BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

Week Sep 24, 1910

Item Metadata

Download

Media
pwv-1.0344070.pdf
Metadata
JSON: pwv-1.0344070.json
JSON-LD: pwv-1.0344070-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): pwv-1.0344070-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: pwv-1.0344070-rdf.json
Turtle: pwv-1.0344070-turtle.txt
N-Triples: pwv-1.0344070-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: pwv-1.0344070-source.json
Full Text
pwv-1.0344070-fulltext.txt
Citation
pwv-1.0344070.ris

Full Text

 [AN DYKE'S LILLY BLOOM
Flesh and White—50c
For  Theatres,   Balls  and
Parties
Terry's Drug Store
Fort and Douglas
The Week
A British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria,  B. &.
HALL & WALKER
Agents
WELLINGTON   COLLIERY
COMPANY'S COAL
1H2 Government St
Telephone M
ol. VII.   No.
K5
THE  WEEK,  SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER  24,   1910
One Dollar Per Annum.
I.AND POLICY
'he  "Victoria   Times"   is  vexing  its
about  the   land policy   of the Pro-
;ial  Government,   although   there  is
e than a, lingering suspicion that the
ition arises  from circumstances  that
d be explained better on the ground of
ey than principle. The editor of the
;mes" is a very poor student of history,
(s blest with a very defective memory if
ias forgotten that in its essential prin-
es, the land  policy of the Provincial
rnment is the same as that of the Do-
ion. The main difference is that under
administration of the   former   there
ie been fewer opportunities for donat-
big tracts of lands to its friends as a
ard for services rendered."   Both gov-
iients have realized that the quickest
surest means of getting a new country
led up is to encourage the investment
apital in the land by private individ-
, or corporations.    These people hav-
expended, as they must, considerable
is of money cannot afford to rest on
r oars, unless interest is to eat off the
d of capital, so they get busy and by a
isaiid and one organized methods ad-
ise the country, and induce individual
lers to come in.    It is true that they
the land at an increased price, surely
is permissible.    It is true that they
it for very much more than the settler
Id purchase from the government, but
whole question is one of proportion.
[3 so-called land speculator has to take a
nee; indeed in a new and undeveloped
ntry, a great many chances.    IJis suc-
depends on a course of fortuitous cir-
Instances, wliieh include the advent of a
Iway, the development of a local town-
, and in some cases of local industries,
i generally speaking, the attraction to
t particular section of country of a suf-
ent number of people to constitute it a
tied district.    In the absence of anyone
these factors, the land speculator may
1 that he has acquired a considerable
ea, has paid out a large sum of money,
d yet cannot realize at a profit.    The
stem makes it to the interest of the spce-
ator to indulge iu a publicity and adver-
ling campaign.   This costs money, whicii
has to provide, but from a public standing the method is justified because a
mmercial firm can do this class of work
ore   effectively   than  the   Government.
lose who  have   followed  the  trend of
ents in Northern B. C. during the last,
w years are aware that there have been
number of instances in which land spec-
ators have been disappointed. The route
railway lines has been changed. Selected
visional points   have   been abandoned,
id what looked like a gilt-edged invest-
ent, has turned out to be a risky speeu-
tion.   No doubt there is room for criti-
sm of the methods adopted by many land
mpanies; they are no more immune than
e average tradesman from the temptation
exaggerate the value of their wares, but
■ this time, the public is pretty well ac-
lainted  with   their   methods,   and   the
imber of people who can lie taken in by
om  articles  is constantly  diminishing,
ie question is what would the Victoria
rimes" substitute for  tlie  present   sys-
m ? It has never laid down an alternative
'licy; it has contented itself with lying
out the government and its friends, but
has not particularized, nor has if point-
out, what is a well known fact, tliat al:
1st as many Liberals as Conservatives
ve benefited by the acquisition of block"
land in British Columbia.   If it knew
ything about the subject it would know
at* conspicuous supporters of the govern-
mt have notoriously had more difficulty
getting their land deals through than
dl   known   Liberals.     A   circumstance
lich reflects credit on the administration
of the department because it shows a sup*
ersensitiveness where there is a possibility
of suspicion. The ''Times" gives the Government no credit for having watched
closely the development of hmd staking
and imposing government reserves, whenever it appeared that in any particular
district, the staking was becoming to general. With all its criticism, the "Times"
has never been able to point to anything
in connection with land speculation comparable with the notorious achievement of
the federal government in connection with
the Saskatchewan lands. The "Times"
ought to take a lesson from Benjamin
Goldfinch, of immortal memory, and
change its spectacles of green for gold. It
would then cease to look out on all mundane affairs with prejudiced eyes, and
might at times detect a rosy glow, even
on the policy of a conservative administration, but, in any event, it can make up
its mind, if it possesses such a thing, that
when it charges the McBride. administration with favoring its friends, it is quali
fying in the highest degree for a niche in
that temple of fame, with which the name
of Ananias is invariably associated.
WANTED A DICTATOR
No outsider should interfere in the domestic concers of his neighbor, although
there have been precedents which might
be taken to justify an occasional exception
to tliis most excellent rule.    The London
Press chronicled just such an exception
when a certain well known colonel was
entertained at the Guild Hall, but let that
pass.    The colonel is a law unto himself,
and if it be.true that the King can do
no -wrong, it must assuredly be true of a
greater than a King.    Without interfering, however, one may occasionally look-
over the wall, and at the present time,
the whole of the civilized world, more or
less, is indulging in the process.    This is
not, to be wondered at when the history
of the last six or seven years is borne in
mind.    To the on-looker, who has no direct interest in the game, and who therefore is quite possibly the best judge,  it
looks as if the people of the United States
are about ready for a Dictator; and it
would be a strange irony of fate if a nation, which has always professed itself intolerant of monarchical rule should fall
at the feet of a Czar.      Still,   circumstances alter cases, and facts are stubborn
things, and no honest observer of public
affairs can deny that circumstances have
changed very much since the Declaration
of Independence was made; and that it
is a stubborn fact that whether Roosevelt
be right or wrong, lie lias the unquestioned
support of the great masses of his fellow-
countrymen.    Those  who follow him  in
liis present  movement  are called  insurgents, but it is a title which tlie gallant
colonel would be very unwilling to accept
since he holds that the men whom he is
fighting, and not he, have departed from
the fundamental  principles of consideration.    Tie holds that the trusts in  their
modern development nre inimical to tho
public interest; that* they have got out of
bounds,—tliat they are lawless, unscrupulous, and even vidictive.    Ifo holds that
the  combination   which  originally  might
have been conceived upon just such principles has degenerated, until its main object   is  no  longer to foster  and  develop
industrial enterprises in order to support
large centres of population, but to exterminate individual enterprise, and to con-
suniate autocratic   control.      Viewed  as
enemies of the people, it is natural  that
this modern champion should want to engage in mortal  combat with them;  it  is
not surprising that to a man of liis force,
110 half measures will he accepted; it is to
to he a case of "war a ontranee," and no!
a few people believe that if he has his way,
when the conflict is over, the battle field
will be strewn with the relics of the Trusts.
Nothing is more impressive than the enthusiasm with which the initiation of the
campaign has been received. Roosevelt
has gathered moral support from every
centre in which he has appeared. It is
no longer a matter of doubt that if he persists in the fight, he will cary the country,
and will be placed in a position of supreme
control. There is, however, more than a
doubt whether the fight will get beyond
the flinging down of the gage of battle,
not because the champion can be daunted,
but because the enemy may never come out
into the open. Nothing will be less surprising than, once convinced of the determination of Roosevelt, the Trusts should
capitulate bn every hand, and sue for sucn
terms as they can obtain. This would be
the policy of wisdom, for the issue appeals so directly to the heart and conscience of the American people, that money
would count for nothing, and the united
influence of the greatest system of Trusts
in the world has ever known would be
swept away before the awakened conscience of a. determined people.
CHRISTIAN CHARITY
It is a good many years since Tom Hood
pened those memorable lines
'Oh for the rarity
Of Christian charjiy
Under the sun." ,_*..
and unfortunately the lesson* which he
tried to teach, and which was^so magnifi-
ciently illustrated in the song of the shirt,
still needs impressing upon civilized mankind. The "Toronto Globe" finds occasion to emphasize this fact in a recent editorial, which tells that for five days a
starving Englishman walked the streets
of "Toronto, the good," without a morsel
to eat. The poor fellow declared that he
tried hard to get something on several occasions, but luck was against him, and he
had to go without it. The "Globe" recalls the fact that last winter a similar
thing ocurred. What amazes one is, that
this man, whose name was Charles Moody,
appealed to many persons to help him, but
they refused. Most of them did so on the
ground that large sums of money are
spent by the city, and by benevolent societies for the relief of distress; far more
than enough to help every deserving poor
person in Toronto, if properly distributed.
The incident may be paraphrazed in a
nutshell. In the most boastful and egotistical city on fhe American continent, a
poor starveling searched for five days in
vain for one good Samaritan. The "Week"
has always maintained that while no
doubt organied benevolent institutions do
some goocl, they do a lot of harm. Tn tha
first place they overlap to an alarming extent, because every little Bethel must outvie its neighbor. In the next place, they
maintain a horde of sleek, fat, paid officials, who care li tic* for deserving objects
of sympathy, but a great deal for reports,
conventions and statistics. But, beyond
this, possibly the worst aspect of charity
organiations is, that they destroy the sense
of individual responsibility, exactly as
they did in Toronto, and in consequence,
men like Charles Moody have to starve.
Tt is about time that, the distribution of
charities was taken out of the hands ot
professional time-servers, and placed under civic, or governmental control. This
would not terminate all the evils complained of. but it would make the community responsible through its own elected
officers for attending to the urgent requirements of every one in need.
SANITATION IN CAMPS
The "Week" would be glad to add anything to the plea put forward by the "Vancouver World" for a closer observance of
the Health Act in the lumber camps of the
Province.
The World has been moved to action in
this matter by a petition, extensively
signed by men employed in construction
camps. The object of the petition will
meet with general sympathy and can hardly be disregarded by the government. This
is an opportune moment for dealing with
the question, because British Columbia is
on the eve of enormous development work.
Within the next few years there will bc
hundreds of construction camps in the
Province, most of them far removed from
centres of population ancl civiliation, and
unfortunately, from the close observation
of the health inspectors. The lives of
construction camp laborers are just as valuable to the community as the lives of
any other men, indeed, at the present
time, it is doubtful if they do not cut a
more important figure in the development
of the Province than any others. Of
clerks, artisans, and bosses, we have more
than enough. Of brawn ancl muscle, far
from enough. Those who have lieen familiar with railway building in Britisli
Columbia know that sanitary precautions
have unfortunately had very little consideration, as a result men .have not only been
subjected to inconvenience and suffering,
but typhoid has taken a heavy toll. Thi)
Health Department of the Provincial gov
ernment has been conspicuous for good
work, ancl in the zeal and energy with
whicli sanitary matters generally havc beea
attended to. ' The "Week" feels sure that
so reasonable a petition as that referred to
will be received in a sympathetic spirit
ancl will receive prompt attention.
STRETCHING IT
Why will not the American papers exercise some little regard for tlie truth, in
reporting Britisli  news    Monday's  press
dispatches, gave information of a serious
strike of coal miners in South Wales, and
incidentally    remarked  that   "the   strike
temporarily closes all the mines supplying
coal to the British Navy."    This dispatch
further says that "the federation of initio
owners  is considering   locking   out   two
hundred thousand men, as a result of the
trouble."    The point of the dispute seems
to be that the employees of the Cambrian
colliery struck despite the instructions of
the labor union.    Now all this no doubt
means something, but the dispatch is as
inaccurate as it can possibly lie.    In the
first place the Cambrian colliery, instead
of employing twelve thousand miners, as
stated, employes fewer than one thousand.
In the next place, the strike cannot havtf
closed   even,   temporarily,  all  tlie mines
supplying coal to the British Navy, because, the Federation of Mine Owners is
only "considering" the locking out of the
whole of the whole of the men.      The
amount of coal actually produced bv the
Cambrian colliery, wliieh is the only one,li
yet   idle,   does not   exceed   two  thousand ii
tons per clay.    But while Welch smokeless •■
coal is the chief fuel used in the Bri-tislf1'1
Navy, it is by no means the sole fuePMP''
in  an  emergency Northumberland '^'Vi'ir-'"'
ham. Yorkshire ancl Lancashire would a]j^
be in tlie market.    The only object flt.-,XW'i.
"Week" in calling attention to this,,efts-,,,,
patch is to deprecate such alarmist reports*./*■
and especially to show that tlie foundation***
is absolutely groundless, except sti'-fWr-'ft*-^-*
the single! incident of a strike af'Vme'cttT-' !
liery  is concerned.    Surely  it..ils'"'fibpnf,1.
time that Canada got that Aiifflo-Cannclian?1
I ress service, about which sol!muc;]).||]ip1£r.,
been said, but whicli does iio.ti.appear.jto,,,
be. materializing, in spite of the Colonial
Press conference. THE WEEK, SATTJEDAY,  SEPTEMBEK 24,  1910
At The Street
Corner
By TUB LOUNQBB
I did not know until I picked up
the evening paper on Saturday last
that Victoria rejoiced in the possession of a full-fledged expert burglar,
but Raymond, or whatever name he is
entitled to be known by, is a "bird,"
at least I thought so when I was
permitted to take a glance at the miscellaneous collection of articles which
he had managed to accumulate in the
course of a brief campaign. He
could easily have started up in the
second-hand furniture business, for
the articles were as varied as they
were numerous, and even in this respect, Raymond manifested a fine artistic sense, evidently being a sworn
foe of monotonous sameness whether
in furniture, or decorations.
What puzzles mc is how he managed to distribute his affections over
so wide an area, without being caught
sooner, but probably hc was a student of Gaboriatt, or Boisgobcy, and
these past-masters in thc art of burglary would have taught him that the
safest plan is to jump a mile or two
at a stretch. Acting upon this principle, he burgled in Foul Bay tonight,
and in Esquimalt tomorrow night,
then shifted his attention to Spring
Ridge, and took a flying leap from
there to James Bay.
However, thc pitcher that goes to
the well often enough always gets
broken at last, and Mr. Raymond, the
artistic and volatile burglar is now-
cooling his heels in King George's
parlor. More's the pity, since he was
not always thus, 1 remember the time
when he was rendering good service
in South Africa, and might have come
through the Boer War with a medal,
if not, with a V. C. But like many
South African heroes, too much glory
was his un-doing, and he no sooner
returned to Calgary than hero-worship turned his head. I think it only
charitable to draw a veil over the
subsequent proceedings, the while
paying a compliment to Inspector
Palmer who recognized his man at a
glance, when he came to prefer a
charge of assault, and this infallible
gift of our inspector led to the undoing of the man who had been burgling, though no one knew it.
*     *     *
I have been a little amused at the
line of argument put in connection
with the suggested dismissal of the
City Engineer. Some people wanted
to get rid of him because he has not
been able to build a modern road in a
day. Others because he has not gone
about the task of reorganizing civic
work as "a bull goes at a gate"; others
again because he never served an apprenticeship to the strenuous individual who wields the big stick. Some
of his critics say that he spends too
much money in grading new streets,
others that hc is too parsimonious,
and keeps the street grades lower than
is necessary. Some are so unreasonable as to blame him for wrong grades
established by his predecessor, as in
the case of May Street. Hc has been
criticised because Smith's Hill reservoir leaks, and hc was criticised once
because it did not leak fast enough
for those who declared that it was a
veritable sieve. Now Engineers are
born, not made, and they are not to
be picked up for $3,500 a year. Now-
a-days, that is about a fair wage for a
young assistant, it is not much above
the value of a first-class foreman, and
•it Ss less than any bright, young professional man expects to make by the
tii^ejhe is thirty. Thc whole situation reminds me of an incident which
occurred longer ago than I care to
say. A skilled workman being out of
enipfpyinent took up with a shovel-
an'd'-'spadt job, but made a very poor
gcr<__1if****His speed indicated that he
wasliiiimo hurry to finish thc job, so
thaolor.iman took him to task, and
askfld'-ljijTMvhy he did not work faster.
