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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Mar 21, 1908

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Kingsford Smith & Co.
Stock and General
AUCTIONEERS
^Commission and Real Estate Agents.
860 Granville,
Vancouver.
IfejUUUm.ft B..-UUUUUUU JUUUUUU i
Victoria Edition
The Week
A British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vancouver B. 6.
^rr_ir_T_vr_inrrKrn > *» wrra
Siewart Williams R. C.Janlu   tt
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION AND
HEAL ESTATE A6ENTS
Si FORT ST. VICTORIA, B. C.   3
■l&JUUUUUUUUUUU » 18 9AAX. ftl
Lol. V.   No. 8
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 21, 1908
One Dolla* Put Annum
The Victoria Canadian Club
If. Prophet has added a new recruit to
j!t Canada, the list of its more or less
illustrious guests. It has
ted Mr. A. J. Dawson, wandered, ad-
enturcr, journalist, promoter, and pro-
het. Mr. Dawson is a young man of
ibility, of intelligence, and of energy. He
devoting all these qualifications to the
t'omotion of an enterprise whieh he calls
Imperial and which the man in the street
ill call commercial. He proposes to run
weekly supplement to the London Stan-
rd. It is to consist of sixteen pages and
be devoted exclusively to advocating the
Iiterest of the various sections of greater
ritain beyond the seas. The sixteen
■tges include advertising as well as read-
space, and as practically half has al-
fcady been sold for the former purpose Mr.
jawson may fairly be congratulated on
iviug made a commercial success of his
•oposition at the very outset. In fact,
»tli Mr. Dawson and the owners of the
andard are already insured against any
rssible loss on the undertaking. This
pect of the question was not touched
)on in Mr. Dawson's address to the Ca-
idian Club, although his Business
anager, as is quite right and proper, was
isy. One would naturally have expected
at Mr. Dawson's address ignoring the
nmercial would have dealt with the Im-
Irial aspects of his mission, but unless
generously conceived autobiography to
lich he devoted practically the whole of
at address is to be regarded as an illus-
tion of Imperial development, both sides
j the question were ignored and the per-
|ial note predominated. Mr. Dawson's
Ircss contained nothing' new, and his ex-
pience has been duplicated in thousands
instances among boys from the Old
Iuntry who have, won their way through
rring adventures by flood and field to
assured position as reputable and pros-
•ous citizens. The suggestion of the
lonist that the title of " Empire
ilder" which was applied to Cecil
odes should be transferred to Mr. Daw-
cannot but raise a wondering smile,
lore is an old saying that " one should
look a gift horse in the mouth " and
[first sight it may appear churlish to
ticise a man whom all men delight to
tour and who has declared his intention
doing so much for the Empire. The
iwer to this objection is two-fold: first
1 all that as Mr. Dawson's venture is
eutially commercial and one out of
ich he and his backers stand to make a
of money, it cannot be regarded in the
lit of philanthropy. Canadian adverbs are paying, and paying through tlie
ie, for the privilege of recognition in
pages of the Empire supplement;  the
I ond is that Mr. Dawson has yet to
lake good," when lie has done this the
nadian Club can with propriety banquet
11. It is not so certain that it would
have been wiser to defer the function.
The interview between re-
Tourist;     presentatives of the Tourist
|ociation.     Association and the Victoria
City Council makes inter-
Iig reading.    The case of the former
well presented by the various speakers,
densed into a few sentences it may be
expressed—that the  Tourist Asso-
Iion has done a large amount of suc-
ful missionary work, that it has laid
foundations for a great ingathering of
:,ors and residents, that the first fruits
his preparatory work has already been
lered, that any break in the work
ld be a serious check in the progress
he City, that Victoria has started on
EDITORIAL
a prosperous career whicli is about to be
signalized by extensive development, that
the Tourist Association has been and will
continue to be possibly the most important
factor. None of these propositions were
questioned by the Council and every disposition was shown to renew the grant of
last year, but the Council has not tlie
money, and in view of a large deficit, and
increased demands is on tlie horns of a
dilemma, consequently the request remains in abeyance. The Colonist as usual
sits on tlie fence, and while damning tho
work of the Tourist Association with faint
praise suggests that under the circumstances the Council might find justification for refusing the grant. The Week
endorsed the application and believes that
it is a mere bagatelle compared with tlie
benefit which the City derives, but, and
here is the crux, who is to be the active
officer of the Association . The Secretary,
Mr. Cuthbert, resigned some months ago.
Since then the Executive has made no announcement as to his reappointment or the
appointment of a successor. Private subscribers are complaining of the uncertainty
of the situation and of several other things
which need not here be particularized, but
which have a very distinct bearing on the
attitude of the public ancl the Council
towards the Association. Let, the latter
make a public statement as to tlieir policy,
as they are taking public money it is right
that they should do so, and if that policy
commends itself there will be 110 difficulty
in getting the usual grant from the Council
and the usual amount in personal contributions.
A Legacy
Of Debt.
Victoria is only just beginning to realize what the
vagaries of the late Chief
Magistrate and his supporters have cost. To put it mildly the
finances are in a bad condition. There is
a deficit of $70,000 contributed to by
losses which the ratepayers were assured
again and again would not be incurred;
especially is this so in connection with
the deficit on the Agricultural Show. But
it is no good crying over spilt milk, and
instead of bewailing their hard luck the
new Council is facing the difficulty in 9
business-like manner. It is quite obvious
that one of two things must be done, eithe.'
the revenues must be increased or the expenditures diminished. The only means
of raising the income is to increase assessments or taxation, or both. The City
Assessor is the only man who can say
whether property assessments have been
increased in proportion to the recent
advance in the value of real estate. If
not, some relief can be found in this direction, otherwise there is no alternative
but to submit to the addition of several
mills on the rate of taxation, a course
which while always unpopular is at least
honest and effective, and'should meet with
the same success in the Civic as in the
Provincial arena. One thing is certain
Victoria, for the first time in its history,
is getting out :of the groove and is beginning to move along the lines of improvement and development. Its progress must
not be arrested for the sake of a little extr-i
burden. While there will always be some
who object to increased taxation under all
circumstances, on principle, The Week is
convinced that the majority of the ratepayers would acquiesce in a moderate in
crease in order that their City may not
lag behind in the race.
ciple they at least have the satisfaction of
knowing that they are consistent. Perhaps
as the milennium draws near the practice
may extend to the West. Meanwhile it is
greatly to be feared that the advertisers
have no remedy; they might use some of
their space and run the single word, in
display type, " STUNG."
No man who reads the
Temperance and daily papers, and who
Consistency. does not, can fail to be
aware   that   a   wave   of
temperance reform is sweeping over the
civilized   world.     Public   sentiment   is
manifesting  itself  in  drastic  legislation
and the organization of Reform associations v. hich have dropped the word Temperance ovtt of their title but include hostility to the liquor traffic in their programme.   Public opinion is a unit on the
necessity for minimising the evils of the
drink traffic and even viewed from the
standpoint of the trade its greatest enemies
are not to be found in tlie ranks of temperance reformers but among those who
abuse the traffic by abusing themselves.
The greatest interest of the distiller, the
brewer, the wholesaler, and the respectable
hotel and saloon keeper lies in securing the
enforcement of the law and in ridding the
traffic of its most glaring abuses.    An
habitual drunkard is a far greater enemy
to the trade than a temperance crank, and
it is not until every saloon keeper realises
this fact, that the bitter hostility which
now exists and which is increasing will
give place to tolerance.   The Licence Victuallers' Association is a powerful organization.    In public affairs its influence is
one of the strongest factors.    If it would
bend all its energies to the enforcement of
the laws governing the trade, even against
its own members when necessary, it could
effect more in a short time than any Reform association.    This is not to belittle
or in the slightest degree to depreciate such
work, but to point out where the trade
could render a great public service whilst
at the same time protecting its own interests.    Recent   legislation  in  England
aims at reducing the number of licenses
by one-third through a gradual process of
extinction extending over twenty years.
The latest information from the Northwest Provinces shows increased stringency
in the issuance of licences and in respect
of closing hours.    This is a move in the
right direction.    It will tend to exclude
unsuitable men from the trade as it will
remove features whicli have aroused public
hostility.    The day for senseless vituperation lias passed; there are as respectable
men in the liquor trade as in any other.
These men realize that it is not temperance   but   intemperance   which   is   their
greatest foe.    They are entitled to fair
treatment, and that the enormous vested
interest in a legitimate trade is entitled
to full recognition, is evident by the compensation  scheme which  is4 attached   to
every English measure restricting licenses.
They do not always get fair play and
some people have yet to learn that consistency is a jewel and that even a good
cause is not advanced by unfair dealing.
Newspapers   which  violently   attack  tho
trade are hardly consistent in advertising
it.   But what shall be said of newspapers
which obtain advertising on a promise of
editorial support and after they have their
contract signed proceed to line up for an
attack ?   In the East there are several influential dailies with pronounced hostility
to the trade; in order that their hands may
be free in all matters of temperance reform they refuse liquor advertisements,
and if they sacrifice a few dollars for prin-
Even a worm will turn and
The Fifth the Eifth Regiment is by
Regiment.        no means a worm, but it has
turned after something like
ten years constant agitation for necessary
up-to-date equipment. The Officers, practically to a man, have resigned as a protest against the indifference of the Military authorities at Ottawa. Thc Fifth
Regiment lias fared no better with the
powers that be than the Provincial Government, which, representing the people
of the Province, has been habitually turned
down. Tliere are certainly no politics in
the course adopted by the Fifth Regiment
since the wholesale resignations include
men of both parties. With them it is a
straight, business proposition; they find
that they cannot maintain tlie efficiency of
tlie Regiment with the appliances furnished, and are unwilling to tamely
acquiesce in a course which cannot but
bring discredit upon the serivce. It is
difficult to understand the attitude of the
.Minister of Militia in this matter. One
would naturally think that a request preferred by such competent officers, and persisted in over a course of years, a request
endorsed at the time it was made by the
highest military authority in Canada,
would have been complied with long ago.
It is difficult to write without warmth
upon this matter, especially in view of
the incompetency which has characterized
the handling of the Work Point barracks
under the same Minister. It will be futile
to ask what the Hon. William Templeman
is doing all this time, and why with a
.Minister of our own at Ottawa Victoria
is so easily ignored.
By common consent the
The City presentation of the City's
Water Case.     case before the Executive of
the Provincial Government
by Mr. W. J. Taylor, K.C, was one of thc
most brilliant pieces of legal work which
has ever been witnessed in Victoria. Scores
of pages in the Daily Press have within
the last, few years been used up to explain
the situation to the wondering and weary
ratepayers, only to leave them in a greater
fog than ever as to tlie cxncl points at issue.
Mr. Taylor's concise, lucid exposition
makes the matter so clear I lint any average
school boy who reads his statement would
thoroughly understand the .subject. A3
the matter is still under consideration it is
perhaps unnecessary to discuss it beyond
saying that Mr. Taylor's statement has
rendered it impossible for either party to
persist in unreasonable demands. On his
presentment of the matter it is a foregone
conclusion that thc request of the City will
be granted, and equally certnin that the
Esquimalt Waterworks Conipuny will
modify their attitude. The conviction is
deepened that the City must have Gold-
stream wnter, and that the Waterworks
Company must, reduce their price. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH ai, 1908.
NOT HAPPY THOUGH
THEY'VE QOT IT.
A Symposium on Woman's Suffrage
Written Specially for The Week.
By C. H. GIBBONS.
"Do you want the franchise," I
asked the best all-round office woman
in Victoria a day or so ago, meeting
her just after reading a long press report of the indignation meeting of
would-be woman voters held at the
City Hall. I still had the matter of
that meeting on my mind.
The best all-round office woman
fixed me with dangerous eye.
"Do I look as dowdy as that?" she
challengingly answered. "No, I don't
want the franchise; I want a new
Easter costume and a hat I"
"But seriously," I insisted, "don't
you think the women ought to have
thc right to vote, especially girls like
you, who take a man's place in life,
know thc man's world of business,
and shoulder a man's responsibilities?"
The maiden is eighteen years of
age and supports a family of five.
She is quick, keen, thorough, a paragon of office efficiency, with an alert,
original, initiative mind, and an insatiable appetite for work. No one
ever heard her complain of being
tired or lament if work piled up so
that sixteen hours a day was required
to clear it. She answered my second
question, woman-like, with two others.
"Now don't you think," she said,
"that I've quite enough responsibility on my shoulders already? Have
you ever known any woman that has
to take a man's place and work man-
fashion for a living bothering herself
about her right to vote?"
I humbly feinted with the excuse
of a treacherous memory. Cowardice
brought its penalty, for she was irritated.
"What do I know about the franchise?" she pursued. "What does one
woman out of every hundred know
about politics? And they don't want
to either. If you'll notice it, you'll
find that it is the woman with a
comfortable home and a husband to
look after her, who has time to shout
about being trampled upon and not
allowed to vote. The girls that are
in business to keep their families
aren't agitating. It's the woman with
time on her hands and a good-natured husband to humour her, that
can go in for woman's rights. Of
course they get some women to follow them. Lots of women wouldn't
be happy if they hadn't some fad to
amuse themselves with. Curiosity
stimulates this one, but to make women vote would be ridiculous. Nine-
tenths of them don't want to, and
the other tenth are not the kind of
women who ever will represent feminine sentiment or the business woman's viewpoint. Why, God forgive
me if I haven't been talking politics
of a sort myself, and I loathe the
word!"
This one girl's view I venture to
think is that of a large percentage of
her sex, and for that reason, and because it is well expressed, I quote
it. The crusade of the suffragettes
is not the crusade of the business woman for equal place in the political
as well as the commercial life of her
country. The business woman rather
looks upon her political sister with
contempt. She sizes her up either as
a crank or else an hysterical woman
sufficiently well provided for by an
indulgent husband to be able to amuse
herself with her fad. That the suffragette may be violently sincere she
freely admits—but this does not abate
her poor opinion of her. Nor does it
alter her opinion that the suffragette
represents a minority of women in
her opinions, and in her politics shows
herself somewhat unsexed.
"There will bc time enough to se
riously consider the enfranchisement
of women when a majority of the
women want it," is her conclusion
to which may be added the warning
that this is r:ie question in which it
is eminently the part of wisdom to
"go slow." Not to enlarge the fran
chise prematurely is a very much
simpler thing to taking it back again
after it has once been granted—even
if experience prove  the  granting to
have been a dire mistake.
That is the situation in New Zealand today and public men of the new
Dominion make no bones about it.
The influence of the woman vote is
very plainly evident in New Zealand,
where it seems to have already largely femininized the national character.
Public business is in many departments conducted in a very pretty way,
and I have it from one of the best
known leaders in New Zealand's affairs, that the woman vote is usually
exercised illogically and without regard to state financial responsibility
or thc business capacity of Candida'.
"Enfranchised woman," said the
New Zealand public man to whom I
refer, "was from the first urged by
the political leaders of her sex that
her duty was to find out the probable
candidates, and institute searching inquiry into their moral character and
history. That in many cases meant
voting for the respectable sweater
who lives a life of conjugal propriety, and by means of starvation
wages drives many women into the
street. It certainly suggested that
every political organization of women
became a scandal-collecting machine,
and that's not the way to do good
work in politics. There never was
advantage in this unification of public
and private fitness. The most saintly
man is very often worse than useless
as a practical worker for his country's good, and there have been many
great men—great patriots and great
statesmen—who have had their private failings, great also, which do not
destroy, however, the value of their
service to their country. We have
latterly got a lot of hysterical, harmful laws upon our statute-book, and
the woman voter is largely to be
blamed. It is her disposition to fill
parliament with picturesque, well-
meaning visionaries rather than business men."
It is subject of no surprise to find
that New Zealand is not a drinking country—that is, a liquor
drinking country. The temperament
of the people never impels them to
alcoholic or other excesses. But given
the weapon of the ballot and the women promptly proceeded to extremes
in radical legislation. It is the hard
and fast law throughout New Zealand
that hotels must close at 10 o'clock.
Not only the bar, but the hotel. The
place must be locked and barred and
no one not resident there may be upon the premises. Nor is a guest permitted to entertain friends after the
fateful hour of io o'clock or on a
Sunday. Of course there are many
practical people who regard this as
carrying regulation to a ridiculous
extreme, but the laws are made by
home-dwellers, not residents in hotels, and the woman voter decides that
10 o'clock is quite late enough for
anyone to be out of bed—and legislates accordingly.
Next year the ladies propose going further and pressing for the total
prohibition of retail liquor selling--
although why wholesale consumption
of an admitted evil should be preferable to retail is not yet clear to me.
For the time being the prohibition
crusade holds the centre of the stage
of New Zealand politics, the rival
forces temporarily abandoning all
other battling in order to bring their
fill strengths to bear. It may be
that in taking no active part in the
great Australian debate: "The barmaid—to be or not to be?" the New
Zealand women folk have merely held
the question in abeyance, hoping that
in the prohibition in its entirety of
retail liquor selling they will incidentally dispose of the subordinate
barmaid issue most conclusively. But
meanwhile the barmaid flourishes in
New Zealand undisturbed by the woman vote, although the stern facts are
very much in evidence that year by
year the bars claim the fairest of the
country's budding womanhood, speedily take the bloom from their innocence by making them a bait for the
vicious instincts dormant in average
man, cultivating their appetite for
drink, making them hourly auditors
for the "smutty" story, and ultimately delivering them first as recruits
and then as recruiting agents for numberless houses of assignation.
Are You Going
To Build?
A $2,800 Home.
Plans of this beautiful home
only 930.00. Full set of working
drawings and specification prepaid. Send 5 cents for booklet
on "Homes."
E. STANLEY MITTON
Architect     -     VANCOUVER, B.C.
Nothing Too Qood
for His Majesty
King Baby.
Don't give the little one opium.
Many parents are careless in
the matter of cough syrups;
they do not ascertain if the remedy contains opium, and, alas,
the lives of many children arc
jeopardised.   In
Baby Cough Syrup
We have an unrivalled remedy
for Croup, Whooping Cough,
Hoarseness, Coughs and Colds.
This Syrup does not contain
any Opium, Morphine or othei
injurious drugs. A perfectly
■safe cure that should be in
every household.   Prepared by
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
Government Street, Near Yates.
Wl^^O
Rain
Coat
Weather
The lian, who owns one of our
useful Bain Coati, hal no fear
as to what the weather may be,
for if it rains he is protected—
if it shines he has a modishly'
modeled garment that playi the
role of a swagger Light Weight,
1 Overeoat.
BAIN    OB    BRINE
RE'S    WELL    ATTIRED.
$10.00 to $85.00.
ALLEN & CO.
Fit=Reform Wardrobe
» 1201   Government   St.,     Victoria.'
tyf-l/tr**'
«Q
LLOYD & CO., practical chimney
cleaners, 716 Pandora St. Chimneys can be cleaned without making an ellova mess. Try us and
be convinced.
Phone A476. NUF SED.
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OP
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
phone 893. VICTORIA!
WHY   NOT   HAVE   THE   BEST
THE REPUTATION OF
; James Buchanan & Co's SCOTCH WHISKIES
1    Is world-wide, and  stands for the BEST that can be produced.
*    The following brands are for sale by all the leading dealers:
RED SEAL VERY OLD LIQUEUR SCOTCH
ROYAL HOUSEHOLD        BLACK AND WHITE
2RADIQER & JANION, Sole Agents for B.C.
Plows, Harrows, Seed Drills,
Etc.
Bain Wagons and Carts.
Brantford Carriages, Buggies,
Phaetons, Buckboards,
Spring Wagons and
Carts.
Petaluma Incubators.
Melotte Cream Separators.
e. g. prior &ee..
LTD.
LTY.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Established 1867
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
5a Uovernment St., Victoria, B. C,
Charles Hayward, President F. Caselton, Manager.
We make a specialty of Undertaking and Embalming,
An experienced certificated staff available at all times, day
and night.
Phones Nos. 48, 305, 404 or 594, Victoria.
Investigate the
"Cushman" ilarine floto
As good as the best.   Cheaper than the rest.
BAXTER & JOHNSON 811 Qovernment Stre
Victoria, B. C.
You can always      — -      ,g-w    It tastes different
tell an M. B. cigar J\|#    tS«      than otners-
Union Made. O^lflsW
Havana Filler.       WI*!*11
Made by S. A. Bantly, Victoria, B. C.
Two Sizes.
Sold Everywhere.
_ THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH ai, 1908
It is evident that prohibition has a
hater chance of success in New Zea-
|d than in almost any other British
Imtry.    Prohibition   is   indeed   al-
|.dy in force by local option in a
iber of New Zealand towns, Inver-
[gill  (the southermost city of the
Irld)   being  one  of  these.   And  I
eatly   doubt   if   anywhere   else   in
fw Zealand there is so much drink-
and drunkenness as in Invercar-
[1.   Liquor may be imported there
individuals for their private use
gift, but may not be purchased or
Jd.    The temptation or restriction
Icites an appetite and there is said
be   double   the   amount   of   hard
Inking   in this    population centre
ke the prohibition law became ef-
ctive, while at the same time the
jndard  of  first-class  hotel  accomodation is the lowest in New Zea-
id.   Indeed the quality of hotel ac-
Immodation seems ever to deterior-
and the low groggery and vilely
|ulterated   liquor   to  be   more  and
}re in evidence as restrictive meases  are made abnormally drastic.
