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Week Apr 11, 1908

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Array |iYOY»aTnr»iTnro-yyrrinnnri
[Cingsford Smith & Co.
Stock and General
AUCTIONEERS
[Commission and Real Estate Agents.
1141 Homer Street     Vancouver.
utft_uuuuuuuuut,« ».a mslsu
Victoria Edition
The Week
R British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vancouver B. 6.
k. V.   No. ii
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL n, 1908
^■rsrioTnryoTroTnntoT-fVJinrRa
Stewart Williams R.C. Janion     '
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION AND
REAL ESTATE A6ENTS
Si FORT ST. VICTORIA, S. C.
liUUUUU, 9 9MJL& A 8 JUUJUUUU-c
One Dollar Pbr. Annum
The    Canadian   press    it!
! English     never  tired   of   discussing
aigrant. the English immigrant, and
the Englishman in Canada,
lis poor benighted mortal is dealt with
Ider various headings, but the favourite
es are the "Tenderfoot," the "Kemit-
lice Man," and the "Egoist." Even
Last papers have undertaken to put him
tht on various matters with respect to
liich his ignorance is supposed to be
llossal.    The fact that his mentors try
put him right by the use of bad Eng-
Ih and "second class words" may be
Icen as a matter of course, for even his
Iterest enemies are constrained to con-
Is that he can both write and speak
mother tongue. The assumption of
l Canadian press is that the Englishman
luild line up with every other class of
[migrant, subdue his natural impulses,
liordinato his individuality and grace-
Illy submit to bo moulded on the Cana-
lin type. Needless to say there is just
lit inextinguishable spark of individual-
about the young Englishman which
Is no ambition to be moulded on Oana-
lin lines, or any other lines than those
liich tradition has endeared to him.
Iirthermore he finds it impossible to for-
I that he belongs to a governing race,
Id that wherever Englishmen have gone
by have not only not succumbed to the
bduing and assimilating influences of
I3 land of their adoption, but in the long
In have imposed tlieir own ideas, and
jiintained   their   ascendency.    Holding
ese views, which alas are sadly at vari-
ce witb those recently expressed by a
[iast paper, The AVeek has particular
easure in quoting portions of an editorial
lich appeared only last week in the Mon-
eal Herald.    No ono will accuse the
raid of being anti-Canadian or pro-
ritish, but under Mr. Brier-ley's direction
J has always been fair, and in respect of
II matters outside party politics—broad.
|he editorial throws a little new light on
old subject, and for this reason is re-
liectfully commended to the attention of
Canadians, but in particular to the
Jttention of editors who arc prone when
leal ing witli this subject to express second
lass ideas in third class language:
'Tlie attitude of any country towards
Jniniigration is of two kinds, the collective
liew, in which thc community as a whole
onsiders what sort of new population is
est for building up thc community as a
'hole, and the individual view, in which
lose who come into personal relations
ith the new immigrant (employers, land
.mpanies, and such) consider what best
tits their immediate interests. Assured-
r, it is the individual and immediate view
iat is to the fore at this moment in Ca-
ada, when the cry of 'No English need
pply' goes up to heaven from all parts of
ie land. A few years ago, when Eng-
sh immigration was almost an unattain-
ble ideal, before the Englishman began
i swarm over here and establish personal
elations in the country, the Canadian na-
ion collectively yearned for him. He
vas the ideal nation-builder.   The dream
EDITORIAL
of our immigration policy was to lure him
here in vaster and ever vaster numbers.
We put our shoulders to the wheel to get
him, and we succeeded. What reason have
wc today for changing our former opinion
of the ultimate value of the Englishman as
stuff for the making of nations? Not a
whit. All that we know about him from
personal experience is that in the moment
of his first awakening in new surroundings
he is, as a type, helpless and indocile, unable for a time to do much for himself,
and unwilling to do much for others as
others want it done. But it is a general
principle that the higher an animal is in
the scale of species, the more incapable
are its young in the period immediately
after birth. May not a good deal of this
principle apply also to the immigrant in
the first days and months of his new life
in a new land? From the standpoint of
the employer, the ideal immigrant is the
man who will simply carry out the ideas
that already prevail in the country, with
quick apprehension and immediate docility. But are these men exactly the type
to fertilize the life of the young country,
to broaden its mind and strengthen its
heart, to give it a stronger national character? Are they the highest species of
now-born Canadians? It hardly seems
so. Arc we not figuring too much on what
use some Canadians can make of our new-
immigrant within the first year of his life
in Canada, and too little on what he may
contribute to tho nationhood of the country ten, twenty or fifty years hence? It
is not by such figuring that Canada is to
be built up. Let us revert to the old collective view of the Englishman, the man
of the great 'pioneer race,' the man whose
forbears established parliamentary government and created the greatest literature
in the world; and let us forget a little
about the awful nuisance that an unac-
climated Englishman may make of himself in Canada for a twelve-month or so."
In The Week issue of
Martin Luther   March 28th, comment was
made upon a lengthy letter
on the subject of "Martin Luther and the
Bible," which had just appeared in the
Colonist. The purpose of the comment
was two-fold: First to deprecate the introduction of religious controversy into the
pages of secular journals, and on this point
The Week Avishes to reiterate what it then
said, that "no good purpose could be
served by opening up the columns of a
newspaper to religious controversy." The
second purpose of the comment was to criticize the writer of the letter in question
for using heated language in connection
with such a topic. The Week has no
knowledge whatever of the gentleman in
question, beyond the fact that he is an
honoured priest of the Koman Catholic
church, a church, to which this paper has
been uniformly friendly, ancl for tho support of whose institutions it has always
given the free use of its columns. The
criticism was based upon a misleading
statement made by the Colonist in inserting his letter to the effect that it had
omitted certain portions because of the unsuitable language used. The Week had
no reason to doubt the accuracy of tbis
statement and was undoubtedly justified in
assuming it to be correct. It turns out,
however, that the Colonist was not justified in making any such reflection upon the.
controversial methods of Father Caine.
The portions of his letter omitted were
argumentative, and their omission altogether marred the effect of the argument.
With this explanation The Week desires
in fairness to Father Caine to say that
since the criticism directed at him was due
to misrepresentation by the Colonist; it
was unjustifiable, and is withdrawn. This
explanation is entirely voluntary; The
Week has had no communication whatever
with Father Caine at the time of writing.
The Week never hesitates to criticise
where there is room, criticism is its vocation, but the strength of its position depends upon the fairness of its criticism, a
characteristic which it is determined to
preserve.
large increase of business. Another very
gratifying feature is revealed by a careful
examination of the list of shareholders
which shows that more than 90 per cent, of
these reside West of the Great Lakes. If
the same enlightened policy which has
hitherto governed this institution is continued it will in a few years vie with the
large financial institutions of Canada. The
other gratifying circumstance in connection with Western Banks is the securing
of a Charter ancl the successful flotation
of the Bank of Vancouver. Mr. Alexander L. Dewar is the moving spirit of
this new enterprise, and having regard to
financial conditions during the last six
months he has made a marvellous success
of the promotion. All the directors are
British Columbia men, with large businesses and large interests at stake in the
Province. Sufficient capital has already
been subscribed to ensure the opening of
the head office within a short time, and it
is likely before the 30th of June that
Western Canada will have two flourishing
banks to offset the destructive policy of
currency exportation which has pressed so
heavily during the last few days.
It seems only yesterday
Western Banks, that The AVeek was hammering away at the Banking institutions of Canada because of their
neglect of Western interests. The series
of articles published in these columns were
cpioted in every paper of importance in the
Dominion, and in the main their conclusions were endorsed. The remedy suggested was the establishment of AVestern
Banks, and this policy is rapidly meeting
with popular favour. Its "raison d'etre"
lies in the fact that the Western branches
of Eastern banks are simply collecting
agencies whieh deplete the country of its
currency. AVhen this declaration was
made iu The AVeek articles, one or two
local managers demurred, but the statement was never seriously contested. Since
then additional evidence has come to hand
which more than justifies the position
taken up by The AVeek. Within the lasl
ton days a leading Canadian Bank has
written a letter to a Lank Manager iu
A'ictoria tolling him in so many words
that he must net advance another dollar
under any circumstances or on any security, that his business is "to secure deposits and to ship them East without delay." Although I have no evidence 1 cannot doubt that other local managers havc
received similar communications. AVhen
The Week informs its readers that thc particular bank in question is accountable
for over two million dollars of local deposits tbe iniquity of the system becomes
apparent, and every AVestern man will emphatically endorse the opinion that thc
time has come when their business should
be handled by AVestern Banks. In this
connection there are two gratifying features of the situation, the first is that the
pioneer AVestern Bank, the Northern, has
just issued its second annual report showing splendid progress ancl a rapidly increasing business. The Northern Lank is
governed by an enlightened policy ancl
controlled by local Directors who are thoroughly in touch with the country. In
addition it has absorbed the Crown Lank
of Canada, ancl by so doing acquired a
The AVeek has not always
The School been able to support the
By-law. by-laws   whicli   have   been
submitted by the City Council to the ratepayers. The present by-law
to raise $70,000 in order to increase the
school accommodation is ono which on
every ground should receive support. The
time is not opportune to build a new High
School. Such a school properly equipped
ancl thoroughly up-to-date in every respect
would cost $150,000. There is a greater
need for a substantial increase in the ordinary school accommodation, and the
trustees are to be commended for the
policy which they have decided to
adopt. Statistics go to show that the present population of Victoria approximates
closely to 35,000. This is an increase of
10,000 since the last census, of which probably 5,000 have been added during the
last year ancl a half. Adequate school accommodation is a "sine qua non" in any
progressive city ancl A'ictoria is undoubtedly progressing. To refuse this grant
would bc not only to increase the present
congestion, but to retard growth ancl to
discourage newcomers, to say nothing of
inflicting a hardship upon the children
themselves. The Week cordially endorses
what it believes to be a very wise policy
and the best possible solution of a
difficulty.
At the recent business
Commercialism luncheon of the Canadian
In Literature,   ('lull, n local critic opposed
the endorsation of Mr. Wel-
lington Dowler's fine national song on the
ground thai lo do so savoured of commercialism. The speaker presumably meant
ihal Mr. Dowler intended to exploit the
Club for commercial purposes. The Club
evidently did not* think so, and unanimously passed a resolution recommending the
composition to the consideration of the
Quebec Commemoration Committee. What
many readers of The AVeek are asking is
why lhe same critic moved a resolution at
the previous meeting of the Club endorsing the project of Mr. Dawson who came
before it witli a purely commercial proposition which should never even have
been submitted to the Club, and for the
support of which his business manager had
already raised upwards of $S0,000. One
reader suggests "straining at a gnat and
swallowing a camel," but an old timer is
probably much nearer the mark when he
suggests "Wheels within wheels." THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL ii, 1908.
NATIONALIZATION OF RAILWAYS.
By C. H. GIBBONS
(An  interview,  written  specially for The Week.)
(Continued) though anyone who has used Ameri-
"Railway lines, being built, with us can railways cannot agree with them,
are maintained and operated on busi- In appointment of first-class rolling
ness principles. Competition assures stock they are twenty years behind
a marked superiority in equipment the United States ot Canada. As for
and service which one looks for in speed and wage-paying—passenger
vain on government railways secure and freight tariffs are about parallel
in an imperishable monopoly, and with ours—the following figures will
whose proprietors are therefore con- perhaps interest Canadians. I quote
tent that anything will do, so long as them from a letter to me of Mr. L.
people arc able to get from place to McClelland, Secretary of the Victoria
place, and that there may be no criti- Railway Commission, of the 3rd Aug-
cism as to waste in luxurious appoint- us* 'ast, and they represent the maxi-
ment of rolling stock or extravagant mum speed and wage attainments on
salaries—so termed by the worker for Australasian railways:
wages who wields the ever-to-be-con-      Class of Train.      Maximum Speed.
sidered Labor vote—such as would be Through  Express 41.04 miles
commanded by the specialist in rail- Passenger   39.97    "
way affairs most competent to direct Suburban Passenger  23.89    "
the  business  he  has  made  his  life Mixed   25.18    "
study, and in which he is an expert.      Express Goods  25.18    "
"To view the matter from another Through Goods   19.89    "
standpoint: when private railway en- Roadside   Goods    19.89    "
terprise builds speculatively into new Salaries and Wages.
country, the first objective is the ere- Clerical and professional staff, ex-
ation of traffic which will justify in elusive of heads of departments, £40
the eyes of the capitalists interested to £600 per annum,
the large investments made. Hence Artisan class, including foremen,
we see these capitalists infinitely the 8s to 14s per diem,
more ready to venture further money Artisan class, apprentices, is 3d to
in  co-operation with  the  prospector 4s 9d per diem.
or the miner in the development of      Non-artisan  class,  unskilled  labor,
his claim, in the establishment of re- 2s to 5s per diem,
duction works, in the  equipment of     Station, yard, and way and works
timber camps  and the  erection  and staff, including foremen, 6s to 12s per
operation of saw-mills, in the exploit- diem.
ation of fisheries, in the providing of      Signal  and  train-running  staff,  7s
palatial hotels, opera houses, etc.—in to lis 6d per diem,
a hundred and one activities making     Locomotive running staff, 6s to 14s
for the support of an industrious pop- per diem.
ulation and the augmentation of the "It should be borne in mind that
national wealth as well as the na- these figures represent the maximum
tional capacity for self-support. These wages under government ownership
secondary industrial investments are in Australia, and also that the ap-
each looked to to provide their legi- prentice system is worked to the ex-
timate profit to the investors. At the treme. The higher ratings are reach-
same time they are obviously of the ed only by slow advance during a
greatest importance to the state, and long period of years. Hence the post
profits thus brought to the pockets of never made a slip. This great goal
the capitalists, supplementing the of the railroader's ambition carries
earnings from their original railway the magnificent wage of about $3.50
investments, enable them to look with per day, while the maximum wage for
equanimity upon lower dividends than unskilled labor is $1.25. And this is
would be satisfactory in the event of in the country where labor controls
their railway holdings constituting politics, and runs public business as it
their only slake in the country. judges best for its own class interests.
"To those to whom the dream of "New Zealand is pre-eminently thc
nationalization appeals so strongly by country of the common people and
reason of the vgaueness with which the elegancies of polite life are little
all allied considerations are under- in evidence. Indeed there seems a
stood, it may be fairly said that the restrained antagonism everywhere
experience of Australia and New toward the man who asks for a morn-
Zealand proves the utter non-service- ing bath or a serviette at table. That
ability of government railways as col- accommodation be clean, cheap and
onization agents. In Canada the rail- wholesome is deemed quite sufficient,
way is a nccesasry forerunner of set- The practical success or failure of
tlement. In Australia and New Zea- New Bealand's Socialistic doctrines is
land the country must first be settled altogether a matter of viewpoint. If
up before it can induce thc govern- the objective is individual or raa-
ment to provide railway facilities. In- terial prosperity, New Zealand is
deed, the most liberal policy as to rail- the best country in the world to keep
way building adopted in the southern away from. If one has no other am-
Commonwealth (that of Queensland) bition than to get through life as
would be viewed in Canada as cruious- easily as possible, and exploit the
ly short-sighted. This policy is to pleasures and the philosophies of the
require a guarantee of a substantial simple life, taking no thought for the
portion of the cost from the appli- morrow, it is ideal. Here in Am-
cants for a new railway line, then erica the mass of the people find their
resident within the area to be bene- chief occupation and enjoyment in
fited. How many railways would making money by the use of their ut-
have been built within the "sea of most powers, and developing the
mountains" pictured by Hon. Edward great country God has given us. And
Blake, and how many cities and we. don't begrudge a fortune to the
towns, mining and timber camps man who shows unusual business ca-
would have arisen, should Canada or pacity, and employs it in exploitation
any of its western provinces have of the country. In New Zealand it is
followed the nationalization pro- axiomic that no one should be richer
gramme instead of adhering to the than his neighbour, no matter if he
support of controlled private enter- be shrewd and industrious, and his
prise? Of course the Australian rail- neighbour a lazy fool. Labor legis-
ways provide, too, for a little army lation has so penalized industrial cn-
of uniformed officials who have se- terprise in New Zealand that no ex-
cured appointment through the ma- pansion is possible, and no capital
chinery of politics rather than by seeks investment there. 'Carrying on'
reason of their peculiar fitness in the is the maximum of present success,
profession of railroading. The wage The men who grasp large opportuni-
scale everywhere in Australia save in ties and develop them arc agreed that
Victoria, is one which American rail- New Zealand under present condi-
way men would not consider for a tions is no place for them, and have
moment. left  the  country or  are  leaving  it
"Victoria, where the railways are And under these conditions, with a
in the hands of a Canadian, Mr. weakened market for labor, wages in
Thomas Tait, is the model railroad- all lines arc lower than a Canadian
ing state of the Southern Cross conn- artisan would ever dream of accept-
try, and they assure you with pride ing. To fix a wage for so many
in Melbourne that this service is ab- hours of labor, regardless of the
solutely the finest in the world—al- variations in individual skill, experi-
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OF
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
PHONE 893. VICTOR II
WHY   NOT   HAVE   THE   BEST
THE REPUTATION OF
James Buchanan & Co's SCOTCH WHISKIES
Is world-wide, and  stands for the BEST that can be produced.
The following brands are for sale by all the leading dealers:
RED SEAL VERY OLD LIQUEUR SCOTCH
ROYAL HOUSEHOLD BLACK AND WHITE
'RADIGER & JANION, Sole Agents for B.C.
MISS BESSIE ABOTT
Of  the  Metropolitan   Grand   Opera
House,   New   York.     At   the
Victoria, May 8th.
Try It Next
Wash Day.
If you desire your Clothes to be
of pearly whiteness, with neither
a streak nor spot of blue, use
DY-O-LA
LAUNDRY
BLUING
Simpler, cleaner and infinitely
better than the old way; made
in little sheets—a sheet for a
tub; 26 sheets in a package.
ioc WORTH WILL LAST
AN ORDINARY FAMILY
FOR SIX MONTHS.
Get it from
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
Government Street, Near Yates.
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
LATEST NUMBERS
English
Magazine
CHUMS
TIT-BITS
THE STRAND
PEARSONS
PUNCH
KNIGHT'S BOOKSTORE
TIOTOBIA, 8. 0.
Plows, Harrows, Seed Drills,
Etc.
Bain Wagons and Carts.
Brantford Carriages, Buggies,
Phaetons, Buckboards,
Spring Wagons and
Carts.
Petaluma Incubators.
Melotte Cream Separators.
e. g. prior & ee..
LTD.
LTY.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Established 1867
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
52 Uovernment St., Victoria, B. C,
Charles Hayward, President. F. Caselton, Manager.
We make a specialty of Undertaking and Embalming.
An experienced certificated staff available at all times, day
and night.
Phones Nos. 48, 305, 404 or 594, Victoria.
Investigate the
"Cushman" flarine flotor
As good as the hest.   Cheaper than the rest.
BAXTER & JOHNSON 811 Government Street
Victoria, B. C.
You can always      — -      ^    It tastes different
tell an M. B. cigar jy|9   Q^     than others.
eiqar
Made by S. A. Bantly, Victoria, B. C.
Union Made.
Havana Filler.
Two Sizes.
Sold Everywhere. |e, industry, application and special-
aptitude,  seems   on  its   face  a
Ictical denial of the wisdom of the
feator   in   not   casting   every   man
Im the same mental and physical
luld.    It also operates forthwith in
Ictice toward lowering the standard
J individual efficiency, crushing am-
|ion,  and  exiling inventive  genius,
here the laws of the land prescribe
wage in all crafts upon the basis
time-serving,  the  good  workman
[bound to deteriorate and the less
[icient  workman  to   cease   striving
Ir  self-improvement  in  his   calling,
lanufacturers  and  other  large  em-
|oyers of labor in New Zealand tell
orkman  of this  generation  is  less
Jm   today   that   the   New   Zealand
|orkman  of  this  generation  is  less
Scient, less painstaking and less am-
Itious than his predecessor of a de-
Ide   ago.   And   it   is   only   natural,
|here   legislation   insists   upon   the
t>od  workman   and   the   bad   being
hually   rewarded.    The   whole   sys-
|m makes inevitably for the lowering
the standard of individual efficien-
, whereas under keen competition,
le individual is impelled to excel in
|hatever calling may be his, to cul-
vate his    industry    and    skill, and
ttentimes  develop  inventive  genius.
Ind  with   all   the  legislative   enact-
jents to compel improvement of the
|orkcr's condition in New Zealand, is
improved?    The  market  for  his
Irvices is  becoming daily more re-
Iricted.     New   lines   of   enterprise
le  not springing up,  for capital  is
pt offering where it is challenged as
arch-enemy.   The constant haras-
Ing   of   established   enterprises   re-
bces their capacity for payments out
len at the demands of labor.   Wages
le low, and when the New Zealand
■orkman of today  seeks  fortune in
Tiy  of  the  high-wage  countries,  he
|ids that he is no longer the equal
his fellow craftsman developed un-
|:r   competitive  conditions   stimula-
ve of individual efficiency.    He is
bing backward in his value  as  an
Idustrial factor, instead of forward.
Ind as the unit retrogrades, so does
le country built upon units."
["And how about the 'Unrest in In-
|a,"   the   returned   Canadian   was
Iked, "is it a serious matter?"
["Undoubtedly very serious.    What
its   origin?    Why   the   inevitable
totism  of  the  Anglo-Saxon, which
ppels him to try and convince every-
ne of the superiority of his particu-
|r   civilization  and   methods.     The
ellow peril' is the inevitable result
our   sending   our   missionaries,
erical and commercial, to China and
Ipan, there to boast of our super-
Irity and urge the Japanese to adopt
pr standards.    They did, and now
fey are the most dangerous menace
our own commercial and political
hpremacy and to the peace of the
lorld.    In  India we have not been
[intent to rule the alien and diverce
Ices as firm but kindly fathers. Wc
ave urged the native to live by Eng-
sh rule, which is in no sense appli-
(lble to his traditions, temperament
talents.    We have applauded his
eclaration for university education.