LopJiJ!ijgj((\ip^ at him the man asked.
"Howimucli a day arc you paying mc
for this' joli?" "Three shillings," re-
pl/e(i'it'fier'!forcmaii. "Well," said the
woftU_n.-.iil,l""that is a three-shilling
stftikc*.-*','fq|--dA.i't   say  thai   thc   City
[jifnofoO "ill
Engineer is goving poor service, because he is poorly paid, but I do say
that the city has no right to expect
a Heaven-sent genius at the price, and
the fact that the Mayor and Council
propose to pay Mr. Rust five thousand dollars a year for a start and
six thousand following, is fairly conclusive that my argument is sound.
* *     *
The battle of the pavements is not
yet over, and the issue still hangs in
the balance. I have said a good deal
lately about asphalt, not forgetting to
point out that in the largest English
cities, it stands discredited, and is now
entirely abandoned. I have always
expressed a preference for wood
blocks, because they are easier on
horses, less noisy, and give occupation
to a local industry. I have been led
to believe that the principal defect
in our wood block pavement hitherto,
has been careless selection of the
blocks. Now we are told that the
selection is too strict, and that in a
country containing untold billions of
feet of the highest grade lumber, it
is impossible to cut sufficient wood of
the right quality to yield 20,000
blocks per day. Even if the wood
could be cut, it cannot be creosotcd
fast enough to keep the workmen
busy. I was recently told by an experienced contractor, that it is a mistake to creosote at all, and that the
blocks would last nearly as long if
they were put in in their natural
state. He had a scientific theory to
justify his opinion. It had something
to do with the proper evaporation of
the sap before the blocks were used.
On that 1 express no opinion, as it is
an expert matter, but if it is correct
as he stated, that thc cost of creo-
soting was about equal to the original
cost of the blocks, it might be worth
while, acting on his suggestion, and
laying a section of a street without
treating thc blocks, and keep careful
tap on the results. Personally I think
that the chief objection to wood block
pavement has been overcome by putting in a substantial concrete foundation. The cost of renewing the blocks
is not formidable, and would be even
less so with the suggestion now made
adopted.
* *     *
A few weeks ago I drew attention
to the possibilities of economizing in
building construction by allowing contractors to use the streets free of
charge, and to erect saw-mills, brick-
making plants and other such mechanical structures in order that work
might be done on the spot, which is
now done at a distance. I do not claim
that the idea was original, and I am
not sure that it has borne fruit, still
if anyone will take the trouble to pay
a visit to the corner of View and
Douglas streets, he can have an object lesson in the very system which
I recommended.
The contractors for building the
Sayward block have a very neat, up-
to-date building plant in full operation. It relieves thc monotony of a
quiet street corner, and well illustrates how a truly paternal government can foster local industries by
allowing enterprising firms to utilize
the public streets. The idea may well
be carried further, and I shall look
for interesting developments in the
near future.
* *     *
There is a matter which has puzzled
me a great deal of late, and that is,
why drivers ol" vehicles are required
to proceed at a walking pace, when
crossing Point Ellice Bridge. No
doubt it is a matter of precaution,
against thc possible collapse of the
bridge, or against subjecting it to such
a strain as might endanger its safety.
One can never bc too careful, and T
should be thc last to deprecate excessive care, hut what I cannot understand is that a bridge designed to take
the place of one which had collapsed
should not have had a sufficient margin of safety to render it unnecessary
to treat it like an old structure in
the last stages of decay. Point Ellice
bridge is a steel erection, on granite
piers. Il should havc been possible
to make such a bridge perfectly safe
for any class of road traffic to pass
over al any reasonable speed. If
thc  public  safety  demands   the  pre-
VAPQR
CABINET
BATHS
CURE
RHEUMATISM
They open the 5,000,000 little
pores in the body and draw
from them all impurities, filth
germs and poisonous matter accumulated in the system. The
acme of safety, simplicity and
comfort. One should be in
every home.   A
BEUTIFUL
COMPLEXION
creamy skin, with natural,
healthful, youthful bloom is assured to ladies who are wise
enough to use one. Prices,
$7.50, $9.00 and $13.00. Call or
write us for Free Booklet Giving Particulars.
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
1228 Government Street
Near Yates
If It's For
the Office
We
Have It
Baxter & Johnson
COMPANY, LIMITED
721 Yates St. Phone 730
Would You
Buy
A Watch just because it looked
nice? Wouldn't you want, as
well, a positive assurance that
it would be reliable in use?
We give that assurance with
every watch purchased from us.
Careful knowledge on our part
in selecting our stock, and the
attention we give it, make care
on your part, in purchasing, unnecessary. Our.48 years' experience and a written guarantee insure you the highest possible
value and satisfaction for the
amount you invest.
Redfern & Sons
Watchmakers and Jewellers
1009 Government Street
VICTORIA, B.C.
sent arrangement, no reasonable man
will object, but it involves a serious
loss of time, and I hope that the regulation is not a in    ely arbitrary one.
Cfri
trtticf&r.
Feminine Log-ic
"Geoi-R-c,   you   seem   to  be   losing  all
control over Jimmie."
"What makes you think sn?"
"Why, he won't do a thing I tell him
to do."
Tbe Generous Bagamuffin
Old Lady—ity little lad. do you smoke
ilgarettes?
Boy—No; hut I can give yer 11 chew
it* tnhaeco.
_w
The Established Reputation of the
Montelius Piano House
Is founded on its policy to represent None but Pianos of Unquestionably Established Reputation.
Value is our slogan, both in buying and in selling.
Over 300 Haines Bros. Pianos sold within 30 days by Chicker-
ing & Sons, Boston, to Leading Conservatoires of Canada and the
United States.
Over 2,000 Bell Pianos sold by the Montelius Piano House,
Ltd., to Representative Citizens of British Columbia.
Victoria's Reliable Headquarters for Everything Musical
Montelius Piano House, Ltd.
B. P. GREENE, Manager Victoria House
Telephone 44
1104 GOVERNMENT STREET
CORNER FORT ST.
SHOAL BAY
FOR QUICK SALE—Eight acres, already subdivided and
adjoining property held at $2,500 per acre.
PRICE $1,950 PER ACRE
Bevan, Gore & Eliot
LIMITED
Stock and Bond Brokers.
1122 GOVERNMENT STREET      -
Real Estate.
Phones 2124 and 163
The name on the Label should be SCHMIDT'S, if you
want the best in genuine imported Clarets and Burgundies. They have been on this market for the past
fifteen years and stand for the Popular Choice.
For sale by all liquor dealers.
RADIGER & JANION
1318 Wharf Street
'British Columbia Agents
FURNITURE PACKING BY EXPERTS
For shipment to any part ot the world.
Good OlMH Materials.      Satiafaotion anaraateed.      Ertlmat** CHtm.
Special Car* 'takes with CHasi and China.
A Special feature of our business   is   re-upholstering  and   restoring
Furniture of all descriptions
STYLES & SHARP
PHONE 2149
80S *0»T STWBST
REMEMBER
We   are   the   only  firm   that
can please in
ARTISTIC DECORATING,
PAINTING,
PAPER-HANGING or
SIGN WORK
C H. Tite & Co.
Phone 2050   - 620 Johnston St.
The Taylor Mill Co
BLUE PRINT!
Any Length in One Piece
Six Cents per foot
TIMBER AND LANI
MAPS
DRAUGHTING
Electric Blue Print
Map Co.
North Qovernment St.. Victoru 11218 Langley St. - Victoria, <Ba
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
Satisfaction
We guarantee quality and satisfaction with every purchase of
Groceries.
Phone   orders   carefully   at
tended to.
A. POOL
623 Yates St. Phone 44!
Watson's Old Stand THE  WEEK,  SATUKDAY,  SEPTEMBEK 24,   1910
MUSIC
AND   THE   STAGE
Crystal Theatre
This new and well fitted up theatre
las been showing some good films
luring the week, among others were
(Settling the Boundary Dispute,"
■ooo feet of comical situations. "The
l?ell Tale Perfume," "A Day of
'leasure," an extremely funny film.
iTangled Lives" and others. Illustrat-
Id song picture "My Morning Rose,"
Jung by Geo. McLellan. This theatre
taking well judging by the crowded
louses and seems to have jumped at
|inc bound into popularity.
Majestic Theatre
Some exceedingly fine films of
lowboy life have been shown at this
theatre during the week, under the
title "Cowboy Life in the Great
South West," and it is no exaggeration to say that they are some of the
Jinest films yet seen, from an interesting point of view. Roping and tying
Iteer competition, are a series of pic-
lures which are absolutely realistic,
lind but for the moving pictures portraying the actions too quickly for
reality, one might almost imagine
lhey were looking at the actual
licenc. "A Cowboy's Rcmuda," is a
l:owboy's sport, with roping and ty-
lying steers. Bulldoging and other
forms of amusement arc practised.
Irhcse films are an education in themselves.
Romano's Theatre
The   Elgin   National  Trophy  Auto
iRoad Races were shown at the above
Iheatre during the week.   Their realism is something extraordinary, and
fcvhen they were  first exhibited at a
panquet thc large crowd   who   were
present got up and cheered vociferously.    "Thc Grasshopper    and    the
lAnt," "The White Squaw,"  a  West-
fern  drama, "Love and  Money" also
Iwcre   of   intense   interest   although
lin      this     country     there     appear
[to   be   rather   a   surfeit   of   Western dramas, most of the moving picture theatres having got them in some
I form or another and  we should like
to see some other country represented
such  as Australia, South  Africa,  India,  China, etc.    Moving picture  agents appear  to 'obtain  most of their
subjects  from  the   American  continent.    From an   educational  point  of
view other countries could with  advantage be shown.
Lyceum Theatre
At the Lyceum theatre Hunt's Musical Comedy Co. havc been staging a
comedy entitled "A General Mix-up"
which teems with funny situations.
The company arc a strong one and
all who wish to enjoy a good laugh
should visit this show. There is
plenty of dancing and singing. The
company numbers 20 strong and the
.scenic effect is good.
Victoria Theatre
"Charlie's Aunt," is to be repeated
by special request at the Victoria
Theatre Monday and Tuesday next
week. Since this popular company
has been in Victoria they have put
on a number of well known English
and American comedies out of which
the most popular play has been
"Charlie's Aunt," and owing to the
theatre being engaged for three
nights by road attractions, a number of the patrons of the Victoria
were not able to avail themselves of
the opportunity of witnessing this
evergreen comedy. Mr. Blyden has
received quite a number of letters
from residents in this city asking him
if it would not be possible to reproduce this play again, and he as usual
being always willing to cater to Unpopular tastes, has decided to give
"Charlie's Aunt" another two productions on Monday and Tuesday next.
Crystal Theatre
BROAD STREET OPPOSITE MAYNARD
THE AUCTIONEER'S
The Finest and Most Up-to-date Picture Theatre in the City
NEW AND WELL VENTILATED
MATINEE EVERY DAY
CHILDREN'S MATINEE SATURDAYS
ADMISSION  ioc
Complete change of Programme every Monday, Wednesday and
Friday
such theatric stars as Denman j
Thompson, as Uncle Joshua, Frank
Mayo as Crockett, J. K. Emmet as
Fritz, John T. Raymond as Col. Sellers, John E. Owens as Solen Shingle, Barney Macauley as Uncle Dan,
James A. Terne as Terry Dennison,
Booth as Hamlet, Marret as Casius,
Sothern as Dundreary, Jefferson as
Rip, Frank Chanfrau as Kit, Edwin
Adams as Enoch Arden, George L.
Fox as Humpty Dumpty, et al., and
there is a great anxiety on the part
of local play-lovers to see Mr. Mason
in his best character type, for this
fine actor is as well known and popular as any modern star, having won
the hearts of this city's audiences
long ago by his splendid work as
leading male player in support of
Mrs. Fiske in her most popular plays
"Leah Kleshna" and "The New York
Idea," etc.
/-V    \
Miss S. P.
A.T.CM.
TAXEri   PIANO   PUPILS   AT
HEB STUDIO
Sea View, Dallas Road
Harmony and Theory a
Specialty
Monday and Tuesday
September 26th and 27th
Mr. Huron L. Blyden, appearing- as
"Cahliei Aunt"    Monday    and
Tuesday, Victoria Theatre
The attraction at the Victoria theatre on Thursday, Sept. 29, will be
John Mason and his Hackett theatre
players in Augustus Thomas' spirited
melodrama, "The Witching Hour."
As Brookfield, the polite hypnotic
millionaire gambler of Louisville, Mr.
Mason scored a metropolitan success
akin to the stellar achievements    of
But, John Mason won fame long
before Mrs. Fiske took him up. He
was a leading member of the old Boston Museum Stock Company, in its
great day, and years before Mrs.
Fiske's appearance in the plays, Mr.
Mason so ably aided her in, he starred the country in "Friend Fritz,"
playing here and there with the same
success attained by contemporary
stellar players at that time.
Mr. Mason lately returned to his
home city, Boston, where he played
Brookfield in "The Witching Hour,"
at the Majestic Theatre for live
weeks, to what his management declares the largest scat-sale receipts
ever played to in a New England
playhouse, actually excelling Thompson, Mrs. Fiske, Joseph Jefferson
and David Warfield. in Philadelphia
Mr. Mason twice repeated his engagement last season, and in San
Francisco and Los Angeles, it is said
he appeared to the largest audiences
ever seen on the Pacific Coast.
Mr. Huron L. Blyden
And Associate Players
Presents
By   many   Repeated  Requests
Charlie's Aunt
The Greatest  Laughing: Comedy  of
Comedies
Prices—25c,  35c and  50c.
Pook Early
ONE NIGHT
Thursday, September 29th
SAM S. AND LEE SHUBERT
Present
JOHN MASON
and the Hackett Theatre (New York)
Cast and Production
IN AUGUSTUS THOMAS' GREAT
TELEPATHIC DRAMA
The Witching Hour
The  Play That  Has Thrilled  New
York for 18 months
THE GREATEST SENSATION
SINCE "TRILBY"
Prices—50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50, $2.00.
Box   Office  opens   Thursday,   Sept   29th.
Mail orders as usual.
New Grand Treatre
One of the highest compliments
ever paid Harry Van Fossen, who
will be at the Grand next week, was
that he was funny enough and fast
enough to "carry a seven act bill all
by himself and make the other six
acts go as if they were really good."
For several years he was the star of
Al. G. Field's minstrels and, while hc
has recovered from the minstrel business he never has been able to get
away from thc black face habit and
he still appears disguised in burnt
cork. In addition to his rapid fire
talk  and   nonsensical   song  numbers,
Saturday, October 1st
VIOLA ALLEN
The White Sister
Prices—50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50, $2.00.
Box  Office   opens   Thursday,   Hept   29th,
Mail orders as usual.
n/UDTIC
THEATRE
Yates Street, Just Below Government
WHERE EVERYBODY GOES
If you are dull and get the blues,
And do not know the place to choose
Come to the Majestic on Yates Street
Bring the friends you are apt to meet
And if on pleasure you are bent,
You won't regret the Dime you spent.