U   suggested   above,   the   woman
lte has been exercised in New Zea-
|id not as it had been expected it
puld be, in increased penalties fo:
duction and similar offences, or in
elimination of sex discrimination
Jthe wage scale to the detriment of
woman worker who does a man's
|rk with the same degree of pro-
lency displayed by the man.   It ha;
pn  exercised violently, uncompro-
pingly, positively in the extinction
Jthe social evil as officially recog-
|ed,   with   increased   penalties and
_rous enforcement, all bagnios and
lilar houses  have  seemingly been
|mped out, and New Zealand towns
longer possess  a  tenderloin  dis
tt  known  of  all   adult  residents
(inned by all respectable, and under
watchful eye of the public medical
Ihorities and that of the police. New
pland's women by their votes have
[s to all appearances and officially,
j their  chosen  weapon  the  ballot
/ed the great social problem of thc
Itttries.   The inevitable consequence
(calculated  to  disgust  the  visitor
pi  the  most  wide-open  town  of
jarous,    man-governed,    practical
lerica.   Harpies of every age night-
larade the streets of New Zealand
ps, boldly  soliciting every pedes-
Houses of assignation and il
ll liquor selling flourish abundant-
|Contagious disease becomes more
eral, since medical as well as po-
supervision of loose women be-
les no longer possible.    And the
j woman and the innocent, suecep-
girl are brought directly in con-
to the  undoing of the  latter-
through this reform.
|he woman vote in New Zealand
I was told by a member of the
srnment at Wellington, been very
ve in the exploitation of fads and
|ks.   "Let's try it" is the cry with
ch every few and visionary poli-
shibboleth   is  welcomed.     The
es decline (just as in less advanced
|itries) to listen to the serious, sin-
words of warning upon the text
feckless  expenditure, or explana-
of the immutable laws of trade
finance.   "Whoever wants to lis-
to that dry talk" they coo—and
bge again into the vortex of their
prite   political   dissipation   of   the
-being.    Perhaps in this respect
woman voter is not so very dif-
fnt from the  average male voter
|> has learned that financial statis-
will clear a public hall almost as
|dly as a dog fight or an alarm of
But the    average    man  if he
^n't  listen  to   financial  speeches
vote for those whom he knows
lound business men.   The woman
Ir bestows her franchise less sane-
Ind safely.     The lady   voter if
lined with fine phrases, and while
ferely   and   seriously   anxious   to
Jly exercise her franchise for the
|ntage   of  her   country  and   the
B, she is prone to extravagance in
legislation   and   administration,
lthe government can pay for it,"
le careless response to criticism
rarning—for they have a blindl;
I faith in the inexhaustible public
and  decline  to  consider  that
^y must  first  be  put into  it in
that it may be taken from it
minting   the   financial   capability
of the country and living beyond the
country's income (the over-expenditure being for legislation, administration, civil service, etc.) and not foi
reproductive public works of development character) is said to be steadil)
lowering New Zealand's credit, depreciating the value of the country's
securities, and making ultimately foi
national bankruptcy.
Restaurants, cafes, and kindred institutions of American life are prac
tically unknown in New Zealand
which is a country of home life. S.
also are absent the boot-black's stand
the modern barber shop, the manicurist's parlour—the dozen and one typical institutions of American city lite.
Hairdressers' parlours of course there
are—always in association with thc.
tobacconist business. But there an
but three operations known to the
New Zealand or the Australian barbe;
—the shave, the hair-cut and the
shampoo. The price of the shave <
three pence (5 cents). Hair cuttin;
and shampooing is six pence. Thc
barber who earns the equivalent 0
ten dollars per week is doing well ii
Labour's and the Ladies' paradise.
But to return to the drinking pro
pensities of the New Zealander. While
his temperament and instincts do not
incline him to indulgence in alcoholic drink, he is a slave to tea, tha:
lingual laxative throughout Americr
sacred to womankind. A wise mai
has said that a woman is known b\
what she wears; a man by what hc
drinks. The tea-drinking habit ir,
New Zealand is said to have been
evolved out of the restriction of liquoi
selling—that and the fact that undei
present-day conditions the New Zealander has very little money in hi.
pockets. Tea is in order at almost
any hour of morning, afternoon and
evening. It is a certainty that with
all the talk of the development of 1
national sentiment in New Zealand
the people of the New Dominioi
could never follow the example o
the population of any New Zealand
city getting together and throwing al
their tea into the harbour is to con
jure up a picture the most stalwat
imagination would necessarily decline
to accept.
In the New Zealand office world
they go to "work" at about 10 o'clocl
—have tea at 11—lunch from 12 tc
1 or 1.30—partake of more tea at 3—
and close at five. The first half hour
of the office day is devoted to taking
out the books and the last three-quarters to putting them away. I went
into a big shipping office not long
ago to purchase tickets. Three clerks
were at a small table behind the counter, busy with a teapot, some bis
cuits, and a jar of marmalade. One
of them reluctantly came to the counter by slow freight, and I stated my
business.
"Oh," said he, "you'll have to com*
in again—we're just having tea."
It  made  me  almost  homesick.   I
was so very foreign.
To meet the cost of immenselj
complicated and cumbrous administrative and legislative machinery, and
at the same time avoid the too ob
vious appearance of excessive taxation, they have a sly way in New
Zealand of prescribing petty assess
ments and taxations in a variety of
petty ways. A penny stamp must be
put on every business document.
There are late fees and early fees
and Sunday fees and haste fees on
telegrams and letters. Telegram
forms are charged for; so are railway
time-tables. And if you open an account at the bank they charge you
ten shillings for taking your money
and another ten shillings for a chequebook, and every cheque has to be
stamped to the glory of the government or it will not draw any better
than a plugged pipe. Every once in
a while (while waiting for his tea)
a clerk turns up your account and
languidly charges you for stationery
or wear and tear on the bank premises or insurance or alimony or
something else of the kind. As Marl;
Twain would remark, it is as easy
for a New Zealand bank to make
money as for a cat to have twins.
Woman-influenced  and  labour-dictated legislation, largely in the over-
regulation of the liquor traffic, reduc-
(Continued on Page Seven)
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT.
District ot Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Marie Phillppl,
of Omaha, occupation, Lady, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of section 21, township
1, range 4, Poudrier Survey; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to place of beginning, being said
section 21.
Dated January 15th, 1908.
MARIE PHILIPPI.
Feb. 16 A. Olson, Agent.
$1,000 Reward
THE GOVERNMENT of the
PROVINCE of BRITISH COLUMBIA hereby offers a reward of ONE
THOUSAND DOLLARS for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the two men who, on the
25th day of February, 1908, at thc
Gorge Hotel, near the City of Victoria, B.C., armed with revolvers, entered and, while committing a robbery
in the said Hotel, shot and wounded
one Richard Dancey.
DESCRIPTION.
No. 1—Man about 5 feet 11 inches in
height, slim build, dressed in dark-
colored clothing; wore dark cap.
No. 2—Man about 5 feet 8 or 9 inches
in height; slim build;   dressed   in
dark-colored clothing; wore dark
cap.   Both men were armed with
dark-colored   revolvers and   wore
long white cotton masks.
FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS reward will be  given  for information
leading to the arrest and conviction of
either one of the said men.
By order, F. S. HUSSEY,
Superintendent of Provincial Police.
Victoria, B.C., 26th February, 1908.
Claim No. 2—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
28, township 18; thence north 60 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains to the beach; thence easterly and
northerly along beach to point of commencement.
Located January 25, 1908.
CHRISTEN   JACOBSEN.
Claim No, 8—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
28, township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement; 640 acres, more
or less.
MRS. CHRISTINA McALPINE,
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 4—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
19, township 18; thence north 60 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east to shore; thence
along shore to point of commencement.
Located January 25, 1908.
FRANCIS J. A. GREEN.
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 5—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
24. township 27; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to point
of commencement; 640 acres, more or
less.
Located January 26,  1908.
WILLIAM EDWARD NORRIS.
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 6—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.W. corner of section
30, township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement; 640 acres, more or
less.
Located January 25, 1908.
WILLIAH TYRONE POWER,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 7—Commencing at a post
planted about 40 chains north of the
S.E. corner of section 30, township 18;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement;  640  acres,  more or less.
Located  January  29,  1908.
TYNINGHAM VERE PIGOTT,
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 8—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.W. corner of section
31, township 18; thenco north 80 ohains;
thence east SO chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement; 640 acres, more or
less.
Located January 29, 1908.
MINA C. E. NORRIS,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 9—Commencing at a post
planted about 40 chains north of the
S. E. corner of section 31, township 18;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement.
GEORGE DAY,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 10—Commencing at a post
planted about 60 chains north of the
S. E. corner of section 28, township 18;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement; 640 acres, more or less.
Located January 25, 1908.
WELLINGTON McALPINE,
Feb. 22       Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Noakes,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Civil Engineer, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
land—on Porcher Island:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 1292, about 2
miles distant and In a southeasterly direction from Jap Bay; thence north 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing
160 acres,  more or less.
Dated Dec. 20th, 1907.
Jan. 18 ARTHUR NOAKES.
TO HOME SEEKERS.
100 ACRES
Six miles from Victoria by water
and ten by excellent road. About 20
acres fenced, 10 acres cleared ready
for cultivation; good soil; balance in
good timber. Building containing
two rooms, also two stables and loft.
About one-quarter mile from sea-
front, with magnificent view. Good
hunting. For quick sale, $2,000, terms
to suit.   Box 162, Victoria.
______ TsL _\\
%&M
NOTICE
The bridge at Craigflower over Victoria Arm ls closed to vehicular traffic
until further notice.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Lands and Works Department, Victoria,
B.C., 9th March, 1908.
BEF0I
When you wear one of our
toupees you have the satisfaction of knowing that it is a
perfect fit and is natural in
colour and correct in style.
Write today for our descriptive catalogue and price list of
toupees, wigs, switches and
transformations.
B. C. HAIR GOODS CO.
436   Granville  Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
AU kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
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TELEPHONE 564
North Qovernment St.. Victoria
Y.W.C.A.
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VICTORIA.
Reading and rest rooms, lunch and
tea rooms. Instruction in English,
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Needlework, Domestic Science, etc.
Bible Class. Social evening every
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AGENTS WANTED
We pay resident agents good
salary to represent us during
their spare time.
Readvertlsed from The Week of Oct. 24.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Vancouver Timber & Trading Co., of Vancouver, B.C.,
loggers, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands, bounded as follows:—
1. Commencing at a post planted 80
chains north from the northeast corner of T.L. 11,892; thence north 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 120 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
Dated 14th day of October, 1907.
VANCOUVER TIMBER &
TRADING CO., LTD.
Feb. 22 C. O. P. Olts, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that William Croteau
of Aldermere, B.C., occupation Farmer,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner; thence north 20 chains
to McClure Lake; thence along McClure
Lake ln an east southerly direction 43
chains, more or less; thence west 40
chains to place of beginning and making 40 acres more or less, and known
as the southwest fractional quarter section of 36, township 5, Range 5.
Dated November 20, 1907.
Jan. 18 WILLIAM CROTEAU.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Jennie Croteau
of Aldermere, B.C., occupation housewife, Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner; thence north 40 chs.;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence west 40 chains to place
of beginning and known as the northwest quarter section of 30, Tp. 6, Rge.
6,  and  containing  160  acres,  more  or
Dated 23rd of November, 1907.
Jan. 18 WILLIAM CROTEAU.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that W. N. Campbell
of Victoria, occupation Civil Engineer,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of. lot 1294, (J.R.
Cody) one mile west of Jap Inlet, Porcher Island, thence north 40 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east 40 chains, containing 160 acres,
Dated Dec. 16th, 1907.
W.  N. CAMPBELL,
Jan 18 J. J. Templeton, Agent.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that J. J. Templeton
of Victoria, occupation surveyor, Intends lo apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of lot 1293, M. S.
McLeod, one-half mile west of Jap Inlet Porcher Island, thence south 20
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 20 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 160 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
Jan. 18 J. J. TEMPLETON.
Y. M. C. A.
A home for young men away from
home. Comfortable Reading Room,
Library, Game Room, Billiards, Hot
ancl Cold Shower Baths, Gymnasium
and efficient instruction.
Manitoba Free Press on file for
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Lower and Upper School. Boys prepared for the Universities and Business.
Calendar sent on Request.
Rev. D. Bruce Macdonald, M.A..LL.D-
Principal
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VICTORIA, B. C.
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VICTORIA
THOMAS CATTERALL
Builder and General Contractor.
Tenders given on Brick, Stone and
Frame, Alterations, Parquetry Flooring, Office, Bank, Store and Saloon
Fittings.
Pile   Driving,  Wharves  and   Dock
Shed constructed and repaired.
VICTORIA. THE WEEK, SATURDAY MARCH 21, 1908
Incorporated 1906
Capital, $500,000.00
Capital increased
in 1907
to ...$2,000,000.00
Subscribed
Capital,     $550,000
Reserve . . $50,000
Surplus, Jan. 30,
1907   .   .   $130,000
J. B. MATHERS, Gen. Man.
IN CLOSING UF ESTATES
either as Executors or Assignees
the Dominion Trust Co., Ltd., Is
never Influenced by ulterior motives. Their entire ambition,
effort, and energy ls directed towards securing the best possible
returns for all concerned.
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when we are made your executor.
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COMPANY, LIMITED.
Pnbllihed at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
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W. BLAKEMORE..Manager and Editor
On Making Promises.
It is a truism that one should never
make a promise and then break it,
but I have always been in doubt whether the injunction is based upon regard for the reputation of the prom-
iscr or the feelings of the promisee.
Both considerations are entitled to
weight, but there are broader issues
involved, and the subject is one well
worthy of a few moments' study.
The subject has its roots back in
childhood days, when we were always crying, like the horseleech,
"Give, give," and urging our parents
to pledge themselves by a promise.
Since we have grown up, it has been
drilled into us that we should be particularly careful in making promises
to children, because it is so easy to
dull the tine edge of their sensitive natures and to shatter their faith in
humanity by breaking our word. This
is an impressive aspect of the case
and one to which too much importance cannot bc attached. We shall
never know how much of the misdoing of mature years is due to the
reflex influence of promise-breaking
in youth.
But I want to deal with the matter
mainly as it effects men in business
and in public life. The gravity of the
subject is forced upon my notice by
the string of disappointed hangers-on.
all carrying a grievance and all complaining that they had been thrown
down by someone who promised
them an appointment.
In the lirst place, I must confess to
having very little respect for the man
who lias no more grit than to place
himself in this humiliating position.
Before T would go to the same man.
day after day, begging for a soft snap
and forcing him to perjure his soul by
repeating a lying promise every twenty-four hours, would dig, even if
blistered my hands and broke my
back. I wonder if such men ever
heard the phrase, "The dignity of
labour." if they ever read a single line
of Carlyle, or if they wcre born with
a vestige of that proper spirit which
every true man should feci.
Tf a man had a spark of intelligence
he would know that in nine cases out
of ten a deferred promise means a
broken promise, and at any rate after
the first two or three visits he is
either put to work or mentally dropped. This is true even of strictly busi
ness engagements, but it is if possible
more emphatically true of political
promises.
The experiences of men who live in
expectation of political plums would
make an angel weep. It is true that
"kissing goes by favour," and that he
who has the most pull invariably gets
the job, but the sadness of the outlook
is that for every one with pull there
are hundreds who nevertheless delude
themselves with the expectation of
success.
I have sat in many an ante-room,
and seen suppliant after suppliant file
through; I could read their fate to a
certainty. Ninety-nine per cent, wore
that supplicating, self-despising air
which bespeaks the congenital sycophant. It would be a sin to give these
men public work, because they possess none of the qualifications which
would enable them to render efficient
public service. And yet they return
day after day, until life becomes a
burden to the man who listens to
their appeal, and who lacks the courage and the kindness to turn them
down at the first.
This phase of public life is demoral
izing and sickening. This army of
hangers-on are as truly snowed under
as if they belonged to the submerged
tenth. They are unstable, they have
neglected their own business, and now
they exist, it cannot be called living,
by the favour of a politician, who is
able occasionally to throw them a
few crumbs. If they work three
months in the year, they do well; during the balance of the time they are
waiting for the next session or looking out for a bye-election, a municipal
election, a school trustee election, or
any other kind of an election where
the professional heeler can earn a few
dollars in a more or less dubious manner, and mainly because some political
boss has made them promises which
he is unable to fulfil, but which keeps
them in a constant state of suspense
and expectation.
The result is as demoralizing for
the man who promises. How he must
despise himself when, day by day, he
doles out some specious excuse and
lives under the haunting shadow of
the fear that he may alienate a few
votes. Inevitably he becomes in time
a degenerate; he may continue to
hold office, but he has lost his self-
respect, and men of insight have long
ago found him out ancl mentally labelled him.
I am quite aware that the question
of tact and diplomacy crops up in this
connection. I have been told again
and again how Sir John A. Macdonald
would convert an enemy into a friend
by the charm of manner with which
he would refuse a favour, and it must
be conceded that tact should be used
in all these relations. The turning
down an applicant does not necessarily mean kicking the poor fellow out
of doors, but I am prepared to maintain that more tact is shown in dismissing an applicant with the settled
conviction that his request will not
be granted than in what is called i
"smooth" method of handling, which
leaves him in doubt and brings him
back again to-morrow.
When all is said and done, men respect a man, and manhood pre-sup-
poscs at any rate a measure of manliness, and with this quality goes that
spirit of fairness and justice which
will refuse to raise false hopes and
which knows that it is knider never
to excite them. The strong man is he
who has the courage of his convictions, the strong leader is he who
lives up to them.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a license to prospect for coal, on
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner of B. M. Richardson
Claim, being about one mile and a quarter northwest of Skidegate Inlet, Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence north eighty chains;
thence east eighty chains; thence south
eighty chains; thence west eighty chains
back to place of commencement, containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D.  1908.
D. R. YOUNG.
Mch 21 William Woods, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
(30) days after date, I intend to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal, on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the B. M. Richardson Claim, being about one mile and a
quarter northwest of Skidegate Inlet,
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence north eighty chains;
thence west eighty chains; thence south
eighty chains; thence east eighty chains
back to place of commencement, containing six hundred and forty (040)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D, 1908.
Mch 21
C. A. YOUNG,
William Woods, Agent,
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
(30) days after date, I intend to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal, on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile and a quarter north of Skidegate Inlet and mouth of the Honna
River, Graham Island, Queen Charlotte
Islands Group; thence south eighty
cliains; thence east eighty chains; thence
north eighty chains; thence west eighty
chains back to place of commencement,
containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D. 1908.
B. M. RICHARDSON.
Mch 21 William Woods, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
(30) days after date, I intend to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for coal
on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of B. M. Richardson
Claim, being about one mile and a
quarter northwest of Skidegate Inlet,
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence south eighty chains;
thence east eighty chains; thence north
eighty chains; thence west eighty
chains; back to place of commencement,
containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D. 1908.
R. W. RAYSAY,
Mch 21 William Woods, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast. Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of Bllnklnsop Bay,
about 100 feet west of the wharf; running west 60 chains; thence north 60
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south along the shore back to the place
of commencement.
Dated  February  24th,  1908.
March 14 C. G. JOHNSTONE.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of Bllnklnsop Bay,
three-quarters of a mile from the entrance of said bay, running west 80
chains; thence south 60 chains; thence
east along the shore of bay Inside of
Jesse Island; thence northerly along the
shore of BUnkinsop Bay to the place
of commencement.
Dated February 22nd, 1908.
O. C. BASS.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the under*
signed, intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for the rurchase of the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the east shore of Bllnklnsop
Bay, three-quarters of a mile from the
outlet of the creek at the head of bay,
running north along the shore 60 chains;
thence east 60 chains; thence south 60
chains; thence west 60 chains back to
the place of commencement.
Dated February 24th, 1908.
L. P. LOCKE.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the head of Bllnklnsop Bay, 60 feet
north of the creek running to the bay;
running west GO chains; thence north
60 chains; thence east 60 chains; thence
south 60 chains back to the place of
commencement.
Dated February  24th,  1908.
M, J. G. WHITE.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
The Nanaimo press, which is in
close touch with the coal trade, and
therefore in a position to know the
facts, declares that already there is *i
noticeable improvement; not only i*
there a prospect of resuming shipments to San Francisco on a larger
scale, but the demand for bunker coal
is increasing. Two large steamers
were in port on Monday last. Mr. T
R. Stockett, the general manager of
the Western Fuel Company, also confirms these anticipations.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
tho purchase of the following described
lands,'—Commencing at a post planted
ono mile west-north-west from Jesso
Island, running west 60 chains; thence
north 60 chains; thence east 60 chains',
thenco south 60 chains back to place
of commencement.
Dated February 22nd, 1908.
G. E. GIBSON.
March 11 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
tho purchase of tho following descrlhed
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of bay Inside of
Jesse Island, one quarter of a mile
north of Jesse Island, running west 60
chains; thence north 60 chains; thence
east 00 chains; thence south GO chains
back to the place of commencement.
Dated February 22nd, 1908.
H. G. ANDERSON.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
CLOISONNE
The Japanese poteries are noted for their CLOISONNE and
SATSUMA WARES. The firm of T. HATTORI is celebrated in
Japan for making the finest grade of cloisonne ware and holding
the appointment of manufacturer to the Imperial household. We
have imported direct from T. Hattori an exceedingly choice collection of his highest grade CLOISONNE WARE. An inspection
will assure you of the beauty of the workmanship. All prices are
marked in plain figures and range from $2 up.
SATSUMA
HODOTA of Yokohama has a world-wide reputation for turning
out the finest SATSUMA WARE. We have paid HODOTA'S
prices in order to secure the best. The goods consist of beautiful
vases of all sizes and shapes; cups and saucers; rosebowls; tea
caddies;   teapots;   christening bowls.    Prices range from $2 up.
Every piece of Satsuma and Cloisonne Ware we are now
offering is from the hands of the old artists, who are rapidly dying
out.  These goods will steadily increase in value.
Challoner & Mitchell
Diamond Merchants and Silversmiths
Government Street Victoria, B. C.
Vletor-Berlinei
Vaecleville
How would you like to hearj
May Irwin, the queen of fun-makers, [
Vesta Victoria and Alice Lloyd, the
famous English comediennes; that
celebrated tenor, Richard Jose;
clever Clarice Vance, with her
irresistibly humorous song-hits;
Harry Lauder, the great Scotch
comedian; popular Eddie Morton,
in your own borne ?
You can hear them all on the Victor
or Berliner Gram-o-phone just the same
as if you were at the theatre—these
___mm_mm___________m famous vaudeville artists who are delighting thousands of people every night in
the theatres all over the United States and Canada and who
make records exclusively for the Victor.
You can do what you can't do at the theatres; you can
pick out your own performers and arrange your own program to suit yourself.
Then there's Billy Murray, Harry Macdonough,
Arthur Collins, Ada Jones, Harry Tally and other favorites
to sing for you.