Ind the universities have turned out
leir thousands of book-learned In-
lian  natives  for  whose  educational
fctainments the work-a-day world of-
lers no market.   They promptly be-
lome political agitators—patriotically
loo—following exactly upon the sequences of cause and effect, naturally
Iccepting the theories of government
j.e have urged them in our English
Ichools to admire.   And in India it
hard to find argument to justify
lie denial of Home Rule, when all
he ablest jurists and other leaders
If thought are native;   and so the
lowers that be have to come back to
lie old doctrines of expediency and
Tjrce.   It is forbidden to hold meet-
;s of more than twenty people, or
discuss political or semi-political
batters.   This closure will not suffice
do ought but stimulate in the end
|ie growth of the seed of discontent
awn by English pride and thought-
tssness.
"And it all comes back to the fact
hat we in our egotism think every
ace should live and manage affairs
|s we do.   Nature never meant it so.
ndia, for example, is on the whole
leopled with adult children; their gov-
Irnment must be paternal for their
good. The sword won India and the
sword must hold that Empire, lest
race and religious antipathies bathe
the land in blood. And Kitchener is
the sword to hold it safe.
"Of course the thoughtlessness of
our own British Columbia people in
their treatment of Indian immigrants
needlessly and vexatiously complicates
the difficulties which the Indian Council is facing. But we must hope that
larger discretion on the part of the
western Canadian people will very
shortly lighten theis burden."
" 'I've got my shoes on.'
" 'So have I,' after a pause.
"There was another space, and
Johnny called:
" 'I've got my pants on,'
"Then a long pause followed, and
finally the silence was broken by giggles and a guffaw in the rooms adjoining, but the rafters rang when
Johnny called:
" 'What are they laughing about
Mrs. Smith?'" — February Young's
Magazine.
"An audience," said Mr. William
Norris, who has scored the hit of his
career in Mr. Henry W. Savage's production of "Tom Jones," "an audience
is a peculiar animal. It reminds me
at times of the girl and the flatiron—
the audience representing the flatiron.
"On a bitter night of late December
a kind mistress said to the servant
girl:
" 'Jennie, it's a frightful night. It
presages a white Christmas. And
there's no fire in your room. I think
child, you'd better take a flatiron tr
bed with you.'
" 'Do ye think so, ma'am?' says Jennie, doubtfully.
" 'Yes, I do,' says the mistress, very
kindly and firmly. T insist on it
Don't forget.'
" 'Very wei, ma'am,' said Jennie, in
a sullen voice.
"The next morning the cold was
terrible. The landscape was iron-
bound with frost.
" 'Well, Jennie,' said the mistress
'did you take that flatiron to bed with
you, as I ordered?'
" 'Yes, ma'am,' Jennie answered.
" 'And how did you make out with
it?'
"'Oh, so-so,' said Jennie; 'I think I
got it almost warm before morning.'"
Considerate Old Gentleman.
"Why, gracious, pa," said the only
daughter, "what in the world are
those queer arrangements you have
placed in the vestibule?"
The old gentleman rubbed his gouty
foot and chuckled.
"Not much, dearie," he responded.
"You see, I noticed how long it takes
for you and that young man to say
good night, so I fitted up an electric
heater to keep your feet from getting cold, and a portable alarm clock
to inform you of the breakfast
hour."—Chicago News.
Heard in the Museum.
Glass Eeater—Why are all the
freaks laughing?
Circassian Girl — Haven't you
heard the joke? Why, the midget
tried to kiss the fat lady and she said:
"Sir!   You monster!"—Chicago News.
Johnny's Query.
"Speaking of infants and others,"
laughed Rose Stahl, in "The Chorus
Lady," "reminds me of a good one I
heard this summer.
"The kind lady has taken Johnny
bathing that morning. They had
come up from the beach and gone
into adjoining rooms at the bathhouse. After a few minutes Johnny
called:
"'Mrs. Smith, let's race getting
dressed.'
"'All right, Johnny,' she called
back.
"'I've got my stockings on,' called
Johnny. ,
" 'So have I,' after a pause.
It Was "So Sudden."
"Miss Eleanor," said he, as they sat
on the beach in the moonlight, "will
you marry me?"
"This is so sudden!" she cried.
"My love?" hc asked.
"No,1 she replied; "your nerve."—
Judge.
You Can Never Tell.
Ransom—Never judge a man by
the umbrella he carries.
Beckly—No; it may not be his.
Height of Folly.
Gertrude—Isn't Percy Rider a
reckless youth?
Louise—How so?
Gertrude—He actually ran over a
tramp and got the tires of his auto
all soiled.—Exchange.
Colections.
"My collection," said the numismatist, proudly, "is worth $100,000.
And every coin is genuine."
"Mine," said the minister, sadly, "is
worth about $7.63 a Sunday. And I
have to take my chances on the coin's
being good."—Cleveland Leader.
Timber Limits
FOR QUICK SALE--A SNAP.
12 Sections in the neighborhood of Quatsino Sound—
Rupert District.
35,000 feet to the Acre Guaranteed.
No Cash Deposit.
Time allowed for inspection.   Located , on water and easy
of access.
Apply to W. BLAKEMORE
1208 Government Street, Victoria.
THE WORD REVIVER SPELLS THE
SAME BACKWARDS OR FORWARDS
Ever think what a good reviver is a glass of good Champagne?
When in pain mentally or physically, just try a "split" of Mumm's
Extra Dry and you'll think your pain was only sham. If you have
that tired feeling after "la grippe," or if the spring "blueness"
is upon you, try Mumm's for a reviver. You can pronounce
Mumm's backwards also if you wish. It's a good, quiet appela-
tion worthy of the best wine produced. "Silence is Golden," so
is Mumm's Champagne. Thc Champagne market is somewhat
quiet just now, but "Mumm's the word," because the class of
people  who  order   Champagne is thc class who desire the best.
Order a "split" of Mumm's Extra Dry today at your
club, cafe, bar or hotel and see if it does not prove a
reviver in the best sense of the word. If_your dealer
cannot supply you with a case of "splits" for home
consumption, kindly phone us and we'll see that you
get it promptly.
PITHER   &   LEISER
Corner Fort and Wharf Streets.
The B. C. Home of Mumm's Champagne.
000000000000000000000<X><X>000000<>000000000000000000<>0*
Dermatologist
Institute
Mrs. Stanner (graduate of Mrs. Nettie Harrison, San Fran-
cosco), cordially invites the ladies of Victoria to call and investigate
her methods. Expert in Dermatology, Facial Massage, Hair
Dressing, Shampooing, Scalp Treatment, Manicuring, etc.
CLAY PACK FOR THE COMPLEXION.
ELECTRICAL FACE MASSAGE.
Room 23, Vernon Block
Hours 9 to 6.       - - - - Phone 1629
OOOOOOO-0-OOOOOO-OOOOOO-OO-^^
ST. ANDREWS
COLLEGE
TORONTO
A RwldaatUl ami Day School tor Boy*
Y. W. C. A.
1208 Government Street
VICTORIA.
Reading and rest rooms, lunch and
tea rooms. Instruction in English,
French, Music, Physical Culture,
Needlework, Domestic Science, etc.
Bible Class, Social evening every
Wednesday.
Thorough Instruction.
New Buildings, Large Athletic
Fields.
Summer term commences April
22 nd, 1908.
For information write to
REV.  D.  BRUCE   MACDONALD,
M.A., LL.D.
Principal.
Y. M. C. A.
A home for young men away from
home. Comfortable Reading Room,
Library, Game Room, Billiards, Hot
and Cold Shower Baths, Gymnasium
and efficient instruction.
Manitoba Free Press on file for
Middle West visitors.
40 BROAD STREET. THB WJUSK., SATUKX»AX  ft.rix.iiw n,  19U0
Incorporated 1906.
Capital, {500,000.00
Capital Increased
ln 1907
to ...$2,000,000.00
Subscribed
Capital,     $550,000
Beserve . . $60,000
Surplus, Jan. 30
1907   .   .  $130,000
J. B. MATHERS, Gen. Man.
IK CLOSING UP ESTATES
(lther as Executors or Assignees
the Dominion Trust Co., Ltd., Is
never influenced by ulterior motives. Their entire ambition,
effort, and energy ls directed towards securing the best possible
returns for all concerned.
Name this company executor ln
your will. Blank will forms furnished free of charge and stored
in our safety deposit vaults,
when we are made your executor.
DOMINION   TRUST CO.,
Limited.
328 Basting Street, West,
Vancouver, B. O.
The Week
A Provincial Bevlew and Magazine, published every Saturday by
•1 HE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
83-14 Government Street. ..Victoria, B.C.
626   Hastings Street. ...Vancouver, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE. .Manager and Editor
Personality.
The longer 1 live the more I am
convinced that it is personality which
counts every time. I do not know
who invented thc phrase, but quite a
number of years ago our leaders of
political warfare in the Old Country
were very fond of assuring the electorate that it was a matter of
"measures and not men." I have always regarded this as the prelude to
the political machine, and all those
organizations which aim at the suppression of individuality and the exaltation of party platforms.
Of course the purpose of the cry
was to consolidate party support for
the candidate ou the ground that being the nominee of tlie party he
should bc accepted enthusiastically in
spite of his personal shortcomings.
This is a doctrine which has spread
far and wide of late years, and in the
United States and Canada especially
nearly every political nominee is the
product of the Convention. Once the
selection has been made every member of the party is supposed to fall
in line.
As a broad principle I am not prepared to condemn this modus operandi, because although it has many
objectionable features it is probably
necessary under our present system
of party government. Thc lirst thing
to seek in all forms of Government is
a means of fixing and enforcing responsibility, and up to date it has been
found impossible to do this outside
the discipline ensured by party organizations. But even this system does
not exclude the matter of personality,
and it is upon atht subject that f
wish to say a little.
Personality counts in all the affairs
of life, its vital principle can neither
be extinguished nor suppressed by
artificial means, ft is true that many
a good man has been downed by
cliqueism or by the repeated onslaught of a section of his party, but
the cases are rare indeed where this
has been effectually done unless the
man had "a white streak" somewhere.
In the competition of public life courage and combativeness arc an essential part of the equipment. A man
may possess all the gifts and graces,
but if he lacks these he will go down
to defeat at some time or another. In
the moment of greatest stress he will
turn his face to the wall.
It is not the man who carries a
chip on his shoulder and always wants
to scrap who exemplifies the qualities
I refer to, but rather he who is slow
to quarrel but once in for it would
die rather than yield. Looking back
over a pretty long career I can recall
many men who have dropped out of
public life simply because of the white
streak. The most notable of all is
probably Lord Roseberry who had
the ball at his feet' and a long and
glorious career opening out before
him, but allowed himself to be sidetracked rather than light. A man who
deliberately chooses to plough "the
lonely furrow" when his country is
calling can never be more than a dil-
letante loiterer in the path of duty.
For this reason I attach no importance to the rumors that Lord Rosebery may emerge from his retirement
to take an active part once more in
the Government of the country. He
has too often been found wanting,
and despite his brilliant gifts, which
are unsurpassed and almost unapproached by those of any political
leader of the day, it may be taken as
a settled fact that he will never again
be trusted iether by his party or by
the country.
But I have deviated somewhat because I set out to emphasize the point
that personality is all powerful, and
that neither circumstances nor environment can down a man if he has
both talent and courage.
Again and again I have seen this
illustrated in the case of men who
have been unfortunate enough to
make enemies of tlieir own party,
sometimes by thoughtlessness, oftentimes because their rise was too rapid,
and could not be tolerated by meaner
minds. At other times because they
were newcomers and had the audacity
to ignore "the traditions of the
ciders," and went in to win from the
very start. All this energy and determination is very distasteful to venerable antiquity. "Slow and sure" is an
old proverb and it contains a great
truth, but it is not all the truth, and
a too close adherence to the letter in
violation of the spirit of the proverb
has kept more than one community
far behind the times. Then many a
man becomes an object of envy if he
establishes his claim to recognition
above his fellows. Still he has this
consoling reflection that though the
few may be jealous the many will
applaud. The rank and file can always be trusted to size up a man correctly. If they know him to be just
and true they will follow him, and he
will be recognized as their leader. No
party organization, no cliqueism can
defeat him, not even the busy tongue
of slander nor the doubtful inuendo
are effective weapons if he keeps up
his courage and retains the confidence
of the crowd.
Leaders and would-be leaders sometimes forget this, and they play off
smartness and the machine against
character. They are bound to lose,
not necessarily at the beginning of the
conflict, but assuredly at the end.
Things are moving rapidly now-a-
days, the machine has had its innings,
the party whip has cracked long and
loud. The party Shiboleth has served
its purpose, but all arc weakened before an advancing public opinion. Personality has come into its own, men
of talent are being summoned from
omscurity and before the smart ones
know will be directing affairs. Not
that there is any substitute for brains,
but natural law is permanent, and
while it suffers a temporary eclipse
it is only to reassert itself with
greater effect.
The next few years will see the end
of systems and methods which have
flourished for too long, and the reas-
sertion of the power and influence of
personality.
To Match His Descendants.
"1 see they have discovered where
George Washington told a lie once."
"What did he do that for?"
"T don't know—perhaps to qualify
as Father of His Country."
* flusic and      %
%   The Drama. *
Victoria Theatre.
This popular house has furnished
two excellent entertainments during
the present week. On Monday night
that old favourite the Burgomaster
was performed by an all round good
company in which Gus Weinburg was
easily the star. Tllis excellent comedian is an artist who produces his
effects without apparent effort. He
has lost none of his skill nor freshness, and every point was as well
made on Monday as if it were the
first performance. He was well supported by Leo Kendal, as Doodle, and
by Ruth White as Willie Van Astor-
bilt. The chorus if not numerous was
attractive, more so than the average,
and the whole performance gave general satisfaction.
Mary Mannering.
On Thursday night Mary Mannering, the popular American actress,
supported by a well-balanced Company appeared at the Victoria Theatre
iii "Glorious Betsy." Miss Mannering ha sbeen touring with this play
during the whole of the present season, and has been greeted everywhere
with enthusiasm. Being an American
actress presenting an American play
it might naturally be expected that
she would achieve success south of
the line as her charming personality
and high reputation are a guarantee
for excellence under any circumstances. Victoria, influenced by none
of these considerations and rendered
doubly critical through several recent
disappointments in American stars,
has more than endorsed the verdict
of her own countrymen. "Glorious
Betsy" as presented by Miss Mannering can only be described as a glorious success.
It is doubtful if Miss Maunering's
performance does not register the
high water mark of excellence in her
dramatic career. The part suits her;
it is a pleasing one, and it has a
range possessed by none of her previous portraitures, which furnishes
full scope for all her matured powers.
Nothing could possibly be daintier,
more infections or more fascinating
than her comedy in the first two acts.
Hardly since the days of Adelaide
Neilson has this class of character
been so delightfully portrayed. Betsy
as represented by Miss Mannering, is
the very embodiment of youthful
spirits, vivacity and archness. Any
society belle of the 20th century might
well envy the graces of this one of
a hundred years ago, as she dazzled
and perplexed and cajoled alternately
until all the young beaux of society
were crazy about her, all loved her,
and yet all were handled so daintily
and generously that they remained
her firm friends, and gracefully yielded to the real Prince Charming.
The third and fourth acts were of
a different calibre altogether; the
fourth was probably the most satisfying from an artistic standpoint. Few
actresses could have suggested so exquisitely the heart-broken girl, who
by the irony of fate returned to Baltimore besieged on all hands to tell
of her successes in France, vainly
trying to hide from loving eyes the
fact that she was humiliated and
heart-broken, and yet struggling
through her tears to put a brave face
on the situation and to reassure those
who cared for her so tenderly. The
perfectly natural, unstrained womanly
demeanour of Miss Mannering
throughout this trying act was beyond all praise, and in that supreme
moment when in the semi-darkness
of her room Jerome returned and her
dazed senses but slowly recognized
him, she had one piercing moment
which thrilled.
But from a dramatic standpoint
her greatest work was in the third
act where she confronts the inscrutable Napoleon on the deck of La Ci-
gale. This act made great demands
upon her dramatic intelligence and
skill, and she rose to them all, and
played with a force, an intensity and
an abandon of which no one would
have suspected the light-hearted girl
(Continued on Page 8).
Bangles and Bracelets for
Every Costume.
In Paris, Berlin and Vienna, the three great centres in which
dress is almost of primal consideration, the subject of matching
fabrics with precious or semi-precious stones has rapidly forged to
the fore. Worth and his distinguished patrons have done much
for this delightful vogue. Choice dressers in Victoria have readily
recognized the fact that at Challoner & Mitchell's they can always
find that wonderful blending of tones in gems so essential to
present style costume.
In Bracelets for Spring and Summer wear, we are showing an
almost endless variety from the plain Gold Bangle up to the
gorgeous Bracelet of Diamonds and Pearls. Garnet Bracelets,
Bracelets of Jade, Amethyst, Peredot, Chalcedon Pearl, Opal,
Turquoise, etc. Snake Bracelets, a charming display, Extension
Bracelets plain, stone-set or with reliable watch.
SOLID GOLD BRACELETS FROM $5.00 UP.
Challoner & Mitchell
Diamond Merchants and Silversmiths
Government Street Victoria, B. C.
Sentimental Ballads
On The
Victor-Berliner
Gram-o-phone
Who doesn't enjoy the dear
old songs of heart and home!
Such melodies as "Home Sweet
Home", "The Old Oaken
Bucket","Auld Lang Syne" and
VW%      "°k*     °k Joe"' wit-k ^k
\^ *\p        touching beauty and power!
No matter where you live you can heal'
these cherished songs on the Victor or Berliner Gram-o-phone
—sung and played as you never heard them sung and
played before; with famous soloists and the most celebrated
bands and orchestras to bring out their rich harmony and
sentiment in full perfection.
Besides the old-time favorites, you can hear on the
Victor or Berliner Gram-o-phone the newest sentimental
ballads—"'Neath the Old Cherry Tree, Sweet Marie","In
the Evening by the Moonlight, Dear Louise", and all the
other popular successes.
More than that: These instruments bring right into your home beautiful sacred selections; grand opera numbers by fhe w rld's greatest start;
comic song-hits and minstrel humor; perfect dance music ; classic
0 x symphonies
^y\  occasion;
. cj\.   Gram-o-phone.
ntertainment of every sort for every mood and every
and all to be heard at its best on the Fitter tr Berliner
Any Victor or Berliner dealer will gladly
Victor Records for you.   Call and ask to tear
them, and get him to tell you about tbe
easy-payment plan. Write us for catalogue
—use the coupon.
<_v •% v
\\\\v
Till Mir I
Csnpu) tf Cnada, Ltd.
Mimu.  608
_
TIMBER! TIMBER! TIMBER!
QUATSINO   SOUND,   BEDWELL SOUND, SACE NARROWS.
GUARANTEED 3,000 TT. TO THE ACRE.
; |™ PRICE $2.50 TO 93.00.    ALL LICENSES ISSUED.
ARTHUR BELL
ROOMS 14 and 16
MAHON   BUILDING,   GOVERNMENT   STREET, VICTORIA.
F. O. BOX 765. PRONE 1385. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL u, 1908.
50000000000000000000000000C
>00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
Newest Curtain Styles Shown Here
THE 1908 EXAMPLES ARE INDEED DAINTY CREATIONS—SEE THEM.
This is "Curtain Time." The Spring Cleaning has not dealt kindly with the old curtains, and new
ones must take the place of the old—in the more important rooms, at least. When you are ready to
choose curtains, come to the store that can offer you the widest choice of styles, the greatest range
of prices, absolutely the best curtain values in the city. In other words, visit Specialists in this very
important work—they can assist you very materially. The curtain section now offers the handsomest
assortment of new curtains and curtainings we have ever shown. Many charming and exclusive patterns
are shown, in high, medium and low-priced varieties. In the completeness of this gathering of most
worthy curtain furnishings, you will surely be suited. Then, perhaps, our drapery experts may assist
you. Don't you think that a firm that makes a specialty of this sort of work and employs only expert
decorators could help you some in the choosing? And isn't the larger choice that this firm offers you
worth something, oto?   Let us assist you.   Won't cost you a penny.
Hand-Painted
Wedding Gift
Chinaware
_ You can't choose a more acceptable object, to present her brideship,
than a piece of genuine hand-painted
china.
_ It's the reigning fashion in ceramics.
_ A bride that isn't "just crazy" over it is
r.ot strictly up-to-date.
f_\ It is useful—every bit of it—and is sure
!o occupy a place of honor in the home
_l the NewIy-Weds.
_ What more is to be desired of a
;•::•' .ling gift?
CJ A gorgeous selection now at your
disposal. Don't think it is beyond your
means—for it isn't, here.
NEW LIBRARY TABLES
NEW WRITING TABLES
NEW CARD TABLES
NEW BRIDGE TABLES
Nottingham Lace Curtains—In these popular
curtains we offer a very wide choice of designs and a price range that is surprising.
The last shipment of these curtains, received
but a short time ago, added more than sixty
new designs to our already very large range.
We can promise you values in these curtains
that cannot be beaten elsewhere. Just see
what we offer, at per pair $14.00, down to 75c
Novelty Braided Curtains—This is a "new
thing" in Curtains and a style we think you'll
like very much. The designs are uncommonly
dainty and pleasing. We have them in Arab
and white and offer you very special value, at,
per pair  $S-00
Ariston Lace Curtains—This is a very dainty
curtain and the new styles just unpacked are
indeed pleasing. A special weave makes a
very strong curtain and you'll find this style
an excellent wearer. The ecru and two-tone
effects are very pleasing. Several very attractive designs are shown at, from, per pair,
$6.00 down to  $4.00
Swiss Lace Curtains—We offer about one hundred different designs in this stylish curtain.