WE CATER TO  LADIES AND  CHILDREN
CHANGE OF PROGRAMME
Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday
THEATRE
LATE PANTAGES
JOHNSON STREET
VICTOEIA
WEEK OF SEPT. 26th
Return engagement of
Hunt Musical
Comedy Company
Presenting a Musical Farce
entitled
Muldoon's Picnic
(Direction of Gus C. Seville)
SYNOPSIS
Scene 1—Muldoon's residence.
Scene 2—Going to the picnic.
Scene 3—The picnic.    The  famous three-handed reel.
SPECIAL FEATURES
AMATEUR CONTEST
THE
New Grand
Week of Sept. 26
WEEK bEPT. 26th
A Bundle of Fun and
Personal
HARRY VAN FOSSEN
Vaudeville's Greatest Single
Blackface Comedian
WEST and VAN SICLEN
Joyful Musicians
RICE and PREVOST
Presenting their Laughable and
Sensational Acrobatic
Offering
"Bumpity Bumps"
CELESTE
Peerless  Wonder of the  Wire
PISTIL and CUSHING
Famous Minstrels of an  Older
Day in a Blackface Riot
LANCASTEr7hAYWARD
and LANCASTER
THOS. J. PRICE
NEW MOVING PICTURES
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
Interesting
Instructive
ROMAN©
THEATRE
GOVERNMENT STREET
NEAR JOHNSON
THE ONLY THEATRE USING FILMS THAT ARE ABSOLUTELY NEW, NEVER HAVING BEEN SHOWN BEFORE.
Latest and best music by Romano Orchestra.
Admission io cents; Children at Matinee, 5 cents.
hc shows a line of eccentric dancing
that kills  at sight.
West and Van Siclen arc friends
of long standing with those addicted
to the vaudeville habit, but they
come out over the route this year
with a brand new act. Their music
has been a bright attraction fur several years, and Mr. West has not forgotten how tn play thc saxaplionc,
(Continued on Page 8)
A Splendid Opportunity
For Starting a Motor Delivery Service
There is nothing of this kind in the city, and to any
person wishing to start such business we offer a splendid
opportunity to do so.
We have live touring cars whicli we will convert into
delivery motor vehicles, and will give specially easy terms.
These cars are all in good order and are absolutely of
modern construction.
If you can see your way clear in opening tip such a
business, it will pay you to investigate this special offer.
WESTERN MOTOR AND SUPPLY CO.
Nev Premises, 1410 Broad Street
Telephone 695 -      R. P. CLARK, Manager THE  WEEK,  SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER  24,  1910
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
•THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
1208 Government Street, Victoria, B. C.
W. BLAKEMORE, Editor
Canada's Western Growth
BY BOHEMIAN
The newspapers tell us from time
to time that the Canadian West has
entered upon a period of rapid development, and they cite statistics to
prove their case, although as thc
census periods arc a decade apart,
there is only too much reason to believe that the statistics are the work
of publicity organizations, and may
be discounted at the next census
taken.
It is however impossible to travel
through the country at recurrent periods without being forcibly impressed
with the changes that have taken
place during the last few years, and
not the least interesting feature is the
rejuvenescence of old  settlements.
For instance, the historic town of
Hope, which in the days of the
Fraser and Cariboo gold rush was a
post of great importance and activity
but for forty years at least has been
nothing but a sleepy hamlet, is again
becoming a station of importance, in
view of the construction of thc Canadian Northern Railway down the
Fraser Canyon, and the Great Northern over the Summit from the Similkameen country. In fact, there are
many people who believe that it is
destined to a future not merely of
raihvay activity as a divisional point,
but that by reason of the lavish supplies uf coal and mineral in the neighborhood, it will become an industrial
centre. Bc that as it may, there are
abundant evidences that the little
place is waking up, and perhaps the
most cogent evidence is an unprecedented activity in real estate, and the
sale of lots for townsite purposes,
which have never before been worth
consideration.
What is true of Hope is true,
though in a lesser degree, of Ashcroft and Lytton. They too, expect
to share in the development which
will naturally follow from thc advent
of one, if not two, additional Transcontinental railway systems. When
one comes to Kamloops it is clear
that the headquarters of thc "bunch
grass" country is already well on the
way to become a large and important
city. Much could be written of the
beauties and attractions of Kamloops.
Its situation is ideal, and the climate
enjoys a Continental reputaion, as
being probably the driest of all the
so-called dry-belt districts.
This has led to the establishment
here of the Tranquille Sanitarium for
consumptives, and makes it also a
rendezvous for many sufferers from
pulmonary complaints, who do not
require the more drastic treatment of
a medical institution. But Kamloops
fights shy of this feature of its
popularity, and, prefers to base its
claims on climate, an unequalled
ranch country, and a happy conjunction of circumstances, which constitute it an ideal transportation centre.
To its advancement the development
of thc coal areas of thc North
Thompson will contribute largely,
and the Canadian Northern Coal
Company is actively engaged in prosecuting boring and prospecting operations. Thc late Doctor Dawson
thought very highly of the possibilities of these coal areas, and if his
opinion is justified, and there can
hardly be a doubt of it, it is not improbable that the valley of thc
Thompson will rival thc fame of the
celebrated  Crow's  Nest  District.
The next centre of conspicuous
growth is Revelstoke, which is rapidly becoming an imposing city. The
backbone of its prosperity is, of
course, the fact that it is a divisional
point, but it is no longer correct to
regard it as a purely C.P.R. town, for
although thc Railway Company is its
principal support, the payroll approximating one hundred thousand
dollars per month, the lumbering industry may be regarded as a staple,
and bids fair to dominate the situation.
I did not notice any very marked
change while passing through the
Rockies from Revelstoke to Calgary,
the only substantial development has
been at the Bankhead Mines, which
have been opened up during the last
few years by the C.P.R. but as they
are away from the main line, I did
not get a glimpse of the mine passing. Local information is to the effect that the expenditure has exceeded one million dollars, and that there
is a steady output of one thousand
tons per day.
I was, however, greatly interested
to learn that a number of other coal
mines arc being opened up on the
Eastern slopes, and in the foothills
of the Rockies. P. Burns and Company are said to have amalgamated
their interests with McKenzie and
Mann, and contemplate a large expenditure to open up the coal properties
which they located some six years
ago, on the advicdSof Mr. Alexander
Sharpe. There iSpalso talk of development on Fi|h Creek, where
high-grade bituminous coal is said
to have been foun# As a matter of
fact, there are prbbably hundreds of
points along the'foothills between
the International Boundary line, and
Alaska, where high-grade coal can be
found.
The Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company were but the pioneers. Some
people thought they possessed all of
the coal in Western Canada, but they
merely blazed the trail, and it is not
certain that they will continue to
hold the pre-eminence.
In this connection, it is interesting
to note that their former geologist,
Mr. James McEvoy is opening up a
much larger concern on the Brazeau
River, for which the capital has been
found by German financiers. Rumor
says that McKenzie and Mann are
also interested in it. I cannot close
this brief sketch without a word
about the marvellous growth of Calgary.
When I was here in 1897, there
were probably not more than five
thousand, or at any rate, six thousand people in the place. There were
hundreds of vacant houses. Many of
them with the windows smashed and
thc doors broken in. The streets were
deserted and the whtHe of the shopping district was bounded by the
Bank of Montreal a$f8 the Alberta
Hotel at one end, and the Bank of
Commerce at the other. Today,
Calgary claims a population of fifty
thousand, and judging from appearances, I should not be disposed to
question the claim. This means that
Calgary is a much larger place than
Victoria, and that it has twice the
population which Vancouver had at
thc last census. It undoubtedly furnishes the most remarkable illustration of the rapid growth of the Western Canadian country, and it is still
forging ahead at such a rate that
some optimists predict that it will
ultimately leave Winnipeg in the
shade. I doubt this, because after
all "Wheat is king," and I still think,
as I have always thought, that Winnipeg is to become the Canadian Chicago. But there is a disturbing factor in the case. It is the uncertainty
as to the future port of shipment
whether to thc Orient, or other foreign markets than England. Evidences point to Vancouver, and experts speak positively of rows of elevators and steamship lines from the
Terminal City for wheat carrying
purposes. This would detract from
the importance of Winnipeg, and the
opening up of thc Hudson's Bay
route would also weaken it on the
Eastern side, but when all is said and
done, Calgary is a city of wonderful
growth. Its present era of remarkable activity is due mainly to thc
great irrigation works which have
been carried out by thc C. P. R.
These works will be extended, and
copied, and when ten blades of grass
have been made to grow where one
grew before, it is impossible to foretell how thick settlement may become, and what the ultimate popula-
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Otter Point School
Sealed Tenders, superscribed "Tender
for Otter Point School," will be received
by the Hon. the Minister of Public
Works up to noon of Monday, the 3rd
day of October, 1910, for the erection
and completion of a small one-room
school building at Otter Point, in the
Esquimalt Electoral District.
Plans, Specifications, Contract, and
Forms of Tender may be seen on and
after the 19th day of September, 1910,
at the offices of M. Emerson, Esq., Otter
Point, Secretary to the School Board, and
the Department of Public Works, Victoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque or certificate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the Hon. the
Minister of Public Works, for the sum
of $125, which shall be forfeited if the
party tendering decline to enter into
contract when called upon to do so, or
if he fail to complete the work contracted for. The cheques or certificates
of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will
be returned to them upon the execution
of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the forms supplied, signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed in the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., September 15th, 1910.
sep 17
LICENCE    TO    AN    EXTRA-PROVINCIAL   COMPANY
Companies Act
Canada:
Province of British Columbia.
No.   74A   (1910)
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that "Dart
Union Company, Limited," is authorised
and licensed to carry on business within
the Province of British Columbia, and to
carry out or effect ail or any of the
objects of the Company to which the
legislative authority of the Legislature
of British Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company ls
situate  at  Toronto,  Ontario,  Canada.
The head office of the Company in
this Province is situate at Victoria, and
Edgar Crow Baker, Agent, whose address is Victoria aforesaid, is the attorney for the Company.
The amount of the capital of the Company is forty thousand dollars, divided
Into four hundred shares.
Given   under   my   hand   and   Seal   of
Office at Victoria,  Province of British
Columbia, this fifteenth day of August,
one thousand nine hundred and ten.
(L.S.) S.  Y.  WOOTTON.
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has been  established  and  licensed are:
To manufacture and sell pipe couplings and other arttcles of iron and
bronze;
To manufacture, sell and deal in iron,
bronze and other metals, and
To carry on tlie work of manufacturing necessary or Incidental to a general
machine shop,
sep 17
"LAND  REGISTRY  ACT"
In the matter of an application for a
Duplicate   Certificate    of    Title   to
Lots 7, 14 and 15, Block 32, Nanaimo  City, and    Lot    10,    Block    5,
Viewfleld Farm, Esquimalt District.
NOTICE is hereby given that it is my
intention at the expiration of one month
from  the date of the  first  publication
hereof  to  issue a Duplicate  Certificate
of Title  to  said  lands,  issued  to  The
Bishop of Vancouver Island on the 10th
day of June, 1899, and numbered 5309C.
Land   Registry  Offlce,  Victoria,   B.C.,
the 19th day of August, 1910.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar General of Titles,
aug 27
Detachable
Umbrellas
GOLD, SILVER,
GUN METAL AND
ASSORTED WOOD
HANDLES
FROM
$2.50 to $20.00
W. H. Wilkerson
The Jeweller
915 GOVERNMENT ST.
tion of the counry may be. Briefly,
these are the evidences of growth
which I was able to notice on a flying trip.
BOHEMIAN.
A 94-YEAR-OLD VICAR
Rev. W. W. Wingfield, who has just entered the seventieth
year of his vicarate of Gulval, Penzance, was an invalid
when he was appointed to Gulval in 1839, and he tells with
gless how Lord Cottenham, then Chancellor, chaffed him
soon after his arrival concerning several applications for
the living on the ground that the new Vicar could not
possibly live long. Mr. Wingfield at 94, has still an upright
figure, has the clear complexion of health, bright, piercing
eyes and hair that has not yet turned from grey to snowy
white. He does not believe in "systems of living or that
sort of thing," but lives as ordinary people do. He is not
in bed at night until 11 and rises before 8. "I eat as much
as is good for an old man," he says. "I don't take as much
as younger people, but then I don't want to. One doesn't
take so much exercise and therefore wants less. I touch
no wine but MUMM'S 'EXTRA DRY' and sometimes
when tired I have a limited quantity of whisky and water."
'    A NEW
DEPARTMENT
AFTER CAREFUL CONSIDERATION WE HAVE DECIDED
TO CARRY A STOCK OF
Ladies' Silk and Linen Shirt Waists
and Blouses
WHICH WE ARE NOW DISPLAYING
WE INVITE YOUR EARLY INSPECTION
Oriental Importing Co.
510 CORMORANT STREET
•   OFF. E. A N. DEPOT
"What shall hc have that killed the deer?"—Shakespeare.
HUNTING  PARTIES
will find everything here they need in good things to eat and drink
to take with them on their shooting expeditions. These are both
tempting and satisfying suggestions:
Sardines, 2 tins for  25c
Potted Meats, per tin, 25c, 15c and  10c
Jars of Cheese, each 10c
Horse Shoe Salmon, half pound tins, 2 for 25c
Coffee and Milk, makes an excellent cup when mixed with hot
water, per tin  25c
Cream, per small can  5c
Pork and Beans, per tin, 20c, 15c and  10c
Cocoa, per tin  15c
Coffee Extract, per bottle  25c
Maggi's Soups, delicious soup when boiled a short time in hot
water, packet    5c
Cooked Chicken and Meats of all kinds, Boston Brown Bread, Pies
and Cakes, good as mother made.
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
Independent Grocers, 1317 Government Street
Tels 50, 51, 52. Liquor Department Phone 1590
TENDERS
TENDERS for the purchase of the
five following described timber limits
will be received by the undersigned up
till noon of the 15th October, 1910.
Nos. 37719 to 37723 (both inclusive).
Situate at Benton Creek, Lillooet District. The highest or any tender will
not necessarily be accepted.
September  17,   1910.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA TRUST
CORPORATION
No.  1232  Government St.. Victoria, B.C.
Wanted, 1000 Babies
Between now and Xmas to
be Photoed at the
ESQUIMALT
PHOTO  STUDIO THE WEEK, SATUKDAY,  SEPTEMBER 24,  1910
>ale of Land for Unpaid Delinquent Taxes and School Rates in
the Victoria District, Province of British Columbia
I HEREBY GIVE NOTICE that on Wednesday, the 12th day of October, A.D. 1910, at the
Dur of 11 o'clock a.m., in the Maple Leaf Committee Room of the Parliament Buildings, Victoria,
Ic, I shall sell by Public Auction the lands of the persons in the list hereinafter set out for the delin-
jent taxes unpaid by the said persons on the 31st day of December, 1909, and for interest, costs
id expenses, including the cost of advertising the said sale, if the total amount due is not sooner paid.
LIST  ABOVE   MENTIONED
CANCEILATIOH Or »ESE»T«
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve existing upon the lands embraced
in special Timber Licences No. 20289,
situated near Sechelt Inlet, New Westminster District, is cancelled, and that
the said lands will be open for location
under the provisions of the Land Act,
at midnight on October 14th, 1910.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands
Lands Department,
Victoria, July  14,  1910.
jyl6
lame of Person Assessed
Delinquent Taxes
Short Description of Property
|EO. HEATHERBELL
ESQUIMALT DISTRICT
45  acres  of Sec.  35  as  per Deed  No.  3561,
L. R. 0	
li.PT. J. F. GOSSE.