■v You can also have a complete minstrel show with a Victor or Berliner
\ Gram-o-phone Or you can have music by famous bands; dance music;
■^N. classic symphonies; sacred songs; and grand-opera by the world's
%y< \ greatest stars. All these things are absolutely true to life, and
S> *«■ °<»^\ are heard at their best on the Victor or Berliner Gramophone.
'_, ■%.  \\       Any Victor or Berliner dealer will gladly play Victor Records for '
\ V,
\\Vo.
Any Vicloi ot Berliner dealer will gladly play Victor Records for yon.
ill and ask to hear them, and get*"'    '   *"
you nbout the easy-payment plan.
■*«.** \   » ..      . .    .
" \ *%OvCa" a".<i aslc. to llcnI' ,hem. and get him to tell
'/1 QfX Write us for catalogue.—just fill out the
".    -*\ coupon and mail it to us.
. \\ V^'tX.   The Berliner Gram-o-phone
a \\ \ VC-VS.   Vmwi ol Canada, Ltd.
. \ \  *■-.   % *„^_\ .. .   .
w;
%, *.
Montreal.   607
TIMBER! TIMBER! TIMBER!
QUATSINO   SOUND,   BEDWELL SOUND, RACE NARROWS.
GUARANTEED  8,000 FT. TO THE  ACRE.
PRICE $2.50 TO $3.00.   ALL LICENSES ISSUED.
ARTHUR BELL
ROOMS 14 and 16
MAKON   BUILDING,   GOVERNMENT   STREET, VICTORIA.
P. O. BOX 766. PHONE 138S.
- THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 21, 1908.
,-<_k>ooo*oo*ooo*oooooooo©ooooooooooo-c>o-^^
soooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
1*1
l*'<
1
MORE NEW CARPETS
Still   once   again   do   we
chronicle the arrival of ad-
"1  111    J^vV5r___*f*»i    ' ' f \       [H'WHHYi ditions to our immense car-
-J   'IsffliMTt^^ lrt''M       \WMMm Pet stock.   This time it is a
carload of carpets from the
famous Templeton looms,
and includes some of their
nicest efforts in Axminster
carpets. While Axminsters
predominate, there is still a
liberal sprinkling of Brussels
and Wiltons in this ship-
■ ment. In each line are to
i be found many handsome designs that have never before
been shown here, and designs you won't find elsewhere in the city this year.
It is real economy to buy
Templeton's carpets. They
wear fully twice as long as
most makes, and in the majority of cases cost more than do these common kinds. The
quality is guaranteed by the makers and by this house—the largest dealers in carpets
in Western Canada. We have also received a very large consignment of Ingrain Wool
Squares, and have now a very complete range of sizes. The choice of colourings and
designs gives you great scope in the choosing, and you can "match" or carry out any
"scheme." These artistic squares are hard wearers, and are genuinely satisfactory
floor coverings. There is no such complete showing of carpets in the West. We are
truly "The Carpet Store of the West," and—buy your carpets at a carpet store—it pays.
Axminster Carpets—A splendid range of
pretty and attractive designs in this
favorite carpet. Prices range at, per
yard, $375, $3.00, $2.25 and $2.00
Wilton Carpets—In Wiltons we also
show a very extensive range of handsome designs and splendid range of
colorings. Per yard, $3.50, $2-75.
$2.25 and  ., $1-9°
Tapestry Carpets—In low-priced, hard-
wearing carpets we show a splendid
line of Tapestry Carpet at a great
choice of prices. We have it at,
per yard, $1.25, $1.00, 85c and....75c
Axbury Carpets—This is a splendid carpet style and in it we have an unusually fine range of patterns and colorings. All at once price. Per
yard  $2.75
Brussels Carpets—In our offerings of
this Housekeeper's Carpet you'll find
a great choice of styles. It is probably the most serviceable carpet one
could buy. Per yard, $2.00, $1.75, $1.60,
$1.50, $1.40, $1.25 and  $1.00
Velvet Carpet—This is a nice carpet
style from the famous Crossley looms.
At, per yard  $1.70
BEDROOM FURNITURE
Some Dainty Bedroom Furniture is shown
in our Showrooms today—items that are most
useful and also highly decorative. These furniture pieces are highly attractive in design,
and would make a most acceptable addition
to the furnishings of any bedroom. The
pieces shown are moderate-priced styles, and
you'll agree are very fine values—representative of the splendid values to be found all
through this establishment. The Chiffoniere is
an almost indispensable bedroom furniture
item, and the Lady's Dresser a great convenience. Both are priced within the reach
of most any buyer, and there is no reason why
you shiuldn't enjoy the comforts of these useful and attractive articles.
Chiffoniere—This is a very attractive
style in mahogany finish, polished
highly and finished in best possible
manner. The design is new and
pleasing. Has large oval, bevel
mirror of finest quality, ancl there are
five large drawers. The price is only,
each    $25.00
Ladies' Dresser—Here is a style in this
very useful, piece of furniture which
should appeal to every lady who admires an excellent combination of
style and usefulness. This dresser
has a large tall mirror of first quality, two small and one large drawers,
and is made of finest quartered oak,
finished golden. The price is fair
at, each  $28.00
Bureau and Stand—A splendid style in
mahogany finish. This is a very
pleasing design and the workmanship
on both pieces is the finest. The
bureau has large oval, bevel mirror,
two small and two large drawers,
stand has large drawer and cupboard.
Excellent  value  at    $38.00
Bureau and Stand—This is another pleasing style made in handsome golden
oak. The finish is as superior as the
design is pleasing, making a really
handsome set. The bureau has large,
shaped bevel mirror, two small and
one large drawers. The stand has
one large drawer and cupboard. The
whole is priced at the low figure
of   $45.00
"THE LOWBOY"—This is a style of gentlemen's Chiffoniere which has found much
favour with discriminating men. It is constructed on entirely different lines from
the usual Chiffoniere styles. There is an abundance of drawers and trays of several
sizes and styles for the storage of various articles. The whole is closed with two
doors, making a very neat and stylish article.   Price is, each $40.00
GET YOUR HOUSE-CLEANING HELPS AT THIS STORE.
TO DEALERS
We solicit correspondence
from dealers who are not
already acquainted with us
and who wish to get
acquainted with the largest
wholesalers of Homefurnish-
ings in the West. Try furniture as a "side-line"—we
help you.
WEILER BROS.
Complete Home Furnishers,       VICTORIA.
TO RETAILERS
Isn't it poor business to
carry a large stock in your
little town when the quantities you require may be purchased from us on short
notice. We help you. Prompt
and satisfactory service guaranteed.
Jo^OOOOOOO-OOOOOOOOO-OOOO-OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO-OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO^^
t^oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo^^
^porting
Comment.
A few of the faithful supporters of
association football braved the cle-
lients and put in an appearance at
|)ak Bay last Saturday, to witness
lie match between the Y.M.C.A. and
J.B.A.A., and were rewarded by seeing a game very much after the style
If a burlesque. The grounds' were
li a frightful state, which made it
Inpossible for either of the teams to
llay good football, but to the credit
If the players they put up as good a
lame as could be expected under the
lircumstances. The result was a win
|or the Bays by the narrow margin of
-2. On the form of Saturday, it
Jvas easily seen that had Victoria en-
lered one team in the Island scries in-
Itead of three, a first-class eleven
(ould have been selected. It would
unfair to criticize either of the
|eams, as under the conditions it
[ould not expected to have first-class
■ootball. Every player tried hard,
Ind although, there were several fouls
licy were not made with the intention
If putting' an opponent out of business, but rather through the inability
If the other players to hold their feet.
I While the Bays and Y.M.C.A. were
I riving for honours on one pitch, the
.M.C.A. and Victoria West intermediates yere trying conclusions right
mgside, thc result of which was a
|in  for  the  latter  by  the  score   of
-!.    The  game   was   very   ragged,
|ving to the  condition  of the  field,
lit   the   winners   showed   that   they
|erc the superiors of their opponents
no small manner.
I The Ladysmith and Nanaimo teams
le   now   tied   for   the   race   for   the
championship, and it is very probable
that it will require a game in this city
to decide the question of supremacy.
Both teams have won a game, the
Ladysmith boys winning on Saturday
after what is conceded to be one of
the finest games ever played in British Columbia. The Nanaimo team
had been strengthened by the addition
of several players from the Mainland,
but even their assistance was not sufficient to obtain a win. In this connection I owe an apology to the
Ladysmith team for a statement in
my remarks last week. Referring to
the teams, I stated that the Nanaimo
team would have six Mainlanders and
Ladysmith five. This was given me
on good authority, and I also took it
from the daily press, but I am pleased
to see that the Ladysmith team only
had one Mainlander on the team, ancl
he had already played a game. According to press reports, the game
was very fast and attracted a large
attendance. Both these teams havc
to play the Esquimalt team in this
city, and if they succeed in winning
they will have to play off for the
championship, but in case thc Esquimalt team wins, it will be tie with the
other two for first filace. According
to the constitution of the league, a
tie must be played off on neutral
grounds, and as Victoria is the only
neutral ground for Ladysmith and
Nanaimo, it is very likely that Victorians will be given thc opportunity
of witnessing these teams in action.
minion taking part, it would be a
good advertisement for* Victoria to
have a team in the competition, but
evidently this has been overlooked.
If I understand correctly, the newly formed baseball club is to have the
Oak Bay grounds after April 1, in order that the playing space may be
put in condition for the summer
sports. If 1 am correct in this, there
is no doubt but that there will be a
conflict between the footballers and
baseballers. According to the present
schedule, there are sufficient football
games to be played to take up every
Saturday afternoon until the end of
April, and in that case it will be too
late to make any improvements to the
park which are so badly needed. 1
hope that some satisfactory arrangement is reached befure it is too late.
Tommy Burns still retains his title
as heavyweight champion of the
world, having defeated Jem Roche,
the Irish champion, in a very decisive
manner. It only required one round
to dispose of the Irishman, and the
knockout was accomplished in such a
manner as to leave but little doubt as
to the ability of Burns to deliver the
punch. It is now up to Burns to
meet Johnson, and unless T miss my
guess, the coloured gentleman will
not last much longer than half tin
limit.
UMPIRE.
According to the rules which govern the competition for the People's
Shield, all players should be registered not later than to-day. and as yet
nothing has been done towards entering a Victoria team. It is too had
that some effort was not made to
have the capital city of the Province
represented. With teams representing nearly every province in the  Do-
The Cranbrook Herald makes the
following true statement of prevailing
conditions in some newspaper offices:
"It is a deplorable fact that a few
tickets or a two-inch advertisement
will fix the average Western newspaper so far as notices go. Most of
the attractions on the mad to-day in
this part of thc country realize that
the Herald is not built that way.
I lence the trouble."
I flusic and      $
*   The Drama. I
The programme announced for the
Xew York Symphony Orchestra engagement, which appears in Victoria
Theatre before the end of the season,
is unusually attractive, while the solo
features arc bound to arouse more
than ordinary interest. The Orchestra's concertmeister on the present
tour is Mr. Alexander Saslavsky, a
violinist of rare attainments. Saslavsky is a Russian by birth, a graduate
of thc Imperial Conservatory of Vienna, and he has been associated with
lhe famous orchestra leader since
coming to this country ten years ago.
His solo playing is marked by lire
and clash and with all the Slav's innate sense of expression. Another
member of thc organization who frequently appears as a soloist is Mr,
Leo Schulz, 'cellist, a German musician who came to merica when Nik-
isch lirst appeared as leader of the
Boston Symphony.
At the New Grand,
Next week's features will be Naomi
Ethardo, European noelty equilibrist:
Maud Sutton and eompany of three
people, in a little playlet called "Cin-
dcrel"; Lopez and Lopez, Spanish instrumentalists and oculists; the Dorin
Opera Trio; Golden and Hughes
blackface comedy act; Thos. J. Price
singing the illustrated song. "Yankee
Rose." and new moving pictures, entitled "Uncle by Marriage" and "Doing- of a  Poodle."
distanced all competitors in the race
for unreliable, sensational despatches.
Its character is so well known that
its comments are harmless, but when
it prints a false news item with all the
circumstantiality of truth, it may once
in a while obtain credence. Recently
it published a despatch declaring that
Vietoria was suffering from a violent
epidemic, and that many deaths had
resulted. Still more recently it announced that the population of Vernon was being decimated by diphtheria. Sueh statements inflict a very
real ancl serious injury upon the
places libelled, and there ought to bc
some means of bringing the World to
book. The matter is more serious
than might appear at lirst sight. Surely the World might forego a little of
its intense yearning for the sensational, when its gratification injures
whole communities.
A Journalistic Libel.
Tin* Vancouver World has long
Joakley—lie would never have become so addicted to drink if It
hadn'l been for the trouble he had.
Coakley—Why, what trouble did he
have?
Joakley—He had trouble keeping
away from it. The Catholic Standard and Times.
Messrs. Williams & Janion
Duly  Instructed   by   ,1.   A.   CAMERON,
BSQ.i will sell at liis residence 842
Kurt   Sirt'cl    (above  Cook)
—on—
TUESDAY,   MARCH   24TH
Commencing- at 11 a.m.
the  whole  of  hls
Household Furniture and
Effects
Also a PINE LIBRARY as ihm* particulars In last Saturday's am! Sunday's papers.
The   tull   list   of  goods   will  appear
again  in  the  papers.
On  View  MONDAY,  MARCH  23RD.
The Auctioneor, STEWART WILLIAMS THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH ax, 1908.
* Social and
$ Personal, t
»|» iji i£i i|i iff i|i iff i|» iImJi (Jt* i|» tjf
Miss Angus left on Thursday for
Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. W. E. Norris, Vancouver, was
a visitor during the week.
* *   *
Mr. Alexis Martin, Vancouver, spent
a few days in Victoria this week.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Hincks of Cowichan
Bay were registered at the Balmoral
Hotel during the week.
* *   *
Miss Agnes Wootten arrived from
Collingwood on Sunday evening on a
visit  to  her  uncle  Mr.   E.  Wootten
of this city.
* *   *
Miss Ruby Fell entertained a number of friends on Saturday evening
last at a bridge and five hundred
party. The players included Mr. and
Mrs. Thornton Fell, Mrs. McBride,
Mr. and Mrs. T. S. Gore, the Misses
L. and W. Lugrin, S. and V. Blackwood, N. Holmes, A. King, Morley,
P. Irving, Loenholm, Mrs. Holden,
and the Messrs. McCurdy, Landry,
D. Templeton, Haggerty, Morley,
Scott, Holmes, Holden, McLean,
Sparks, Vetch, and Boyer. The prizes
for five hundred were captured by
Mr. Boyer and Miss Suzette Blackwood.
* *   *
The Cosy Corner Tea Rooms, on
Monday last, St. Patrick's eve, was
the scene of a merry little dance
given by a few of the Bachelors. The
floor was in excellent condition and
Miss Thain and support in splendid
form, introducing The Shamrock and
a "Bit 0' Green" which received many
encores.
Those present were: Mrs. Henderson, the Misses Henderson, Miss Forrester, Mr. G. Schwabe, Mr. L. F.
Armstrong, Mrs. Shuttleworth, the
Misses Add and Grace Smith, Mr.
Bert Shaw, Mr. J. H. McConnell, Mrs.
Moss, the Misses Moss, Mr. Leo.
Sweeney, Mr. L. 0. Keith, Mrs. Grant,
Misses Grant, Mrs. Hastings, Miss
Hastings, Mr. W. H. Loat, Mr. A.
Dorman, Miss Tena Atwood, Mr. W.
Sweeney, Mr. I. Hopkins, Miss Bee
Cameron, Miss Mamie Fell, Mr. Eric
Hardy, Miss Nettie Locke, Mr. H.
Jacobson and Mr. Ed. Townsley.
* *   *
Mrs. Atkins, Beach Cottage, Dallas
Road, gave her annual St. Patrick's
tea on Tuesday afternoon. The refreshment table was very artistic and
effectively arranged with pale pink
carnations, smilax and shamrock, set
in very handsome old family silver
(jardinieres), which were presented
to Mr. Atkins' father, the Dean of
Ferns, Wexworth Island.
The following young ladies assisted the hostess in dispensing the tea:
The Misses Lona Holmes, Gladys
McCallum, Maud McB. Smith, Phyllys Jay, Dorothy Trampton, Viva
Blackwood.
Mr. Allen and the Misses Lugrin
delighted the guests with several
Irish songs.
Games were also indulged in, prizes
for "Tumble In," which was in charge
of Miss Suzette Blackwood and Mr.
Colin Hogg, were won by Mrs.
Kenah, Miss Hawthornthwaite ancl
Miss Lawson, and for "Pit," which
was run by Mr. Johnston were carried off by Mrs. Hogg and Miss
Irving.
Among thc numerous guests were
Mrs. F. W. Vincent and Miss Vincent, Mrs. and Miss Nicholles, Miss
Sorby, Miss Work, Mrs. Sorby, Mrs.
and Miss Gillespie, Mrs. J. H. Todd,
Miss Wriggley, Mrs. Gibb, Mrs.
Coles, Mrs. Matson, Mrs. R. Finlayson, Miss Grahame, Rev. W. B. and
Mrs. lien, Bishop Cridge, Rev. Mr.
Collison, Mrs. Hogg, Mr. C. Hogg,
Mr. Kenah, Mr. and Mrs. Trampton,
Miss Trampton, Mr, C. Trampton,
Miss Irving, Mrs. and the Misses McMicking, Mrs. Worlock. Mrs. and
the Misses Blackwood, Mrs. Brett,
Mrs. Ker, Miss Heisterman, Mrs. Ar-
~     _t___m
The Most Artistic and the Most Exclusive Sub-division
Ever Placed on the Market.
^
^
We are favored with   instructions
to offer
FOR   SALE
commanding building sites in
CAREY CASTLE
GARDENS
Rockland Avenue, Running Through to Richardson Street
This magnificent property is situated on Rockland Ave., between Government House and the charming residence of John Arbuthnot, Esq., while across
the avenue is "Craigdarroch," the home of Mrs. Joan Dunsmuir.
There is no other property in Victoria in any such situation surrounded
by such palatial homes in which building sites can be obtained by the person
who does not wish to buy acreage.
THE PURCHASER OF THESE LOTS KNOWS BEFOREHAND THAT
HE IS IN THE CENTRE OF THE MOST VALUABLE
RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY IN VICTORIA.
And that he has no anxiety as to the character of the homes that will for
all time surround him.
It would be a pity to spoil such a beautiful property by cutting it up in the
usual way, therefore a great deal of time and trouble has been taken in planning
this subdivision so as to conserve as much as possible its original characteristics.
Therefore it has been decided to make the top portion of it into
A PRIVATE RESIDENTIAL PARK ON THE SAME LINES AS SOME
OF THE BEAUTIFUL PLACES AROUND LIVERPOOL AND
OTHER CITIES IN ENGLAND AND MANY CITIES
IN THE UNITED STATES.
Provision will be made to complete a system of sewerage and private roads
that will connect with a 66-foot public street to be made and boulevarded, with
concrete sidewalks, by the city, on the lower portion, which has a splendid
frontage on the best part of that fine new street, Richardson Street.
The property has been named " CAREY CASTLE GARDENS," because
it has a frontage on its entire length upon Government House, formerly Carey
Castle. The main avenue is named Lotbiniere Ave., in memory of the most
beloved of all our Governors, because he planted with his own hands along a
portion of this avenue two rows of Butternut trees, which will always be
interesting to residents and visitors.
In order that purchasers of these sites may be protected from having
inferior buildings erected on any of the lots now offered for sale,
BUILDING RESTRICTIONS WILL BE IMPOSED UPON
EACH PURCHASER.
The property has been surveyed and the plans, together with a detailed
description of each lot, are now being prepared. These will be ready in a few
days, when the exact date of sale and terms will be announced.
The owners realize that it is necessary to sell every lot, almost, in order to
carry out their ideas of making this a unique subdivision, therefore the prices
will be much lower than the lots are actually worth and within the reach of
every one who wishes to build a nice home.
It is unnecessary to say that these sites cannot be equalled in Victoria for
health, beauty and view.   They are high and dry.
WATCH OUR ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR FURTHER PARTICULARS.
As the owners preferred that where possible two lots should be sold
together the sale will open at the offices of the undersigned for all people who
wish to buy two or more lots adjoining at 9.30 a.m. Wednesday morning,
March 25th, 1907, and at 11 a.m. for those who wish to buy single lots.
Teems—10 per cent, deposit, 25 per cent, on May lst, 25 per cent, on
November lst, 20 per cent, on May lst, 1909, and 20 per cent, on November
lst, 1909, with interest at 6 per cent, from May lst, 1908.
Herbert Cuthbert & Company
616 Fort St., Victoria, B. C.
PHONE  610 \
cher Martin, Mrs. and Miss Musgra|
Mr. J. Musgrave, Dr. Newcombe,
C. Newcombe, Miss Newcombe, Ml
Dupont, Miss N. Dupont, Mrs. JI
Mrs. McB. Smith, Mrs. and Miss Bif
rows, Miss Brown, Mr. M. Johnstcj
Mr.    Mason,   Mrs.    Shaw,   Mrs.
Shaw,   Misses   Lugrin,   Mrs.   Rithl
Mrs. R. Jones, Mrs. Hanington, Ml
McCallum,    Miss    Hawthornthwai|
Mrs.    B.   Schwengers,   Mrs.   Edv
Johnston,   Dr.   Fraser,   Mrs.   Rocl
Robertson, Mrs. H. Robertson, Ma
Raymour, Miss Lawson, Mr. Holma
Miss   Dumbleton,   Mrs.   Mess,   Mi|
Church,   Miss   Crease,   Mrs.   W.
Langley, Mrs. Rome, Mrs. Blaiklocl
Mrs. Robertson, Mr. and Mrs. Mul
kett, Mr. and Mrs. A. Crease, Arcl|
deacon and Mrs. Scriven, Major aii
Mrs. Walsh, Miss Walsh, Miss Moorl
Mr.   C.   Pemberton,  Mrs.  and  Mif
Bell, Mrs. Mohun, Miss Newton, Mrj
Berkeley, Mrs. R. Jones Shallcross.
Correspondence.
The Week accepts no responsibility
for the views expressed by its corre|
pondents.
The columns of The Week are op<|
to everyone for the free expression
their opinion on all subjects which
not involve religious controversy.
