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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Sep 15, 1906

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 IvoTToTroTniVo'yToTnrra^
Bank of Hamilton
Capital $3,500,000
Reserve $1,500,000
Total Assets, $29,000,000'
Interest paid half yearly on deposits of
1 $1 and upwards in Savings Department.
Drafts and Money Orders on all parts of
the world.  Vancouver Branches, cor.
of Hasting and Hamilton Sts., Powell St.
, Cedar Grove.
UUUUL8.B. a. PJUUUUUUUUUUI?
The Week
TL Provincial Review and Magazine.
x&vvvvrrsvv»5 m * < trrmv)or\
£ Pacific Coast Realty Co. Ld
p Telephoie 1086
5 Offices, 12 NacOrefor Block.
$ Lands. City Lots, Timber.
£      P. 0. Drawer 762, Victoria, B. C.
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Vol. III.   No.
££
VICTORIA AND  VANCOUVER    B. C, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1906.
One Dollar Per Annum
he Editor's Review
Of Current Topics.
Plcome      Yesterday   His   Excel-
rl Grey,   lency the Governor-Gen-
eral of Canada, accom-
Inied by Countess  Grey,    several
limbers of their family, and suite,
■rived in Victoria.   This is the first
easion on which    Earl Grey has
Bited the Western Capital, and on
ery ground he is entitled to and
111 receive a hearty welcome which
[11 extend over the fortnight he is
spend at the coast.   He comes as
Ie representative of he best and
isest of democratic monarchs, for
1st as the Prince Consort acquired
je title of "Albert the Good/' so
illustrious son,    although    only
iigning over the British Empire for
[few years, has already entrenched
aself in the affections of his mil-
llns of subjects in every part of the
lirld, as well as in the respect of
civilized nations and is univer-
illy known as "Edward the Peace-
liker."   It is no small honor to act
I the ambassador and official deputy
such a King. Earl Grey comes also
one of a line of great Governors
Id rulers, and by no means the least
Istinguished of that line, who have
retained tlie position with  dignity
|d  usefulness  and  contributed  inr
slight degree to  the  upbuilding
! what is beginning to be recognized
J the foremost of the English-speak-
colonies.   On that account every
tal Canada must feel a pride in
jlcoming him. But it ought to be pos-
He to take a broader view, to look
(rther, and to recognize    in   Earl
ey one among the many great pub-
I servants ofthe Empire who, whilst
fcv particularly identified with our
[intry, is a link 'in the chain of
pernors who perpetuated the best
Editions of the British Constitution
continue to weld together the di-
I'se interests of a gigantic Empire
lo one    Solidarity.      When    one
[nks not of one, but of twenty men
the status and calibre of   Earl
|ey carrying on the high functions
State in different   parts of the
jrld, presiding over the administra-
\a of the same laws, exemplifying
same innate determination to see
jry British subject,    and   indeed
jjry alien committed to our charge,
leive fair play; sustaining the dig-
ly of, and cementing loyalty to the
lone, we feel a tinge of the pride
j!ch inspired Tennyson to write:
Uld   statesmen   to   her   councils
came
lo knew the seasons), when to take
jjasion by the hand and make
bounds of freedom wider yet.
[shaping some august decree
|t left her throne unshaken still
ad-based upon the people's will,
compassed by the inviolate sea.
nt in addition to the Constitution-
rounds for welcoming Earl Grey
livill be most heartily welcomed
personal reasons.     It is many
fs since the Dominion was blest
a Governor-General who is so
li'tially a man of the people. Like
[King, he is in the best sense "all
Irs  to  all men,"  and  wherever
[travels have    carried him,    his
lliness of disposition and personal
tact have made him popular. He
sustains the dignity of his position
without that air of aloofness which
is too often the characteristic of the
parvenu official "drest in a little brief
authority." He has grasped the
genius and understood the spirit of a
free, democratic people, who are prepared to support the substance of
court ceremonial if the thing symbolized is more in evidence than the
mere externals. Of red-tape Canada
is intolerant, of the simple direct
character of the King and his representatives of like spirit Canada is
enamoured. For this reason we hail
the visit of Earl Grey, who is a type
of the true Westerner and who will
be equally at home in Government
House and in a workman's shack.
There is only one regret in connection with the excellent arrangements
for his visit, and we feel sure Earl
Grey is in no way responsible for it
—the reception intended for all
classes should have been held at a
popular hour and not at 9.45 p.m.,
when only one class can possibly attend. Wle hope it is not yet tue late
;'cr His Excellency to hold a wite
open reception in the City Hull at a.i
hour when the workingmen can be
there. We are satisfied that to them
as to His Excellency such a gathering
would be far more agreeable than
that arranged for Monday night.
An Appeal During his recent visit
to Caesar, to "Victoria, Sir William
Broadbent, physician to
the King, and one of the most eminent surgeons of the day, granted an
interview to the editor of "The
Week" for the express purpose of
discussing the subject of cancer, and
the advertisement of the Western
Medicine Company claiming that they
possess a "Never Fail" remedy. Sir
William, who is a Vice-President of
the Imperial Cancer Research Fund,
naturally takes a deep interest in the
subject, especially as it is well
known, for reasons that need not be
particularized here, that his Royal
miaster has associated himself in a
marked manner with the investigation of this dread disease. Sir William carefully read the original advertisement of the Western Medicine
company which has appeared from
timie lo time in the columns of the
"Colonist," and also the editorial
comment of "The Week" upon-the
same. He authorized "The Week"
to state that Cancer is incurable
within Ihe present knowledge and
scope of medical science. He said
tint the terms applied in "The
Week" editorial to the Western
Medicine Company and their manager, were deserved by any person purporting to have a cure for Cancer,
and that such a person was, as declared in the editorial, "a quack,
a quack of the most dangerous type,
and a pest who should be surpassed." Sir William also read the
correspondence whicli had passed between the editor of "The Week"
and Dr. E. F. Bashford, superintendent of the Cancer Research Fun,
/which was published in our last issue, and stated that he entirely agreed
with the structures of Dr. Bashford.
The interview took place in the pre
sence of a well known Victoria gen-
lemlan. Dr. Alfred Jukes Johnson, formerly of St. Thomas Hospital, London,, but for many years resident at Toronto,, coroner for that
city, and medical inspector for the
Province of Ontario, also granted an
interview, and for upwards of two
hours discussed the subject in all its
bearings. He authorized "The Week"
to state that he fully endorsed our
editorial on the subject, and that the
whole thing was "an absolute fake."
He confirmed the opinion of Sir William Broadbent that Cancer is an insurable disease and wished to point
out that not only had the Imperial
Research Fund made the strongest
possible appeal for any information
which would tend to the discovery of
a remedy, but that very large sums
"worse than empirical." "The
Week" is content to rest its position
on the opinion of these eminent and
famjous physicians, and has little
doubt that their remarks will be received by he public with the consideration to which they are undoubtedly entitled.
Pity the Several of the Liberal
Sorrows. papers have recently
been clamoring for a
higher standard in political life, and
urging that at times one should rise
above the prejudices of party and
display a little all round fairness.
The sentiment is an excellent one;
and will no doubt begin to be popular some time between this and the
dawn of the milennium. To the Nelson Daily News, which started the
toWk(
PHYSICIAN IN ORDINARY TO HIS MAJESTY
KING EDWARD VII.
of money had been offered, and were
still available, for rewarding any
person making the discovery. He deplored the fact that the Western
Medicine Company and similar vendors of quack nostrums have not been
prosecuted, suppressed and punished.
Ho said that in Ontario, the publication of the advertisement which they
had inserted in the "Colonist" would
lead to instant prosecution and the
closing of the business. He illustrated this point hy quoting the case of a
"Dr." Mann who has been conducting in Toronto a college of "Radio-
pnthy," upon whom the police recently pounced, nt his instigation.
The business was stopped, and the
fakir taken into custody. He now
awaits his trial.
Dr. Johnson declares that the business of the Western Medicine Company is a "fake" of the same class^
although it has not been successful
to the same extent. The Radiopath-
ist scooped in $76,000 in the month
of July last. Dr. Johnson has kindly promised, in addition to expressing those views, to forward a written
communication immediately on his
return to Toronto, as he is desirous
of doing all he can to warn the public against remedies which both he
and Sir William Broadbent said were
.discussion, we commend the pitiable
plight in which the Hon. William
Templeman has been placed by nn
abortive and futile attempt to inst.i
the principles of broad-mindedness
into narrow guage people. Everyone
likes the Hon. William. He is tho
type of man whom no one takes too
seriously, and who is commonly regarded as a jolly, large hearted, simple minded bluffer. In spite of the
fact that he has been a member of
parliament for many years, a Senator and a Cabinet Minister, he declared at the complimentary banquet
on Monday last that he was "no
politician." His opponents have always maintained this, and now his
friends seem to have found it out.
Six short months ago Victoria was
frantically urged to support Mr.
Templeman "regardless of parly"
at the bye-election, because his
success meant British Columbia getting a Cabinet Minister. Conservatives were implored to lay aside, for
once, their parly allegiance in order
that this great triumph might be
achieved. They did so. Mr. Templemnn
got thc seat and a portfolio, Victoria
got a Cabinet representative. The
Honorable William Templeman went
to Ottawa. Last Saturday the Honorable William Templeman returned
from Ottawa after the arduous toil
of a session in which for the first
time he shone as a new star in tbe
political firmament. It is customary
to greet the representative of a great
constituency on such an occasion.
For the due recognition of a member
of Cabinet rank even "party prejudices" may be laid aside. Where
were the enthusiastic and loyal Liberals last Saturday when the Princess Victoria rounded the harbor f
Where even were the self-sacrificing
Conservatives who had Stultified
themselves to secure a minister? The
Hon. William's portly form was
seen on the captain's bridge eagerly
scanning James Bay Causeway and
the C.P.R. wharf for the triumphal
arches, the banners, the brass band
and the procession with whicli custom has been wont to honour such
occasions. Alas! they were conspicuous by their absence. The dull grey
of the sky-line was relieved only by
a huge pile of empty petroleum barrels and an ininerant vendor's pyramid of multi-colored bladders. Not
even "one so poor to do him reverence." No wonder that the venerable statesman heaved a sigh, and
that reminiscent of his early school-
I days and the little house on the hill
he mused of the fallen Cardinal and
his heart-broken "Oh, how wretched
is that poor man who hangs on
(party's) favors." What had he
done to deserve such a fate? He
had tried to do his duty—as he saw
it. He was "no politician," but
what of that; he had his feelings.
Had he not shed a halo of glory on
Victoria by elevating the constituency to the higher level of Cabinet
representation? And he, "the
noblest Roman of them all," to suffer such cold neglect. The rain poured down, the wind played with his
straggling locks, his mobile countenance fell, and as he assumed an air
of utter dejection the captain heard
him mutter:
"Blow, blow ,thou winter wind,
Thou are not so unkind
As man's ingratitude."
The boat was tied up; carrying
his own baggage, the Honorable William Templeman, Minister of Mines,
first Cabinet Minister for Victoria,
but "no politician," hailed a cab,
got in unattended and without a word
of friendly greeting or even a nod
drove—home. On Monday he was
entertained at supper by the Young
Liberals, at the Victoria Hotel. The
president was an influential and well
known Victorian, Mr. Courtenay. Tho
star orator was the Liberal editor of
tho Conservative "Colonist," and
the speakers forgot to congratulate
William Templeman on his high promotion.
"Sic transit gloria Monday."
.Something On Tuesday next an in-
Important, fluential committee, consisting of representatives of the Municipal Council, the
Board of Trade, the Property Owners'
Association, and the Property Owners
along the Waterfront will interview
the Hon. Mr. Templemnn on a subject
of vital interest to Victoria. It is desired to secure from the Dominion
Government a grant estimated at
$200,000 a year, for four years, for
the purpose of deepening the harbor
to a uniform depth of 25 feet at low
water. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1906.
Iff
VANCOUVER I
a
^^^^^^^^     aiauaaiaiBiaaBia
A Daniel Come to Judgment.
Rev. J. A. McDonald is the editor of
the Toronto Globe; he is also a bright
and shining light of the Liberal party,
and therefore to some extent a law to
the Liberal press. Recently he has
been visiting Vancouver, and as might
reasonably have been expected, lie delivered an address. The irony of fate
decreed that this address should be reported verbatim in the columns of the
sensational journal presided over by D.
W. Higgins. From the context it is
clear that Mr. McDonald is both a
reader and admirer of The Week, for
he has not only adopted our sentiments
with respect to the senile Higgins, but
has actually appropriated our phraseology in describing his peculiarities. Our
muck rake simile seems especially to
have met with his approbation. We
must admit that Mr. McDonald has
sized up Higgins far better than we
have been able to do. The address is
too long to do more than quote the following extract, whicli in the light of
recent events canot fail to be interesting:
"Swinging to the oposite pole of life,
there is danger almost as hurtful as
corruption in politics or dishonesty in
trade. I mean the reckless hysterical
and often untruthful allegations of
wrong-doing made against public men
and public bodies by people who have
only selfish or sensational ends in view.
The 'literature of exposure' has, during
the past year, become a disease, and
has run into morbid and violent sensationalism. Without discrimination,
without knowledge, without regard for
truth or honor or the restraints of conscience, men feel free to assail the capacity and character of private citizens
and of public officials, and to do their
utmost to inflame public opinion into a
confused and reasonless hyslcria that,
if unchecked, would undermine public
confidence and re-act damagingly on
public life,
"Mind you, I make no plea for kid-
gloved, lavender-scented handling of
corporate or political crime. Offence
should be given short shrift. But the
danger of which I now speak is from
wholesale unjust and sensational criticism of public officials and public men.