Many very attractive designs are shown in
white, champagne, ivory and ecru shades. We
should appreciate an opportunity to show you
some of these. Prices range from, per pair,
$30.00, down to  $3.50
CABLE LACE CURTAINS—Here is one of the best wearing Curtains manufactured. This famous
Cable Net will outlive almost any other curtain style. A special weave makes a strong, staunch, wear-
resisting mesh that will stand lots of washing and general hard usage. We show some genuinely
handsome* designs in Ecru and White. You'll be surprised at what an amount of style we can offer you
at these low prices of, per pair, $4.75, $4.00, $3.75, $3.50, $3.00 and  $2.00
Arabian Lace Curtains—Real Arabian lace, plain net centre, in
ecru. A very handsome curtain,
at a low price. Sizes 3 ft. x 50
in.    Per pair   ..$S-S°
Real Lace Curtains—Genuine lace
curtains, with cluny lace edging
and Battenburg corners. This is
a curtain style you'll like. They
come in white.    Per pair..$6.50
Antique First Empire—A bold design of Linen Applique on heavy
net. A handsome curtain for
dining-room or library, new
champagne shade, 3 yds. x 50 in,
Price, per pair  $16.00
Florentine Lace Curtains—Dainty
designs in ecru and white, with
hand-worked insertions, at per
pair    $12.00
Ivory Point Venise—An elegant
reproduction of this famous lace
in two-tone treatments—ivory
with white embroidery, 3 yds. x
50 in.   Price, per pair $20.00
Ivory Italian Filet—A new design
of Filet Insertion, double eagle
and crown decorations, interspersed with other motives, 3
yds. x 50 in. Price, per
pair    $18.00
Ivory Irish Point — Handsome
floral treatment, rich border, finished by hand, 3 yds. x 48 in;
Price, per pair, $12.00 and $9.50
Dainty Curtains, with designs of
inverted fleur de lis and other
motives, 3 yds. x 48 in,, at, per
pair   $10.00
Would you
Rehabilitate
the Pantry?
What with new paper and
paint and oil cloth in the
kitchen and pantry, the battered and blackened tins look
out of place in the surroundings. The spring cleaning has
put some things out of joint,
hasn't it?
t| Well it won t cost much to substitute
harmony for discord—for the dollar buys
a lot of tins and kitchen things these days.
_ Even the best sorts—the kinds we selL
_ A most complete line at your service.
WNE EXTENSION TABLES
NEW BUFFET STYLES
NEW BUTLERS' TRAYS
NEW WALL SHELVES
TO DEALERS
We solicit correspondence
from dealers who are not
already acquainted with us
and who wish to .get
acquainted with the largest
wholesalers of Homefurnish-
ings in the West. Try furniture as a "side-line"—we
help you.
WEILER  BROS.
Complete Home Furnishers,       VICTORIA.
TO RETAILERS
Isn't it poor business to
carry a large stock in your
little town when the quantities you require may be purchased from us on short
notice. We help you. Prompt
and satisfactory service guaranteed.
>o<hxk>-o*o-o-ck>oo-*o-o*oo*o<k>--^^ 5
porting
Comment.
The result of the football matches
tween the All-Island vs. All-Main-
id have proven very unsatisfactory,
second like the first ending in
araw.   While I did not agree with
selection  committee  in some of
decisions they arrived at, I still
Diight that the Islanders would win
d  I  was  rather disappointed with
result, but there is some consola-
111 in knowing that the Islanders are
t'en credit for having the better of
play.   I am more than pleased to
rn, however, that the Victoria ,re-
esentatives acquitted themselves in
most creditable manner.   There was
?reat deal of adverse criticism over
selection   of   any   players   from
end of the island and the fact
it they did as good if not better
ork than those from up t^e line is
matter of congratulation.   The team
selected by thc committee was al-
cd at the last minute by the ab-
nce  of  Graham  from the forward
-Brightman  of the  Bays  taking
place. Graham is a very consist-
t player, but I doubt very much
the team was weakened by his ab-
:nce, as in my opinion Brightman
s entitled to his place.    But after
-manner in which Graham failed
put in his appearance I would not
'_ him a place if he was the best
ward in Canada. Any time a
,yer is chosen to fill a position
docs not think enough of the
lie to notify the committee that he
unable to play, is not entitled to
■lace and I hope the committee will
nember  the  action  of  Graham  in
last match.
This afternoon will in all probabil-
witness tlie last game in the Island
series when Ladysmith and Nanaimo
line up for the final game at Oak
Bay. There is considerable hard feeling between these teams, so much so
that several importations have been
made from the Mainland and I am
creditably informed that Nanaimo will
have no less than nine Vancouver
players on their line up. As far as
1 can learn Ladysmith will have one,
making ten out of the twenty-two
players practically paid men. This in
my opinion is a very bad state of
affairs, and unless the Association
takes some stand on the question at
its annual meeting the future of football on the Island is doomed. It is
all very well allowing professionals
to play with amateurs, but I do not
think that the committee ever had
any idea that such drastic measures
would bc taken by the Up-Island
teams. Despite the fact that the Nanaimo team is mostly composed of
outsiders who have been registered
only long enough to qualify I do not
think that they will be sufficiently
strong to hold last year's champions
and I am looking for Ladysmith to
win. The committee acted very wisely in their selection of a referee. No
better man in the Province than T.
J. Mahoney of New Westminster
could be secured. He is very strict,
impartial and knows the rules thoroughly and the teams can rest assured that it will be their play and
not the action of the referee which
will win or lose the match. The game
will be played at Oak Bay and special
arrangements have been made for
handling the crowd,
Ladysmith team, did not impress me
as championship form and unless they
improve it will be difficult for them
to defeat the champions from the
Mainland. The goal and back division is strong, but the three half-hacks
were about as fast as an ice wagon.
Time after time the forwards would
take the ball up the field only to have
it sent well clown to the backs owing
to the fact that thc halves were not
in position. This style of playing will
not make champions and had it not
been for the spectators who continually urged these players to get in
tlieir place it is extremely doubtful
whether the result would have been
the same. Despite this thc team won
but it would be well if in the next
match the halves made extra efforts
to win the game.
I have to congratulate the Victoria
West intermediate team on their success in winning the intermediate
championship of Vancouver Island
and I can only hope that they will
soon be able to include British Columbia. On the whole their play last
Saturday   when   they   defeated    the
It does not take long for decisions
on athletic matters to travel and 1
am pleased to see that the sporting
authority of Toronto has commented
very favorably on the action of the
British Columbia Lacrosse Association on ils stand for amateurism. Thc
action of the Association in this respect is not taken very kindly to,
in Vancouver, several of the players
absolutely refusing to play unless
tliere is something coming, and as
the Vancouver team has decided to
amalgamate with the Vancouver Athletic Club it is hard to sec how the
players from this club at least will
receive any rake-off. There is some
talk of the disgruntled ones forming
ail independent team. They figure
that the Vancouver Club will be only
too pleased to ruin their franchise in
the league over to them after July
ist, but in my opinion they have another think coming. The men at the
head of the Vancouver Club arc
known as stayers and I will be greatly
surprised if they do not cany the
club through as they have started.
The boxing tournament which took
place in the Victoria Theatre on Tuesday evening last proved the worst
kind of a fiasco. The arrangements
were badly managed, the price of admission was on par with that charged
to see championship events in San
Francisco when the best men in the
business can be seen, and last but not
least the two bouts were, to say the
least, "rotten." The first bout was
advertised for 8.30 but the principals
did not put in an appearance till rj.10
and then the men knew very little of
the game. It was scheduled for ten
rounds, but it only went three, the
decision being given for an alleged
fi ul. 1 do not like to criticize the
third man in the ring, but in this instance was closer to the participants
than he was anil although 1 was
watching the men closely I failed to
see a low blow land, and in this 1
was supported by the majority at the
ring side. The boxer to whom the
decision was given was very tired and
it was an after thought that caused
him to claim a foul, McNamee as a
lighter might be all right but as a
referee he is a failure. The main
event lasted about live minutes. But
from the style of boxing it was sufficient. Adams, the much-touted Welsh
Wonder, is not in the same class as
Paris. It was claimed that he was
put out by striking a water pail as he
fell, but in my-opinion it was a left
jolt in the wind and a right swing
to the jaw that did the work. 1 do
not like to cast cold water on the
ambitions of any rising athlete but
in this instance I certainly think that
Adams should make an effort to find
some vocation more suitable, for hc
is certainly not cut out for :t boxer.
In comparison with thc show put on
by the Victoria West Athletic Club
the exhibition was a frost, the only
redeeming feature being the fact that
thc stall' of the Victoria theatre
handled the seating of the spectators.
UMPIRE,
E. G. Prior & Co.'s New Catalogue.
The distinction of issuing the first
large General Hardware Catalogue in
British Columbia belongs to E. G.
Prior & Co., who arc npw distributing to the trade a large volume of
over (.50 pages, 8x11 in., weight 5^4
lbs., which is appropriately referred
to as their "Fiftieth Anniversary Catalogue." The Catalogue contains
some 3,500 illustrations, covering
every conceivable article of hardware
and kindred goods for which there is
a demand in this seel ion of thc country.
The average British Columbian
would hardly expect a book of such
large dimensions to lie issued outside
of Toronto or Montreal, but it remained for the progressive hardware
house of Victoria to lake the initiative.
A chief compiler and several assistants were employed for one year on
the work', the better part of one of
the largest printing plants in Victoria
was engaged for a like period on thc
printing and binding, and, viewed
from an industrial standpoint, there
is just cause for pride in that the
mechanical part was executed by a
local printing concern, and against
outside competition.
An establishment thai will invest
several thousands of dollars in catalogues for distribution among the
merchants in British Columbia certainly has faith as to th egreat prospects within its boundaries—not faith,
but positive assurance. Not many
business houses in British Columbia
have reached the half-century mark,
and P.. G. Trior & Co. are among the
pioneers who. through large expenditures in the direction referred to, give
proof of the confidence they have in
the continued prosperity of the Province in whieh their catalogue will bc
distributed. Their Fiftieth Anniversary Catalogue is supplied lhe trade
only, and is not a mailing edition. -VrEEJS_7 tfXTtfRLTA i.',~AFKlJ_, II,  1^00.
*
At The Street    t)
Corner h
p By THB LOUNGER
Since my connection with The
Week, I have criticised many things,
but I do not think anyone has ever
accused me of being a literary critic.
I happened however to be filling a
professional engagement at the business luncheon of the Canadian Club
on Wednesday, and although it was
not in any sense a public meeting I
do not think I am straining a point
when I refer to a very interesting
incident which occurred.
Those of my readers who attended
the Paardcburg celebration at the Empress Hotel will remember the splendid patriotic song which Mr. W. J.
Dowler recited on that occasion. It
has since been set to music by another well known Victorian, Mr. Geo.
Werner, and on Wednesday the members of the Canadian Club heard ;t
delightfully rendered by Mr. Gideon
Hicks. The upshot was that the Club
unanimously decided to recommend it
to the celebration committee with a
view to its performance at Quebec
in July next and its possible acceptance as the national song of Canada.
Two members of the club very properly pointed out that the poem might
be open to criticism, and that it was
a somewhat unusual course for the
Club to endorse the composition, but
as President Lampman said, the occasion was an exceptional one, and
the song as rendered appealed so
strongly to those present, as to set
the seal of excellence upon its sentiment, and upon the musical accompaniment.
The argument used against its acceptance turned out to be the
strongest argument in its favour, that
while it might not satisfy all the
canons of criticism, it possessed the
indefinable something which appealed
both to the sentiment and the senses
of the hearers. This is about all that
can be said of most national anthems.
Mr. Dowler's composition is far above
any which has come under my notice
as a national patriotic song. The
music to which it is wedded is not
only appropriate but inspiring and
I should be greatly surprised if the
whole is not accepted by the celebration committee.
I share the general regret felt by
the citizens of Victoria at the unfortunate experience of Alderman Mes-
ton. However one may differ from
him on some subjects everyone agrees
that he is a citizen of irreproachable
character, and honest intention. Circumstances have placed him in an invidious position. If he had consulted
the able counsel who conducted his
case in thc courts before, instead of
after, the event he would have saved
himself a lot of trouble. He has committed a technical breach of the law,
but must be held morally blameless.
One lesson may be learned by intending candidates for Aldermanic
honors, and that is what they should
carefully examine their financial position, their qualifications, and their relations to the city before embarking
on a candidature.
Thc subject of thc new police uniforms is still agitating the minds of
the Commissioners and thc force. I
am satisfied that Victorians to a man,
and I believe to a woman, will be
disappointed if the Britisli Uniform is
not adopted. All the tenders to hand
ask a slightly lower price for this
than for thc American, and to purchase the latter under the circumstances would not only be running
counter to public opinion, and to the
express wish of several public bodies,
but would be entirely inconsistent
with the action of the Commissioners
in opening the question at all if they
did not intend to make the change,
subject only to the question of cost.
It is not necessary here to ventilate
the objections which have been raised
to the British uniform, suffice it to
say that the only ones urged arc
based upon sartorial considerations
which certainly will not appeal to thc
ratepayers.
I am borry that the City Council
has not *_f.fn fit to accept my "bona
fide" offer to plant and fence the
triangular space at the corner of Government and Belleville Streets. I
gather, however, from a report of a
recent meeting that the Parks Board
is going to do it ,if so I have gained
my point, but the work will not be
done as quickly as if the Council had
accepted my offer. Moreover I doubt
whether it will be done as cheaply,
but I am not anxious to go into the
contracting business, nor am I looking for trouble. I want to see Victoria made clean and tidy; nature has
made her beautiful.
At the request of a prominent citizen I said something last week about
the demoralization of young boys in
Victoria, and promised to return to
the subject. After discussing the matter with the authorities I have decided not to publish certain facts
which have come to my knowledge,
because to do so would be to defeat
the ends of justice, but I wish to say
that unless parents can be aroused
to a keener sense of their personal
responsibility than at present exists
in many quarters, deplorable conditions, which are known to a few, will
intensify. Girls of fifteen and sixteen require at least as much looking
after as boys of the same age, and
unrelated men of adult age are not
always their best protectors. The old-
fashioned custom of chaperonage was
a wise one, and its utility is not confined to any class, although its vogue
may be. The father or mother who
allows a young girl to be out at night
without themselves providing a proper escort is neglecting a very serious
duty, and, as society is constituted
today, taking serious risks.
I do not think that in this respect
Victoria is worse, I rather think that
it is better than most other cities,
but here as elsewhere a very real
problem exists of which many parents
seem to be oblivious; it would be too
unfair to suggest that they are purposely indifferent. Naturally a Lounger who lounges at all hours of the
day and night and whose main duty
is to gather unconsidered trifles sees
many things that will not bear inspection, and many more of which
little can be said. The pity of the
position under review is that the very
people who have most need to lay
these words to heart will probably
never imagine as they read that they
possess any interest for them. So
naturally do we fall into the error
of fitting the cap on some other
person.
*Tfc*^£<
IN THE OLD LAND.
By RAMBLER.
Well now to our wanderings, since
I last wrote. This is All Saints or
All Souls or All Somebody's day.
After leaving Aberdeen wc journeyed on to Inverness, calling at a
place named Ellon to see an old lady
who was a contemporary of my
fathers and remembered my grandfather well. She is ninety-four years
old, with all her faculties, except that
she is deaf, wonderfully smart, with
eyesight better than yours or mine.
Truly the Scotch women are great
livers. She was very anxious to see
us, but I am afraid was disappointed.
The trouble with all very old people
is that they never seem to realize
that others all advance in years. After we left she said to her daughter-
in-law in a tone of surprise, "Ai, Ai,
but they are grown up bodies." I
imagine she expected to see a boy
and girl.
There is nothing much of interest
to sec at Inverness, except Highlanders and you do come across some fine
specimens of manhood there. I was
looking up the directory in the hotel
and out of curiosity counted the number of pages devoted to Macdonalds
and Frasers. They appeared to be the
most numerous. Well, there were
over fourteen pages of the former
and eleven of the latter. How they
ever   located  a   particular  one   is  a
mystery for they all bear just a few
common Christian names. We drove
out to see the battlefield of -Culloden.
I obtained a very good photo of the
Cairn erected upon it. All round are
headstones shewing where those of
the different clans fell. How little
one can realize the very often serious
results of one's, at the time, apparently trivial actions.
Before the battle, Prince Charlie,
ignorant of the extreme jealousy of
the Celtic character, stationed the
Macdonald clan, which was by far
the most numerous, on the left wing,
instead of the right—and placed the
Macintoshes there instead, with the
consequence that the Macdonalds during the whole of the fighting stood
sullenly looking on and absolutely refused to take a hand in it, notwithstanding the entreaties of their chiefs.
Now a great many military authorities say that it is extremely probable
if they had acted otherwise, the day
would have gone in favor of the Highlanders, and Prince Charlie would
have gained the Crown, thereby
changing the course of history. The
poor Macintoshes were so elated at
being placed where they were that
they bore the brunt of the battle, and
were nearly exterminated. Visiting
the scene of the fight and expecting
to go through the country where
Prince Charlie wandered for five
months before he escaped to France
led me to read a full account of such
wanderings. How he managed to
elude the English is marvelous, with
a £30,000 price on his head—and in
a district so small that you could
lose it in Macpherson's old constituency of Burrard, and absolutely overrun with thousands of soldiers. It
speaks eloquently for the trustworthiness aiid fidelity of the Highland
Character.
Most tourists go from Inverness
down the Caledonian canal and thence
along the West Coast, but as wc had
in British Columbia seen plenty of
rocks, bays and seas, decided to take
the Highland Railway through the
heart of Scotland. Some forty miles
south of Inverness you pass through
the Macintosh country. I was rather
amused at an incident that happened
while we were in that district. I drew
my wife's attention to Moy Lake a
beautiful piece of water, with an
island in the middle, upon which are
the ruins of the Macintosh stronghold, and at the upper end of which
is the modern castle of the Macintosh
Chief of that clan. Not a soul in
the carriage took the slightest interest in what I was saying though they
all heard me, until a man suddenly
remembered that the Prince of Wales
had stayed with Macintosh some two
weeks previously and supplemented
my remarks to that effect. In an instant all hands got up off their seats,
made for the window with craning
necks to see the Castle, nearly crushing the life out of me in their anxiety
to see a place where the Prince of
Wales had stayed, thereby illustrating a peculiar phase in the English
character. Thc district, with all its
old historical associations had no interest to them until it was connected
with royalty.
Our first stay off was at Pitlochry
at the foot of the Gary Glen, where
Dundee, with his Highlanders nearly
annihilated the English Army under
General Mackay, at the battle of Kil-
licrankie. I took a photo of the place
where an English soldier pursued by
clansmen is said to have leaped to
safety over the falls of the river. The
late Queen doubted whether such a
feat were possible and it was then
looked upon as a myth, until an Englishman showed some years later its
feasibility by duplicating it. The
guide was a Cockney woman married to a Highlander. He looked on,
she did all the talking. It was very
funny to hear her say "when the
henemy pressed 'im." One scarcely
expected to meet with such language
in the heart of Scotland.
This puts me in mind that the other
day while traveling in an omnibus
through Picadilly there were Cockneys sitting upon the opposite seat.
They were very excited about the
treatment they had received from
somebody and in their denunciations
of him one said: "Damn im hany ow,
hi would like to ang im has igh has
Leave Your Baggage Checks at the
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.       A. E, KENT, Proprietor
Will You Take
$500 a Year...
for your spare time. In other
words the man who has a couple
of hours morning and evening
and will employ it in operating
A Cyphers Incubator
at his home can make from $500
in twelve months. We have a
unique plan to work on and will
be pleased to explain it to any
one interested.    Call or write.
Watson &
McGregor
647  Johnson   Street,
VICTORIA, B. C.
C. H. TITE & CO.
PAINTERS, PAPER-HANGERS
Wall Paper from 2-^c up.
No old stock. Estimates given.
Prices Cheaper than ever.
COR. YATES AND BROAD STS.
Your Fortune I
Briefly Told   ;:
First, you're going on a
journey.
Then you'll be very happy—
and you're going to have money
left to you. You're a lucky
Man.
Here's the way of it.
You're going on a journey to
this store.
You'll select your new Spring
Suit, and it will please you so
well that you'll be very happy.
You'll buy for less than you
thought and have money left;
therefore you're a lucky Man.
That's your fortune—see that
it comes true.
ALLEN & CO.
Fit=Reform Wardrobe
1 1301   Qovernment   St.,    Victoria.,
tyv^ft/****
4
Aman." I will bet you the drinks
when I return to Vancouver that
neither you or anyone of the usual
crowd can pronounce that sentence
aloud, and yet you persist that the
mass of the people over here speak
English. They will never repent
either I am afraid. Though I must
confess no woman that I have ever
heard speak with as nice and pleasant
an accent as the educated refined
Englishwoman.
I climbed up to the top of Ben
Y Vrackie, one of the highest mountains in Central Scotland, overtaking
on the way many younger men, so
that I realize I am not getting very
old yet. Had a grand view ,but oh,
the desolation 1 How in the world
the Clansmen ever existed is a mystery. It was well for them they had
the rich lowlands to raid upon. From
Pittsburg we took the train to Aber-
feldy and drove thence to Kenmore at
the foot of Loch Fay. Opposite the
hotel is a pretty little island upon
which are the ruins of a very ancient
Abbey, where Sybilla, the Queen of
Alexander the First is buried. A
(Continued on Page 8)
Pantage's
Theatre
JOHNSON STREET
 VICTORIA, B. C.
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLI
Matlnses (any part of houie).
Evenings, Balcony 	
I.owor Floor	
Boxes    )
Matinees
Every Afternoon
at
3 O'CIock.
Night Performances
8 and 9.15
WEEK 13TH APRIL
The New Gram
SULLIVAN « CONSIDINE,    Proprietor
Management of ROBT. JAMIESON.
EXTRAORDINARY.
VAUDEVILLE
PORTER J. WHITE &
COMPANY
Presenting
"THE VISITOR"
By Oliver White.
THE ASCOTT-EDDY TRIO
Comedy Pantomimists direct frc
Europe.
THE MUSICAL BENNETT-:
In a Unique Musical Playlet.
THREE WALTON BROTHEI
Baritones.
Presenting an Original Sketch
entitled "In Camp."
MUSICAL LOWE
Xylophone Artist Extraordinar
MART FULLER
Monologist.
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrat
"Stingy Moon."
NEW MOVING PICTURES
"Will He Overtake Them."
"Funny Face Competition."
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M. Nagel, Director.
Sadies     MEDICAL CMim
MASSAGE
Turkish Baths
VIBRATOR  TREATMENT
MR.     BJORNFELT,      SWEDIS
MASSEUR.
Special  Massage and Hometrea
ment by appointments,
Room 2, Vernon Blk., Douglas S
Body Development.
Hours 1 to 6. Phone 162
BEDDING
PLANT
Cheap Prices.   Get our price lis
Johnston's Seed Sto
City Market
VICTORIA
HOLLY TREES
Prices from 35 cents to $5.00, ace
ing to size. Write for seed and
catalog.
