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Week Apr 18, 1908

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Array reTrranrrannnnn
jigsford Smith & Co.
Stock and General
AUCTIONEERS
|imi8sioii and Real Estate Agents.
Homer Street     Vancouver, g
|LJLBJULa_OJUJUWJULlJLILS.jU
Victoria Edition
The Week
fl British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vancouver B. ©.
ynnnrttTrfrsvTnrKifTnwvvp
Stewart Williams R. c. Janion
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION Alt
REAL ESTATE AGENTS
Si FONT ST. VICTORIA, I. C.
3JULO_O.AJUUUUUU4Jl«JUUt_Utf
V.   No. 12
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL iS, 1908
One Dollar Pkr Ann dm
■Three things make earth unquiet,
!tnd four she cannot brook;
The pious Agur counted them,
_.nd put them in a book—
These Four Tremendous Curses
iVith which mankind is curst:
But, A Servant when he Reigneth,
1)ld Agur counted first.
Handmaid that is Mistress
[Ve need not call upon;
Fool when he is full of Meat
■/ill fall asleep anon.
^.n Odious Woman married
bear a babe and mend—
|iut A Servant when he Reigneth
Confusion to the end.
tis feet are swift to tumult,
lis hands are slow to toil;
lis ears are deaf to judgment,
lis lips are loud in broil:
Ind, if his folly opens
■he unnecessary hells,
Servant when he Reigneth
throws the blame on some one else.
—Rudyard Kipling.
Kipling's Letters to the Family.
Impressions and Experiences in British Columbia.
Easter offering of the Victoria Col-
Ito its British born readers is an
lat and scurrilous attack upon one
lthe London Times has declared to
I greatest personality in the Empire.
I Rudyard Kipling's first letter to
Family," appeared in Colliers, the
pt has not ceased to gird at the ex-
opinions and impressions of the
lous author.    Its attitude is not in
lise original, for it has lined up with
fanadian papers in resenting plain
\\_ and the statement of unpalatable
This is characteristic of the Ca-
press from the Atlantic  to the
as long as a visitor will compli-
llie Dominion and declare that it is
eatest country on earth with the
litless  resources,  and the finest
Itions,  he   is  acclaimed great  and
but let him once throw aside the
mentary garb, and tell the public
how matters strike him, and to
ypical American phrase, "the conn-
no further use for him," and the
twill   promptly   proceed   to   make
|flcat of him.    It is quite under-
ble that self-respecting citizens of
Juntry should resent carping criti-
the vapouring of unimportant no-
I who pose in an attitude of auth-
but what shall bc said of the intel-
of any English speaking country
■jdenios to Kipling the right anil the
to discern true conditions and to
lilly reflect them.
AX  EMPIRE BUILDER.
equipment is in every respect
I, not only has he possessed oppor-
perhaps unequalled in tlie case of
Iher writer of studying Imperial
Ins in every part of tbe Empire,
Has demonstrated that he possesses
lellous insight, the insight of genius,
fiman nature, the workings of the
; heart and the true inwardness of
II and economic conditions. Further
fe enjoys fame as a great writer, it
laps as an Imperialist that he has
|iis mark, and his services to the
in arousing England to a sense
[importance of Greater Britain belie Seas, have earned for him the
|g gratitude of all her sons, and the
Laureate of tlie Empire.    Should
i ordinary mortal gifted with just
I intelligence and no more, pause
■[charging him with making a state-
'infainously false" and declaring
■'A grosser   or   more   indefensible
slander was never uttered." Whether the
mental equipment of the editor of the Colonist entitles him to sit in judgment upon
Kipling, and to denounce him in something lower than "second class" language,
may be safely left to the readers of his
journal, and admirers of Kipling will not
be fearful of the result. Such unreasoning vituperation almost suggests that Kipling did not speak the whole of his mind
when he said that "the rigour of domestic
labour, without the aid of servants, had
driven some women off their heads." If
thare were the slightest ground for the
attack of the Colonist it would be necessary to ask what could have happened
Avithin a few months to change the hero
of the Empire with his broad humanness,
and quick sympathies into a blind, unreasoning, slandering penny-a-liner, with no
true insight, no just conception and no
understanding of conditions which he has
studied all his life and illuminated by
every utterance. And what is the occasion
for this storm in a tea cup.
DOMINATED BY LABOUR UNIONS.
The publication of Kipling's impressions of British Columbia, and especially
of labour conditions there. The Week has
carefully studied this particular letter, and
makes bold to say that Kipling is the only
great writer who has had the courage to
state not only what is absolutely true,
but what people all over the Province are
saying with bated breath, because they are
afraid to say it openly and fearlessly. The
strongest statement made by Kipling in.
liis letter is that the source of most of
the trouble in British Columbia is the
domination of labour unions, ancl the autocracy of labour. He attributes this to tho
fact that the unions are controlled and
directed by American agitators from across
the line. Will any fair-minded man, free
from the fear of offending advertisers or
alienating votes, venture to deny the absolute accuracy of either of these statements %
Is it not absolutely true that politicians
and business men alike are afraid to speak
out openly on this subject because of political and trade interests, and because if
they did their business would suffer?
AMEBIOAN DICTATION.
How many times have the more reasonable of Canadian journals pointed out to
Canadian Labour organizations, lhe folly
nt' submitting to American dictation?
How many disastrous strikes have been
fomented on this side the line by American officials of American unions, and as
was clearly demonstrated in the C.P.R.
strike of 1902, at the instigation of American capitalists . Who in British Columbia is ignorant of the fact that American agitators of the worst possible type
were the founders of the Asiatic Exclusion League in this Province, and that
these men when seen in iheir true colours
became so intolerable to their associates
that they were openly denounced and excluded from the counsels nf the League.
And yet the Colonist denounces Kipling
for saying that, "What is called labour absolutely dominates this part of the world."
Note how carefully Kipling says, "What
is called labour," by which he means the
demagogues and "blatherskites" whom
American domination forces into and
maintains in control of Canadian Labour
Unions ami allied organizations. Is Kipling wrong or is it that the truth is un
palatable to the Colonist*.
THE SALVATION   AEMY PLAN.
Once more Kipling is charged with misrepresentation when he states that the Salvation Army plan of bringing in white
immigrants from Great Britain fell
through ' for political reasons." This is
not only absolutely but it is most precisely
true; when a year ago Finance Minister
Tatlow had concluded (all but signing) a
contract with the Salvation Army through
Commissioner Coombs for bringing in ten
thousand white labourers, the Government
was denounced by every labour union in
the Province, the politicians got to work,
the members of the local Legislature Avere
beset on every hand, they in turn, to a
man, clamoured at the Government and
represented that labour Avas up in arms
and that if the contract was actually
signed they would lose the labour vote in
every direction. Friends of the movement represented that the Government just
victorious from the polls, and with a four
Avars' lease of life before it, could safely
take the chance, and leave the wisdom of
the policy to be demonstrated during their
term of office, but no, tlie voice of Demos
Avas all powerful, and "for political reasons" and political reasons alone, the
scheme Avas turned doAvn at that time. The
Colonist very disingenously seeks to make
capital out of the situation as it is today,
and because train loads of English settlers
are being brought into Canada by the Salvation Army, seeks to show that Kipling's
.statement is incorrect. But the Colonist
might at least have the honesty to point
out that this has matured since Kipling
Avas here, through a revival of the original
negotiations. Further if it had any desire to treat the subject fairly, it Avould
admit that tAvo present conditions have
rendered it possible to carry out the arrangement with the Salvation Army, the
first being the effective check imposed on
Oriental Immigration by the policy of the
Provincial Government, and the negotiations of the Federal Government; and
further the urgent demand for thousands
of labourers on railway construction. The
former had not been secured when Kipling was here, and not uutil the recent
session of Parliament did the policy become effective. The latter has eventuated
from the successful negotiations between
ihe Government and the G.T.P., all of
which have taken place this year. It is
well known to every independent observer
thai, at the time of Kipling's visit, the
attitude of organized labour towards the
Salvation Army's scheme of immigration,
was as irreconcilable as ever, and even
since the date of his visit, when il was
known ihat the Government were about
to reopen negotiations, the labour unions
again passed condemnatory resolutions. In
views of these facts, Iioav can tho Colonist
deny that the original scheme was turned
down for political reasons {
DOMESTIC SERVICE.
The Colonist lakes Kipling to task for
his remarks in reference to domestic service. The Week has carefully read and
reread these remarks and from its own
experience, does not hesitate to confirm
them in lhe main, it may he a little
exaggeration, but only a little one, when
he says that lack of domestic servants is
one of the reasons why over-worked white
women die or go off their heads.    There
is not a married man in this Province who
does not know from bitter experience that
there is at least a kernel of truth in this
somewhat dramatic statement. Strange to
say the Colonist appears to be more incensed at the suggestion of insanity than
death, and perhaps the former is a more
merciful denouement, but alloAving in this
instance for a little poetic licence, is it
not an absolute fact that the restriction,
of Chinese immigration has deprived our
Avives of necessary menial labour, doubled
the cost of that labour, led to over-work
and over-worry, in every way hardened the
conditions of life, raised the cost of living, created the tendency to abando housekeeping to live in rooms or hotels, and as
Kipling very suggestively points out, paved
the way to the inevitable reduction in the
birth rate . These statements are all true,
and none the less true because unpalatable
to the Colonist.
FREE  WHITE  IMMIGRATION.
Kipling goes to the heart of the subject of immigration Avhen he says: "If
the Asiatic goes this part of the Continent
will drop out of sight unless Ave get free
Avhite immigration." Accepting the hypothesis, it is impossible to dispute* the
conclusion, but fortunately it is not necessary, because thanks to the enlightened
policy of some public men and of that
section of the press which from the beginning of the agitation advocated free
white immigration, public opinion on this
subject has gradually crystallized and today it is generally recognized that even
if the phrase is more picturesque than
iti'ecise Kipling's advice to "pump in the
whites" is after all the true solution of
the problem. It furnishes another illustration of "life's little ironies" that the
man who has suggested the true and only
practical solution should have to submit
lo the ill-natured snarls of "blind leaders
of the blind." But he has his justification in the fact that his suggestion has.
been accepted and tbe wisdom of his policy
recognized. Even the all powerful
unionism has been obliged to take in a
reef and to submit, though with ill-grace,
to the carrying out of a policy which it
has uncompromisingly resisted. British
Columbia is getting, and will get, free
white immigration, and in proportion as
the white man comes in, the Mongolian
will diminish both in numbers and in importance, lt is not necessary in discussing this question to enter into economic
reasons why yelloAV must succumb to
white. The racial reasons which nature
supplies and which existed before economics were thought of still prevail, and
must always be the dulei'itiining factor
when the races clash. Conditions today
may be and undoubtedly are as Kipling
describes them, liis impressions are not,
as the Colonist somewhat disgracefully
suggests, the vapourings of "imaginary individuals," but the genuine convictions of
one of tlie keenest observers and profoundest thinkers of our race. Only a contemptible mind could have conceived tbe
idea that Kipling Avished to traduce Britisli Columbia. He Avished to do Avhat he
has mosl effectively done, that is point
out the salient features of our economic
ami social conditions.
EMPIRE BUILDING.
We are so absorbed in the fascinating
task of building up a new country, and we
stand so close to the landscape that it is
out of perspective, and we do not see fhe
ridges and the hollows. The clearer eye
and the riper judgment of the "Laureate
of the Empire" has penetrated beneath the
mists, ami shown us not merely the crags
and peaks which obtrude themselves upon
(Concluded on Page Four) THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 18, i«o8.
IN THE OLD LAND.
By RAMBLER.
(Continued)
Duncan said that she would soon console herself with another husband in
the person of the Laird of Comrie, she
composed a wild Gaelic lament. I
will give you a few verses to give
you an idea of what it is like:
I'd rather be with Gregor
In ragged grab of hair
Than with the little meadow laird
In silks and ribbons rare.
Tho' down with sevenfold fury,
The blinding drifts might sweep
For me would Gregor find a crag
And sheltered there we'd sleep.
I afterwards went down Loch Tay
on  a  comfortable  little steamer  to
Killin about fifteen miles distant—to
see the ruins of Finlarig Castle and
the ancient seat of the Bredalbane
Campbells, also the scene of the principal exploits and misdeeds of Black
Duncan.   From all accounts he was a
sublimated rascal, his only redeeming
feature being lack of fear.    The ruins
are now being well looked after by
the Marquis of Bredalbane, who has
built a well around them, and they
are  in  charge  of  an  old  Highland
soldier (a Campbell) in full costume,
who shows visitors round.   After the
Castle was burned by the Royalists,
during the    lirst    Jacobite   rising in
which conflagration the noble Duncan
perished,  the  peasants  used it as  a
quarry for  building purposes.    Well
about two years ago, the above mentioned caretaker had occasion to excavate some drains belonging to cottages   near   by   and   found   the   flat
stones used for covering were sculptures taken from the ruins.    He gathered  them  together  and with  other
relics   has   quite   a   museum   in   the
Castle.    I  took  a  photo  of the  interior,   which,   if   you   will   examine
closely will  be  found interesting as
showing  the  way   in  which   obstreperous women were treated in those
days.    The   men   they  hanged,   but
spanked in the good old Scotch way
the  women,  a   course  of  treatment,
which might be found to have efficacious results in modern times.
From there I visited the Clan McNab burial ground on a small island
near by. The last of that clan, Sir
Alexander McNab, emigrated with
about four hundred of his clansmen
in the beginning of the nineteenth
•century to Ontario. He afterwards
became a man of note. There is a
square and a street called after him
in Hamilton. He was practically
forced to this by the Campbells. They
are a good illustration of the Scotch
characteristic of "holding on to all
they get their hands upon," being
really interlopers into this part of
Scotland, but have used their peculiar qualities and methods to such
an extent that the Marquis owns
about one hundred miles by forty of
territory in the district. This kind
of landlordism is the curse of Scotland. Hc is too poor to work such
an estate profitably and yet will not
sell an acre. The consequence is
what was once a populous country
is now given up to sheep and deer
runs. The people preferring to emigrate to Canada, where they are land
owners than to remaining as tenants
in Scotland. Along Loch Tay there
are the ruins of whole villages and
farm houses shewing what the population once was, and this is found
to be the situation all over Scotland.
Of course there are a few good land
owners like, for instance, Sir Donald
Currie, who has the means and the
inclination to induce his tenants to
remain. I drove all through his estates, formerly the property of the
Menzies family and Campbell of Glen-
lyon. What a contrast to that of
Bredalbanes. There is a fine old specimen of a Highland stronghold on
Sir Donald's estate—Garth Castle-
built upon what must have been an
impregnable position at the junction
of two streams. He spent considerable money upon it and restored some
material portions. The old iron door
is replaced in its original position
secured by a padlock as big as a din
ner plate. Between Kenmore and
Aberfeldy are Druidical remains in the
shape of three complete circles of
stones standing upon their edges—
some of huge size—how the Ancient
Britons handled them is a marvel.
We were very loth to leave Ken-
more. It is in the heart of a district full of interesting associations
and most picturesque. Moreover the
hotel is one of the best in Scotland,
as far as comfort is concerned. From
there we went to Edinburgh—only
stayed in that city a say. Went all
over the Castle and amongst other
things was shown the window out of
which James I. was lowered, when
about an hour old down to friends
of Mary who took him off to be baptized in the Roman Catholic faith.
Women who have had kids say that
no child of that age could have sur*
vived the ordeal, and strangely
enough, about fifty years ago, while
repairs were being made in that portion of the Castle, where his mother
was confined, they found a small box
with the skeleton of a new born infant contained therein and on the
cover roughly carved, J. R., surmounted by a crown. It was reported to Queen Victoria, who gave instructions to bury it and who tried
to hush it up,—but the story got
abroad. Now the theory is that
Mary's infant died and another baby
was substituted, who afterwards became James 6th of Scotland, and ist
of England.
From Edinburgh we stayed off at
Glasgow to see a friend but only
stopped there a couple of days, too
much dirt, squalor and drunken women. I hate Glasgow, went on to
Dumfries. This is. where Robbie
Burns lived for some three years
at the latter end of his life and died
there. When he took up his abode
he must have had in his minds eye
the interests of guides to tourists in
the coming ages. You leave the main
street by going down a court, then
up  an  alley,  thence through  a 	
and into a passage. Well at the
entrance to the Court stand an army
of ragged boys and girls, these tell
you something, that is they all shout
at you at one and the same time in
an unknown tongue, by courtesy called Scotch English, which I was informed afterwards being translated
was to the effect that each and all
of them were guides to Burns' house.
Then as you proceed they are reinforced at the alley by another band
and so on. The unfortunate thing
for the tourist is the fact that the
different bands will not agree among
themselves as to which particular detachment you belong to, and as this
question has usually to be settled by
a free fight with the tourist as the
Umpire the feelings of the pilgrim
towards the immortal Robert can be
imagined for having chosen such a
place to end his days in. However,
as each of these youthful guides ranging in age from four to eight are quite
satisfied with a half-penny each a
whole penny being looked upon as a
competence, it does not cost so very
much after all to defray the expense
of their services. I think by the
time we reached the late Mr. Burns'
residence we had a following of about
thirty-seven, the clothes of which
brigade would probably have about
decently covered some twelve children
at the outside.