Communications     will    be    lnsert<|
whether  signed  by  the  real  name
the writer or a nom de plume, but tl|
waiter's   name   and   address   must
given to the editor as an evidence
bona   fides.    In    no    case    will    it
divulged without consent.
The   Canadian   Mexican   Steamsh|
Line.
Mexico, D.F., Feb. 20, 1908.J
Editor The Week,
Victoria, B.C.
Dear Sir,—A copy of your journj
of the nth January has been handJ
me containing an editorial article el
titled "A Screw Loose," which artic|
severely criticizes the management
the Canadian-Mexican Steamsh|
line, its boats and officers.
As my name is quoted therein j
wish you would be good enough
publish these few remarks in connel
tion with the "Lonsdale" incidel
therein related, as your statement
regard to the circumstances is qui]
erroneous and misleading.
The crew did not mutiny in a bocl
nor did it at any time charge tl
bridge, nor was there a firearm dl
charged at any stage of the difficul]
Out of a total Chinese crew of neaij
40 there were only eleven who il
dulged in any insubordination. Tl
mutiny consisted in these eleven, tl
boatswain and ten sailors objecti.J
to work on the ground that the df
was the Chinese Christmas. Not'l
quarter-master, fireman or other meil
ber of the crew took any part wh:,|
soever in the dispute.
In regard to the Captain and ll
relations with his subordinates y'l
state: "Enquiry elicits the inforrrfl
tion that for some time the relatio'l
between the Captain of the Lorl
dale and his crew have been of su,l
a character as would certainly resi|
in mutiny sooner or later."
Had you wished to publish the fadl
in the case it seems to me it woul
have been better and fairer to ha |
awaited the return of the Lonsdale '
Victoria and read the signed stat'l
ment of the officers and passengei
instead of relying for your inform I
tion on sensational press telegran'l
and irresponsible people at the Vi |
toria end of the line who could n j
possibly know any more than whj
was conveyed in the aforesaid tell
grams.
I am a firm believer in the pre]
using all its weight to correct r<J
abuses, but I also think it the sacrl
duty of an editor to be sure he _J
the facts of a case before printing
marks that, far from being correl
can only do a very serious injust |
to another.
Trusting that in justice to the coj
pany you were criticizing you vl
give this letter the same prominei|
as the original article.
Believe me, Sir,
Your obedient servant,
A. W. DONLY,
Trade Commission I
[This letter was accidentally on
ted last week.—Editor Week.] THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH ai, 1908.
otes on
Provincial News
Football at Ladysmith.
hat was a great football match at
dysmith last Saturday, and allow-
for the fact that the ultimate win-
i were playing on their own
jund, the teams must be regarded
pretty evenly matched. It is not
tain that pn neutral ground the
ult would not havc been different
th teams demonstrated their un*
ubted superiority to any other club
ven on the Island, indeed it is ."
estion whether a selected team out
e of Ladysmith and Nanaimo could
at either. As usual Jimmy Adams
oved himself to be the star per-
mer, and it is more than doubtful
his equal as centre forward can be
ind in Canada. For this reason it
all the more regrettable that his
thods are not above the suspicion
unfairness. It is one thing to be
cky, it is another thing to be foul
d the general opinion on Saturday
that Adam indulged in many
actices which should have been pen-
zed. A man of such exceptional
tlliance can well afford to play the
me according to the rules, and even
en he would have a considerable
•irgin over all competitors. The
tory of Ladysmith will be popular,
th because it is the veteran team
d because the public had begun to
k upon Nanaimo as almost invinci-
It must be highly gratifying tc
lovers of the game to know that
: best brand of association football
Canada is found in British Colum-
Miss Winifred Crowley.
On several occasions The Weel*
has commented on the exceptional
ability and brilliant prospects of Miss
Winifred Crowley, formerly of Rossland. This young lady possesses a
remarkably rich contralto voice which
only requires training to land her
amongst the leading artists of the day.
She spent two seasons with the Roseian and the Bostonian Opera Company, gaining much valuable experience but not much correct training
She is now a pupil in the Boston Conservatory of Music, and if she is able
to spend two years there will undoubtedly create a sensation in the
musical world.
Swift Justice.
Frederick King and Donald Langley have a great deal more respect for
the administration of justice and the
strong arm of the law in Canada than
they had a couple of weeks ago. On
the 9th of March they broke into the
store of the William Hunter Company
at Phoenix, and stole goods to the
value of $250; within four days the
men were arrested, tried and sentenced to three years each in the penitentiary. They will doubtless emerge
sadder, and it is to be hoped wisei
men.
Another Canard.
fournalism in Victoria has been -i
e dull of late, lacking those in-
nious and sensational despatches
ich were wont to relieve its mono-
jiy, but which have been conspicu-
|s by their absence for about a year,
ere is now a revival, and the out-
e press has been treated to a de-
table canard to the effect that Sir
gar Vincent, who recently visited
toria, is negotiating for the pur-
ise of the Dunsmuir interests on
ncouver Island. The veracious cor-
pondent even went  so  far as  to
e the price, and to suggest the
teon why Mr. Dunsmuir was willing
part with his "gold" mine. It is
ause he has keenly felt the attacks
de on him by organized labour.
jedless to say, the report has been
mptly  denied.    What   impresses
most is that a chronicler of such
ing ingenuity should bungle his
|rk so badly that it bears the ear-
rks of spuriousness in every para-
ph.
Comparisons Are Odious.
Occasionally one hears a complaint
with reference to the accommodation
furnished on the C. P. R., although by
common consent it is the best on the
continent. On the other hand, there
are a few people in the Boundary
country who have always extolled the
Great Northern system at the expense
of its rival. To such the following
cutting from the Phoenix Pioneer ;s
respectfully referred:
"As Judge Williams settled himself in the palatial smoking car of the
Great Northern last Sunday morning
as he was starting for the coast, he
remarked: 'How thoughtful it is, of
Jim Hill to have the back of one seat
taken off, in case a man is hurt and is
brought in on a stretcher, and how
very considerate of passengers that
the windows should be smoked up, so
as not to hurt the eyesight of travellers.'
"These remarks were elicited by the
fact that one seat was broken and the
windows looked as though they had
last been washed in the days of Methuselah—a standing disgrace to any
railway that has made the earning?
that are credited to the Great Northern. The car would be a disgrace to
third-class travellers in Europe, and
yet is provided for those who pay four
cents per mile to travel."
NOT HAPPY THO' THEY'VE OOT IT.
The Price of Newspapers.
provincial daily has been discuss-
the current rates of subscriptions
bur provincial newspapers, and sug-
Its that they ought to be raised.   It
|iinds the public that they are get-
their papers as cheaply to-day as
len newspapers were first establish-
lin Canada, in spite of the increased
It  of  production.    It  opines   that
Iders would gladly pay more, espc-
Jly where the rates are very low,
11   supports   its   argument  by  thc
Itement   that   Canadians   are  the
latest   newspaper   readers   in   the
Irld, and would as willingly pay a
liar extra as not.   There is an an-
|er   to   this,   and   every   canvasser
ows it.    Newspapers are supported
It by subscriptions but by advertise-
ints.     Advertising   patronage    de-
nds on circulation; the more sub-
libers, the higher   thc   advertising
|ss.    As a matter of fact, it would
anj' except thc very strongest pals to abolish subscription rates, or
liny rate reduce them to a nominal
|, as the increase in the number of
(lers would raise the income from
ertising rates far above the sacri-
involved.   The truth of the mat-
is  not that  newspapers  are  too
lip, but that many of them are too
T; the leading coast dailies are not
|th more than half their subscrip-
rates.    If  one  eliminates   their
Rowings from the American west-
1 papers, few contain enough live
nraphic news to furnish a small
lountry sheet.
(Continued from Page Threel
tion of the hours of labour, and kin
dred lines, fills the New Zealand horizon to the exclusion and neglect o
legislation designed for the exploitation of the natural resources and the
encouragement of industrial activities
—and industrial expansion and augmentation of population is naturally
at a standstill. So long as present
political conditions continue it would
seem inevitable that New Zealand
should advance materially. It is in
fact debarred from doing so. Further, the business man is rapidly losing all interest or part in politics
"If the women are going to run
things, let them do it and make .-
mess of it without me," he says. For
the Labour-extremist vote plus the
Woman-theorist vote swamps thc
business vote utterly. Of course the
attitude of the disgusted business
man is scarce heroic—if eminently
natural. The policy of the country
is no longer expansive and creative
It is limited to the mechanical conduct of established business interest-
along traditional lines, and in a pettj
way. Thrift, economy, frugality, temperance, industry, produce however :
fairly contented population in whicl
the average of simple comfort is high
and poverty as unusual as wealth.
Small cottage homes, prettily set ir
well-c;ired-for grounds are everywhere. Clean streets, fine publi'
buildings, good libraries, well appoint
ed  parks,   a  general  appreciation  of
books and art, and a common speech
unmarred by grossness, profanity 01
slang, testify to the fine average character of a people satisfied with thei.
humble lot, but producing few mer
of action or of enterprise—men capable of the heroic. The captain of
industry is an exile from the New Dominion. He would be manifestly indiscreet who would suggest disparage
ment of the distinctive virtues of New
Zealand, but in a new country om
looks rather for crudeness and en
ergy, the indomitable spirit of pion
eering conquest—breadth—force—virility.   And for these one looks vainh
in ladylike New Zealand    And
yet one must come back to the philo
sophical viewpoint of New Zealand in
striving to give a fair verdict upon tin
success or failure of New Zealand'
political  doctrine.    Judged  from  th
standpoint  of  commercialism,  which
is the only viewpoint known in Am
erica, the New Zealand system is
colossal blunder.    It does  not make
for the exploitation of the resource
of the country—it does not make for
wealth—or national industrial growtV
and expansion—or augmented popula
tion.     But it has produced, or at all
events the product is in evidence, an
absence of dire poverty; a fairly ever
balance of comfort and content for
the  entire population;   a   temperate,
orderly,   law-abiding   people,   whose
talk with their fellows is last of all
based  on  the acquisition  of money
which with the American is usually
the all-engrossing subject.
PACIFIC  COAST  OBOWN
SEEDS, TREES
For the Farm, Garden, Lawn, or
Conservatory.
Reliable,   approved   varieties,   at
reasonable prices.
No Borers.   No Scale.   No fumigation to damage stock.
No windy agents to annoy you.
Buy   direct   and   get   trees   and
seeds  that  GROW.
Bee   Supplies,   Spray   Pumps,
Spraying Material and
Cut Flowers.
Catalogue Free.
M. J. HENRY
3010   Westmlnsted   Road
VANCOUVEB, B. C.
ALBERNI LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
NOTICE ls hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to prospect for coal and petroleum on the following  described   lands:—
Claim No. 1—Commencing at a post
planted on the shore at the S.E. corner of the north half of section 20,
township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south to
the beach; thence easterly along the
beach to point of commencement.
Located January 25, 1908.
MRS. FRANCIS GREEN.
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
WEEK 23RD MARCH
The New Grand
SULLIVAN 1 C»l*SlilNE.    Proprietors.
M.n.f.m.nt of R-MT. JAMIESON.
NAOMI ETHARDO
European Equilibrist.
MAUD SUTTON & CO.
Presenting the Natural Playlet
"Cinderel."
LOPEZ & LOPEZ
Spanish Instrumentalists and
Vocalists.
DORIA OPERA TRIO
Operatic Vocalists.
GOLDEN & HUGHES
The Comedy Boomers.
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrator
"Yankee Rose."
NEW MOVING PICTURES
"Uncle By Marriage."
"Doings of a Poodle."
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M. Nagel Director.
Pantage's
Theatre
JOHNSON STREET
VICTORIA, B. C
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE
Matinees (any part of houi*)....10c
Evtnlngs, Balcony  lOe
Lowor Floor SOo
Boxes    tOo
Matinees
Every Afternoon
at
3 0'CIock.
Night Performances
8 and 9.15
LADIES        MEDICAL   OXUTT8
MASSAGE
Turkish Baths
VIBBATOB  TREATMENT
MB.     BJOBWPELT,     SWEDISH
MASSEUB.
Special   Massage and Hometreat-
ment by appointments.
Room 2, Vernon Blk., Douglas St.
Body Development.
Hours 1 to 6. Phone 1629.
The Tavern in England
H. Belloc, M.P., had an able article in "The London Daily
Express" recently, under this heading, in which were the following
paragraphs:—
"To tell a man who has used wine and beer properly the whole
of his life that they are harmful, and to try to mystify him into
believing you by using long and technical words, is rank charlatanism, and should be punished by the hearty and expressed contempt of every honest man. People who talk in this fashion
should be made fools of. It is the best cure, and if they are not
yet treated in this fashion it is because our society still .suffers
from a moral evil far worse than drunkenness, and that is lack
of courage.
"Beer that is made out of malt and hops is healthy; and if substitutes of one kind or another are used, the concoction becomes
more and more dangerous in proportion to the type of adulterant
supplied. Beer has been an ordinary and healthy food for our
ancestors from the earliest recorded times."
Moral: Drink the best; drink Lemp's. Call for a bottle of
this delicious, strengthening beverage at your hotel, bar, club or
cafe. If your dealer cannot supply you with a case for home use,
kindly 'phone
PITHER   &   LEISER
Wholesale Distributors.
TIMBER
If you have any
timber for sale
list it with us
We can sell it
BURNETT, SON  & CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,   B. C.
The days are getting Cold.
THE
WILSON BAR
Is Warm and Comfortable.
VISIT IT.
648 Yates St., Victoria, B. C.
COAL.
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo
Vollieries
New Wellington Coal.
The  best  household  coal  in  the
market at current rates.
Anthracite Coal for sale.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA. B.C.
L«*v« Your Baggage Cheek* at th*
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.      A. E. KENT, Proprietor
Will You Take
$500a Year...
for your spare time. In other
words the man who has a couple
of hours morning and evening
and will employ it in operating
A Cyphers Incubator
at his home can make from $500
in twelve months. We have a
unique plan to work on and will
be pleased to explain it to any
one interested.    Call or write.
Watson &
McGregor
647  Johnson  Street,
VICTORIA, B. C.
Most
Particular
Smokers
Experience little or no difficulty
in finding a cigar or blend of
smoking mixture that fits their
taste.
Our Manila or Havana
Cigars can't be beaten.
We carry a most complete line of smokers'
sundries.
The Army
unit Navy
Olgar Store.
Richardson
Phone 345 THE WEEK, SATURDAY MARCH ai, 1908,
j    At The Street
I Corner
By THB LOUNGER
I think the fact that I have to submit to criticism entitles me to point
out the errors of my fellow scribblers who direct the literary col-
ums of the leading dailies. I do 't
more in sorrow than in any spirit of
carping criticism, but why, oh why,
does not the management of the Colonist and the Times furnish the
Editor and the Proof reader with a
book of synonyms and foreign
phrases? Hardly a day passes but
each paper falls into an error which
must be a surprise to every school
boy in Victoria. The error is to
preface a comment upon some paragraph which has appeared in another
paper by saying "Apropos of." I
wonder if the gentlemen who use this
very convenient preface are aware
that the "of" is superfluous and not
merely that but absolutely incorrect
and ungramatical? The exact equivalent of apropos is "with reference to."
The addition of the word "of" is
therefore meaningless. This occurs so
often, and has passed so long without
comment, that I feel it needs no excuse on my part for calling attention
to it. If the Editors will deign to
look at any English paper they will
find that the useful word referred to
is properly used. Indeed I think Victoria is the only . place in Canada
where this striking error is made.
Apropos my remarks of last week
on the subject of bridge playing and
the social craze into which it has developed I want to relate two incidents
which certainly "point a moral" if
they do not "adorn a tale." Recently
a lady friend of mine called at the
house of one of her friends on the
usual day. She found the blinds
drawn and a card stuck in the knob
of the door displaying the legend "Not
receiving today." She thought this
rather peculiar as she was pretty
well posted on the movements of the
lady, so made a few enquiries of mutual friends and learned that behind
those drawn blinds a game of bridge
was progressing all afternoon.
I do not think this incident calls
for^any comment except that there is
this peculiar feature in bridge playing that it severs friendships; its open
sesame is skill at the game; its closed
door is inability to excel, and the
most intimate friend soon becomes
de trop under these circumstances.
The other incident can be described
in a few words. It occurred in the
house of one of the leaders of Victoria Society, the performers were society ladies long out of their teens,
the occasion an afternoon bridge, thc
result a quarrel with one short round
lasting twenty seconds during which
hats were torn off, hair pulled down
and several scars left to tell the story.
The incident is so abhorrent that I
would not give it publicity but for
the fact that it throws a strong side-'
light on thc amenities of Bridge playing, and its publication will help to
drive a nail into the coffin of a craze
which has developed to such an extent that it has become a positive
menace to good fellowship.
By thc way, it occurs to me to say
that possibly ladies are not aware
that all these little things leak out,
and that it is impossible to hide
them under a bushel. It is a perfectly safe conclusion that when The
Week records an affair of this kind
it is common talk on the street. I
think that if ladies knew this they
would be a little more careful.
I heard many complaints because
the Canadian Club Luncheon of Tuesday last was held at thc Poodle Dog
instead of at the Empress Hotel, but
the complaints were all addressed to
the fact that the accommodation Is
necessarily insufficient for so large a
number. The Club now tallies between 600 and 700 members. At the
luncheon on Tuesday only 150 were
present; suppose three or four hundred bad turned up, which might happen at any time, what could have
been done to accommodate them? In
addition, it docs seem that the  Em
press is the right place for large and
important functions of this kind, but
in saying this I want to endorse what
I heard on every hand, viz., that the
Luncheon at the Poodle Dog was far
superior to that furnished at the Empress, and that the proprietors deserve every credit for the admirable
manner in which they have catered.
But for the growth of the Club every
member would desire to remain at
the old place.
If, as I understand, it is the intention of the Club to go to the Empress
in future, the dining committee should
certainly demand some guarantee as
to quality of the catering.
Sub-divisions seem to be the order
of the day. Ever since I have lived
in Victoria I have been looking
round for a desirable site where I
could induce some susceptible and
lonely girl to build a retreat and share
it with a poor Lounger. 1 had my
eye on the girl, and on the retreat,
and I rather flatter myself that thing?
were working all right when lo ancl
behold, the insatiable real estate agent
has pounced on my retreat and it has
gone the way of all desirable sites—
to sub-division. I need hardly say
that I refer to the picturesque and
delightfully romantic slope which lies
between Carey Castle grounds and
Mr. Arbuthnot's property. I had
planned to have a nine-foot stone wall
built all round it, to raze the little
red school-house to the ground, and
to build something modern and artistic on what I have always considered,
next to Carey Castle, the finest site
in Victoria.
But my dream is shattered; I have
been wounded "in the house of my
friends," the irrepressible Herbert
Cuthbert has got ahead of me and
within the next few days some thirty
fortunate mortals will have acquired
every inch of this estate.
I am now considering whether I
shall drop the girl on some polite pretext or whether I shall hunt for auother property; if I do the latter I
have resolved that my hunting shall
bc done by moonlight, and that not
even "my dearest friend and next my
heart" shall know when my eye lights
on another delectable spot.
Next to the Victoria Cross, probably the most prized decoration in the
Empire is The Week's leather medal
for Valour. This is awarded annually,
and, as regular readrs of this column
are doubtless aware, it goes for 1907
to the popular manager of the Victoria Theatre. It is a beautiful work
of art, finely finished in embossed lea -
ther, by Mr. Norris, the well-known
saddler of this city. It is awarded in
connection with an incident which will
be remembered by Victorians in consequence of unusual courage displayed
by the hero of thc occasion. In October last the Rambeau Stock Company gave one representation of
"Young Mrs. Winthrop." Tt was
fierce, and Manager Denliam arose in
his fury, slammed the door in their
faces, and refused to allow them on
the second night to inflict endless torture upon his patrons. The occasion
was so unique that there will be no
difference of opinion about the award.
On the front side the medal bears the
following words: "CLIFFORD
DENHAM, for valour, 26th October,
1907.'' On the reverse side the award
is more fully explained in the following words: "By a grateful people this
medal is presented to Major Clifford
Denliam, V.T.R., for conspicuous valour in defeating the forces of thc
Rambeau tribe—which wcre storming
thc heights of Parnassus—and putting
them to flight on thc memorable 26th
day of October, 1907. This medal was
subscribed for by the THESPIANS
and THALIANS of the Loyal City of
Victoria."
The medal now hangs in Manager
Denham's sanctum among his most
cherished memorials, which include
Old Covent Garden programmes, "If
Mother Could Only See Me Now,"
and the withered bouquets of susceptible matinee girls.
Angell
Engraving Co.
PHOTO-ENGRAVERS
and DES1QNERS
In All Branches
518 Hastings St.
Vancouver, B.C.
p
HTtlVXS   and Trade M»rk
obtained in all countries.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville St.
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
Cfri
m*j%*.
A Skin of Beauty is a Joy Forever
SB. T. FELIX FOUBAUD'S
Oriental Cream
OB MAOICAL BEAUTIFIES
Purifies as well as Beautifies tlie Skin.
No other cosmetic will do it.
Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, Moth
Patches, Hash and Skin diseases, and
every blemish on beauty, and defies detection. It has stood the test of 60
years; no other has, and is so harmless—we taste It to be sure it is properly made. Accept no counterfeit of
similar name. The distinguished Dr. L.
A. Sayre said to a lady of the haut-ton
(a patient). "As you ladles will use
them, I recommend 'Gourand's Cream' as
the least harmful of all the Skin preparations."
Por sale by all druggists and Fancy
Goods Dealers.
OOUBAUD'S ORIENTAL TOIX-ET
FOWDEB
For infants and adults. Exquisitely perfumed. Relieves Skin Irritations, cures
Sunburn and renders an excellent complexion.
Price 35 cents, by mall.
OOUBAUD'S POUDBB SUBTIAE
Removes superfluous Hair.
Price $1.00, by mail.
FBSD T. HOPKINS, Prop.,
37 Great Jones St.,        New York City.
AT BENDEBSON BBOS.,  Distributors.
Vanoouver and Victoria, B.C.
MAPS
OF
Timber and Land.