JAY A CO.
VICTORIA, E
AGENTS WANTED!-i6x20 cr;
portraits 40 cents, frames 10 <
and up, sheet pictures one
each. You can make 400 per
profit or $36.00 per week. (
logue and Samples free. Franl
Williams Company, 1208 W. T:
St., Chicago, 111. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL n, 1908.
7
■ •l_l*l*__4____M_U_H«_MMtl_k_-4
if
Social and        *
Personal. J
Ir. Stanley Lamb spent a few days
■own.
Ir. Mahue of Mandins was a visitor
|own during the week.
tr. Dick Mainguy of Westholme
fit a week in town.
* *
lieut. Kingscote is enjoying some
|ing at Cowichan Lake.
* #   *
llrs. Roy Troupe has left on a visit
Tlerkeley, California.
* *   *
Jliss Noel Moresby returned last
|nday from Seattle.
* *   *
liss Robertson of Westholme was
I guest of Mrs. Carew Gibson, dur-
I the week.
* *
Jir. Grahame Williams returned on
Iday from Seattle where he spent
|w days.
________ *   *
liss Boultbee of Vancouver was
Istered at the Empress during the
Ik.
Ir. and Mrs. Oscar Schoefield of
Jtholme are registered at the Bal-
lal.
* *   *
Irs. Purdy of Bellingham was reared  at  the  Empress  for  a  few
last week.
_■«■*   *
Irs. Landes returned to Seattle last
jlnesday after spending a few days
Fictoria.
* *   *
Ir. Fritz Claxton of San Francisco
lie guest of Mr. and Mrs. Stuart
lertson.
* *   *
|rs. Streatfield came in from Saa-
and spent a couple of days in
* *   *
liss Vera Gosnell returned from :i
to Tacoma and Bellingham last
day.
Ir. E. P. Colley is expected on
[lay evening from England, after
Ibsence of five or six months.
* *   *
Irs. Stephen Phipps and her father,
|F. Maitland Dougal, came down
Cowichan on Tuesday returning
IVednesday afternoon.
I *   *   *
|ie  engagement  is  announced  of
Gertrude Savage to Mr. T.  O.
|_ay, both formerly of Winnipeg,
of this ciyt.    The wedding has
1 arranged to take place at the end
lie summer.
* *   *
and Mrs. Biggerstaff Wilson
|t a few days last week at their
ity little summer cottage on the
ks    of   the    beautiful    Cowichan
returning home with a splendid
let.
BIJBj^H__
Ir. Fletcher and Mr. Foster of the
jidian Bank of Commerce, were
Its at Princess Hotell on Cowshr
Its at Price's Hotel on Cowichan
during the week. They enjoy-
tome excellent fly-fishing, March
vn proving itself to be the favored
[he marriage was solemnized at
list church, Bath, England, on thc
I inst., by the Rev. Claude S. Bird,
fer of the bridegroom, assisted by
jy B. Norton Thompson and Rev.
P. Hanl.s, of Mr. Claude Cecil
of Sintaluta, Saskatchewan, to
Amy Ethel Holley, daughter of
ate Lt.-Col. George Hunt Holley
ie 101st regiment.
* *   *
ursday last at St. Mark's Episco-
Church, Seattle, there was united
larriage Mr. A. W. Johnson, of
treal, and Miss Edna B. Beards-
of Azusa, Cal. The bride, who
charmingly gowned in a tan-col-
I tailor suit with picture hat to
h, was given away by Mr. Percy
Ddenrath of Vancouver, while Mr.
ett B. Duncan of Nome, acted as
man. A wedding luncheon was
wards served at The Rathskellar
in the evening the couple were
:s of Mr. James Fallon to dinner
e Butler Annex. They spent the
here at The Empress returning
ancouver, where they will reside,
irday. Mr. Johnson is well
.11 in business circles in Victoria.
* *   *
e residence of Mrs. George Mat-
A Skin of Beauty ls a Joy Forever
DR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S
Oriental Cream
OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER
Purifies as well as Beautifies the Skin.
No other cosmetic will do it.
Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, Moth
Patches, Rash and Skin diseases, and
every blemish on beauty, and defies detection. It has stood the test of 60
years; no other has, and is so harmless—we taste it to be sure it is properly made. Accept no counterfeit of
similar name. The distinguished Dr. L.
A. Sayre said to a lady of the haut-ton
(a patient). "As you ladies will use
them, I recommend 'Gourand's Cream' as
the least harmful of all the Skin preparations."
For sale by all druggists and Fancy
Goods Dealers.
GOUBAUD'S ORIENTAL TOILET
POWDER
For infants' and adults. Exquisitely perfumed. Relieves Skin Irritations, cures
Sunburn and renders an excellent complexion.
Price 25 cents, by mail.
GOURAUD'S  POUDRE  SUBTILE
Removes superfluous Hair.
Pries $1.00, by mail.
FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop.,
37 Great Jones St.,        New York City.
AT HENDERSON BROS.,  Distributors.
Vancouver ana Viotoria, B.O.
MAPS
Timber and Land.
The   kind   that   show   what's
taken  up   and   what's   vacant.
Electric Blue Print & Map Co.
Electric  Blue  Print  and  Map  Co.
1218 Langley Street
Victoria, B. C.
COAL
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo
Vollieries
New Wellington Coal.
The best  household  coal  in  the
market at current rates.
Anthracite Coal for sale.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA. B.C.
thews, Lampson St., was the scene
of the meeting of the "Five Hundred
Club" on Wednesday afternoon. Some
very close and exciting play was witnessed. Mrs. Courtney, however, made
the highest score. The house had
been sweetly arranged with daffodils
and clusters of primroses, filling the
air with their delicious perfume.
The competitors were Mrs. T. S.
Gore, Mrs. W. S. Gore, Mrs. Crosse,
Mrs. Mathews, Mrs. Shallcrosse, Mrs.
Gibb, Mrs. Courtney, Mrs. Blackwood,
Mrs. C. Roberts, Mrs. C. Todd, Mrs.
Spratt, Mrs. Troupe, Mrs. Crowe-
Baker, Mrs. Matson, Mrs. Coles, Mrs.
H. Tye, Mrs. Holmes, Mrs. Griffiths,
Mrs. J. Raymour, Mrs. Gibson, Mrs.
Stretfield, Mrs. Arthur Wolfenden and
Miss Monteith assisted with the tea
while Mrs. Stuart Robertson acted as
Very Considerate.
Mistress—Bridget, I hope you're
not thinking at al of leaving me. I
should be very lonesome without you.
Maid—Faith, and it's not lonely
ye'll be. Most-like, I'll go whin there's
a houseful o' company for luncheon
or dinner.—Lippincott's.
"Ut's a poor soldier yez are," bantered Larry.
"Phoy should yez say thot?" replied Denny, in injured tones. "During th' great battle wasn't Oi where
th' shells wor thickest?"
"Yez wor thot! Oi hurr-rud th'
corporal say yez got so scared yez
wint into a barn an' stuck yez head
into an egg crate, bedad!"—Chicago
News.
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days
after date we intend to apply to the
Hon. the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect
for coal and petroleum on the following
described lands, situated near Coal
Creek, Renfrew District, B.C.: Commencing at a post planted at the northeast corner of section SS, and marked
J. Hastle and H. J. Kirby; thence west
80 chains to northeast corner of section
S7; thence north 80 chains: thence east
to western boundary of the E. & N.
Railway Company's Lands; thence following said boundary of Esquimalt and
Nanaimo Railway Company's lands to
point of commencement.
Staked March 17th, 1908.
JAMES HASTIE.
H. J. KIRBY.
April 11
CERTIFICATE   OF   THE   REGISTRATION OF AN EXTRA-PROVINCIAL
COMF ANT.
"Companiea Act, 1897."
I hereby certify that "The Ferro-Con-
crete Construction Company" has this
day been registered as an Extra-Provincial Company under the "Companies Act,
1S!»7," to carry out or effect all or any
of the objects of the Company to which
the legislative authority of the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
Tlie head offlce of the Company is
situate at Cincinnati In Hamilton County, Ohio.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is flve hundred thousand dollars, divided into flve thousand shares
of one hundred dollars each.
The head ofllce of the Company in this
Province   is   situate   at   Victoria,   and
Henry Graham Lawson, Solicitor, whose
address Is Victoria, B.C., is the attorney
for  the  company.    Not  empowered  to
issue and transfer stock.
Given under my hand and Seal of Offlce
at Victoria,  Province of British Columbia, this fourth day of April, one
thousand nine hundred and eight.
S. T. WOOTTON.
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this company
has been established and registered are:
Manufacturing and dealing in fire-proofing and building material of all kinds,
and constructing, equipping and owning
buildings, bridges and structures of all
kinds, and all things incident thereto,
of engaging in a general contracting
business; and of acquiring, holding, owning and disposing of all rights, patent
and otherwise, necessary and convenient for the prosecution of its business.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
one mile west-north-west from Jesso
Island, running west CO chains; thence
north 60 ehains; thence east 60 chains;
thenco south 60 chains back to place
of commencement.
Dated February 22nd, 1908.
G. E. GIBSON.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, Intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of bay inside of
Jesse Island, one quarter of a mile
north of Jesse Island, running west 60
chains; thence north 60 chains; thence
east 60 chains; thence south 60 chains
back to the place of commencement.
Dated February 22nd, 190S.
H. G. ANDERSON.
March 1* C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
The bridge at Craigflower over Victoria Arm is closed to vehicular traffic
until further notice.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Lands and Works Department, Victoria,
B.C., 9th March, 1908.
$1,000 Reward
THE GOVERNMENT of the
PROVINCE of BRITISH COLUMBIA hereby offers a reward of ONE
THOUSAND DOLLARS for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the two men who, on the
25th day of February, 1908, at thc
Gorge Hotel, near the City of Victoria, B.C., armed with revolvers, entered and, while committing a robbery
in the said Hotel, shot and wounded
one Richard Dancey.
DESCRIPTION.
No. 1—Man about 5 feet 11 inches in
height, slim build, dressed in dark-
colored clothing; wore dark cap.
No. 2—Man about 5 feet 8 or 9 inches
in height; slim build; dressed in
dark-colored clothing; wore dark
cap. Both men were armed with
dark-colored revolvers and wore
long white cotton masks.
FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS reward will be given for information
leading to the arrest and conviction of
either one of the said men.
By order,
F. S. HUSSEY,
Superintendent of Provincial Police.
Victoria, B.C., 26th February, 1908.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Marie Phlllppi,
of Omaha, occupation, Lady, intends to
apply for permission to purchase tha following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of section 21, township
1, range 4, Poudrier Survey; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to place of beginning, being said
section 21.
Dated January 15th, 1908.
MARIE PHILIPPI.
Feb. 15 A. Olson, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a license to prospect for coal, on
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner of B. M. Richardson
Claim, being about one mile and a quarter northwest of Skidegate Inlet, Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence north eighty chains;
thence east eighty chains; thence south
eighty chains; thence west eighty chains
back to place of commencement, containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D. 1908.
D. R. YOUNG.
Mch 21 William Woods, Agent.
NOTICE ls hereby given that thirty
(30) days after date, I intend to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal, on the following desoribed lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the B. M. Richardson Claim, being about one mlle and a
quarter northwest of Skidegate Inlet,
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence north eighty chains;
thence west eighty chains; thence south
eighty chains; thence east eighty chains
back to place of commencement, containing six hundred and forty (640)
aeres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D. 1908
Mch 21
C. A. YOUNG,
William Woods, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
(30) days after date, I intend to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal, on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile and a quarter north of Skidegate Inlet and mouth of the Honna
River, Graham Island, Queen Charlotte
Islands Group; thonce south eighty
chains; thence east eighty chains; thence
north eighty chains; thence west eighty
chains back to place of commencement,
containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D. 1908.
Mch 21
B. M. RICHARDSON.
William Woods, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
(30) days after date, I intend to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for coal
on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of B. M. Richardson
Claim, being about one mile and a
quarter northwest of Skidegate Inlet,
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence south eighty chains;
thence east eighty chains; thence north
eighty chatns; thence west eighty
chains; back to place of commencement,
containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D. 1908.
R. W. RAYSAY,
Mch 21 William Woods, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of Bllnklnsop Bay,
about 100 feet west of the wharf; running west 60 chains; thence north 60
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south along the shore back to the place
of commencement.
Dated  February  24th,  1908.
March 14 C. G. JOHNSTONE.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, Intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of Blinkinsop Bay,
three-quarters of a mile from the entrance of said bay, running west 80
chains; thence south 60 chains: thence
east along the shore of bay inside of
Jesse Island; thence northerly along the
shore of Blinkinsop Bay to the place
of commencement.
Dated February 22nd, 1908.
O. C. BASS.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for the purchase of the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the east shore of Bllnklnsop
Bay, three-quarters of a mile from the
outlet of the creek at the head of bay,
running north along the shore 60 chains;
thence east 60 chains; thence south 60
chains; thence west 60 chains back to
the place of commencement.
Dated February 24th, 1908.
L. P. LOCKE.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
TIMBER
If you have any
timber for sale
list it with us
We can sell it
BURNETT, SON  & CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,   B. C.
The days are getting Warm.
THE
WILSON BAR
Is Comfortable.
VISIT IT.
648 Yates St., Victoria, B. C.
Most
Particular
Smokers
Experience little or no difficulty
in finding a cigar or blend of
smoking mixture that fits their
taste.
Our Manila or Havana
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We carry a most complete line of smokers'
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Phone 345
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days from date I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted in the
southwest corner and marked Initial
Post No. 1; thence east 80 chatns; thence
north SO chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated March 7th, 1908.
Graham Island, B.C.
Apl. 4 R. D. HOYT.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Frank Kelly,
of Victoria, B.C., timber cruiser, Intend
to apply for a special timber license
over the following described lands:
6. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
3, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
tiience north 160 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres,  more or less.
December  17th,  1907.
Apl   I FRANK KELLY.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, Intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the head of Bllnklnsop Bay, 50 feet
north of the creek running to the bay;
running west 60 chains; thence north
60 chains; thence east 60 chains; thence
south 60 chains back to the place of
commencement.
Dated February  24th,  1908.
M. J. G. WHITE.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
LLOYD & CO., practical chimney
cleaners, 716 Pandora St. Chimneys can be cleaned without making an ellova mess. Try us and
be convinced.
Phone A476. NUF SED.
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
days from date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum on the following
described lands, on Graham Island, B.C.:
Commencing at a post planted In the
southwest corner and marked Initial
Post No. 1, thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated  March  7th,   1908.
Graham Island, B.C.
Apl 4 J. O. HOYT.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days from date I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum on the following
described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted in the
southwest corne rand marked Initial
Post No. 1, thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 1,0 chains;
thenco south 80 chains to placo of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated  March  7th,  1908.
Graham  Island,   B.C.
Apl. 4 W. L. ARCHAMBEAU.
NOTICE Is hereby given tliat thirty
days from date I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissionei' of Lands
and Works for n license to prospect for
eoal and petroleum on the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted In the
northwest corner and marked Initial
Post No. 1: thenco east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence weBt 80 chains;
thence north SO chains to place of commencement containing 6*10 acres.
Dated   March  7th,   1908.
Graham Island,  B.C.
Apl. 4 JOHN DEARBORN. THE WEAK, SATURDAY APRIL ii, 1908,
In The Old Land.
(Continued from Page 0)
nice drive which we took was across
the Lyon River with its junction with
the Tay and up Glen Lyon, one of the
grandest and gloomiest glens in the
Highlands, passing on the way and
commanding the principal ford of the
river, much used before there were
any bridges. Comrie Castle ruins, the
ancient citadel of the Menzies family. About half way up the Glen
upon a knoll with sides about as steep
as the roof of a house, is a castle very
seldom visited and not mentioned in
any of the guide books, called Cari-
bane, once the stronghold of Campbell of Glenlyon. In connection with
this man there is a very pathetic story,
too long however to relate the particulars of in a letter, concerning
one of the Chiefs of the McGregor
clan who married his daughter
through the instrumentality of another Campbell Chief of collateral
branch called Black Duncan of the
Cowl. He was outlawed and eventually beheaded.
RAMBLER.
Music and Drama.
(Continued from Page 4).
Lilian Fisher, a notably good soprano,
last season starring in "Mam-selle
'Awkins" under the Klaw & Erlanger
direction. The tour it is understood
will be inaugurated at Duncan, probably on Saturday, the 25th, engagements at Chemainus, Ladysmith, Nanaimo, Cumberland and Alberni following, previous to the beginning of
the Mainland tour, which will extend
until the ist of June. Miss Fisher is
under contract to be in New York
again by August 1 to begin rehearsals
of a new comic opera in which she
will have the leading part with one of
the Kirke La Shelle companies on the
road next season.
of the previous acts capable. Her
handling of the situation with Napoleon on the one hand and Jerome
on the other was simply superb. With
a less firm touch this episode might
easily have become melo-dramatic,
and only Miss Mannering's great acting invested it with realism. The
whole scene rings false from a dramatic standpoint but for that the actress is not responsible, and she fairly
triumphed over a dramatic obsession.
Miss Mannering has reached maturity in the full possession of her
beauty, a fine stage presence and high
dramatic endowment. She has shown
in "Glorious Betsy" that she could
shine in classic roles, and she would
make no mistake in abandoning
modern American plays and turning
her attention to higher work. Since
her last visit to Victoria something
has imparted a touch of humanness to
her acting which it lacked before.
Mrs. Patrick Campbell.
Mrs. Patrick Campbell has chosen
for her one appearance here on the
night of Monday, April 13, The
Second Mrs. Tanqueray. When criticized the other day for her choice of
plays as being confined solely to those
of women who have had more or less
disagreeable pasts, Mrs. Campbell answered: "I play the roles that are
the most sympathetic to me; there
is no reason why a woman with a
future should not be as interesting as
a woman with a past, but you must
remember I made my first London
success in the role of a lady who had
a good bit of a past, and just as that
past clung to Mrs. Tanqueray in Pi-
nero's play, so that heroine has clung
to my reputation." It was in fact,
Mrs. Campbell who made Pinero famous as a serious dramatist by her
wonderful performance of "The Second Mrs. Tanqueray." A few years
later Pinero wrote for her "The Notorious Mrs. Ebbsmith." In neither
role has any actress seriously challenged her supremacy, although many
have tried.
Society is taking an unprecedented
interest in her coming engagement,
an interest which is awakened by
something more than thc symptuous
wardrobe which the English actress
has brought with her for thc tour.
From inquiries and advance orders
for seats that has been received during the past few days, it is evident
that the theatre will hold an audience
rarely equalled in brilliancy.
The New Grand.
The performance at the New Grand
this week is good without being
super-excellent. It hardly, however,
bears out the claims which were made
for it in the advance notice. Better
individual turns have been seen, for
instance the top liner is a little dramatic skit entitled "The Cracksman."
Richard Buhler, the leading character
has a very poor conception of the
gentleman burglar, as he was played
by the inimitable Willard, who created The Spider in the Silver King.
Buhler is far too stagey and artificial,
and if he toned down his performance it would be much more effective.
Even gentlemen burglars do not jump
all about the room like an animated
marionet at the slightest noise. The
lady who played up to him in the
little skit was much more natural and
therefore more effective. The most
meritorious performance was that of
the Robert Dumont Co., the comedy
acrobats, they were exceedingly clever
and their looping across the stage,
underneath the table was exceptionally good work. The Doria Opera
Trio were very good in their operatic selections, notably in the one
from Faust. Two turns could be cut
out with advantage, that of Wesson
and Walters and that of Lefevre and
Frankie St. John, the one on account
of an undoubted approach to vulgarity, the other on account of
inanity.
Next week's bill is promised to be
fully equal to that of this week, and,
in the sketch which is to be the big
feature even better, for "The Visitor,"
presented by the noted actor, Porter
J. White, and his company of three,
is said to be the best ever shown in
a Sullivan-Considine playhouse on the
coast. Other big features will be The
Ascott-Eddy Trio in a pantomimic
acrobatic act; the Musical Bennetts
in a novel musical act, thc three Walton Brothers, baritones, in an original singing sketch entitled "In
Camp"; Musical Lowe, Xylophone
artist extraordinary, and late soloist
with Sousa's Band; Mart Fuller, monologist; Thos. J. Price, in the illustrated song, "Stingy Moon"; New
Moving Pictures, entitled "Will Hc
Overtake Them?" and "Funny Face
Competition," and a new overture by
the Orchestra.
MOMUS.
518 Hastings St.W.
VANCOUVER.BC.
P
iHTENTS   and Trade Mark
obtained in all countries.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville St.,
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
A Concert Tour.
Music-loiving residents of thc smaller centres of population, as well as
the chief cities, will be deeply interested in the announcement made by
Mr. C. H. Gibbons, who recently returned from thc direction of Madame
Albani's notable round-the-world tour,
of his intention to shortly send the
rising young violinist, Francis Armstrong en tour through the Province,
associated in such concert work with
MONDAY, APRIL 13
Mrs. Patrick Campbell
in
A. W. PINERO'S MASTERPIECE
THE SECOND MRS. TANQUERAY
oo-oooooooooooooooooooooooo
En Tour of B. C.
April and May
Francis
Armstrong
Violin Virtuoso
Lilian Fisher
Prima Donna Soprano
Management of C. H. QIBBONS
oooooooooooooooooooooooooo
r
JUST A WORD
ABOUT   PLANS
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Remember specially drawn
plans cost you a little more
than the stock pattern book designs, why not have what you
desire—the cost of a set of
drawings for a home to cost
say $1,000 would be $20. If
you can afford to build at all,
you acn afford to build right.
Send me your ideas and I will
work them into practical shape
for $2.00. A copy of my booklet on "Homes" will be mailed
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write me now for a copy.
^
E. STANLEY MITTON
Architect   -   Taneouver, B.C,
We Make It Both Pleasurable and Profitable
For you to do your buying here, and our reliable delivery system
brings your purchases at the time you want them. You'll find it
good to get your groceris here where you take no risks.
We would itemize:—
PRESERVED FRUITS.