Besides Cairlaveroch Castle and
Thrieve Castle, the latter being the
old stronghold of the Douglas family,
which stood off the King of Scotland's army for months and was only
taken through the instrumentality of
Mons, a monster cannon constructed
for the purpose—now in Edinburgh
Castle—there are two very interesting Abbey ruins in the neighbourhood
of Dumfries, Lincluden , and Sweetheart. We drove out to see the latter
about eight miles distant on the
Sabbath, when to our disgust we were
informed by the lady who had charge
of the key that there was no admittance on the seventh clay. I tried
every persuasion, monetary and otherwise, but without avail, no sight seeing could be tolerated on the Sab-
baath. How I "cussed" the whole
Scotch nation and their Sabbatarianism. However, I saw all I wanted
and with the help of a couple of Englishmen who were companions in the
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Sold Everywhere] THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 18 1908
at
lon
misfortune   obtained   a   good
of the interior.   It has a great
historical associations connect-
h it and is for a ruin in a fair
f preservation.   As regards this
r phase of Scotch character I
acknowledge that it is far ditto   what   it  was   some  years
The   intolerance   and   bigotry
respect is fast dying out, only
Ider conservative  people retain
■narrow   views   concerning   be-
|ur on that day.
d an amusing experience in this
ction   in   Wolverhampton,   was
pending the evening with some
Hls who had at the time staying
Hthem an old Scotchman and his
After dinner they got me talk-
(bout my travels and the subject
rmah came up.   I told them that
the   custom   there   to   pray
wheels mostly turned by hand,
some instances they were work-
water power.   I remarked that
sidered it a good scheme, be-
great saving of labour.     The
who is unmarried and of very
ain age and consequently of a
disappointed,   dour   disposition,
females in that position, jump-
me like a thousand of bricks,
id she could not allow me to
[ike that in her presence.    She
o much respect for her Maker,
he   had   to   do   with   th'e
I    could    not    understand,
er,   I   at  once  collapsed,  sub-
and  gave  no  more   travelling
licences.     But   my   time   came
n in the evening.   She evident-
lized that by my manner to-
her  I  was  none too  pleased
ier snub, so in as sweet a way
vinegar face could allow she
me if I would not like to come
[ind live in the land of my fore-
I  replied no, preferred  Ca-
but it might be possible to in-
|me to live six days a week in
nd.    What did I mean by that,
quired.   I answered if by any
J nice fate compelled me to live
orth   I   would   every   Saturday
take the train and migrate
to spend the Sabaaath (and 1
d the A's) in a country where
Hwere accustomed to live in a
d manner on that day, in fact
would rather be in the peni-
y in England on Sunday than
it in thraldom in Scotland,
bsided—
Dumfries we traveled on to
rhampton, where we had a good
with   friends   for   two   weeks.
is nothing of interest in that
except coal and iron. I had
conversations with the differ-
embers of the family on the
questions. They were former-
eral Free Traders, but they are
hamberlanites. The fact is that
f the country is going back-
and will continue to do so un-
ngland changes her jug-handled
rade policy. The population is
sing and iron works are being
own and dismantled. While on
bject I may mention the fact
hen in Edinburgh the last Vul-
Factory (employing 2,000 peo-
the British Isles closed. In
xt letter will enter more fully
e subject, also the social and
us ones that are agitating peo-
ninds over here at the present
It
Sporting
Comment.
The football match last Saturday
between Ladysmith and Nanaimo for
the Island championship, attracted
the largest crowd that has ever witnessed a football match in this city
and to say that every one of the spectators got their money's worth is putting it mildly. Although, from a
scientific standpoint the game was
not as good as was expected it was
evenly contested, every player exerting himself to win. On the play Nanaimo certainly should have won. The
players showed more dash, were on
the ball all the time and still played
their positions. On the other hand
the Ladysmith forwards showed very
poor class and it is to them that the
blame of failure can be rested. They
were seldom if ever in their places,
often as far back as half way line,
and this when they were behind is
something that cannot be understood.
Had the forwards of the Ladysmith
team displayed as much energy as
the Nanaimo forwards there is no
question as to which would have won.
The Ladysmith half-backs gave their
forwards lots of fine openings but
they were never taken advantage of.
Time after time both Hewitt and
Graham were given practically speaking free kicks owing to the fact that
the forwards were not in their places.
I have often seen the Ladysmith forwards in action, but never have I
seen them play such a poor game as
they did Saturday. It is to the credit
of the half-back division that the
game resulted in a draw. Time after
time they broke up dangerous rushes
but their work was futile as the forwards failed to take advantage of
tlieir efforts. I have to add my congratulations to Referee Mahoney of
New Westminster for the able manner in which he handled the game. At
no time did he lose control and every
foul of any consequence was always
attended to. The management made
a good move when Mahoney was
secured.
The local baseballers had their first
practice last week and sufficient players to form two teams turned out.
If this enthusiasm continues there is
no reason why Victoria should not
have as good a team as represented
this city a few years ago. I understand the schedule for the season is
being drawn up which will provide
for a game nearly every Saturday if
this is carried out ictorians will have
no reason to spend a dull Saturday
afternoon.
As the summer season appraoches
the cricketers are commencing to get
uneasy and are anxious for the time
to arrive when they may take the
field. From all reports this grand
old game will flourish in this city this
summer and I hope that the local
teams will maintain the reputation
they  have established in the past.
His Valentine.
\ send her a present," said he,
the 14th of Februareel"
-but no, it is best
leae out the rest,
Ltaht alentine came C. 0. D.I
I do not like to interfere with the
management of any club, but I have
to point out to thc lacrosse club that
unless a start is made on the new
grounds it will be impossible to play
the first game there. The grounds
themselves have to be attended to,
fences and grandstands erected and
all must be done in exactly live weeks
from today. This is not allowing
very much time and I would advise
the club members to get busy.
Useful Odes.
|nned her verse on white foolscap,
told of Cupid's capers;
lowered: "Send some more, old
chap;
make such nice curl papers."
A Lazy M. D.
Hayrix—What  be  yore  son
|iew th' city?
Meadowgrass—He's studyin'
Idoctor.
Hayrix—The idee I Is th' doc-
fo lazy to study for himself?—
?o News.
The Nanaimo Free Press says:
"Despite the fact that the Victoria
senior clubs made a very poor showing against Nanaimo and Ladysmith
the North Ward juniors and Victoria
West intermediates have won the
championship in their classes and suggests that the seniors would have
done better if only one team had been
entered. This is a good suggestion
and although it is rather early to discuss next year's affairs it might be
acted on to advantage by the local
clubs.
Thc action of thc Victoria Baseball
Club in presenting cups for competition in the Intermediate League and
also for a league to comprise teams
teams from business houses is highly
commendable and should produce
good results. If the older players
maintain this attitude to the younger
players there is no reason why the
American National game should not
prosper in this city.
Although it might be said that it
does not come under direct attention,
I venture to suggest that something
should be done towards arranging for
the annual celebration of Empire Day.
This is Victoria's big holiday, but
unless an early start is made it is
liable to prove a failure. There is
now only about five weeks before the
celebration, which is none too much
time.
UMPIRE.
MISS BESSIE ABOTT
Of   the   Metropolitan   Grand   Opera
House, New York.   At the
Victoria, May 8th.
MAPS
OF
Timber and Land.
The   kind   that   show   what's
taken  up   and   what's   vacant.
Electric Blue Print & Map Co.
Electric   Blue   Print   and   Map   Co.
1218 Langley Street
Victoria, B. C.
COAL.
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo
Vollieries
New Wellington Coal.
The   best   household   coal   in   the
market at current rates.
Anthracite Coal for sale.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA, B.C.
BEDDING
PLANTS
Cheap Prices.   Get our price list.
Johnston's Seed Store
City Market
VICTORIA
AGENTS WANTED!-i6x20 crayon
portraits 40 cents, frames 10 cents
and up, sheet pictures one cent
each. You can make 400 per cent,
pront or $36.00 per week. Catalogue and Samples free. Frank W.
Williams Company, 1208 W. Taylor
St., Chicago, 111.
The
Bank of Vancouver
Incorporated by Special Act of Parliament of the
Dominion of Canada.
Head Office, Vancouver, B. C.
Capital, $2,000,000
In 30,000 shares of $100 each with $10 Premium.
W. H. MALKIN, Esq.,
(The W. H. Malkin Co., Ltd.,
Wholesale Grocers, Vancouver, B.C.
J. A. HARVEY, Esq., K.C.,
Cranbrook, B.C.
R. P. McLENNAN, Esq.,
(McLennan, McFeeley & Co.,
Ltd., Wholesale Hardware),
Vancouver, B.C.
T. W. PATTERSON, Esq.,
Capitalist, Victoria, B.C.
J. A. MITCHELL, Esq.,
Capitalist, Victoria, B.C.
F. W. JONES, Esq.,
Lumberman, Victoria, B.C.
H. T. CEPLERLY, Esq.,
(Ceperly, Rounsefell & Co.,
Brokers), Vancouver, B.C.
SOLICITOR
GEO.   H.   COWAN,   Esq.,   K.C,
TRUSTEES
Vancouver, B. C.
YORKSHIRE   GUARANTEE   &   SECURITIES    CORPORATION,
Vancouver, B.C.
LTD.,
The Bank of Vancouver is being organized to meet in part the increased banking accommodation required by the natural and steady
expansion of business, coincident with the great development of the
country and especially of British Columbia, and while organizing to eon-
duct a general banking business, will give special consideration to the
industries and commerce of the Province, and is being established primarily for this purpose, and through its connections in Great Britain,
Eastern Canada and the United States, it will be able to greatly facilitate the ivnestment of outside capital in the various enterprises of the
Province.
It is the Intention to open Branch Offices at various points from
time to time as opportunity arises.
SUBSCRIPTIONS POR STOCK.
The Stock Books of the Bank of Vancouver are now open for the
subscription of the Capital Stook at the Provisional Offices of the Bank
at the corner of Pender and Homer Streets, Vancouver, B.C., and also
at   the   offices   of   Mitchell,   Martin & Co., 643 Port Street, Victoria, B.C.
A. L. DEWAR, Secretary.
After "La Grippe" Drink
Carnegie's Porter.
Far better than drugs. Nothing like it for building up health
and strength and giving one the power to throw off wasting
diseases. It is now universally recommended by leading
physicians in Europe and on this continent on account of its
goodness and purity.
The recent analysis of the Pure Food
Inspection Laboratory declares Carnegie's
Porter to be "A pure Malt beverage,
free   from   any   kind   of   preservative."
Call for a bottle at your hotel, bar, club or restaurant. Look
at the label and you'll see that it is bottled at the famous
Gothenburg Brewery, in Sweden. None genuine without this*
label. If your dealer is unable to supply you witli a case for
home use, kindly 'phone us and we will see that you get tlie
genuine—the beverage of health.
PITHER & LEISER,
Wholesale Distributors.
0000*0-00©-->000-0<>00<>-0-0*0-<^^
Dermatologist
Institute
Mrs. Stanner (graduate of Mrs. Nettie Harrison, San Fran-
cosco), cordially invites the ladies of Victoria to call and investigate
her methods. Expert in Dermatology, Facial Massage, Hair
Dressing, Shampooing, Scalp Treatment, Manicuring, etc.
CLAY PACK FOR THE COMPLEXION.
ELECTRICAL FACE MASSAGE.
Room 23, Vernon Block
Hours 9 to 6.       - - - - Phone 1639
oo©oo-ooo-oo<x>-ooooo-->o-o-*ao<^ TH.B WBEK, SATURDAY APRIL i8, 1908
Incorporated 1906
Capital, $600,000.00
Capital Increased
in 1907
to ...$2,000,000.00
Subscribed
Capital,    $550,000
Beserve . . $50,000
Surplus, Jan. 30,
1907  .   .  $130,000
J. B, MATHERS, Gen. Man.
IN CLOSING UP ESTATES
•lther as Executors or Assignees
the Dominion Trust Co., Ltd., Is
never Influenced by ulterior motives. Their entire ambition,
effort, and energy is directed towards securing the best possible
returns for all concerned.
Name this company executor In
your will. Blank will forms furnished free of charge and stored
In our safety deposit vaults,
when we are made your executor.
DOMINION   TBXTST CO.,
Limited.
328 Hasting' Street, Weat,
Vancouver, B. O.
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published -avery Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
83Mi Government Street.. .Victoria, B.C.
626   Hastings Street.. ..Vancouver, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE..Manager and Editor
Blind Leaders
of the Blind.
Last Sunday I picked up the Western Clarion, the organ of Socialism.
The whole of the first page with the
exception of a small space devoted
to the historic utterances of great
men was editorial. I should like to
quote a few of the most striking sentences, not because they possess the
slightest merit but because they illustrate the true character of the men
who are responsible lor the journalism which is supposed to represent
the Socialists.
I have asked my editor to say something about one aspect of the matter
in hij column, so will content myself
with referring to a subject singularly
appropriate for the Easter number
of The Week. I notice in several
places that references which can only
be regarded as blasphemous are made
to Christ, and His claims as a leader
and a Saviour are derided. The style
of the writer recalls that with which
Bradlaugli in England, and lngersoll
in America familiarized the public
thirty years ago, and I have wondered more than once whether it is
possible for an intelligent man really
to believe that Christ has no claims
upon the race, or whether the whole
attitude of these iconoclastic writers
is not a pose.
One wishes to give every propagandist credit for sincerity. The fair-
minded man and the seeker after
truth will not be deterred in his quest
because he finds himself confronted
with novel and startling ideas. He
will not conclude that a new proposition is false because it runs counter
to his preconceived ideas or to his
cherished beliefs. No man is more
out of date in this progressive age
than he who has ceased to be receptive and adaptable, and yet there are
not a few of us who believe that on
some subjects the last word has been
said, and those who profess the Christian faith at any rate are not expecting a new revelation.
It is inconceivable how any man
who has studied the life and teaching
of Christ can come to the conclusion
that he is not the friend of humanity.
It is still more difficult to conceive
how any labouring man or friend of
labour can deny His claims. Of all
the great teachers the world has
known not one has identified himself
so absolutely with the labour classes.
Born the son of a Carpenter He worked at the bench until he was thirty
years of age. When He abandoned
manual labour to undertake His mission in life He chose all His friends
and helpers from the labouring class.
He made His home with people of
the same class, and His most intimate
personal friends, to whose hearth He
gladly turned from the stress and
burden of the day, lived in a cottage
in Bethany.
No man of note has so dignified and
glorified common toil, both by his
own devotion to work, and by the
halo with which he has surrounded
it. But apart from His own example,
and the lessons which it inculcates, it
can never be forgotten that His teachings as to the dignity of labour, the
spirit in which it should be performed,
its economic aspect, the true relation
between capital and labour, and government and labour are all upon such
a high plane of wisdom and justice
that more than one profound student
has declared that the translation of
the principles enunciated in the Sermon on the Mount into actual practice would solve all labour problems
and correct the evils which spring
from existing conditions.
There is no substitute for the
Golden Rule, and it still remains the
corner stone of all progressive labour
legislation. The vast improvement in
labour conditions, especially during
the last fifty years, is mainly due to
a recognition of this principle; and
although the world is still very far
from living up to its requirements the
nearer the approximation, the greater
the increase of good understanding.
The most conspicuous feature of
labour legislation during the last few
decades has been the adoption of arbitration, and later of conciliation, in
the settlement of disputes. This is
thc distinct outgrowth of the reasoning as opposed to the compulsory attitude of the disputants; and so
marked has been the success attending its introduction into the labour
world, that it has now been adopted
as a permanent factor in International politics.
In spite of the frailty and blunders
of many who have constituted themselves leaders in the religious world,
it still remains that Christianity is
the greatest moral force in the world,
and the vital truth of Christianity is
the personality of its founder.
Men find it hard to forgive the mistakes of His followers but they never
tire of turning to the Founder, and
apart altogether from the theological dogma involved in the acceptance of Christ as a religious teacher,
it still remains that lie is the supreme
Leader of human thought in its search
for truth, and that He alone has
pointed a way by whicli the race can
be emancipated from the thraldom
of error.
Socialist leaders have either never
studied, or have utterly failed to grasp
the purport of His teaching, and the
beauty of His character. If they
understood these aright far from casting one word of reproach on the ten-
derest, the truest and the wisest friend
that labour ever had, they would study
His sayings and concentrate all their
energies on spreading them and winning the world over to their acceptance, for when all is said and done,
it is not coercion which rules. There
is in the Avorld today such a thing
as an elevated public opinion, it is
the sentiment of the majority of
thinking men, it is shaped by the
thoughtful .study of great teachers,
of whom the Christ is the greatest.
Arbitrary combinations may achieve
a temporary success, but it is not a
success which can be labelled victory. When once the public conscience becomes aroused and just indignation demands executive force,
everything is swept before it, and
this is the instrument which is being used and which in thc future
will be more widely used for the
overcoming of social and economic
evils. It is not from Iconoclastic,
Socialistic or Anarchistic teachers
that its spirit is derived, but from
the Son of the Carpenter, who spake
as never man spake and who first
among the great characters of history pointed the way which the
labour world is only just beginning
to travel in the twentieth century.
There could be no more appropriate
reflection for Easter time than that
the humble Galilean, whose resurrection is now being celebrated by the
Christian Church throughout the
world, is the truest labour representative of all time, and there could be
no greater mistake especially, on the
part of professed friends of labour,
than to belittle His teaching or to
attempt to besmirch His character.
The  Promise  of  Easter.
(By Blanche  E.  Holt  Murison.)
Glamour of marvellous things,
Limitless measure of hope,
Springeth eternal on new-born wings,
From a grave in a garden slope.
Look up sad eyes where the glory
lies,
Shining    resplendent    across    the
skies.
Purple and gold of the morn,
Arches triumphal of light
Blazon the sky; while lilies adorn
The earth with their splendor white.
Each hill and lea keepeth jubilee,
And every breeze is a symphony.
Promise of cheer and delight,
To comfort us on our way:
Oh  covenant sweet!  Earth's  darkest
night
But heralded Easter day.
Jubilate!   Jubilate I
Heaven's gates are open wide,
Love hath found a sanctuary,
Where all weary souls may hide:
Death's finality is ended,
Life   with   Death   hath   met   and
blended,
Life through Death is glorified.
KIPLING'S LETTERS.
(Continued from Page One.)
the notice of the observer but the
deeps which are obscured.   When
the spirit of truth descended into
the Shades the apparition was so
startling that its denizens were bereft of reason, ancl scattered in
affright.    When Kipling had the
courage to lift the veil from some
of the ugly problems of the Western Avorld and hold up the mirror
of truth, some glanced at it and
fled, but the mirror Avill remain,
and he Avho looks into it Avill see
the truth. A higher authority than
the editor of the Colonist in the
day of his derision, said:     'The
truth shall make you free." Carefully sifted and condensed into a
feAv pithy sentences Kipling's fifth
letter, Avhich has so aroused the venom of the Colonist, becomes a
bald recital of fact, Avhich every
honest observer must subscribe to.
He declares that British Columbia
at the time of liis visit, both as to
its   politics   and  economics,   was
dominated by   the   thing which
called itself labour; that the only
hope for the Province lay in free
Avhite immigration; that the Salvation Army and the Government
had arranged to secure this but
Avere prevented by political considerations;   that the Province requires additional labour;  that domestic service in particular Avas
scarce and costly, so scarce that for
Avomen in particular life Avas a
hardship, in some cases almost beyond endurance; that under these
conditions   the  man   Avho   urged
English people to settle here Avas
incurring a great responsibility in
the present and a greater in the
future; and finally that his solution of the problem was free white
immigration ■ or as he phrased it,
'"pump in the whites."   All these
impressions   and   opinions   have
been verified in the few months
that have elapsed since Kipling's
visit, ancl he could have no higher
justification and no higher compliment than the adoption of his suggestion, unless it be the cavilling
of the Colonist.