The   kind   that   show   what's
taken   up   and   what's   vacant.
Electric Blue Print & Map Co,
Electric   Blue   Print   and   Map   Co.
1218 Langley Street
Victoria, B. C.
♦ Valuable
! Timber Sections
For quick sale, is licensed
Timber Sections at Quatsino
Sound, District of Rupert.
These claims adjoin salt
water and are guaranteed to
average 20..000 feet to the acre.
Time for inspection and
cruising allowed.
Price, net cash, $1.25 an acre. ^
Apply
W. BLAKEMORE
1208 Government St., Victoria.
These Hot Favorites Please
Victorian Epicures
Grated Horseradish (Victorian), per bottle  25c
Evaporated Horseradish, per bottle   25c
Heinz Evaporated Horseradish, per bottle  35c
Grated Horseradish, quart jar    75c
Mustard and Horseradish, per jar    25c
Horseradish and Tomato Ketchup (fine for cocktail), bottle.. 35c
Curry and Mustard, per bottle   25c
Curry Powder, per bottle  25c and 50c
Curry Powder, per tin   ioc
Curry Sauce, per bottle     40c
Tobasco Sauce, per bottle    65c
Chili Powder, the genuine for making "Con Came," bottle— 40c
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
UP-TO-DATE GROCERS. 1316 GOVERNMENT ST.
000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
The Poodle Dog Hotel
A centre of good cheer is the Cosy Grill-room where the business and professional men of Victoria meet to exchange good
stories and gossip over things in general. The atmosphere here
is that of Bohemia in the best sense of the word; a Bohemia
governed by up-to-date and genial surroundings.
Smith & Shaughnessy, Proprietors
YATES ST., Victoria, B. C.
oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo<
The Way to
A Man's Heart
You know the old adage
and Punch's advice: "Feed
the brute!" Doubtless there
would not be so many divorces if women studied culinary matters more and
made up their minds to
COOK WITH GAS
The easiest, cleanest, most hygienic and most economical way. Call
in and let us show you our present matchless values in Gas Cook
Stoves.   Prices cannot fail to please.
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, Ltd.
CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS.
KODA
You'll need a
KODAK
AT
Vancouver's
First
Horse Show
March 19, 20
and 21
Will Marsden
♦
♦1665 Granville Street,      Vancouver, B. pr ■» vrfr_r_-f. mnrmnfrmnrmfT^
10 Kingsford Smith & Co.
Stock and General
AUCTIONEERS
s  ((Commission and Real Estate Agents.
o
I MO draoYille, Vaacoaver.
JOJUO_«_ftJUUUULtAA«JUUUUljO
Vancouver Edition
The Week
A British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vaacoaver B. C.
j-yrrinnf «TeTnnnnro < »vtf wi
Stewart William R.CJuioa   •(
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
Vol. V.   No. 8
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH zi, 1908
INDUSTRIAL CANADA.
The Canadian Census of 1901 contains
! returns of 14650 manufacturing establishments, representing 204 kinds of industries, which are grouped under 15 main
headings. Arranged according to the number of persons employed, which seems to
ine the best measure of relative importance,
they come in the following order:—(1)
Timber, lumber and manufactures cf, 82,-
492; (2) textiles, 09,139; (3) food products, 47,951; (4) iron and steel products, 27,002; (5) miscellaneous, 24,003;
(6) leather, 20,770; (7) paper and
printing, 18,049; (8) vehicles, 15,923;
(9) clay, glass, and stone products,
11,143; (10) metals other than steel,
10,fi59; (1) tobacco, 6,982; (12) liquors,
3,987; (13) chemicals, 3,514; (14) vessels, 2,719;   (15) hand trades, 702.
The position of timber at the head of
the list needs no explanation. It is a
natural product of the country, and one
of its oldest industries. The original
sources of wealth in Canada were furs,
farms, forests, and fish; and, while the
irst has declined in importance, the farm
I ias taken the lead of all others, and the
rorest still provides the raw material for
he largest of manufacturing interests.
The great bulk of the persons employed in
t are engaged on "log products" and "lnm-
Der products," which represent a very
. arly stage of manufacture; but a considerable number are also engaged in making
furniture, wood pulp, boxes, and other
nanufactured articles. The textile group
includes all the principal branches of
manufacture,   except   linen,   silk,   and
Ihread.     Clothing   employs   the   largest
lumber, then cotton and then wool.   Cot-
on shows a considerable increase between
1891 and 1901; but wool is stationary or
declining.    Of all the textiles hosiery has
Imdergone the most rapid expansion in
jecent years, and is now a very active and
promising branch of manufacture; carpet
■weaving,  too,  is vigorous,  though on a
smaller scale.    Coming to iron ancl steel,
jwe find that "foundry and machine shop
■products" are by far the largest item,
[employing nearly 13,000 men;   and that
leading does not include agricultural im-
ilements.   Boilers and engines show a re-
narkable expansion since 1891; the num-
>or of men employed has increased 133
ier cent., and now exceeds 4,000.   That is
fair gauge of mechanical activity.   Iron
nd steel also show a large growth, which
as been accelerated since thc census was
dcen.   Other considerable items under the
ame heading are edged tools, bridges, sew-
Hg machines, wire, and hardware;   but
ome of these have undergone a rather
erious decline.    Under the heading of
I liscellaneous   products   some   important
ems occur.   Chief of them is agricultural
nplemonts, which are, at the same time,
ne of the oldest branches of manufacture
In Canada, and one of the most flourishing
oday.    The Dominion can, in fact, chal
lenge comparison with any country in the
quality of its agricultural implements of
pure native production. Among other
miscellaneous products of note are electrical apparatus and musical instruments.
Electricity is going to be a very great field
in Canada at no distant date, as the enormous and widely-distributed water poAver
is brought into play. Development is as
yet only on the threshold, but it is to be
noted that the Canadians are energetically
engaged in supplying themselves with electrical plant. The number of persons employed in this industry increased from 408
in 1891 to 2,021 ten years later. Musical
instruments means chiefly pianos, of which
tliere are some very flourishing factories,
partly of German origin. The largest
branch of manufacture under the heading
of leather is boots and shoes, in which
Canada seems to be making good headway
against the enormous competition of Massachusetts. There were not very many
large factories, but they must be increasing; in 1891 there were 269 establishments employing 11,031 persons, and in
1901 there were 179 employing 13,743.
These figures, which only include establishments employing more than five persons,
indicate a distinct growth of the factory.
Tanning and saddlery are other considerable leather industries, employing about
7,000 persons. The production of paper
is not developed as it might be considering the quantity of pulp made and exported, which might be further manufactured at home; but it is growing. In
1901 there were 28 paper mills employing
nearly 3,000 persons. With regard to
vehicles, the construction of cars both for
rail and tram is a rapidly-growing industry. The clay, glass, and stone group, on
the contrary, seems to he declining as a
whole. The largest branch is brick-making, which fluctuates with the ups and
downs of the building trade; and that is
apt to oscillate with unusual violence in
Canada. Brick is the commonest building
material in several of the larger towns.
It is used to replace wood, which is the
original and still the most general building
material, after the inevitable conflagration
which sooner or later overtakes wooden-
built towns. Pottery is very little developed, and glass manufacture is hardly
considerable, though increasing, as also is
cement. The tenth group on the list,
headed ''metals," is of a very miscellaneous character. It includes smelting,
which ought to have a large future in Canada as soon as capital is available to set
up plant for smelting the numerous ores
which now go to the United States. At
present pig iron is the chief product, extracted in blast furnaces; but great hopes
are entertained of electric smelting in the
future. Silversmithing and jewelry are
making progress, but, broadly speaking,
tliere is great room for the development of
tlie small metal industries in Canada. The
remaining groups are too small to detain
us, hut it may be noted that shipbuilding,
small as it is already, is declining.
Chemicals, on the contrary, are increasing,
and the manufacture of carbide of calcium, in particular, promises to be on a
very large scale.
The above has dealt briefly with the principal branches of manufacture, as exhibited in the official statistics, in order to
give a comprehensive view of the subject; but it must be borne in mind that
the list of other things, produced on a
small scale, is very long. They are making in Canada pretty nearly everything required in civilized life; and though many
of the things are produced on a very small
scale aud only represent beginnings, there
is an ample prospect before them. They
are weakest, of course, as in all young
manufacturing countries, in the finer qualities of goods, in which they cannot hope
to compete for a very long time. Agricultural machinery is the most conspicuous
exception, ancl the cause is obvious—it has
been developed, as in the United States,
by necessity, ancl also under the influence
of American example ancl emulation. It
says a great deal for Canadian energy and
capacity that the native manufacture of
agricultural machinery has so successfully
held its own, technically and commercially,
against the enormous resources ancl calculated assaults of the great American interests. On the other hand, the weakest
points in the Canadian industrial output
are, I should say, other machinery—particularly textile machinery and machine
tools—shipbuilding, pottery, wool and
worsted, cutlery, furnishing and upholstery
materials both textile and metal, paper,
ancl small metal wares in general, particularly of brass.
The local distribution of manufactures
in Canada is curious ancl interesting. It
exhibits the process in a comparatively
early stage of development, when tlie economic forces whicli govern distribution have
an order of relative importance different
from that which obtains in older and more
settled communities ancl more thickly
populated lands. There is but little of
that specialized localization which is so
conspicuous in European countries and
even in the United States, but most of all
in Great Britain. It is beginning in
Canada, but is as yet hardly visible in the
prevailing promiscuity, which takes two
opposite forms. One is the wide scattering
of tho same industry in many places far
apart; the other is the concentration of
many industries having nothing in common in the same place. The governing
factor appears to be facilities of transport. Manufactures on any considerable
scale are almost entirely confined to the
eastern provinces ancl Ontario. Out of
14,050 establishments employing more
than five persons just about 13,000 are in
those provinces, and nearly all the rest
are on tlie Pacific Coast and in Winnipeg,
which are centres of traffic; waterways
ancl railways have clearly been the dominant factor in determining localization.
There is in Canada one regular manufacturing area comparable in character with
Massachusetts or the AVest Biding or the
Rhine "Province; it is the southeast corner
of Ontario lying between the three lakes
Huron, Erie ,and Ontario and stretching
from Toronto to Detroit. There are also
two great single centres of manufacture,
Montreal and Toronto. In all three cases
transport facilities have clearly had more
to do with the matter than anything else.
Montreal is on the great national highway,
the St. Lawrence river; it is the chief
port, the chief railway centre, ancl the
commercial capital of the Dominion. Toronto is on Lake Ontario, with Ihe State
of New York across the water, and it is
also a great railway centre. The industrial peninsula just to the east of Toronto
impinges on the three great lakes, and is
better served with railway tracks than any
COMMISSION AND
REAL ESTATE ASEHTS
f 1 CORT ST. VICTORIA, B. C.
_AXAASl\lL-WXlfL-_UllXiXu!_
One Dollajl ?t_ Annum
area in the Dominion except the immediate neighbourhood of Montreal. Factories and works have been put clown or
have grown up in all these places without
regard to their character or to any other
consideration but convenience of transport. The result is an extraordinarily
promiscuous collection of manufactures in
the same place, having no bearing whatever upon each other such as neighbouring
trades generally have in older seats of industry, where they have developed moro
gradually and under other influences. Yon
may find, for instance, cotton mills with
blast furnaces, electrical works with patent
foods, pianos ancl rubber, cars and boots,
hosiery and boilers alongside each other.
Xext to transport, and frequently associated with it, the most influential factor
discernible is power, ancl conspicuously
water power, which to a large extent takes
the place occupied by coal in other countries. The comparative absence of coal
and presence of water power are the most
distinguishing natural features of industrial Canada. No coal of local origin
worth mentioning is available from Nova
Scotia right away out to British Columbia,
and in I\ ova Scotia it lies at the northern
extremity of the province. Its presence
there has contributed to the establishment
of large iron and steel works, which again
are leading to other secondary industries,
at Sydney, a busy and growing little
centre; and from Sydney it can be shipped
by water during the summer up the St.
Lawrence and elsewhere. But during the
protracted winter the harbour is frozen,
and it is a very long haul by land from
Sydney to any other centre. Ontario gets
its coal from Pennsylvania, and the proximity of the particular industrial area
mentioned above to the Pennsylvaniau
coalfields has no doubt contributed largely
lo its development. Bat water power is
re-'* nisi ble ior the location of factories in
num isolated places and some consider-
al Le centre.-1, of which Ottawa is a conspicuous example, and Sherbrooke, in the
province of Quebec, is another on a smaller
scale. LuniL _ aud pulp mills are naturally established on the banks of streams,
which at Ibe same time bring d iwn the raw
material and furnish power for working
it; and other branches of manufacture are
added lo them. One result is the appearance of littie li ctory towns in charming
situations amid delightful scenery. There
is the clear rushing river, probably with
steep and rocky banks; the clean little
town, with a few factories here and there,
and in the background hill and forest. In
such 11 suiting the factory loses all repellent associations, which really come from
the grime and gloom generally surrounding it.
The influence of water power will be
greatly increased before, long by the development of electrical transmission, now beginning in earnest; but it will take effect
in concent rating industries locally more
perhaps than iu spreading them, us heretofore; for the electric current, by distributing power and conveying it to works
at a distance, obviates the necessity of
bringing the works to it.
Proximity of raw materials, which plays
so great a part in determining the localization of industries under earlier conditions of life, exercises unusually little
influence iu industrial Canada. The only
noticeable instance is the location of some
of the iron works near sources of supply
of ore and limestone. At Sydney, which
is the largest scat of iron and steel production, the ore is brought across from
the Wabana mines in Newfoundland; the
limestone comes from the neighbourhood
in Cape Breton. THE WKEK, SATURDAY, MARCH ai, 1908.
NOT HAPPY THOUGH
THEY'VE Q0T IT.
A Symposium on Woman's Suffrage
Written Specially for The Week.
By C. H. GIBBONS.
"Do you want the franchise," I
asked the best all-round office woman
in Victoria a day or so ago, meeting
her just after reading a long press report of the indignation meeting of
would-be woman voters held at the
City Hall. I still had the matter of
that meeting on my mind.
The best all-round office woman
fixed me with dangerous eye.
"Do I look as dowdy as that?" she
challengingly answered. "No, I don't
want the franchise; I want a new
Easter costume and a hat!"
"But seriously," I insisted, "don't
you think the women ought to have
the right to vote, especially girls lik-
you, who take a man's place in life,
know the man's world of business,
and shoulder a man's responsibilities?"
The maiden is eighteen years of
age and supports a family of five.
She is quick, keen, thorough, a paragon of office efficiency, with an alert,
original, initiative mind, and an insatiable appetite for work. No one
ever heard her complain of being
tired or lament if work piled up so
that sixteen hours a day was required
to clear it. She answered my second
question, woman-like, with two others.
"Now don't you think," she said,
"that I've quite enough responsibility on my shoulders already? Have
you ever known any woman that has
to take a man's place and work man-
fashion for a living bothering herself
about her right to vote?"
I humbly feinted with the excuse
of a treacherous memory. Cowardice
brought its penalty, for she was irritated.
"What do I know about the franchise?" she pursued. "What does one
woman out of every hundred know
about politics? And they don't want
to either. If you'll notice it, you'll
find that it is the woman with a
comfortable home and a husband to
look after her, who has time to shout
about being trampled upon and not
allowed to vote. The girls that are
in business to keep their families
aren't agitating. It's the woman with
time on her hands and a good-natured husband to humour her, that
can go in for woman's rights. Of
course they get some women to follow them, ^ots of women wouldn't
be happy if they haun't some fad to
amuse themselves with. Curiosity
stimulates this one, but to make women vote would be ridiculous. Nine-
tenths of them don't want to, and
the other tenth are not the kind of
women who ever will represent feminine sentiment or the business woman's viewpoint. Why, God forgive
me if I haven't been talking politics
of a sort myself, and I loathe the
word!"
This one girl's view I venture to
think is that of a large percentage of
her sex, and for that reason, and because it is well expressed, I quote
it. The crusade of the suffragettes
is not the crusade of the business woman for equal place in the political
as well as the commercial life of her
country. The business woman rather
looks upon her political sister with
contempt. She sizes her up either as
a crank or else an hysterical woman
sufficiently well provided for by an
indulgent husband to be able to amuse
herself with her fad. That the suffragette may be violently sincere she
freely admits—but this does not abate
her poor opinion of her. Nor does it
alter her opinion that thc suffragette
represents a minority of women in
her opinions, and in her politics shows
herself somewhat unsexed.
"There will bc time enough to seriously consider the enfranchisement
of women when a majority of the
women want it," is her conclusion—
to which may be added the warning
that this is one question in which it
is eminently the part of wisdom to
"go slow." Not to enlarge the franchise prematurely is a very much
simpler thing to taking it back again
if experience prove  the  granting to
have been a dire mistake.
That is the situation in New Zealand today and public men of the new
Dominion make no bones about it.
The influence of the woman vote is
very plainly evident in New Zealand,
where it seems to have already largely femininized the national character.
Public business is in many departments conducted in a very pretty way,
and I have it from one of the best
known leaders in New Zealand's affairs, that the woman vote is usually
exercised illogically and without regard to state financial responsibility
or the business capacity of candidates.
"Enfranchised woman," said the
New Zealand public man to whom I
refer, "was from the first urged by
the political leaders of her sex that
her duty was to find out the probable
candidates, and institute searching inquiry into their moral character and
history. That in many cases meant
voting for the respectable sweater
who lives a life of conjugal propriety, and by means of starvation
wages drives many women into the
street. It certainly suggested that
every political organization of women
became a scandal-collecting machine,
and that's not the way to do good
work in politics. There never was
advantage in this unification of public
and private fitness. The most saintly
man is very often worse than useless
as a practical worker for his country's good, and there have been many
great men—great patriots and great
statesmen—who have had their private failings, great also, which do not
destroy, however, the value of their
service to their country. We have
latterly got a lot of hysterical, harmful laws upon our statute-book, and
the woman voter is largely to be
blamed. It is her disposition to fill
parliament with picturesque, well-
meaning visionaries rather than business men."
It is subject of no surprise to find
that New Zealand is not a drinking country—that is, a liquor
drinking country. The temperament
of the people never impels them to
alcoholic or other excesses. But given
the weapon of the ballot and the women promptly proceeded to extremes
in radical legislation. It is the hard
and fast law throughout New Zealand
that hotels must close at io o'clock.
Not only the bar, but the hotel. The
place must be locked and barred and
no one not resident there may be upon the premises. Nor is a guest permitted to entertain friends after the
fateful hour of io o'clock or on a
Sunday. Of course there are many
practical people who regard this as
carrying regulation to a ridiculous
extreme, but the laws are made by
home-dwellers, not residents in hotels, and the woman voter decides that
10 o'clock is quite late enough for
anyone to be out of bed—and legislates accordingly.
Next year the ladies propose going further and pressing for the total
prohibition of retail liquor selling-—
although why wholesale consumption
of an admitted evil should be preferable to retail is not yet clear to me.
For the time being the prohibition
crusade holds the centre of the stage
of New Zealand politics, the rival
forces temporarily abandoning all
other battling in order to bring their
ful strengths to bear. It may be
that in taking no active part in the
great Australian debate: "The barmaid—to be or not to be?" the New
Zealand women folk have merely held
the question in abeyance, hoping that
in the prohibition in its entirety of
retail liquor selling they will incidentally dispose of the subordinate
barmaid issue most conclusively. But
meanwhile the barmaid flourishes in
New Zealand undisturbed by the woman vote, although the stern facts are
very much in evidence that year by
year the bars claim the fairest of the
country's budding womanhood, speedily take the bloom from their innocence by making them a bait for the
vicious instincts dormant in average
man, cultivating their appetite for
drink, making them hourly auditors
for the "smutty" story, and ultimately delivering them first as recruits
and then as recruiting agents for num-
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Bain Wagons and Carts.
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I
1
It is evident that prohibition has a
greater chance of success in New Zealand than in almost any other British
country. Prohibition is indeed already in force by local option in a
number of New Zealand towns, Inver*
cargill (the southermost city of thc
world) being one of these. And I
greatly doubt if anywhere else in
New Zealand there is so much drinking and drunkenness as in Invercar-
gill. Liquor may be imported there
by individuals for their private use
or gift, but may not be purchased or
sold. The temptation or restriction
excites an appetite and there is said
to be double the amount of hard
drinking in this population centre
since the prohibition law became effective, while at the same time the
standard of first-class hotel accommodation is the lowest in New Zealand. Indeed the quality of hotel accommodation seems ever to deteriorate and the low groggery and vilely
adulterated liquor to be more and
more in evidence as restrictive measures are made abnormally drastic.
As suggested above, the woman
vote has been exercised in New Zealand not as it had been expected ,t
would be, in increased penalties fo:
seduction and similar offences, or in
the elimination of sex discrimination
in the wage scale to the detriment of
the woman worker who does a man's
work with the same degree of proficiency displayed by the man. It ha;
been exercised violently, uncompromisingly, positively in the extinction
of the social evil as officially recognized, with increased penalties ancl
rigorous enforcement, all bagnios and
similar houses have seemingly been
stamped out, and New Zealand towns
no longer possess a tenderloin dis
trict known of all adult residents;
shunned by all respectable, and under
the watchful eye of the public medical
authorities and that of the police. New
Zealand's women by their votes have
thus to all appearances and officially,
by their chosen weapon the ballot
solved the great social problem of tin
centuries. The inevitable consequence
is calculated to disgust the visitor
from the most wide-open town of
barbarous, man-governed, practical
America. Harpies of every age nightly parade the streets of New Zealand
cities, boldly soliciting every pedestrian. Houses of assignation and il
legal liquor selling flourish abundantly. Contagious disease becomes more
general, since medical as well as police supervision of loose women becomes no longer possible. And the
bad woman and the innocent, suecep-
tible girl are brought directly in contact to the undoing of the latter-
all through this reform.