BANTHIER
IRS. G. TRENCHARD..
IAS. DOERING
VMES STEELE
B. JOSEPH
A.COPLEY
A.COPLEY
|EO. AIKMAN.
$48.00
14 9-10 acres of Sec. 35, as per Deed No. 5119,
L. E. 0	
24 acres S. E. corner of Sec. 79, as per Deed
No. 4445, L. R. 0	
METCHOSIN DISTRICT
10 acres, Lot B of Sec. 32, Map 718....
16 acres, Lot A of Sec. 32, Map 718....
SOOKE DISTRICT
103 acres, Bk. C. of Sections 6 ancl 17.
RENFREW DISTRICT
N. W. y4 of Sec. 7, Township 10,160 acres..
MALAHAT DISTRICT
East part of Lot 44, 16.66 acres)
East part of Lot 49, 160 acres   )
a
o w
f*J   03
0__-t
■»«■>
'JI --H
—   O
_-Q
$...
HIGHLAND DISTRICT
N. 1/2 oi Section 14, 80 acres.
24.00
4.20
9.00
7.80
12.1
19.20
18.00
18.00
.90
2.90
$2.15
1.10
.20
.45
.35
.60
.85
1.90
1.90
>_ _
—
ft
u
f!
a
H
_
r-Z
+-
£
■J.
-*s
$2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
LICENCE    TO    AN    EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANY
Companies Act
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert
TAKE NOTICE that D. C. McDonald,
.of Russell, Manitoba, occupation Agent,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted one mile
west of the north-east corner of Section 12, township 21, thence west 80
chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement and containing 320 acres more or less.
Dated June IB, 1910.
DONALD CROMWELL McDONALD
jy23 F. M. Kelly, Agent
$52.15
27.10
6.40
12.35
10.15
18.10
22.05
21.90
21.90
Dated at Victoria, B.C., Sept. ioth, 1910.
E. E. LEASON,
Assessor and Collector, Victoria Assessment District.
DEPARTMENT OP PUBLIC WORKS
J The Honourable the Minister of Pubic Works will receive proposals for the
lurchase of a quantity of lumber and
lllcloth now lying at the rear of the
larliament Buildings, up to and in-
luding Tuesday, the 30th Instant.
J The right is reserved to reject the
llghest or any proposal.
F, C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer
department of Public Works,
r   Victoria, B.C.. 26th August, 1910.
RUPERT LAND DISTRICT
District of Vancouver Island
TAKE NOTICE that I, Reginald Jae-
ter agent   for   Samuel   Grossman,   of
fancouver,   B.C.,   occupation   Surveyor,
Jitends to apply for permission to pur-
Ihase the following described  lands  in
township   24,    Rupert    District;—Commencing at a post planted at the south-
Test  corner  of  Section   22;   thence   SO
|hains   east;   thence   SO   chains   north;
lience SO chains west; thence SO chain?
outh  to point  of commencement.
Dated 30th August, 1910.
ep3 REGINALD  JAWHCK.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Mary Dennip
Ohrly, of London, England, occupation
Spinster, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles north of Lot 3S7, Salmon River Country, and at South end
of Small Lake and marked the N.W.
corner;  thence south  80 chains;  thence
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of i_ands for
a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum upon the land and under the
foreshore and under the water in Rupert
District, described as follows:—Commencing at a post planted on the beach
at the south-west corner of Section 27
east 40 chains; thence north 80 chains;   Township  2,    Rupert    District;   thence
  north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south to the shore-line; thence
following the sinuosities of ine shoreline to the place of commencement;
known as "Claim 3."
Dated July 4th, 1910.
aug 20       R. W. WILKINSON, Locator
thenee west 40 chains to point of commencement.
Located June 24 th,  1910.
MARY DENNIS OHRLY,
jy30 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
RUPERT LAND DISTRICT
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands for a License to prospect for Coal and Petroleum on the following described land,
situate on the north side of West Arm,
Quatsino Sound, Vancouver Island, commencing at a post planted at the southwest corner of section 13, township 32,
Rupert District, thence north 80 chains,
thence east SO chains; thence south SO
chains; thence west SO ehains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
JOE BELANGE, Locator,
aug 13 Prank Patterson, Agent.
LICENCE
TO    AN    EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANY
Companies Act
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert
TAKE NOTICE that W. L Ney, of
ussell, Manitoba, occupation Bank
ierk, intends to apply for permission to
archase the following described lands:
ommencing at a post planted at the
jrth-east corner of section 12, town-
lip 21, thence west SO chains; thencs
>uth 40 chains; thence east 80 chains;
ience north 40 chains to point of com-
encement   and   containing   320 acres,
lore or less.
IDated June 15,  1910.
WILLIAM LOCKYER NEY.
'23 P. M. Kelly, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert
ll'AKE   NOTICE   that  Angus   Suther-
nd   of   Russell,   Manitoba,   occupation
lirmer,   intends   to  apply   for  permls-
bn to purchase the following descrlb-
lands:—Commencing at a post plant-
near   small   lake   about   120   chains
list of the north-west corner of Sec-
>n   13,   Township   21,   thence   oast   40
lins,  thence south  80 chains;  thence
40 chains; thence north 80 chains
. Mnt of commencement and contain-
320 acres more or less,
bated June 16, 1910.
ANGUS SUTHERLAND.
■23 P. M. Kelly, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Busick E. Pemberton, of London, England, occupation
Barrister, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted near Salmon River about two miles
S.W. of the S.W. eorner of Lot 385;
thence north SO chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 40 chains to point of commencement.
Located June 25th,  1910.
BUSICK E. PEMBERTON,
jy 30 J.  R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Alexander Ham-
field, of Duluth, Minnesota, occupation
Engineer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands;—Commencing at a post planted on the north bank of Salmon River
near the crossing of the Bella Coola
Ootsa Lake Summer trall; thence north
40 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 40 chains, more or less ,to river;
thence west 80 chains, more or less,
along river to point of commencement.
Located  June  22nd,  1910.
ALEXANDER HAMFIELD,
jy 30 J. R. Morrison, Agent
Canada:
Province or British Columbia.
No.   5B   (1910)
I HEREBY CERTIFY that "Raphael
Tuck % Sons Company, Limited," has
this day been registered as a Company
under the "Companies Act" to carry out
or effect all or any of the objects of the
Company to which the legislative authority of the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company is
situate In the City and State of New
York,   United   States  of America.
The head office of the Company In
this Province Is situate in the Citv of
Victoria, and David S. Tait, Barrister-
at-law, whose address Is Victoria aforesaid, is the attorney for the Companv.
The amount of the capital of tlie
Company Is two hundred thousand dollars, divided into two thousand shares
of one hundred  dollars each.
Tlie Company Is limited and the time
of its existence is thirty years from
the  20th day  of  March,   1S91.
Given   under   my   hand   and   seal   of
office   at   Victoria,   Province   of   British
Columbia, this thirteenth day of August,
one thousand  nine hundred nnd ten.
(L. S.) S.  Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has been established and registered are:
Art publishing and printing In all Its
phases; the printing, lithographing,
engraving, publishing and manufacturing of hooks, drawings, paintings,
chromos, prints, pictures, cards, paper-
goods, fancy-goods and novelties of all
kinds; and the Importing, exporting
and dealing In books, drawings, palnt-
1 Ings, chromos, prints, pictures, paper-
goods, cards, colors, artists' materials,
fancy-goods, and  novelties of nil kinds.
Canada:
Province of British Columbia.
No. 81A,  (1910)
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that "H. C.
Tugwoll & Company, Limited," is authorised and licensed to carry on business
within the Province of British Columbia, and to carry out or effect all or
any of the objects of the Company to
which the legislative authority of the
Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company is
situate at Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
The head office of the Company in
this Province is situate at Victoria,
and Ernest Victor Bodwell, Barrlster-
at-Law, whose address is Victoria aforesaid, is the attorney for the Company.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is sixty thousand dollars, divided  into six  hundred  shares.
Given under my hand and Seal of
Office at Victoria, Province of British
Columbia, this twenty-sixth day of
August, one thousand nine hundred and
ten.
(L. S.) S.  Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has  been  established  and  licensed  are:
To manufacture, buy, sell, and deal in
and with photographers' supplies;
To take over the business carried on
at the said City of Toronto by H. F.
Sharpe   &   Company;
To carry on any other business
whether manufacturing or otherwise
which may seem to the Company capable of being conveniently carried on
In connection with the above or calculated directly or indirectly to enhance
the value of or render profitable any
of the Company's property or rights:
To acquire and undertake the whole
or any part of the business property
and liabilities of any person or Company
carrying on any business which this
Company is authorized to carry on or
possessed of property suitable for the
purposes of this Company;
To apply for, purchase or otherwise
acquire any patents, brevets d'invention,
licenses, concessions, and the like conferring any exclusive or non-e.xciuslve
or limited rights to use or any secret
or other information as to any invention whicii may seem capable of being
used for any of the purposes of the
Company or the acquisition of which
may seem calculated directly or indirectly to benefit this Company and to
use, exercise, develop or grant licenses
In respect of or otherwise turn to account ihe property rights or information
so acquired;
To enter into any agreement for sharing profits, union of Interests, co-operation, joint adventure, reciprocal concession or otherwise with any person
or Company carrying on or engaged in
or ahout to carry on or engage in any
business or transaction whicli this company is authorized to carry on or en-
g»ge In or any business or transaction
capable of being conducted so as directly or indirectly to benefit this Company and to lend money to, guarantee
the contracts of, or otherwise assist
any such person or Company and to
take or otherwise acquire shares and
securities of any such Company and to
sell, hold, re-Issue with or without guarantee or otherwise deal with the same;
To take or otherwise acquire and hold
shares in any other Company having
objects altogether or ln part similar to
those of this Company or carrying on
any business capable of being conducted
so as directly or indirectly to benefit
this  Company;
To promote any Company or Companies for the purpose of acquiring all
or any of the property and liabilities
of this Company or for any other purpose whicii may seem directly or indirectly calculated to benefit this Company;
To enter into any arrangement with
nny Government or authorities, municipal, local or otherwise that may seem
conducive to the Company's obiects or
any of them and to obtain from any
such government or authority any
rights, privileges and concessions which
the Compnny may think it desirable to
obtain and to carry out, exercise and
comply with any such arrangements,
rights, privileges nnd concessions, and
To sell or dispose of tlle undertaking
of the Company or any part thereof
for such consideration as the Company
may think fit and In particular for
shares, debentures or securities of any
other Company having objects altogether
or in part similar to those of this
Company,
sep 17
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert
TAKE NOTICE that W. W. W. Wilson, of Russell, Manitoba, occupation.
Student-at-Law, intends to apply for-
permisslon to purchase the following
described  lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
one mlle north of the north-west corner of Section 12, Township 21, thence
north 40 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence soutb 40 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement and
containing 320 acres more or less,
Dated June 16, 1910.
William Wilbur Wilfred Wilion
jy23 F. M. Kelly, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert
TAKE NOTICE that R. H. Keay, of
Shellmouth, Manitoba, occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 20 chains north of the south-east
corner of Timber License 36038, thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 cliains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement and
containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated June 16, 1910.
RICHARD HENRY KEAY,
Jy 23 F. M. Kelly, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert
TAKE NOTICE that W. S. Bartley, of
Russell, Manitoba, occupation Jeweller,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about 80
chains north of the North-west corner
of Section 12, township 21, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated June 16, 1900.
WILFRED STANLEY BARTLEY,
Jy 23 F. M. Kelly, Agent.
LICENCE    TO    AN    EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANY
"Companies Act, 1897"
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Renfrew
NOTICK is hereby given that, thirty
ilnys after date, 1 Intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands for
a licence to prospect for coul ami petroleum on the following described foreshore lands and lands covered with
water:—Commencing at a post planted
nn tiie foreshore, about 70 chains west
of the mouth of Muir Creek, In the
District of Renfrew, In the Province
uf British Columbia, and marked "C.
13. D.'s N.W. cor. post"; thence south
SO chains; thenee east SO chains; thence
north SO chains; thence west SO chains;
following the sinuosities of the shoreline to the point of commencement and
intended to contain 640 acres, more
or less.
Dnted this Srd day of September. 1910.
D. A. SLATER,
sep 17 Agent for C.  E.  Daniell.
.SUBMARINE AREA
NOTICE is hereby given that Arthur
E. Hepburn will, within thirty days
from this date, apply to the Assistant
Commissioner of Lands at Victoria for
n licence to prospect for coal on the
lands and under the area described ns
follows:
Commencing nt a post on the North
Boundary of Section 6, Mnyne Island,
Cowichan District, twenty (20) chains
West from the North-east corner post
of Section 0; thence nortli one mile;
thence enst one mile; thence south one
mlle; thence west one mile to point of
commencement,
Dated   this  30th day of August,  1910.
ARTHUR E. HEPBURN,
sep 17       Harry .Mclvor Hepburn, Agent.
"Companies Act, 1897"
Canada:
Province of British Columbia,
No. 597.
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that "The
Computing Scale Company of Canada,
Limited," is authorized and licensed to
carry on business within the Province
of British Columbia, and to carry out
or effect all or any of the objects of
the Company to which the legislative
authority of the Legislature of British
Columbia extends.
The head offlce of the Company is
situate at the City of Toronto In the
Province  of Ontario.
The amount of the capital of the Company is forty thousand dollars, divided
into four hundred shares of one hundred dollars. each.
The head office of the Company In this
Province is situate at the City of Victoria, and James Hill Lawson, Barris-
ter-at-Law, whose address is Victoria
aforesaid, is the attorney for the Company.
Given   under  my  Hand   and   Seal  of
Offlce  at  Vietoria,  Province  of British
Columbia, this fourteenth day of June,
one  thousand  nine  hundred  and  ten.
J. P. McLEOD,
Acting Registrar  of  Joint  Stock
Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has been established and licensed are:—
To manufacture, purchase or otherwise acquire, hold, own, mortgage, sell,
assign, and transfer or otherwise dispose of, trade in, deal in, and deal with
ell kinds of scales, balances, novelties,
labour saving devices, store and offlce
supplies, appliances, furniture, fittings
and fixtures and all articles and materials entering Into the manufacture
thereof and the sale and disposition
thereof and generally to carry on the
business of a manufacturer of and
dealer in all kinds of scales, balances,
novelties, labour saving devices, store
and offlce supplies, appliances, furniture
fittings and fixtures and all articles
and materials entering Into the manufacture thereof and in connection therewith, to acquire hy lease, license, purchase or otherwise patents of invention, trademarks, trade names, labels
and designs and interests or rights In
patents of invention trade marks, trade
names, labels and designs and to own
and utilize and dispose of the same and
to acquire and take over any business
and any interest In any business of a
nature similar to the above now or hereafter carried on by any Compnny, firm
or individual and all or any of the assets and liabilities of the same upon
such ternis as to payment therefor ln
stock, bonds or otherwise and upon such
other ternis as may be agreed on and to
sell the property and assets of the
Company or uny part thereof for such
consideration as the Companv may deem
lit Including shares debentures or securities of any Compnny purchasing or acquiring the same,
aug 20
NOIICE Is hereby given  that,  thlrtv
_','.-ys/lAter dl,lte- ! -ntenu" t0 nrP'y to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands for n licence to prospect for coal and petroleum
upon the land and under the foreshore
and under the water In Rupert District,
described ns follows:—Commencing nt a
post planted on the beach at the southwest corner of section 27, township 2,
Rupert District; thence nortli SO chains;
thenee west 80 chains; thence soutli to
the shore llne; thence following the sinuosities of the shore line to plnce of
commencement, known as "Claim 2,"
Dated July 4th,   1910.
aug 20        R. W. WILKINSON,  Locator
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Francis Richard
Robblns, of Victoria, B.C.. occupation
Gardiner, intends to npplv for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing nt a post planted about 40 chains north of Uhlqnko
River nnd about 30 miles west of Cluscus Lake on the Cluscus and Alcacho
trail and marked the N. W. corner-
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commence-
ment.