A Snap in
Fountain Pens
Nowadays a Fountain Pen is a necessity as well as a luxury!
for everyone. A business man and a business woman not!
only show themselves to be behind the times, but they are|
handicapped if they do not carry one.
Commencing Next Monday, the 20th inst.,
we will for a few days sell our good
Fountain Pens at
ONE-HALF PRICE
JUST EXACTLY HALF OUR REGULAR FIGURES.
"Eclipse" Fountain Pens; Blair's Non-Leakable Vest Pocket]
Pens; "Nosak" Self-Filling Pens, which can be filled without
a dropper anywhere that ink is obtainable.
LOOK AT THESE PRICES
"Eclipse," regular price $1.50 for 75c
"Blair's   Non-Leakable,"   regular   prices,   $2.00  to
$2.50 for $1.00 to $1.25
"Nosak" Self-Filling Pen, regular prices, $2.00 to
$7.00, for $1.00 to $3.50
14k Points and Iridium Tips.
Our business reputation is your assurance that these prices are
bona fide and the Pens first-class in quality. These should not
be on sale long.
Challoner & Mitchell
Diamond Merchants and Silversmiths
Government Street Victoria, B. C.
Victor-Berliner -Gramophone
Sacred Music
Wouldn't it be fine
to sit in your home
and hear the Trinity1
Choir sing "Jesus
Lover of My Soul"
and"RockofAges";
or the Haydn Quartet sing, "Where is
My Boy Tonight"
and"0 That Will Be
Glory For Me"; or
to listen to the chants
and other sacred
music by the
Gregorian and
Sistine Choirs .
That's exactly what you
can do with a Fitter or Berliner Gram-o-phone.
The powerful soul-stirring hymns and the magnificent anthems as
oratorios of the masters, sung by noted soloists and famous hoirs, are you
whenever you want to hear them.
The Fictor or Berlir, r Gram-o-phone plays this music true to the livii
voice—you have never kmwn the full beauty of sacred songs until you hav
heard them on one of these instruments.
The Fictor tr Berliner Gram-o-phone not only enables you to hav
sacred concerts at home, but puts the best entertainment of every sort at yov
command. The magnificent voices of the most famous grand-opera stars, th
world's greatest bands and famous instrumentalists, the latest song-hits, old
time ballads, side-splitting jokes and comic song:, the liveliest dance music
—all this and more you can have with a Fictor or Berliner Gram-
o-phone and only with one of these famous instuments.
Ask any Victor or Berliner dealer to plav any sacred music or anything y^* <^_
else you want to hear. Also ask him to tell you about the easy terms onVljr »j>-% _fi
which you can buy one of these Instruments.     *_!*_%£ JT
Use thc coupon and get free catalogues.     /*' & ~*
The Berliner Gram-o-phone
Company of Canada, lid.
H0NTBEAL
606
TIMBER! TIMBER! TIMBER!
QUATSINO   SOUND,   BEDWELL SOUND, BACE NABBOWS.
OUABANTEED 3,000 FT. TO TEE ACBE.
FBICE $2.50 TO 83.00.    ALL LICENSES ISSUED.
ARTHUR BELL
BOOHS 14 and 16
MAHON   BUILDING,   OOTEBNKENT   STBEET, VICTOBIA.
P. O. BOX 765. PHONE 1385. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL i8, 1908.
*200000-*>00*-»<>0-0--30000^
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Whitney Go-Carts
BABY  CABBIAGE.
FBIOE,   $14.00.
Bo. 802—Body is reed, varnished; sides
upholstered; lace parasol. Gear ls all
steel; four 16-in. rubber tire wheels.
Whitney patent anti-frietlon wheel
fastener; foot brake. Green enamel
finish,
YOUR CARPET IS HERE
Come and See It To-Day. We Have Chosen a "Correct" One
Do you fully realize what an important part the carpet plays in the
furnishings of a room; how highly
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there may be no marring of an
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rather an added touch of daintiness, a "something" that makes a
finished room which, while breathing hospitality to your guest, leaves
an indellible impression of your
excellent good taste? It is as easy
to get the correct sorts as the
incorrect. A little "thought" on
your part, a little assistance from
a staff of experienced experts, such
as we employ, and the benefit of
such a choice as our stock offers makes the choosing of "proper" carpets an easy matter.
Durability, color, design—three very important factors. We have an enormous stock of
handsomely-designed carpets made by mills renowned for their hard-wearing products. Any
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we have the daintiest Brussels in such combinations as green and white, blue ancl pink, green and
pink, rose and gold, blue and ivory, and also some excellent two-tone carpets. In Axminsters, we
show the largest and finest selection in the West.   You're welcome to come any time.
Axminster Carpets—A splendid range
of pretty and attractive designs
In this favorite carpet. Prices
range at, per yard, $.75, $3.00,
$2.25   and    $3.00
Wilton Carpets—In Wiltons we also
show a very extensive range of
handsome designs and splendid
range of colorings. Per yard, $3.50,
$2.75,   $2.25   and    $1.90
Tapestry Carpet! — In low-priced,
hard wearing carpets we show a
splendid line of Tapestry Carpet
at a great choice of prices. We
have it at, per yard, $1.25, $1.00,
85c and    75c
Axbury Carpets—This is a splendid
carpet style and in it we have
an unusually fine range of patterns and colorings. All at one
price.    Per yard   93.75
Brussels Carpets—In our offerings of
this Housekeeper's Carpet you'll
find a great choice of styles. It
is probably the most serviceable
carpet one could buy. Per yard,
$2.00, $1.75, $1.60, $1.50, $1.40,
$1.25 and   $1.00
Velvet Carpet—This is a nice carpet
style  from   the  famous   Crossley
Whitney Go-Carts
BECLINING  FOLDING   GO-CABT.
PBICE, $15.00.
Bo. K. 55, U. & P.—Body is reed, varnished; sides upholstered; has mattress cushion, lace parasol. Gear Is
all steel; four 12-in. rubber tire
wheels; patent wheel fastener; foot
brake. Patent folding cross reach.
Dark green enamel finish. Enameled
push bar.
A Splendid Range of Carpet Squares Shown Now.
PULLMAN 8LBEPEB
FBICB, $16.00.
No. 823—Body is reed, varnished; sides
upholstered; has mattress cushion:
lace para-Sol. Gear is all steel; four
16-ln. rubber tire wheels; Whitney
patent anti-friction wheel fastener;
foot brake.   Carmine enamel finish.
The Pullman Sleeper is a combination
of carriage  and go-eart.
The body is smaller than that of a carriage, size of base being 22x15 inches.
It also has adjustable reclining back,
and foot-well with sliding cover.
SEND FOB GO-CABT CATALOGUE.
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PBICE, $35.00.
No. S. 892—Body is wood, painted dark
green, varnished; upholstering Is
leather eloth, lined. Brass plated
joints. Other trimmings brass. Gear
is English strip; tour 16x22-tn.
cushion rubber tire wheels. Whitney
patent anti-friction wheel fastener;
foot brake.    Enameled push bar.
SEND FOB GO-CABT CATALOGUE.
Championship Match.
The deciding match in the race for
e Vancouver Island Football cham-
onship was played at Oak Bay on
Wednesday when the coveted title
as won by the Nanaimo players,
two years the Ladysmith team
is occupied the premier position but
the showing made on Wednesday
id Saturday last the Nanaimo team
fully entitled to the win. At hard-
any stage of the game on Wednes-
ly was the Ladysmith team dan-
:rous. During the first half the new
tampions continually pressed their
pponents but it was thought that the
idysmith players would be seen to
ettcr advantage with the wind at
leir backs but although they played
letter they were not as aggressive as
leir opponents, and towards the hull the Nanaimo men not only held
lem at bay but made frequent at-
cks on the Ladysmith goal. The
sing forwards made a better show-
g than on the previous occasion, but
eir efforts were spasmodic. The
tfence of the winners was strong
id they never gave Ladysmith a
od opening. Adams, on whom
rich was counted, was too closely
itched to be effective, but he played
ich better than he did on Saturday
d at times brilliantly, the other
rwards were too slow in taking ad-
ntage of their opportunities. The
Ives of the Ladysmith team were
t as aggressive as on Saturday. Al-
ough two goals were scored against
e Ladysmith team it cannot be said
at it was the fault of the backs or
al-keeper although one was the re-
It of a penalty given against Morion. In this instance Hartley cer-
inly played in hard luck. After
opping the ball he could not reiver and it was sent through while
was on the ground.   The winners
all played consistent football and are
entitled to tlieir victory, every man
played his position in good style and
the work of Cruickshanks and Mitchell on the right wing was very
pretty to watch; Blundell on the left
was a star performer; Graham at full
back stood out as a shining light and
it was mainly through his supreme
efforts that the victory was secured.
The game was stubbornly contested,
and at times the players fouled in
their attempts to gain possession of
the ball, in fact the game was much
more strenuous than on Saturday.
Under the circumstances Referee
Lockley did will. On several occasions his rulings were not in accordance with the strict reading of the
rules, but he was impartial in his
decisions.
UMPIRE.
Mistook His Man.
Green—I undertook to make him
eat his words, but	
Brown—But what?
Green—He turned out to be one
of those chaps who would rather
fight than eat.—Chicago News.
An Appreciation of a Good Musician,  sic.    Tickets (50 cents)  can be ob-
  tabled at Wain's and Fletcher's music
On Tuesday, April 28, Professor E.   stores,   at   Hibben's   bookstore,   and
A Feat.
"Do you imagine it possible for a
camel to go through the eye of a
needle?"
"Oh, I wouldn't be surprised. You
know how large my wife is?"
"Yes."
"Well, she goes through my pockets
regularly."—Houston Post.
At the New Grand Next Week.
Next week patrons of the Grand
w'll be treated to a performance
which is expected to be quite the
equal of those of the last two weeks.
It will include Miss Lisle Leigh, assisted by Griffin Barry and Sata Alexander in the one-act playlet, "Kid
Glove Man"; "The Laughing Horse,"
a comedy turn with three people in
the cast, two of them clever dancers
and the third a burlesque horse that
never fails to bring down the house
with his gyrations; Mrs. Peter Ma-
her, an Irish singer, in songs and
stories from old Erin; the Three
Musical Bell Boys in a musical, singing and dancing act; the Eugene
Trio, comedy triple bar artists; Arnold Von De Rave, tyrolean singer;
Thos. J. Price in the illustrated song,
"In the Valley of Yesterday," and
new Moving Pictures.
Human Nature.
"Good morning, parson."
"Good morning, deacon. As I was
coming along just now I saw a fight
between a brindle bulldog and a mastiff. And, upon my word, deacon,
more than fifty men were standing
around. How can people take an interest in such things?"
"I dunno, parson. Which dawg
won ?"—Washington  11 erald.
In Fashion.
Benevolent Stranger—What are you
going to be when you grow tip?
Johnny—Investigated, I s'pose.—
New York Sun.
Our Language.
"He's  the   coming  man."
"Yes, he's one of the best fellows
going."*—Baltimore American.
The Wicked Husband.
"Why does a man lie to his wife?"
asks a woman writer. Dear mc; does
he?—Duluth Herald.
Balloonists are not necessarily
quick tempered because they "go up
in the air" so often.
Sticks.
A Washington physician announces
that grip is catching. It is worse than
that. It is sticking.—Chicago Record-
Herald.
G. Wickcns will give his sixteenth annual students' recital, in the Institute
Hall, View street, Victoria. We take
pleasure in drawing public attention
to this concert on account of a charming little surprise which happened to
a musically inclined member of our
staff who, last year, chanced to drop
in at the professor's 1907 students'
recital. The surprise took the shape
of delight at the wonderful proficiency of the profesosr's student soloists and children's orchestra; it resulted in our man delving down and
making enquiries from past and present students, leading to the discovery
that for sixteen years- Professor
Wickcns has been diligently assisting
in keeping alive and advancing musical knowledge in Victoria. By dint ol
labouring from daylight to dark, he
has, with conspicuous success, trained
hundreds of our younger generation
to be something more than mere
players on instruments; in addition,
each year has seen at least one of his
pupils, of more than average ability,
proceed to Germany, to obtain at the
Mecca of musicians that complete
specialized tuition which only Germany can give. This year Jir. Victor
Levy, who has been one of the professor's students for the past six
years, is the musical pilgrim; the
present concert is in part a farewell
to Mr. Levy; in addition to an excel
lent instrumental programme by fellow students and the children's orchestra, Miss Emma Sehl (soprano)
and Mr. J. 11. Griffiths (baritone) will
assist, and The Week advises all parents who have children musically inclined, to purchase a few tickets and
let their offspring listen to what can
be accomplished by careful tuition,
accompanied by genuine love of nui-
from members of Professor Wickens'
cll'ldren's orchestra. The proceeds,
in pari, will hc devoted to the Protestant  Orphanage.
Mr. Victor Levy. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 18, 1908.
Ticker Scene in Brewster's Millions.
A Skin of Beauty is a Joy Forever
DR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S
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OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER
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No other cosmetic will do it.
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every blemish on beauty, and defies detection. It has stood the test of 60
years; no other has, and is so harmless—we taste lt to be sure it is pro*
perly made. Accept no counterfeit of
similar name. The distinguished Dr. L.
A. Sayre said to a lady of the haut-ton
(a patient). "As you ladies will use
them, I recommend 'Gourand's Cream' as
the least harmful of all the Skin preparations."
For sale by all druggists and Fancy
Goods Dealers.
OOUBAUD'S ORIENTAL TOILET
POWDER
For infants and adults. Exquisitely perfumed. Relieves Skin Irritations, cures
Sunburn and renders an excellent complexion.
Price ISS cents, by mail.
GOURAUD'S  POUDRE  SUBTILE
Removes superfluous Hair.
Price $1.00, by mail.
FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop.,
37 Great Jones St.,        New York City.
AT  HENDERSON BROS., Distributors.
Vanoouver ana Victoria, B.C.
Leave Your Baggage Checks at thc
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.       A. E. KENT, Proprietor
| Husic and      |
|   The Drama. |
^■^■?^*^*^*^'^9^*%'*^'^'*!^1^;
Mrs. Patrick Campbell.
On Monday evening Mrs. Patrick
Campbell played to capacity in the
Victoria Theatre before the most
fashionable audience of the season. It
was her first appearance in Victoria,
and she elected to submit her most
famous play, Arthur Pineo's "Second
Mrs. Tanqueray." The result justified the selection, and showed that
in spite of the doubts and fears of
some newspaper correspondents and
some would-be critics her selection
was justified. The "Second Mrs. Tanqueray" is not a pleasant play, moreover it is out of its "milieu" on this
Continent where the laxity of the
marriage tie and the prevalence of divorce render the woman with a past
rather a "persona grata" than a social
pariah. This is why the appelation
"problem play" is a mosnomer on this
side of the Atlantic; and all through
the play Mrs. Campbell was struggling against a condition of affairs
which pertains generally in England
but is more or less unknown here, lt
must be remembered further that even
in England what are known as the
"smart set" have familiarized people
with some of the conditions which
when Pinero's play was written sixteen years ago were only half suspected or hinted at. The problem is
a problem no longer, not that decent
people have or ever will modify their
opinions on morality, but that in certain circles, fortunately circumscribed
in area, familiarity with the problem
has bred contempt.
Viewed in this light the "Second
Mrs. Tanqueray" may bc regarded as
out of date, and as thc play is both
morbid and unpleasant, without however being offensive, Mrs. Campbell
would be well advised in relegating it
to thc limbo of plays which have
served their purpose.
But whatever may be said of thc
play it is impossible lo speak too
highly of thc actress, no living woman can play Paula Tanqueray as
Mrs. Campbell docs. I recently wrote
a critique in which I compared Olga
Nethersole's representation with hers,
and while I still htink it is substantially correct, I realized on Monday
night that they arc farther apart than
I thought. As a psychological study,
perfect in every detail and without
a single artistic blemish, Mrs. Campbell is simply superb. It satisfies
every detail, there is not a single
false note; she lives and breathes the
character. I looked in vain for the
slightest flaw in her marvellous technique, but found it as perfect, and
yet as fresh, as on that first night in
1892 when she electrified London.
There can be but one opinion of her
acting, and that is that she is a great
actress in every sense of the word,
and unrivalled in the parts she has
practically made her own. It is not
difficult to understand why she continues to play Paula, Madga, Hedda
Gabler, and the like. In a recent interview she explained that they suited her temperament, and that is the
whole secret of her acting. She is
natural in parts in which other actresses are artificial, and they are different parts. Although Mrs. Campbell is still in the full possession of
her extraordinary beauty, and magnetic force, it is doubtful if she will
ever abandon the line in which she
has been so eminently successful. It
is just a little too late. In manner
as well as in appearance there is the
least suggestion of maturity. Ten
years ago she might have thought
of classic roles bordering on thc
tragic, but now it seems as if she
would stay with "problem plays" to
the end of her career, and possibly
dn lor Paula what Genevieve Ward
did for "Forget-me-not," thirty years
ago, almost make the part classic.
Whatever she may decide to do, I
venture to predict, newspaper correspondents and dramatic critics notwithstanding, thai she will always
play to crowded houses by reason
of her personal magnetism and dramatic skill.
Brewster's Millions.
Ou Monday next at the Victoria
Theatre the popular American farci-
cal comedy entitled Brewster's Millions will be represented by a New
York Company. This is admittedly
one of thc most laughter provoking,
and has been one of the most successful, plays of the season. Thc management has spared no expense in
mounting and equipping, and thc
Compauy is the same numerically as
played through all the big Eastern
cities. All who have read Geo. Barr
McCutcheon's book, and many who
have only heard of him will want to
make the acquaintance of the millionaire who could not spend his money
fast enough to get rid of it.
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
En Tour of B. C.
April and May
Francis
Armstrong
Violin Virtuoso
Lilian Fisher
Prima Donna Soprano
Management of C. H. GIBBONS
oooooooooooooooooooooooooo
WiU You Take
$500 a Year...
for your spare time. In other
words the man who has a couple
of hours morning and evening
and will employ it in operating
A Cyphers Incubator
at his home can make from $500
in twelve months. We have a
unique plan to work on and will
be pleased to explain it to any
one interested.    Call or write.
Watson &
McGregor
647  Johnson  Street,
VICTORIA, B. C.
C. H. TITE & CO.
PAINTERS, PAPER-HANGERS
Wall Paper from z^c up.
No old stock. Estimates given.
Prices Cheaper than ever.