The woman vote in New Zealand
has, I was told by a member of the
government at Wellington, been very
active in the exploitation of fads and
freaks.   "Let's try it" is the cry with
which every few and visionary political  shibboleth   is  welcomed.     The
ladies decline (just as in less advanced
countries) to listen to the serious, sincere words of warning upon the text
of reckless  expenditure,  or  explanation of thc immutable laws of tradi
and finance.   "Whoever wants to listen to that dry talk" they coo—ancl
plunge again into the vortex of their
favorite   political   dissipation   of   thc
time-being.    Perhaps in this  respect
the woman voter is not so very different from the average  male  voter
who has learned that financial statistics will clear a public hall almost as
rapidly as a dog fight or an alarm of
fire.   But the    average    man  if  he
doesn't  listen  to  financial  speeches
will vote for those whom he knows
|as sound business men.   The woman
oter bestows her franchise less sane-
y and safely.      The  lady    voter  if
harmed with fine phrases, and while
incerely   and   seriously   anxious   to
ightly exercise her franchise for the
dvantage  of  her  country  and   the
lpme, she is prone to extravagance in
oth legislation   and   administration.
'Oh the government can pay for it,"
s the careless response to criticism
\>r warning—for they have a blindl;
lial faith in the inexhaustible publii
urse,  and  decline  to  consider  that
oney must  first be put  into it in
rder that it may be taken from it
[Discounting   the   financial   capability
of the country and living beyond thc
country's income (the over-expenditure being for legislation, administration, civil service, etc., and not for
reproductive public works of development character) is said to be steadily
lowering New Zealand's credit, depreciating the value of the country's
securities, and making ultimately foi
national bankruptcy.
Restaurants, cafes, and kindred institutions of American life are prac
tically unknown in New Zealand
which is a country of home life. S.
also are absent the boot-black's stand
the modern barber shop, the manicurist's parlour—the dozen and one typical institutions of American city lite.
Hairdressers' parlours of course there
are—always in association with thi.
tobacconist business. But there an
but three operations known to thc
New Zealand or the Australian barbe:
—the shave, the hair-cut and the
shampoo. The price of the shave <
three pence (5 cents). Hair cuttin;
ancl shampooing is six pence. Tin
barber who earns the equivalent o:
ten dollars per week is doing well ii
Labour's and the Ladies' paradise.
But to return to the drinking pro
pensities of the New Zealander. While
his temperament and instincts do not
incline him to indulgence in alcoholic drink, he is a slave to tea, thai
lingual laxative throughout Americ;
sacred to womankind. A wise mat
has 'aid that a woman is known b\
what she wears; a man by what hc
drinks. The tea-drinking habit in
New Zealand is said to have been
e\ ulved out of the restriction of liquoi
selling—that and the fact that undet
present-day conditions the New Zealander has very little money in hi.
pockets. Tea is in order at almost
any hour of morning, afternoon and
evening. It is a certainty that with
all the talk of the development of ;
national sentiment in New Zealand
the people of the New Dominioi
could never follow the example o
the population of any New Zealand
city getting together and throwing al
their tea into the harbour is to con
jure up a picture the most stalwar
imagination would necessarily decline
to accept.
In the New Zealand office world
they go to "work" at about 10 o'clocl
—have tea at II—lunch from 12 tc
1 or 1.30—partake of more tea at 3—
and close at five. The first half hour
of the office day is devoted to taking
out the books and the last three-quarters to putting them away. I went
into a big shipping office not long
ago to purchase tickets. Three clerks
were at a small table behind the counter, busy with a teapot, some bis
cuits, and a jar of marmalade. One
of them reluctantly came to the counter by slow freight, and I stated my
business.
"Oh," said he, "you'll have to com
in again—we're just having tea."
It  made me  almost  homesick.    I
was so very foreign.
To meet the cost of immenselj
complicated and cumbrous administrative and legislative machinery, and
at the same time avoid the too obvious appearance of excessive taxation, they have a sly way in New
Zealand of prescribing petty assess
ments and taxations in a variety of
petty ways. A penny stamp must bc
put on every business document.
There are late fees and early fees
and Sunday fees and haste fees on
telegrams and letters. Telegram
forms are charged for; so are railway
time-tables. And if you open an account at the bank they charge you
ten shillings for taking your money
and another ten shillings for a chequebook, and every cheque has to be
stamped to the glory of the government or it will not draw any better
than a plugged pipe. Every once in
a while (while waiting for his tea)
a clerk turns up your account and
languidly charges you for stationery
or wear and tear on the bank premises or insurance or alimony or
something else of the kind. As Mark
Twain would remark, it is as easy
for a New Zealand bank to make
money as for a cat to have twins.
Woman-influenced   and   labour-dictated legislation, largely in the over-
regulation of the liquor traffic, reduc-
(Continued on  Page Seven)
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Marie Phlllppl,
of Omaha, occupation, Lady, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of section 21, township
1, range 4, Poudrier Survey; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to place of beginning, being said
section 21.
Dated January 15th, 1908.
MARIE PHILIPPI.
Feb. IE A. Olson, Agent.
$1,000 Reward
THE GOVERNMENT of the
PROVINCE of BRITISH COLUMBIA hereby offers a reward of ONE
THOUSAND DOLLARS for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the two men who, on the
25th day of February, 1908, at the
Gorge Hotel, near the City of Victoria, B.C., armed with revolvers, entered and, while committing a robbery
in the said Hotel, shot and wounded
one Richard Dancey.
DESCRIPTION.
No. 1—Man about 5 feet 11 inches in
height, slim build, dressed in dark-
colored clothing; wore dark cap.
No. 2—Man about 5 feet 8 or 9 inches
in height; slim build;   dressed   in
dark-colored  clothing;  wore  dark
cap.   Both men were armed with
dark-colored   revolvers and  wore
long white cotton masks.
FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS reward  will be  given  for  information
leading to the arrest and conviction of
either one of the said meh.
By order, F. S. HUSSEY,
Superintendent of Provincial Police.
Victoria, B.C., 26th February, 1908.
Claim No. 2—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
28, township 18; thence north 60 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south SO
chains to the beach; thence easterly and
northerly along beach to point of commencement.
Located January 25, 1908.
CHRISTEN   JACOBSEN.
Claim No. 8—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
28, township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement; 640 acres, more
or less.
MRS, CHRISTINA McALPINE,
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 4—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
19, township 18; thence north 60 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east to shore; thence
along shore to point of commencement.
Located January 25, 1908.
FRANCIS J. A. GREEN.
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 6—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
24. township 27; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to point
of commencement; 640 acres, more or
less.
Located January 25,  1908.
WILLIAM  EDWARD NORRIS.
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 6—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.W. corner of section
30, township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement;  640 acres,  more or
Located January 25.  1908.
WILLIAH TYRONE POWER,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 7—Commencing at a post
planted about 40 chains north of the
S.E. corner of section 30, township 18;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 81)
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement;  640 acres,  more or less.
Located January  29,  1908.
TYNINGHAM VERE PIGOTT,
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 8—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.W.  comer of section
31, township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement; 640 acres, more or
less.
Located January 29. 1908.
MINA C. E. NORRIS,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 9—Commencing at a post
planted about 40 chains north of the
S. E. corner of section 31, township 18;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement.
GEORGE DAT,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 10—Commencing at a post
planted about 60 chains north of the
S. E. corner of section 28, township 18;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement; 640 acres, more or less.
Located January 25, 1908.
WELLINGTON  McALPINE,
Feb. 22      Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Noakes,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Civil Engineer, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
land—on Porcher Island:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 1292, about 2
miles distant and ln a southeasterly direction from Jap Bay; thence north 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing
160 acres,  more or less.
Dated Dec. 20th, 1907.
Jan. 18 ARTHUR NOAKES.
TO HOME SEEKERS.
100 ACRES
Six miles from Victoria by water
and ten by excellent road. About 20
acres fenced, 10 acres cleared ready
for cultivation; good soil; balance in
good timber. Building containing
two rooms, also two stables and loft.
About one-quarter mile from sea-
front, with magnificent view. Good
hunting. For quick sale, $2,000, terms
to suit.   Box 162, Victoria.
NOTICE
The bridge at Craigflower over Victoria Arm ls closed to vehicular traffic
until further notice.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Lands and Works Department, Victoria,
B.C., 9th March, 1908.
BEFW
When you wear one of our
toupees you have the satisfaction of knowing that it is a
perfect fit and is natural in
colour and correct in style.
Write today for our descriptive catalogue and price list of
toupees, wigs, switches and
transformations.
B. C. HAIR GOODS CO.
436   Granville  Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
AGENTS WANTED
We pay resident agents good
salary to represent us during
their spare time.
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Qovernment St., Victoria
Y. W. C. A.
1208 Government Street
VICTORIA.
Reading and rest rooms, lunch and
tea rooms. Instruction in English,
French, Music, Physical Culture,
Needlework, Domestic Science, etc.
Bible Class. Social evening every
Wednesday.
Readverttsed from The Week of Oct. 24.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Vancouver Timber & Trading Co., of Vancouver, B.C.,
loggers, Intends to appjy for a special
timber licence over the following described lands, bounded as follows:—
1. Commencing at a post planted 80
chains north from the northeast corner of T.L. 11,892; thence north 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 120 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
Dated 14th day of October, 1907.
VANCOUVER TIMBER &
TRADING CO., LTD.
Feb. 22 C. O. P. Olts, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that William Croteau
of Aldermere, B.C., occupation Farmer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner; thence north 20 chains
to McClure Lake; thence along McClure
Lake in an east southerly direction 43
chains, more or less; thence west 40
chains to place of beginning and making 40 acres more or less, and known
as the southwest fractional quarter section of 36, township 6, Range 5.
Dated November 20, 1907.
Jan. 18 WILLIAM CROTEAU.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Jennie Croteau
of Aldermere, B.C., occupation housewife, Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner; thence north 40 chs.;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence west 40 chains to place
of beginning and known as the northwest quarter section of 30, Tp. 6, Rge.
5,  and  containing  160  acres,  more  or
Dated 23rd of November, 1907.
Jan. 18 WILLIAM CROTEAU.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that W. N. Campbell
of Victoria, occupation Civil Engineer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest comer of. lot 1294, (J.R.
Cody) one mile west of Jap Inlet. Porcher Island, thence north 40 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east 40 chains, containing 160 acres.
Dated Dec. 16th, 1907.
W.  N.  CAMPBELL,
Jan 18 J. J. Templeton, Agent.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that J. J. Templeton
of Victoria, occupation surveyor, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of lot 1293, M. S.
McLeod, one-half mlle west of Jap Inlet Porcher Island, thence south 20
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 20 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 160 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th,  1907.
Jan. 18 J. J. TEMPLETON.
Y. M. C. A.
A home for young men away from
home. Comfortable Reading Room,
Library, Game Room, Billiards, Hot
and Cold Shower Baths, Gymnasium
and efficient instruction.
Manitoba Free Press on file for
Middle West visitors.
40 BROAD STREET.
VICT0   A
ST. ANDREWS
COLLEGE
TORONTO
A lesldeatlal aad Day School Ior Boy.
Handsome New Buildings. Larg*
Athletic Field. Careful Oversight in
every Department. First Class Staff.
Lower and Upper School. Boys prepared for the Universities and Business.
Calendar sent on Request.
lev.D.Bruce Macdonald,M.A..LL.D-
Principal
HOLLY TREES
Prices from 25 cents to $5.00, according to size. Write for seed and tree
catalog.
JAY & CO.
VICTORIA, B. C.
LATEST NUMBERS
English
Magazine
CHUMS
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THE STRAND
PEARSONS
PUNCH
KNI GHT'SBOOKSTORE
VICTOBIA, B. O.
BEDDING
PLANTS
Cheap Prices.   Get our price list.
Johnston's Seed Store
City Market
VICTORIA
THOMAS CATTERALL
Builder and General Contractor.
Tenders given on Brick, Stone and
Frame, Alterations, Parquetry Flooring, Office, Bank, Store and Saloon
Fittings.
Pile   Driving,  Wharves  and   Dock
Shed constructed and repaired.
VICTORIA. THB WBEK, SATURDAY MARCH 21, 1908
Incorporated 1905
Capital, $500,000.00
Capital increased
in 1907
to ...$2,000,000.00
Subscribed
Capital,     $550,000
Reserve . . $50,000
Surplus, Jan. 30,
1907   .   .   $130,000
J. B. MATHERS, Gen. Man.
IN CLOSING UP ESTATES
•lther as Executors or Assienees
the Dominion Trust Co., Ltd., Is
never Influenced by ulterior motives. Their entire ambition,
effort, and energy is directed towards securing the best possible
returns for all concerned.
Name this company executor ln
your will. Blank will forms furnished free of charge and stored
ln our safety deposit vaults,
when we are made your executor.
DOMINION   TRUST CO.,
Limited.
328 Hasting Street, West,
Vancouver, B. O,
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THEWEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
83% Government Street...Victoria, B.C.
526   Hastings Street.. ..Vancouver, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE..Manager and Editor
On Making Promises.
It is a truism that one should never
make a promise and then break it,
but I have always been in doubt whether the injunction is based upon regard for the reputation of the prom-
iser or the feelings of the promisee.
Both considerations are entitled to
weight, but there are broader issues
involved, and the subject is one well
worthy of a few. moments' study.
The subject has its roots back in
childhood days, when we were always crying, like the horseleech,
"Give, give," and urging our parents
to pledge themselves by a promise.
Since we have grown up, it has been
drilled into us that we should be particularly careful in making promises
to children, because it is so easy to
dull the line edge of their sensitive natures and to shatter their faith in
humanity by breaking our word. This
is an impressive aspect of the case,
and one to which too much importance cannot be attached. We shall
never know how much of the misdoing of mature years is due to the
reflex influence of promise-breaking
in youth.
But I want to deal with thc matter
mainly as it effects men in business
and in public life. The gravity of the
subject is forced upon my notice by
the string of disappointed hangers-on.
all carrying a grievance and all complaining that they had been thrown
down by someone who promised
them an appointment.
In the lirst place. T must confess to
having very little respect for the man
who has ho more grit than to place
himself in this humiliating position.
Before 1 would go to the same man,
day after day. begging for a soft snap
and forcing him to perjure his soul by
repeating a lying promise every twenty-four hours, would dig, even if
blistered my hands and broke my
back. T wonder if such men ever
heard the phrase, "The dignity of
labour," if they ever read a single line
of Carlyle, or if they were born with
a vestige of that proper spirit which
every true man should feel.
If a man had a spark of intelligence
he would know that in nine cases out
of ten a deferred promise means a
broken promise, and at any rate after
the lirst two or three visits he is
either put to work or mentally dropped. This is true even of strictly busi
ness engagements, but it.is if possible
more emphatically true of political
promises.
The experiences of men who live in
expectation of political plums would
make an angel weep. It is true that
"kissing goes by favour," and that he
who has the most pull invariably gets
the job, but the sadness of the outlook
is that for every one with pull there
are hundreds who nevertheless delude
themselves with the expectation of
success.
I have sat in many an ante-room,
and seen suppliant after suppliant file
through; I could read their fate to a
certainty. Ninety-nine per cent, wore
that supplicating, self-despising air
which bespeaks the congenital sycophant. It would be a sin to give these
men public work, because they possess none of the qualifications which
would enable them to render efficient
public service. And yet they return
day after day, until life becomes a
burden to the man who listens to
their appeal, and who lacks the courage and the kindness to turn them
down at the first.
This phase of public life is demoral
izing and sickening. This army of
hangers-on are as truly snowed under
as if they belonged to the submerged
tenth. They are unstable, they have
neglected their own business, and now
they exist, it cannot be called living,
by the favour of a politician, who is
able occasionally to throw them a
few crumbs. If they work three
months in the year, they do well; during the balance of the time they are
waiting for the next session or looking out for a bye-election, a municipal
election, a school trustee election, or
any other kind of an election where
the professional heeler can earn a few
dollars in a more or less dubious manner, and mainly because some political
boss has made them promises which
he is unable to fulfil, but which keeps
them in a constant state of suspense
and expectation.
The result is as demoralizing for
the man who promises. How he must
despise himself when, day by day, he
doles out some specious excuse and
lives under the haunting shadow of
the fear that he may alienate a few
votes. Inevitably he becomes in time
a degenerate; he may continue to
hold office, but he has lost his self-
respect, and men of insight have long
ago found him out and mentally labelled him.
I am quite aware that the question
of tact and diplomacy crops up in this
connection. I have been told again
and again how Sir John A. Macdonald
would convert an enemy into a friend
by the charm of manner with which
he would refuse a favour, and it must
be conceded that tact should be used
in all these relations. The turning
down an applicant does not necessarily mean kicking the poor fellow out
of doors, but I am prepared to maintain that more tact is shown in dismissing an applicant with the settled
conviction that his request will not
be granted than in what is called rt
"smooth" method of handling, which
leaves him in doubt and brings him
back again to-morrow.
When all is said and done, men respect a man, and manhood pre-sup-
poses at any rate a measure of manliness, and with this quality goes that
spirit of fairness and justice which
will refuse to raise false hopes and
which knows that it is knider never
to excite them. The strong man is he
who has the courage of his convictions, the strong leader is he who
lives up to them.
The Nanaimo press, which is in
close touch with the coal trade, ami
therefore in a position to know the
facts, declares that already there is a
noticeable improvement; not only is
there a prospect of resuming shipments to San Francisco on a larger
scale, but the demand for bunker coal
is increasing. Two large steamers
were in port on Monday last. Mr. T
R. Stockett, the general manager of
the Western Fuel Company, also confirms these anticipations.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a license to prospect for coal, on
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner of B. M. Richardson
Claim, being about one mile and a quarter northwest of Skidegate Inlet, Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence north eighty chains:
thence east eighty chains; thence south
eighty chains; thence west eighty chains
back to place of commencement, containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
AD. 1908.
D. R. YOUNG.
Mch 21 William Woods, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
(30) days after date, I intend to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal, on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the B. M. Richardson Claim, being about one mile and a
quarter northwest of Skidegate Inlet,
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence north eighty chains;
thence west eighty chains; thence south
eighty chains; thence east eighty chains
back to place of commencement, containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D. 1908
Mch 21
C. A. YOUNG,
William Woods, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
(30) days after date, I intend to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal, on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile and a quarter north of Skidegate Inlet and mouth of the Honna
River, Graham Island, Queen Charlotte
Islands Group; thence south eighty
chains; thence east eighty chains; thence
north eighty chains; thence west eighty
chains back to place of commencement,
containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D. 1908.
Mch 21
B. M. RICHARDSON.
William Woods, Agent.
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
(30) days after date, I intend to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospeot for coal
on  the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of B. M. Richardson
Claim, being about one mile and a
quarter northwest of Skidegate Inlet,
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence south eighty chains;
thence east eighty chains; thence north
eighty chains; thence west eighty
chains; back to place of commencement,
containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D. 1908.
Mch 21
R. W. RAYSAY,
William Woods, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast. Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of Blinkinsop Bay,
about 100 feet west of the wharf; running west 60 chains; thence north 60
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south along the shore back to the place
of commeneement.
Dated  February 24th,  1908.
March 14 C. G. JOHNSTONE.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of Blinkinsop Bay,
three-quarters of a mile from the entrance of said bay, running west 80
chains; thence south 60 chains; thence
east along the shore of bay inside of
Jesse Island; thence northerly along the
shore of Blinkinsop Bay to the place
of commencement.
Dated February 22nd, 1908.
O. C. BASS.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range l.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for the purchase of the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the east shore of Blinkinsop
Bay, three-quarters of a mile from the
outlet of the creek at the head of bay,
running north along the shore 60 chains;
thence east 60 chains; thence south 60
chains; thence west 60 chains back to
the place of commencement.
Dated February 24th, 1908.
L. P. LOCKE.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
Distriot of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, Intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the head of Bllnklnsop Bay, 60 feet
north of the creek running to the bay;
running west 60 chains; thence north
60 chains; thence east 60 chains; thence
south 60 chains back to the place of
commencement.
Dated February  24th,  1908.
M. J. G. WHITE.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned. Intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
one mlle west-north-west from Jesse
Island, running west 60 chains; thence
north 60 chains; thence east 60 chains;
thence south 60 chains back to place
of commencement.
Dated February 22nd, 1908.
G. E. GIBSON.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of bay inside of
Jesse Island, one quarter of a mile
north of Jesse Island, running west 60
chains; thence north 60 chains; thence
east 60 chains; thence south 60 chains
back to the place of commencement.
Dated February 22nd,  1908.
H. G. ANDERSON.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
CLOISONNE
The Japanese poteries are noted for their CLOISONNE and
SATSUMA WARES. The firm of T. HATTORI is celebrated in
Japan for making the finest grade of cloisonne ware and holding
the appointment of manufacturer to the Imperial household. We
have imported direct from T. Hattori an exceedingly choice collection of his highest grade CLOISONNE WARE. An inspection
will assure you of the beauty of the workmanship. All prices are
marked in plain figures and range from $2 up.
SATSUMA
HODOTA of Yokohama has a world-wide reputation for turning
out the finest SATSUMA WARE. We have paid HODOTA'S
prices in order to secure the best. The goods consist of beautiful
vases of all sizes and shapes; cups and saucers; rosebowls; tea
caddies;   teapots;   christening bowls.    Prices range from $2 up.
Every piece of Satsuma and Cloisonne Ware we are now
offering is from the hands of the old artists, who are rapidly dying
out.   These goods will steadily increase in value.
Challoner & Mitchell
Diamond Merchants and Silversmiths
Government Street Victoria, B. C.
Victor-Berliner
Vaudeville
How would you like to hear
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TIMBER! TIMBER! TIMBER!
QUATSINO   SOUND,   BEDWELL SOUND, RACE NARROWS.
GUARANTEED 2,000 FT. TO THE ACRE.
PRICE $2.50 TO 93.00.    ALL LICENSES  ISSUED.
ARTHUR BELL
ROOMS 14 and 16
MAHON   BUILDING,   GOVERNMENT   STREET, VICTORIA.
P. O. BOX 765. PHONE 1385. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH ai, 1908.
a 7-000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000<KK>00<><>OCK>00000000
^OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO'OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
MORE NEW CARPETS
Still once again do we
chronicle the arrival of additions to our immense carpet stock. This time it is a
carload of carpets from the
famous Templeton looms,
and includes some of their
nicest efforts in Axminster
carpets. While Axminsters
predominate, there is still a
liberal sprinkling of Brussels
and Wiltons in this shipment. In each line are to
, be found many handsome de-
! signs that have never before
been shown here, and designs you won't find elsewhere in the city this year.