It has come to this in the neighboring
republic, and it is coming to this in
Canada, that men of high personal
honor shrink from public service, because they know that neither truth nor
decency will save them from the assaults of slander and from the poisoned lampoon. Scarcely a man enters
parliament, scarcely an appointment is
ever made by any government, federal
or provincial, but some brazen voice
cries corruption and graft from the
housetops.
' "Let public opinion be kept strong,"
concluded the lecturer on this head,
adopting a phrase which became historic from the tactics of the opposition
in the last session of the Dominion parliament; "let the public conscience be
kept sensitive, let tlle unwinking eye
of the press be turned full and straight
on public affairs; but the man with the
muck-rake, the man who shuts his eyes
to truth and honor and a square deal
and sees nothing but the unclean gatherings of his own diseased imagination,
is a public nuisance; and the mock-
hero who everlastingly struts and
mouths, and shrieks in the limelight
has neither part nor lot in the high
and serious business of industrial or
political  reform."
On The Trail.
By the Traveller.
I
Percy F. Godenrath.
that is to be seen in the Province—at
least  it  so  struck
THE TRAVELLER.
An Artistic Buochure.
• One of the most artistic little bro-
brochurcs we have seen is published this
week from the presses of the Calgary
Herald. Il is entitled "Canada's National Playground," and is an illustrated guide and souvenir of Banff and
the tourist resorts of the Rocky and
Selkirk mountains. The author is
Percy F, Godenrath. journalist and
special   commissioner   of   the   Week.
Adam had his troubles, but he never
had a spasm at sight of a dressmaker's
bill.
Thc man who says he could win if
he had a chance, is the man who is
too cowardly to take chances.
It was my first visit to Golden, and
when I alighted from the train, the
frosty mists of an early September
morning held it in a white shroud,
through which Old Sol shortly appeared, and lhe pretty village on | the banks
of the Columbia was unfolded to the
eye. The place is unincorporated, but
excellent sidewalks and roads—the work
of the Provincial Government—leave
little to be desired for getting around.
There are four commodious hotels, several stores and numerous pretty residences. Unfortunately for the Traveller the place was deserted—nearly half
of the population having journeyed up
to Revelstoke to help their fun-loving
neighbors  to celebrate  Labor Day.
Golden is the supply point for a large
section of country along the Columbia
River, on which plies the "Ptarmigan"
a modern river steamer, owned by the
Upper   Columbia  Transportation    Co.,
which makes  Golden the headquarters
for, and the home port of,its fleet. The
steamers   of  this  company  are   under
the management of Captain F. P. Armstrong, the pioneer pilot of the Upper
Columbia river,  who  built and placed
the first steamer thereon in 1886.   This
little steamer was called the "Duchess,"
and   small  and   incommodious   as   she
was, yet her advent revolutionized the
trade all along the river route.    Previous to that time all supplies for exploration  and  survey  parties,    settlers
and prospectors, were brought in from
Portland, Oregon, by rail as far as possible,   and  thence   by  pack-trail   along
the valley of the Kootenay and across
Canal   Flat   and   down   the   Columbia
in  small  row-boats.    As  soon  as  the
'Duchess"   was   placed   on   the   route,
supplies   were   purchased   in   Canadian
markets, brought by fail to Golden, and
thence   up  river   by  steamer  to  their
various  points  of destination.    At the
present   writing   the    increased   traffic
necessitates the  use of two large and
commodious steamers, the "North Star"
and  the  "Ptarmigan"    making    semi-
weekly trips from Golden to Lake Windermere.
The Columbia Lumber Co. is another
prosperous concern having a large
modem milling plant, which gives employment to a big force throughout the
year—both at the mill and in the neighboring lumber camps. This company
manufactures a goodly proportion of
the stock and ties used by the C.P.R.
on  its  mountain  division.
The mining, lumbering, ranching and
fruit growing industries of the Columbia valley tributary to Golden make
for it a splendid business centre, and
the healthy condition of its trade was
forcibly brought to the attention of the
writer by one of its storekeepers, who
said his trade for August bad increased
over 50 per cent of the same month
of the previous year.
The Golden Board of Trade is a live
organization, ever working for the upbuilding of its own city and the valley. It believes in the distribution of
good literature and has issued a well
illustrated booklet descriptive of the
natural beauties of this section of the
Province. The board has been reaching out for a share of the tourist traffic, for the district does not lack in
scenic charms, for few trips can equal
that offered by the Upper Columbia river in its kaleidoscopic panorama of
wild scenes and solitary beauty. For
the sportsman guides, hunters, trappers,
experienced boatmen, as well as pack
and saddle ponies, boats and canoes can
be had on short notice. A letter addressed to Secretary Thomas O'Brien,
of the Golden Board of Trade, will
meet with every consideration, and he
will gladly make all necessary preliminary arrangements for parties contemplating an outing, and will send free
a copy of the booklet, "Mountain, Lake
and River." descriptive of one hundred
miles of the finest scenery in B. C. between Golden aud Windcremer, on application.
To anyone interested in the mineralogy of the North-cast Kootenay division, a visit is well worth paying to
the Government office, where F. C.
Lang, the mining recorder, has on display one of the largest and most artistically arranged exhibits from the
treasure  vaults  of old  Mother  Earth,
TRAVELLERS' GUIDE
CAMBORNE
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining men and
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
REVELSTOKE
Hotel Victoria
REVELSTOKE, B.C.
Headquarters lor miners and
lumbermen.
ROBT. LAUGHTON, Prop'r.
A WELL KNOWN FACT.
if it's dixTtea
It's The Best
Per lb. 35c and 50c.
DIXI H, ROSS & CO.
The Grocers. Ill Government St., Victoria.
Where Mall Orders are specially cared for. R. 1515
BANFF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
Banff's Most Popular $2 a Dav Hotel.
Close to Station and Sulphur
Baths.
N. K. LUXTON. Proprietor.
Collectors!
I carry an assortment of 400
subjects of
Genuine
Photographic
Pos Cards
of Banff nnd the Canadian National
Park, also of Northwest Indians,
Mountain and Game Scenes.
PRICE 60c. PER DOZEN.
FOR THE TRADE ONLY.
My quotations by the hundred are
the lowest in Canada. Photo post
cards made from any subject yon
may send me.
Write for particulars,
Byron Harmon
TELEPHONE 606
Johnston's Transfer
I35 Douglat St.   VICTORIA.
RATES CUT IN TWO.
HACKS FOR HIRE.
Driving Loads 75c. per hour.
Photographic Artist,
Banff, Alberta.
A new shipment jnst arrived
of English Riding Breeches in
Scotch and Donegal Tweeds,
$3.50, $4.50, $5.50.
E. CHAPMAN
DAVIS  CHAMBERS
Opposite Strand Hotel,
Vancouver.
JOHN COOPER
Taxidermist and Pur Dresser
Mounting Large Game Heads
a Specialty.
826 PENDER STREET,
VANCOUVER
The Sanitarium Hotel, which is beautifully situated, overlooking the Bow Hivcr and its lovely and
romantic valley, is a large 5-story building elegantly
fitted with every appointment calculated to bring
pleasure and comfort, to tho tourist or invalid.
A private hospital, which, though isolated, is in
close proximity to tho Sanitarium, is presided over by
skilfully trained nurses and is also fitted out with
every appliance necessary to a first class institution
of its kind.
A very commodious bath-house adjoins the hotel,
where Turkish, Russian, plunge, shower and douche
baths are given under medical supervision, with
water direct from the celobrated hot sulphur springs.
A first, class livery in connection so that rides and
drives through the magnificant scenery may be enjoyed.
Terms : $2.(M a day upwards. Special rates by weok
or month.  Open all the year.
W. H. SCAUTH, Manager.
Medical Staff:
11. G. Brett, m.d ;   G. M. Atkin, m.d.;
It. H. Bkktt, U.A.. M D.
JAMES BUCHANAN & CO.
LONDON AND GLASGOW
^Purvejots to.the Royal family,
DISTILLERS OF HIGH GRADE  SCOTCH WHISKIES
Buchanan's Royal Household at J1.50 per bottle
Buchanan's Bli.ck and V hilt al Ji .2^ | er bottle
Buchanan's Red Seal at J1.00 pet*botlle
ARE LEADERS AMONG THE BEST
For sale by all dealers,
VICTORIA, B. C.
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OF
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
PHONE 893. VICTOR I THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1906.
At The Street   ^
Corner        h
By THE LOUNGER
*
Victoria is certainly becoming the
lecca not only of tourists but of Con-
mtioners, and when the Convention
'oper is held in some other place the
'lerflow manages to reach the capital
Britisli Columbia. This accounts
r the important visitation of eminent
Iedicos who have honored us with
fiir presence during the week. First
kne Sir Thomas Barlow, then Sir
jilliam Broadbent, then quite a bakers'
izen of men noted in the profession,
Id only less eminent than the King's
ysician and the physician of the Ro-
1 Household. These men are of the
lest type both professionally and per-
hally. They carry with them per-
ps more than any others of our il-
itrious visitors the "grand air" which
! acquired only in the most cultured
'cles, and they preserve the same ju-
fcial viewpoint which affords such
contrast to the carping, one-sided
esentation of matters so common in
e new world. Nor are they stiff and
rmal, but seem to have adapted them-
lves to their environment with ap-
eciative good humor. As raconteurs
ey are unexcelled, and the small but
armed circle in Victoria which en-
jred the pleasure of their society will
it soon forget their stories.    One of
e best was told by an illustrious me-
co who took afternoon tea at the bar-
cks.   There were present the doctor,
s wife and daughter, with a gentle-
kn visitor and the military host and
■stess.    Thinking to make  entertain-
* talk with a story the host told of
' accident at mess the day before when
e officers present agreed, for a joke,
■ put up $5 each and buy a genuine
inama  for  the most  moral  man  of
% group—decision to be by the vote
the majority.   At this stage of the
"ital in jumped the hostess with the
precating remark, "Oh!  George and
(i never told me!   Where is it?" The
it face he could put on the nufter
s to burst out in a choleric splutter,
My, Maude, you know I always did
>k like h—1 in a Panama."
Doctor  Johnson  of    Toronto    tells
ny amusing stories of Colonel Den-
11, the police magistrate, better known
; his  splendid    work  in  connection
(h the Empire league.    The best >>f
se cannot he well told on paper bc-
ise it requires the reproduction oi .1
ture and grimace to bring out tlie
nt.   But this comes pretty near it. A
ight  tramp,   a  veritable  hobo,   was
ed before the Colonel one morning
:rged    with  sleeping    in  the public
k, the offence was proved, and the
gistrate  in his  sternest  voice  thus
Iressed    the   prisoner,    "Now,   you
iw perfectly well you had no right
sleep  in the park, you know  it  is
inst the law, what the devil were
doing there?" "Oh," responded the
np with a long drawn  whistle and
link, "You know."   "Ten dollars and
ts."    "Ten dollars and costs!" with
air of surprise, "what  for?" "Oh,"
londed the magistrate, with an ex-
bnt   mimicry  of  the    whistle   and
k. "you know."
suppose I had better stop, or my
min will be filled and none of the
pus  business  of  the  week tackled.
il, I must say one word about the
(rations.   Until Victoria is prepared
pend sufficient to do the thing de-
jy it would be, far better to leave it
fe and confine the festiviites to Chi-
lantems  and   fire-crackers.    The
I erected  by Thomas  Catterall  on
brnment  street near Yates  is the
one even  suggestive  of an  arch,
(others are dumpy, dwarfed carica-
.. The covering is flimsy and the
le appearance poverty-stricken. Any
j city in the interior, Nelson, Ross-
[ Grand Forks, Kamloops, or Revel-
|, would have spent five times the
l.nt with  one fifth  of the popula-
I Instead of being in any way wor-
lif the occasion, or a credit to the
(and  island,  the  decorations  as  a
b and the so-called arches in paf-
Ir  are   surnly an   apology.    Why
have built half a dozen with the
yets of the country?   It has been
done elsewhere with marked success.
A coal arch, an ore arch ,a grain arch,
a fruit arch, and one or two constructed from local manufactured products.
Instead we have the tawdry skeleton
lumber and colored chiffon scarecrow
of tradition, with only one recommendation, its cheapness. Wake up, Victoria, another splendid opportunity of
advertising your resources has gone.
The subject of the mayoralty is already causing speculative comment.
Three probable candidates are men'-
tioned, Aldermen Ernest Hall and Stewart, and 1 Mr. Joshua Kingham. The
first would make a strong candidate,
the last a stronger. Alderman Stewart
has somewhat discounted his chances
by his vacillation on the water question. I doubt if the winner has yet
been named, but it is certain that he
must be a man who does not know too
much and he must be willing to admit
fallibility once in a while.
I hear that a porte cochere is to be
built at the offices of the Colonist before  winter  weather  sets  in.
LOUNGER.
OLLA PODRIDA
A Question of Valuation.
One of the very smallest of the late
Marshall Field's employees, and he was
a very small boy indeed, once came to
the great merchant for an in increase in
wages.
"Huh!" said Mr. Field, looking at
him as if through a magnifying glass.
"Want a raise, do you ? How much are
you getting now?"
"Three dollars a week," chirped the
little chap.
"Three dollars a week!" exclaimed
his employer. "Why, when I was your
age I only got two dollars."
"Oh, well," piped the youngster, "perhaps you weren't worth any more."
There was a change in the pay-roll.
The Really Weaker Sex.
Woman has been taught for generations, centuries, icons, the absurd doctrine that man, being more fierce and
uncontrolled than she, is thereby
stronger and grander. It is time for her
to rub her eyes and see the truth, th^t
mere brutalism renders man not superior and powerful, but lamentably weak
and helpless.—"Spinster," in M. A. P
Fate of the Meat Lords.