COR. VATES AND BROAD STS.
melange teeming with good points
and furnishing the unique opportunity fora most versatile actor to display his gifts. Tiie musical Bennetts have a very interesting specialty in which the combine music
and conjuring most effectively. The
Eddy trio as pantomime acrobate are
excellent. Musical Lowe on the
xylophone sustains his claim to championship honors. Fuller the monologist is well above the average, altogether the programme is excellent
and would fill a house twice as large
as the New Grand.
The Empress Theatre.
Readers of The Week will wonder
where the Empress Theatre is, and
will be surprised to learn that there
is shortly to be an important addition to Victoria's playhouses'. The
management of the Arcade Theatre,
which has been doing such a splendid
business on Yates St., has found it
necessary to secure larger premises
and on the ist of May will open in
the old Brackman-Ker Block. The
management promises the best line
of moving pictures which can be acquired, and good musical turns in
addition. Tllis unique form of entertainment has evidently come to stay
and as it appeals to all classes alike
there should be a prosperous future
before thc proprietors.
The New Grand.
The programme at the New Grand
this week is without doubt one of
the best ever put on. lt discounts
last week's fifty per cent., and Manager Jameson wil find it very difficult
to reach a higher level than this in
thc future. The piece dc resistance
is the "Visitor" introduced by Mr.
Porter   J.   White,   an   extraordinary
Philadelphia Ledger:
Returning to Japan the spy reported
that America was preparing for war.
"Your proof?" demanded the Elder
Statesmen.
"I have evidence," resumed the spy,
"that thc yellow ournals have laid in
enough red ink for a long and desperate  campaign."
Apprehension in their eyes, the Elder Statesmen sat in silence.
Your Fortune
Briefly Told
First,    you're    going    on    a
■ ' journey.
Then you'll be very happy—
and you're going to have money
left   to   you.     You're   a   lucky
• Man.
Here's the way of it.
You're going on a journey to
this store.
, You'll select your new Spring *
Suit, and it will please you so ',
well that you'll be very happy.'
You'll buy for less than you
thought  and  have  money  left; 1
therefore you're a lucky  Man.
That's your fortune—see that ,
it comes true.
ALLEN & CO.
Fit=Reform Wardrobe
1301   Qovernment   St.,    Viotoria. j
OWlr*»"
_
ST. ANDREW'S
COLLEGE
TORONTO
A lasldcatial aad Day School for Boys
Thorough Instruction.
New Buildings, Large Athletic
Fields.
Summer term commences April
22nd, 1908.
For information write to
REV.   D.   BRUCE  MACDONALD,
M.A., LL.D.
Principal.
HOLLY TREES
Prices from 25 cents to $5.00, according to size. Write for seed and tree
catalog.
JAY & CO.
VICTORIA, B. C.
Pantage's
Theatre
JOHNSON STREET
VICTORIA, B. C.
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE |
Matinees (any part of house)....lli
Evenings, Balcony  10
Lower Floor 10
Boxes    tt
Matinees
Every Afternoon
at
3 0'CIock.
Night Performances
8 and 9.15
WEEK 20TH APRIL, 1908.
The New Gram
SULLIVAN * CONS'DIIIE,    Proprlston|
Management of ROBT. JAMIESON.
THE LAUGHING HORSE
A Circus Travesty.   Five people i|
Cast.
MISS LISLE LEIGH AND
COMPANY
One-Act Dramatic Playlet
"Kid Glove Man."
EUGENE TRIO
Comedy Triple Bar Artists.
THE   MUSICAL   BELL   BOYl
Musical, Singing and Dancing _\c\
MRS. PETER MAHER
"The Irish Queen."
ARNOLD VON DE RAUE
Tyrolean Singer.
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrato|
"In the Valley of Yesterday."
NEW MOVING PICTURES
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
EHPRES:
THEATRE
Will open in tbe
BRACKMAN   fe   KER   BLOCK
ON MAY lst, 1908
Under the same management as nov
controls the
AECADE THEATRE
Best Moving
Pictures
of the day and
HIOH CLASS MUSICAL TURNS.
POPULAR PRIOES.
«,THEATR,
-^ ttssti «. mana:
MONDAY, APRIL 20
Brewster's Million;
THE     POPULAR     AMERICAN
FARCICAL COMPART.
PRICES 50o TO $1.50. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 18, 1908.
By THE LOUNQER
At The Street    o)
Corner h
W_\f*r*%fi<*S_m_,_t*tyei ****\i**£}
I do not for a moment suppose that
wthing I can say will influence the
ly Engineer or those whose official
lition should, but apparently does
I, entitle them to control his varies I have not the pleasure of
I gentleman's acquaintance and any
Iticism I may offer is directed sole-
I to the manner in which he dis-
prges his public duties. The rate-
wers have had a specimen of his
Item of street paving on Govern-
Int street, but let that pass. He
I giving us a still more ridiculous
rformance on Rockland Avenue and
im not surprised that the property
Iners have refused to pay their pro-
I'tion of the cost of constructing
lh roads as that which has been
Irted from Moss St. East. As a
Itter of fact it is not road construe-
In at all, because it has no found-
bn The City Engineer apparently
es not know that to excavate a
Idway to a depth of say a foot is
I sufficient preparation. Opposite
I. Arbuthnots this excavation has
In made still leaving soft earth and
l* beneath; loose rock of all sizes
I been dumped and was being roll-
linto the soft foundation until the
Iperty owners called a halt. Un-
I. good roads are made it is just
■well to save the ratepayers money
I make shift with the old one. The
I on Rockland Avenue can never
Iome a road; it will wear down into
■lows and the soft earth will ooze
■ between the rock and no amount
surfacing will prevent it.
But I am more concerned in the
I of vandalism perpetrated by the
m Engineer, let us hope not on his
li responsibility, in destroying
Imdid old oaks and other valuable
■de trees in order to make a
light line for a gutter. I sincere-
Ivish that it were possible for the
lining property owners to recover
Biages for what is undoubtedly an
■rage, in any event a valuable asset
■the public highway, belonging to
I ratepayers, has been destroyed,
lh folly cannot be defended; it was
■10 sense necessary and is the re-
I either of ignorance or obstinacy.
■haps it is too much to expect a
■iness council to be governed by
I but material considerations. A
■y of men elected solely upon thc
lis of their capacity to economize
I hardly be expected to give a
light to Ruskin, or his ideas on
I preservation of natural beauty.
Iietimes a paid official, especially
|e be a professional man, has had
le little education, and whispers
le suggestions into the ear of
Imble," but in this case clearly
Idom is not justified of her chil-
Whilst on the subject of streets I
luld like to say a word about boule-
Iding. A great rumpus has been
lie by certain Aldermen because of
I expenditures which have been
■de on boulevarding. They claim
It good streets should come first
II ornamentation second. This is
I strictly correct, the two should
■ceed together, on the principle that
■ays to make a City attractive. For
I reason I favour the boulevarding
I certain sections where visitors
It do congregate; as the work is
le on the improvement plan this
Ino hardship to anyone and it
■ild not be forgotten that every
Iness in the city benefits by an
Hx of visitors, and that the more
Bttiful a city is the more visitors
will have, and the more widely
Hits attractions be advertised. This
Butting the matter on what I reft as the lowest ground, that of
Ky and profit. A public spirited
B:y pays best on every ground, and
Beautiful City not only adds to
■joy of living in it but also aug-
Bts the profit.
I notice   that   a  movement  is   on
I to banish the "red light"  dis-
I  from its present location,  and
I behind the movement is the Wo
men's Council and the Moral Reform
Association. Any judicious policy for
dealing with the social evil would
have my hearty support, but that one
word "judicious" is the key to the
whole situation. I have seen so many
well meant efforts to restrict this
horrible traffic and nearly all of them
have ended in failure. This is because the promoters of the movement
have more zeal than discretion, and
mainly because they are ignorant of
many of the conditions. Up to date
the only system tolerated in English
speaking countries which has been attended with any measure of success is
that of restriction and control. I
quite agree that the location should
in every case be where it will constitute the least possible offence to
law-abiding citizens, and any attempt
to get beyond its confines should be
promptly and severely checked. Further I have repeatedly called attention to the fact that the traffic would
be diminished by at least fifty per
cent., and its most objectionable features eliminated by the simple enforcement of the law which regulates
the sale of liquor. Half these houses
would be closed in less than a week
if the illicit trafficking in liquor were
stopped. Would not this be a very
wise programme for the Moral Reform Association? At any rate it
would be beginning at the right end.
There is however a much more important work which the ladies of
Victoria might with advantage undertake, and that is the initiation of a
campaign for the better protection of
girls of tender age. Numbers of
girls between fourteen and sixteen,
daughters of comparatively poor parents, are walking our streets dressed
in silk, fancy millinery and costly
furs. Everyone knows that these are
not purchased out of the scanty wage
earned by labour. These same girls
are allowed to go unattended to
dances, and whether allowed or not
visit restaurants at all hours of the
day and night in company with men
twice, and sometimes thrice, their
age; it is not necessary to speculate
on the result. I recall one case which
was recently brought to my notice,
where a girl of sixteen was allowed
to attend a third rate dancing hall
and on the plea that the dance did
not break up until late obtained permission to get a room at some hotel
in town for the night. She had no
escort whatever. The prompt action
of the hotel proprietor probably saved
the girl from the natural consequences
of her folly, but what can be' said of
her parents, who unhesitatingly admitted that they had given their consent to this? I am convinced from
observation, and indeed I know full
well, that the Women's Council could
engage in no nobler and no more urgent work than in a systematic endeavour to arouse the parents of Victoria to a sense of their responsibility
for their children. There is a very
intimate association between this matter and the one which is attracting
their attention.
Apropos the fire in the Mahon
Block, I am just in receipt of a letter
from an old friend in Nelson, and
strange to say it incidentally discusses the fire situation. I extract
the following paragraph which is not
without significance at the present
moment. "Our Fire Chief has now
been here two years, and since he
came we haven't lost a building. A
pretty good record, don't you think?
Everything is working smoothly, and
we have just raised the Chief's wages
again. I wonder how long Victoria
will stand the nonsensical fire service it has. Poor old Victoria needs
some pointers. If the Council instead of talking so much about shortage of water would dig into the fire
service, and stop playing favourites,
they would unearth something. Verb
sap.1'
qCi
rtt4c*_z*.
LLOYD & CO., practical chimney
cleaners, 716 Pandora St. Chimneys can be cleaned without making an ellova mess. Try us and
be convinced.
Phone A476. NUF SED.
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days
after date we intend to apply to the
Hon. the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and "Works for a license to prospect
for coal and petroleum on the following
described lands, situated near Coal
Creek, Renfrew District, B.C.: Commencing at a post planted at the northeast corner of section 88, and marked
J. Hastie and H. J. Kirby; thence west
80 ehains to northeast corner of section
87; thence north 80 chains; thence east
to western boundary of the E. & N.
Railway Company's Lands; thence following said boundary of Esquimalt and
Nanaimo Railway Company's lands to
point of commencement.
Staked March 17th, 1908.
JAMES HASTIE.
H. J. KIRBY.
April 11
OEBTIPICATE   OP   THE   BECHSTBA-
TION OP AN EXTRA-PROVINCIAL
COUP ANY.
"Companies Aot, 1897."
I hereby certify that "The Ferro-Con-
erete Construction Company" has this
day been registered as an Extra-Provincial Company under the "Companies Act,
1897," to carry out or effect all or any
of the objects of the Company to which
the legislative authority of the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head offlce of the Company is
situate at Cincinnati in Hamilton County, Ohio.
The amount of the capital of the
Company Is flve hundred thousand dollars, divided into five thousand shares
of one hundred dollars each.
The head offlce of'the Company in this
Province   is   situate   at  Victoria,   and
Henry Graham Lawson, Solicitor, whose
address is Victoria, B.C., is the attorney
for  the   company.     Not  empowered   to
issue and transfer stock.
Given under my hand and Seal of Offlce
at Victoria,  Province of British Columbia,  this fourth day of April,  one
thousand nine hundred and eight.
S. Y. WOOTTON.
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this company
has been established and registered are:
Manufacturing and dealing in lire-proofing and building material of all kinds,
and constructing, equipping and owning
buildings, bridges and structures of all
kinds, and all things incident thereto,
of engaging In a general contracting
business; and of acquiring, holding, owning and disposing of all rights, patent
and otherwise, necessary and convenient for the prosecution of its business.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lamds and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
one mile west-north-west from Jesse
Island, running west 60 chains; thence
north 60 chains; thenee east 60 chains;
thence south 60 chains back to place
of commencement.
Dated February 22nd, 1908.
G. E. GIBSON.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of bay inside of
Jesse Island, one quarter of a mile
north of Jesse Island, running west 60
chains; thence north 60 chains; thence
east 60 chains; thence south 60 chains
back to the place of commencement.
Dated February 22nd, 1908.
H. G. ANDERSON.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NOTICE
The bridge at Craigflower over Victoria Arm is closed to vehicular traffic
until further notice.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Lands and Works Department, Victoria,
B.C., 9th March, 1908.
$1,000 Reward
THE GOVERNMENT of the
PROVINCE of BRITISH COLUMBIA hereby offers a reward of ONE
THOUSAND DOLLARS for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the two men who, on the
25th day of February, 1908, at thc
Gorge Hotel, near the City of Victoria, B.C., armed with revolvers, entered and, while committing a robbery
in the said Hotel, shot and wounded
one Richard Dancey.
DESCRIPTION.
No. 1—Man about 5 feet 11 inches ir
height, slim build, dressed in dark-
colored clothing; wore dark cap.
No. 2—Man about 5 feet 8 or 9 inches
in height; slim build; dressed in
dark-colored clothing; wore dark
cap. Both men wcre armed with
dark-colored revolvers and wore
long white cotton masks.
FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS reward will be given for information
leading to the arrest and conviction of
either one of the said men.
VICTORIA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank V. Hobbs
of Victoria, B.C., occupation gentleman,
intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted about
eight chains in a northerly direction
from the southeast corner of section
eleven, township eleven, thence following the sinuosities of the shore line
northwesterly 17 chains, thence southwesterly 10 chains, thence northerly 10
chains, thence southeasterly to the point
of intersection of the southeast quarter
of section eleven 11) and the southwest quarter of _ction twelve (12),
township 11, Renfrew District, and extending eastwards from said shore line
as before described and including the
foreshore and land covered by water.
Dated April 6, 1908.
April  18 FRANK VICTOR HOBBS.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a license to prospect for coal, on
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner of B. M. Richardson
Claim, being about one mile and a quarter northwest of Skidegate Inlet, Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence north eighty chains;
thence east eighty chains; thence south
eighty chains; thence west eighty chains
back to place of commencement, containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D. 1908.
D. R. YOUNG.
Mch 21 William Woods, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
(30) days after date, I intend to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal, on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the B. M. Richardson Claim, being about one mile and a
quarter northwest of Skidegate Inlet,
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence north eighty chains;
thence west eighty chains; thence south
eighty chains; thence east eighty chains
back to place of commencement, containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D. 1908.
C. A. YOUNG,
Mch 21 William Woods, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
(30) days after date, I intend to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal, on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile and a quarter north of Skidegate Inlet and mouth of the Honna
River, Graham Island, Queen Charlotte
Islands Group; thence south eighty
chains; thence east eighty chains; thence
north eighty chains; thence west eighty
chains back to place of commencement,
containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D. 1908.
B. M. RICHARDSON.
Meh 21 William Woods, Agent.
NOTICE ls hereby given that thirty
(30) days after date, I Intend to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for coal
on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of B. M. Richardson
Claim, being about one mile and a
quarter northwest of Skidegate Inlet,
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence south eighty chains;
thence east eighty chains; thence north
eighty chains; thence west eighty
chains; back to place of commencement,
containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D. 1908.
R. W. RAYSAY,
Mch 21 William Woods, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of Blinkinsop Bay,
about 100 feet west of the wharf; running west 60 chains; thence nortli 60
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south along the shore back to the place
of commeneement.
Dated  February  24th,  1908.
March 14 C. G. JOHNSTONE.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, Intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of Bllnklnsop Bay,
three-quarters of a mile from tho entrance of said bay, running west 80
chains; thence south CO cliains; thence
east along the shore of bay inside of
Jesse Island; thence northerly along the
shore of Bllnklnsop Bny to the place
of commencement.
Dated February 22nd, 1908.
O. C. BASS.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
TIMBER
If you have any
timber for sale
list it with us
We can sell it
BURNETT, SON  & CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,   B. C.
The days are getting Warm.
THE
WILSON BAR
Is Comfortable.
VISIT IT.
648 Yates St., Victoria, B. C.
Most
Particular
Smokers
Experience little or no difficulty
in finding a cigar or blend of
smoking mixture that fits their
taste.
Our Manila or Havana
Cigars can't be beaten.
We carry a most complete line of smokers'
sundries.
and0 n™/   Richardson
Cigar Store.     ll,VUBI UOVII
Phone 345
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days from date I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Land*
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted ln the
southwest corner and marked Initial
Post No. 1; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated March 7th, 1908.
Graham Island, B.C.
Apl. 4 R. D. HOYT.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Frank Kelly,
of Victoria, B.C., timber cruiser, intend
to apply for a special timber license
over the following described lands:
6. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
3, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres,  more or less.
December 17th,  1907.
Apl 4 FRANK KELLY.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICB that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lnnds and Works
for the purchase of the following described lands:—-Commencing at a post
planted on the east shore of Bllnklnsop
Bay, three-quarters of a mile from the
outlet of the creek at the head of bay,
running north along the shore CO chains;
thence east 60 chains; thence south CO
chains; thence west 60 chains back to
the place of commencement.
Dated February 24th, 1908.
L. P. LOCKE.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
days from date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum on the following
described lands, on Graham Island, B.C.:
Commencing at a post planted in the
southwest corner and marked Initial
Post No. 1, thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; therice west SO chains;
thence south 80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated  March  7th,   190S.
Graham Island, B.C.
Apl 4 J. O. HOYT.
By order,
F. S. HUSSEY,
Superintendent of Provincial Police.
Victoria, B.C., 26th February, 1908.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, tho undersigned. Intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner nf Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the head of Bllnklnsop Bay, 50 feet
north of the creek running to the bay;
running west 60 chains; thence north
60 chains; thence east 60 chains; thence
south 60 chains back to the place of
commencement.
Dated February  24th,  1908.
M. J. G. WHITE.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
days from date I Intend to apply to
tho Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal and potroloum on the following
described  lnnds:—
Commencing at a post planted in the
southwest corne rand marked Initial
Post No. 1, thence east 80 chains; thonce
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated  March  7th,  1908.
Graham  Islnnd,  B.C.
Ap'. 4 W. L. ARCHAMBEAU.