It is real economy to buy
Templeton's carpets. They
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ wear fully twice as long as
most makes, and in the majority of cases cost more than do these common kinds. The
quality is guaranteed by the makers and by this house—the largest dealers in carpets
in Western Canada. We have also received a very large consignment of Ingrain Wool
Squares, and have now a very complete range of sizes. The choice of colourings and
designs gives you great scope in the choosing, and you can "match" or carry out any
"scheme." These artistic squares are hard wearers, and are genuinely satisfactory
floor coverings. There is no such complete showing of carpets in the West. We are
truly "The Carpet Store of the West," and—buy your carpets at a carpet store—it pays.
Axbury Carpets—This is a splendid carpet style and in it we have an unusually fine range of patterns and col-
Axminster Carpets—A splendid range of
pretty and attractive designs in this
favorite carpet. Prices range at, per
yard, $3.75, $3.00, $2.25 and $2.00
Wilton Carpets—In Wiltons we also
show a very extensive range of handsome designs and splendid range of
colorings. Per yard, $3.50, $2.75,
$2.25 and   $1.90
Tapestry Carpets—In low-priced, hard-
wearing carpets we show a splendid
line of Tapestry Carpet at a great
choice of prices. We have it at,
per yard, $1.25, $1.00, 85c and 75c
onngs.
yard ..
All    at    once   price.
Per
|$2.7S
Brussels Carpets—In our offerings of
this Housekeeper's Carpet you'll find
a great choice of styles. It is' probably the most serviceable carpet one
could buy. Per yard, $2.00, $1.75, $1.60,
$1.50, $1.40, $1.25 and $1.00
Velvet Carpet—This is a nice carpet
style from the famous Crossley looms.
At, per yard  $1.70
BEDROOM FURNITURE
Chiffoniere—This is a very attractive
style in mahogany finish, polished
highly and finished in best possible
manner. The design is new and
pleasing. Has large oval, bevel
mirror of finest quality, ancl there are
five large drawers. The price is only,
each    $25.00
Some Dainty Bedroom Furniture is shown
in our Showrooms today—items that are most
useful and also highly decorative. These furniture pieces are highly attractive in design,
and would make a most acceptable addition
to the furnishings of any bedroom. The
pieces shown are moderate-priced styles, and
you'll agree are very fine values—representative of the splendid values to be found all
through this establishment. The Chiffoniere is
an almost indispensable bedroom furniture
item, and the Lady's Dresser a great convenience. Both are priced within the reach
of most any buyer, and there is no reason why
you shiuldn't enjoy the comforts of these useful and attractive articles.
Bureau and Stand—A splendid style in
mahogany finish. This is a very
pleasing design and the workmanship
on both pieces is the finest. The
bureau has large oval, bevel mirror,
two small and two large drawers,
stand has large drawer and cupboard.
Excellent  value  at    $38.00
Ladies' Dresser—Here is a style in this
very useful piece of furniture which
should appeal to every lady who admires an excellent combination of
style and usefulness. This dresser
has a large tall mirror of first quality, two small and one large drawers,
and is made of finest quartered oak,
finished golden. The price is fair
at, each   $28.00
Bureau and Stand—This is another pleasing style made in handsome golden
oak. The finish is as superior as the
design is pleasing, making a really
handsome set. The bureau has large,
shaped bevel mirror, two small and
one large drawers. The stand has
one large drawer and cupboard. The
whole is priced at the low figure
of   $45.00
"THE LOWBOY"—This is a style of gentlemen's Chiffoniere which has found much
favour with discriminating men. It is constructed on entirely different lines from
the usual Chiffoniere styles. There is an abundance-of drawers and trays of several
sizes and styles for the storage of various articles. The whole is closed with two
doors, making a very neat and stylish article.   Price is, each $40.00
GET YOUR HOUSE-CLEANING HELPS AT THIS STORE.
TO DEALERS
We solicit correspondence
from dealers who are not
already acquainted with us
and who wish to get
acquainted with the largest
wholesalers of Homefurnish-
ings in the West. Try furniture as a "side-line"—we
help you.
WEILER BROS.
Complete Home Furnishers,       VICTORIA.
TO RETAILERS
Isn't it poor business to
carry a large stock in your
little town when the quantities you require may be purchased from us on short
notice. We help you. Prompt
and satisfactory service guaranteed.
?J^___-rtrtOAOO<wv>ooo<>00000000000000000000000000000000
?ggggggggooooooooooooooooooo^^
Sporting
Comment.
A few of the faithful supporters of
association football braved the elements and put in an appearance at
Oak Bay last Saturday, to witness
the match between the Y.M.C.A. and
J.B.A.A., and were rewarded by seeing a game very much after the style
of a burlesque. The grounds were
in a frightful state, which made it
impossible for either of the teams to
play good football, but to the credit
of the players they put up as good a
game as could be expected under the
circumstances. The result was a win
for the Bays by the narrow margin of
3—2. On the form of Saturday, it
was easily seen that had Victoria entered one team in the Island scries instead of three, a first-class eleven
could have been selected. It would
be unfair to criticize either of the
teams, as under the conditions it
could not expected to have first-class
football. Every player tried hard,
and although there were several fouls
they were not made with the intention
of putting an opponent out of business, but rather through the inability
of the other players to hold their feet.
While the Bays and Y.M.C.A. were
striving for honours on one pitch, the
Y.M.C.A. and Victoria West intermediates yere trying conclusions right
alongside, the result of which was a
win for the latter by the score of
8—1. The game was very ragged,
owing to the condition of the field,
but the winners showed that they
were the superiors of their opponents
in no small manner.
championship, and it is very probable
that it will require a game in this city
to decide the question of supremacy.
Both teams have won a game, the
Ladysmith boys winning on Saturday
after what is conceded to be one of
the finest games ever played in British Columbia. The Nanaimo team
had been strengthened by the addition
of several players from the Mainland,
but even their assistance was not sufficient to obtain a win. In this connection I owe an apology to the
Ladysmith team for a statement in
my remarks last week. Referring to
the teams, I stated that the Nanaimo
team would have six Mainlanders and
Ladysmith five. This was given me
on good authority, and I also took i.
from the daily press, but I am pleased
to see that the Ladysmith team only
had one Mainlander on the team, and
he had already played a game. According to press reports, the game
was very fast and attracted a large
attendance. Both these teams have
to play the Esquimalt team in thi.
city, and if they succeed in winning
they will have to play off for thc
championship, but in case the Esquimalt team wins, it will be tie with the
other two for first filace. According
to the constitution of the league, a
tie must be played off on neutral
grounds, and as Victoria is the only
neutral ground for Ladysmith and
Nanaimo, it is very likely that Victorians will be given the opportunity
of witnessing these teams in action.
minion taking part, it would be a
good advertisement for Victoria to
havc a team in the competition, but
evidently this has been overlooked.
If I understand correctly, the newly formed baseball club is to have the
Oak Bay grounds after April 1, in order that the playing space may be
put in condition for the summer
sports. If I am correct in this, there
is no doubt but that there will be a
conflict between the footballers and
baseballers. According to the present
schedule, there are sufficient football
games to be played to take up every
Saturday afternoon until the end of
April, and in that case it will be too
late to make any improvements to the
park which are so badly needed. 1
hope that some satisfactory arrangement is reached before it is too late.
Tommy Burns still retains his title
as heavyweight champion of the
world, having defeated Jem Roche,
the Irish champion, in a very decisive
manner. Jt only required one round
to dispose of the Irishman, and the
knockout was accomplished in such a
manner as to leave but little doubt as
to the ability of Burns to deliver the
punch. It is now up to Bums to
meet Johnson, and unless I miss my
guess, thc coloured gentleman will
not last much longer than half tin
limit.
UMPIRE.
The Ladysmith and Nanaimo teams
are   now  tied   for  the   race  for  the
According to the rules which govern the competition for the People's
Shield, all players should bc registered not later than to-day, and as yet
nothing has been clone towards entering a Victoria team. It is too bad
that some effort was not made to
have the capital city of the Province
represented. With teams representing nearly every province in the Do-
The Cranbrook Herald makes the
following true statement of prevailing
conditions in some newspaper offices:
"Tt is a deplorable fact that a few
tickets or a two-inch advertisement
will fix thc average Western newspaper sfi far as notices go. Most of
thc attractions on the road to-day in
this part of thc country realize tliat
the Herald is not built that way.
Hence the trouble."
I flusic and      |
J   The Drama. *
The programme announced for the
Xew York Symphony Orchestra engagement, which appears in Victoria
Theatre before the end of the season,
is unusually attractive, while the solo
features are bound to arouse more
than ordinary interest. The Orchestra's concertmeister on the present
tour is Mr. Alexander Saslavsky, a
violinist of rare attainments. Saslavsky is a Russian by birth, a graduate
of the Imperial Conservatory of Vienna, and he has been associated with
the famous orchestra leader since
coming to this country ten years ago.
His solo playing is marked by fire
and dash ancl with all the Slav's innate sense of expression. Another
member of tin* organization who frequently appears as a soloist is Mr.
Leo Schulz, 'cellist, a German musician who came to merica when Nik-
isch first appeared as leader of the
Boston Symphony.
At the New Grand.
Xext week's features will he Naomi
Ethardo, European noelty equilibrist;
Maud Sutton and eompany nf three
people, in a little playlet called "Cifl-
derel"; Lopez and Lopez, Spanish instrumentalists and ocalists; the Doria
Opera Trio; Golden ancl Hughes
blackface coined) act; Thos. J. Price
singing the illustrated song. "Yankee
Rose," and new moving pictures, entitled "Uncle by Marriage" and "Doing:, of a  Poodle."
distanced all competitors in the race
for unreliable, sensational despatches.
Its character is so well known that
its comments are harmless, but when
it prints a false news item with all the
circumstantiality of truth, it may once
in a while obtain credence. Recently
it published a despatch declaring that
Victoria was suffering from a violem
epidemic, and that many deaths had
resulted. Still more recently it announced that thc population of Vernon was being decimated by diphtheria. Such statements inflict a very-
real and serious injury upon the
places libelled, and there ought to bc
some means of bringing the World to
book. The matter is more serious
than might appear at first sight. Surely the World might forego a little 01
its intense yearning for the sensational, when its gratification injures
whole communities.
Joakley—He would never have become so addicted to drink if it
hadn't  been  for the trouble he had.
Coakley—Why, what trouble did he
have.'
Joakley—lie had trouble keeping
away from it.—The Catholic Standard and Times.
Messrs. Williams & Janion
Duly   Instructed   by   J.   A.   CAMERON,
ESQ.. win soil ut hls residence 242
Port  Street   (above  Cook)
A Journalistic Libel.
Thc Vancouver World has long ag
TUESDAY,  MABCH  24TH
Commencing* at 11 a.m.
the  whole  of  hls
Household Furniture and
Effects
Also a PINE LIBRARY as per particulars In last Saturday's and Sunday's papers.
Tho   full   list   ol'   woods   will   appear
again  in  the  papers.
On View MONDAY, MABCH 23RD.
The Auctioneer, STEWART WILLIAMS THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH ax, 1908.
v *i' v if if if 'l' ,t"t"»"»' *r if
* Social and        $
$ Personal. $
't' * '*' '*' v 'i' '*' '*' '*' '*''»' '*' if
Miss Angus left on Thursday for
Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. W. E. Norris, Vancouver, was
a visitor during the week.
Mr. Alexis Martin, Vancouver, spent
a few days in Victoria this week.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Hincks of Cowichan
Bay were registered at the Balmoral
Hotel during the week.
* *   *
Miss Agnes Wootten arrived from
Collingwood on Sunday evening on a
visit  to  her  uncle  Mr.   E.  Wootten
of this city.
* *   *
Miss Ruby Fell entertained a number of friends on Saturday evening-
last at a bridge and five hundred
party. The players included Mr. and
Mrs. Thornton Fell, Mrs. McBride,
Mr. and Mrs. T. S. Gore, the Misses
L. and W. Lugrin, S. and V. Blackwood, N. Holmes, A. King, Morley,
P. Irving, Loenholm, Mrs. Holden,
and the Messrs. McCurdy, Landry,
D. Templeton, Haggerty, Morley,
Scott, Holmes, Holden, McLean,
Sparks, Vetch, and Boyer. The prizes
for five hundred were captured by
Mr. Boyer and Miss Suzette Blackwood.
* *   *
The Cosy Corner Tea Rooms, on
Monday last, St. Patrick's eve, was
the scene of a merry little dance
given by a few of the Bachelors. The
floor was in excellent condition and
Miss Thain and support in splendid
form, introducing The Shamrock and
a "Bit o' Green" which received many
encores.
Those present wcre: Mrs. Henderson, the Misses Henderson, Miss Forrester, Mr. G. Schwabe, Mr. L. F,
Armstrong, Mrs. Shuttleworth, the
Misses Add and Grace Smith, Mr.
Bert Shaw, Mr. J. H. McConnell, Mrs.
Moss, the Misses Moss, Mr. Leo.
Sweeney, Mr. L. O. Keith, Mrs. Grant,
Misses Grant, Mrs. Hastings, Miss
Hastings, Mr. W. H. Loat, Mr. A.
Dorman, Miss Tena Atwood, Mr. W.
Sweeney, Mr. I. Hopkins, Miss Bee
Cameron, Miss Mamie Fell, Mr. Eric
Hardy, Miss Nettie Locke, Mr, H.
Jacobson and Mr. Ed. Townsley.
* *   *
Mrs. Atkins, Beach Cottage, Dallas
Road, gave her annual St. Patrick's
tea on Tuesday afternoon. The refreshment table was very artistic and
effectively arranged with pale pink
carnations, smilax and shamrock, set
in very handsome old family silver
(jardinieres), which were presented
to Mr. Atkins' father, the Dean of
Ferns, Wexworth Island.
The following young ladies assisted the hostess in dispensing the tea:
The Misses Lona Holmes, Gladys
McCallum, Maud McB. Smith, Phyllys Jay, Dorothy Trampton, Viva
Blackwood.
Mr. Allen and the Misses Lugrin
delighted the guests with several
Irish songs.
Games wcre also indulged in, prizes
for "Tumble In," which was in charge
of Miss Suzette Blackwood ancl Mr.
Colin Hogg, were won by Mrs.
Kenah, Miss Hawthornthwaite ancl
Miss Lawson, and for "Pit," which
was run by Mr. Johnston were carried off by Mrs. Hogg and Miss
Irving.
Among the numerous guests were
Mrs. F. W. Vincent and Miss Vincent, Mrs. and Miss Nicholles, Miss
Sorby, Miss Work, Mrs. Sorby, Mrs.
and Miss Gillespie, Mrs. J. H. Todd,
Miss Wriggley, Mrs. Gibb, Mrs.
Coles, Mrs. Matson, Mrs. R. Finlayson, Miss Grahame, Rev. W. B. and
Mrs. lien, Bishop Cridge, Rev. Mr.
Collison, Mrs. Hogg, Mr. C. Hogg,
Mr. Kenah, Mr. and Mrs. Trampton,
Miss Trampton, Mr. C. Trampton,
Miss Irving, Mrs. and the Misses McMicking, Mrs. Worlock, Mrs. and
the Misses Blackwood, Mrs. Brett,
Mrs. Ker, Miss Heisterman, Mrs. Ar-
A
The Most Artistic and the Most Exclusive Sub-division
Ever Placed on the Market.
^
We are favored with  instructions
to offer
FOR  SALE
commanding building sites in
CAREY CASTLE
GARDENS
Rockland Avenue, Running Through to Richardson Street
cher Martin, Mrs. aiid Miss Musgrave
Mr. J. Musgrave, Dr. Newcombe, Mr
C. Newcombe, Miss Newcombe, Mis:
Dupont, Miss N. Dupont, Mrs. Jay
Mrs. McB. Smith, Mrs. and Miss Bur
rows, Miss Brown, Mr. M. Johnston
Mr. Mason, Mrs. Shaw, Mrs. B
Shaw, Misses Lugrin, Mrs. Rithet
Mrs. R. Jones, Mrs. Hanington, Mrs
McCallum, Miss Hawthornthwaite
Mrs. B. Schwengers, Mrs. Edwii
Johnston, Dr. Fraser, Mrs. Rocki
Robertson, Mrs. H. Robertson, Mrs
Raymour, Miss Lawson, Mr. Holmes
Miss Dumbleton, Mrs. Mess, Mrs
Church, Miss Crease, Mrs. W. H
Langley, Mrs. Rome, Mrs. Blaiklock
Mrs. Robertson, Mr. and Mrs. Mus
kett, Mr. and Mrs. A. Crease, Arch
deacon and Mrs. Scriven, Major am
Mrs. Walsh, Miss Walsh, Miss Moore
Mr. C. Pemberton, Mrs. and Mis
Bell, Mrs. Mohun, Miss Newton, Mrs
Berkeley, Mrs. R. Jones Shallcross.
This magnificent property is situated on Rockland Ave., between Government House and the charming residence of John Arbuthnot, Esq., while across
the avenue is "Craigdarroch," the home of Mrs. Joan Dunsmuir.
There is no other property in Victoria in any such situation surrounded
by such palatial homes in whicli building sites can be obtained by the person
who does not wish to buy acreage.
THE PURCHASER OF THESE LOTS KNOWS BEFOREHAND THAT
HE IS IN THE CENTRE OF THE MOST VALUABLE
RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY IN VICTORIA.
And that he has no anxiety as to the character of the homes that will for
all time surround him.
It would be a pity to spoil such a beautiful property by cutting it up in the
usual way, therefore a great deal of time and trouble has been taken in planning
this subdivision so as to conserve as much as possible its original characteristics.
Therefore it has been decided to make the top portion of it into
A PRIVATE RESIDENTIAL PARK ON THE SAME LINES AS SOME
OF THE BEAUTIFUL PLACES AROUND LIVERPOOL AND
OTHER CITIES IN ENGLAND AND MANY CITIES
IN THE UNITED STATES.
Provision will be made to complete a system of sewerage and private roads
that will connect with a 66-foot public street to be made and boulevarded, with
concrete sidewalks, by the city, on the lower portion, which has a splendid
frontage on the best part of that fine new street, Richardson Street.
The property has been named " CAREY CASTLE GARDENS," because
it has a frontage on its entire length upon Government House, formerly Carey
Castle. The main avenue is named Lotbiniere Ave., in memory of the most
beloved of all our Governors, because he planted with his own hands along a
portion of this avenue two rows of Butternut trees, which will always be
interesting to residents and visitors.
In order that purchasers of these sites may be protected from having
inferior buildings erected on any of the lots now offered for sale,
BUILDING RESTRICTIONS WILL BE IMPOSED UPON
EACH PURCHASER.
The property has been surveyed and the plans, together with a detailed
description of each lot, are now being prepared. These will be ready in a few
days, when the exact date of sale and terms will be announced.
The owners realize that it is necessary to sell every lot, almost, in order to
carry out their ideas of making this a unique subdivision, therefore the prices
will be much lower than the lots are actually worth and within the reach of
every one who wishes to build a nice home.
It is unnecessary to say that these sites cannot be equalled in Victoria for
health, beauty and view.    They are high and dry.
WATCH OUR ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR FURTHER PARTICULARS.
As the owners preferred that where possible two lots should be sold
together the sale will open at the offices of the undersigned for all people who
wish to buy two or more lots adjoining at 9.30 a.m. Wednesday morning,
March 25th, 1907, and at 11 a.m. for those who wish to buy single lots.
Terms—10 per cent, deposit, 25 per cent, on May lst, 25 per cent, on
November lst, 20 per cent, on May lst, 1909, and 20 per cent, on November
lst, 1909, with interest at 6 per cent, from May lst, 1908.
Herbert Cuthbert & Company
616 Fort St., Victoria, B. C.
„ PHONE   610 n
Correspondence.
The Week accepts no responsibllit:
for the views expressed by Its corres
pondents.
The columns of The Week are opei
to everyone for the free expression o
their opinion on all subjects which d*
not involve religious controversy.
Communications will be inserter
whether signed by the real name o
the writer or a nom de plume, but th
\v„iter's name and address must b
given to the editor as an evidence o
bona fides. In no case will lt b
divulged without consent.
The   Canadian   Mexican   Steamshij
Line.
Mexico, D.F., Feb. 20,  1968.
Editor The Week,
Victoria, B.C.
Dear Sir,—A copy of your journa
of the nth January has been handec
me containing an editorial article en
titled "A Screw Loose," which artich
severely criticizes the management o
the Canadian-Mexican Steamshi)
line, its boats and officers.
As my name is quoted therein '.
wish you would be good enough tt
publish these few remarks in connec
tion with the "Lonsdale" inciden
therein related, as your statement ii
regard to the circumstances is quit
erroneous and misleading.
The crew did not mutiny in a body
nor did it at any time charge th
bridge, nor was there a firearm dis
charged at any stage of the difficult)
Out of a total Chinese crew of nearl;
40 there were only eleven who in
dulged in any insubordination. Th
mutiny consisted in these eleven, th
boatswain and ten sailors objectiii]
to work on the ground that the da,
was the Chinese Christmas. Not
quarter-master, fireman or other mem
ber of the crew took any part what
soever in the dispute.
In regard to the Captain and hi
relations with his subordinates yo
state: "Enquiry elicits the informs
tion that for some time the relation
between the Captain of the Lon.
dale and his crew have been of sue
a character as would certainly resul
in mutiny sooner or later."
Had you wished to publish the fact
in the case it seems to me it woul
have been better and fairer to hav
awaited the return of the Lonsdale t
Victoria and read the signed state
ment of the officers and passenger
instead of relying for your informs
tion on sensational press telegram
and irresponsible people at the Vic
toria end of the line who could nc
possibly know any more than whs
was conveyed in the aforesaid tele
grams.
I am a firm believer in the pres
using all its weight to correct re;
abuses, but I also think it the sacre
duty of an editor to be sure he ha
the facts of a case before printing re
marks that, far from being correc
can only do a very serious injustic
to another.
Trusting that in justice to the con
pany you were criticizing you *wi
give this letter the same prominenc
as the original article.
Believe me, Sir,
Your obedient servant,
A. W. DONLY,
Trade Commissione
[This letter was accidentally omi
ted last week.—Editor Week.] THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH ax, 1908.