In a savage tribe the lords of the
Meat Trust would be stoned to death. In
a mediaeval village they would be
hanged on the nearest tree. In a modern and highly civilized state, with a
network of laws and a clockwork of
police, it is excessively unlikely that
anything at all will be done to them.
Illustrated London News.
"Speaking of fast runners," said the
man with the loud shirt, "did you ever
hear of Bobbie Streeter, the geologist?
'Well, while we were attending a convention at Hudson Bobbie found some
little petrified lobsters—-trilobites I
thing he called them. He went plumb
daffy over his find and bought a young
valise to carry thein home in. Well, we
thought it was about time to have some
fun, so before starting home, Bill Sawyer bought another valise exactly like
Bobbie's and filled it full of ordinary
rocks. Bobbie's treasure was in the
aisle along side of his seat, and when
he wasn't looking, one of the boys carefully stole it and laid ours in its place.
Of course we had ut plie conductor
wise. Then Jack Ryder, a lawyer,
came swaggering down the aisle and
accidentally on purpose i ripped over
tne bag. He let out a pretty string of
cusses about people's luggage being in
the way, and finally picked the thing up
anr flung it out of the window. Gee,
but Bobbie was an an awful heat! He
wanted to flag the train! The conductor happened in then and said he'd do
his best. In a few minutes he came
back panting and as red as a beat, but
with Bobbie's little satchel tucked under
his arm.
" 'By gosh,' he puffed, 'it was pretty
far behind but I got it all right!'
"And to this day Bobbie says he
never heard of such fast running in all
his life."
It is the fashion of the present age
to underrate the influence of the individual character. This is a consolation of mediocrity. Everything that
is great has been accomplished by great
men.
Tbe Pacific Coast
Realty Co, Ltd.
Have an exclusive list of specially selected ACREAGE, ESTATE and FARM
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12 MacGregor Bl'k, Victoria, B.C.
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OFFICES : Vancouver, B. C.
Grand Forks, B. C.
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Transacts a General Financial and
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Buys and Sells High Grade Investment Securities. Manages, buys,
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Insurance. Negotiates Loans on
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Correspondence Solicited.
HAROLD M. DALY, Manager |
VICTORIA,   B. C.
Week September 17
The New
Grand
SULLIVAN « CONSIDINE,    Proprietor*.
Management of ROBT. JAMIESON.
The Tidbeaux Souav Girls
Ten beautiful maidens in marvellous
military  evolutions, marching, gun
drilling, gun spinning, sward combats, wall scaling, etc.
Raymond and Clarke
Rapid Fire Conversationalists.
The Chamberlains
Lariat Experts.
Jimmy Wall
Black Face Monologuist
Frederic Roberts,
New Moving Pictures.
Prof. M. Nagel's Orchestra.
If you love your wife
BUY   HER  A  GAS STOVE
It will save her a lot of extra work and
give her time for other things
besides cooking.
Cook Your Roast, Do Not Boast Your Cook,
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, LIMITED.
A thing is not necessarily true because a man dies for it.
It is always when the game is played
that we discover the cause of the result.
The Home
Seekers
Goal.
! Special   Bargains  to
Wind Up An  Estate.
6Y2 acres in the North
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to Post Office, with southern aspect, $600 per acre,
5 acres is all cleared and in
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Seaview lots from $50 to
$100 each, chiefly cleared,
and ready for building on.
Easy terms if necessary.
The B. C. Land & Investment
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Real Estate, Financlitl and
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VICTORIA, B. C. ♦
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Mrs. M. E. MacLeod,
Opposite Balmoral Hotel
BEE SUPPLIES.—Buckwheat, Fall
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Ensilage Corn, Mangel, Turnip, Special quotations in quantity.
Spray Pumps, Whale Oil Soap, Vegetable Plants.
Large Stock of HOME GROWN
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No expense, loss or delay of fumigation or inspection.
Let me price your list before placing
your order.
We do business on our own grounds
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Catalogue Free.
M. J. HENRY, I
3010 Westminster Foad,
Vancouver, B.C.
Real Hair
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!
VICTORIA. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1906
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Offices:
88tt Government Street .... Victoria B. C.
Empire Block   Vancouver, B. C.
W. BLAKEMORE...Manager and Editor
Annual Subscription  JI in Advance
Transient rates, per Inch  50c.
Legal notices (60 days), from  (5.00
Theatrical, per inch  }1.00
Readers, per line   6c. to 10c.
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Lost and
Found and other small advertisements, per insertion, from...26c. to $1.00
NOTICE.
Contributors are hereby notified
that all copy for The Week should be
delivered to the office, 88% Government
Street, not later than Thursday morning.
ANNOUNCEllENT.
The Week Publishing Company has
pleasure in announcing that Mr. Percy
F. Godenrath, who for a year has been
employed on the Colonist staff, has been
retained by The Week, and started out
three weeks ago on a three month*'tour
of tlie Province in the interests of this
publication. Whilst on the journey Mr.
Godenrath will not only attend to the
financial business of the paper, but wil
contribute sketches and articles on matters of interest to every locality which
he visits. The Week Publishing Company will be glad to hear of an experienced energetic man who is prepared
to take a similar trip through the
Island.
BADINAGE
By BOHEMIAN
*L
One day this week, I strolled into
the Carnegie library, on two missions
bent. The first was to carry out with
such exactitude as was possible the,
instruction of a lady friend of mine
to exchange a venerable relic of fiction
for an up-to-date novel; the other to
have a desultory chat with the librarian
on books in general, and new books in
particular. This is not the first time
I have undertaken a mission more serious than lounging at street corners,
or keeping pink assignations in purple
tea-rooms. In fact, some of my more
appreciative friends have, on occasion,
declared that I have a pretty taste in
literature. On this particular occasion
I must confess to having met with a
surprise Here had I been going to the
library off and on for six months, selecting books from the old catalogue,
in total ignorance of thc fact that
there was a written catalogue of more
than a thousand volumes, among which
might be found the latest publications.
I was pleased to learn that after such
delay, a printed catalogue of these later
books is to be immediately available.
The librarian informed me that while
a considerable number of readers made
their selection from among the older
standard works, the vast majority patronized the supplementary list, devoted
entirely to fiction. He added that the
number of borrowers increased in
about the same ratio as the increase in
new works of fiction. Statistics of public libraries through Canada and thc
U. S. confirm this as a general condition, and with rare exceptions it is
probably a fact tbat nearly oo per cent
of the reading matter taken from public
libraries is of this class. I have no
intention of entering into a discussion
of the ethics of this subject. The fact
must be accepted, and is not altogether
so pessimistic in its bearing as some
book-lovers would make out. The redeeming feature is that whilst it must
be admitted that more trashy novels
arc written today than ever, it is also
true that never did so much good literary work go into thc realm of fiction.
We have no wizard like Scott or Dick-
or Hugo, but an epoch which boasts
living  writers like    Meredith,    Hardy,
Jacobs, Hope, Conrad, and Dunton, to
say nothing of a host of second class
writers,   including    such   accomplished
craftsmen as  Conan Doyle,    Crockett,
Caine, Parker, James, and Connor need
hardly   strike   its   colors   to   any  that
have gone before.    Even  a Bohemian
cannot argue that fiction, however excellent,  can be regarded  as a  substitute for the higher forms of literature.
History, biography, and philosophy must
ever occupy a higher platform, but the
demand for a lighter and more entertaining medium, for the conveyance of
thoughts and ideas engendered by the
more strenuous conditions of life and
competition,   has   determined   that   the
popular channel of the twentieth century shall be through the medium of
works  of  imagination.    The  result  is
that  what  modern fiction  has  lost  in
picturesqueness and plot it has gained
in purpose, analysis of character, motive, and ethical teaching.   Some of the
very highest work of this class, combining   all   the   excellencies   of    lofty
thought, sound teaching, and pure style,
have been given to the world by the
novelists  of the  last  decade.    Always
tbe wise man chooses his works through
the author, and not through the title.
Who that has read them would concede
to the writer of any preceding epoch,
the palm which their judgment awards
to George Meredith for ''Richard Fev-
rel," to Thomas Hardy for "Far From
the Madding Crowd," to William Black
for 'The Daughter of Heth," to J. M.
Barrie  for "A Window  in Thrums,"
and ''The Little Minister," to Kipling
for "The Light that Failed," to Anthony  Hope  for    "The  Prisoner    of
Zenda," to James Lane Allen for "The
Choir  Invisible,"   to  Theodore  Watts
Dunton for "Alwyn," to Benjamin Swift
for "Nancy Noon," to Lucas Malet for
'The Wages of Sin," to John Oliver
Hobbs  for "Saints and  Sinners," not
forgetting R. D. Blackmore's immortal
"Lorna   Doone,"    and   the    inimitable
"John Inglesant," of John Henry Short
house,  and the three  works  of Mark
Rutherford of which  no one  on  this
side  of  the Atlantic    seems  to have
heard, yet which are among the most
notable products of the close of the
last  century  for  loftiness  of thought
and  elegance  of  diction.    I   refer, .of
course, to "The Autobiography," "The
Deliverance," and the    "Revolution in
Tanner's  Lane."    It  is  gratifying  to
find that many of these are in the Caruegie library. All the same one regrets
to note that some authors of the highest merit and interest are conspicuous
by their absence.    D'Annunzio is represented by  one book,    and that his
worst.   If tbe selection committee could
strain a point in favor of thc brilliant
author whom Comstock surpressed in
New York, it is a pity it could not
arrange that he should be represented
by "II Triumpho Del Morte," by far
his  most  brilliant  work.    Neither  is
place found for Valdes, the great Spanish novelist.   One would have liked to
see on the shelves of every public library the one book on which the fame
of Harold Frederics safely rests, "The
Damnation of Theron Ware,"    afterwards  changed  at  the  request of his
publishers to "Illumination."    But after all it does not do to be too critical,
and I must excuse this    unusual and
somewhat desultory dessertation on the
ground that it is a "hobby," and even
Bohemians may have bobbies.   A wealthy citizen with a thousand dollars to
spare could not  spend  it more wisely
or produce more real enjoyment than
by purchasing a thousand of the best
novels of the last quarter of a century,
and  if such an one is  stimulated to
"good works" by reading this sketch,
and wants assistance in making thc selection, let him call on
BOHEMIAN.
A New Proposition In Law.
Mr. Justice Martin has just rendered
a decision which is causing considerable
comment among the members of the
legal fraternity and the quidnuncs generally. The captain of a German vessel
—the Lizbeth, was sued by a seaman
for $36 for wages. The action was
brought through the Admiralty Court
before Mr. Justice Martin of the Supreme' Court. The writ was dismissed
by His Lordship. As a matter of fact
the minimum amount for which suit
can be brought in the Supreme Court
is £50, so there could be no question as
to the judgment. So far so good, but
when Messrs. Eberts & Taylor, the solicitors for the owners of the vessel,
make application to the court for a release they are told that they can only
procure it by paying the marshall's
fees, amounting to $40, which they had
to do in order to enable the vessel to
sail. No reasons are given for the de
cision, whicli is contained in a brief
judgment, and the only rule quoted is
rule 54 with which every one who has
had dealing with Admiralty matters is
familiar; but it will occasion no little
surprise if it should ultimately be
found that this is a case in which costs
do not follow judgment. It is not permissible to think that the decision is
wrong; the only conclusion, therefore,
is that it is a new proposition in law
which may or may not be sustained
by the higher courts if any suitor
should have the temerity to test the
matter.
<P
A Large Sale.
Stewart Williams, the popular auctioneer, is holding one of his large
stock and farm sales on the property
of W. Stevenson, Cadboro Bay, on
Friday, Sept. ist. The whole of the
stock, including pedigree Jersey ctttle,
and a splendid team of draught horses
is for sale. Refreshments will be served
on the grounds.
THE RUBY
Sporting Comment.
A regatta will be held by the Vancouver Rowing Club on Saturday, and
a large number of entries have already
been received for the various events.
The crews entered have been rowing
all summer and are in first-class condition. The best races of the day
will be the four-oared contest for the
Murray cup, and in addition there will
be canoe races, single and double paddle events and tilting contests.
The cup presented by H. B. Cambie
for the single sculling championship of
the club will be contested for in about
two weeks. Several entries have already been received, including N. C.
Sawers, Lang, |F. H. Godfrey, Wait,
Waugh, Dillabough, Pearsall, Tennant
and Patison.
Salmon's St. Leger sweep has been
a subject of 1 interest this week. More
than 2,000 dollar tickets were sold. All
throe of the placed horses were drawn
by residents in the city, the lucky winner of tbe first prize, $732, being Mr.
Vaughan, employed at F. D. Stewart
& Co.'s. The drawing was conducted
with perfect satisfaction to all concerned, and the money paid over on Wednesday.
THIS POPULAR GEM is regarded by mineralogists as a red variety
of sapphire or spinel. The Balas ruby is rose redf The Almandine
ruby is tinged with violet or brown. The finest RED RUBIES are
known as ORIENTAL RUBIES and are, as their name denotes, from
the Orient, chiefly from Ceylon and Burmali. Our Oriental connections
give us a commanding position on the ruby market, hence we have a
large rstock of extra fine rubies which we use in conjunction with ourf
well known stock of the finest diamonds, for mounting in rings, necklets, pendants, brooches, earrings,   etc.
\\\\\ll/////. Our factory saves all middlemen's profits In the
^mounting, and our large purchases of dlamondsand
other precious stones made before the recent rise
enables ns to sell at less than market rates. We |
make a special feature of Gentlemen's Single Stone
Diamond Rings With platlnum.llned mountings, as
shown In cut.