Del Monte Canned Fruits, per tin  35c
Wagstaffe's Bottled Fruits, per jar  35c
C. & B. Bottled Fruits, each  75c
Bar le Due White and Red Currant, per jar 35c
Guava Jelly, pr jar  25c
Marrons in Syrup, per bottle  $1.00
Cherries in Marasquin, per bottle  35c, 65c and $1.00
Green Figs in Marasquin, per bottle  50c
Stuffed Figs, per bottle  50c
CHICKEN TAMALE
The famous B. & M. make, each 25c
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Jj
Smith & Shaughnessy, Proprietors
YATES ST., Victoria, B. C.
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toupees, wigs, switches and
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DAYS
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HAND
Write me for 1908
Catalogue
Will Marsden
665 Granville Street,      Vancouver, B. (vwnnnrmoTVTr»T*r-nnnnn
Kingsford Smith & Co.
Stock and General
AUCTIONEERS
| (Commission and Real Estate Agents.
I 441 Homer Street     Vancouver.
UI_9JLX_UUL_9.9__9.SJ
Vancouver Edition
The Week
fl British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vancouver B. 6.
3 mnmnrvnnnnnnf ram* mre
Stewart Williams R. C. Janion
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION AND
REAL ESTATE AGENTS
Si FONT ST. VICTORIA, I. C.
1.UUUUU8 9,_ULlSL_9JLSUUUUUL3U.k.
|0L.  V.     No. II
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL n, 1908
Tho Canadian press is.
lie English never tired of discussing
Inmigrant.       the English immigrant, and
the Englishman in Canada,
his poor benighted mortal is dealt with
;nder various headings, but the favourite
es are the "Tenderfoot," the "Remit-
nce Man," and the "Egoist." Even
oast papers have undertaken to put him
ght on various matters with respect to
hich his ignorance is supposed to be
ilossal. The fact that his mentors try
put him right by the use of bad Eng-
sh and "second class words" may be
ken as a matter of course, for even his
tterest enemies are constrained to con-
iss that he can both write and speak
s mother tongue. The assumption of
e Canadian press is that the Englishman
fould line up with every other class of
nmigrant, subdue his natural impulses,
inordinate his individuality and grace-
illy submit to be moulded on the Canaan type. Needless to say there is just
at inextinguishable spark of individually about the young Englishman which
as no ambition to be moulded on Canaan lines, or any other lines than those
Ihich   tradition  has   endeared   to   him.
1
ui'thermore he finds it impossible to for-
)_ that he belongs to a governing race,
d that wherever Englishmen have gone
ey have not only not succumbed to the
ibduing and assimilating influences of
e land of their adoption, but in the long
m have imposed their own ideas, and
aintained their ascendency. Holding
lese views, which alas are sadly at vari-
ltfe with those recently expressed by a
oast paper, The Week has particular
easure in quoting portions of an editorial
hich appeared only last week in the Mon-
eal Herald. No one will accuse the
erald of being anti-Canadian or pro-
ritish, but under Mr. Brierley's direction
has always been fair, and in respect of
I matters outside party politics—broad.
he editorial throws a little new light on
jn old subject, and for this reason is re-
oectfully commended to the attention of
II Canadians, but in particular to the
Mention of editors who arc prone when
ealing with this subject to express second
ass ideas in third class language:
"The attitude of any country towards
mniigration is of two kinds, the collective
lew, in which the community as a whole
onsiders what sort of new population is
.est for building up the community as a
hole, and the individual view, in which
jhose who come into personal relations
'ith the new immigrant (employers, land
mpanies, and such) consider what best
■tits their immediate interests.   Assured-
', it is the individual and immediate view
lat is to the fore at this moment in Ca-
ada, when the cry of 'No English need
pply' goes up to heaven from all parts of
|jie land.    A few years ago, when Eng-
sh immigration was almost an unattain-
M'e ideal, before the Englishman began
swarm over here and establish personal
elations in thc country, the Canadian na-
ion collectively yearned for him. He
\.a_ the ideal nation-builder.   The dream
EDITORIAL
of our immigration policy was to lure him
here in vaster and ever vaster numbers.
AVe put our shoulders to the wheel to get
him, and we succeeded. What reason have
we today for changing our former opinion
of the ultimate value of the Englishman as
stuff for the making of nations? Not a
whit. All that we know about him from
personal experience is that in the moment
of his first awakening in new surroundings
ho is, as a type, helpless and indocile, unable for a time to do much for himself,
and unwilling to do much for others as
others want it done. But it is a general
principle that the higher an animal is in
the scale of species, the more incapable
are its young in the period immediately
after birth. May not a good deal of this
principle apply also to the immigrant in
the first days and months of his new life
in a new land? From the standpoint of
the employer, the ideal immigrant is the
man who will simply carry out the ideas
that already prevail in the country, with
quick apprehension and immediate docility. But are these men exactly the type
to fertilize the life of the young country,
to broaden its mind and strengthen its
heart, to give it a stronger national character? Are they the highest species of
new-born Canadians? It hardly seems
so. Are we not figuring too much on what
use some Canadians can make of our new
immigrant within the first year of his life
in Canada, and too little on what he may
contribute to the nationhood of the country ten, twenty or fifty years hence? It
is not by such figuring that Canada is to
be built up. Let us revert to the old collective view of the Englishman, the man
of the great 'pioneer race,' the man whose
forbears established parliamentary government and created the greatest literature
in the world; and let us forget a little
about the awful nuisance that an unac-
climated Englishman may make of himself in Canada for a twelve-month or so."
In The Week issue of
Martin Luther   March 28th, comment was
made upon a lengthy letter
on the subject of "Martin Luther and the
Bible," which had just appeared in the
Colonist. The purpose of the comment
was two-fold: First to deprecate the introduction of religious controversy into the
pages of secular journals, and on this point
The Week wishes to reiterate what it then
said, that "no good purpose could be
served by opening up the columns of a
newspaper to religious controversy." The
second purpose*of the comment was to criticize the .writer of the letter in question
for using heated language in connection
with such a topic. The Week has no
knowledge whatever of the gentleman in
question, beyond the fact that he is an
honoured priest of the Roman Catholic
church, a church to which this paper has
been uniformly friendly, and for the support of whose institutions it has always
given the free use of its columns. The
criticism was based upon a misleading
statement made by the Colonist in inserting his letter to the effect that it had
omitted certain portions because of the unsuitable language used. The Week had
no reason to doubt the accuracy of this
statement and was undoubtedly justified in
assuming it to be correct. It turns out,
however, that the Colonist was not justified in making any such reflection upon the
controversial methods of Father Caine.
The portions of his letter omitted were
argumentative, and their omission altogether marred the effect of the argument.
With this explanation The Week desires
in fairness to Father Caine to say that
since the criticism directed at him was due
to misrepresentation by the Colonist; it
was unjustifiable, and is withdrawn. This
explanation is entirely voluntary; The
Week has had no communication whatever
with Father Caine at the time of writing.
The Week never hesitates to criticise
where there is room, criticism is its vocation, but the strength of its position depends upon the fairness of its criticism, a
characteristic whicli it is determined to
preserve.
One Dollar Per Annum
large increase of business. Another very
gratifying feature is revealed by a careful
examination of the list of shareholders
which shows that more than 90 per cent, of
these reside AVest of the Great Lakes. If
the same enlightened policy which has
hitherto governed this institution is continued it will in a few years vie with the
large financial institutions of Canada. The
other gratifying circumstance in connection with AVestern Banks is the securing
of a Charter and the successful flotation
of the Bank of \7ancouver. Mr. Alexander L. Dewar is the moving spirit of
this new enterprise, and having regard to
financial conditions during the last six
months he has made a marvellous success
of the promotion. All the directors are
British Columbia men, with large businesses and large interests at stake in the
Province. Sufficient capital has already
been subscribed to ensure the opening of
the head office within a short time, and it
is likely before the 30th of June that
AVestern Canada will have two flourishing
banks to offset the destructive policy of
currency exportation which has pressed so
heavily during the last few days.
It seems only yesterday
Western Banks, that The AVeek was hammering away at the Banking institutions of Canada because of their
neglect of AVestern interests. The series
of articles published in these columns were
quoted in every paper of importance in the
Dominion, ancl in the main their conclusions were endorsed. The remedy suggested was the establishment of Western
Banks, and this policy is rapidly meeting
with popular favour. Its "raison d'etre"
lies in the fact that the Western branches
of Eastern banks are simply collecting
agencies which deplete the country of its
currency. AVhen this declaration was
made in The AVeek articles, one or two
local managers demurred, but the statement was never seriously contested. Since
then additional evidence has come to hand
which more than justifies the position
taken up by The AAreek. AVithin the last
ten days a leading Canadian Bank has
written a letter to a Bank Manager in
A'ictoria telling him in so many words
that ho must not advance another dollar
under any circumstances or on any security, that his business is "to secure deposits and to ship them East without delay." Although I have no evidence I cannot doubt that other local managers havc
received similar communications. When
The AVeek informs its readers that the particular bank in question is accountable
for over two million dollars of local deposits the iniquity of thc system becomes
apparent, and every AVestern man will emphatically endorse the opinion that the
time has come when their business should
be handled by Western Banks. In this
connection there are two gratifying features, of the situation, the first is that the
pioneer AA:cstern Bank, thc Northern, has'
just issued its second annual report showing splendid progress and a rapidly increasing business. The Northern Bank is
governed by an enlightened policy and
controlled by local Directors who are thoroughly in touch with the country. In
addition it has absorbed the Crown Bank
of Canada, and by so doing acquired a
The AVeek has not always
The School been able to support the
By-law. by-laws  which  have  been
submitted by the City Council to the ratepayers. Thc present by-law
to raise $70,000 in order to increase the
school accommodation is one which on
every ground should receive support. The
time is not opportune to build a new High
School. Sucn a school properly equipped
and thoroughly up-to-date in every respect
would cost $150,000. There is a greater
need for a substantial increase in the ordinary school accommodation, and the
trustees are to be commended for the
policy which they have decided to
adopt. Statistics go to show that the present population of A7ictoria approximates
closely to 35,000. This is an increase of
10,000 since the last census, of which probably 5,000 have been added during the
last year and a half. Adequate school accommodation is a "sine qua non" in any
progressive city and A7ictoria is undoubtedly progressing. To refuse this grant
would be not only to increase the present
congestion, but to retard growth and to
discourage newcomers, to say nothing of
inflicting a hardship upon thc children
themselves. The Week cordially endorses
what it believes to be a very wise policy
and the best possible solution of a
difficulty.
At thc recent business
Commercialism luncheon of the Canadian
In Literature.   Club, a local critic opposed
the endorsation of Mr. Wellington Dowler's fine national song on thc
ground that to do so savoured of commercialism. Thc speaker presumably meant
that. ilr. Dowler intended to exploit the
Club for commercial purposes; I'he Club
evidently did not* think so, and unanimously passed a resolution recommending the
composition to the consideration of the
Quebec Commemoration Committee. "What
ninny readers of The AA'eek are asking is
why the same critic moved a resolution at
the previous meeting of the Club endorsing the project of _\lr. Dawson who came
Wore it with a purely commercial proposition which should never even have
been submitted to the Club, and for the
support of which his business manager hail
already raised upwards of $SO,000. One
reader suggests "straining at 11 gnat and
swallowing a camel," but an old timer is
probably much nearer the mark when he
suggests "Wheels within wheels." THE WEKK, SATURDAY, APRIL u, 1908.
NATIONALIZATION OF RAILWAYS.
By C. H. GIBBONS
(An  interview,  written  specially for The Week.)
(Continued) though anyone who has used Ameri-
"Railway lines, being built, with us can railways cannot agree with them,
are maintained and operated on busi- In appointment of first-class rolling
ness principles. Competition assures stock they are twenty years behind
a marked superiority in equipment the United States ot Canada. As for
and service which one looks for in speed and wage-paying-passenger
vain on government railways secure and freight tariffs are about parallel
in an imperishable monopoly, and with ours-the following figures will
whose proprietors are therefore con- Perhaps interest Canadians. I quote
tent that anything will do, so long as them from a letter to me of Mr. L.
people are able to get from place to McClelland, Secretary of the Victoria
place, and that there may be no criti- Railway Commission, of the 3rd Aug-
cism as to waste in luxurious appoint- »s* ^t, an« they represent the maxi-
ment of rolling stock or extravagant mum speed and wage attainments on
salaries-so termed by the worker for Australasian railways:
wages who wields the ever-to-be-con-      Class of Train.      Maximum Speed.
sidered Labor vote—such as would be Through  Express 41.04 miles
commanded by the specialist in rail- Passenger   39.97    "
way affairs most competent to direct Suburban Passenger  23.89    "
the  business  he  has  made  his  life Mixed    25.18    "
Study, and in which he is an expert.     Express Goods  25.18    "
"To view the matter from another Through Goods   19.89    "
standpoint: when private railway en-  Roadside   Goods    19.89    "
terprise builds speculatively into new Salaries and Wages.
country, the first objective is the ere-      Clerical and professional staff, ex-
ation of traffic which will justify in elusive of heads of departments, £40
the eyes of the capitalists interested to  £600 per annum.
the large investments made.    Hence      Artisan   class,   including   foremen,
we see these capitalists infinitely the 8s to 14s per diem.
more ready to venture further money     Artisan class, apprentices, is 3d to
in  co-operation  with  the  prospector 4s 9d per diem.
or the miner in the development of      Non-artisan  class,  unskilled  labor,
his claim, in the establishment of re- 2s to 5s per diem.
duction works, in the equipment  of     Station, yard, and way and works
timber  camps  and  the  erection  and staff, including foremen, 6s to 12s per
operation of saw-mills, in the exploit- diem.
ation of fisheries, in the providing of     Signal  and  train-running  staff,   7s
palatial hotels, opera houses, etc.—in to us 6d per diem.
a hundred and one activities making
for the support of an industrious population and the augmentation of the
national wealth as well as the national capacity for self-support. These
Locomotive running staff, 6s to 14s
per diem.
"It should be borne in mind that
these figures represent the maximum
wages  under  government  ownership
«p|l|||
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OF
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
PHONE 893. VICTORIA
MISS BESSIE ABOTT
Of  the   Metropolitan   Grand   Opera
House,    New    York.     At    the
Victoria, May 8th.
secondary industrial investments are in Australia, and also that the ap-
each looked to to provide their legi- prentice system is worked to the ex-
timate profit to the investors. At thc treme. The higher ratings are reach-
same time they are obviously of the ed only by slow advance during a
greatest importance to the state, and long period of years. Hence the post
profits thus brought to the pockets of never made a slip. This great goal
the capitalists, supplementing the of the railroader's ambition carries
earnings from their original railway the magnificent wage of about $3.50
investments, enable them to look with per day, while the maximum wage for
equanimity upon lower dividends than unskilled labor is $1.25. And this is
would be satisfactory in the event of in the country where labor controls
their railway holdings constituting politics, and runs public business as it
their only stake in the country. judges best for its own class interests.
"To those to whom the dream of "New Zealand is pre-eminently the
nationalization appeals so strongly by country of the common people and
reason of the vgaueness with which the elegancies of polite life are little
all allied considerations are under- in evidence. Indeed there seems a
Stood, it may be fairly said that the restrained antagonism everywhere
experience of Australia and New toward the man who asks for a morn-
Zealand proves the utter non-service- ing bath or a serviette at table. That
ability of government railways as col- accommodation be clean, cheap and
onization agents. In Canada the rail- wholesome is deemed quite sufficient,
way is a necesasry forerunner of set- The practical success or failure of
tlement. In Australia and New Zea- New Bealand's Socialistic doctrines is
land the country must first be settled altogether a matter of viewpoint. If
up before it can induce the govern- the objective is individual or raa-
ment to provide railway facilities. In- terial prosperity, New Zealand is
deed, the most liberal policy as to rail- the best country in the world to keep
way building adopted in the southern away from. If one has no other am-
Commonwealth (that of Queensland) bition than to get through life as
would bc viewed in Canada as cruious- easily as possible, and exploit the
ly short-sighted. This policy is to pleasures and the philosophies of the
require a guarantee of a substantial simple life, taking no thought for the
portion of the cost from the appli- morrow, it is ideal. Here in Am-
cants for a new railway line, then erica the mass of thc people find their
resident within the area to be bene- chief occupation and enjoyment in
fited. How many railways would making money by the use of their ut-
have been built within the "sea of most powers, and developing the
mountains" pictured by Hon. Edward great country God has given us. And
Blake, and how many cities and we don't begrudge a fortune to the
towns, mining and timber camps man who shows unusual business ca-
would have arisen, should Canada or pacity, and employs it in exploitation
any of its western provinces have of the country. In New Zealand it is
followed the nationalization pro- axiomic that no one should be richer
gramme instead of adhering to the than his neighbour, no matter if he
support of controlled private enter- be shrewd and industrious, and his
prise? Of course the Australian rail- neighbour a lazy fool. Labor legis-
ways provide, too, for a little army lation has so penalized industrial en-
of uniformed officials who have se- terprise in New Zealand that no ex-
cured appointment through the ma- pansion is possible, and no capital
chinery of politics rather than by seeks investment there. 'Carrying on'
reason of their peculiar fitness in the is thc maximum of present success,
profession of railroading. The wage The men who grasp large opportuni-
scale everywhere in Australia save in ties and develop them are agreed that
Victoria, is one which American rail- New Zealand under present condi-
way men would not consider for a tions is no place for them, and have
moment. left  the  country  or  are  leaving  it
"Victoria, where the railways are And under these conditions, with a
in the hands of a Canadian, Mr. weakened market for labor, wages in
Thomas Tait, is the model railroad- all lines are lower than a Canadian
ing state of thc Southern Cross conn- artisan would ever dream of acccpt-
try, and they assure you with pride ing. To fix a wage for so many
in Melbourne that this service is ah- hours of labor, regardless of the
solutely the finest in thc world—al- variations  in individual  skill,  experi-
Try It Next
Wash Day.
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DY-0=LA
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BLUING
Simpler, cleaner and infinitely
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ioc WORTH WILL LAST
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Get it from
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
Government Street, Near Yates
The Taylor Mill Co.
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All kinds of Building Material,
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TELEPHONE 564
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LATEST NUMBERS
English
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CHUMS
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THE STRAND
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PUNCH
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TIOTOBIA, B. 0.
WHY   NOT   HAVE   THE   BEST
THE REPUTATION OF
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Is world-wide, and stands for the BEST that can be produced.
The following brands are for sale by all the leading dealers:
RED SEAL VERY OLD LIQUEUR SCOTCH
ROYAL HOUSEHOLD BLACK AND WHITE
gRADIGER & JANION, Sole Agents for B.C.
www
Plows, Harrows, Seed Drills,
Etc.
Bain Wagons and Carts.
Brantford Carriages, Buggies,
Phaetons, Buckboards,
Spring Wagons and
Carts.
Petaluma Incubators.
Melotte Cream Separators.
E. G. PRIOR & eO..
LTD.
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VICTORIA, B.C.
Established 1867
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
52 Uovernment St., Victoria, B. C.
Charles Hayward, President F. Caselton, Manager.
We make a specialty of Undertaking and Embalming.
An experienced certificated staff available at all times, day
and night.
Phones Nos. 48, 305, 404 or 594, Victoria.
Investigate the
"Cushman" flarine Hotor
As good as the best.   Cheaper than the rest.
BAXTER & JOHNSON 811 Government Street
Victoria, B. C.
You can always
tell an M. B.
ys      — -      q    It tastes different
cigar _\\9   Yit)     than oiiitrs'
Siqar
Made by S. A. Bantly, Victoria, B. C.
Union Made.
Havana Filler.
Two Sizes.
Sold Everywhere. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL n 1908
ce, industry, application and special-
ed  aptitude,  seems   on  its   face  a
actical denial of the wisdom of the
reator  in  not  casting  every  man
om the same mental and physical
ould.    It also operates forthwith in
actice toward lowering the standard
If individual efficiency, crushing am-
'ition,  and  exiling  inventive  genius,
here the laws of the land prescribe
e wage in all crafts upon the basis
f  time-serving,  the  good workman
bound to deteriorate and the less
fficient  workman   to   cease   striving
;or  self-improvement  in  his  calling,
anufacturers  and  other  large  cm-
•loyers of labor in New Zealand tell
orkman  of this  generation  is  less
ou   today   that   the   New   Zealand
orkman  of  this  generation  is  less
fficient, less painstaking and less am-
itious than his predecessor of a de-
:ade   ago.   And   it   is   only   natural,
where   legislation   insists   upon   the
ood   workman   and  the   bad   being
qually  rewarded.    The  whole   sys-
em makes inevitably for the lowering
f the standard of individual efficien-
y, whereas under keen competition,
ie individual is impelled to excel in
vhatever calling may be his, to cul-
lvate his    industry    and    skill, and
ftentimes  develop  inventive  genius.
^nd  with  all  the  legislative   enact-
lents to compel improvement of the
rorker's condition in New Zealand, is
improved?    The   market   for   his
ervices is becoming daily more re-
tricted.     New   lines   of   enterprise
re not springing up, for capital  is
ot offering where it is challenged as
n arch-enemy.   The constant haras-
ing   of   established   enterprises   re-
uces their capacity for payments out
ven at the demands of labor.   Wages
re low, and when the New Zealand
vorkman of today seeks fortune in
ny  of  the  high-wage  countries,  he
nds that he is no longer the equal
f his fellow craftsman developed un-
er   competitive  conditions  stimula-
ve of individual  efficiency.    He is
oing backward in his value as an
ldustrial factor, instead of forward.
.nd as the unit retrogrades, so docs
ie country built upon units."
"And how about the 'Unrest in In-
a,"   the   returned   Canadian   was
sked, "is it a serious matter?"
"Undoubtedly very serious.    What
1   its   origin?    Why  the .inevitable
gotism of the Anglo-Saxon, which
pels him to try and convince every-
ne of the superiority of his particu-
ir  civilization  and  methods.     The
fellow peril' is the inevitable result
f   our   sending   our   missionaries,
lerical and commercial, to China and
apan, there to boast of our super-
Drity and urge the Japanese to adopt
ur standards.    They did, and now
ley are the most dangerous menace
o our own commercial and political
upremacy and to the peace of the
irorld.    In India we have not been
ontent to rule the alien and diverce
aces as firm but kindly fathers. We
ave urged the native to live by Eng-
ish rule, which is in no sense appli-
able to his traditions, temperament
>r talents.    We have applauded his
eclaration for  university  education.