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt thirty
days from date I Intend to npply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum on the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted In the
northwest corner and marked Initial
Post No. 1; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains to place of commencement containing 640 acres.
Dated   March  7th,   1908.
Graham  Island,  B.C.
Apl. 4 JOHN DEARBORN. THE WEEK, SATURDAY APRIL 18, 1908,
1  I
/
itifiriri?ipipifififi?$if
*
if
if
if
Social and
if
if
Personal, t
Mr. F. G. Crickmay of Vancouver
is the guest of Mrs. Sherwood.
Mr. R. G. Ward came in from
Metchosin to take in "Mrs. Patrick
Campbell" at the theatre last Monday.
He was a guest at the Balmoral.
* *   *
Miss Wilson of Duncans arrived in
Victoria  last   Monday  and  was  the
^-^*j^^t$?^<H^?i^*^ !"easdl of Mrs-w-F- Bullen' Es<luimalt
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Williams and
* *   * children  are  the  guests  of  Mrs.   R.
Mr. E. R. Rickett is on a short visit J-  Roberts,  Kuper Island.
here   from   Vancouver. *   *   *
* *   * Mrs. W. Fisher, Metchosin, came in
Mr. E. M. Yarwood of Nanaimo is  for Mrs. Patrick Campbell, returning
in Victoria on a short visit. home a few days later.
* *   * *   *   *
Dr. Stewart of Mission is a visitor Mrs. Freeman and Miss Little leave
in town. next Tuesday on an extended visit to
* * be spent with friends and relatives in
Mr.  and  Mrs.   Dighton,   Cowichan San Francisco.
Bay, came down on Wednesday. *   *   *
* *   * Mr. R. G. Monteith and Mr. Foote
Mrs.    Fitzgibbons   returned   from  0f ie\_ Canadian Bank of Commerce
Seattle during the week
*   st
are   spending   their   Easter   holidays
fishing at Cowichan River.
Mr. R. Matthews, on the staff of the
. .       Bank of  Montreal  in Vancouver,  is
Mrs. Wilemar of Comox is visiting spending his holidays in Victoria and
is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Bulwer,
Esquimalt.
*   *   *
Mr. J. J. Theobald of San  Francisco   accompanied   by   Mr.   Webb,
spent a few days in the city, during
the week and were guests at the Em--
They left on Wednesday for
Mr.  F.  Hamilton of Agassiz is in
Victoria.
#   *   *
friends here.
*   *   *
Mr. R. Ross of Fernie was a guest
at the Empress for a short time.
Mr.   J.   Jukes,   Vancouver,   was
visitor here early in the week.
* *   •*.
press
Mr. J. Maitland-Dougal of Duncans  §eattie
arrived in the city on Wednesday.
* *   *
The members of the Alexander Club
are giving a tea next Wednesday.
Mrs. Gordon, beautifully gowned in
grey panne velvet, relieved bv touches
of old  lace, made a most charming
Mrs. Bert Powell, Vancouver, was  hostess at a smart little luncheon on
staying   with   relatives   here   during  Monday at the Empress.    The table
the week. ' was very  pretty and  dainty,  having
* *   * as a centre piece a large basket ol
Mrs.  Biggerstaff  Wilson  is  enter-  daffodils, asparagus and maiden hair
taining her friends at "five hundred"  fern.  and carelessly scattered  round
on Thursday next. lt were daffodils and fern frons.  The
* * * guests were Mrs. J. R. Anderson, Mrs.
Rocke Robertson, Mrs. Rithet, Mrs.
Rogers, Mrs. Hermann Robertson,
Mrs. H. Barnard, Mrs. Harold Robertson, Mrs. T. S. Gore, Mrs. Pooley,
Mrs. Heisterman has issued invitations for an "at home" next Wednesday.
,, , ,r      r, .,       _ „ Mrs! W. S.  Gore, Mrs. James,  Mrs.
Mr. and Mrs. Butler of Vancouver  w   p   B „       M'rs   Carj!uther'    and
were  m   Victoria   and   registered   at  otilers
and
the  Empress  during  their  stay
* *   *
Mr.  J.   N.   Ellis,  of  the   Terminal
City was a guest for a
the Empress.
* *   *
Mr. C. D. Morkill of Vancouver 1ui* ,we,ek' A,m°"g those wh° at"
was a guest at the Empress during tended the performance were: Mrs.
his visit in this city. A C. Flumerfelt, Mr. and Mrs. HA.
* *   *     -•       -    *-—-Ritchie,-Mr.   Av  W.   Bridgman,   Dr.
Mr   and   Mrs.  James   Douglas   of j^Mrs. O^Jone^Mr.atid Mrs.
Seattle  were  guests  at thc  Empress
Mrs. Patrick Campbell's appearance
few'days at  'iere 'ast Monday was about the only
event of much interest in social circles, it naturally having been a very
during their stay in the city.
Mrs.  Dunne,  Miss Dunne,  Mr.  D
T. S. Gore, Dr. and Mrs. Rundel Nelson, Dr. and Mrs. H. Robertson, Mr.
Henry Croft, Mr. J. R. Anderson,
Miss Clute, Miss L. Wark, Mr. Hag-
McLeod and  Mr. J.  W.   Stewart  of  "ty,   Mr.   McDougal,   Mr   and   Mrs,
Kenora are guests at the Empress.
* *   *
Mrs. A. Koeing of Shawnigan Lake
is in    thc    city    registered    at  the
Dominion.
* *   *
Mr. R. L. Morse of Seattle, after a
few days    here,    left    for    home on
Thursday.
* *   *
Mrs. Nixon, Thetis Island, was the
Piggott, Mr. and Mrs. Rant, the
Misses Rant, Mr. and Mrs. Hogg,
Mr. C. Hogg, Mr. Kenah, Mrs. Rattenbury, Miss Bowron, Messrs. S.
Powell and J. B. Bell, Mr. F. Pemberton, Miss Dupont, Mr. Bell, Miss
J. Bell, Miss N. Dupont, Miss Newcombe, Mr. Brady, Miss Monteith,
Miss T. Monteith, Mr. and Mrs. W.
S. Gore, Mr. A. Gore, Miss Hickey,
Miss Hickey, Mr. Blakemore, Miss
Blakemore, Mrs. P. de Noe Walker,
guest of Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Crease  Mr  A_ W. Harvey, Mrs. Blackwood,
during the week
* *    *
Mr. J. Anderson left on Thursday
for Saanich where he will spend a
few clays'  fishing.
* *   *
Mr. R. G. Roberts of Kuper Island
Mme. Kerpeydron, Mr. Sampson, Mr
J. Bridgman, Mr. Charles Newcombe,
Miss Cobauld, Mrs. Nixon, Mr. R.
Roberts, Mrs. Costerton, Mr. W.
Newcombe, Mr. and Mrs. V. Eliot,
Mrs. Langley, Miss Langley, Mr. M.
Hills, Mr. Ward, Mr. G. Williams, Mr.
after a few days in Victoria returned  Cookson,   Mr.   Burroughs,   Mrs.   W.
home last Tuesday.
*   *
Mr.   and   Mrs.  P.
couver are in Victoria
ing the  Empress their
Spicer of Van-
-ind are mak-
headquarters.
Mr. and Mrs.  R,   P.   Roberts
Mr.   Greig   of   Kuper    Islaud   came
down  last  week and  were  guests at
the Balmoral, the two hitter leaving
for the  North a dav or so later.
'"isher, Mr. W. Fisher, Miss King,
Mr. and Mrs. Carew Gibson, Mrs.
King, Mr. Stewart Williams, Mr. and
Mrs. Billinghur'st, Miss Miles, Mrs.
White Eraser, Mr. B. Parker, Mrs.
Tuck, Miss Tuck, Mrs. Archer Mar-
ind till, Mr. Newton, Miss Tilton, Mrs.
Coles, Mrs. Matson, Mrs. J. 0. Grahame, Mrs. Kirk, Mr. T. Swinnerton,
Mr. and Mrs. [-1. Hardy and many
others too numerous to mention,
: ROOFING slate;
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For Prices and Particulars apply to
J. S. FLOYD, Secretary-Treasurer ♦
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VANCOUVER.BC.
P
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obtained in all countries
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville St.,
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
"In the Spring the Sneezer's fancy
Turns to Thoughts of prime Old Scotch."
NOTHING LIKE QOOD WHISKY TO CURE
A BAD COLD
Simpson's Blue Funnel Scotch, per bottle $1.25
Spey Royal Scotch, per bottle $1.25
Strathmill, per bottle 90c
Gilbey's Invalid Port, per bottle $1.25
Gilbey's Dry Gin, per bottle, $1;  Pint  50c
Plymouth Dry Gin, per bottle, $1; Pint 50c
AROMATIC SCHNAPPS.
Distilled from Juniper, recommended by leading physicians for
all   diseases   of  the   Kidney,   Rheumatism,   Neuralgia, etc.
Per bottle   $1.25
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
Up-to-Date Grocers.
1317 Government Street. Tels. 52, 1052, 1590
r_
7*
JUST A WORD
ABOUT   PLANS
My ambition is to fill Canada
with Beautiful Homes. Now
and then some man tries to
build his house without plans.
Have you noticed the usual results? Properly drawn plans
will save on the cost of the
house, furthermore, completely
drawn plans will enable the
owner to take competitive bids
on the wrok.
Remember specially drawn
plans cost you a little more
than the stock pattern book designs, why not have what you
desire—the cost of a set of
drawings for a home to cost
say $1,000 would be $20. If
you can afford to build at all,
you acn afford to build right.
Send me your ideas and I will
work them into practical shape
for $2.00. A copy of my booklet on "Homes" will be mailed
to you for 5 cents. Better
write me now for a copy.
E. STANLEY M1TT0N
Architect    -    Vancouver, B.C.
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When you wear one of our
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Write today for our descriptive catalogue and price list of
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transformations.
B. C. HAIR GOODS CO.
436  Granville  Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
AGENTS WANTED
We pay resident agents good
salary to represent us during
their spare time.
PACIFIC  COAST  BBOWN
SEEDS, TREES
For the Farm, Garden,  Lawn, or
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Reliable,   approved   varieties,   at
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No Borers.    No Scale.    No fumigation  to  damage  stock.
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3010   Westminsted   Boad
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When staying at the office in the evening or going to the
theatre, a dinner at the "Poodle Dog" will be appreciated by
those who enjoy a good meal promptly served. We know our
efforts have been appreciated because we have been told so.
—A Centre of Good Cheer is
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Smith & Shaughnessy, Proprietors
YATES ST., Victoria, B. C.
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IN THE HOT WEATHER
A Gas Stove feels good. Your
kitchen will be as cool and
comfortable as any other part
of the house if you
Cook by Gas
You are then spared the heat,
dirt, worry and inconvenience
attendant on a coal range ami
you escape the awful danger of
an oil stove. Gas for cooking
is positively unsurpassed. We
have a splendid lot of new
Gas Ranges In our Showrooms
which we would like to have
you see.
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, Ltd.
CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS.
KODAK
DAYS
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HAND
Write me for 1908
Catalogue
Will Marsden
665 Granville Street,      Vancouver, B. C. f__inrs_T-~&r__~_~i
lgsford Smith & Co.
Stock and General
AUCTIONEERS
amission and Real Estate Agents.
Homer Street     Vancouver. jj
ISL_U.__1____IX._0
Vancouver   Edition
The Week
A British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vancouver B. @.
a innrrryryrirrrintrnntwf vvt
Stewart Williams R.CJsakm
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION AND
REAL ESTATE AGENTS
Si FORT ST. VICTORIA, B. C.
aiuuuuuuutB.gaaamtiuut.u.t
V.   No. 12
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL iS, 1908
Onb Dollar Pbk Annum
hree things make earth unquiet,
nd four she cannot brook;
he pious Agur counted them,
nd put them in a book—
hese Four Tremendous Curses
ith which mankind is curst:
But, A Servant when he Eeigneth,
ld Agur counted first.
Handmaid that is Mistress
7e need not call upon;
Fool when he is full of Meat
fall fall asleep anon.
Odious Woman married
[ay bear a babe and mend—
Jut A Servant when he Eeigneth
|s Confusion to the end.
lis feet are swift to tumult,
lis hands are slow to toil;
lis ears are deaf to judgment,
lis lips are loud in broil:
Ind, if his folly opens
ihe unnecessary hells,
Servant when he Eeigneth
throws the blame on some one else.
—Eudyard Kipling.
I Easter offering of the Victoria Col-
its British born readers is an
at and scurrilous attack upon one
[the London Times has declared to
[greatest personality in the Empire.
[Eudyard Kipling's first letter to
7amily," appeared in Colliers, the
pt has not ceased to gird at the ex-
opinions and impressions of the
ms author.    Its attitude is not in
pse original, for it has lined up with
Canadian papers in resenting plain
pg, and the statement of unpalatable
This is characteristic of the Ca-
press from the Atlantic to the
as long as a visitor will compli-
be Dominion and declare that it is
leatest country on earth with the
limitless resources, and the finest
jtions,  he  is  acclaimed great and
but let him once throw aside the
aentary garb, and tell the public
how matters strike him, and to
epical American phrase, "the coun-
no further use for him," and the
1   promptly  proceed   to   make
peat of him.    It is quite underlie that self-respecting citizens of
luntry should resent carping criti-
the vapouring of unimportant no-
|who pose in an attitude of auth-
but what shall be said of the intel-
of any English speaking country
|denies to Kipling the right and the
to discern true conditions and to
[illy reflect them.
AN EMPIEE BUILDEE.
equipment   is   in   every   respect
not only has he possessed oppor-
. perhaps unequalled in the case of
;her writer of studying Imperial
ns in every part of the Empire,
has demonstrated that he possesses
jellous insight, the insight of genius,
.man nature, the workings of the
heart and the true inwardness of
il and economic conditions. Further
ie enjoys fame as a great writer, it
laps as an Imperialist that he has
is mark, ancl his services to the
in arousing England to a sense
[importance of Greater Britain be-
le Seas, have earned for him the
g gratitude of all her sons, and the
Laureate of tlie Empire.    Should
\ ordinary mortal gifted with judt
; intelligence and no more, pause
charging him with making a state-
infamously false"  and declaring
A grosser   or   more   indefensible
Kipling's Letters to the Family.
Impressions and Experiences in British Columbia.
slander was never uttered." Whether the
mental equipment of the editor of the Colonist entitles him to sit in judgment upon
Kipling, and to denounce him in something lower than "second class" language,
may be safely left to the readers of his
journal, and admirers of Kipling will not
be fearful of the result. Such unreasoning vituperation almost suggests that Kipling did not speak the whole of his mind
when he said that "the rigour of domestic
labour, without the aid of servants, had
driven some women off their heads." If
there were the slightest ground for the
attack of the Colonist it would be necessary to ask what could have happened
within a few months to change the hero
of the Empire with his broad humanness,
and quick sympathies into a blind, unreasoning, slandering penny-a-liner, with no
true insight, no just conception and no
understanding of conditions which he has
studied all his life and illuminated by
every utterance. And what is the occasion
for this storm in a tea cup?
DOMINATED BY LABOUE UNIONS.
The publication of Kipling's impressions of British Columbia, and especially
of labour conditions there. The Week has
carefully studied this particular letter, and
makes bold to say that Kipling is the only
great writer who has had the courage to
state not only what is absolutely true,
but what people all over the Province are
saying with bated breath, because they are
afraid to say it openly and fearlessly. The
strongest statement made by Kipling in
his letter is that the source of most of
the trouble in Britisli Columbia is the
domination of labour unions, and the autocracy of labour. He attributes this to the
fact that the unions are controlled and
directed by American agitators from across
the line. Will any fair-minded man, free
from the fear of offending advertisers or
alienating votes, venture to deny the absolute accuracy of either of these statements .
Is it not absolutely true that politicians
and business men alike are afraid to speak
out openly on this subject because of political and trade interests, and because if
they did their business would suffer?
AMEBICAN DICTATION.
How many times have the more reasonable of Canadian journals pointed out to
Canadian Labour organizations, the folly
of submitting to American dictation?
How many disastrous strikes have been
fomented on this side the line by American officials of American unions, and as
was clearly demonstrated in the C.P.E.
strike of 1902, at thc instigation of American capitalists i Who in British Columbia is ignorant of the fact that American agitators of the worst possible type
were the founders of the Asiatic Exclusion League in this Province, and that
these men when seen in tlieir true colours
became so intolerable to their associates
that they were openly denounced and excluded from the counsels of the League.
And yet the Colonist denounces Kipling
for saying that, "What is called labour absolutely dominates this part of the world."
Note how carefully Kipling says, "What
is called labour," by which he means the
demagogues and "blatherskites" whom
American domination forces into and
maintains in control of Canadian Labour
Unions and allied organizations. Is Kipling wrong or is it that the truth is un
palatable to the Colonist?
THE SALVATION AEMY PLAN.
Once more Kipling is charged with misrepresentation when he states that the Salvation Army plan of bringing in white
immigrants   from   Great   Britain   fell
through 'for political reasons."   This is
not only absolutely but it is most precisely
true; when a year ago Finance Minister
Tatlow had concluded (all but signing) a
contract with the Salvation Army through
Commissioner Coombs for bringing in ten
thousand white labourers, the Government
was denounced by every labour union in
the Province, the politicians got to work,
the members of the local Legislature were
beset on every hand, they in turn, to a
man, clamoured at the Government and
represented that labour was up in arms
and that if the contract was actually
signed they would lose the labour vote in
every direction.    Friends of the movement represented that the Government just
victorious from the polls, and with a four
years' lease of life before it, could safely
take the chance, and leave the wisdom of
the policy to be demonstrated during their
term of office, but no, the voice of Demos
was all powerful, and "for political reasons"  and  political  reasons  alone,  the
scheme was turned down at that time. The
Colonist very disingenously seeks to make
capital out of the situation as it is today,
and because train loads of English settlers
are being brought into Canada by the Salvation Army, seeks to show that Kipling's
statement is incorrect.    But the Colonist
might at least have the honesty to point
out that this has matured since Kipling
was here, through a revival of the original
negotiations.   Further if it had any desire to treat the subject fairly, it would
admit that two present conditions have
rendered it possible to carry out the arrangement with the Salvation Army, the
first being the effective check imposed on
Oriental Immigration by the policy of the
Provincial Government, and the negotiations of the Federal Government;   and
further the urgent demand for thousands
of labourers on railway construction. The
former had not been secured when Kipling was here, ancl not until the recent
session of Parliament did the policy become effective.   The latter has eventuated
from the successful negotiations between
the Government and the G.T.P., all of
which have taken place this year.   It is
well known to every independent observer
that at the time of Kipling's visit, the
attitude of organized labour towards the
Salvation Army's scheme of immigration,
was as irreconcilable as ever, and even
since the date of his visit, when it was
known tliat the Government were about
to reopen negotiations, the labour unions
again passed condemnatory resolutions. In
views of these facts, how can the Colonist
deny that the original scheme was turned
clown for political reasons?