IMPORTANT.
Our Mail Order Department gives special attention
to country orders and enquiries.
CHALLONER & MITCHELL
•     DIAMOND MERCHANTS
47 and 49 Government Street, Victoria, B. C.
C M. 1575 .
numerous calls.   Mr.'    Leary has de-
ens and possibly no peer of Thackeray  served well of the city.
An Efficient Chaperon.
No one was more attentive to Sir
William Broadbent and the other illustrious members of the medical fraternity during their recent visit to
Victoria than Mr. Arthur Leary, who
met them at the boat and placed practically the whole of the week at their
disposal, showing them the sifehts of
the city and chaperoning them in their
A Song.
By  Fallow  Norton.
I made my mind into a sky-
So great above love's tyranny.
But bird-wings flecked my farthest blue;
They were my flying thoughts of you.
I made my mind a deep, deep sea:
This should be safe retreat for me.
But where -the silence sweetest grew,
Tliere depths and dusks all spoke of you.
NO CHARGE
We shall be glad to forward, ENTIRELY
FREE, our sample book containing samples
of the largest and most fashionable stock
of wall papers and wall coverings in Western Canada. We can also offer you many
great bargains in this season's wall papers.
We give a special discount of 10 per cont.
to all those who cut out this ad. and use it
as an introduction to
MELROSE CO.Ii
40 Port St., Next to Five Sisters Block, Victoria, B. C.
"IF IT'S CORRECT WE HAVE IT."
M. '497 0
Tho' eons cleft my way from you,
Each moment were a link unto
This love of you where I am thrall—■
My deep, my high, my heaven, my all!
Bishop Potter, after being made much
of in London, has gone back to New
York and cast aspersions on the Old
Country. The old poet must have been
impelled by the spirit of prophecy to
write:—
For I remember stopping by the way
To watch a Potter thumping his wet
clay.
And with its all-obliterated Tongue
It nuirmur'd, "Gently, Brother, gently,
pray I"
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British Columbia
THE FRUIT GROWING RESOURCES
OF THE PROVINCE.
Fruit Growing.
British Columbia fruit is preferred
above all others in the markets of
the Middle West, where it commands
profitable prices. In 1904 a small
exhibit sent to England was awarded the gold medal of the Royal Horticultural Society, and last year
(1905) a car lot, exhibited in London, won the first prize from all competitors, while no less than eight
medals were awarded the individual
exhibits which made up the collection. This goes to prove that despite
the great distance British Columbia
fruit has seemed a prominent place
in the British market, in which Oregon and California applies have heretofore sold at the highest prices.
The fruit industry of British Columbia is in its infancy, but the results so far secred are convincing as
to its future importance. The actual
extent of fruit growing land has not
yet been ascertained, but by a conservative estimate at least one million acres south of the 52nd degree
will produce all the fruits of the temperate zone. The recognized fruit
districts include the southern part
of Vancouver Island and the Gulf
Islands, Lower Fraser River Valley,
Thompson River Valley, Shuswap
Lake, Okanagan, Spallumcheen, Oso-
yoos, Similkameen, Upper Columbia
Valley, Kootenay Lake, Arrow Lake,
Lower Columbia River and Grand
Forks, which are all suited to the
best grades of fruit, and which contain extensive areas of fruit lands.
Other good fruit districts are: West
Coast of Vancouver Island, West
Coast of Mainland (where patches of
fruit lands are found at the heads of
the numerous inlets), Lower Fraser
Valley, Nicola,. Grand Frairie, and
many other localities. In some of
these sections irrigation is necessary,
and, as mentioned elsewhere, water is
being supplied where the influx of
population warrants the neceBsary
expenditure. Many localities, which
are now proved to be suitable for
fruit culture, were but recently "discovered," for a few years ago fruit
was only raised in the settlements
along the coast and along the rivers,
and in quantity that failed to supply
even the limited local demand. In
1891 the total orchard area of the
province was 6,500 acres. In ten
years it only increased 1,000 acres,
but from 1901 to 1905 it jumped to
22,000 acres, and it is safe to say
that that acreage will be more than
doubled again before lthe close of
1906. Ten years ago British Columbia did not produce enough fruit to
supply her own population. The foi-
following table of fruit shipments is
interesting in showing the steady
growth of the industry:
.'
Royal HortiIultural Society
(■
ESTABLISHED A.D. 1804.
INCORPORATE!) A.O. 1809.
Jfck&CrYUAJb JjiMxk JKQajS. JjCrYULorv, jfcv, ,5<* Id■   IQ05
Awarded to   Jbu jkcnJoruou of ^AxXtAki Axo(xAArd>uxj..-]
For     feo£]fetujYv .oj. ..JfciiiJUd: 	
Ayvarded Exhibits of British Columbia Apples.
December 1905.
Nelson Fruit Pair.
By freight. By Express. Total. Increase.
1902    1,469 tons , 487 tons 1,956 tons
1903    1,868 tons 676 tons 2,544 tons , 588 tons
1904    2,161  tons 864 tons 3,025 tons , 481 tons
1905    3,181 tons 1,176 tons 4,357 tons 1,332 tons
An increase of over 50 per cent in four years.
J THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1966.
.
Love at First ^ Sight.
Is It a Poetic Fiction.
I read somewhere recently a refer
ence to that "flabby sentimentalism
love at first sight," and I marvelled at
the profound knowledge of human nature displayed in this saying. We are
accustomed to hear that the poets are
responsible for most of the fictions
which rule our conduct. For example,
it is declared that the poets have idealised woman to the undoing of man.
And so the poets have invented and
handed down this thing called roman
tic love.
Now, we should all have the honest
courage of our convictions, and face
the consequences of our actions; and,
therefore, we should all admit that it
is not the poet but the lover who has
made romantic love. The poet merely
voices the heart of the lover, and more
fine things have flutered in the lover's
heart than have ever appeared on the
poet's page. It is but the echo of romantic love that lilts in the lyric.
The attitude of many elderly people
towards love is singularly unfair and
unimaginative; also, it is frequently
ungrateful. The decline of a passion,
even the loss of it, does not obliterate
the fact that it once existed.
Thank Heaven we begin life as
idealists, even if we afterwards grow
cynical. And supreme among ideals is
romantic love, which (I say it boldly)
is in its essence love at first sight. This
is not to say that in these more temperate countries youth and maiden emulate the passionate South, and fly into each other's arms on first acquaintance. But I do claim that the more
devout and single-minded a passion is
the earlier will have been its inception.
Deliberation has no place in the courts
of love. Our grandmothers were fond
of advocating a leisurely growth of
affection on the part of their daughters. It was in their view immodest
to be in love with your fiancee, al
though it was very proper to love your
husband. Of course, every nice woman did love her husband. And that
was the love they inculcated. It was
to come slowly; it dawned with respect, and was encouraged by gratitude,
admiration, and the like. And the full
flower of that marital love is depicted
for us in the novels of a bygone generation.
Well, a homely affection of a drab
sort may develop out of such circumstances, but I should not like to call it
love. We ought to differentiate as the
Greeks did, between the various kinds
of love; but we do not. We have one
little word to cover everything, and it
is vastly overworked. The romantic
sentiment which alone deserves the
name of love is the only justification
of marriage.
A man or a woman is, or ought to
to be, married for personality, and
personality includes many elements.
There is beauty, there is wit, there is
charm, there js intelligence, there is
character, there is imagination. .
But it is unanalysable, Everyone
knows that personality decides his affection, and, luckily, as many divergent
personalities as tliere are so many
corresponding tastes do they suit. You
may wonder what Smith saw in the
ugly woman he has made his wife,
Smith may even come to wonder that
himself later. But the correspondence
of Mrs. Smith's personality with
Smith's taste decided him. And he
did not take years to find it out. The
impression of personality is made instantly.
As a girl steps ino the punt, as a
man advances up the ball-room, so in
the twinkling of an eye does the small
shaft go home to someone. I do not
mean to say that cither man or woman
of necessity will recognize thc hit at
once. Human beings are fortunately
not all self-conscious, nor are they
constantly feeling their pulses. Healthy
young people will not stop to question,
"Am I in love?" But presently, when
they are aware of their condition, if
they will look back, they will honestly
confess that the quickening of the
heart dated from that first meeting. Of
such is love at first sight.
The very constitution of human nature, if its instincts arc obeyed, demands that love should thus be inau
gurated. The correspondence of the
personality with the lover's tastes, the
dovetailing of it, is precisely on the
lines of Kan's famous "forms." The
girl fits in with a demand of the man's
nature. He may disapprove of her in
many ways; she may annoy him; but
he cannot help loving. Nor could he
say what in her attracted him. Perhaps it was the voice that made the
first impression, or was it the grace of
her carriage? It may have been the
gentle beauty of her face. But she has
no beauty? She has for him. At least,
he admits that she is not strictly beautiful, but .    Oh, there is only one
explanation.    He loves.
This, then, is the origin of romantic
love, this instantaneous attraction, refining ino the full passion under favoring influences. And now we are in a
position to deal with that pale counterfeit of love which our grandmothers
advocated. It creates beside the real
thing no more impression than a tallow dip beside the burning sun. But romantic sentiment, while the necessary
foundation of marital love, is not by
any means its only constituent. From
the outset there begin to grow up
around this rooted passion the affections and sentiments of common associations, of common interests, and of
mutual appreciation. These in course
of years invest the original sentiment
with a hundred other ties, and so the
love of husband and wife at its best
should be "merged into the perfect
star" of a radiance fuller and greater
than in the more passionate beginnings.
Nevertheless, the original instinct is
not in error, and we may ask with
Marlowe,
"Who ever loved that loved not at
first sight?"
The Surprised Physician.
A well known New York physician,
while recently attending a banquet, indulged rather freely in various liquors.
Not being accustomed to drinking, the
effects soon became apparent. Before
the banquet was over, he was summoned to one of his most aristocratic patients, and was soon speeding up Fifth
Avenue in his automobile. Arriving at
a certain brown-stone mansion, the
doctor with superhuman efforts managed to walk straight, and was ushered
into his patient's boudoir. He drew out
his watch and proceeded to feel the
pulse, but try as he would it was impossible for him to find it. Disguted
with himelf he muttered: "Positively
drunk!" when to his amazement the
lady exclaimed: "Oh, doctor, I implore
you, not to tell on me!"
A Prisoner,
By Theodosia Garrison.
His youth was like that mariner of old,
Keen with the  daring that makes
dreams come true
Who steered a course courageous to
those new
Strange lands that ever beckoned to
the bold;
To \vhom adventure was a cup of gold
From which the   valiant,   thirsting
spirit drew
That wine of singing life, the old
gods' brew(
To   make   their   heroes   glad   with
strength untold.
This was his youth triumphant.    See
today
How life hath thrust him   crippled
'neath her bars
Of ceaseless toil and sordid   hopes
and gains—
A prisoner of Fate who needs must
stay
With dulled eye turned forever from
the  stars,
A bound Columbus weighed by many
chains.
Too Good to Be Done.
To penalise the cutting down of a
single tree for the next thirty years or
so; to forbid the erection of any building, unless upon ground that has been
already used for that purpose, would be
to enact laws so wise, so good, so excellent, that wc fear no Parliament
would be ever found to pass them; to
see that only ill-built and insanitary
houses were pulled down, a method so
sensible that no authorities would countenance  it.—Gentleman's  Magazine.
MfMri^r   This  is the advertisement which HAYOR MORLEY
M*\J I   lUL   REFUSED TO  SANCTION  after our Ad. Agent had
arranged for it, subject to the endorsation of the Executive.      His   excuse   was  that   THE WEEK  had
criticized his conduct as Mayor!! 1   We are running the Advertisement gratis
in the interests of Victoria and the Provincial Exhibition.
1906
PROVINCIAL EXHIBITION
AT VICTORIA, B. C.
SEPT. 25TO 29
$10,000 in Premiums and Valuable Special Prizes.
3 Days' Horse Racing, $3,000 IN PRIZES
Grand Stock Parades Daily, iha^Btest.stock in the Province
BANDS,   SPORTS,   GAMES
AND NEW EXCITING ATTRACTIONS.
<C?nh   In   D*t*cko and Champion Belt of British Columbia for
$£uu in rrueb    bronco busting: competitions.
WRITE FOR PRIZE LISTS
A. J. MORLEY, Mayor, President. J. E. SMART, Secretary.
A FEATURE of the
**•   Semi-ready trousers—one found no place
else than  high grade
custom tailoring—is the
high waist.
The waist is made to
g^   fit perfectly and yet give
"2~   comfort—plenty of cloth
— as you can see for
yourself.
There are straps on
the back of each pair to
tighten—but you won't
need them; these trousers fit
The legs are neatly
_ shaped — conventional
in width and "set" beautifully.
Delivered two hours after trying on.
B„ WILLIAMS 4 CO,
OLE AGENTS.
At $10, $12, $15, $18, $20, $22 and $25.
TROUSERS—At $3, $4, $5, and $6.
TWO THOUSANDIGABMENTS CAKRIED IN STOCK AT THE
Seril-REAOY WARDROBE
1kg THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, iqo6.
The Man and His Den.
A brilliant author has observed "Man is a queer animal"; that depends entirely on the viewpoint. Put him in a well furnished drawing room full of daintiness and nine out of every ten men will fidget; but put him in his den with hard-wearing, substantial furniture, and he is a different being. Here comes in the
wife's difficulty, which we will help to overcome by introducing her to real den furniture; artistic as well as cosy; attractive as well as durable; and it costs no
more than the roughly designed furniture very frequently sold as den furnishing.
