
of the approach of the "Sandman,"
and all bade a reluctant adieu to their
tiny hostess. Over forty small people
were invited, a few of whom were as
follows:
Misses Ethel and Baby Rhodes,
This Burton, Sylvia and Baby Luxton, Gwenthlyn Jones, Carol Eberts,
Constance Heyland, Lucy Little, Jessie Prior, and Masters Jimmie Andain,
Tommy Lampman, D. Mathews, MacKenzie, "Joe" Jones, Baby Times and
Andrew  Robertson.
Among the older people who were
privileged to enjoy thc pretty sight
were Mrs. 0. M. Jones, Mrs. Little,
Miss M. Little, Mrs. C. W. Rhodes,
Mrs. Innis, Mrs. Mathews, Mrs. MacKenzie, Mr. and Mrs. Robin Dunsmuir, Mrs. Duncan Eberts, Miss
Netta Heyland and many others.
WHEN YOU HAVE THAT
"BLUE PEELING" [DROP
IN AT THE
GARRICK'S HEAD
BASTION STREET;
Nufp Sed !
SIM & JACK, Proprietors
VICTORIA, B. C.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 3
THE HEIR TO THE
HOORAH
Direction of the Kirke LaShelle Co,
with
Guy Bates Post
Prices—25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50
WEEK DECEMBER 31
The New Grand
SULLIVAN 4 CONSIDINI,    fropiltUr*.
M»n«K<m.nt ef ROBT. JAMIESON.
BYRNE-KENYON COMEDY 4
Rural Comedy Sketch, introducing
Songs and Music
THE THREE POIRIERS
In their new and original novelty Ring and Bar Act.    Adolph
Poirier, the only man in the world
doing a double dislocation of the
shoulder on a bar 16 inches wide.
ROBT.  ROGERS and  LOUISE
MACKINTOSH
In their Laughing Playlet, by Edward Locke, entitled
"Out of Sight"
MANOLITA
Spanish Soubrette
GEORGE F. KEANE
Song Illustrator
NEW MOVING PICTURES    ,
PROP NAGEL'S ORCHESTRA •
VICTORIA THEATRlJ
Saturday, Jan. 5th.
Prank W. Healy presents the Musici|
Comedy
THE STROLLERS
Prices-$1.60, fl.00, 75c, 50c, 25c.

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