DOMESTIC SERVICE,
The Colonist takes Kipling to task for
liis remarks in reference to domestic service. The Week has carefully read and
reread these remarks ancl from its own
experience, does not hesitate to confirm
them in the main. It may be a little
exaggeration, but only a little one, when
he says that lack of domestic servants is
one of tlie reasons why over-worked white
women die or go off their heads.    There
is not a married man in this Province who
does not know from bitter experience that
there is at least a kernel of truth in this
somewhat dramatic statement. Strange to
say the Colonist appears to be more incensed at the suggestion of insanity than
death, and perhaps the former is a more
merciful denouement, but allowing in this
instance for a little poetic licence, is it
not an absolute fact that the restriction
of Chinese immigration has deprived our
wives of necessary menial labour, doubled
the cost of that labour, led to over-work
and over-worry, in every way hardened the
conditions of life, raised the cost of living, created the tendency to abando housekeeping to live in rooms or hotels, and as
Kipling very suggestively points out, paved
the way to the inevitable reduction in the
birth rate ? These statements are all true,
and none the less true because unpalatable
to the Colonist.
FEEE  WHITE  IMMIQEATION.
Kipling goes to the heart of the subject of immigration when he says: "If
the Asiatic goes this part of the Continent
will drop out of sight unless we get free
white immigration."    Accepting the hypothesis, it is impossible to dispute the
conclusion, but fortunately it is not necessary, because thanks to the enlightened
policy of some public men and of that
section of the press which from the beginning of the agitation advocated free
white immigration, public opinion on this
subject has gradually crystallized and today it is generally recognized that even
if the phrase is more picturesque thau
precise Kipling's advice to "pump in the
whites" is after all the true solution of
the problem.    It furnishes another illustration of "life's little ironies" that the
man who has suggested the true and only
practical solution should have to submit
to the ill-natured snarls of "blind leaders
of the blind."   But he has his justification in the fact that his suggestion has
been accepted and the wisdom of his policy
recognized.      Even   the    all    powerful
unionism Las been obliged to take in a
reef and to submit, though with ill-grace,,
to the carrying out of a policy which it.
has uncompromisingly resisted.     British.
Columbia is getting, and will get, free
white immigration, and in proportion as
the white man comes in, the Mongolian*
will diminish both in numbers and in importance.   It is not necessary in discussing this question to enter into economic
reasons   why  yellow  must  succumb  to
white.    The racial reasons which nature
supplies and which existed before economics were thought of still prevail, and
must always be the determining factor
when the races clash.    Conditions today
may be and undoubtedly are as Kipling
describes them.   His impressions are not,
as the  Colonist somewhat disgracefully
suggests, the vapourings of "imaginary individuals," but the genuine convictions of
one of the keenest observers and profoundest thinkers of our race.    Only a contemptible mind could have conceived the
idea that Kipling wished to traduce British Columbia.   He wished to do what he
lias most effectively done, that is point
out the salient features of our economic
and social conditions.
EMPIEE BUILDING.
We are so absorbed in the fascinating
task of building up a new country, and wc
stand so close to the landscape that it is
out of perspective, and we do not see the
ridges and the hollows. The clearer eye
and the riper judgment of the "Laureate
of the Empire" lias penetrated beneath the
mists, and shown us not merely the crags
ancl peaks whicli obtrude themselves upon
(Concluded on Page Four) I
THE WKKK, SATURDAY, APRIL 18, i*o8.
IN THE OLD LAND.
By RAMBLER.
(Continued)
Duncan said that she would soon console herself with another husband in
the person of the Laird of Comrie, she
composed  a  wild  Gaelic  lament.    I
ner plate. Between Kenmore and
Aberfeldy are Druidical remains in the
• shape of three complete circles of
stones standing upon their edges—
some of huge size—how the Ancient
Britons handled them is a marvel.
We were very loth to leave Ken-
more. It is in the heart of a district full of interesting associations
and most picturesque.   Moreover the
I'd rather be with Gregor
In ragged  grab of hair
Than with the little meadow laird
In silks and ribbons rare.
Tho' down with sevenfold fury,
The blinding drifts might sweep
For me would Gregor find a crag
And sheltered there we'd sleep.
will give you a few verses to give hotd is 0„e ~f the" best in Scotland,
you an idea of what it is like: as far as comfort is concerned. From
there we went to Edinburgh—only
stayed in that city a say. Went all
over the Castle and amongst other
things was shown the window out of
which James I. was lowered, when
about an hour old down to friends
of Mary who took him off to be baptized in the Roman Catholic faith.
Women who have had kids say that
  no child of that age could have survived the ordeal, and strangely
I afterwards went down Loch Tay enough) about fifty yeafs ag0> whi,e
on  a  comfortable  little  steamer  to repairs were being made in that por-
Killin about fifteen miles distant—to tion of the Castle, where his mother
see the ruins of Finlarig Castle and was confined, they found a small box
the ancient seat  of the  Bredalbane with thc skeleton of a new born in"
Campbells, also the scene of the prin- fant  contained  therein  and  on  the
cipal exploits and misdeeds of Black cover rouShly    carved-    J'    R"  sur"
Duncan.   From all accounts he was a mounted by a crown'   K was rePort"
sublimated rascal, his only redeeming ed to Queen Victoria, who gave in-
feature being lack of fear.    The ruins structions to bury it and who tried
are now being well looked after by t0  hush   h  up,-but  the  story  got
the Marquis of Bredalbane, who has abroad'    Now    the    theory    is that
built a well around them, and they Mary's infant died and another baby
are  in  charge  of  an  old   Highland was substituted, who afterwards be-
soldier (a Campbell) in full costume, came James 6tn of Scotland, and 1st
who shows visitors round.   After the of England.
Castle was burned by the Royalists,      From Edinburgh we stayed off at
during the    first   Jacobite    rising in Glasgow   to   see   a  friend  but   only
which conflagration the noble Duncan stopped there a couple of days, too
perished, the peasants used it as a much dirt, squalor and drunken wo-
quarry for building purposes. Well
about two years ago, the above mentioned caretaker had occasion to excavate some drains belonging to cottages near by and found the flat
stones used for covering were sculptures taken from the ruins.    He gath
men. I hate Glasgow, went on to
Dumfries. This is where Robbie
Burns lived for some three years
at the latter end of his life and died
there. When he took up his abode
he must have had in his minds eye
the interests of guides to tourists in
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CHEMIST
Government   Street,   near   Yates.
ered them together and with other the coming ages. You leave the main
relics   has  quite  a  museum  in  the street by going down a court, then
Castle.    I  took  a  photo  of the  in-  up an  alley,  thence through  a 	
terior, which, if you will examine and into a passage. Well at the
closely will be found interesting as entrance to the Court stand an army
showing the way in which obstre- of ragged boys and girls, these tell
perous women were treated in those you something, that is they all shout
days. The men they hanged, but at you at one and the same time in
spanked in the good old Scotch way an unknown tongue, by courtesy call-
the. women, a course of treatment, ed Scotch English, which I was in-
which might be found to have effica- formed afterwards being translated
cious results in modern times. was to the effect that each and all
From there I visited the Clan Mc- of them were guides to Burns' house.
Nab burial ground on a small island Then as you proceed they are rein-
near by.    The  last, of that clan, Sir forced at the alley by another band
Alexander McNab,    emigrated   with and  so  on.. The  unfortunate  thing
about four hundred of his clansmen for the tourist is the fact that the
in the  beginning of the  nineteenth different bands will not agree among
■century to Ontario.    He afterwards themselves as to which particular de-
became a man of note.   There is a tachment you belong to, and as this
square and a street called after him question has usually to be settled by
in   Hamilton.     He   was   practically a free fight with the tourist as the
forced to this by the Campbells. They Umpire the  feelings of the pilgrim
are a good illustration of the Scotch towards the immortal Robert can be
characteristic of "holding on to all imagined for having chosen such a
they  get  their  hands  upon,"   being place to end his days in.   However,
really   interlopers   into   this   part  of as each of these youthful guides rang-
Scotland, but have used their pecu- ing in age from four to (eight are quite
liar  qualities  and  methods  to  such  satisfied  with  a  half-penny  each  a
an   extent  that   the   Marquis   owns whole penny being looked upon as a
about one hundred miles by forty of competence, it does not cost so very
territory in the district.    This kind much after all to defray the expense
of landlordism is the curse of Scot- of  their  services.    I  think  by  the
land.   He is too poor to work such  time we reached the late Mr. Burns'
an estate profitably and yet will not  residence we had a following of about
sell   an   acre.    The   consequence   is thirty-seven,    the   clothes   of   which
what was once a populous  country brigade would probably have  about
is now given up to sheep and deer decently covered some twelve children
runs.   The people preferring to emi- at the outside,
grate to Canada, where they are land     Besides   Cairlaveroch   Castle   and
owners than to remaining as tenants Thrieve Castle, the latter being the
in Scotland.   Along Loch Tay there 0jd stronghold of the Douglas family,
are the ruins of whole villages and -which  stood  off the King of Scot-
farm houses shewing what the popu- land's army for months and was only
lation  once  was, and  this  is  found taken through the instrumentality of
to be the situation all over Scotland.  Mons, a monster cannon constructed
Of course there are a few good land for the purpose—now in Edinburgh
owners like, for instance, Sir Donald Castle—there are two very interest-
Currie, who has the means and the jng Abbey ruins in the neighbourhood
inclination to induce his  tenants to 0f  Dumfries,  Lincluden and  Sweet-
remain.    I drove all through his es- heart.   We drove out to see the latter
tates,  formerly the  property of thc  about   eight   miles   distant   on   the
Menzies family and Campbell of Glen- Sabbath, when to our disgust we were
lyon.    What  a  contrast  to  that  of informed by the lady who had charge
Bredalbanes. There is a fine old spe-  0f the  key  that there was  no  ad-
cimen of a Highland stronghold on mittance on the seventh day.   I tried
Sir  Donald's  estate—Garth  Castle— every persuasion, monetary and other-
built upon what must have been an wise, but without avail, no sight see-
impregnable position at the junction i„g could  be tolerated on the  Sab-
of two streams.   He spent consider- baat'h,    How  I  "cussed"  the  whole
able money upon it and restored some  Scotch nation and their Sabbatarian-
material portions.   The old iron door ism.    However, I saw all I wanted
is   replaced  in  its  original  position and with the help of a couple of Eng-
secured by a padlock as big as a din- lishmen who were companions in thc
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THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 18 1908
', misfortune obtained a good
■ of the interior. It has a great
(historical associations connect-
th it and is for a ruin in a fair
pf preservation. As regards this
ar phase of Scotch character I
(acknowledge that it is far dif-
to what it was some years
I The intolerance and bigotry
It respect is fast dying out, only
Jlder conservative people retain
narrow views concerning be-
ur on that day.
ad an amusing experience in this
rction  in   Wolverhampton,   was
[pending the evening with some
Js who had at the time staying
|them an old Scotchman and his
After dinner they got me talk-
Ibout my travels and the subject
lrmah came up.   I told them that
Is   the   custom   there   to   pray
[wheels mostly turned by hand,
some instances they were work-
water power.   I remarked that
|isidered it a  good  scheme, be-
great saving of labour.     The
I who is unmarried and of very
Jtain age and consequently of a
■disappointed,   dour   disposition,
[11 females in that position, jump-
me like a thousand of bricks,
aid she could not allow me to
like that in her presence.    She
po much respect for her Maker,
pit   he   had   to   do   with   th'e
Ion   I    could    not    understand,
rer,  I  at  once  collapsed,  sub-
and  gave  no  more   travelling
|iscences.    But   my  time   came
Dn in the evening.   She evident-
lilized that by my manner toiler   I   was   none  too   pleased
|ier snub, so in as sweet a way
vinegar face could allow she
I me if I would not like to come
rtnd live in the land of my fore-
is.   I  replied no, preferred Ca-
I but it might be possible to in-
ne to live six days a week in
Ind.   What did I mean by that,
squired.   I answered if by any
]ince fate compelled me to live
3rth   I   would   every   Saturday
take   the   train   and migrate
Ito spend the Sabaaath  (and I
^d the A's) in a country where
vere  accustomed  to  live  in a
^d manner on that day, in fact
would rather be in the peni-
\y in England on Sunday than
it   in   thraldom   in   Scotland.
Jbsided—
Dumfries we traveled on to
Irhampton, where we had a good
|with   friends   for   two   weeks.
is nothing of interest in that
It except coal and iron.    I had
J conversations with  the differ-
lembers  of  the  family  on  the
(questions.    They were former-
leral Free Traders, but they are
Ihamberlanites.   The fact is that
if the  country  is  going back-
J and will continue to do so un-
[ngland changes her jug-handled
Trade policy.   The population is
Ising and iron works are being
jown and dismantled.    While on
lubject I may mention the fact
|dien in Edinburgh the last Vul-
Factory (employing 2,000 peo-
|n the British  Isles  closed.   In
ext letter will enter more fully
lhe subject, also the social and
Ijus ones that are agitating peo-
Ininds over here at the present
Sporting
Comment.
The football match last Saturday
between Ladysmith and Nanaimo for
the Island championship, attracted
the largest crowd that has ever witnessed a football match in this city
and to say that every one of the spectators got their money's worth is putting it mildly. Although, from a
scientific standpoint the game was
not as good as was expected it was
evenly contested, every player exerting himself to win. On the play Nanaimo certainly should have won. The
players showed more dash, were on
the ball all the time and still played
their positions. On the other hand
the Ladysmith forwards showed very
poor class and it is to them that the
blame of failure can be rested. They
were seldom if ever in their places,
often as far back as half way line,
and this when they were behind is
something that cannot be understood.
Had the forwards of the Ladysmith
team displayed as much energy as
the Nanaimo forwards there is no
question as to which would have won.
The Ladysmith half-backs gave their
forwards lots of fine openings but
they were never taken advantage of.
Time after time both Hewitt and
Graham were given practically speaking free kicks owing to the fact that
the forwards were not in their places.
I have often seen the Ladysmith forwards in action, but never have I
seen them play such a poor game as
they did Saturday. It is to the credit
of the half-back division that the
game resulted in a draw. Time after
time they broke up dangerous rushes
but their work was futile as the forwards failed to take advantage of
their efforts. I have to add my congratulations to Referee Mahoney of
New Westminster for the able manner in which he handled the game. At
no time did he lose control and every
foul of any consequence was always
attended to. The management made
a good move when Mahoney was
secured.
The local baseballers had their first
practice last week and sufficient players to form two teams turned out.
If this enthusiasm continues there is
no reason why Victoria should not
have as good a team as represented
this city a few years ago. I understand the schedule for the season is
being drawn up which will provide
for a game nearly every Saturday if
this is carried out ictorians will have
no reason to spend a dull Saturday
afternoon.
As the summer season appraoches
the cricketers are commencing to get
uneasy and are anxious for the time
to arrive when they may take the
field. From all reports this grand
ola game will flourish in this city this
summer and I hope that the local
teams will maintain the reputation
they have established in the past.
His Valentine.
send her a present," said he,
the 14th of Februaree!"
—but no, it is best
leae out the rest,
Itaht alentine came C. 0. D.l
I do not like to interfere with the
management of any club, but I have
to point out to the lacrosse club that
unless a start is made on the new
grounds it will be impossible to play
the first game there. The grounds
themselves have to be attended to,
fences and grandstands erected and
all must be done in exactly live weeks
from today. This is not allowing
very much time and I would advise
the club members to get busy.
Useful Odes.
|nned her verse on white foolscap,
told of Cupid's capers;
Jswered: "Send some more, old
chap;
make such nice curl papers."
A Lazy M. D.
Hayrix—What  be  yore  son
J.ew th' city?
Meadowgrass—He's   studyin'
■doctor.
I. Hayrix—The idee! Is th' doc-
|o lazy to study for himself?—
zo News.
The Nanaimo Free Press says:
"Despite the fact that the Victoria
senior clubs made a very poor showing against Nanaimo and Ladysmith
the North Ward juniors and Victoria
West intermediates have won the
championship in their classes and suggests that the seniors would have
done better if only one team had been
entered. This is a good suggestion
and although it is rather early to discuss next year's affairs it might be
acted on to advantage by the local
clubs.
The action of the Victoria Baseball
Club in presenting cups for competition in the Intermediate League and
also for a league to comprise teams
teams from business houses is highly
commendable and should produce
good results. If the older players
maintain this attitude to the younger
players there is no reason why the
American National game should not
prosper in this city.
Although it might be said that it
does not come under direct attention,
I venture to suggest that something
should be done towards arranging for
the annual celebration of Empire Day.
This is Victoria's big holiday, but
unless an early start is made it is
liable to prove a failure. There is
now only about five weeks before the
celebration, which is none too much
time.
UMPIRE.
MISS BESSIE ABOTT
Of  the  Metropolitan   Grand   Opera
House, New York.   At the
Victoria, May 8th.
MAPS
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Vollieries
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Anthracite Coal for sale.
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City Market
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T.  W.  PATTERSON, Esq.,
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Brokers), Vancouver, B.C.
soliottob
GEO.   H.   COWAN,   Esq.,   K.C,   Vancouver, B. C.
TBUSTBEB
YORKSHIRE   GUARANTEE   &   SECURITIES    CORPORATION,    LTD.,
Vancouver, B.C.
The Bank of Vancouver is being organized to meet In part the Increased banking accommodation required by the natural and steady
expansion of business, coincident with the great development of the
country and especially of British Columbia, and while organizing to conduct a general banking business, will give special consideration to the
Industries and commerce of the Province, and is being established primarily for this purpose, and through its connections in Great Britain,
Eastern Canada and the United States, It will be able to greatly facilitate the lvnestment of outside capital In the various enterprises of the
Province.
It ls the intention to open Branch Otllces at various points from
time to time as opportunity arises.
SUBSCRIPTIONS POB STOCK.
The Stock Books of the Bank of Vancouver are now open for the
subscription of the Capital Stock at the Provisional Offices of the Bank
at the corner of Pender and Homer Streets, Vancouver, B.C., and also
at   the   offices   of   Mitchell,   Martin & Co., 643 Fort Street, Victoria, B.C.
A. L. DEWAR, Secretary.
After "La Grippe" Drink
Carnegie's Porter.