MANY MEN will have a Morris chair;
we sell large quantities; they are real
Morris chairs, full of comfort and
made to stand hard wear. Prices range
from $9 to $40. It all depends on the
size of chair and the style of upholstering.
DEN TABLES should be either round
or octagonal, as they are frequently
used for a hand at bridge when the
other card tables are in use; we carry
so many different styles that our advice
to country customers is: Write our
mail order department and learn all
about them, especially those at
$10, $12, $25.
If the husband takes the lounge, his
best friend the Morris chair, his wife
the rocker, where does the best friend's
wife sit? Why in the arm chair, of
course. Not so heavy and substantial
as the oak rocker, but built of oak,
lighter in construction, and sold at
prices ranging from $12 up.
A comfortable lounge or cozy corner is almost indispensable in the den. The
one illustrated is manufactured by us. Our factory supplies the extra strong
frame; our upholstery department the denim, tapestry, or plush; our drapery
department the comfortable McLINTOQK DOWN Cushions at $1.50 each.
These Lounges cost from $7 up. We have a very large assortment, which
our free catalogue tells you all about.
This illustrates a very handsome Den Suite in oak, early English, Tudor
period. We can sell you a similar Suite without the clock for $100, with
the clock for $145. The carpet is extra and is from our Oriental carpet
section; it is a Mirzapore Rug, costing $35- Our Mail Order Department will
give full particulars.
a eozY CORNER.
The Carpets, Portieres, Wall Decorations   and   Furniture   supplied   by  us.
N.B.—We have hundreds of different designs, or perhaps you would
prefer your own ideas being carried out. In either case, if you cannot
visit our showrooms, write our Mail Order Department; it will
assist vou.
g IMPORTANT o
We want you to see our Catalogue. It is the largest work on Furniture and Furnishing ever published in Western Canada, containing very
valuable information for furnishing every room in the home, with oyer
1700 illustrations of furniture, furnishings, accessories and beautiful
homes in B. C. It is mailed to you FREE. Just write our mail order
department enclosing this coupon.
In Old English and Mission Rockers
we carry the largest line in Western
Canada; handsome and comfortable;
built of the finest selected oak and upholstered in that beautiful soft Spanish
leather; here are a few prices out of
many: $8, $9, $12, $18.
A good bookcase is a necessary item in
den furnishing; it is here the husband
stores his pet volumes on amateur gardening, etc. We are agents for the celebrated Macey Extension Bookcases,
and in addition we have hundreds of
bookcases of all sorts from $24 up. witb
glass front.
Of recent years, man has demanded a
writing desk in his den; his wife uses
the drawing room one; be must have
somewhere to keep his papers. A roll
topdesk is all right jn tbe office, but
out of place in the den. That is why
we sell well lilted weathered oak and
Early English oak Desks from $13 up.
G
A FREE GIFT
In order to trace the results of each of our advertisements, we present
a free gift to every lady who writes for our free catalogue. This week
we are giving a very pretty Tapestry Cushion Top, size 20 in. by 20 in.,
providing you cut this out and enclose it when writing for our free
catalogue address Mail Order Department, Weiler Bros., Victoria, B.C
WAREHOUSE:
Cor. of Broad and Broughton Sts.,
Victoria, B. C.
Weiler Bros.
Complete Home, Hotel, dub and Office Furnishers,
SHOWROOMS:
To which you are cordially invited to inspect all that is best in Furnishings
from London, Paris, New York, Vienna and Berlin.
33 GOVERNMENT STREET
Corner of Broughton and Government Streets, Victoria, B. C.
FACTORY:
HUMBOLDT  STREET
Victoria, B. C. THE WEEK   SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 190b.
THE   MOTHERLAND
Hands Across the Sea,
Exchanges With Our Kindred.
Parliamentary Gear.
One by one the links of tradition are
being snapped by the new order of
Parliamentarians, writes a Parliamentary correspondent. It is years ago thai
Mr. Kier Hardie, now in some d^.ngur
of waxing comparatively conventional in
his new position as leader of a real, dvt
political party, drove down to Pa'ace
Yard in a waggonette with a particularly flagrant brass band. The hon. member on that occasion sported the famous cloth cap, which one day ought to
be exhibited in lhe British Mujcnm
alongside the Rocket. The other af.er-
noon, a new sartorial milepost was
passed. Mr. Philip Snowden, the lebor
member for Blackburn, sat among hi*
political confreres wearing with entire
unconcern the first ordinary straw hat
ever seen within the precincts of the
Mother of Parliaments.
Peer's Heir as Socialist.
Taunted at a public meeting by Mr.
Clough, M.P., on Saturday with "sowing his Socialistic wild oats" and with
wearing a red tie, the Hon. Charles
Lister, son and heir of Lord Ribbles-
dale, has definitely joined the Socialist
party. He is the heir to about 5,000
acres.
He is only eighteen. At Eton his
views were well known. It is probable
that the Socialists and Labor pary will
find in him a powerful ally, for he has
a ready tongue, and is popular among
the working classes at Blackburn.
Mammoth Turbine Liner.
It is reported in Belfast that the
Hamburg-American line, after long
consideration, have decided to build a
vessel designed to eclipse the new mammoth Cunarders both in size and speed.
No details of her construction have
as yet been decided upon, and it is not
determined whether she is to be driven
by turbine or reciprocating engines.
Messrs. Harland and Wolff, it is understood, have booked thc order for
the construction of the vessel.
Exit the Family Doctor.
There are surgeons in general practice who are equal to the performance
of almost any operation, but the public
have been so thoroughly educated into
the belief that no one but a hospital
surgeon, and a specialist to boot, should
be trusted to perform an operation that
most general practitioners shrink from
the responsibility of opening an abscess
or even removing a toe nail.—The
Medical Times.
Modern Robin Hoods.
In Britain nothing has taken the
place of the native genius for archery.
Perhaps the reason is that the old skill
of wrist and eye is turned on games,
and we have lost, not a quality, but a
proper exercise for it. Soon, it may
be hoped, Robin Hoods and Little
Johns will be found making bulls with
the Morris tube, instead of splitting
wands with the arrow, over half the
villages of Great Britain.—County Gentleman.
The Eternal Feminine.
The dogcart, driven by a lady, had
plunged into the ditch, and the baronet,
heedless of harm to his new car, had
stopped dead, seized the brute, and rescued beauty. "Thank you so much,"
sweetly lisped the lady. "Would you
mind doing it again? We do so want
our horse to get used to those horrid
things."
Rudeness In America.
The Rector of Lowestoft, describing
his recent visit to America, says he was
struck with the rudeness and incivility
of all the officials. "It was quite refreshing," he says, "to get back to Eng
land and to be spoken to civilly and
kindly by the police and porters."
Very Anti-British.
In former days, when Britain was
comparatively less strong, and France
was more powerful, these two nations
feared and hated each other. Then
Great Britain tried to pit Prussia
against France: now it is the other way
round. Both France and Britain fear
Germany, and for this reason are as
one soul and one body.—"Bismarck-
Bund," Berlin.
How Dickens Sells.
The English Bible is. by far, our best
selling book, and Shakespeare is our
best-selling author. Who conies next
in popularity? There can be little
doubt that it is Charles Dickens, with
Sir Waller Scoll a good third. It may
be taken that half a million volumes of
Dickens arc sold every year in English
editions, not tn speak nf thnsc issued in
America.—Tlle   Bonk   Monthly.
A Strange Name for the Baby.
Bishop Hartsell, while on a tour in
lhe Southern States of America, met a
negro who was the father of sixteen
children, the younger of whom was
scarcely out of arms, and on asking him
the youngster's name received this reply: "Judas 'Scariot, sail." "You don't
mean to tell me that that is really his
baptismal name, do you?" asked the
Bishop. "Indeed I do, sah; ain't dat a
Script'ral name?" "Yes, but do you
know who Judas Iscariot was?"
'course I does, sah; but doan de Scripture say it would have been better for
Judas 'Scariot if he had never been
borned?" "Yes, but what has that to
do with this poor little chap?" "Dat's
jest it, sah. It would have been better
for dis poor little chap if he had never
been borned, and dat's why we calls him
Judas 'Scariot."
When In Debt.
The West Bromwich County Court
judge told an architect who owed io
that he ought to rise early and walk to
his office instead of paying tram fares,
and that 6d. was too much to pay for
lunch if a man was in debt.
Obvious.
An applicant for thc post of mistress
in a country school was asked: "What
is your position with regard to thc
whipping of children?" She replied:
"My usual position is on a chair with
lhe child held firmly across my knees,
face  downwards!"—The  Rural  World.
Parasol Skill.
A well-adjusted parasol enables
yau to hide bluolies ynu don't
want people to see, and to hide the
blushes that aren't there if you want
people to think they are; and it enables
you to cut people who deserve to be
cut, and to avoid people whom you
daren't cut, but whom you particularly
don't want to sec—Mrs. Neisb, in
The  World  and His Wife.
American Humiliation.
One thing, and one thing only, will
have any real effect in Europe. When
America begins to send its greatest
criminals to gaol Europe will begin to
believe that there is a real standard
of morality in the country. The administration of justice in the United
States i* to-day the subject of open
ridicule and contempt throughout Europe.—Sun, New York.
Power of Acting.
Acting is a very real art. It trades
with our souls by the art of illusion. In
the theatre we can live over again our
own lives, suffer even the torments of
the damned, and that even after a good
dinner and a motor waiting for us outside.—The Observer.
Outfit of the Social Climber.
With the advent of the scaso'i the
pulse of the social climber begins to
heat more quickly. Tn order to make
any sort nf ascent worth mentioning, she
must start equipped with a "mansion" in
one of the most fashionable West End
squares, a place in thc country, live
motor-cars, as well as several horses and
carriages, Ihree tiaras, and a very thick
skin.—Ladies' Field.
Britain's Restless Blacks.
i here is the possibility that some
Kaffir military genius may arise, that
some person or nation, unfriendly to
Britain, may supply arms to the natives.
If, by one of those mysterious things
known to history, the fever of revolt
should spread to the warlike Matabele,
to lhe brave Basutos, and to the minor
nations, then the whiles would be swept
back towards the sea. crushed and annihilated, until hy weight of better armament and the white man's superior brain
the conquest ot Africa would begin
again—A former editor of "Johannesburg Datly News," in "Harpers
Weekly."
Canadian
Wheat Flakes
Is the name of our New Cereal. It is made
from the Finest Selected Wheat, treated by
a special process which removes all useless
parts and leaves only those portions of the
wheat kernel giving the largest amount of
the most healthy food for both body and
brain.   It is ENTIRELY PURE.
CANADIAN WHEAT FLAKES differ from ALL IMPORTED Cereals, not
only in ibeing more carefully manufactured from FINER wheat, but Jso in
the fact that they are ABSOLUTELY FRESH. Your grocer is in touch with
our mills, which are situated in all the leading centres in Western Canada.
There is no need for storage nor risk of musty flavor.
In every package you will find a
MOST USEFUL GIFT \
Of Chinaware, consisting of Berry Dishes, Cereal Dishes, Plates, Cups and
Saucers, daintily decorated with fVral and fruit designs. It is q..-".tt easy
to colect a complete Tea, Berry or Cer eal Set if you simply
Ask Your Grocer for
CANADIAN WHEAT  FLAKES
1   MANUFACTURED SOLELY BY
BRACKMAN-KER MILLING CO., LTD.
125 Government St., Victoria, B. C.
B-K 1625
Chinese- made Skirts ^Overalls
MUST GO!
UNION-MADE,
RN BRANtf
BUTTING AHEAD.
Fashionable Pastime of the Day
ROLLER
SKATING
AT ASSEMBLY HALL,
Afternoons 2 to 5, evenings 7.30 to 10.30
Saturday mornings 10 to 12.
Courteous and competent instructors
free for ladies.
Boys under 16 not allowed on floor at
evening sessions.
Excellent orchestra.
Ouly first-class patronage solicited.
THE NEW GROCERY STORE
74 Fort Street.
COAL.
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo Collierln.
New Wellington Coal.
The bent household coal in Ihe market al
current rates.   Anthracite ccal lor sale..
Dealers 'n Cord and Cul Wood.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA
SPECIAL SALES
FOR SATURDAY
I
Good Eastern Kggs. 30c, per doz,,
2 doz. 52c.
Clover Leaf Butter, 30c. lb., 2 lbs. 55c.
Canadian Cheese 18c. lb.
Ham a, 21c. per lb.
Bacon, 21c perlb.
REMEMBER THE PLACE
47 FORT STREET
VICTORIA.
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited,
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
Cook With Good
Baking:
Powder
That means our Baking Powder, bi
cause it is as good as Pure Cream i
Tartar, Pure Soda and other goq
things can make.
The large sale our Baking Powdi
is having shows that lots of good cool
are using it.
TRY IT FOX BISCUITS
Price 25c. Per Poum
CYRUS H. BOWES,
CHEMIST
I Government St.. near Yates Stre
M THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER i 5 1906.
Stewart   Williams
Duly instructed by tho mortgagees, will
sell. by
Public Auction
^without reserve at the farm lately occupied
by W. Stevenson, Cadboro Hay, on
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st
Jit 11 a.m., the whole of the live stock, pigs,
horses, poultry, farming Implements
and household furniture now thorn.
[Refreshments will be served on the ground.
i'he Auctioneer, Stewart Williams
Notice
Utheast Kootenay Railway Co.
take Notice that the first meeting of
_e shareholders of the Southeast Koo-
fiay Railway Company will be held
Tthe office of Messrs. McPhillips &
bisterman, Davie Chambers, Bastion
ft, Victoria, B. C, on Thursday, the
|h day of October, 1906, at the hour of
') p.m.