Vnd the universities have turned out
heir thousands of book-learned In-
ian  natives  for  whose  educational
ttainments the work-a-day world of-
ers no market.   They promptly be-
ome political agitators—patriotically
00—following exactly upon the se-
luences of cause and effect, naturally
ccepting the theories of government
ve have urged them in our English
chools to admire.   And in India it
5 hard to find argument to justify
he denial of Home Rule, when all
he ablest jurists and other leaders
f thought are native;   and so the
lowers that be have to come back to
he old doctrines of expediency and
orce.   It is forbidden to hold meet-
ngs of more than twenty people, or
0  discuss political  or semi-political
latters.   This closure will not suffice
0 do ought but stimulate in the end
he growth of the seed of discontent
own by English pride and thought-
essness.
"And it all comes back to the fact
hat we in our egotism think every
ace should live and manage affairs
is we do. Nature never meant it so.
India, for example, is on the whole
eopled with adult children; their gov-
rnment must be paternal for their
good. The sword won India and the
sword must hold that Empire, lest
race and religious antipathies bathe
the land in blood. And Kitchener is
the sword to hold it safe.
"Of course the thoughtlessness of
our own British Columbia people in
their treatment of Indian immigrants
needlessly and vexatiously complicates
the difficulties which the Indian Council is facing. But we must hope that
larger discretion on the part of the
western Canadian people will very
shortly lighten theis burden."
and
" 'I've got my shoes on.'
" 'So have I,' after a pause.
"There   was   another   space,
Johnny called:
" 'I've got my pants on.'
"Then a long pause followed, and
finally the silence was broken by giggles and a guffaw in the rooms adjoining, but the rafters rang when
Johnny called:
" 'What are they laughing about
Mrs. Smith?'" — February Young'a
Magazine.
"An audience," said Mr. William
Norris, who has scored the hit of his
career in Mr. Henry W. Savage's production of "Tom Jones," "an audience
is a peculiar animal. It reminds me
at times of the girl and the flatiron—
the audience representing the flatiron.
"On a bitter night of late December
a kind mistress said to the servant
girl:
" 'Jennie, it's a frightful night. It
presages a white Christmas. And
there's no fire in your room. I think
child, you'd better take a flatiron t<
bed with you.'
" 'Do ye think so, ma'am?' says Jennie, doubtfully.
" 'Yes, I do,' says the mistress, very
kindly and firmly. 'I insist on it
Don't forget.'
" 'Very wei, ma'am,' said Jennie, in
a sullen voice.
"The next morning the cold was
terrible. The landscape was iron-
bound with frost.
" 'Well, Jennie,' said the mistress
'did you take that flatiron to bed with
you, as I ordered?'
" 'Yes, ma'am,' Jennie answered.
" 'And how did you make out with
it?'
"'Oh, so-so,' said Jennie; 'I think I
got it almost warm before morning.'"
Considerate Old Gentleman.
"Why, gracious, pa," said the only
daughter, "what in the world are
those queer arrangements you have
placed in the vestibule?"
The old gentleman rubbed his gouty
foot and chuckled.
"Not much, dearie," he responded.
"You see, I noticed how long it takes
for you and that young man to say
good night, so I fitted up an electric
heater to keep your feet from getting cold, and a portable alarm clock
to inform you of the breakfast
hour."—Chicago News.
Heard in the Museum.
Glass Eeater—Why are all the
freaks laughing?
Circassian Girl — Haven't you
heard the joke? Why, the midget
tried to kiss the fat lady and she said:
"Sir!   You monster!"—Chicago News.
Johnny's Query.
"Speaking of infants and others,"
laughed Rose Stahl, in "The Chorus
Lady," "reminds me of a good one I
heard this summer,
"The kind lady has taken Johnny
bathing that morning. They had
come up from the beach and gone
into adjoining rooms at the bathhouse. After a few minutes Johnny
called:
" 'Mrs. Smith, let's race getting
dressed.'
" 'All right, Johnny,' she called
back.
"T've got my stockings on,' called
Johnny.
" 'So have I,' after a pause.
It Was "So Sudden."
"Miss Eleanor," said he, as they sat
on the beach in the moonlight, "will
you marry me?"
"This is so sudden!" she cried.
"My love?" he asked.
"No,' she replied; "your nerve."—
Judge.
You Can Never Tell.
Ransom—Never judge a man by
the umbrella he carries.
Beckly—No; it may not be his.
Height of Folly.
Gertrude—Isn't Percy Rider a
reckless youth?
Louise—How so?
Gertrude—He actually ran over a
tramp and got the tires of his auto
all soiled.—Exchange.
Colections.
"My collection," said the numismatist, proudly, "is worth $100,000.
And every coin is genuine."
"Mine," said the minister, sadly, "is
worth about $7.63 a Sunday. And I
have to take my chances on the coin's
being good."—Cleveland Leader.
Timber Limits
FOR QUICK SALE--A SNAP.
12 Sections in the neighborhood of Quatsino Sound-
Rupert District.
35,000 feet to the Acre Guaranteed.
No Cash Deposit.
Time allowed for inspection.   Located on  water and easy
of access.
Apply to W. BLAKEMORE
1208 Government Street, Victoria.
THE WORD REVIVER SPELLS THE
SAME BACKWARDS OR FORWARDS
Ever think what a good reviver is a glass of good Champagne?
When in pain mentally or physically, just try a "split" of Mumm's
Extra Dry and you'll think your pain was only sham. If you have
that tired feeling after "la grippe," or if the spring "blueness"
is upon you, try Mumm's for a reviver. You can pronounce
Mumm's backwards also if you wish. It's a good, quiet appela-
tion worthy of the best wine produced. "Silence is Golden," so
is Mumm's Champagne. The Champagne market is somewhat
quiet just now, but "Mumm's the word," because the class of
people  who   order   Champagne is the class who desire the best.
Order a "split" of Mumm's Extra Dry today at your
club, cafe, bar or hotel and see if it does not prove a
reviver in the best sense of the word. If your dealer
cannot supply you with a case of "splits" for home
consumption, kindly phone us and we'll see that you
get it promptly.
PITHER   &   LEISER
Corner Fort and Wharf Streets.
The B. C. Home of Mumm's Champagne.
o-oo-oooo-ooooooooooo-c^^
Dermatologist
Institute
Mrs. Stanner (graduate of Mrs. Nettie Harrison, San Fran-
cosco), cordially invites the ladies of Victoria to call and investigate
her methods. Expert in Dermatology, Facial Massage, Hair
Dressing, Shampooing, Scalp Treatment, Manicuring, etc.
CLAY PACK FOR THE COMPLEXION.
ELECTRICAL FACE MASSAGE.
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Hours 9 to 6.        - - - - Phone 1629
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ST. ANDREW'S
COLLEGE
TORONTO
A KaaltUatlal aad Day School lor Boys
Thorough Instruction.
New Buildings, Large Athletic
Fields.
Summer term commences April
22nd, 1908.    '
For information write to
REV.  D.   BRUCE  MACDONALD,
M.A., LL.D.
Principal.
Y. W. C. A.
1208 Government Street
VICTORIA.
Reading and rest rooms, lunch and
tea rooms. Instruction in English,
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The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
83% Government Street. ..Victoria, B.C.
626   Hastings Street....Vancouver, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE..Manager and Editor
Personality.
The longer J live the more I am
convinced that it is personality which
counts every time. I do not know
who invented the phrase, but quite a
number of years ago our leaders of
political warfare in thc Old Country
were very fond of assuring the electorate that it was a matter of
"measures and not men." I have always regarded this as the prelude to
the political machine, and all those
organizations which aim at the suppression of individuality and the exaltation of party platforms.
Of course the purpose of the cry
was to consolidate party support for
the candidate on the ground that being the nominee of the party he
should be accepted enthusiastically in
spite of his personal shortcomings.
This is a doctrine which has spread
far and wide of late years, and in the
United States and Canada especially
nearly every political nominee is the
product of the Convention. Once the
selection has been made every member of the party is supposed to fall
in line.
As a broad principle 1 am not prepared to condemn this modus operandi, because although it has many
objectionable features it is probably
necessary under our present system
of party government. The lirst thing
to seek in all forms of Government is
a means of fixing and enforcing responsibility, and up to date it has been
found impossible to do this outside
the discipline ensured by party organizations. But even this system does
not exclude the matter of personality,
and it is upon atht subject that I
wish to say a little.
Personality counts in all the affairs
of life, its vital principle can neither
be extinguished nor suppressed by
artificial means. It is true that many
a good man has been downed by
cliqueism or by the repeated onslaught of a section of his party, but
the cases arc rare indeed where this
has been effectually done unless the
man had "a white streak" somewhere.
In thc competition of public life courage and combativeness are an essential part of the equipment. A man
may possess all the gifts and graces,
to defeat at some time or another. In
the moment of greatest stress he will
turn his face to the wall.
It is not the man who carries a
chip on his shoulder and always wants
to scrap who exemplifies the qualities
I refer to, but rather he who is slow
to quarrel but once in for it would
die rather than yield. Looking back
over a pretty long career I can recall
many men who have dropped out of
public life simply because of the white
streak. The most notable of all is
probably Lord Roseberry who had
the ball at his feet and a long and
glorious career opening out before
him, but allowed himself to be sidetracked rather than light. A man who
deliberately chooses to-plough "the
lonely furrow" when his country is
calling can never be more than a dil-
letante loiterer in the path of duty.
For this reason I attach no importance to the rumors that Lord Rosebery may emerge from his retirement
to take an active part once more in
the Government of the country. He
has too often been found wanting,
and despite his brilliant gifts, which
are unsurpassed and almost* unapproached by those of any political
leader of the day, it may be taken as
a settled fact that he will never again
be trusted iether by his party or by
the country.
But I have deviated somewhat because I set out to emphasize the point
that personality is all powerful, and
that neither circumstances nor environment can down a man if he has
both talent and courage.
Again and again I have seen this
illustrated in the case of men who
have been unfortunate enough to
make enemies of their own party,
sometimes by thoughtlessness, oftentimes because their rise was too rapid,
and could not be tolerated by meaner
minds. At other times because they
were newcomers and had the audacity
to ignore "the traditions of the
elders," and went in to win from the
very start. All this energy and determination is very distasteful to venerable antiquity. "Slow and sure" is an
old proverb and it contains a great
truth, but it is not all the truth, and
a too close adherence to the letter in
violation of the spirit of the proverb
has kept more than one community
far behind the times. Then many a
man becomes an object of envy if he
establishes his claim to recognition
above his fellows. Still he has this
consoling reflection that though the
few may be jealous the many will
applaud. The rank and file can always be trusted to size up a man correctly. If they know him to be just
and true they will follow him, and he
will be recognized as their leader. No
party organization, no cliqueism can
defeat him, not even the busy tongue
of slander nor the doubtful inuendo
are effective weapons if he keeps up
his courage and retains the confidence
of the crowd.
Leaders and would-be leaders sometimes forget this, and they play off
smartness and the machine against
character. They are bound to lose,
uot necessarily at the beginning of the
conflict, but assuredly at the end.
Things are moving rapidly now-a-
days, the machine has had its innings,
the party whip has cracked long and
loud. The party Shibolcth has served
its purpose, but all are weakened before an advancing public opinion. Personality has come into its own, men
of talent are being summoned from
omscurity and before the smart ones
know will be directing affairs. Not
that there is any substitute for brains,
but natural law is permanent, and
while it suffers a temporary eclipse
it is only to reassert itself with
greater effect.
The next few years will scc the end
of systems and methods which have
flourished for too long, and the reas-
sertion of the power and influence of
personality.
if
i>
The Drama. |
To Match His Descendants.
"I see they have discovered where
George Washington told a lie once."
"What did he do that for?"
"I don't know—perhaps to qualify
* ilusic and
^ifi^^ififi^'^if'^ififi?
Victoria Theatre.
This popular house has furnished
two excellent entertainments during
the present week. On Monday night
that old favourite the Burgomaster
was performed by an all round good
company in which Gus Weinburg was
easily the star. This excellent comedian is an artist who produces his
effects without apparent effort. He
has lost none of his skill nor freshness, and every point was as well
made on Monday as if it were the
first performance. He was well supported by Leo Kendal, as Doodle, and
by Ruth White as Willie Van Astor-
bilt. The chorus if not numerous was
attractive, more so than the average,
and the whole performance gave general satisfaction.
Mary Mannering.
. On Thursday night Mary Mannering, the popular American actress,
supported by a well-balanced Company appeared at the Victoria Theatre
in "Glorious Betsy." Miss Mannering ha sbeen touring with this play
during the whole of the present season, and has been greeted everywhere
with enthusiasm. Being an American
actress presenting an American play
it might naturally be expected that
she would achieve success south of
the line as her charming personality
and high reputation are a guarantee
for excellence under any circumstances. Victoria, influenced by none
of these considerations and rendered
doubly critical through several recent
disappointments in American stars,
has more than endorsed the verdict
of her own countrymen. "Glorious
Betsy" as presented by Miss Mannering can only be described as a glorious success.
It is doubtful if Miss Mannering's
performance does not register the
high water mark of excellence in her
dramatic career. The part suits her;
it is a pleasing one, and it has a
range possessed by none of her previous portraitures, which furnishes
full scope for all her matured powers.
Nothing could possibly be daintier,
more infections or more fascinating
than her comedy in the first two acts.
Hardly since the days of Adelaide
Neilson has this class of character
been so delightfully portrayed. Betsy
as represented by Miss Mannering, is
the very embodiment of youthful
spirits, vivacity and archness. Any
society belle of the 20th century might
well envy the graces of this one of
a hundred years ago, as she dazzled
and perplexed and cajoled alternately
until all the young beaux of society
were crazy about her, all loved her,
and yet all were handled so daintily
and generously that they remained
her firm friends, and gracefully yielded to the real Prince Charming.
The third and fourth acts were of
a different calibre altogether; the
fourth was probably the most satisfying from an artistic standpoint. Few
actresses could have suggested so exquisitely the heart-broken girl, who
by the irony of fate returned to Baltimore besieged on all hands to tell
of her successes in France, vainly
trying to hide from loving eyes the
fact that she was humiliated and
heart-broken, and yet struggling
through her tears to put a brave face
on the situation and to reassure those
who cared for her so tenderly. • The
perfectly natural, unstrained womanly
demeanour of Miss Mannering
throughout this trying act was beyond all praise, and in that supreme
moment when in the semi-darkness
of her room Jerome returned and her
dazed senses but slowly recognized
him, she had one piercing moment
which thrilled.
But from a dramatic standpoint
her greatest work was in thc third
act where she confronts the inscrutable Napoleon on the deck of La Ci-
gale. This act made great demands
upon her dramatic intelligence and
skill, and she rose to them all, and
played with a force, an intensity and
an abandon of which no one would
have suspected the light-hearted girl
Bangles and Bracelets for
Every Costume.
In Paris, Berlin and Vienna, the three great centres in which
dress is almost of primal consideration, the subject of matching
fabrics with precious or semi-precious stones has rapidly forged to
the fore. Worth and his distinguished patrons have done much
for this delightful vogue. Choice dressers in Victoria have readily
recognized the fact that at Challoner & Mitchell's they can always
find that wonderful blending of tones 'n gems so essential to
present style costume.
In Bracelets for Spring and Summer wear, we are showing an
almost endless variety from the plain Gold Bangle up to the
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SOLID GOLD BRACELETS FROM $5.00 UP.
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Sentimental Ballads
On The
Victor-Berliner
Gram-o-phone
Who doesn't enjoy the dear
old songs of heart and home I
Such melodies as "Home Sweet
Home", "The Old Oaken
Bucket",«Auld Lang Syne" and
"Old Black Joe", with their
touching beauty and power!
No matter where you live you can heav
these cherished songs on the Victor or Berliner Gram-o-phone
—sung and played as you never heard them sung and
played before; with famous soloists and the most celebrated
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sentiment in full perfection.
Besides the old-time favorites, you can hear on thc
Victor or Berliner Gram-o-phone the newest sentimental
ballads—" 'Neath the Old Cherry Tree, Sweet Marie", "In
the Evening by the Moonlight, Dear Louise", and all the
other popular successes.
More than that:   These instruments bring right into your home beauti-
sacred selections; grand opera numbers by the w rld's greatest stars;
^£\ comic song-hits and minstrel humor; perfect dance music ; classic
^»> X   tvmnhnnies—entertainment of every sort for every mood and every
and all to be heard at its best on the Fitter tr Berliner
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O \ symphonies-
occasion ;
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\'°f \\ them, and get him to tell you about the
•     \ C*». ^\ easy-Payment plan. Write ns for catalogue
>vTz IjfcN   —use the coupon,
%'/_7 2>S-       »»■■ ■••*-• •
'i?-vo^
\*e^
TtuBertiMt6ri_to-itNi
-Snafu} of baa, Ltd.
608
but if he lacks these he will go down as Father of His Country.'
(Continued on Page 8).
TIMBER! TIMBER! TIMBER!
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P. O. BOZ 765. PHONE 1385. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL n, 1908.
Hand-Painted
Wedding Gift
Chinaware
_ You can't choose a more acceptable object, to present her brideship,
than a piece of genuine hand-painted
, china.
: _ It's the reigning fashion in cera-
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; _ A bride that isn't "just crazy" over it is
I not strictly up-to-date.
j 0 It is useful—every bit of it—and is sure
; !o occupy a place of honor in the home
[ :f the Newly-Weds.
What more is to be desired of a
tr: '.i:ng gift?
Q A gorgeous selection now at your
disposal.   Don't think it is beyond your
j means—for it isn't, here.
NEW LIBRARY TABLES
NEW WRITING TABLES
NEW CARD TABLES
NEW BRIDGE TABLES
Newest Curtain Styles Shown Here
THE 1908 EXAMPLES ARE INDEED DAINTY CREATIONS-SEE THEM.
This is "Curtain Time." The Spring Cleaning has not dealt kindly with the old curtains, and new
ones must take the place of the old—in the more important rooms, at least. When you are ready to
choose curtains, come to the store that can offer you the widest choice of styles, the greatest range
of prices, absolutely the best curtain values in the city. In other words, visit Specialists in this very
important work—they can assist you very materially. The curtain section now offers the handsomest
assortment of new curtains and curtainings we have ever shown. Many charming and exclusive patterns
are shown, in high, medium and low-priced varieties. In the completeness of this gathering of most
worthy curtain furnishings, you will surely be suited. Then, perhaps, our drapery experts may assist
you. Don't you think that a firm that makes a specialty of this sort of work and employs only expert
decorators could help you some in the choosing? And isn't the larger choice that this firm offers you
worth something, oto?   Let us assist you.   Won't cost you a penny.
Nottingham Lace Curtains—In these popular
curtains we offer a very wide choice of designs and a price range that is surprising.
The last shipment of these curtains, received
but a short time ago, added more than sixty
new designs to our already very large range.
We can promise you values in these curtains
that cannot be beaten elsewhere. Just see
what we offer, at per pair $14.00, down to 75c
Ariston Lace Curtains—This is a very dainty
curtain and the new styles just unpacked are
indeed pleasing. A special weave makes a
very strong curtain and you'll find this style
an excellent wearer. The ecru and two-tone
effects are very pleasing. Several very attractive designs are shown at, from, per pair,
$6.00 down to  $4.00
Swiss Lace Curtains—We offer about one hundred different designs in this stylish curtain.
Many very attractive designs are shown in
white, champagne, ivory and ecru shades. We
should appreciate an opportunity to show you
some of these. Prices range from, per pair,
$30.00, down to  $3.50
Novelty Braided Curtains—This is a "new
thing" in Curtains and a style we think you'll
like very much. The designs are uncommonly
dainty and pleasing. We have them in Arab
and white and offer you very special value, at,
per pair $5-00
CABLE LACE CURTAINS—Here is one of the best wearing Curtains manufactured. This famous
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Arabian Lace Curtains—Real Arabian lace, plain net centre, in
ecru. A very handsome curtain,
at a low price. Sizes 3 ft. x 50
in.    Per pair   $5.50
Real Lace Curtains—Genuine lace
curtains, with cluny lace edging
and Battenburg corners. This is
a curtain style you'll like. They
come in white.    Per pair..$6.50
Antique First Empire—A bold design of Linen Applique on heavy
net. A handsome curtain for
dining-room or library, new
champagne shade, 3 yds. x 50 in.
Price, per pair  $16.00
Florentine Lace Curtains—Dainty
designs in ecru and white, with
hand-worked insertions, at per
pair    $12.00
Ivory Point Venise—An elegant
reproduction of this famous lace
in two-tone treatments—ivory
with white embroidery, 3 yds. x
50 in.   Price, per pair $20.00
Ivory Italian Filet—A new design
of Filet Insertion, double eagle
and crown decorations, interspersed with other motives, 3
yds. x 50 in. Price, per
pair   $18.00
Ivory Irish Point — Handsome
floral treatment, rich border, finished by hand, 3 yds. x 48 in,
Price, per pair, $12.00 and $9.50
Dainty Curtains, with designs of
inverted fleur de lis and other
motives, 3 yds. x 48 in!, at, per
pair   $10.00
Would you   .
Rehabilitate
the Pantry?
What with new paper and
paint and oil cloth in the
Kitchen and pantry, the battered and blackened tins look
out of place in the surround'
ings. The spring cleaning has
put some things out of joint,
hasn't it?
<| Well it won't cost much to substitute
harmony for discord—for the dollar buys
a lob of tins and kitchen things these days.
_ Even the best sorts—the kinds we sell
_ A most complete line at your service.
WNE EXTENSION TABLES
NEW BUFFET STYLES
NEW BUTLERS' TRAYS    §
NEW WALL SHELVES
TO DEALERS
We solicit correspondence
from dealers who are not
already acquainted with us
and who wish to get
acquainted with the largest
J wholesalers of Homefurnish-
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help you.
WEILER  BROS.
Complete Home Furnishers,       VICTORIA.
TO RETAILERS
Isn't it poor business to
carry a large stock in your
little town when the quantities you require may be purchased from us on short
notice. We help you. Prompt
and satisfactory service guaranteed.