Far better than drugs. Nothing like it for building up health
and strength and giving one the power to throw off wasting
diseases. It is now universally recommended by leading
physicians in Europe a:id on tllis continent on account of its
goodness and purity.
The recent analysis of the Pure Food
Inspection Laboratory declares Carnegie's
Porter to be "A pure Malt beverage,
free   from   any   kind   of   preservative."
Call for a bottle at your hotel, bar, club or restaurant. Look
at the label and you'll see that it is bottled at the famous
Gothenburg Brewery, in Sweden. None genuine without this,
label. If your dealer is unable to supply you with a case for
home use, kindly 'phone us and we will see that you get the.
genuine—the beverage of health.
PITHER & LEISER,
Wholesale Distributors.
•0OOOOOO-00*0-0-0-CK>-(_K>O^^
Dermatologist
Institute
Mrs. Stanncr (graduate of Mrs. Nettie Harrison, San Fran-
cosco), cordially invites the ladies of Victoria to call and investigate
her methods. Expert in Dermatology, Facial Massage, Hair
Dressing, Shampooing, Scalp Treatment, Manicuring, etc.
CLAY PACK FOR THE COMPLEXION.
ELECTRICAL FACE MASSAGE.
Room 23, Vernon Block
Hours 9 to 6.       - - - - Phone 1629
ooooooooooooooooo<x><>o<>ooooo<>ooo<xk>ooooooooooo<x>ooooo - i   —■■■-■ niu.       -
THB WEBt, SATURDAY APRIL 18, 1908
Incorporated 1906.
Capital, J500.000.00
Capital increased
in 1907
. to .. .$2,000,000.00
Subscribed
Capital,    $560,000
Reserve . . J50.000
Surplus, Jan. 30,
1907  .   .  $130,000
J. B. MATHERS, Sen. Man.
IN CLOSING UP ESTATES
either as Executors or Assignees
the Dominion Trust Co., Ltd., Is
never influenced by ulterior motives. Their entire ambition,
effort, and energy is directed towards securing the best possible
returns for all concerned.
Name this company executor In
your will. Blank will forms furnished free of charge and stored
ln our safety deposit vaults,
when we are made your executor.
DOMINION   TRUST CO.,
Limited.
338 Halting Street, Vert,
Vancouver, B. O.
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
83% Government Street.. .Victoria, B.C.
626   Hastings Street. ...Vancouver, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE..Manager and Editor
Blind Leaders
of the Blind.
Last Sunday I picked up the Western Clarion, the organ of Socialism.
The whole of the first page with the
exception of a small space devoted
to the historic utterances of great
men was editorial. I should like to
quote a few of the most striking sentences, not because they possess the
slightest merit but because they illustrate the true character of the men
who are responsible for the journalism which is supposed to represent
the Socialists.
I have asked my editor to say something about one aspect of the matter
in his column, so will content myself
with referring to a subject singularly
appropriate for the Easter number
of The Week. I notice in several
places that references which can only
be regarded as blasphemous are made
to Christ, and His claims as a leader
and a Saviour are derided. The style
of the writer recalls that with which
Bradlaugh in England, and lngersoll
in America familiarized the public
thirty years ago, and I have wondered more than once whether it is
possible for an intelligent man really
to believe that Christ has no claims
upon the race, or whether the whole
attitude of these iconoclastic writers
is not a pose.
One wishes to give every propagandist credit for sincerity. The fair-
minded man and the seeker after
truth will not be deterred in his quest
because he finds himself confronted
with novel and startling ideas. He
will not conclude that a new proposition is false because it runs counter
to his preconceived ideas or to his
cherished beliefs. No man is more
out of date in this progressive age
than he who has ceased to be receptive and adaptable, and yet there are
not a few of us who believe that on
some subjects the last word has been
said, and those who profess the Christian faith at any rate are not expecting a new revelation.
It is inconceivable how any man
who has studied the life and teaching
of Christ can come to the conclusion
that he is not the friend of humanity.
It is still more difficult to conceive
how any labouring man or friend of
labour can deny His claims. Of all
the great teachers the world has
known not one has identified himself
so absolutely with the labour classes.
Born the son of a Carpenter He worked at the bench until he was thirty
years of age. When He abandoned
manual labour to undertake His mission in life He chose all His friends
and helpers from the labouring class.
He made His home with people of
the same class, and His most intimate
personal friends, to whose hearth He
gladly turned from the stress and
burden of the day, lived in a cottage
in Bethany.
No man of note has so dignified and
glorified common toil, both by his
own devotion to work, and by the
halo with which he has surrounded
it. But apart from His own example,
and the lessons which it inculcates, it
can never be forgotten that His teachings as to the dignity of labour, the
spirit in which it should be performed,
its economic aspect, the true relation
between capital and labour, and government and labour are all upon such
a high plane of wisdom and justice
that more than one profound student
has declared that the translation of
the principles enunciated in the Sermon on the Mount into actual practice would solve all labour problems
and correct the evils which spring
from existing conditions.
There is no substitute for the
Golden Rule, and it still remains the
corner stone of all progressive labour
legislation. The vast improvement in
labour conditions, especially during
the last fifty years, is mainly due to
a recognition of this principle; and
although the world is still very far
from living up to its requirements the
nearer the approximation, the greater
the increase of good understanding.
The most conspicuous feature of
labour legislation during the last few
decades has been the adoption of arbitration, and later of conciliation, in
the settlement of disputes. This is
the distinct outgrowth of the reasoning as opposed to the compulsory attitude of the disputants; and so
marked has been the success attending its introduction into the labour
world, that it has now been adopted
as a permanent factor in International politics.
In spite of the frailty and blunders
of many who have constituted themselves leaders in the religious world,
it still remains that Christianity is
the greatest moral force in the world,
and the vital truth of Christianity is
the personality of its founder.
Men find it hard to forgive the mistakes of His followers but they never
tire of turning to the Founder, and
apart altogether from the theological dogma involved in the acceptance of Christ as a religious teacher,
it still remains that He is the supreme
Leader of human thought in itc search
for truth, and that He alone has
pointed a way by which the race can
be emancipated from the thraldom
of error.
Socialist leaders have either never
studied, or have utterly failed to grasp
the purport of His teaching, and the
beauty of His character. If they
understood these aright far from casting one word of reproach on the ten-
derest, the truest and the wisest friend
that labour ever had, they would study
His sayings and concentrate all their
energies on spreading them and winning the world over to their acceptance, for when all is said and done,
it is not coercion which rules. There
is in the world today such a thing
as an elevated public opinion, it is
the sentiment of the majority of
thinking men, it is shaped by the
thoughtful study of great teachers,
of whom the Christ is the greatest.
Arbitrary combinations may achieve
a temporary success, but it is not a
success which can be labelled victory. When once the public conscience becomes aroused and just indignation demands executive force,
everything is swept before it, and
this is the instrument which is being used and which in the future
will be more widely used for the
overcoming of social and economic
evils. It is not from Iconoclastic,
Socialistic or Anarchistic teachers
that its spirit is derived, but from
the Son of the Carpenter, who spake
as never man spake and who first
among the great characters of history pointed the way which the
labour world  is only just beginning
to travel in the twentieth century.
There could be no more appropriate
reflection for Easter time than that
the humble Galilean, whose resurrection is now being celebrated by the
Christian Church throughout the
world, is the truest labour representative of all time, and there could be
no greater mistake especially, on the
part of professed friends of labour,
than to belittle His teaching or to
attempt to besmirch His character.
The  Promise  of  Easter.
(By Blanche  E.  Holt  Murison.)
Glamour of marvellous things,
Limitless measure of hope,
Springeth eternal on new-born wings,
From a grave in a garden slope.
Look up sad eyes where the glory
lies,
Shining    resplendent    across    the
skies.
Purple and gold of the morn,
Arches triumphal of light
Blazon the sky; while lilies adorn
The earth with their splendor white
Each hill and lea keepeth jubilee,
And every breeze is a symphony.
Promise of cheer and delight,
To comfort us on our way:
Oh covenant sweet! Earth's darkest
night
But heralded Easter day.
Jubilate!  Jubilate!
Heaven's gates are open wide,
Love hath found a sanctuary,
Where all weary souls may hide:
Death's finality is ended,
Life   with   Death   hath   met   and
blended,
Life through Death is glorified.
KIPLING'S LETTERS.
(Continued from Page One.)
the notice of the observer but the
deeps which are obscured. When
the spirit of truth descended into
the Shades the apparition was so
startling that its denizens were bereft of reason, and scattered in
affright. When Kipling had the
courage to lift the veil from some
of the ugly problems of the Western world and hold up the mirror
of truth, some glanced at it and
fled, but the mirror will remain,
and he who looks into it will see
the truth. A higher authority than
the editor of the Colonist in the
day of his derision, said: 'The
truth shall make you free." Carefully sifted and condensed into a
few pithy sentences Kipling's fifth
letter, which has so aroused the venom of the Colonist, becomes _.
bald recital of fact, which every
honest observer must subscribe to.
He declares that British Columbia
at the time of his visit, both as to
its politics and economics, was
dominated by the thing which
called itself labour; that the only
hope for the Province lay in free
white immigration; that the Salvation Army and the Government
had arranged to secure this but
were prevented by political considerations; that the Province requires additional labour; that domestic service in particular was
scarce and costly, so scarce that for
women in particular life was a
hardship, in some cases almost beyond endurance; that under these
conditions the man who urged
English people to settle here was
incurring a great responsibility in
the present and a greater in the
future; and finally that his solution of the problem was free white
immigration or as lie phrased it,
"pump iu the whites." All these
impressions nnd opinions havc
been verified in the few months
that have elapsed since Kipling's
visit, and he could havc no higher
justification and no higher compliment than the adoption of his suggestion, unless it be the cavilling
of the Colonist.
A Snap in
Fountain Pens
Nowadays a Fountain Pen is a necessity as well as a luxury |
for everyone. A business man and a business woman not I
only show themselves to be behind the times, but they are]
handicapped if they do not carry one.
Commencing Next Monday, the 20th inst.,
we will for a few days sell our good
Fountain Pens at
ONE-HALF PRICE
JUST EXACTLY HALF OUR REGULAR FIGURES.
"Eclipse" Fountain Pens; Blair's Non-Leakable Vest Pocket
Pens; "Nosak" Self-Filling Pens, which can be filled without
a dropper anywhere that ink is obtainable.
LOOK AT THESE PRICES
"Eclipse," regular price $1.50 for 75c
"Blair's   Non-Leakable,"   regular   prices,   $2.00   to
$2.50 for $1.00 to $1.25
"Nosak" Self-Filling Pen, regular prices, $2.00 to
$7.00, for  .$1.00 to $3.50
14k Points and Iridium Tips.
Our business reputation is your assurance that these prices are
bona fide and the Pens first-class in quality. These should not
be on sale long.
Challoner & Mitchell
Diamond Merchants and Silversmiths
Qovernment Street Victoria, B. C.
Victor-Berliner dram
Sacred Music
Wouldn't it be fine
to sit in your home
and hear the Trinity
Choir sing "Jesus
Lover of My Soul"
and"RockofAges";
or the Haydn Quartet sing, "Where is
My Boy Tonight"
and"0 That Will Be
Glory For Me"; or
to listen to the chants
and other sacred
music by the
Gregorian and
Sistine Choirs ?
That's exactly what yon
can do with a Fictor or Berliner Gram-t-phene.
The powerful soul-stirring hymns and the magnificent anthems am
oratorios of the masters, sung by noted soloists and famous hairs**, are youi
whenever you want to hear them.
The Fictor or Berlin r Gram-t-phone plays this music true to the livinj
voice—you have never known the full beauty of sacred songs until yon han
heard them on one of these instruments.
The Fitter er Berliner Gram-o-phone not only enables you to hav<
sacred concerts at home, but puts the best entertainment of every sort at youi
command. The magnificent voices of the most famous grand-opera stars, thi
world's greatest bands and famous instrumentalists, the latest song-hits, old-
time ballads, side-splitting jokes and comic song:, the liveliest dance music -
—all this and more you can have with a Fitter tr Berliner Gram'
t-pbone and only with one of these famous instilments.
Ask any Victor er Berliner dealer to plav any sacred music or anything
elac you want to hear. Also ask him to tell yon about the easy terms on
which you can buy one of these instruments.
Use the coupon and get bee catalogues.
Tbe Berliner Brao-o-pbooi
Company of Canada. Ltd.
TIMBER! TIMBER! TIMBER!
QUATSINO   SOUND,   BEDWELL BOUND, BACE NABBOWS.
OUABANTEED 2,000 FT. TO THE AOBE.
PBICE 92.60 TO 93.00.    ALL LICENSES  ISSUED.
ARTHUR BELL
BOOMS 14 and 16
MAHON   BUILDING,   GOVEBNMENT   STBEET, VICTOBIA.
F. O. BOZ 70S. PHONE 1385. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 18, 1908.
'•ooooo--»oooooo*oooo*oo-->o*^^
,00000--X>-0©0<>00<>0000*0*0<^
Whitney Go-Carts
BABT   CABBIAGE.
FBICE,   $14.00.
No. 803—Body is reed, varnished; sides
upholstered; lace parasol. Gear is all
steel; four 16-in. rubber tire wheels.
Whitney patent anti-friction wheel
fastener; foot brake. Green enamel
finish.
PULLMAN SLEEPEB
PBICB, $16.00.
No. 833—Body is reed, varnished; sides
upholstered: has mattress cushion;
lace parasol. Gear is all steel; four
16-in. rubber tire wheels; Whitney
patent anti-friction wheel fastener;
foot brake.  Carmine enamel finish.
The Pullman Sleeper is a combination
of carriage and go-cart.
The body is smaller than that of a carriage, size of base being 22x16 inches.
It also has adjustable reclining back,
and foot-well with sliding cover.
SEND FOB GO-CABT CATALOGUE.
Come and See It To-Day. We Have Chosen a "Correct" One
Do you fully realize what an important part the carpet plays in the
furnishings of a room; how highly
important it is to have this item
"correct"; how very necessary it is
to exercise great care in the selection of the floor covering so that
there may be no marring of an
otherwise excellent "effort," but
rather an added touch of daintiness, a "something" that makes a
finished room which, while breathing hospitality to your guest, leaves
an indellible impression of your
excellent good taste? It is as easy
to get the correct sorts as the
incorrect. A little "thought" on
your part, a little assistance from
a staff of experienced experts, such
as we employ, and the benefit of
such a choice as our stock offers makes the choosing of "proper" carpets an easy matter.
Durability, color, design—three very important factors. We have an enormous stock of
handsomely-designed carpets made by mills renowned for their hard-wearing products. Any
"color" scheme may be carried out from our stock. For Chintz Bedrooms, now so fashionable,
we have the daintiest Brussels in such combinations as green and white, blue and pink, green and
pink, rose and gold, blue and ivory, and also some excellent two-tone carpets. In Axminsters, we
show the largest and finest selection in the West.   You're welcome to come any time.
Whitney Go-Carts
Axminster Carpets—A splendid range
of pretty and attractive designs
ln this favorite carpet. Prices
range at, per yard, $.76, $3.00,
$2.25   and    $3.00
Wilton Carpets—In Wiltons we also
show a very extensive range of
handsome designs and splendid
range of colorings. Per yard, $3.60,
$2.75,   $2.26   and    $1.90
Tapestry Carpets — In low-priced,
hard wearing carpets we show a
splendid line of Tapestry Carpet
at a great choice of prices. We
have it at, per yard, $1.25, $1.00,
85c and    75c
Axbury Carpets—This is a splendid
carpet style and in it we have
an unusually fine range of patterns and colorings. All at one
price.    Per yard  $3.75
Brussels Carpets—In our offerings of
this Housekeeper's Carpet you'll
find a great choice of styles. It
is probably the most serviceable
carpet one could buy. Per yard,
$2.00, $1.75, $1.60, $1.60, $1.40,
$1.25 and   $1.00
Velvet Carpet—This is a nice carpet
style from  the famous  Crossley
A Splendid Range of Carpet Squares Shown Now.
BECLINING   FOLDING   GO-CABT.
PBICE, $15.00.
No. X. 55, U. ft P.—Body ls reed, var-'
nished; sides upholstered; has mattress cushion, lace parasol. Gear la
all steel; four 12-in. rubber tire
wheels; patent wheel fastener; foot
brake. Patent folding cross reach.
Dark green enamel finish. Enameled
push bar.
ENGLISB CABBIAGE, FULL
PBICE, $35.00.
No. S. 893—Body is wood, painted dark
green, varnished; upholstering is
leather cloth, lined. Brass plated
joints. Other trimmings brass. Gear
is English strap; four 16x22-in.
cushion rubber tire wheels. Whitney
patent anti-friction wheel fastener;
foot brake.    Enameled push bar.
SEND FOB GO-CABT CATALOGUE.
££&&$c_SSSS$S£SSSSS£S2^^
>©000©0-0-O0*00©00©00-O*000000000*0-O00-CK^^
hampionship Match.
The deciding match in the race for
e Vancouver Island Football cham-
onship was played at Oak Bay on
Wednesday when the coveted title
as won by the Nanaimo players.
Or two years the Ladysmith team
is occupied the premier position but
l the showing made on Wednesday
id Saturday last the Nanaimo team
fully entitled to the win. At hard-
any stage of the game on Wednes-
ly was the Ladysmith team dan-
;rous. During the first half the new
ampions continually pressed their
jponents but it was thought that the
adysmith players would be seen to
etter advantage with the wind at
leir backs but although they played
etter they were not as aggressive a?
leir opponents, and towards the fin-
h the Nanaimo men not only held
em at bay but made frequent at-
cks on the Ladysmith goal. The
sing forwards made a better show-
g than on the previous occasion, but
eir efforts were spasmodic. The
fence of the winners was strong
d they never gave Ladysmith a
|od opening. Adams, on whom
uch was counted, was too closely
tched to be effective, but he played
jch better than he did on Saturday
d at times brilliantly, the other
rwards were too slow in taking ad-
ntage of their opportunities. The
Ives of the Ladysmith team were
t as aggressive as on Saturday. Al-
ough two goals were scored against
e Ladysmith team it cannot be said
at it was the fault of the backs or
al-kecper although one was the re-
It of a penalty given against Moron. In this instance Hartley cer-
nly played in hard luck. After
opping the ball he could not re-
er and it was sent through while
was on the ground.   The winners
all played consistent football and are
entitled to their victory, every man
played his position in good style and
the work of Cruickshanks and Mitchell on the right wing was very
pretty to watch; Blundell on the left
was a star performer; Graham at full
back stood out as a shining light and
it was mainly through his supreme
efforts that the victory was secured.