R. B. Punnett, Secretary.
IsiXTiY    dnys    after  date I  intend    to
Inly to the Ohlef Commissioner of lands
Id Works for permission to purchase the
Blowing  described  laud,   commencing  at
A post plnnted on  the left bnnk of the
fteent   ulver,     nbout    three     and     one-
ilf    miles    nbove    the    Lakelse    river
id   joining    John     Neldhardt's     N.   E.
frner and mnrked L. W.  S.'s northwest
truer    nnd   running    south   100    chnins
nfcnce  enst 40  chains,   thence  north   loO
Bains,  more or less,  to left bnnk of the
|;eena river, thence westwardly along the
Iteeua   river  to  point   of  commencement
Mi containing 040 acres,  more or less.
fiPort Esslngton, B. C.
II' L. W. SLOAN, Locator,
if. „E. BATEMAN, Agent.
BSIIXTY days nfter date I Intend to
Italy to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
Jfd Works for permission to purchase the
■'lowing described lnnd, commencing ut
If post plnnted on the left bank of the
Tk'enu, about four miles nbove the Lnkelse
Jier and adjoining L. W. S.'s northeast
Irner nnd mnrked N. M. J.'s northwest
■rner, nnd running south along the enst-
|:i boundary of L. W. S.'s application 100
nins, thence enst 40 cbulns, thence north
.5 chains, more or less, to bnnk of the
loeua river, thence westerly along the
I'eeua liver to point of commencement
f.d containing 040 acres, mare or less.
I'.'ort Esslngton, B. C.
T N. M. JOSEPH, Locator.
IE. BATEMAN, Agent.
Is'otlce Is hereby given that thirty dnys
|rtr date I Intend  to apply  to the Hon.
Chief    Commissioner of   Lands    and
Wks for a special license to cut aud carry
|fay timber from the following described
|.d,  situated  ln  Port   Renfrew   District
{the north side of Snn Juan river, and
joining John Young on his uorth bound-
Commencing at a post marked
ilexr. Young," thence 40 chains west,
knee 80 chains uorth, thence 80 chains
lit, thence 80 chains south, thence 40
fins west to place of commencement, con-
Jilng 040 acres,
li'nted nt Port Renfrew this 20th day of
:;ust, 1906.
ALEXB. YOUNG.
TIMBER LICENSE.
Kotlce Is hereby giveu that thirty days
pr dnte 1 intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief    Commissioner  of    Lands  and
Irks  for  a  special  license  to cut  and
Iry awny timber from the following de-
Ibed land, situated on   the   San   Juan
Renfrew   District,    and    adjoining
In Young east boundary:    Commencing
la post marked "Alexr. Young," thence
t chains south, thence 80    chnins   east,
lnce 80 chuius uorth, thence 80 chains
Tt, thence 40 chains south to place of
I'uieuceineut,   containing   040  acres.
iited nt Port Renfrew, Renfrew District,
19th dny of August, 1900.
ALEXR.  YOUNG.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
dnys after date I intend to apply, to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
nsphultum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about eight miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest coiner on the bonk of a stream
running into Yakoun river and marked
"Initial post No. 1, H. W. Treat's N. W.
corner," and running east 80 chains; thence
south SO chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains to place of commencement, containing 040 acres.
Located August 1st, 1900.
H. W. TREAT.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
dnys after date I Intend to apply to the
Hou. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphultum and petroleum on lands located
ou Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about ten miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest cotner aud marked "Initial Post
No. 1, J. D. Meenach's S. W. comer," and
running north 80 chains; thence cast 80
chains; theuce south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains to tlie place of commencement,
containing 040 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
J. D. MEENACH.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about flve miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner and marked "Initial post
No. 1, Walter Oakes's S. E. corner" and running north 80 chains; thenee west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to place of commencement, containing 040 acres.
Located August 1st, 1900.
WALTER OAKES.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about six miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, G. A. Brown's N. W. corner" and
running south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; tbence west
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1900.
G. A.  BROWN.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Grahnm Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about six miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, S. U. Williams's N. W. corner" and
running south 80 chnins; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
S. U. WILLIAMS.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
dnys after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Grnham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
nbout flve miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post plnnted nt the
northenst corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, G. E. Beardslee's N. E. corner" and
running south 80 chnins; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chnins; thence enst
80 chains to plnce of commencement, con-
tninlng 040 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
G. E. BEARDSLEE.
TIMBER LICENSE.
lotice is hereby giveu that thirty days
Ir date I Intend to apply to the Hon.
I, Chief Commissioner of Lands and
I'ks for a special license to cut and
ly awny timber from the following de-
Led laud, situated iu Port Renfrew,
Rfrew District: Commencing at n post
l.'ted 40 cbulns north of Alexr. Young
Tlieust corner, mnrked "John Young"
I'hwest corner," thence 80 chuins north,
tee 80 chnins enst, thence 80 chnins
Jill, thonce SO chnins west to plnce of
Imeneemcnt,  containing 040 ncres.
jtcd nt Port Renfrew this 16th dny of
let, looo.
JOHN YOUNG.
TIMBER LICENSE.
[Itlce is .hereby given thnt thirty days
1 dnte 1 Intend to npply to the Hon.
KChlef   Commissioner   of   Lnnds   and
f;s for a  special  license   to   cut   nud
I] nwny timber from the following de-
IIlhI  lnnd,   situated  on   the San  Juan
_R Renfrew District, and adjoining E.
Rnlmcr  on  his  east  boundary:   Com-
Eing at a post marked "John Young,"
p 40 chains north,  thence 80 ohains
thence  80 chains  south,  thence  80
§[s eii6t,  thence   40 chnins uorth    to
of   commencement,   containing   040
led nt Port Renfrew this 18th day of
jit,   1906.
JOHN YOUNG.
lice   is   hereby given that, .ill days
jdate, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
} Commissioner of Lands and Works
prniission to purchase the following
fibed    land    on    the    Skeena  River,
§3 V., Coast District: Commencing al
1 located at the S. W. corner of E
JfGeachle's land and marked "J.  M
ibchle's    N.    W.    corner";    thence
W40 chains;    thence east 40 chains;
north 40 chains;  thence  west   4(
to point  of  commencement,  con
160 acres, more or less.
J.  M.  McGEACHIE.
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
dnys nfter dnte I Intend to npply to the
lion. Chief Commissioner of Lands nnd
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
nsphaltum nnd petroleum on lnnds loented
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
nbout nine miles from the west const
thereof nnd described as follows:
Commencing at a post plnnted nt the
southenst corner nnd mnrked "Initlnl Post
No. 1, D. H. Jarvls's S. E. corner" nnd running north 80 chnins; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence enst 80
chnins to plnce of commencement, containing 640 ncres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
D. H. .TARVIS.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I intend to npply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd
Works for n licence to prospect for coal,
nsphaltum and petroleum on lnnds located
on Grahnm Islnnd, Queen Chnrlotte group,
nbout six miles from the west const
thereof nnd described ns follows:
Commencing nt n post plnnted nt tho
southwest corner nnd marked "Initlnl Post
No. 1, G. J. Hodge's S. W. corner" nnd
running north 80 chnins; thence enst 80
chnins; thence south 80 chnins; thence west
80 chnins to plnce of commencement, containing 610 ncres.
Loented August 1st, 1906.
G. J. HODGE.
NOTICE is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
dnys nfter dnte I Intend to npply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd
Works for n licence to prospect for conl,
nsphnltuin nnd petroleum ou lands located
on Grnhnm Islnnd, Queen Chnrlotte group,
about six miles from the west const
thereof nnd described ns follows:
Commencing nt a post planted nt thc
southwest corner nnd mnrked "Initlnl Post
No. 1, F. M. Munger's S. W. corner" nnd
running north 80 chnins; thonce enst 80
chnins; thence south 80 chnins; thonce west
SO chnins to plnce of commencement, containing 040 ncres.
Loented August 2nd, 1906.
F. M. MUNGER.
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
dnys nfter dnte I Intend to npply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd
Works for n licence to prospect for conl.
usphnltum nnd petroleum on lnnds loented
nn Grnhnm Islnnd, Quoen Chnrlotte group,
nbout seven miles from the west coast
thereof nnd described as follows:
Commencing nt a post plnnted nt the
northenst corner nnd mnrked "Initlnl Post
No. 1, H. P. Fogh's N. E. corner" nnd running south 80 chains; thonce west 80
chains; thence north 80 chnins; thence east
80 ohains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
H. P. FOGH.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I iutend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum aud petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about seven miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, Edgar C. fogh's S. E. corner" and
running north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south SO chains; thence east
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
EDGAR C. FOGH.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about seven miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, H. L. Emmons's S. W. corner" and
running north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains to place of commencement, containing  040 acres.
Located August 2nd, 1900,
H. L. EMMONS.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (3»)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about seven miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, Victor Vlgelius's N. W. corner" and
running south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
VICTOR VIGELIUS.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about flve miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, M, G. Munley's N. E. corner" and
running south SO chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 040 acres.
Located August 1st, 1908.
M. G. MUNLEY.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
nsphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about flve miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, E. H. Guie's S. E. corner" and running north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 040 acres.
Loented August 2nd, 1906.
E.  H.  GUIE.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
dnys nfter dnte I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum nnd petroleum on lnnds located
on 'GTaham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about seven miles from the west coast
thereof aud described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, W. Langllle's S. E. corner" and running north 80 chains; 'thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1900.
<W. LANG1LLE.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after dnte I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands nnd
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
nsphultum and petroleum on lnnds loented
on Grnhnm Island, Queen Chnrlotte group,
nbout flve miles from the west const
thereof nnd described us follows:
Commencing nt n post plnnted nt tho
northwest corner nnd marked "Initial Post
No. 1, W. P. Flint's N. W. corner" ond
running south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thenco north SO chnins; thence
west 80 chnins to plnce of commencement,
containing 640 ncres.
Loented August 2nd,  1906.
W. P   FLINT.
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
dnys after (Into I Intend to npply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd
Works for n licence to prospect for conl,
nsphnltuin nnd petroleum on lnnds loented
on Grnhnm Islnnd, Queen Chnrlotte group,
nbout six miles from the west const
thereof nnd described ns follows:
Commencing nt a post plnnted nt the
northwest corner nnd mnrked "Initial Post
No. 1, F. W. Crnry's N*. W. corner" nnd
running south 80 chnins; thence enst 80
ehnlns; thenco north SO chnins; thence west
SO chnins to plnce of commencement, containing 040 acres.
Loented August 2nd,  1906.
F. W. CRARY,
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
dnys nfter dnte I Intend to npply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd
Works for n licence to prospect for coal,
nsphnltuin nnd petroleum on lands loented
on Grnhnm Islnnd, Quoen Chnrlotte group,
nbout seven miles from the west const
thereof nnd described ns follows:
Commencing nt n post plnnted nt the
northenst corner nnd marked "Initlnl Post
No. 1, ,T. Albert Johnson's N. E. corner"
nnd running south 80 chnins; thence enst
SO chnlus; thence north 80 chnins; thence
west 80 chnins to plnce of commencement,
containing 640 ncres.
Located August 2nd,  1908.
J. ALBERT JOHNSO.S.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about eight miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, R. S. Eskridge's N. E. corner," and
running south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence east
SO chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1900.
R.   S.   ESKRIDGE.
NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days
after date 1 intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to purchase the following land,
situated on Works Channel: Commencing
at a post marked "Initial Post T. H. W„"
thence east 20 chains, thence north 20
chains, thence west 20 chains, thence nortn
20 chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
south 40 chains, more or less, to shore
line; thence following shore line to point
of commencement, containing 240 acres
more or less.
8t T. H. WATSON.
Port Simpson, B. C, Aug. 16, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about seven miles from the west coaat
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, C. D. Emmons's N. W. corner" and
running south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
C. D. EMMONS.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the west half
of southeast quarter and west half of
northeast quarter, all in Section 8, Township 6, Coast Range 5, Bulkley Valley;
containing one hundred and sixty (160
acres, more or less.
Dated July 25th,  1906.
aul1 ERNEST MORIN.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 60 days
?"« date, I intend to apply to the Hon
Chief Conimissloner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the southwest
quarter    sect on    17,   Township  0,   Coast
SfiT h BSW? .Valley; containing (160)
one hundred and sixty acres, more or less
au » . J,°S.  BOURGON.
Aldermere. July 25,  1906. aull
™ .     x, NOTICE.
Claim No. 1.
Further take notice that 30 davs nfter
Chief 1cSSSf.1 f° appl? r"the hSoSSK
unlet Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to out and tow
away timber from the following described
lands, commencing at post planted at the
N. E. corner of T. L. 7197. or on the 1 ne
u ,00rn|f °£ said claim, thence W 80
chains, N. 80 chains, E. 80 chains, S 80
chains to point of commencement.
Dated this ISth day of July, 1906.
.  p. Mcdonald.
Claim No. r.
Take notice that 30 days after date I
Intend to apply io the Honorable Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for a
special license to cut and carry away
umber from the following described
lands: Commencing ut post planted 30
chains from S. W. corner on Uie line of
1. L. il97, thence N. SO chains, thence W.
80 chains, S. 80 chains, E. SO chains to
point of commencement.
Dated this 18th day of July, 1900.
P. MCDONALD.
No. 20.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
Intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lauds and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Tahsish Arm, Kyuquot Sound, Rupert
District:
Beginning at a post planted on the
east boundary of Application No. 13,
about 00 chains south of the northeast
corner thereof, thence east ICO chains,
ihence north 40 chains, ihence west 100
chains, thence south along said boundary
40 chains to point of commencement.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 11)06.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. 27.
lake notice that, 30 days after date, I
intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lauds and Works fur a special license
to cut and carry away timber irom the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,  Hupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted near the
Initial post of Application No. 20, thence
east 40 chains, thence souin 80 chains,
west 80 cnains, north SO chains, east 40
chains to point of commencement, containing 040 acres more or less.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
7        JOHN HIRSCH.
No. 28.