JRSSSSSSSSSSSS^^
sorting
Comment.
tie result of the football matches
tveen. the All-Island vs. All-Main-
have proven very unsatisfactory,
; second  like  the   first  ending  in
raw.   While I did not agree with
,* selection  committee in some  of
; decisions they arrived at, I still
tight that the Islanders would win
I was  rather disappointed with
fresult, but there is some consola-
in knowing that the Islanders are
|:n credit for having the better of
(play.   I am more than pleased to
[n, however, that the Victoria re-
sentatives acquitted themselves in
5.st creditable manner.   There was
feat deal of adverse criticism over
selection   of   any   players   from
end of the  island and the fact
they did as good if not better
than those from up the line is
atter of congratulation.   The team
elected by the committee was al-
at the last minute by the ab-
of Graham from the forward
-Brightman  of the Bays  taking
blacc.   Graham is a very consist-
Iplayer,  but  I  doubt very  much
Ic team was weakened by his ab-
Ice, as in my opinion Brightman
1 entitled to his place.    But after
■manner in which  Graham failed
nt in his appearance I would not
him a place if he was thc best
rd   in    Canada.   Any    time    a
ir   is   chosen   to   fill   a   position
' does  not  think  enough  of  thc
to notify the committee that he
(liable to play, is not entitled to
Jice and I hope thc committee will
fcmber the  action  of Graham  in
flast match.
lis afternoon will In all probabil-
Liitnpss the last.eame_ii__jj!_e_J_dand__
series when Ladysmith and Nanaimo
line up for the final game at Oak
Bay. There is considerable hard feeling between these teams, so much so
that several importations have been
made from the Mainland and I am
creditably informed that Nanaimo will
have no less than nine Vancouver
players on their line up. As far as
1 can learn Ladysmith will have one,
making ten out of the twenty-two
players practically paid men. This in
my opinion is a very bad state of
affairs, and unless the Association
takes some stand on the question at
its annual meeting the future of foot-
bull on the Island is doomed. It is
all very well allowing professionals
to play with amateurs, but I do not
think that the committee ever had
any idea that such drastic measures
would be taken by thc Up-Island
teams. Despite the fact that the Nanaimo team is mostly composed of
outsiders who have been registered
only long enough to qualify I do not
think that they will be sufficiently
strong to hold last year's champions
and I am looking for Ladysmith to
win. The committee acted very wisely in their selection of a referee. No
better man in the Province than T.
J. Mahoney of New Westminster
could be secured. He is very strict,
impartial and knows the rules thoroughly and the teams can rest assured that it will be their play and
not the action of thc referee which
will win or lose thc match. The game
will be played at Oak Bay and special
arrangements have been made for
handling the crowd.
Ladysmith team, did not impress me
as championship form and unless they
improve it will be difficult for them
to defeat the champions from the
Mainland. The goal and back division is strong, but the three half-backs
were about as fast as an ice wagon.
Time after time the forwards would
take the ball up the field only to have
it sent well down to the backs owing
to the fact that the halves wcre not
in position. This style of playing will
not make champions and had it not
been for the spectators who continually urged these players to get in
their place it is extremely doubtful
whether the result would havc been
the same. Despite this thc team won
but it would be well if in the next
match the halves made extra efforts
to win thc game.
I have to congratulate the Victoria
West intermediate team on their success in winning the intermediate
championship of Vancouver Island
and I can only hope that they will
soon be able to include British Columbia. On the whole their play last
Saturday   when   thev   defeated    the
It does not take long for decisions
on athletic matters to travel and I
am pleased to see that the sporting
authority of Toronto has commented
very favorably on thc action of thc
British Columbia Lacrosse Association on its stand for amateurism. The
action of the Association in this respect is not taken very kindly to,
in Vancouver, several of the players
absolutely refusing to play unless
there is something coming, aud as
the Vancouver team has decided to
amalgamate with thc Vancouver Athletic Club it is hard to see how the
players from this club at least will
receive any rake-off. There is some
talk of the disgruntled ones forming
an independent team. They figure
that the Vancouver Club will be only
too pleased to ruin their franchise ill
the league over to them after July
ist, but in my opinion they havc another think coming. The men at the
head of the Vancouver Club are
known as stayers and I will be greatly
surprised if they do not carry the
club through as they havc started.
THf hoyintr tnnrn:u*nmit* wliirli  too..-
place in the Victoria Theatre on Tuesday evening last proved the worst
kind of a fiasco. The arrangements
were badly managed, the price of admission was on par with that charged
to see championship events in San
Jvaijcisco when the best men in the
business can be seen, and last but not
least thc two bouts were, to say the
least, "rotten." The first bout was
advertised for 8.30 but the principals
did not put in an appearance till 9.10
and then thc men knew very little of
the game. It was scheduled for ten
rounds, but it only went three, the
decision being given for an alleged
foul. I do not like to criticize the
third man in thc ring, but in this instance was closer to the participants
than he was and although I was
watching the men closely I failed to
see a low blow land, and in this 1
was supported by the majority at the
ring side. The boxer to whom thc
decision was given was very tired and
it was an after thought that caused
him to claim a foul. McNamee as a
fighter might bc all right but as. a
referee he is a failure. Thc main
event lasted about fivc minutes. But
from the style of boxing it was sufficient. Adams, the much-touted Welsh
Wonder, is not in the same class as
Paris. It was claimed that he was
put out by striking a water pail as he
fell, but in my opinion it was a left
jolt in the wind and a right swing
to thc jaw that did the work, I do
not like to east cold water on the
ambitions of any rising athlete but
in this instance I certainly think that
Adams should make an effort to find
some vocation more suitable, for hc
is certainly not cut out for a boxer.
In comparison with thc show put on
by the Vietoria West Athletic Club
the exhibition was a frost, the only
redeeming feature being the fact that
the staff of the Victoria theatre
handled the seating of the spectators.
TTvmi d r_
E. G. Prior & Co.'s New Catalogue.
Thc distinction of issuing the first
large General Hardware Catalogue in
British Columbia belongs to E. G.
Prior & Co., who are now distributing to thc trade a large volume of
over 650 pages, Sxn in., weight $H
lbs., which is appropriately referred
to as their "Fiftieth Anniversary Catalogue." The Catalogue contains
some 3,500 illustrations, covering
every conceivable article of hardware
and kindred goods for which there is
a demand in this section of the country.
The average British Columbian
would hardly expect a book of such
large dimensions to be issued outside
of Toronto or Montreal, but it remained for the progressive hardware
house of Victoria to lake the initiative.
A chief compiler and several assistants were employed for one year on
the work, the better part of one of
the largest printing plants in Victoria
was engaged for a like period on thc
printing and binding, and, viewed
from an industrial standpoint, there
is just cause for pride in that the
mechanical part was executed by a
local printing concern, and against
outside competition.
An establishment that will invest
several thousands of dollars in catalogues for distribution among the
merchants in British Columbia certainly has faith as to th egreat prospects within ils boundaries—not faith,
but positive assurance. Not many
business houses in British Columbia
have reached the half-century mark,
and E. G. Prior & Co, are among thc
pioneers who, through large expenditures in the direction referred to, give
proof of the confidence they have in
the continued prosperity of the Province in which their catalogue will be
distributed. Their Fiftieth Anniversary Catalogue is supplied thc trade THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL it, 1908.
At The Street    \
Corner
»
By THB LOUNQER
I
Since my connection with The
Week, I have criticised many things,
but I do not think anyone has ever
accused me of being a literary critic.
I happened however to be filling a
professional engagement at the business luncheon of the Canadian Club
on Wednesday, and although it was
not in any sense a public meeting I
do not think I am straining a point
when I refer to a very interesting
incident which occurred.
Those of my readers who attended
the Paardeburg celebration at the Empress Hotel will remember the splendid patriotic song which Mr. W. J.
Dowler recited on that occasion. It
has since been set to music by another well known Victorian, Mr. Geo.
Werner, and on Wednesday the members of the Canadian Club heard ;t
delightfully rendered by Mr. Gideon
Hicks. The upshot was that the Club
unanimously decided to recommend it
to the celebration committee with a
view to its performance at Quebec
in July next and its possible acceptance as the national song of Canada.
Two members of the club very properly pointed out that the poem might
be open to criticism, and that it was
a somewhat unusual course for the
Club to endorse the composition, but
as President Lampman said, the occasion was an exceptional one, and
the song as rendered appealed so
strongly to those present, as to set
the seal of excellence upon its sentiment, and upon the musical accompaniment.
The argument used against its acceptance turned out to be the
strongest argument in its favour, that
while it might not satisfy all the
canons of criticism, it possessed the
indefinable something which appealed
both to the sentiment and the senses
of the hearers. This is about all that
can be said of most national anthems.
Mr. Dowler's composition is far above
any which has come under my notice
as a national patriotic song. The
music to which it is wedded is not
only appropriate but inspiring and
I should be greatly surprised if the
whole is not accepted by the celebration committee.
I share the general regret felt by
thc citizens of Victoria at the unfortunate experience of Alderman Mes-
ton. However one may differ from
him on some subjects everyone agrees
that he is a citizen of irreproachable
character, and honest intention. Circumstances have placed him in an invidious position. If he had consulted
the able counsel who conducted his
case in the courts before, instead of
after, the event he would have saved
himself a lot of trouble. He has committed a technical breach of the law,
but must be held morally blameless.
One lesson may be learned by intending candidates for Aldermanic
honors, and that is what they should
carefully examine their financial position, their qualifications, and their relations to the city before embarking
on a candidature.
The subject of the new police uniforms is still agitating the minds of
the Commissioners and the force. I
am satisfied that Victorians to a man,
and I believe to a woman, will be
disappointed if the British Uniform is
not adopted. All the tenders to hand
ask a slightly lower price for this
than for the American, and to purchase the latter under the circumstances would not only be running
counter to public opinion, and to the
express wish of several public bodies,
but would be entirely inconsistent
with the action of thc Commissioners
in opening the question at all if they
did not intend to make the change,
subject only to the question of cost.
It is not necessary here to ventilate
the objections which have been raised
to the British uniform, suffice it to
say that the only ones urged are
based upon sartorial considerations
which certainly will not appeal to the
ratepayers.
I am borry that the City Council
has not _(.en fit to accept my "bona
fide" offer to plant and fence the
triangular space at the corner of Government and Belleville Streets. I
gather, however, from a report of a
recent meeting that the Parks Board
is going to do it ,if so I have gained
my point, but the work will not be
done as quickly as if the Council had
accepted my offer. Moreover I doubt
whether it will be done as cheaply,
but I am not anxious to go into the
contracting business, nor am I looking for trouble. I want to see Victoria made clean and tidy; nature has
made her beautiful.
At the request of a prominent citizen I said something last week about
the demoralization of young boys in
Victoria, and promised to return to
the subject. After discussing the matter with the authorities I have decided not to publish certain facts
which have come to my knowledge,
because to do so would be to defeat
the ends of justice, but I wish to say
that unless parents can be aroused
to a keener sense of their personal
responsibility than at present exists
in many quarters, deplorable conditions, which are known to a few, will
intensify. Girls of fifteen and sixteen require at least as much looking
after as boys of the same age, and
unrelated men of adult age are not
always their best protectors. The old-
fashioned custom of chaperonage was
a wise one, and its utility is not confined to any class, although its vogue
may be. The father or mother who
allows a young girl to be out at night
without themselves providing a proper escort is neglecting a very serious
duty, and, as society is constituted
today, taking serious risks.
I do not think that in this respect
Victoria is worse, I rather think that
it is better than most other cities,
but here as elsewhere a very real
problem exists of which many parents
seem to be oblivious; it would be too
unfair to suggest that they are purposely indifferent. Naturally a Lounger who lounges at all hours of the
day and night and whose main duty
is to gather unconsidered trifles sees
many things that will not bear inspection, and many more of which
little can be said. The pity of the
position under review is that the very
people who have most need to lay
these words to heart will probably
never imagine as they read that they
possess any interest for them. So
naturally do we fall into the error
of fitting the cap on some other
person.
IN THE OLD LAND.
By RAMBLER.
Well now to our wanderings, since
I last wrote. This is All Saints or
All Souls or All Somebody's day.
After leaving Aberdeen we journeyed on to Inverness, calling at a
place named Ellon to see an old lady
who was a contemporary of my
fathers and remembered my grandfather well. She is ninety-four years
old, with all her faculties, except that
she is deaf, wonderfully smart, with
eyesight better than yours or mine.
Truly the Scotch women are great
livers. She was very anxious to see
us, but I am afraid was disappointed.
The trouble with all very old people
is that they never seem to realize
that others all advance in years. After we left she said to her daughter-
in-law in a tone of surprise, "Ai, Ai,
but they are grown up bodies." I
imagine she expected to see a boy
and girl.
There is nothing much of interest
to see at Inverness, except Highlanders and you do come across some fine
specimens of manhood there. I was
looking up the directory in the hotel
and out of curiosity counted the number of pages devoted to Macdonalds
and Frasers. They appeared to be thc
most numerous. Well, there were
over fourteen pages of the former
and eleven of the latter. How they
ever  located  a  particular  one   is  a
mystery for they all bear just a few
common Christian names. We drove
out to see the battlefield of Culloden.
I obtained a very good photo of the
Cairn erected upon it. All round are
headstones shewing where those of
the different clans fell. How little
one can realize the very often serious
results of one's, at the time, apparently trivial actions.
Before the battle, Prince Charlie,
ignorant of the extreme jealousy of
the Celtic character, stationed the
Macdonald clan, which was by far
the most numerous, on the left wing,
instead of the right—and placed the
Macintoshes there instead, with the
consequence that the Macdonalds during the whole of the fighting stood
sullenly looking on and absolutely refused to take a hand in it, notwithstanding the entreaties of their chiefs.
Now a great many military authorities say that it is extremely probable
if they had acted otherwise, the day
would have gone in favor of the Highlanders, and Prince Charlie would
have gained the Crown, thereby
changing the course of history. The
poor Macintoshes were so elated at
being placed where they were that
they bore the brunt of the battle, and
were nearly exterminated. Visiting
the scene of the fight and expecting
to go through the country where
Prince Charlie wandered for five
months before he escaped to France
led me to read a full account of such
wanderings. How he managed to
elude the English is marvelous, with
a £30,000 price on his head—and in
a district so small that you could
lose it in Macpherson's old constituency of Burrard, and absolutely overrun with thousands of soldiers. It
speaks eloquently for the trustworthiness and fidelity of the Highland
Character.
Most tourists go from Inverness
down the Caledonian, canal and thence
along the West Coast, but as we had
in British Columbia seen plenty of
rocks, bays and seas, decided to take
the Highland Railway through the
heart of Scotland. Some forty miles
south of Inverness you pass through
the Macintosh country. I was rather
amused at an incident that happened
while we were in that district. I drew
my wife's attention to Moy Lake a
beautiful piece of water, with an
island in the middle, upon which are
the ruins of the Macintosh stronghold, and at the upper end of which
is the modern castle of the Macintosh
Chief of that clan. Not a soul in
the carriage took the slightest interest in what I was saying though they
all heard me, until a man suddenly
remembered that the Prince of Wales
had stayed with Macintosh some two
weeks previously and supplemented
my remarks to that effect. In an instant all hands got up off their seats,
made for the window with craning
necks to see the Castle, nearly crushing the life out of me in their anxiety
to see a place where the Prince of
Wales had stayed, thereby illustrating a peculiar phase in the English
character. The district, with all its
old historical associations had no interest to them until it was connected
with royalty.
Our first stay off was at Pitlochry
at the foot of the Gary Glen, where
Dundee, with his Highlanders nearly
annihilated the English Army under
General Mackay, at the battle of Kil-
licrankie. I took a photo of the place
where an English soldier pursued by
clansmen is said to have leaped to
safety over the falls of the river. The
late Queen doubted whether such a
feat were possible and it was then
looked upon as a myth, until an Englishman showed some years later its
feasibility by duplicating it. The
guide was a Cockney woman married to a Highlander. He looked on,
she did all the talking. It was very
funny to hear her say "when the
henemy pressed 'im." One scarcely
expected to meet with such language
in the heart of Scotland.
This puts me in mind that the other
day while traveling in an omnibus
through Picadilly there were Cockneys sitting upon the opposite seat.
They were very excited about the
treatment they had received from
somebody and in their denunciations
of him one said: "Damn im hany ow,
hi would like to ang im has igh has
Leave Your Baggage Checks at thc
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.       A. E. KENT, Proprietor
Will You Take
$500 a Year...
for your spare time. In other
words the man who has a couple
of hours morning and evening
and will employ it in operating
A Cyphers Incubator
at his home can make from $500
in twelve months. We have a
unique plan to work on and will
be pleased to explain it to any
one interested.    Call or write.
Watson &
McGregor
647 Johnson  Street,
VICTORIA, B. C
C H. TITE & CO.
PAINTERS, PAPER-HANGERS
Wall Paper from 2j^c up.
No old stock. Estimates given.
Prices Cheaper than ever.
COR. YATES AND BROAD STS.
Your Fortune
Briefly Told
First,   you're   going   on
1 journey.
Then you'll be very happy-
1 and you're going to have money ',
left   to   you.     You're   a   lucky |
1 Man.
Here's the way of it.
You're going on a journey to *
this store.
1    You'll select your new Spring
Suit, and it will please you so
1 well that you'll be very happy.
You'll buy for less than you
thought and have money left;
therefore you're a lucky Man.
That's your fortune—see that
it comes true.
ALLEN & CO.
Fit=Reform Wardrobe
> U01   Government   St,,
Aman." I will bet you the drinks
when I return to Vancouver that
neither you or anyone of the usual
crowd can pronounce that sentence
aloud, and yet you persist that the
mass of the people over here speak
English. They will never repent
either I am afraid. Though I must
confess no woman that I have ever
heard speak with as nice and pleasant
an accent as the educated refined
Englishwoman.
I climbed up to the top of Ben
Y Vrackie, one of the highest mountains in Central Scotland, overtaking
on the way many younger men, so
that I realize I am not getting very
old yet. Had a grand view ,but oh,
the desolation! How in the world
the Clansmen ever existed is a mystery. It was well for them they had
the rich lowlands to raid upon. From
Pittsburg wc took the train to Aber-
feldy and drove thence to Kenmore at
the foot of Loch Fay. Opposite the
hotel is a pretty little island upon
which are the ruins of a very ancient
Abbey, where Sybilla, the Queen of
Alexander the First is buried. A
I (Continued on Page 8)
Pantage's
Theatre
JOHNSON STREET
VICTORIA, B. C.
ADVANCED VAUDEVILI
Matinees (any part of houae).
Evenings, Balcony 	
Lower Floor	
Boxes  	
Matinees
Every Afternoon
at
3 O'CIock.
Night Performance!
8 and 9.15
WEEK 13TH APRIL
The New Grai
SULLIVAN * CON-SI BINE,    Proprlcl
Management of ROBT. JAMIESO
EXTRAORDINARY.
VAUDEVILLE
PORTER J. WHITE &
COMPANY
Presenting
"THE VISITOR"
By Oliver White.
THE ASCOTT-EDDY TRI
Comedy Pantomimists direct f
Europe.
THE MUSICAL BENNET'
In a Unique Musical Playh
THREE WALTON BROTH]
Baritones.
Presenting an Original Sket
entitled "In Camp."
MUSICAL LOWE
Xylophone Artist Extraordin;
MART FULLER
Monologist.
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illusti
"Stingy Moon."
NEW MOVING PICTURI
"Will He Overtake Them.
"Funny Face Competition.'
OUR OWN ORCHESTR.
M. Nagel, Director.
ladies     MEDICAL <M-»
MASSAGE
Turkish Baths
VXBBATOB  TBEATMEKT
HB.     BJOBNTELT,      SWEDX
MASSEUB.
Special  Massage and Hometrc
ment by appointments.
Room 2, Vernon Blk., Douglas
Body Development.
Hours 1 to 6. Phona lt
BEDDING
PLAN!
Cheap Prices.   Get our price li
Johnston's Seed Sti
City Market
VICTORIA
HOLLY TREES
Prices from 25 cents to $5.00, a<
ing to size. Write for seed am
catalog.
JAY & CO. VICTORIA,
AGENTS WANTED 1-16x20 c
portraits 40 cents, frames 10
and  up,  sheet  pictures  one
each.   You can make 400 per
profit or $36.00 per week,
logue and Samples free.   Fran'
Williams Company, 1208 W. T
St., Chicago, 111. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL ii. 1908.
social and        *
Personal. J
Stanley Lamb spent a few days
ra.
* *   *
Mahue of Mandins was a visitor
n during the week.
* *   *
Dick  Mainguy of  Westholme
a week in town.
* *   *
ut.  Kingscote is enjoying some
g at Cowichan Lake.
* *   *
Roy Troupe has left on a visit
rkeley, California.
* *   *
s  Noel Moresby returned last
lay from Seattle.
* *   *
s Robertson of Westholme was
lest of Mrs. Carew Gibson, dur-
e week.
* *   *
Grahame Williams returned on
y from Seattle where he spent
days.
* *   *
s  Boultbee  of  Vancouver was
ered at the Empress during the
* *   *
and Mrs. Oscar Schoefield of
lolme are registered at the Bal-
* *   *
Purdy of Bellingham was reid  at the  Empress  for a few
ast week.
, Landes returned to Seattle last
:sday after spending a few days
toria.
* *   *
Fritz Claxton of San Francisco
guest of Mr. and Mrs. Stuart
tson.
* *   *
Streatfield came in from Saa-
md spent a couple of days in
Vera Gosnell returned from a
o Tacoma and Bellingham last
* *   *
E.  P.   Colley  is  expected  on
y evening from England, after
ence of fivc or six months.
* *   *
Stephen Phipps and her father,
Maitland Dougal, came down
lowichan on Tuesday returning
dnesday afternoon.
* *   *
engagement  is  announced  of
lertrude Savage to Mr. T. O.
both formerly of Winnipeg,
f this ciyt.    The wedding has
rranged to take place at the end
summer.