(Notes on
Provincial News
Football at Ladysmith.
That was a great football match at
Ladysmith last Saturday, and allowing for the fact that the ultimate winners were playing on their own
ground, the teams must be regarded
as pretty evenly matched. It is not
certain that on neutral ground the
result would not have been different
Both teams demonstrated their undoubted superiority to any other club
eleven on the Island, indeed it is ';
1 question whether a selected team out
side of Ladysmith and Nanaimo could
beat either. As usual Jimmy Adam,
proved himself to be the star performer, and it is more than doubtful
if his equal as centre forward can be
found in Canada. For this reason it
is all the more regrettable that his
methods are not above the suspicion
of unfairness. It is one thing to be
tricky, it is another thing to'be foul
and the general opinion on Saturday
was that Adam indulged in many
practices which should have been penalized. A man of such exceptional
brilliance can well afford to play the
game according to the rules, and even
then he would have a considerable
margin over all competitors. The
victory of Ladysmith will be popular,
both because it is the veteran team
and because the public had begun to
look upon Nanaimo as almost invincible. It must be highly gratifying tc
all lovers of the game to know that
the best brand of association football
in Canada is found in British Columbia.
Miss Winifred Crowley.
On several occasions The Weel
has commented on the exceptional
ability and brilliant prospects of Miss
Winifred Crowley, formerly of Rossland. This young lady possesses a
remarkably rich contralto voice which
only requires training to land Her
amongst the leading artists of the day.
She spent two seasons with the Roseian and the Bostonian Opera Company, gaining much valuable experience but not much correct training
She is now a pupil in the Boston Conservatory of Music, and if she is able
to spend two years there will undoubtedly create a sensation in tlle
musical world.
Swift Justice.
Frederick King and Donald Langley have a great deal more respect for
the administration of justice and the
strong arm of the law in Canada than
they had a couple of weeks ago. On
the 9th of March they broke into the
store of the William Hunter Company
at Phoenix, and stole goods to tlie
value of $250; within four days the
men were arrested, tried and sentenced to three years each in the penitentiary. They will doubtless emerge
sadder, and it is to be hoped wisei
men.
Another Canard.
Journalism in Victoria has been  i
little  dull  of late, lacking those  ingenious   and   sensational   despatches
which were wont to relieve its monotony, but which have been conspicuous by their absence for about a year.
There is now a revival, and the outside press has been treated to a delectable canard to the effect that Sir
Edgar Vincent, who recently visited
I Victoria,  is negotiating for the  purchase of the Dunsmuir interests   on
| Vancouver Island. The veracious correspondent  even went  so  far  as  to
I name the  price, and to suggest   the
(reason why Mr. Dunsmuir was willing
Ito part with his "gold" mine.    It is
[because he has keenly felt the attacks
made   on   him  by  organized   labour.
Needless to say, the report has been
[promptly   denied.    What   impresses
[one most is that a chronicler of such
daring   ingenuity  should   bungle   his
[work so badly that it bears the earmarks of spuriousness in every para-
| graph.
Comparisons Are Odious.
Occasionally one hears a complaint
with reference to the accommodation
furnished on the C. P. R., although by
common consent it is the best on the
continent. On the other hand, there
are a few people in the Boundary
country who have always extolled the
Great Northern system at the expense
of its rival. To such the following
cutting from the Phoenix Pioneer ,-s
respectfully referred:
"As Judge Williams settled himself in the palatial smoking car of the
Great Northern last Sunday morning
as he was starting for the coast, he
remarked: 'How thoughtful it is of
Jim Hill to have the back of one seat
taken off, in case a man is hurt and i_
brought in on a stretcher, and how
very considerate of passengers that
the windows should be smoked up, so
as not to hurt the eyesight of travellers.'
"These remarks were elicited by the
fact that one seat was broken and the
windows looked as though they had
last been washed in the days of Methuselah—a standing disgrace to any
railway that has made the earnings
that are credited to the Great Northern. The car would be a disgrace to
third-class travellers in Europe, and
yet is provided for those who pay four
cents per mile to travel."
NOT HAPPY THO' THEY'VE GOT IT.
The Price of Newspapers.
A provincial daily has been discussing the current rates of subscriptions
Ito our provincial newspapers, and sug-
I gests that they ought to be raised.   It
reminds the public that they are get-
[ting their papers as cheaply to-day as
[when newspapers were first establish-
[ed in Canada, in spite of the increased
I cost  of   production.    It  opines   that
readers would gladly pay more, espe-
[ daily where the rates arc very low,
and   supports   its   argument  by  the
I statement   that   Canadians    are   the
greatest   newspaper   readers   in   the
I world, and would as willingly pay a
I dollar extra as not.   There is an answer   to   this,   and   every   canvasser
[knows it.    Newspapers are supported
[not by subscriptions but by advertise-
[ments.     Advertising   patronage    de-
Ipends  on circulation; the more  subscribers,  the higher   the   advertising
|rates.    As a matter of fact, it would
pay any except the very strongest pa-
to abolish subscription rates, or
jit any rate reduce them to a nominal
Bum, as the increase in the number of
readers would raise the income from
jidvertising rates far above the sacri-
ice involved. > The truth of the mater is  not that newspapers  are  too
bheap; but that many of them are too
[tear; the leading coast dailies are not
vorth more than half their subscrip-
rates.    If  one  eliminates   their
lorrowings from the American western  papers, few contain enough live
telegraphic  news to furnish  a  small
lip-country sheet.
(Continued from Page Three"!
tion of the hours of labour, and kin
dred lines, fills the New Zealand horizon to the exclusion and neglect o
legislation designed for the exploitation of the natural resources and the
encouragement of industrial activities
—and industrial expansion and augmentation of population is naturally
at a standstill. So long as present
political conditions continue it would
seem inevitable that New Zealand
should advance materially. It is in
fact debarred from doing so. Further, the business man is rapidly losing all interest or part in politics
"If the women are going to run
things, let them do it and make r
mess of it without me," he says. For
the Labour-extremist vote plus the
Woman-theorist vote swamps the
business vote utterly. Of course the
attitude of the disgusted business
man is scarce heroic—if eminently
natural. The policy of thc country
is no longer expansive and creative
It is limited to the mechanical conduct of established business interest-
along traditional lines, and in a pett;
way. Thrift, economy, frugality, temperance, industry, produce however ;
fairly contented population in whicl
the average of simple comfort is high
and poverty as unusual as wealth.
Small cottage homes, prettily set ii
well-cared-for grounds are everywhere. Clean streets, fine publh
buildings, good libraries, well appoint
ed parks, a general appreciation  of
books and art, and a common speech
unmarred by grossness, profanity o;
slang, testify to the fine average character of a people satisfied with thei:
humble lot, but producing few mer
of action or of enterprise—men capable of the heroic. The captain of
industry is an exile from the New Dominion. He would be manifestly indiscreet who would suggest disparage
ment of the distinctive virtues of New
Zealand, but in a new country oik
looks rather for crudeness and en
ergy, the indomitable spirit of pion
eering conquest—breadth—force—virility.   And for these one looks vainlj
in ladylike New Zealand    And
yet one must come back to the philo
sophical viewpoint of New Zealand in
striving to give a fair verdict upon tin
success or failure  of  New Zealand',
political  doctrine.    Judged from  thj
standpoint  of  commercialism,  which
is the only viewpoint known in Am
erica, the New Zealand system is
colossal blunder.    It does  not make
for the exploitation of the resource
of the country—it does not make for
wealth—or national industrial growtl
and expansion—or augmented popula
tion.     But it has produced, or at all
events the product is in evidence, an
absence of dire poverty; a fairly ever
balance of comfort and content  for
the  entire population;   a   temperate,
orderly,   law-abiding   people,   whose
talk with their fellows is last of all
based  on the acquisition  of money
which with the American is usually
the all-engrossing subject.
PACIFIC COAST  GROWN
SEEDS, TREES
For the Farm, Garden, Lawn, or
Conservatory.
Reliable,, approved   varieties,   at
reasonable prices.
No Borers.   No Scale.   No fumigation to damage stock.
No windy agents  to annoy you.
Buy   direct   and   get   trees   and
seeds   that  GROW.
Bee  Supplies,   Spray  Pumps,
Spraying Material and
Cut Flowers.
Catalogue Free.
M. J. HENRY
3010   Wegtmlnsted   Road
VANCOUVEB, B. C.
ALBERNI LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
NOTICB is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to prospect for coal and petroleum on the following  described   lands:—
Claim No. 1—Commencing at a post
planted on the shore at the S.B. corner of the north half of section 20,
township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south to
the beach; thence easterly along the
beach to point of commencement.
Located January 25,  1908.
MRS. FRANCIS GREEN.
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
WEEK 23RD MARCH
The New Grand
SULLIVAN a COMSIIINE,    Proprietors.
M.n.f.m.nt «f MIT. JAMIESON.
NAOMI ETHARDO
European Equilibrist.
MAUD SUTTON & CO.
Presenting the Natural Playlet
"Cinderel."
LOPEZ & LOPEZ
Spanish  Instrumentalists and
Vocalists.
DORIA OPERA TRIO
Operatic Vocalists.
GOLDEN & HUGHES
The Comedy Boomers.
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrator
"Yankee Rose."
NEW MOVING PICTURES
"Uncle By Marriage."
"Doings of a Poodle."
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M. Nagel Director.
Pantage's
Theatre
JOHNSON STREET
VICTORIA, B. C.
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE
Matinees (any part ot house)....Ito
Evening*, Balcony  lie
Lower Floor He
Bexei    tie
Matinees
Every Afternoon
at
3 O'CIock.
Night Performances
8 and 9.15
LADIES        MEDICAL   OBBTB
MASSAGE
Turkish Baths
VIBBATOB  TBEATMENT
KB.     BJOBNFELT,     SWEDISH
MASSEUR.
Special   Massage and Hometreat-
ment by appointments.
Room 2, Vernon Blk., Douglas St.
Body Development.
Hours 1 to 6. Phone 1629.
The Tavern in England
H. Belloc, M.P., had an able article in "Thc London Daily
Express" recently, under this heading, in which wcre the following
paragraphs:—
"To tell a man who has used wine and beer properly the whole
of his life that they are harmful, and to try to mystify him into
believing you by using long and technical words, is rank charlatanism, and should be punished by the hearty and expressed contempt of every honest man. People who talk in this fashion
should be made fools of. It is the best cure, and if they are not
yet treated in this fashion it is because our society still suffers
from a moral evil far worse than drunkenness, and that is lack
of courage.
"Beer that is made out of malt and hops is healthy; and if substitutes of one kind or another are used, the concoction becomes
more and more dangerous in proportion to the type of adulterant
supplied. Beer has been an ordinary and healthy food for our
ancestors from the earliest recorded times."
Moral: Drink the best; drink Lemp's. Call for a bottle of
this delicioiu, strengthening beverage at your hotel, bar, club or
cafe. If your dealer cannot supply you with a case for home use,
kindly 'phone
PITHER   &   LEISER
Wholesale Distributors.
TIMBER
If you have any
timber for sale
list it with us
We can sell it
BURNETT, SON & CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,   B. C.
The days are getting Cold.
THB
WILSON BAR
Is Warm and Comfortable.
VISIT IT.
648 Yates St., Victoria, B. C.
COAL
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo
Vollieries
New Wellington Coal.
The best  household coal  in  the
market at current rates.
Anthracite Coal for sale.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA, B.C.
L«*vc Vour Baggage Checks at tho
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.       A. E. KENT, Proprietor
Will You Take
$500a Year...
for your spare time. In other
words the man who has a couple
of hours morning and evening
and will employ it in operating
A Cyphers Incubator
at his home can make from $500
in twelve months. We have a
unique plan to work on and will
be pleased to explain it to any
one interested.    Call or write.
Watson &
McGregor
647 Johnson  Street,
VICTORIA, B. C.
Most
Particular
Smokers
Experience little or no difficulty
in finding a cigar or blend of
smoking mixture that fits their
taste.
Our Manila or Havana
Cigars can't be beaten.
We carry a most complete line of smokers'
sundries.
Tho Army        r\.    a .
ayftk Richardson
Phone 345 THE WEEK, SATURDAY MARCH ai, 1908,
I think the fact that I have to submit to criticism entitles me to point
out the errors of my fellow scribblers who direct the literary col-
ums of the leading dailies. I do 't
more in sorrow than in any spirit of
carping criticism, but why, oh why,
does not the management of the Col- certainly demand some guarantee*
onist and the Times furnish the
Editor and the Proof-reader with a
book of synonyms and foreign
phrases? Hardly a day passes but
each paper falls into an error which
must be a surprise to every school
boy in Victoria. The error is to
preface a comment upon some paragraph which has appeared in another
paper by saying "Apropos of." I
wonder if the gentlemen who use this
very convenient preface are aware
that the "of" is superfluous and not
merely that but absolutely incorrect
and ungramatical? The exact equivalent of apropos is "with reference to."
The addition of the word "of" is
therefore meaningless. This occurs so
often, and has passed so long without
comment, that I feel it needs no excuse on my part for calling attention
to it. If the Editors will deign to
look at any English paper they will
find that thc useful word referred to
is properly used. Indeed I think Victoria is the only place in Canada
where this striking error is made.
Apropos my remarks of last week
on the subject of bridge playing and
the social craze into which it has developed I want to relate two incidents
press is the right place for large and
important functions of this kind, but
in saying this I want to endorse what
I heard on every hand, viz., that the
Luncheon at the Poodle Dog was far
superior to that furnished at the Empress, and that the proprietors deserve every credit for the admirable
manner in which they have catered.
But for the growth of the Club every
member would desire to remain at
the old place.
If, as I understand, it is the intention of the Club to go to the Empress
in future, the dining committee should
.15
to quality of the catering.
Sub-divisions seem to be the order
of the day. Ever since I havc lived
in Victoria I have been looking
round for a desirable site where I
could induce some susceptible and
lonely girl to build a retreat and share
it with a poor Lounger. I had my
eye on the girl, and on the retreat,
and I rather flatter myself that things
were working all right when lo and
behold, the insatiable real estate agent
has pounced on my retreat and it has
gone the way of all desirable sites—
to sub-division. I need hardly say
that I refer to the picturesque and
delightfully romantic slope which lies
between Carey Castle grounds and
Mr. Arbuthnot's property. I had
planned to have a nine-foot stone wall
built all round it, to raze the little
red school-house to the ground, and
to build something modern and artistic on what I have always considered,
next to Carey Castle, the finest site
in Victoria.
But my dream is shattered; I have
been wounded "in the house of my
friends," the irrepressible Herbert
Cuthbert has got ahead of me  and
Angell
Engraving Co.
PHOTO-ENQRAVERS
and DESIGNERS
In All Branches
518 Hastings St.
Vancouver, B. C.
These Hot Favorites Please
Victorian Epicures
Grated Horseradish (Victorian), per bottle  25c
Evaporated Horseradish, per bottle   25c
Heinz Evaporated Horseradish, per bottle  35c
Grated Horseradish, quart jar    75c
Mustard and Horseradish, per jar   25c
Horseradish and Tomato Ketchup (fine for cocktail), bottle.. 35c
Curry and Mustard, per bottle   25c
Curry Powder, per bottle  25c and 50c
Curry Powder, per tin   ioc
Curry Sauce, per bottle  40c
Tobasco Sauce, per bottle    65c
Chili Powder, the genuine for making "Con Carne," bottle.... 40c
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
UP-TO-DATE GROCERS. I3i6 GOVERNMENT ST.
P
RTEIVTS   -nt Trade Mirk
obtained in all countries.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville St.,
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
which certainly "point a moral" if within tlle next few days some thirty
they do not "adorn a tale." Recently fortunate mortals will have acquired
a lady friend of mine called at the every inch of this estate'
house of one of her friends on the I am now considering whether I
usual day. She found the blinds shall drop the girl on some polite predrawn and a card stuck in the knob text or whether I shall hunt for an-
of the door displaying the legend "Not other property; if I do the latter I
receiving today." She thought this have resolved that my hunting shall
rather peculiar as she was pretty be done by moonlight, and that not
well posted on the movements of the even "my dearest friend and next my
lady, so made a few enquiries of mu- heart" shall know when my eye lights
tual friends and learned that behind on another delectable spot,
those drawn blinds a game of bridge >Jext to the Victoria Cross, prob-
was progressing all afternoon. ably the most prized decoration in the
1 do not think this incident calls Empire is The Week's leather medal
for any comment except that there is for Valour. This is awarded annually,
this peculiar feature in bridge play- and, as regular readrs of this column
ing that it severs friendships; its open are doubtless aware, it goes for 1907
sesame is skill at the game; its closed to the popular manager of the Vic-
door is inability tc excel, and the toria Theatre. It is a beautiful work
most intimate friend soon becomes 0f art) finely finished in embossed lea-
de trop under these circumstances.      ther, by Mr. Norris, the well-known
The other incident can be described saddler of this city. It is awarded in
in a few words. It occurred in the connection with an incident which will
house of one of the leaders of Vic- ]__ remembered by Victorians in con-
toria Society, the performers were so- sequence of unusual courage displayed
ciety ladies long out of their teens, by the hero of the occasion. In Oc-
the occasion an afternoon bridge, thc tobcr iast t|le Rambeau Stock Corn-
result a quarrel with one short round pany gave 011e representation of
lasting twenty seconds during which "Young Mrs. Winthrop." It was
hats were torn off, hair pulled down fiercC) anci Manager Denliam arose iu
and several scars left to tell the story. i,js fury| slammed the door in their
The incident is so abhorrent that I f;lccSi ami rcfused to allow them on
would not give it publicity but for tjlc SCCond night to inflict endless tortile fact that it throws a strong side- tllre upon __\s patrons.   The occasion
was so unique that there will be no
A Skin of Beauty Is a Joy Forever
SB. T. FELIX FOUBAUD'S
Oriental Cream
light on the amenities of Bridge play
ing, and its publication will help to
drive a nail into the coffin of a craze
which has developed to sueh an extent that it has become a positive
menace to good fellowship.
By the way, it occurs to me to say
that possibly ladies are not aware
that all these little things leak out,
and that it is impossible to hide
them under a bushel. It is a perfectly safe    conclusion   that   when The Rambeau tribe—whic
Week records an affair of this kind
it is common talk on the street, I
think that if ladies knew this they
would be a little more careful.
I heard many complaints because
thc Canadian Club Luncheon of Tuesday last was held at the Poodle Dog
instead of at the Empress Hotel, but
the complaints were all addressed to
the fact that the accommodation is
necessarily insufficient for so large a
number. The Club now tallies between 600 ancl 700 members. At the
luncheon on Tuesday only 150 were
present; suppose three or four hundred had turned up, which might happen at any time, what could havt
been done to accommodate them? In
addition, it does seem that the Em-
difference of opinion about the award.
On the front side the medal bears the
following words: "CLIFFORD
DEN HAM, for valour, 26th October,
1907." On thc reverse side the award
is more fully explained in the following words: "By a grateful people this
medal is presented to Major Clifford
Denliam, V.T.R., for conspicuous valour in defeating the forces of thc
were storming
the heights of Parnassus—and putting
them to flight on the memorable 26th
day of October, 1907. This medal was
subscribed for by the THESPIANS
and THALIANS of the Loyal City of
Victoria."
The medal now hangs in Manager
Denham's sanctum among his most
cherished memorials, which include
Old Covent Garden programmes, "If
Mother Could Only Scc Me Now,"
ancl the withered bouquets of susceptible matinee girls.
OB MAOICAL BEAUTIFIES
Purines as well as Beautifies the Skin.
No other cosmetic will do It.
Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, Moth
Patches, Bash and Skin diseases, and
every blemish on beauty, and defies detection, It has stood the test of 60
years; no other has, and is so harmless—we taste it to be sure it is properly made. Accept no counterfeit of
similar name. The distinguished Dr. L.
A. Sayre said to a lady of the haut-ton
(a patient). "As you ladles will use
them, I recommend 'Gourand's Cream' as
the least harmful of all the Skin preparations."
For sale by all druggists and Fancy
Goods Dealers.
OOUBAUD'S OBIENTAL TOILET
FOWDEB
For infants and adults. Exquisitely perfumed. Relieves Skin Irritations, cures
Sunburn and renders an excellent complexion.
Price 9S eents, by mail.
OOUBAUD'S FOUDBE SUBTILE
Removes superfluous Hair.   '
Prioe $1.00, by mail.
FBED T. HOPKINS, Prop.,
37 Great Jones St.,        New York City.
AT HENDERSON  BROS., Distributors.
Vancouver and Victoria, B.C.
MAPS
OF
Timber and Land.
The   kind   that   show   what's
taken   up   and  what's   vacant.
Electric Blue Print & Map Co.
Electric  Blue  Print and  Map  Co.
1218 Langley Street
Victoria, B. C.
Cfri
♦ Valuable
t Timber Sections
rtoH-pz*,
♦
For quick sale, 15 licensed
Timber Sections at Quatsino
Sound, District of Rupert.
These claims adjoin salt
water and are guaranteed to
average 20,000 feet to the acre.
Time for inspection and
cruising allowed.
Price, net cash, $1.25 an acre.
Apply
W. BLAKEMORE
1208 Government St., Victoria.
©oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooot
The Poodle Dog Hotel
A centre of good cheer is the Cosy Grill-room where the business and professional men of Victoria meet to exchange good
stories and gossip over things in general. The atmosphere here
is that of Bohemia in the best sense of the word; a Bohemia
governed by up-to-date and genial surroundings.
Smith & Shaughnessy, Proprietors
YATES ST., Victoria, B. C.
000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
The Way to
A Man's Heart
You know the old adage
and Punch's advice: "Feed
the brute!" Doubtless there
would not be so many divorces if women studied culinary matters more and
made up their minds to
COOK WITH GAS
The easiest, cleanest, most hygienic and most economical way. Call
in and let us show you our present matchless values in Gas Cook
Stoves.   Prices cannot fail to please.
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, Ltd.
CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS.
KODAK
W^
You'll need a
KODAK
AT
Vancouver's
First
Horse Show
March 19, 20
and 21
Will Marsden
665 Granville Street,      Vancouver, B. I

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