Located  June  23rd,   1910.
FRANCIS RICHARD ROBBINS,
Jy30 J. R. Morrison, Agent. THE  WEEK,  SATURDAY,   SEPTEMBER  24,   1910
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, 1 intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands for
a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum upon the land and under the
foreshore and under the water in Rupert District, described as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-west corner of Lot 9, Township
2, Rupert District; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south to the shore line; thence following the sinuosities of the shore-line to
the north-east corner of the Indian
Reserve; thence south to the south-east
corner of the Indian Reserve; thence
west to the place of commencement;
known as "Claim 1."
Dated  July  4th.  1910.
aug 20        R. W. WILKINSON, Loeator
LICENSE    TO    AN    EXTRA-PROV1N-
CIAL  COMPANY
Companies Act
July lst,  1910
Canada:
Province of British Columbia.
No. 82A (1910)
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that "Canadian Collieries (uiirismulr) Limited," is
authorized and licensed to carry on business within the Province of British Columbia, and to carry out or effect ail or
any of the objects of the Company to
whieh tbe legislative authority of the
Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company is
situate In the City of Victoria, British
Columbia, Canada.
The head office of the Company in
this Provinee is situate in Victoria
aforesaid and William John Taylor,
Barrister-at-law, whose address is Victoria aforesaid, Is the attorney for the
Company.
The amount of the capital of the
Company ls fifteen million dollars, divided into one hundred and fifty thousand shares.
Given under my hand and Seal of
Office at Victoria, Province of British
Columbia, this twenty-fifth day of
August, one thousand nine hundred and
ten.
(L.S.) S.  Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies
The objects for which this Company
has  been  established  and  licensed  are:
To purchase, lease or otherwise acquire coal fields and coal lands, ore
bearing properties, mineral lands, mining locations, mining and surface rights,
timber milits, wood lands and timber
lands, oil fields and privileges, natural
gas lands and properties, water lots,
water powers, and privileges and other
rights, privileges, easements and licenses.
To lay out, construct, purchase, lease
or otherwise acquire, maintain, operate
and  manage:
(1) Mines of coal, Iron or other minerals whatsoever, oil wells and wells of
natural gas, mining structures, plant,
mills, pipe lines, buildings, machinery
and appliances of every description;
(2) Collieries, smelters, furnaces,
mills, plant and machinery for the raising, manufacture, refining or treatment
of coal  and  ores of every  description;
(3) Shops, mills and works for the
manufacture, treatment, or handling of
coal or coke or any produce or by-product thereof or of any product or byproduct of ores of any description, or fnr
the manufacture, treatment or handling
of timber, lumber, pulpwood of every
description and the products and byproducts thereof, and for the manufacture, treatment or handling of oils, both
lubricating and burning, of asphalt,
pitch, tar, paints, acids, clays, sandstone, cement, bricks, and any other
manufactures of metal, wood or other
materials whatsoever, whether severally
or incombinatlon;
(4) Power houses, structures, plant
and equipment for the levelopment, generation, transmission or utilization of
water, steam, electric or other powers
and structures and plant for any form
of heating and lightning; provided
however, that the sale, transmission or
distribution of electric, pneumatic, hydraulic or other power or force beyond
the lands of the company shall be subject to local and municipal regulations
in that behalf;
(6) Steamships and vessels, piers,
docks, dry-docks, wharves, slips, basins,
iir.d all incidental structures and appliances;
(6) Bridges, roads, tramways, on
lands owned or controlled by the Company, aerial carriers, trails and ways
of every description, yards and tracks
for the storage or handling of any of
the Company's products or for the delivery thereof to adjacent railways; and
(7) Offices, stores, shops, grain elevators, hotels, boarding houses, dwellings, workmen's houses, restaurants and
buildings of every description;
To act as agents, commission agents,
forwarders, carriers by water, and to
purchase, sell and deal in any manufactures or products of the works hereinbefore specified, or any commodities,
merchandise or manufactures which may
be conveniently handled therewith, and
are germane to the objects herein specified;
To purchase, acquire, sell and deal in
any exclusive rights, patent rights, privileged or licenses In connection with
the business of the Company;
To promote, aid and encourage Immigration and assist Immigrants in any
way that  may bc desirable;
To guarantee any Indebtedness whether bonded or otherwise of any company authorized to conduct any business
within or similar to the powers of the
Company;
To Issue In payment or part payment
for any property rights or privileges
acquired by the Company or for any
guarantees of the Company's securities,
or for services rendered, shares of the
Company's capital stock, whether subscribed for or not, as fully paid and
non-assessable or the Company's securities;
To acquire the stock, securities or undertaking of any other company having
for one of Its objects the exercise of any
other powers of the Company or to
transfer its undertaking or assets to,
or ot amalgamate with any such Company;
To enter into any partnership or other
arrangements for the sharing of profits,
union of Interests, co-operation, joint
venture, reciprocal concession or otherwise with any person or company carrying on or Intending to carry on any
business which this Company Is authorized to carry on or Is capable of being conducted so as to benefit the Company; and
To acquire by purchase or otherwise,
hold, sell, and deal In the business, assets, good will and securities of any
other company having for one of its objects the exercise of any of the powers
of thc Company, or carrying on any
business capable of being conducted so
as to benefit the company, and to promote or assist In promoting any such
other company or any subsidiary company, nnd to pay nut of thc funds of the
Company tbo costs and expenses of such
promotion or assistance,
sep 17
LICENCE    TO    AN    EXTRA-PROVINCIAL  COMPANY
Companies  Act.
Canada:
Province of British Columbia.
No.   21a   (1910)
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that "Staun-
tons, Limited," is authorized and licensed to carry on business within the
Province of British Columbia, and to
curry out or effect all or any of tho
objects of the Company to which the
legislative authority of the Legislature
of British Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company is
situate at Toronto, in the Province of
Ontario.
The head offlce of the Company in
this Province is situate at the City of
Victoria and J. L. Beckwith, agent, of
Victoria aforesaid, whose address is
Victoria aforesaid, is the attorney for
tbe Company.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is two hundred thousand dollars,  divided into two thousand shares.
Given under my hand and seal of
office at Victoria, Province of British
Columbia, this eighteenth day of July,
one thousand nine hundred and ten.
(L.S.) J.  P.  McLEOD,
Acting Registrar of Joint Stock
Companies.
The objects for which tbis Company
has been  established and  licensed  arc:
To manufacture, buy, sell, and deal
in paper, articles made wholly or
partly of paper, room-mouldings, window-shades, materials or articles for interior or exterior house-decoration, machinery, and articles used in the manufacture of wall-papers and by wallpaper dealers, and colours, oils, and varnishes, and to carry on business as a
painter and paperhanger.
SUBMARINE AREA
NOTICE is hereby given that Arthur
E. Hepburn will, within thirty days
from this date, apply to the Assistant
Commissioner of Lands at Victoria for
a licence to prospect for coal on the
lands and under the area described as
follows:
Commencing at a post at the N. E.
corner of the N. W. quarter of Section
9, Mayne Island. Cowichan District;
thence east one mile; thence north one
mile; thence west one mile; thence south
one mlle of commencement.
Dated this 30th day of August, 1910.
ARTHUR E. HEPBURN,
sep 17       Harry Mclvor Hepburn, Agent.
RUPERT LAND DISTRICT
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands for a License to prospect for Coal and Petroleum on the following described land,
situate on the north side of West Arm,
Quatsino Sound, Vancouver Island,
commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner of Section 16, Township 32, Rupert District, thenee north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres, more or less. Located July
11, 1910.
JOE BELANGE, Locator,
aug 13 Frank Patterson, Agent.
SUBMARINE AREA
NOTICE is hereby given that Arthur
E. Hepburn will, within thirty days
from this date, apply to the Assistant
Commissioner of Lands at Victoria for
a licence to prospect for coal on the
lands and under the area described as
follows:
Commencing at a post at the N. E.
corner of the N. W. quarter of Section
9. Mayne Island, Cowichan District;
thence west one mile; thence north one
mile; thence east one mile; thence south
one mile to point of commencement.
Dated this 30th day of August, 1910.
ARTHUR E. HEPBURN,
sep 17       Harry Mclvor Hepburn, Agent.
IN  THE  SUPREME  COURT   OF
BRITISH  COLUMBIA
Entered Vol. 27, Fol. 243, Dated 16-9-10.
By d: B. T. No. 11, 1910.
Victoria, Sept. 15, 1910, Registry.
In  tbe Matter of  Registered  Plan  914,
Corporation of the District of Oak
Bay,  Victoria District,  British Columbia.
Before  the Honourable,  the  Chief Justice, in Chambers,  Monday, the 12th
day of September, 1910.
Upon  reading the  Petition  of Arthur
Williamson Taylor, Hilda Tilley, Richard
L*   Drury,   Jeanette   Cusack,   Frederick
B.   Pemberton,   William   Curtis   Sampson, Albert Cotton, George O. Leask and
tbe  British  Columbia Electric  Railway
Company, Limited, and the affidavits of
Chartres  C.  Pemberton and Richard  L.
Drury, verifying such petition, and upon
hearing Mr. Hanington in support of an
application  under  Section  seventy   (70)
of   the   Land   Registry   Act   to   amend
Registered Plan, number 914 of the District of Oak Bay, Vietoria District.
It is ordered that unless cause to the
contrary be shewn within one month
from the date of the first publication
hereof, such Registered Plan shall be
then amended and that such plan shall
then be as appears in Exhibit "D," attached to the said a%davit of Richard
L. Drury.
It Is further ordered that this order
shall be published weekly for one month
In a newspaper,  printed  and  published
in the said City  ,f Victoria,
sep 17 G. HUNTER, C..T.
LICENCE    TO    AN    EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANY
Companies Act
Canada:
Province of British Columbia.
No.   80A   (1910)
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that "Chapman and Walker, Limited," is authorized
and licensed to carry on business within
the Province of British Columbia, and
to carry out or effect all or any of tbe
objects of the Company to which the
legislative authority of the Legislature
of British  Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company is
situate at Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
The head office of tlie Company in
tbis Province Is situate at Victoria, and
James Hill Lawson, jr., Barrister, whose
address Is Victoria, aforesaid, is the attorney for the Company.
Tbe amount of the capital of the Company Is fifty thousand dollars, divided
Into live hundred shares.
Given under my hand and seal of
office at Victoria, Province of British
Columbia, this twenty-third day of
August, one thousand nine hundred and
ten.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has  heen  established  and  licensed  nre:
To manufacture, buy. sell and deal
In all kinds of electrical, gas, steam
and other machinery appliances and supplies and all articles into tho manufacture of which wood or metal enters,
anil  all  by-products  thereof,  and
To carry on tho business of a general
construction Cnmpany and contractors
nnd to enter Into contracts fnr construction and execute all descriptions
nf wnrks.
sep 17
IN THE MATTER OF the "Navigable
Waters' Protection Act," being chapter 115 of the Revised Statutes of
Canada,   1906.
TAKE NOTICE that James R. Stewart, in pursuance of Section 7, of the
above named Act, has deposited the
plans of work and description of the
proposed site thereof, to be constructed
upon all that foreshore and submerged
land in West Bay of Victoria Harbour,
B.C., lying adjacent and pertaining to
Lots 6 (six) and 7 (seven) of Section
32 (thirty-two), Esquimalt District, and
more particularly described as follows:
COMMENCING at a point north fifty-
six degrees and forty-five minutes East
(N. 56 deg. 45 min. E.) and twenty-
eight and seven-tenths (28.7) feet from
the intersection of West boundary of
Lot 6 with High Water Mark of West
Bay, thence south eleven degrees and
six minutes East (S. 11 deg. 06 min. E.)
a distance of six hundred and sixty-
seven feet (667 ft.), thence East a distance of one hundred feet (100 ft),
thence north a distance of seven hundred feet (700 ft.), more or less, to
shore line, and thence following shore
line to point of commencement.
AND TAKE NOTICE that at the expiration of one month from date of
publication hereof application will be
made to the Governor in Council for approval thereof.
DATED at Victoria, British Columbia,
this 10th, day of August, 1910.
HANNINGTON & JACKSON,
aug 20 Solicitors for Applicants.
LICENCE    TO    AN    EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANY
Companies Act
Canada:
Province of  British  Columbia.
No.  18A (1910)
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that "Malcolm
Souter Furniture Company, Limited," is
authorized and licensed to carry on
business within the Province of British
Columbia, and to carry out or effect
all or any of the objects of the Company to which the legislative authority
of the Legislature of British Columbia
extends.
The head office of the Company is
situate at the City of Hamilton, in the
Province  of  Ontario.
The head offlce of the Company in
this Province is situate at the City of
Vancouver, and Walter Cline, Merchant,
of Vancouver aforesaid, whose address
is Vancouver aforesaid, is the attorney
for the Company.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is seventy-five thousand dollars, divided into seven hundred and
fifty shares.
Given   under   my   hand   and   Seal   of
Offlce at  Victoria,  Province  of  British
Columbia, this fourteenth day of July,
one thousand nine hundred  and ten.
J. McLEOD,
Acting Registrar of Joint Stock
Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has been established and licensed are:
To manufacture and deal in all kinds
of furniture, interior fittings, wood and
metal work,
aug 13
NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days
after date Alexander Cook, Surveyor's
assistant, of Victoria, B.C, intends to
apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands for permission to purchase the
following described land in Renfrew District, V.I.:—Commencing at a post planted near high water mark on the Straits
of Fuca, near the south-west corner of
Timber Licence No. 40763, thence northerly and along the west boundary of
said licence a distance of 40 chains
more or less to the south-east corner
of Timber Licence No. 35167. thence
westerly a distance of 60 chains more
or less to the shore, thence easterly
along the shore line to point of commencement, the whole containing 200
acres more or less.
July 9th,  1910.
A.   COOK.
jy30
RUPERT LAND DISTRICT
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands for a
License to prospect for Coal and Petroleum on the following described land,
situate on the north side of West Arm
of Quatsino Sound, Vancouver Island,
commencing at a post planted at the
south-west corner of Section 14, Township 32, Rupert District, thence north
80 chains, thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 ehains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres more or less. Located July
11, 1910.
JOE BELANGE, Locator,
aug 13 Frank Patterson, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that Isabel
Armstrong, of Victoria, B.C., dressmaker, Intends within 60 days to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
for permission to purchase the following described land in Renfrew District,
V.l.,:—Commencing at a post planted
near high water mark on the Straits
nf Fuca, near the south-west corner of
Timber Licence No. 40753, thence easterly following the shore line a distance
of 80 chains; thence north to the south
boundary of Timber License No. 40753;
thence westerly along said boundary tn
the south-west corner of the licence,
thence southerly to poinl of commence
ment. the whole containing about 300
acres.
July Oth, 1910.
I. ARMSTRONG,
1y30 A.  Cook,  Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Helena Frank, of
Victoria, B.C., occupation Spinster, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted near
Salmon River, about two miles S.W. of
the S.W. corner of Lot 385; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 40
chains t* loint of commencement.
Locate June 25th, 1910.
HELENA FRANK,
Jr !* J. R. Morrison, Agent.