Tako notice that, 30 days after date, I
Intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,  Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted on the
west side of Union Island about 20 chains
south of a group of small Islands in Blind
Entrance, thence SO chains east, thence 60
cnains north, thence 40 chains west,
thence 40 chains norih, thence west about
20 chains to the shore of Blind Entrance,
thence southerly along said shore to
point of commencement.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
Notice Is hereby given that, 60 dayi
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Worka
for a lease of the foreshore opposite Lota
53 and 54, Melchosln District.
ALBERT A. ARGYLE.
Vancouver, B. C, July 4th, 1906.
No. 24.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,  Rupert District:
Beginning at a post planted on the
south snore of Narrow Gut Inlet, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 40 chains,
thence north 40 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence about 40 chains north to
the shore of Narrow Gut Inlet, thence
following the shore in a westerly direction to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. ■&.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
Intend to apply'to the Chlei Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,  Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted at the
southeast corner of Appllca'lon No. 1, on
Kokshittle Arm, ihence west 80 chains,
thence soulh 80 chains, ihence east 80
chains, thence nortji 80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 040 acres mora
or less.
Kyuquot Sound. June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. 26.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
Intend to apply lo the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,  Rupert  District:
Beginning al a post planted on the
east side of a river unnamed entering Into Clan nlnick Harbor about Vfa mllea
from the mouth, thence east 60 chains,
north 80 chains, west 80 chains, south 80
chains, east 20 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or
less.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
TIMBER   LICENSE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, thirty
(30) days after date, I Intend to apply to
the Hou. the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
aud carry away timber from the following
described lauds, situated lu Port Ueufrew,
Renfrew District: Commencing at a post
planted at the southern t corner of Section
Eighteen (18), TownshIp Ten (10), mnrked
"Alexr. Young, S. .'■'. I ■• ter," thence
eighty chains west; thence "ighty chains
uorth; thence eighty chain* east; thence
eighty chains south to tho pine' of commencement, containing 040 ncres.
Dated  at   Port   Renfrew   this  11th  day
of August, 1900.
aul8 ALEX.   YOUNG.
No. 21.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
Intend lo apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away limber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot   Sound,   Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted at the
southeast corner of No. S Application on
Tahsish Arm, thence north along the easl
boundary of No. 8 40 chains, ihence east
80 chains, thenco north 40 chains, ihence
east 80 chains, thence soulh about 20
chuins to the shore, thence tollowlng the
shore southwesterly to polni of commencement, containing 640 acres more or
less.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. 22.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, 1
Intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from tho
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot   Sound,   Rupert  Dlslricl:
Beginning at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Application No. 8 on
Kokshittle Arm, thence eas: 40 chains,
nortli 81 chains, west 6o chains, soulh lo
tbe shore of Kokshittle Arm, thence
southeasterly along said shore to get one
mile of southing, ihence east about 40
chains to a point north of lhe initial
stake, thence soulh 40 chains lo point of
commencementi
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 190G.
JOHN HIRSCH.
Notice is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to npply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a lease nf the foreshore opposite Lots
45, 46 and 47, Esoulmnlt District.
ALBERT A. ARGYLE.
Vancouver, B. C, July 4th, 1906.
No. 23.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
,ntend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
ot Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from Iho
following described land, situate on
the Kn.-0-wlneh River. Kokshittle Arm,
Kyuquot  Sound,   Rupert   District:
Beginning at a post planted on the
north boundary about 20 chains west of
lhe northeast corner of Application No.
7. on :hc east bank of the Ka-o-wlnch
River, thence cast 20 chains, north 160
chains, cast 20 chnins lo point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or
less.
Kyuquot Sound. June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, U) daya
after date, 1, the undersigned, will npply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lauds and
Works for permission to lease or purchase
the following described lnnd, namely, in
Uesult Harbor, Tlupnna Arm, Nootkn
Sound, commencing at a post marked J.
Mortimer, Southeast Comer, running 40
ehnlns west, thence north to shore Hue,
thence following the shore hue to Hie
point of commencement, coutalnlng 80
acres, more or less.
Victoria, B.  C, July  11th, 1900.
""18 JOHN   .MORTIMER.
Notice Is hereby given .nat, 30 'lays
after date, 1 Intend to apply io the Horn
Chief Commissioner of Lunus and Worka
for special license lo cut and carry away
timber from the following desi ribed land
in Port Renfrew District, Vancouver Inland, on the west side of the Gordon
River, adjoining A. Wheeler's claim on
the southeast corner. Commencing at a
post on the northeast corner marked J.
Young's northenst corner, thence south
80 chains, west SO chains, north So chains,
and cast 80 chains to the place of commencement, containing 040 acres. Located June 8th, 1906.
J. YOUNG.
Notice Is hereby given that, 30 daya
after date, 1 intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lunds and Works
for special license lo cut and carry away
timber from the following described land
In Port Renfrew District, Vancouver Island, adjoining A. E. Manncll's claims on
the southeast corner: Commencing at a
post on the norllienst corner marked A.
Wheeler's (jr.) northeast corner, thence
south 80 chains, west 80 chains, north 80
chains, nnd east 80 chnins to the place
of  commencement,  containing  040  acres.
Located June 9th, 1906.
A. WHEELER, Ji
Notice Is nereby given that, 00 days
after date, I intend to apply 'i the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase ihe following
described land on the Skeena River,
Range V.. Coast District: Starling from a
post located :it lhe norllienst corner of
the Kllsllii3 Indian Reserve, and marked
"E. J. McGenclile, S. W. corner"; Ihence
north 40 chains; thence enst 40 chains;
thence south 40 chnins; thence west 40
chnins to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more or less.
E. J.  McGEACHIE.
Kitsilas, May 28th, 1906. 10
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 75. 1906.
if A Lady's Letter *
iP By BABETTE. *f
if i?
&i?fytyi?i?,ty'fy'fy'$ii?ipi?
Dear Madge:
Sitting in my garden near a bed
overgrown with late nasturtiums, I was
moved to wonder at the splendid wealth
of color; some of the shades being
practically inimitable, in these common
garden flowers. It is as if waning summer had flamed into a sudden last
outburst before settling down into the
sere and yellow garments which are her
portion in the autumn. There is one
shade ini particular—a warni ruddy
chestnut—which it would seem that the
fashion-mongers have been at some
pains to reproduce in (velvet and to
some extent in cloth, for our adornment this fall. The former and richer
fabric is one which lends itself better
than any other to the reproduction of
Nature's own lines, for it possesses the
depth of texture by ,which alone the
fascinating play of light and shade can
be achieved.
The grape fancy seems to be by no
means exhausted as yet. Hats this
season have been adorned with lavish
clusters in their natural purple and
green; no less ;than in white, blue, and
other unnatural tints. Fruit hats, indeed, have of late been more popular
than ever. A friend who picked up an
extremely becoming little 'chapeau" at
a sale was at a loss to describe it, the
trimmings being so miscellaneous that
she might apparently have stocked a
small fruiterer's store with them. There
were red and white currants, green
gooseberries, and some other berries of
doubtful origin, but the whole was undeniably "chic" and verily a bargain.
There seems litle doubt that birds
and wings will play an importont part
also in the decoration of autumn millinery. Owl's plumage is especially favored in a pale sulphur tint just flecked
with brown, quite successful turbans
being evolved, however, from the
smooth white breast plumage with an
owl's head for ornament. Peacock and
pheasant shades will be much in request for small coquettish-looking
toques.
All the world that amuses itself is
either killing something or making its
own cure at this moment.
Anyone who has been in Victoria this
last week will sympathise with me when
I declare that my mind feels almost
incapable of dwelling upon any subjects
save rain-coats and tweed dresses made
short enough to escape the deep puddles
and bog-like depths of the roads. What
a wet beginning to the shooting season!
The grouse have the weather in their
favor, for so torrential has the rain been
some times that even the doughtiest
sportsmen found themselves unable t'>
brave the elements.
That soft weather beautifies the complexion is one of the consolations offered us at this time of the year. Another is that rain soothes thc nerves,
especially after such a dry summer a;
we have bad. Round a cheery lire in
(lie evening one's exploits can comfor
ably be recounted and, by the way,
what an excellent opportunity offers itself for the manifestation of pretty
demi-toilettes I It is the fashion, of
course, to wear short sleeves, and some
of the prettiest evening blouses are ju-t
rounded away enough to show thc full
column of lhe throat, while thc arms
are veiled only lo thc elbow. A favorable opportunity presents itself of wearing gold as an ornament, for some very
lovely necklaces are being sold, wrought
in two or three shades of thc pvcci .-u..
metal, burnished, dull and chased.
Quaint necklets of Etruscan device,
amethyst pendants, and rare quartz
beads arc all suitable and effective embellishments for evening finery. Challoner & Mitchell have a splendid assortment of these fascinating baubles.
Novelties in men's wear costumes to
attract attention at Chapman's, Vancouver, Thc question of becomingncss
must be studied very closely in men's
as well as women's dress, and on no
point more carefully than in the selec-'
tion and combination of colors. This
firm has all the latest shades in tweeds
and heavy fall and winter cloths.
Every housewife  is preserving, can
ning, and jamming at the present moment, and a hint about the preserving-
jar is therefore in season. In the first
place the best brand of preserving-jar
is to be urgently recommended, and
this is obtainable at Weiler Bros. Safeguard against fermentation is wholly
dependent upon air-tight conditions after properly prepared and cooked preserves are once within the jars. The
loss of even a small number of jars
is very disheartening, considering the
time, labor and expense entailed in put-
ting up the fruit. With ordinary care
these preserving jars will do service
for several succeeding years, with a
renewal only of fresh rubbers for each
season. Therefore, the best jars will
constitute a wise economy in the end.
Jars should be always sterilized before
being used. Wash them well, rinse and
put both jars and covers into a boiler
or kettle of water over the fire, allowing the water to come gradually to a
boil. Then leave until the moment of
filling them with the hot fruit or syrup.
The rubbers should also stand in heated water until they are adjusted to the
jars, just before pouring in the fruit.
Do not worry over your sunburn,
tan and freckles. They will wear off
with the aid of that delightful skin
cream put up by Cyrus H. Bowes,
chemist, t# Government street.
Spanish influences are decidedly dominant in the millinery world just now.
One of our leading hatters is showing
as autumn novelties quite a number of
small round toques and hats distinctly
recalling the toreador and matador
models popular a dozen years ago.
Fashioned in the softest of French
felts, simply trimmed with natural quills
and a "cabochon" or rosette of the fell
itself, they will be adopted by many
travellers for the sake of their lightness and general comfort. From time
immemorial—if we except the case of
the untrammelled pair in the Garden
of Eden—Society has made its little
fuss over the wedding garment, and
entirely to the advantage of the fair
sex. It is a little difficult to grasp why
the mere bridegroom attired in garments
the exact counterpart of those in which
he clothes himself daily should look
"dressed up," whereas the bride, who is
certainly not in the habit of trailing
yards of white satin behind her in broad
daylight, continues nevertheless to look
as unconscious of her toilette as though
she were wearing her simplest morinng
cotton in a country town. However, be
he whom he may, the bridegroom should
certainly feel at his ease and satisfied
that he is correctly attired for the occasion if he has consulted Messrs. Sea
& Gowen before the happy event.
BABETTE.
Manager Jamieson is to be congratulated on the show this week at the
Grand. It has probably been the most
uniformly good company seen there
this year. The Mimic Four, with Matt
Hanley, in their comedy playlet, present the best turn of this kind that The
Week has yet seen in Victoria. Chas.
De Vars and Gertrude Curtis do a
good ring and bar act. The coster
turn of Harry Salmon and Ida Curtis
is probably the best on the Pacific
coast. Eddy Lamont as the Drum Major
is excruciatingly funny, and the Novelty
Jugglers introduce something new. F.
Roberts sings in his best style. Those
who have not yet seen the show should
certainly not miss the last opportunity
lodav,
VANOOUVER.
Mr. George Coleman, of Evans, Coleman & Evans, Vancouver, accompanied
by his wife and family, are staying in
Nicalo.
*   *   *
Mrs. J. A. Macdonell, accompanied
by Lady Buorinot, who has been visit
*i? Jfc
* Social and *
$ Personal. $
if if if if w if if if if if if if if
VICTORIA.
Mrs. Gibb, St. George street, entertained at bridge on Tuesday afternoon.
* *   *
Miss Eberts left for Vancouver this
morning (Saturday).    •
* *   *
Mrs. Bolton is visiting in New Westminster, the guest of Mrs. C. E. Worsfold.
* *   *
Mrs. and Miss Troup leave today for
New York City, where, Miss Troup is
to resume her studies.
* *   *
The Misses King are expected to return from Honolulu the end of this
month.
* *   *
Mr. Arthur Gore has been the guest
of Mr. and Mrs. McGill at their home
at Shawnigan Lake.
• *   *   *
Mr. and Miss Maitland-Dougall have
taken Mr. Cecil Robrets' house for the
winter.
* *   *
Mr. Ray Rome, of Vancouver, has
been spending his holidays here, the
guest of his mother.
* *
The many friends of Mrs. Gaudin
will regret to learn that she is still an
inmate of St. Josephs Hospital, although steadily i improving.
* *   *
The Misses Muriel and Kathleen
Dunsmuir, accompanied by Master
Jimmy Dunsmuir, left tbe end of last
week  for  Europe    to    resume    their
studies.