* *   *
and Mrs. Biggerstaff Wilson
a few days last week at their
little summer cottage on the
of the beautiful Cowichan
eturning home with a splendid
* *   *
Fletcher and Mr. Foster of the
an Bank of Commerce, were
at Princess Hotell on Cowshr
at Price's Hotel on Cowichan
luring the week. They enjoy-
le excellent fly-fishing, March
proving itself to be the favored
marriage was solemnized at
church, Bath, England, on thc
St., by the Rev. Claude S. Bird,
of the bridegroom, assisted by
B. Norton Thompson and Rev.
Hanks, of Mr. Claude Cecil
if Sintaluta, Saskatchewan, to
tmy Ethel Holley, daughter of
e Lt.-Col. George Hunt Holley
101st regiment.
* *   *
sday last at St. Mark's Episco-
urch, Seattle, there was united
riage Mr. A. W. Johnson, of
al, and Miss Edna B. Beards-
Azusa, Cal. The bride, who
irmingly gowned in a tan-col-
ailor suit with picture hat to
was given away by Mr. Percy
jnrath of Vancouver, while Mr.
B. Duncan of Nome, acted as
in. A wedding luncheon was
rds served at Thc Rathskellar
the evening the couple were
_f Mr. James Fallon to dinner
Sutler Annex. They spent the
are at The Empress returning
■ouvcr, where they will reside,
iy. Mr. Johnson is well
in business circles in Victoria.
* *   *
csidence of Mrs. George Mat-
A Skin of Beauty li a Joy Forever
BB. T. FELIX GOUBAUD'S
Oriental Cream
OB MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER
Furl&ei as well as Beautifies tbe Skis.
No other cosmetic will do lt.
Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, Moth
Patches, Rash and Skin diseases, and
every blemish on beauty, and defies detection. It has stood the test of 60
years; no other has, and is so harmless—we taste lt to be sure it is properly made. Accept no counterfeit of
similar name. The distinguished Dr. L.
A. Sayre said to a lady of the haut-ton
(a patient). "As you ladies will use
them, I recommend 'Gourand's Cream' as
the least harmful of all the Skin preparations."
For sale by all druggists and Fancy
Goods Dealers,
GOURAUD'S OBIEHTAL TOILET
POWDER
For infants and adults. Exquisitely perfumed. Relieves Skin Irritations, cures
Sunburn and renders an excellent complexion.
Frio* 35 centi, by mall.
GOUBAUD'S FOUDBE SUBTILE
Removes superfluous Hair.
File* $1.00, by mail.
FEBD. T. HOPKINS, Prop.,
37 Gieat Jones St.,        New York City.
AT HENDERSON BROS., Distributors.
Vanoouver and Viotoria, B.O.
MAPS
Timber and Land.
The   kind   that   show   what's
taken  up  and   what's   vacant.
Electric Blue Print & Map Co.
Electric  Blue  Print  and  Map  Co.
1218 Langley Street
Victoria, B. C.
COAL
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo
Vollieries
New Wellington Coal.
The  best  household  coal  in  the
market at current rates.
Anthracite Coal for sale.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA. B.C.
thews, Lampson St., was the scene
of the meeting of the "Five Hundred
Club" on Wednesday afternoon. Some
very close and exciting play was witnessed. Mrs. Courtney, however, made
the highest score. The house had
been sweetly arranged with daffodils
and clusters of primroses, filling the
air with their delicious perfume.
The competitors were Mrs. T. S.
Gore, Mrs. W. S. Gore, Mrs. Crosse,
Mrs. Mathews, Mrs. Shallcrosse, Mrs.
Gibb, Mrs. Courtney, Mrs. Blackwood,
Mrs. C. Roberts, Mrs. C. Todd, Mrs.
Spratt, Mrs. Troupe, Mrs. Crowe-
Baker, Mrs. Matson, Mrs. Coles, Mrs.
H. Tye, Mrs. Holmes, Mrs. Griffiths,
Mrs. J. Raymour, Mrs. Gibson, Mrs.
Stretfield, Mrs. Arthur Wolfenden and
Miss Monteith assisted with the tea
while Mrs. Stuart Robertson acted as
Very Considerate.
Mistress—Bridget, I hope you're
not thinking at al of leaving me. I
should be very lonesome without you!
Maid—Faith, and it's not lonely
ye'll be. Most-like, I'll go whin there's
a houseful 0' company for luncheon
or dinner.—Lippincott's.
"Ut's a poor soldier yez are," bantered Larry.
"Phoy should yez say thot?" replied Denny, in injured tones. "During th' great battle wasn't Oi where
th' shells wor thickest?"
"Yez wor thot! Oi hurr-rud th'
corporal say yez got so scared yez
wint into a barn an' stuck yez head
into an egg crate, bedadl"—Chicago
News.
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days
after date we intend to apply to the
Hon. the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect
for coal and petroleum on the following
described lands, situated near Coal
Creek, Renfrew District, B.C.: Commencing at a post planted at the northeast corner of section 88, and marked
J. Hastle and H. J. Kirby; thence west
80 chains to northeast corner of section
87; thence north 80 chains; thence east
to western boundary of the E. & N.
Railway Company's Lands; thence following said boundary of Esquimalt and
Nanaimo Railway Company's lands to
point of commencement.
Staked March 17th, 1908.
JAMES HASTIE.
H. J. KIRBY.
April 11         	
CERTIFICATE   OF   THE   REGISTRATION OF AN EXTRA-PROVINCIAL
COMPANY.
"Companies Aot, 1897."
I hereby certify that "The Ferro-Con-
crete Construction Company" has this
day been registered as an Extra-Provincial Company under the "Companies Act,
1S97," to carry out or effect all or any
of the objects of the Company to whioh
the legislative authority of the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company is
situate at Cincinnati in Hamilton County, Ohio.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is five hundred thousand dollars, divided into five thousand shares
of one hundred dollars each.
The head office of the Company ln this
Province   is   situate   at   Victoria,   and
Henry Graham Lawson, Solicitor, whose
address is Victoria, B.C., is the attorney
for  the   company.    Not  empowered  to
issue and transfer stock.
Given under my hand and Seal of Offlce
at Victoria, Province of British Columbia,  this fourth day of April, one
thousand nine hundred and eight.
S. T. WOOTTON.
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this company
has been established and registered are:
Manufacturing and dealing in fire-proofing and building material of all kinds,
and constructing, equipping and owning
buildings, bridges and structures of all
kinds, and all things incident thereto,
of engaging in a general contracting
business; and of acquiring, holding, owning and disposing of all rights, patent
and otherwise, necessary and convenient for the prosecution of its business.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
one mile west-north-west from Jesse
Island, running west 60 chains; thence
north 60 chains; thence east 60 chains;
thence south 60 chains back to place
of commencement.
Dated February 22nd, 1908.
G. E. GIBSON.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
'ands:—-Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of bay inside of
Jesse Island, one quarter of a mile
north of Jesse Island, running west 60
chains; thence north 60 chains; thence
east 60 chains; thence south 60 chains
back to the place of commencement.
Dated February 22nd, 1908.
H. G. ANDERSON.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NOTICE
The bridge at Craigflower over Vic*
toria Arm is closed to vehicular traffic
until further notice.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Lands and Works Department, Victoria,
B.C., 9th March, 1908.
$1,000 Reward
THE GOVERNMENT of the
PROVINCE of BRITISH COLUMBIA hereby offers a reward of ONE
THOUSAND DOLLARS for information leading to thc arrest and conviction of the two men who, on the
25th day of February, 1908, at the
Gorge Hotel, near the City of Victoria, B.C., armed with revolvers, entered and, while committing a robbery
in the said Hotel, shot and wounded
one Richard Dancey.
DESCRIPTION.
No. 1—Man about 5 feet 11 inches in
height, slim build, dressed in dark-
colored clothing; wore dark cap.
No. 2—Man about 5 feet 8 or 9 inches
in height; slim build; dressed in
dark-colored clothing; wore dark
cap. Both men were armed with
dark-colored revolvers and wore
long white cotton masks.
FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS reward will be given for information
leading to the arrest and conviction of
either one of the said men.
By order,
F. S. HUSSEY,
Superintendent of Provincial Police.
Victoria, B.C., 26th February, 1908.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Marie Phlllppt
of Omaha, occupation, Lady, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of section 21, township
1, range 4, Poudrier Survey; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to place of beginning, being said
section 21.
Dated January 15th, 1908.
MARIE PHILIPPI.
Feb. 16 A. Olson, Agent.
NOTICE ls hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a license to prospect for coal, on
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner of B. M. Richardson
Claim, being about one mlle and a quarter northwest of Skidegate Inlet, Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence north eighty chains;
thence east eighty chains; thence south
eighty chains; thence west eighty chains
back to place of commencement, containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D. 1908.
Mch 21
D. R. YOUNG.
William Woods, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
(30) days after date, I Intend to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal, on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the B. M. Richardson Claim, being about one mile and a
quarter northwest of Skidegate Inlet,
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence north eighty chains;
thence west eighty chains; thence south
eighty chains; thence east eighty chains
back to place of commencement, containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D. 1908.
Mch 21
C. A. YOUNG,
William Woods, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
(30) days after date, I intend to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal, on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile and a quarter north of Skidegate Inlet and mouth of the Honna
River, Graham Island, Queen Charlotte
Islands Group; thence south eighty
chains; thence east eighty chains; thence
north eighty chains; thence west eighty
chains back to place of commencement,
containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D. 1908.
Mch 21
B. M. RICHARDSON.
William Woods, Agent.
NOTICE ls hereby given that thirty
(30) days after date, I Intend to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for coal
on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
morthweit corner of B. M. Richardson
Claim, being about one mile and a
quarter northwest of Skidegate Inlet,
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence south eighty chains;
thence east eighty chains; thence north
eighty chains; thence west eighty
chains; back to place of commencement,
containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D. 1908.
R. W. RAYSAY,
Mch 21 William Woods, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the under*
signed, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of Bllnklnsop Bay,
about 100 feet west of the wharf; running west 60 chains; thence north 60
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south along the shore back to the place
of commencement.
Dated  February 24th,  1908.
March 14 C. G. JOHNSTONE.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of Blinkinsop Bay,
three-quarters of a mile from the entrance of said bay, running west 80
chains; thence south 60 chains; thence
east along the shore of bay inside of
Jesse Island; thence northerly along the
shore of Blinkinsop Bay to the place
of commencement.
Dated February 22nd, 1908.
O. C. BASS.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for the purchase of the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the east shore of Blinkinsop
Bay, three-quarters of a mile from the
outlet of the creek at the head of bay,
running north along the shore 60 chains;
thence east 60 chains; thence south 60
chains; thence west 60 chains back to
the place of commencement.
Dated February 24th, 1908.
L. P. LOCKE.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, tho undersigned, Intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the head of Blinkinsop Bay, 50 feet
north of the creek running to the bay;
running west 60 chains; thence nortli
60 chains; thence east 60 chains; thence
south 60 chains back to the place of
commencement.
Dated February 24th,  1908.
M. J. G. WHITE.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
LLOYD & CO., practical chimney
cleaners, 716 Pandora St. Chimneys can be cleaned without making an ellova mess. Try us and
be convinced.
Phone A476. NUF SED.
TIMBER
If you have any
timber for sale
list it with us
We can sell it
BURNETT, SON & CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,   B. C.
The days are getting Warm.
THE
WILSON BAR
Is Comfortable.
VISIT IT.
648 Yates St., Victoria, B. C.
Most
Particular
Smokers
Experience little or no difficulty
in finding a cigar or blend of
smoking mixture that fits their
taste.
Our Manila or Havana
Cigars can't be beaten.
We carry a most complete line of smokers'
sundries.
KvVy   Richardson
Cigar Store.
Phone 345
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days from date I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted ln the
southwest corner and marked Initial
Post No. 1; thence east SO chains; thence
north SO chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence soutli 80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated March 7th, 1908.
Graham Island, B.C.
Apl. 4 R. D. HOYT.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Frank Kelly,
of Victoria, B.C., timber cruiser, Intend
to apply for a special timber license
over the following described lands:
6. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
3, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres,  more or less.
December 17th, 1907.
Apl 4 FRANK KELLY.
NOTICE ls hereby given that thirty
days from date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum on the following
described lands, on Graham Island, B.C.:
Commencing at a post planted In the
southwest cornor and marked Initial
Post No. 1, thence east 80 chains; thence
north SO chains; thence west SO chains;
thence south 80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated  March 7th,  1908.
Graham Island, B.C.
Apl 4 J. O. HOYT.
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
days from date I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum on the following
described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted In the
southwest corne rand marked Initial
Post No. 1, thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated  March  7th,  1908.
Graham Island,  B.C.
Apl. 4 W. L. ARCHAMBEAU.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirtv
days from date I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
ooal and petroleum on the following
described lands:
Commencing nt a post plnnted In the
northwest corner and marked Initial
Post No. 1; thonce east 80 chnins; thence
south SO chnins; thonce west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains to placo of commencement containing 610 acres.
Dated   Mnrch   7th,  1908.
Graham Island,  B.C.
Apl. 4 JOHN DEARBORN. .
THE WEEK, SATURDAY APRIL ii, 1908,
In The Old Land.
(Continued from Page 6)
nice drive which we took was across
the Lyon River with its junction with
the Tay and up,Glen Lyon, one of the
grandest and gloomiest glens in the
Highlands, passing on the way and
commanding the principal ford of the
river, much used before there were
any bridges. Comrie Castle ruins, the
ancient citadel of the Menzies family. About half way up the Glen
upon a knoll with sides about as steep
as the roof of a house, is a castle very
seldom visited and not mentioned in
any of the guide books, called Cari-
bane, once the stronghold of Campbell of Glenlyon. In connection with
this man there is a very pathetic story,
too long however to relate the particulars of in a letter, concerning
one of the Chiefs of the McGregor
clan who married his daughter
through the instrumentality of another Campbell Chief of collateral
branch called Black Duncan of the
Cowl. He was outlawed and eventually beheaded.
RAMBLER.
Lilian Fisher, a notably good soprano,
last season starring in "Mam-selle
'Awkins" under the Klaw & Erlanger
direction. The tour it is understood
will be inaugurated at Duncan, probably on Saturday, the 25th, engagements at Chemainus, Ladysmith, Nanaimo, Cumberland and Alberni following, previous to the beginning of
the Mainland tour, which will extend
until the ist of June. Miss Fisher is
under contract to bc in New York
again by August I to begin rehearsals
of a new comic opera in which she
will have the leading part with one of
the Kirke La Shelle companies on the
road next season.
Music and Drama.
(Continued from Page i).
of the previous acts capable. Her
handling of the situation with Napoleon on the one hand and Jerome
on the other was simply superb. With
a less firm touch this episode might
easily have become melo-dramatic,
and only Miss Mannering's great acting invested it with realism. The
whole scene rings false from a dramatic standpoint but for that the actress is not responsible, and she fairly
triumphed over a dramatic obsession.
Miss Mannering has reached maturity in the full possession of her
beauty, a fine stage presence and high
dramatic endowment. She has shown
in "Glorious Betsy" that she could
shine in classic roles, and she would
make no mistake in abandoning
modern American plays and turning
her attention to higher work. Since
her last visit to Victoria something
has imparted a touch of humanness to
her acting which it lacked before.
Mrs. Patrick Campbell.
Mrs. Patrick Campbell has chosen
for her one appearance here on thc
night of Monday, April 13, The
Second Mrs. Tanqueray. When criticized the other day for her choice of
plays as being confined solely to those
of women who have had more or less
disagreeable pasts, Mrs. Campbell answered: "I play the roles that are
the most sympathetic to me; there
is no reason why a woman with a
future should not be as interesting as
a woman with a past, but you must
remember I made my first London
success in thc role of a lady who had
a good bit of a past, and just as that
past clung to Mrs. Tanqueray in Pi-
nero's play, so that heroine has clung
to my reputation." It was in fact,
Mrs. Campbell who made Pinero famous as a serious dramatist by her
wonderful performance of "The Second Mrs. Tanqueray." A few years
later Pinero wrote for her "The Notorious Mrs. Ebbsmith." In neither
role has any actress seriously challenged her supremacy, although many
have tried.
Society is taking an unprecedented
interest in her coming engagement,
an interest which is awakened by
something more than the symptuous
wardrobe which the English actress
has brought with her for thc tour.
From inquiries and advance orders
for seats that has been received during the past few days, it is evident
that the theatre will hold an audience
rarely equalled in brilliancy.
A Concert Tour.
Music-loiving residents of the smaller centres of population, as well as
the chief cities, will be deeply interested in the announcement made by
Mr. C. H. Gibbons, who recently returned from the direction of Madame
Albani's notable round-the-world tour,
of his intention to shortly send the
rising young violinist, Francis Armstrong en tour through the Province,
associated in such concert work with
The New Grand.
The performance at the New Grand
this week is good without being
super-excellent. It hardly, however,
bears out the claims which were made
for it in the advance notice. Better
individual turns have been seen, for
instance the top liner is a little dramatic skit entitled "The Cracksman."
Richard Buhler, the leading character
has a very poor conception of the
gentleman burglar, as he was played
by the inimitable Willard, who created The Spider in the Silver King.
Buhler is far too stagey and artificial,
and if he toned down his performance it would be much more effective.
Even gentlemen burglars do not jump
all about the room like an animated
marionet at the slightest noise. The
lady who played up to him in the
little skit was much more natural and
therefore more effective. The most
meritorious performance was that of
the Robert Dumont Co., the comedy
acrobats, they were exceedingly clever
and their looping across the stage,
underneath the table was exceptionally good work. The Doria Opera
Trio were very good in their operatic selections, notably in the one
from Faust. Two turns could be cut
out with advantage, that of Wesson
and Walters and that of Lefevre and
Frankie St. John, the one on account
of an undoubted approach ' to vulgarity, the other on account of
inanity.
Next week's bill is promised to be
fully equal to that of this week, and,
in the" sketch which "is to be the big
feature even better, for "The Visitor,"
presented by the noted actor, Porter
J. White, and his company of three,
is said to be the best ever shown in
a Sullivan-Considine playhouse on the
coast. Other big features will be The
Ascott-Eddy Trio in a pantomimic
acrobatic act; the Musical Bennetts
in a novel musical act, the three Walton Brothers, baritones, in an original singing sketch entitled "In
Camp"; Musical Lowe, Xylophone
artist extraordinary, and late soloist
with Sousa's Band; Mart Fuller, monologist; Thos. J. Price, in the illustrated song, "Stingy Moon"; New
Moving Pictures, entitled "Will He
Overtake Them?" and "Funny Face
Competition," and a new overture by
the Orchestra.
MOMUS.
MONDAY, APRIL 13
Mrs. Patrick Campbell
in
A. W. PINERO'S MASTERPIECE
THE SECOND MRS. TANQUERAY
00000000000000000000000000
En Tour of B. C.
April and May
Francis
Armstrong
Violin Virtuoso
Lilian Fisher
Prima Donna Soprano
Management of C. H. GIBBONS
00000000000000000000000006
518 Hastings St.W.
VANCCHJVER.BC.
P
t\_ fcIV I S   and Trade Mark
obtained in all countries.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville St.,
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
^
JUST A WORD
ABOUT   PLANS
My ambltlpn ls to fill Canada
with Beautiful Homes. Now
and then some man tries to
build his house without plans.
Have you noticed the usual results? Properly drawn plans
will save on the cost of the
house, furthermore, completely
drawn plans will enable the
owner to take competitive bids
on the wrok.
Remember specially drawn
plans cost you a little more
than the stock pattern book designs, why not have what you
desire—the cost of a set of
drawings for a home to cost
say $1,000 would be $20. If
you can afford to build at all,
you acn afford to build right.
Send me your ideas and I will
work them Into practical shape
for $2.00. A copy of my booklet on "Homes" will be mailed
to you for 5 cents. Better
write me now for a copy.
E. STANLEY MITTON
Architect   -   Vanoouver, B.O.
^-  A
When you wear one of our
toupees you have the satisfaction of knowing that it is a
perfect fit and is natural in
colour and correct in style.
Write today for our descriptive catalogue and price list of
toupees, wigs, switches and
transformations.
B. C. HAIR GOODS CO.
436  Granville  Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
AGENTS WANTED
We pay resident agents good
salary to represent us du.-ing
their spare time.
PACIFIC COAST  OROWN
SEEDS, TREES
For the Farm, Garden, Lawn, or
Conservatory.
Reliable,   approved   varieties,   at
reasonable prices.
No Borers.    No Scale.   No fumigation to damage stock.
No windy agents to annoy you.
Buy   direct   and   get   trees   and
seeds that GROW.
Bee   Supplies,   Spray  Pumps,
Spraying Material and
Cut Flowers.
Catalogue Free.
M. J. HENRY
3010   Westminsted   Boad
VANCOUVEB, B. C.
We Make It Both Pleasurable and Profitable
For you to do your buying here, and our reliable delivery system
brings your purchases at the time you want them. You'll find it
good to get your groceris here where you take no risks.
We would itemize:—
PRESERVED FRUITS.
Del Monte Canned Fruits, per tin  35c
Wagstaffe's Bottled Fruits, per jar  35c
C. & B. Bottled Fruits, each  75c
Bar le Due White and Red Currant, per jar 35c
Guava Jelly, pr jar 25c
Marrons in Syrup, per bottle  $1.00
Cherries in Marasquin, per bottle  35c, 65c and $1.00
Green Figs in Marasquin, per bottle  50c
Stuffed Figs, per bottle  50c
CHICKEN TAMALE
The famous B. & M. make, each 25c
"The best ever," so say our friends.
DIXI H. ROSS &. CO.
UP-TO-DATE GROCERS. 1316 GOVERNMENT ST.
0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
The Poodle Dog Hotel
A centre of good cheer is the Cosy Grill-room where the business and professional men of Victoria meet to exchange good
stories and gossip over things in general. The atmosphere here
is that of Bohemia in the best sense of the word; a Bohemu*
governed by up-to-date and genial surroundings.
Smith & Shaughnessy, Proprietors
YATES ST., Victoria, B. C.
oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo<
Save Time and Labour
Why waste time in starting
coal and wood fires? Why,
put up with dirt, dust and
worry of old-fashioned stoves
when you can
Cook by Gas
Easily and economically, and
have lots of time for making calls, reading, and recre-
time and trouble with A
GOOD GAS RAVGE.
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, Ltd.
CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS.
KOMI
DAYS
ARE
AT
HAND
Write me for 1908
Catalogue
Will Marsden
665 Granville Street,      Vancouver, E

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