RUPERT LAND DISTRICT
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to tho
Chief Commissioner of Lands for License to prospect for Coal and Petroleum upon the following described lnnd
situate on the north side of West Arm
Ountslno Sound, onmmonclna- at a pn=t
planted at the south-west corner of section 2, township 32, Rupert District,
Vancouver Island, thence north SO
chnins: thonce east so chain**-: thonce
smith 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
nlnng salt water tn point of commencement.    Locntod Julv 11. 1910.
JOE BELANGE. Locator,
aug 1.1 Frank Patterson, Agenl
WATER   NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that an application will be made under Part V.
of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a
licence in the Esquimalt Division of
Victoria District.
(a) The name, address, and occupation of the applicant—Albert Edward
Banister.
(b) The name of the lake, stream, or
source (if unnamed, the description is)
The Easterly stream flowing Into Albert Head Lagoon on Section 61, Esquimalt   District.
(c) The point of diversion—near
mouth of stream.
(d) The quantity of water applied for
(in cubic feet per second) lour cubic
feet per second.
(e) The character of the proposed
works—It is proposed to force the water
by steam motor or force pump to piace
o( user.
(f) The premises on which the water
is to be used —on Section 49, Esquimalt
District.
(g) The purposes for which -lie water
is to be used—domestic, irrigation and
steam.
(h) If for irrigation, describe the land
intended to be Irrigated, giving acreage
—Section 49, containing sixty-five acres.
(i) If tbe water is to be used for
power or mining purposes, describe the
place where the water is to be returned
to some natural channel, and the difference in altitude between point of diversion and point of return—not to be returned.
(j) Area of Crown land intended to
be occupied by the proposed works—
none.
(k) This notice was posted on the
6th day of September, 1910, and application will be made to the Commissioner
on the 10th day of October, 1910.
(1) Give the names and address of
any riparian proprietors or licensees
who or whose lands are likely to be
affected by the proposed works, either
above or below tbe outlet—Producers
Rock and Gravel Coy., Store Street, Victoria, B.C.
A. E. BANISTER,
Albert Head, B.C.
Note—One   cubic   foot   per  second   is
equivalent to 35.71 miner's inches,
sep 10
•x_AND REGISTRY ACT'
ln  tlie matter of an  Application  for a
Duplicate    Certificate    of Title    to
Lots 1, 2, 3 and 4, Block 10, Shawnigan  Lake   Suburban  Lots    (Map
218a), Maiahat District.
NOTICE is hereby given that it is my
int2iit.ion at the expiration of one month
from  the  date  of  the  lirst  publication
hereof  to  Issue  a  Duplicate  Certificate
of Title to said lands  issued to Justin
Gilbert, on the   8th day of April,   1904,
and numbered 9845c.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
sep 10 Registrar General of Titles.
LICENCE    TO    AN    EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANY
"Companies Act, 1897."
July lst,  1910
Canada:
Province of British Columbia,
No. 37A (1910)
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that "Canadian Asbestos Company" is authorized
and licensed to carry on business within the Province of British Columbia and
to carry out or effect all or any of the
objects of the Company to which the
legislative authority of the Legislature
of British Columbia extends.
The head offlce of the Company is
situate at the City of Montreal, in the
Province of Quebec.
The head offlce of the Company in
this Province is situate at the City of
Victoria, and William John Taylor, K.
C, whose address is Victoria aforesaid,
is the attorney for the Company.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is thirty thousand dollars
divided into six hundred shares.
Given under my hand and Seal of
Offlce at Vietoria, Province of British
Columbia, this twenty-fifth day of
July, one thousand nine hundred and
ten.
J. P. McLEOD,
Acting  Registrar  of  Joint  Stock
Companies.
The objects for whieh this Company
has been established and licensed are:
To manufacture, buy, sell and deal in
Asbestos and its products.
To carry on the business of General
Manufacturers and  General  Merchants.
To acquire, construct, lease and maintain all buildings and properties necessary or convenient for the proper carrying on of the business aforesaid, and
again dispose of the same.
To acquire and use water, steam, electric   or  other  power  for   the  purposes
aforesaid,
aug 20
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Mrs. E. Hamfleld,
of Duluth, Minnesota, occupation married woman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 20 chains north of Uhlqa-
ko River and about 30 miles west of
Cluscus Lake on the Cluscus and Al-
cacho trail and marked N.E. corner;
thence south 80 chatns; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Located  June  23rd,   1910.
MRS. E. HAMFIELD,
jy30 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
EXAMINATION FOR INSPECTION OF
STEAM  BOILER AND MACHINERY
Examinations for the position of Inspector of Steam Boiler and Machinery,
under the "Steam Boilers Inspection
Act, 1901," will be held at the Parliament Buildings, Victoria, commencing
November 7th, 1910. Application and
instruction forms can be had on application to the undersigned, to whom the
former must be returned correctly filled
in, not later than October 24th, 1910.
Salary, $130.00 per month, increasing at
the rate of $5.00 per month each year
to a maximum of $180.00.
JOHN PECK,
Chief Inspector  of  Machinery.
New Westminster, B. C.
SUBMARINE AREA
NOTICE is hereby given that Arthur
E. Hepburn will, within thirty days
from this date, apply to the Assistant
Commissioner of Lands at Victoria for
n licence to prospect for conl nn the
lands and under ihe area described as
follows:
Commencing at n post at the N, E.
corner of the N. W. quarter of Section
9. Mnyne Island, Cowichan District,
thonco cast one mile; thence south nne
milo: thonce west one mile; thence north
ono mile tn pnlnt nf commencement.
Dated this ,10th day of August, 1910.
ARTHUR E. HEPBURN,
sep 17       Harry Mclvor Hepburn, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thi
days after date, I intend to apply tol
Chief Commissioner of Lands for al
cence to prospect for coal anj pel
leum upon the land and under the fl
shore and under the water in Rul
District, described as follows.—cl
mencing at a post planted on tht bef
40 chains east from the north-eait t
ner of Section 27, Township 2, Jul
District; thence north 73 chains; (hd
east 80 chains; thence south lol
shore-line; thence following the'sil
osities of the shore-line to the plajd
commencement;  known as  "Claim ll
Dated July  4th,  1910. 1
aug 20       H. W. WILKINSON, Loci!
NOTICE is hereby given that, tH
days after date, I intend to appli
the Chief Commissioner of Lands!
a licence to prospect for coal _.ndl
troleum upon the land and underl
foreshore and under the water in Rul
District, described as follows:—CT
mencing at a post planted at the sol
west corner of Section 24, Townshil
Rupert District: thence east 80 chaT
thence south about 60 chains to
shore-line; thence westerly follo\L
the sinuosities of the shore-line tol
north-west corner of Section 26; th|
south to the place of commencen
known as "Claim 5."
Dated July 4th, 1910.
aug 20        R. W. WILKINSON, Lod
NOTICE is hereby given that, til
days after date, I intend to applj
the Chief Commissioner of Lands ff
licence to prospect for coal and p«f
leum upon the land and under the iL
shore and under the water in Rul
District, described as follows:—Cf
mencing at a post planted at the nd
east corner of Section 27, Townshil
Rupert District; thence south 80 cha
thence west 80 chains; thence nortl
the shore-line; thence following thef
uosities of the shore-line to the l
of commencement; known as "Clair
Dated July 4th, 1910.
aug 20       R. W. WILKINSON, Lod
NOTICE is hereby given that, til
days after date, I Intend to applj
the Chief Commissioner of Lands]
a licence to prospect for coal andl
troleum upon the land and under!
foreshore and under the water in \
pert District, described as follow
Commencing at a post planted atl
north-east corner of Section 27, Tn
ship 2, Rupert District; thence soutl
chains; thence east 80 chains; thi
north to the north-west corner of f
tion 25, on the beach; followingI
sinuosities of the shore line to i
of commencement; known as "1__
Claim."
Dated July 4th,  1910.
aug 20        R. W. WILKINSON,  Lo(|
RUPERT LAND DISTRICT _
NOTICE is hereby given that til
days after date I intend to applf
the Chief Commissioner of Landsl
a License to prospect for Coal andl
troleum on the following descil
land, situate on the north side of ll
Arm, Quatsino Sound, at a post plal
at the south-west corner of Sectioil
Township 32, Rupert District, thi
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chfl
thence south 80 chains; tbence easl
chains to point of commencement, I
taining 640 acres more or less. Loci
July 11, 1910.
JOE BELANGE, Locator.l
aug 13 Frank Patterson, Ajj
RUPERT LAND DISTRICT _
NOTICE ls hereby given that thi
days after date I intend to apply tol
Chief Commissioner of Lands for a I
cense to prospect for Coal and Pel
leum on the following described lif
situate on the north side of the 'WL
Arm of Quatsino Sound, Vancoul
Island, commencing at a post planted]
the south-east corner of Section T
Township 32, Rupert District, thi
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chai
thence south 80 chains; thence east!
chains to the point of commeneem!
containing 640 acres, more or less,
cated July 11, 1910.
JOE BELANGE, Locator,
aug 13 Frank Patterson, AgJ
RUPERT LAND DISTRICT
NOTICE is hereby given  that thii
days  after date  I  intend  to  apply f
the   Chief Commissioner  of  Lands
a License to prospect for Coal and
troleum    on    the    following    descrtl
land, situate on the north side of W|
Arm, Quatsino Sound, Vancouver Isla
commencing at  a  post  planted  at  '
south-east corner of section 9, towns!
32,   Rupert   District,   thence   north I
chains;   thence  west  80  chains;   thet
south  80 chains;  thence east  80 chai
to  point  of commencement,   containf
640  acres more  or  less.    Located  jl
11,  1910. "
JOE BELANGE, Locator,
aug 13 Frank Patterson, Agei
RUPERT LAND DISTRICT
NOTICE Is hereby given  that  thi!
days after date I intend to apply to
Chief Commissioner of Lands for a
cense  to prospect  for Coal  and Petl
leum  on  the  following  described  Ial
situate   on   the   West   Arm,   Quatsil
Sound,   Vancouver   Island,   commencil
at   a   post   planted   at   the   south-wa
corner of Section 11, Township 32, H
pert   District,   thence  north   80   chalil
thence east 80 chains; thence south!
chains;   thence  west   80   chains   to
point of commencement, containing
acres   more or  less.    Located  July
1910.
JOE BELANGE, Locator,
aug 13 Frank Patterson, Agei
RUPERT LAND DISTRICT
NOTICE is hereby given that thilL
days after date I intend to apply to tl
Chief Commissioner of Lands for a f
cense to prospect for Coal and Petl
leum on the following described Ial
situate on the north side of West Al
Quatsino Sound, Vancouver Island, col
mencing at a post planted at the norf
west corner of Section 1, Township I
Rupert District, thence south 80 chaii
thence east 80 chains, thence north I
chains, thence west 80 chains to poi
of commencement, containing 640 acn
more or less. Located July 11, 191o|
JOE BELANGE, Locator. r
aug 13 Frank Patterson, Agd
Ail
&M
CANCELLATION   OF   BESEBVE1
NOTICE is hereby given that the L
serve existing upon the lands embral
In  special Timber Licences Nos.  28f
28963 and 28964, situated tn Goldstrcf
District, Is cancelled, and that the
lands   will  be open   for  location   ur
the provisions of the Land Act at
night on October 14th, 1910.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Laj
Lands Department,
Victoria, July  14,  1910.
jyl6 THE  WEEK,  SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER  24,  1910
J
ANDIRONS AND FIRE SETS
We have our usual large assortment of the above on show on our balcony. The designs of
some of these fire dogs are very artistic, and any person with an open fireplace in their home can
appreciate them by giving us a call. We have a fine assortment of Fire Sets, comprising Shovel,
Poker and Tongs, Brush and Stand.   Below are some of our prices, etc.:
Colonial Brass Andirons, per pr, $9.50 and $10.00
Plain Black, a pair, $8.00, $6.00, $3.50 $1.75
Fire Dogs, brass, a pair, $10.00, $9.00, $7.50, $6.00,
$5.00, $2.50 and    $2.00
Copper, $12.50 to $7.00
Flemish Fire Sets, with Stands, $8.50 to.. .$7.00
Colonial Brass  $8.00
Plain Black, $9.00 to   $4.75
Antique Copper and Brass, $10, $9, $6.50, $6.00
Three-piece Fire Sets without Stands—
In Brass, $5.00 and  $2.50
In Copper  $4.50
Black, copper and brass, $4.00 to $3.00
Keep a lookout for the arrival of our new stock
of Fenders, etc.
LIBRARY TABLES
This illustration gives you an idea of the Library Tables we have in stock. Of course, we have a big selection in many styles. These tables are
exceptionally good and are very useful to have in your home. They are very useful for den or parlor, and add greatly to the appearance of a room. Come
in and have a look at them, on our third floor, and let us explain their merits to you.
EARLY ENGLISH SOLID OAK
34 x 49, at $30.00
29 x 50, at $35-0°
30 x 48, at $30.00
MAHOGANY
26 x 44.   Special, at $15.00
26 x 42.   Special, at $18.00
26 x 42.   Special, at $20.00
44 x 28.   Special, at $20.00
GOLDEN OAK, QUARTER CUT
26 x 38, at $20.00
26 x 40, at $30.00
EARLY ENGLISH FINISH, QUARTER
CUT OAK
24 x 36, at $15.00
GOLDEN OAK, OVAL SHAPE
60 in., at $45.00
SURFACE OAK
25 x 36, at $12.00
MAGAZINE RACKS (DRAWER)
24 x 40, at $18.00
36 x 50, at $45.00
32 x 54, at. $35.00
Also a splendid assortment of Small Tables, Parlor Tables, Bedroom Tables, etc.
Two Library Sets, English finish, 3-piece—Settee, Arm Chair and Rocker—upholstered in green or red, at
$34-50
FURNISHERS OF
CHURCHES
SCHOOLS
BOATS
SINCE 1862
AT VICTORIA, B.O.
Complete Home Furnishers
Victoria, B.C.
FURNISHERS OF
HOMES
HOTELS
CLUBS
SINCE 1862
AT VICTORIA, B.O.
The Lost Immortal
By C. H. Bavlll
(Continued from Issue of Sept. 3)
I began to see light at last.
"And who is the young man whom
Ivliss Pettifors is to make happy?" I
nquired, affecting an interest in her
ove-affairs which I am afraid I was
very far from feeling. The Colonel
and his wife looked at me in pained
Surprise.
"Why, Archie, of course! The an-
Inouncement was in all the papers
weeks ago. Surely you saw it?"
As I never read anything but the
cricket news, I hadn't seen it; and
for some reason, which I could not
quite explain to myself, I heard the
intelligence now with a vague sensation of dismay.
"Well," said I at last, "if that
young woman is going to marry your
son Archie, I've got rather a good
piece of news for her."
Miss Pendleburn paused in the mid-i
Idle of a stroke.    Her quick ears had|
evidently caught what I had said.
"Did I hear someone say they had J
I good news about Archie?" she asked.
'Yes—I said so," I sang out boldly.
I "The     most       marvellous—glorious
news!"
The mallets were dropped at once.
"What is it?" asked Miss Pettifors
Iwith an egaerness for which I should
scarcely have given her credit.
"Well," said I, turning to the Col-
|onel with a smile, "as you will prob-
1'ably guess, my*good news has something to do with those poems of
Archie upon which you did me the
honour to ask my opinion."
The Colonel gave an embarrassed
little cough and glanced, rather apprehensively, I thought, at Miss Pettifors. Seldom have I seen anything
more reproachful than the look with
which she met his.
"You don't mean to say that you
have let anybody see the wretched
things?" she asked the Colonel in accents of horror. "Oh, how could you!"