* *   *
Mrs. Hickman Tye, Mrs. Coles, and
Mr. and Mrs. Beauchamp Tye, are
spending the week end at "Mallow-
mot," North Saanich.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Workman, of London,
England, are the guests of Mrs. Herbert Carmichael, "Wonston," i Esquimalt road.
* *   *
Mrs. J. S. H. Matson returned on
Tuesday from Toronto, where she has
been visiting relatives for the past two
months.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs, Herbert Carmichael,
accompanied by their guests, Mr. and
Mrs. Workman, of London, England,
left on the Queen City on Thursday
for  a trip up the coast.
* *   *
Mrs. Rhodes entertained at luncheon
on Thursday of last, week in honor of
Mrs. Barkley, of London, England, who
is visiting her brother, Hon. Mr. Justice Walkem.
* *   *
Mrs. Fagan was hostess at a smart
luncheon given on Tuesday last, covers
being laid for eight. The guests were:
Mrs. Audaine, Mrs. R. H. Pooley, Mrs.
Beauchamp Tye, Mrs. Robin Dunsmuir,
Mrs. Rhodes, Mrs. Halsey Smith, and
Miss Eberts.
* *   *
On Monday afternoon Senator Macdonald held a reception at Armadale
in honor of Sir William Broadbent.
Among the guests in addition to Sir
William, were Lady Broadbent, Miss
Broadbent, and Mr. A. J. Leary. Mrs.
and Miss Macdonald received, assisted
by Captain and Mrs. Fleet and Mr. and
Mrs. Gavin Bums. There was
large attendance of residents.
* *   *
Miss Arbuckle was hostess ata most
enjoyable five hundred party given on
Monday afternoon in honor of Miss
Winona Troup. The tally cards were
post cards, and tbe table was done in
dahlias, a novel touch being added by
the ices being sevred in the form of
travelling conveyances, engines, boats,
automobiles, etc., as the guest of honor
intends leaving for the cast in a few
days' time. The cuiests were: The
Misssc Dunsmuir, Airs. W. S. Gore,
the Misses Eberts. Miss Newling, Miss
Winnifred     Mainwaring-Johnson,   the
NOTICE
Their Excellencies the Governor-General and the Countess Grey
will hold a public reception in the
Legislative Chambers, Parliament
Buildings, on Monday, the iyth
inst. at 9:4.5p.m.
The entrance to the buildings for
the general public will be at the
door to the left of the main gates,
(the usual public entrance.)
The dressing room for ladies
will be the Maple and Cedar committee rooms. The dressing room
for gentlemen ivill be the members'
cloak room.
Tlie dressing room for the officers of the army and navy and
militia will be the members' dining
room behind ihe Legislative Chambers.
The Speaker's room and that
adjoining it will be reserved for
the use of Their Excellencies and
His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor's party.
By command
H. J. S. MUSKETT,
Private Secretary.
ing  in  B; C.  for  some time,  is back | Mis!:(,s p;tts>   m;ss    pem'berton,   Mis
Pemberton, Miss Troup, Mrs. Troup.
Miss Little and others.12345 echooce H
Miss Little, Miss Bullen and others.
in town from Nicola
* *   *
Airs. H, L. Adoplb and son of Brandon, and  Mrs.  H.  Griffiths, of  Cranbrook, arc guests of Mrs. R. W. Rollcs-
ton of Mount Pleasant.
* *   *
J. Maxwel Smith, Dominion fruit inspector, was among thc passengers who
arrived in Vancouver this morning on
the steamer Joan.
* *   *
Mr. Sidney Smith, of the L,nk of
Montreal staff of Nicola, who has been
spending his holiday with relatives in
this  city,  has   returned  to  Nicola.
* »   «
Mr. F. W. Morgan of the firm of
Kilryo, Morgan Co. has left for the
est, takinc in all tbe bit? centres. Mr.
Mnrean intends visiting Toronto, Montreal and New York, with thc view of
nurohasine the very nattiest of poods
for the new store on Hastings street.
VANCOUVER.
in  Vic-
Mrs.  Duchesne  is  visiting
toria.
* *   *
Miss Wey, of Vancouver, is visiting
in  Nicola.
* •   •
Mr. H. J. Cambie arrived in Nicola
on Wednesday last.
* *   *
Mrs. McLagan and daughter went
to Victoria on Tuesday.
* ♦   *
Miss Ida Cambie is staving with
Miss Tallow  at  the Capital.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Grossman and
daitditers, of Chilliwack, are visiting
in Vancouver.
Mrs. Sulley and family of this city
are  staying  at the Capital.
* *   *
Mrs. Farrell and family of Vancouver, are staying at the Capital.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Milton and
family have come to this city.
* *   *
Miss Morris has returned home after visiting Miss Tilton, Victoria
* *   *
Mrs. Smith and Miss McCord of
this city, are staying at Coutlee, B. C,
* *   *
Mrs.   D.   Kilpatrick   and   family,   of
Cumberland, are visiting in this city.
*. *   *
Mr. and Mrs. H. Shaw left on Tuesday to spend a short holiday at Sechelt.
, *   *   *
Mrs. John Bridges is back in town
after visiting at Otter Valley, Nicola
district.
* *   *
The Misses Campbell and Wesicott,
of this city, are holidaying in the Nicola
valley.
* *   *
Mrs. Cleasby, of Nicola, is in the
city. Mr. Cleasby returned to Nicola
a week or two ago.
•••   *   *
' Mr. and Mrs. I. Oppenheimer, of
Vancouver, are visiting their son, Dr.
Oppenheimer of Greenwood.
* *   *
Miss Carss, of Vancouver, has left
town to take charge of the school at
McLeod's, Nicola Valley.
* ♦   *
Miss Fuller, of the Nanaimo hospital, has returned to that city after a
two weeks' visit to Vancouver.
Mrs. Barker and family, of Jervis
street, are back in town after a stay
of  some   months  at  Victoria.
* *   *
Mrs. A. E.  Smith, of Vancouver, is
the guest of her mother, Mrs. Heisterman, Douglas street, Victoria.
*   *   *
Mrs. A. Walacc left town on Tuesday afternoon to spend a week with
Mrs. James Fowler, of Seattle.
Hon. R. G. Tatlow returned on Tuesday evening from a trip to the interior,
having travelled as far as Ashcroft.
»   *   #
Mrs. H. M. Burritt, of Vancouver,
has been snending a few davs at the
capital as the guest of Mrs. J, D. McNiven.
* •   •
Mrs. F. S. Findley, of this citv. is
stayinc with her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
R Butler, of 18 Kingston street, Victoria.
* *   *
Mr. Geo. McQueen left yesterday
morning fnr the east on his return to
McGill after spending the vacation in
Vancouver.
* *   *
The Rev. Merton Smith, pastor of the
Knox Congregational Church, left town
today for a few days sail up the
coast.
NOTICE Is liereby given tint the Lieutenant-Governor ln Council has been p'ensed
to order as follows, namely:
That the boundaries of ;he Assessment
Districts ot Lillooet (East and West) and 1
of Quesnel Forks, as described ln the British Columbia Gazette dated 25tn  April, 1906,'
In pursuance of the Order in Council No.
232, be rescinded and cancelled, and the ,
following boundaries substituted therefor:
Lillooet Assessmant District.
1. West Lillooet.—Commencing at the j
junction of the Chllcotln river with the I
(Eraser river; thence southerly, following]
the course of the Eraser river to the 5lst
parallel of latitude; thence east along said
parallel of latitude to its crossing of the;
iLlllooct and Alexandria Wngon Road at
the 58-mile post; thence southeasterly, following the divide between Pavilion creek
nnd Maiden creek to its intersection with
the western boundary of the Hallway Belt
In Township 22, Itnngo 27 west of the
sixth initial meridian; thenee southerly,
following the western boundary of the
Railway Belt to n point due west from
Lytton on the boundary of said Railway
Belt; thence west to a point where the
124th meridian of west longitude intersects the north shore of Queen's Bench,
Jervis Inlet; thenee due north along the
124th meridian of west longitude to the
51st parallel of latitude; thence due west
along the snid 51st parallel of latitude to
its Intersection with the 125th meridian of
west longitude (n point on the Homnlko
river about seven miles from Waddlngton.
Harbor); thence due north nlong the 125th
meridian of west longitude to Its intersection with the 52nd parallel of latitude;
thence due enst along the 52nd parallel of
latitude to its intersection with the centre
of Tatla lake; thence easterly following the'
centre of Tatla lake, Chilanco river nnd
Chllcotln liver to the mouth of Anaham
creek; thence northerly up Anaham creek
to the crossing of tlie wngon rond; thence
southeasterly "and northeasterly, following 1
the wngon rond pnst Hnrper's lake to the
iFraser river at the mouth of Chimney creek;
thence southerly, following the Fraser river
to the point of commencement.
2.   East   Lillooet—Commenting at    the
junction of the Chllcotln  river  with thc
Fraser river;  thence southerly, following'
the course of the Fraser river to tho 51st
parnllel of latitude; thence cast along said
parallel of latitude to Its crossing of the;
Lillooet and Alexandria Wagon Road at the
53-mile post; thence southeasterly, following the divide between IPavllion creek and
Maiden creek to Its Intersection with the'
western boundary of the Railway Belt ln
Township 22,  Range 27 west of the sixth
Initial   meridian;   thence   south,   following
the western boundary of the Railway Belt'
to its intersection with the northern boundary of Township 21, Range 27 west of the
sixth initial meridian; thence east, following the northern boundary of (Township 21.
in Ranges 27,  20, 25, 24, 23 and 2* west
of the sixth initial meridian to the northeast corner of said Township 21, lu Bange
22  west of    the  sixth Initial    meridian;
thenee north, following the east boundary
of Townships 22, 23 and 21 to the north->
ern boundary of the Railway Belt in Township 24; thenee enst along the north boundary of the Railway Belt to Its intersection with  the  eastern  boundary of Kam-'
loops Assessment District nt the southeast
corner of Section 27, Township 23. Bange,
IS west of the sixth initial meridian; thence
north, following the west boundary of the
Kamloops District to a point on the 52nd
parallel of latitude north of Mahood lake;
thence west along the said 52nd parallel of
latitude tn Its Intersection with the Fraser
liver; thenee following southerly along the
Fraser river to the point of commencement.
Quesnel   Forks Assessment  District.
Commencing at  a   point on the    west!
boundary  of  the  Kootenay  Land  District
on the 52nd parallel of latitude, ton miles
west  of  the   Columbia  river:  thenee   due
west, following the 52nd parallel of latitude
to Its Intersection with the Eraser river;
thenee northerly,  following the course  of
the (Eraser river to the intersection of the
Wagon   Bond   at   the   mouth  of   Chimney
creek;   thence    southwesterly and    northwesterly,  following the Wngon  Bond  past
Harper's lake   to   Aiiahani   ereek;   thence
southerly down Anaham creek to Its mouth;
thence westerly,  following the course of
the Chllcotln liver to its junction with the
Chilanco liver; thence westerly, following
the 00111*0 of the Chilanco river and the
centre of Tatla lake to the intersection of
the centre  line  of said  Tatla   lake,   with
the 52nd  parallel of  latitude;  thence  due
west, following the 52nd parallel of  latitude
tn Its Intersection with the 125th meridian
of  west  longitude;  thence  north  on  the
■height nf  land between  tiie  watershed of
tbe Chllcotln and iBlackwater livers to the
west of Tsa-cha lake; thence easterly, following the    northern    watershed    of  the
IBInckwnter   liver   four   miles   below   the
mouth of the Xn/.co river; thence easterly/
to  the  iFraser    river,    opposite   Quesnel
thenee south,  following the centre of the
iFraser river four miles: thence enst to the
south end of Dragon lake; thenee southeast
to   Twenty-mile   crock;  thence   following
Twenty-Mile    creek    to   Its   hendwnters;
thence following the height nf land forming the watershed between Quesnel liver,
Cnriboo   lake,  and   Swamp   river on   the
south,  and   Swift  liver and  Willow   liver
nnd Its tributaries nn the north, crossing
Swamp   liver   two  miles   south   of  Hands
lake and following Hie height of hind fonm
ing the watershed between the South Fori
of the Eraser liver and Canoe liver tn the
east botindnry of the Kootenay province
thence south along the  enst boundary  0:
the  province  to the northern boundary o
Kootenay District; thence west and s'outl
along the boundary of the Kootenay Dis1
trlct to the point of commencement.
It Is further ordered that the Assessor
and  Collectors  of  the   said   Lillooet   tin?
Quesnel Forks Assessment Districts be ane
are hereby Invested with jurisdiction with
In the Assessment Districts hereby defined
and  that   the   boundaries as  now define!
tnke effect as from the 30th day of .Tune
1IKKI.   That  the  Assessment  Rolls for tn
year 1808, ns finally pnssed, shnll he netei
upon  by  the  Assessors nnd  Collectors
snid Districts until the  snid  30th  day  .
June. 1800. and thnt all taxes shnll be coi
looted in accordance therewith up to and In
eluding that date.   Thnt immediately afttl
said 80th June, where lt may be ne'eessar
to transfer tlle names nf the assessed pr
sons on the rolls of the respective Assosl
ment Districts, or to transfer the descrlj
tlons      of      assessed      property      froi
ono    district     to     the    other    distiic
In   consequence of   the   change   In tl
boundaries   between   the   said  two   Asses
ment Districts, Hie Assessors and roller
nrs are nurhorljsed to make such trnnsfei
nnd to collect any arrears of taxes ilu
said 80th day nf June by the persons an
property so transferred to tliclr respect h
Assessment  Districts.
Treasury Department, 21st August, 190

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