"Yes, really, Jasper, I think you
might use a little discretion!" exclaimed Mrs. Pendleburn with considerable asperity. "Mr. Lemon is
an old friend, I know; and I am sure
he won't let it go any farther; still, I
do think this a matter which you
ought to have kept to yourself. It's
quite bad enough for us to know
what an idiot Archie is making of
himself, without your letting it go
outside the family."
"I did it for the best, Jane," stammered the Colonel apologetically. "I
thought Archie would listen to what
a literary man, like Lemon here, had
to say about his stuff."
His wife and daughter sniffed their
disapprobation of a step as to which
they evidently considered they ought
first to have been consulted. The
Colonel tried to justify himself by explaining to me the useful function
which he apparently expected me to
perform.
"1 want you, when you see the boy,
just to tell him thc bald truth without
any trimmings whatever," he said.
"It would be the greatest kindness
both to him and to us. Don't let any
considerations of politeness stand in
your way. Give it to him straight
from the shoulder and knock all this
nonsense out of him once and for
all."
'Yes, do please, Mr. Lemon, urged
Mrs. Pendleburn, evidently coming to
the conclusion that as 1 had been let
into the secret some use might as well
be made of me. "Wc shall be so
grateful to you if you can only stop
him from writing any more of this
dreadful twaddle."
"Twaddle!" I gasped. "Have you
seen—have you read anything hc has
written?"
Mrs. Pendleburn compressed her
lips and nodded sadly, as people do
when questioned about a tragedy in
their lives of which they cannot bear
to speak.
"And you?"
I turned to the others. They looked at me as if I were asking them
whether they had seen a cheque which
Archie had forged. Miss Pettifors
was visibly on the point of tears.
"There was a grand-aunt of papa's
who had to be shut up; we think
Archie must in some way have got
it from her," volunteered Miss Pendleburn suddenly.
She seemed to feel it incumbent
upon her to try and offer some excuse
for her brother's lamentably eccentric
conduct. The suggestion which lay
behind her words was too much for
Miss Pettifors. The poor girl's eyes
brimmed over, and she had to turn
away her head to hide her emotion.
"Dearest Evadne does feel it so
dreadfully!" whispered Mrs. Pendleburn confidentially in my ear.
She sighed monumentally, so that
I might know that in spite of the
brave front which she kept to the
world she, too, was seriously affected
by her son's humiliating conduct. As
for the Colonel and Miss Violet, they
looked as if they had received a blow
from which they could never rally.
At first I felt very angry wit!) these
foolish people: but reflection told mc
that 1 was unreasonable. After all,
how could they bc expected to know
what constituted good poetry? Probably their only literature was the
weekly box of novels from Mudie's,
Archie's harmonies were not for their
untrained cars. They wcre to bc excused for mistaking liis verse for
"mere twaddle." as Mrs. Pendleburn,
in her ignorance, had called it. Well,
it would hc very pleasant to undeceive
them. What a change would come
over their faces when they heard thc
truth from my lips—how they would
look at mc, increduously at lirst. as if
scarcely daring to believe what F told
them—and then, when they were assured that I was not trying to trillc
with them, how they would exult in
l heir pride and happiness! Dear,
dear! lt would be almost too affecting.
"My good people, you are all giving
yourselves a great deal of very unnecessary uneasiness," I began, slowly and impressively, so that they
might understand I had something important to say and be prepared. Four
very dejected faces were turned towards mc. "Archie is not making an
unmitigated ass of himself, as you
seem to imagine. I have shown his
work to some of-the best authorities
in England, and they agree with me
in thinking that it indicates him to be
a poetic genius of the very highest
order.
"Of the very highest orde.r"
I repeated the phrase, so that there
should be no mistake in their minds
as to what I. had said.
I was not unprepared for the stupefaction with which my announce
ment was received. A piece of news
like that is not to be realised in an
instant. Presently, they would comprehend its full import—and then!
The Colonel was the first to find his
voice.
"I suppose there's no chance of your
being mistaken about this, Lemon?"
he said, looking at mc with quite a
wistful expression on his face. "I
mean—I dare say you come across a
good many poetic geniuses one way
|and another, eh?"
"On the contrary, your son will be
the first I have ever met.'
"But, how's that? I thought you
belonged lo any amount of these
what-do-you-call-ems—literary clubs?"
"Yes, but geniuses don't belong to
literary clubs," I had to explain. "For
one thing, they couldn't afford to pay
llic subscription."
"Just as I feared, Jasper!" exclaimed Mrs. Pendleburn in accents of
the deepest despair. "I told Archie
from the first thai lie could never
make anything by ihis wretched poetry of his! Hut of course he wouldn't
believe mc—his own mother! I was
right  though, wasn't  I?"
She turned to mc for confirmation,
I could only how in acquiescence.
'Of course you were right," I was
hound to admit,   "Archie may become
immortal by his poetry, but he certainly cannot live by it."
"Very well, then—that settles it!"
announced Mrs. Pendleburn very decidedly. "Archie must never be told
about this unfortunate view which has
been taken of his scribbling. We cannot havc his prospects ruined."
"Prospects ruined!" The phrase
took mc aback. . "Why, what better
prospect could a man have than that
of becoming another, and possibly a
greater, Milton?"
"Fiddlesticks!" snapped Mrs. Pendleburn angrily. "For goodness' sake
don't stand there talking rubbish to
me about Archie's prospects as a second Milton, when Lord Gathersea has
offered to take him into thc business!"
"Lord Gathersea is Archie's godfather," interpolated the Colonel hastily. "He came forward in the hand-
omest manner when we wcre in doubt
as to what wc should do with the
boy."
"Gathersea? Gathersea?" Suddenly
I located thc name. "Ah—brews,
doesn't he?"
"The purest beer in England," said
Mrs. Pendleburn severely. She evidently regarded my off-hand reference as doing insufficient justice to
Lord Gathcrsea's services to hum; n-
ity. "And as Jasper has told you—
he has offered to take Archie> into
the business. Now—I ask you-'-what
better  chance  could  the  boy  hav'e?"
"Upon my word, Mrs. Pendleburn,
I don't know," I replied. "I only
wish some pure brewer had taken a
fancy to me in my youth. I might
have been a hereditary legislator by
this time, instead of earning a precarious livelihood hy llic perpetration of
undesired novels."
"Then do please rub that into
Archie!" urged Miss Violet anxiously, "lie is behaving in the most insane way—talks rot about being asked
to drown his soul in a vile vat! Just
as if there was anything derogatory
in brewing beer!"
"Perhaps he prefers to inspire his
fellow-countrymen   hy  more  delicate
(Continued on Page Tea) THE  WEEK,  SATURDAY,   SEPTEMBER  24,   1910
Lightup Your Store Now Ready
for Exhibition Visitors
Now is the time of all times to increase your store and window light ing.   The Victoria Fair and Horse Show is close upon us to bring many Islanders
and visitors into the city and an attractive window is the best advertisement you can have.   A brilliantly lit window is an excellent index to the store within.
WHY NOT LET US INSTALL SOME
OSRAM TUNGSTEN LAMPS ?
They give the very best and most brilliant of all lights and will draw trade your way. You will need .good lighting for the winter arid Christmas trade
and it will be money in your pocket to start the good lighting RIGHT NOW when Exhibition folk will see it and obtain a fine impression of you and
your up-to-date business methods.
TELEPHONE 1609, WHEN OUR REPRESENTATIVE WILL BE
PLEASED TO CALL UPON YOU AND EXPLAIN THE MANY
MERITS OF OSRAM TUNGSTEN LAMPS, THE HIGH EFFICIENCY
LAMPS THAT NEVER FAIL TO GIVE ENTIRE SATISFACTION.
B. C Electric Railway C
Light and Power Department Telephone 1609
Cor. Fort and Langley Streets
MUSIC AND THE STAGE
(Continued from Page 3)
or Miss Van Siclen the French
horn. Neither have they "gone back"
in their duet performance on the cornet. Any way it is taken, it is a
charming vaudeville offering and has
thus far proved a powerful drawing
card. •!
Rice and Prevost, known from one
end of the show world to the other
as leaders in the ranks of vaudeville
acrobats will    show    here    Monday, j
Leaving aside Rice's grotesque make-;
np, which alone is a laugh, his suicidal I
falls are excruciatingly  funny.  Prev-1
ost's ground tumbling is  the  fastest
and cleanest  that  has been seen on
the Sullivan and    Considine    circuit.
The finish of the act, a fall by Rice
from  a   pyramid   of   four   tables,   is
startling, to put it mildly.
Celeste succeeds in getting so far
away from the usual thing that he
has made of his wire walking act a
distinct novelty. He has with him
all of the routine tricks of the trade
but he has in addition many feats
, jyholly original and it is to these lat-
iejr that he owes his reputation in
Eur ipe. Celeste is assisted by Mile. J
Cele.-te and the act must be classed
as ore of the most notable of the
Euiopean division. I
It is true old time minstrelsy that
Pistcl and Cushing have to offer—an
old time minstrel "afterpiece" in fact
and, among the veteran burnt cork
heroes of another day possibly none
arc better known than these two performers. The act has been one of
the great hits of the exceptional bill
it is travelling with and is bound to
prove highly attractive to the local
clientele.
Lancaster, Hayward and Lancaster
are billed for the sixth big turn of the
bill and Thomas J. Price with a song
and the moving pictures will complete
an excellent show.
THE MOTHERLAND
Wireless Tapped by Balloon
Experiments havc been made by
two British aeronauts near VVarley
Barracks, Essex, which may have a
far-reaching effect in thc development
of wireless telegraphy.
By means of a portable wireless apparatus taken to a very high altitude
in a balloon they found that it was
possible to intercept wireless messages. The experimenters were Mr. A.
de Mowbray Bellairs, Lieutenant H.
M. Maitland, of the Essex Regiment,
and a wireless telegraph operator.
"Miriam of the Cave"
Mrs. Miriam Jones, "Miriam of thc
Cave," as she was celled, has just died
at Llandudno, aged ninety-one. For
over fifty years she lived in a cave at
thc foot of Great Orme's Head, where
she brought up a family of fifteen
children.
Tomatoes from Canada
Boxes of tomatoes, packed in peat
and sawdust, were recently despatched
from Toronto to Covcnt Garden. It
is expected that a brisk trade in the
vegetable can be developed between
England and Ontario.
Boy Scouts' Feat
A record was established in scout
work when Scoutmaster Roberts and
Assistant-Scoutmaster Lewis, two
members of the Cardiff Boy Scouts,
delivered their message from thc Lord
Mayor of Cardiff to thc Lord Mayor
of London at thc Mansion House at
seven o'clock on Tuesday night.
They had covered 215 miles on the
road since last Friday morning without once being challenged, although
thc whole of the local branches of
Boy Scouts on the route wcre searching for them. Only four miles of the
journey, from Severn Junction to Pil-
ning. were traversed by rail, while the
electric tramway was utilised between
Brentford and Hammersmith. The
two scouts were accompanied by
Scoutmaster Blake, of Devizes, who,
having been frustrated in his efforts
to entrap, thein, had thrown in his
lot with them and.accompanied them
thc last 115 miles to London.
The three scouts looked little the
worse for the journey, as, making thc
most of an excellent meal in the Long
Parlour at the Mansion House, they
narrated their experiences. "By the
rules laid down," said Scoutmaster
Roberts, "when within the local boundaries, or within a three miles radius
of the Mansion House, we were exempt from challenges. When challenged, two minutes was to bc allowed
for searching us to discover the mes-
safe. If we wcre not challenged more
than nine times we wcre to be considered successful. But we have not
been challenged once.
"1 hid thc letter in various ways.
On ncaring London, when I thought
a search might bc more keen, I bought
a bloater, and after scraping out the
inside 1 put my message in it, sewed
thc fish up again and wrapped it up
in thc paper in which I had bought
it. Of thc four nights we were on
the journey two wcre spent in bed—
at Bristol and Marlborough—and one
in a barn. Monday night wc walked
all thc night through, doing thc last
|eighty live miles in eighteen hours."..
Thc acting Lord Mayor received the
Boy Scouts at the Mansion House on
Wednesday and delivered to them the
answer to thc message.
Headquarters for choice nursery stocl
Apple, pear, cherry, plum and peach tree
and small fruits, also ornamental trees
shrubs, roses, evergreens, etc. Largest am
best assorted stock in Britisb  Columbia.
Ten per cent, cash discount on all order;
above $io.oo.
PRICE LIST AND CATALOGUE ON
APPLICATION.
Royal Shooting Party
Lord Kilmarnock, who is residing
at Bracklcy House, while shooting on
Wednesday with a royal party on the
Micras moors had an accident, which
fortunately was not serious.
There were eleven sportsmen in the
party, including his Majesty and thc
Prince of Wales, and during the first
drive, about midday, Lord Kilmarnock, attended by Donald Stewart, his
gillie, was stationed in one of thc
butts on the Gaillaig Hill. Captain
Hood was in the butt immediately to
the right, and was having very good
sport. Inadvertently Captain Hood
got on the line of a bird crossing
between thc two butts and fired.
Both Lord Kilmarnock and his gillie
were "peppered," a few pellets striking the former on the face, while one
or two were lodged in his left arm.
Fleet for  Sale
Thc Admiralty has decided to sell as
obsolete thc following ships:—Howe,
battleship, 10,300 tons, built in 1888,
cost £640,000; Edinburgh, battleship,
built in 1887, cost £650,000; and the
special service vessels Beaver and
Cockatrice.
quired to run all the railways, manu
factories, electric-light stations, etc., ii
Great Britain. With solar energy wi
should not do quite so well, he added
with a twinkle in his eye.
As for the cost of such power, i
would be cheaped than that produce**!
by steam or gas, and only dearer that
water power in districts where th<
latter was very easy to get. He ii
about to erect in the United States s
3,000-h.p. plant of this nature. Th<
wind-vanes, 300 feet in in diameter
will be placed on a tower 420 feel
high.
Harnessing the Sun
Professor Fessenden, a Canadian,
gave on Wednesday before the British Association a most lucid and intelligible account of experiments he
has made and of theories he has
worked out to show that both wind-
force and sun-heat can be used to produce electrical energy. If wc put up
a number of windmills along thc cliffs
around England, he declared, we could
get   by   their  means   the   power   re-
Lady M. Dalrymple
Viscount Dalrymple, M.P. (heir oi
the Earl of Stair), and his sister, Lady
Marjorie Dalrymple, swam on Tuesday across thc mouth of Loch Ryan
(an inlet of the sea), Stranraer, a distance of three miles, against a strong,
current and in a choppy sea. They]
were two hours in the water.
Two rowing boats accompanied the
swimmers, in one of which was Lord
Stair and in the other Viscountess
Dalrymple. The feat was witnessed
by a gathering of their friends, tht
ancestral home of the Dalrymples be
ing in the neighbourhood. When thi
swimmers left the water at Cairyryan
the villagers gave them a great ova|
tion. Aj.il*.    »»_u._c.____,   oaiuiiL/Ai,   C5r.rirjivi__>jiiiv   __.   jaiu
iOCIETY
Rothwell, from Duncan, was in
[ for a few days this week.
* *   *
E. B. McKay, Surveyor-General,
ned during the week from a visit
luncan,
* *   *
|s. McNeil and Miss Troup, are
ng their brother, Captain Troup,
|imalt Road.
* *   *
Fred.   White  and   Mr.   Roger
leith, have returned from a most
rable visit to Cowichan Lake,
le they have been enjoying the
fin*g.
* *   *
C.   M.   Roberts   has   returned
| a business trip to Thetis Island.
* *   *
Albert   Bechtel   is   the   guest
|lr.   G.   K.   Gillespie,   Cowichan
* *   *
MacKenzie, C.E., in the employ
[ie Stave Lake Power Co., Van-
er,  who  has  been  registered  at
Empress, has returned to his home
lancouver.
* *   *
and Mrs. John Irving have is-
invitations for the marriage of
I daughter, Miss Elizabeth Irving,
lir. Arthur Fullam Weston, R.N.
| ceremony will take place at
1st Church Cathedral on Wednes-
l October the 12th.
* *   *
and Mrs. Sperling from Van-
er are registered at the Empress
hi.
* *  *
. Carter, from Duncan, is spend-
few days in Victoria.
* *   *
rs. Stevenson, Burdette Avenue, is
ing her sister, Miss Skinner, at
can.
* *   *
Irs. W. Dunn, from Duncan, is re-
Ired at  the  Balmoral  for a  few
Miss Bolton, Admiral's Road, who
has been paying an extended visit to
her aunt, Mrs. Cummings, of Nelson,
B.C., returned home during the week.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. John Savage and Miss
Savage have returned from a visit to
Winnipeg.
* *   *
Mrs. James Dunsmuir, Mrs. Little
and Miss Dunsmuir are paying a short
visit to Banff, stopping off at chief
points of interest, en route.
* *   *
Mrs. Oliver Campbell, from Vancouver, was a guest in the city last week.
* *   *
Mr. R. S. Lennie from Nelson is a
guest at the Empress hotel.
* *   *
Miss Evans, from Duncan, is the
guest of Mrs. Lewis Hall for a few
days.
* *   *
Miss Dean, Salt Spring Island, is in
town on a short visit.
* *   *
Last Saturday evening Miss Bowron
and Miss Hampshire were hostesses
of a very enjoyable evening given at
their charming cottage "Inverbroom."
Some of those who attended were
Mr. and Mrs. Jacobs, Mrs. Walker,
Mr. and Mrs. Martin, Miss Johnson,
Miss Nash, Miss Clarke, and the
Messrs. H. C. Barnes, Goss, Craddock.
Walker and C. Hogg.
* *   *
Mr. Henry King, who has been enjoying the shooting at Cowichan Lake,
has returned to the city.
* *   *
Mrs. W. Marvin is the guest of Mrs.
G. S. Courtney, Sidney Island.
* *   *
Mr. H. J. Cambie, resident engineer
of the C. P. R. at Vancouver, was in
Victoria this week.
* *   *
Last Thursday afternoon Mrs. VV.
C. Todd held a post-nuptial reception
at her home "Weimar," Moss Street.
* *   *
Mr. Herman Sehl has returned from
Cowichaii Lake, where he has been
enjoying a holiday.
Mr. J. R. Anderson has returned
from a trip to Hazelton.
* *   *
Mr. A. W. McCurdy is in Vancouver on business.
* *   *
Miss Green and Miss Baker have
returned to the city, after spending a
couple of weeks visiting relatives at
Cowichan  Lake.
* *   *
Mr. R. E. Brett of Banff is a guest
at the Empress Hotel.
* *   *
Mr. G. K. Gillespie, Cowichan Lake,
was host last Saturday evening of a
most enjoyable grouse dinner given
on his charming house-boat on the
Cowichan River. A most delightful
evening was spent by all present, card
games and music being indulged in.
Some of those present being Mr. A.
Bechtel, Mr. Fred White, Mr. R. G.
Monteith, Miss Monteith and Miss B.
Monteith.
SWEDISH MASSAGE
MEDICAL GYMNASTICS
VIBRATORY TREATMENT
Q. Bjornfelt, S.M.
Phone 1856     -     8a 1 Fort St.
P. 0. Box 1048 Phone 1092
O. H. Bowman & Co.
Stocks,   Bonds,   Real   Estate,
Timber and Insurance
Room 8, Mahon Building,
Victoria, B.C.
Island
Storage and
1
Ice Company
VICTORIA, B.C.
Goods received at all hours.
Expert attention given.
Consignments solicited
Phone 2282     P.O. Box 875
Select Any One of These
For Breakfast-You'll be Glad You Did So
Wheat Hearts, packet  35c
Olympic Flour, pckt 35c
Breakfast Gems, 2 pkts 25c
Granulated Hominy, sack  60c
California Cracked Wheat, per sack  60c
California Rye Meal, sack 50c
Rice Flour, sack  50c
Ground Rice, sack  25c
Arrowroot, 2 pkts 25c
C. & B. Semolina, tin  25c
Farina, 2 packets  25c
Triscuit, per packet  15c
Puro, pancake flour, pkt 25c
BAMBOO HANDLE BROOMS—Extra special while they last, 25c
H. O. KIRKHAM
Phone 178
GROCER
Corner Fort and Douglas Street
N BUILDING
A Few_
Offices and
Suites of
Offices
Still to
Rent in this
Building
Rental includes light, heat, hot and cold water, janitor service. Three elevators of the very latest design will be in operation. Forty vaults are already
built, others can be added anywhere and slight alterations can be made before the building is finished, to suit tenants. The building is constructed of
the best materials, is as fireproof as it is possible to make a building, and the finish of it will be nothing but the.very best. The offices are airy, light, have
immense window space, some of them have splendid views, and it would be impossible to find more healthy offices. They will be cleaned regularly by
vacuum cleaners.
PEMBERTON & SON = Agents = 614 Fort Street
« 10
THE WEEK,  SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER 24,   1910
The Lost Immortal
(Continued from Page 7)
means?" I ventured to suggest.
"The difficulty is that Archie declares he can't be both a brewer and
a poet," explained the Colonel. "I
don't understand that at all. But he
says they don't go together; and
doesn't seem able to make up his mind
which to choose."
"As if there could be any doubt
in the matter!" ejaculated Mrs. Pendleburn scornfully.
"Why can't Archie look on this
poetry-writing as a sort of hobby—
something hc could turn to when
there was nothing else doing?" demanded the Colonel querulously. "It
wouldn't matter so much then."
"I don't agree with you there,
father," broke in Miss Violet. "It
would matter very much to Evadne
and me, at all events. Just fancy being asked at a meet why Archie wasn't
out, and having to say: 'Oh, he's writing "poetry"!'   Ugh!"
I distinctly saw Miss Pettifors shudder at the contemplation of this melancholy prospect. To judge by their
expressions she had the full sympathy
of the Pendleburns in the distaste
with which it evidently tilled her.
"Well, I can't understand it," I
said at last, with a puzzled shake of
thc head. "As far as I can make out,
you all seem to regard this wonderful
i__H___i_.A. _W__W
w
John Mason with The Witching
Hour  at   Victoria  Theatre
_gift of Archie's as some sort of affliction. Do you think that having a
great poet in the family is a disgrace?"
"No—not a disgrace exactly, replied
the Colonel slowly, after he had
thought the matter over. "But it's
awkward. You see, it's like this, Lemon. Poets are queer fellows, as you
know. They wear queer clothes, and
they seem to get hold of queer ideas
and queer friends. Wc naturally don't
-nant Archie to drift into habits which
"are not the habits of the—cr—er—
class lo whicii he belongs. Do you sec
what 1 mean?"
1 could only stare at him in blank
amazement. .Mrs. Pendleburn, growing weary of my obtuseness, decided
that it was time to abandon all this
futile beating about the bush.
"What he means is that Archie is a
gentleman, and wc want him to remain one," she said bluntly.
"Rut "
"The boy cannot possibly live like
a gentleman if he docs nothing but
write poetry—you said so yourself,"
she insisted relentlessly.
I denied stoutly ever having said
anything of the kind.
"Well, could he make a thousand
pounds a year by his writing?1' she
demanded.
I could scarcely repress a smile at
this generous estimate-of the appreciation which the British public was
likely to bestow upon poetry of.the
very highest order. As gently as I
could I broke it to Mrs. Pendleburn
that if Archie earned a thousand
pounds by his writing in twenty years
he might consider himself remarkably
lucky. "You must, of course, make
him an allowance," 1 said, turning to
the Colonel. "It's your plain duty—
not only to thc boy, but to thc world."
Colonel Pendleburn shook his head
very emphatically.
"Utterly out of the question," he
declared. "It's as much as 1 can
manage to do thc square thing by
Rudolph as it is. The poor boy can
barely rub along on the miserable live
hundred a year which is all I can
spare for him at present. If 1 cut
him down at all it would mean his
having to exchange into some wretched second-rate regiment. Couldn't be
thought of, really."
"Not for an instant!" chorused JIrs
Pendleburn, shaking with indignation
at the bare idea of such a thing.
"But, good Heavens, you don't
mean to say that you would deprive
the world of all that Archie can give
it, f r the sake of Rudolph, do you?"
I spoke warmly: the thought that
my fellow* creatures might never hear
the golden music of the great epic
which I was convinced that young
Archie Pendleburn had it in him to
compose, simply because his curled
and oiled Assyrian bull of a brother
found life insupportable without plenty of polo and musical-comedy society, outraged my sense of the fitness
of things. I was beginning to let myself go pretty freely on the subject of
Master Rudolph's precise place in the
scheme of creation, when the Colonel,
with a perceptible stiffening of manner, cut me short.
"You will allow me, Lemon, to be
the best judge of what constitutes
my duty towards my sons," he said,
with a maddening pomposity of manner. "Archie—if he chooses to be sensible and accept Lord Gathersea's generous offer—will be far better off than
his brother is. And—if the world is
so anxious for what Archie can give
it, why won't the world pay for it?
Tell me that."
1 couldn't tell him that, and took
refuge in bluster.
"But don't you see," 1 cried, "how
important it is "
"No, I do not see!" interrupted the
Colonel testily. "In any case I might
point out that no allowance I could
make to Archie would enable him to
maintain Sir John Pettifors' daughter
in the style to which she has been accustomed and is entitled."
"Oh, please don't consider me in thc
matter!" begged Miss Pettifors, trying, with complete lack of success, to
convey the impression that the one
thing in the world she was anxious to
do was to sacrifice herself to Archie's
interests.
"Surely your father would like you
to marry a man who will one day bc
great and famous?" I ventured to ask
her.
"I'm afraid father doesn't think-
very much of—of—poets," she answered doubtfully. "Hc was quite rude to
the only one 1 can ever remember
coming to our house. He wasn't at
all pleased when I told him that
Archie   was  trying  lo   write  things."
"Your father, dear Evadne, is the
most sensible man I know," announced Mrs. Pendleburn, with a glance at
nie which told me very plainly that
my place on the scale of her acquaintance was at the end opposite to that
occupied by the intelligent baronet,
"lie wants—and very properly wants
—the man who marries you to bc able
to keep you in decent comfort. And
that Archie will be perfectly well able
to do so long as people don't go stuffing his head with absurd ideas about
his being Shakespeare or somebody
like that!"
Let those who would charge me
with cowardice in my dealings with
Mrs. Pendleburn try to realise how
enormous was thc responsibility
thrust  al  this juncture upon  my in-
Bitulithic
BITHULITHIC is the most perfect form of roadway. Horses do not
slip on it. Motor-cars do not skid. BITHULITHIC is practically noiseless,
dustless, never cracks, is sanitary and waterproof. BITHULITHIC is conceded by many engineers to be the most perfect form of roadway. It is
durable, easy to clean and easy to maintain. Over fourteen million yards
under contract. Four miles being constructed in Vancouver, B. C.
BITHULITHIC can be laid on steep grades with the best results.
Does Your Street Need a Permanent Pavement ?
Send for literature and detailed information. Scores of testimonials
testifying to the merits of BITHULITHIC. BITHULITHIC has been laid
in nearly 200 cities and towns.   It is in a class by itself.
Literature from Mr. Frederick C. Beckett, P. 0. Box 1066.
WE ARE PHOTOING
EVERYBODY
AT THE
ESQUIMALT
PHOTO   STUDIO
adequate shoulders. Here was Archie
Pendleburn on the very threshold of
as promising a career as every young
man saw unfolded before him. On
the one side a lord—a real, live lord
—waiting to welcome him into the
honourable and profitable business of
supplying the thirsty proletariat with
Pure Beer—so much more essential to
their comfort and happiness than mere
thoughts, however beautiful the texture of the language in which those
thoughts were clothed might be; on
the other side a baronet—and the
oldest-established baronet in the country at that—willing to give him his
only daughter for wife. Who was I
that 1 should take upon myself to
make a mess of this young man's life
by any foolish words of mine? The
Pure Beer which Archie Pendleburn
might brew would be appreciated by
millions; his bolden thoughts would
be understood by a few hundreds—
most of them insignificant people like
myself, who did not in the least matter. Though no one had said so, I
knew perfectly well that if Archie decided to take up the lyre instead of
the hop-pole there would be no baronet's daughter for him. Miss Pettifors was not thc stuff that struggling
poets' wives are made of. I could not
picture her toiling at his side up the
rugged slopes of Parnassus, sharing
cheerfully the hardships of the ascent for the sake of the simple laurel
crown that would bc all his reward
when the summit was at last attained.
It was with these perturbing
thoughts running through my head
that  I  mumbled weakly:
"Perhaps — perhaps—I may have
been mistaken about Archie after all."
It was as if they had been four shipwrecked mariners, and my words the
signal from a passing ship. Hope
shone in every face.
"Oh, dear Mr. Lemon, if you only
knew how relieved I feel to hear you
say that!" gurgled Airs. Pendleburn,
looking kindly at me for almost the
first time since my arrival.
"Gad! That's a load off my mind!"
cried thc Colonel, mopping his forehead.
His (laughter and Miss Pettifors
pressed each other's hands in affectionate sympathy. Evidently their
minds had also been relieved of a
load.
1 had meant to retreat from my position  by gradual  stages,  to put  the
Assembly Roller Skating Rinkj
FORT  STREET
NOW OPEN
Regular Sessions
10. a.m. to 12. a.m.   2.00 p.m. to 4.30 p.m.   7.30 p.m. to 10.30 p.m.
Wednesday and Saturday Special Sessions—4.30 to 6.30
Provincial Exhibition
Victoria, B. C.
FIFTIETH   ANNIVERSARY   OF   THE   FIRST
AGRICULTURAL EXHIBITION HELD IN
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Sept. 27, 28, 29, 30 and Oct. 1
VALUABLE EXHIBITS OF HORSES, CATTLE,
SHEEP AND PIGS
HORSE SHOW
High   Jumping,   High   Stepping,   High   School   Horses,   Four-in-
Hands, Tandems, Steplechase.
B. C. CHAMPIONSHIP ATHLETIC SPORTS
ROUGH RIDING AND ROPING CONTESTS
By Genuine Cowboys and Bronchos
HARNESS RACES
General Admission:   Day, 50c;   Evening, 25c; Children, 25c.
Sept. 27 and Oct. lst, children 10c.
Provincial Exhibition
GEORGE SANGSTER, Secretary
Entries Close Sept. 12.
Box 70S
onus of deciding whether Archie Pendleburn was, or was not, to join the
Immortals upon other shoulders—to
refuse resolutely to admit that there
was any doubt in my mind as to the
career which he should embrace: but
when I saw the relief on their faces
I had not thc strength ' > strike another blow in the cause of English
literature. I handed the boy's manuscript back to his father.
"Tell him," I sighed brokenly, "tl
him that I've read these; and thatl
that—eh, what shall I say? Thatl
can't recommend him to write af
more."
"Hurrah!" cried that obnoxicl
Miss Violet.
Hurrah!
It was the epitaph of our Lost I|
mortal.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.pwv.1-0344070/manifest

Comment

Related Items