The game was stubbornly contested,
and at times the players fouled in
their attempts to gain possession of
the ball, in fact the game was much
more strenuous than on Saturday.
Under the circumstances Referee
Lockley did will. On several occasions his rulings were not in accordance with the strict reading of the
rules, but he was impartial in his
decisions.
UMPIRE.
Mistook His Man.
Green—I undertook to make him
eat his words, but	
Brown—But what?
Green—He turned out to be one
of those chaps who would rather
fight than eat.—Chicago News.
An Appreciation of a Good Musician.
A Feat.
"Do you imagine it possible for a
camel to go through the eye of a
needle?"
"Oh, I wouldn't be surprised. You
know how large my wife is?"
"Yes."
"Well, she goes through my pockets
regularly."—Houston Post.
At the New Grand Next Week.
Next week patrons of the Grand
wll be treated to a performance
which is expected to be quite the
equal of those of the last two weeks.
It will include Miss Lisle Leigh, assisted by Griffin Barry and Sata Alexander in the one-act playlet, "Kid
Glove Man"; "The Laughing Horse,"
a comedy turn with three people in
the cast, two of them clever dancers
and the third a burlesque horse that
never fails to bring down the house
with his gyrations; Mrs. Peter Maker, an Irish singer, in songs and
stories from old Erin; the Three
Musical Bell Boys in a musical, singing and dancing act; the Eugene
Trio, comedy triple bar artists; Arnold Von De Rave, tyrolean singer;
Thos. J. Price in the illustrated song,
"In the Valley of Yesterday," and
new Moving Pictures.
Human Nature.
"Good morning, parson."
"Good morning, deacon. As I was
coming along just now I saw a fight
between a brindle bulldog and a mastiff. And, upon my word, deacon,
more than fifty men were standing
around. How can people take an interest in such things?"
"I dunno, parson. Which dawg
won?"—Washington Herald.
In Fashion.
Benevolent Stranger—What are you
going to be when you grow up?
Johnny—Investigated, I s'pose.—
New York Sun.
Our Language.
"He's  the  coming  man."
"Yes, he's one of the best fellows
going."—Baltimore American.
The Wicked Husband.
"Why docs a man lie to his wife?"
asks a woman writer. Dear me; does
he?—Duluth Herald.
Balloonists are not necessarily
quick tempered because they "go up
in the air" so often.
Sticks.
A Washington physician announces
that grip is catching. It is worse than
that. It is sticking.—Chicago Record-
Herald.
On Tuesday, April 28, Professor E.
G. Wickens will give his sixteenth annual students' recital, in the Institute
Hall, View street, Victoria. We take
pleasure in drawing public attention
to this concert on account of a charming little surprise which happened to
a musically inclined member of our
staff who, last year, chanced to drop
in at the professor's 1907 students'
recital. The surprise took the shape
of delight at the wonderful proficiency of the profesosr's student soloists and children's orchestra; it resulted in our man delving down an
making enquiries from past and present students, leading to the discovery
that for sixteen years Professor
Wickens has been diligently assisting
in keeping alive and advancing musical knowledge in Victoria. By dint of
labouring from daylight to dark, hc
has, with conspicuous success, trained
hundreds of our younger generation
to be something more than mere
players on instruments; in addition,
each year has seen at least one of his
pupils, of more than average ability,
proceed to Germany, to obtain at the
Mecca of musicians that complete
specialized tuition which only Germany can give. This year Mr. Victor
Levy, who has been one of the professor's students for the past six
years, is the musical pilgrim; the
present concert is in part a farewell
to Mr. Levy; in addition to an excellent instrumental programme by fellow students and the children's orchestra, Miss Emma Sehl (soprano I
and Mr. J. II. Griffiths (baritone) will
assist, and The Week advises all parents who have children musically inclined, to purchase a few tickets ami
let their offspring listen to what can
be accomplished by careful tuition,
accompanied by genuine love of mu
sic. Tickets (50 cents) can be obtained at Waitt's and Fletcher's music
stores, at Hibben's bookstore, and
from members of Professor Wickens'
ch'ldren's orchestra. The proceeds,
in part, will be devoted to the Protestant Orphanage.
Mr. Victor Levy. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL, i8, 1908.
________
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Ticker Scene in Brewster's Millions.
I flusic and      $
I   The Drama. J
Mrs. Patrick Campbell.
On Monday evening Mrs. Patrick
Campbell played to capacity in the
Victoria Theatre before the most
fashionable audience of the season. It
was her first appearance in Victoria,
and she elected to submit her most
famous play, Arthur Pineo's "Second
Mrs. Tanqueray." The result justified the selection, and showed that
in spite of the doubts and fears of
some newspaper correspondents and
some would-be critics her selection
was justified. The "Second Mrs, Tanqueray" is not a pleasant play, moreover it is out of its "milieu" on this
Continent where the laxity of the
marriage tie and the prevalence of divorce render the woman with a past
rather a "persona grata" than a social
pariah. This is why the appelation
"problem play" is a mosnomer on this
side of the Atlantic; and all through
the play Mrs. Campbell was struggling against a condition of affairs
which pertains generally in England
but is more or less unknown here. It
must be remembered further that even
in England what are known as thc
"smart set" have familiarized people
with some of thc conditions which
when Pinero's play was written sixteen years ago were only half suspected or hinted at. The problem is
a problem no longer, not that decent
people have or ever will modify their
opinipns on morality, but that in certain circles, fortunately circumscribed
in area, familiarity with the problem
has bred contempt.
Viewed in this light the "Second
Mrs. Tanqueray" may be regarded as
out of date, and as the play is both
morbid and unpleasant, without however being offensive, Mrs. Campbell
would be well advised in relegating it
to the limbo of plays which have
served their purpose.
But whatever may bc said of the
play it is impossible to speak too
highly of the actress, no living woman can play Paula Tanqueray as
Mrs. Campbell does. I recently wrote
a critique in which I compared Olga
Nethersole's representation with hers,
and while I still htink it is substantially correct, I realized on Monday
night that they are farther apart than
I thought. As a psychological study,
perfect in every detail and without
a single artistic blemish, Mrs. Campbell is simply superb. It satisfies
every detail, there is not a single
false note; she lives and breathes-the
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VICTORIA
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VICTORIA. B. C.
character. I looked in vain for the
slightest flaw in her marvellous technique, but found it as perfect, and
yet as fresh, as on that first night in
1802 when she electrified London.
There can be but one opinion of her
acting, and that is that she is a great
actress in every sense of the word,
and unrivalled in the parts she has
practically made her own. It is not
difficult to understand why she continues to play Paula, Madga, Hedda
Gabler, and the like. In a recent interview she explained that they suited her temperament, and that is the
whole secret- of her acting. She is
natural in parts in which other actresses are artificial, and they are different parts. Although Mrs. Campbell is still in the full possession of
her extraordinary beauty, and magnetic force, it is doubtful if she will
ever abandon the line in which she
has been so eminently successful. It
is just a little too late. In manner
as well as in appearance there is the
least suggestion of maturity. Ten
years ago she might have thought
of classic roles bordering on the
tragic, but now it seems as if she
would stay with "problem plays" to
the end of her career, and possibly
do for Paula what Genevieve Ward
did for "Forget-me-not," thirty years
ago, almost make the part classic.
Whatever she may decide to do, I
venture to predict, newspaper correspondents and dramatic critics notwithstanding, that she will always
play to crowded houses by reason
of her personal magnetism and dramatic skill.
Brewster's Millions.
On Monday next at thc Victoria
Theatre the popular American farcical comedy entitled Brewster's Millions will be represented by a New
York Company. This is admittedly
one of the most laughter provoking,
and has been one of the most successful, plays of the season. The management has spared no expense in
mounting and equipping, and the
Company is the same numerically as
played through all the big Eastern
cities. All who have read Geo. Barr
McCutcheon's book, and many who
have only heard of him will want to
make the acquaintance of the millionaire who could not spend his money
fast enough to get rid of it.
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
En Tour of B. C.
April and May
Francis
Armstrong
Violin Virtuoso
Lilian Fisher
Prima Donna Soprano
Management of C. H. GIBBONS
0000000000000000000000 c.
melange teeming with good points
and furnishing the unique opportunity fora most versatile actor to display his gifts. The musical Bennetts have a very interesting specialty in which the combine music
and conjuring most effectively. The
Eddy trio as pantomime acrobate are
excellent. Musical Lowe on the
xylophone sustains his claim to championship honors. Fuller the monologist is well above the average, altogether the programme is excellent
and would fill a house twice as large
as the New Grand.
C. H. TITE & CO.
PAINTERS, PAPER-HANGERS
Wall Paper from a^c up.
No old stock. Estimates given.
Prices Cheaper than ever.
COR. YATES AND BROAD STS.
I Your Fortune
Briefly Told
1       First,    you're    going    on    a
1 ' journey.
Then you'll be very happy-
1 and you're going to have money '
IlaC*.      l_A      ...... \t_a..i .       1...1...   ,
left   to   you.
Man.
You're   a   lucky |
The Empress Theatre.
Readers of The Week will wonder
where the Empress Theatre is, and
will be surprised to learn that there
is shortly to be an important addition to Victoria's playhouses. The
management of the Arcade Theatre,
which has been doing such a splendid
business on Yates St., has found it
necessary to secure larger premises
and on the ist of May will open in
the old Brackman-Ker Block. The
management promises the best line
of moving pictures which can be acquired, and good musical turns in
addition. This unique form of entertainment has evidently come to stay
and as it appeals to all classes alike
there should bc a prosperous future
before thc proprietors.
The New Grand.
The programme at thc New Grand
this week is without doubt one Of
thc best ever put on. It discounts
last week's fifty per cent., and Manager Jameson wil find it very difficult
to reach a higher level than this in
the future. The piece de resistance
is the "Visitor" introduced by Mr.
Porter   J.   White,   an   extraordinary
Philadelphia Ledger:
Returning to Japan the spy reported
that America was preparing for war.
"Your proof?" demanded the Elder
Statesmen.
"I have evidence," resumed the spy,
"that thc yellow oumals have laid in
enough red ink for a long and desperate  campaign."
Apprehension in their eyes, the Elder Statesmen sat in silence.
Here's the way of it.
You're going on a journey to
this store.
You'll select your new Spring'
Suit, and it will please you so !
1 wei!  that you'll be very happy.'
You'll buy for less than you
J.thought and have money left;;
therefore you're a lucky  Man. *
'    That's your fortune—see that,
it comes true.
ALLEN & CO.
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laol   Government   St.,     Viotoria.
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TORONTO
A lasld-MtUl aad Day School ior Boys
Thorough Instruction.
New    Buildings,    Large    Athletic
Fields.
Summer   term   commences   April
22nd, 1908.
For information write to
REV.   D.   BRUCE   MACDONALD,
M.A., LL.D.
Principal.
HOLLY TREES
Prices from 35 cents to $5.00, according to size. Write for seed and tree
catalog.
JAY & CO.
VICTORIA, B. C.
Pantage's
Theatre
JOHNSON STREET
VICTORIA, B. C.
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE'
Uatlness (any part of house)....Ill
Evsnlnjs, Balcony  Ill
Lower Floor  tol
Boxes   t*l
Matinees
Every Afternoon
at
3 O'CIock.
Night Performances
8 and 9.15
WEEK 20TH APRIL, 1908.
The New Grain
SULLIVAN * CONSIDINE,    Proprlttor»|
Manac<m«nt af ROBT. JAMIESON.
THE LAUGHING HORSE
Y
A Circus Travesty.   Five people i'|
Cajt.
MISS LISLE LEIGH AND
COMPANY
One-Act Dramatic Playlet
"Kid Glove Man."
EUGENE TRIO
Comedy Triple Bar Artists.
THE   MUSICAL  BELL   BOYS
Musical, Singing and Dancing Act|
MRS. PETER MAHER
"The Irish Queen."
ARNOLD VON DE RAUE
Tyrolean Singer.
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustratoi
"In the Valley of Yesterday."
NEW MOVING PICTURES
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
EMMIES'
THEATRE
Will open in tlie
BRACKMAN   Ik   XEB  BLOCK
ON MAY lst, 1908
Under the same management as now
controls the
ARCADE TKEATBB
Best Moving
Pictures
of the day and
HIOE CLASS MUSICAL TUBNS.
POPULAR PRICES.
THEATR
■>  LtS.H & MANAC
MONDAY, APRIL
Brewster's Millions
THE     POPULAR    AMERICAN
FARCICAL COMPANY.
PRICES 500 TO 91.50. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 18, 1908.
At The Street   ^
Corner h
By THB LOUNOER -p
do not for a moment suppose that
."thing I can say will influence the
y Engineer or those whose official
sition should, but apparently does
entitle them to control his va-
es I have not the pleasure of
gentleman's acquaintance and any
ticism I may offer is directed sole-
jto the manner in which he dis-
irges his public duties. The rate-
yers have had a specimen of his
tem of street paving on Govern-
nt street, but let that pass. He
giving us a still more ridiculous
formance on Rockland Avenue and
m not surprised that the property
ners have refused to pay their pro-
rtion  of the  cost of  constructing
roads as that which has been
rted from Moss St. East. As a
tter of fact it is not road construc-
ti at all, because it has no found-
in. The City Engineer apparently
s not know that to excavate a
dway to a depth of say a foot is
sufficient preparation.    Opposite
Arbuthnots this excavation has
n made still leaving soft earth and
y beneath; loose rock of all sizes
been dumped and was being roll-
into the soft foundation until the
perty owners called a halt. Un-
3 good roads are made it is just
well to save the ratepayers money
I make shift with the old one. The
^ on Rockland Avenue can never
ome a road; it will wear down into
lows and the soft earth will ooze
between the rock and no amount
surfacing will prevent it.
Jut I am more concerned in the
of vandalism perpetrated by the
y Engineer, let us hope not on his
responsibility, in destroying
endid old oaks and other valuable
de trees in order to make a
ight line for a gutter. I sincere-
wish that it were possible for the
lining property owners to recover
lages for what is undoubtedly an
rage, in any event a valuable asset
the public highway, belonging to
ratepayers, has been destroyed.
h folly cannot be defended; it was
0 sense necessary and is the re-
: either of ignorance or obstinacy,
haps it is too much to expect a
iness council to be governed by
but material considerations. A
y of men elected solely upon the
is of their capacity to economize
hardly be expected to give a
ught to Ruskin, or his ideas on
preservation of natural beauty,
netimes a paid official, especially
ie be a professional man, has had
ie little education, and whispers
suggestions into the ear of
imble," but in this case clearly
dom is not justified of her chilli.
Vhilst on the subject of streets I
uld like to say a word about bounding. A great rumpus has been
de by certain Aldermen because of
expenditures which have been
de on boulevarding. They claim
t good streets should come first
ornamentation second.    This is
strictly correct, the two should
ceed together, on the principle that
iys to make a City attractive. For
reason I favour the boulevarding
certain sections where visitors
st do congregate; as the work is
e on the improvement plan this
no hardship to anyone and it
uld not be forgotten that every
iness in the city benefits by an
x of visitors, and that the more
itiful a city is the more visitors
vill  have, and the  more  widely
its attractions be advertised. This
tutting the matter on what I re-
1 as the lowest ground, that of
ty and profit. A public spirited
cy pays best on every ground, and
leautiful City not only adds to
joy of living in it but also aug-
its the profit.
notice  that  a  movement  is   on
to banish the "red light"  dis-
t from its present location,  and
behind the movement is the Wo
men's Council and the Moral Reform
Association. Any judicious policy for
dealing with the social evil would
have my hearty support, but that one
word "judicious" is the key to the
whole situation. I have seen so many
well meant efforts to restrict this
horrible traffic and nearly all of them
have ended in failure. This is because the promoters of the movement
have more zeal than discretion, and
mainly because they are ignorant of
many of the conditions. Up to date
the only system tolerated in English
speaking countries which has been attended with any measure of success is
that of restriction and control. I
quite agree that the location should
in every case be where it will constitute the least possible offence to
law-abiding citizens, and any attempt
to get beyond its confines should be
promptly and severely checked. Further I. have repeatedly called attention to the fact that the traffic would
be diminished by at least fifty per
cent., and its most objectionable features eliminated by the simple enforcement of the law which regulates
the sale of liquor. Half these houses
would be closed in less than a week
if the illicit trafficking in liquor were
stopped. Would not this be a very
wise programme for the Moral Reform Association? At any rate it
would be beginning at the right end.
There is however a much more important work which the ladies of
Victoria might with advantage undertake, and that is the initiation of a
campaign for the better protection of
girls of tender age. Numbers of
girls between fourteen and sixteen,
daughters of comparatively poor parents, are walking our streets dressed
in silk, fancy millinery and costly
furs. Everyone knows that these are
not purchased out of the scanty wage
earned by labour. These same girls
are allowed to go unattended to
dances, and whether allowed or not
visit restaurants at all hours of the
day and night in company with men
twice, and sometimes thrice, their
age; it is not necessary to speculate
on the result. I recall one case which
was recently brought to my notice,
where a girl of sixteen was allowed
to attend a third rate dancing hall
and on the plea that the dance did
not break up until late obtained permission to get a room at some hotel
in town for the night. She had no
escort whatever. The prompt action
of the hotel proprietor probably saved
the girl from the natural consequences
of her folly, but what can be said of
her parents, who unhesitatingly admitted that they had given their consent to this? I am convinced from
observation, and indeed I know full
well, that the Women's Council could
engage in no nobler and no more urgent work than in a systematic endeavour to arouse the parents of Victoria to a sense of their responsibility
for their children. There is a very
intimate association between this matter and the one which is attracting
their attention.
Apropos the fire in the Mahon
Block, I am just in receipt of a letter
from an old friend in Nelson, and
strange to say it incidentally discusses the fire situation. I extract
the following paragraph which is not
without significance at the present
moment. "Our Fire Chief has now
been here two years, and since he
came we haven't lost a building. A
pretty good record, don't you think?
Everything is working smoothly, and
we have just raised the Chief's wages
again. I wonder how long Victoria
will stand the nonsensical fire service it has. Poor old Victoria needs
some pointers. If the Council instead of talking so much about shortage of water would dig into the fire
service, and stop playing favourites,
they would unearth something.   Verb
sap.
fCt^^r,
LLOYD & CO., practical chimney
cleaners, 716 Pandora St. Chimneys can be cleaned without making an ellova mess. Try us and
be convinced.
Phone A476. NUF SED.
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days
after date we intend to apply to the
Hon. the Chief Commissionei- of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect
for coal and petroleum on the following
described lands, situated near Coal
Creek, Renfrew District, B.C.: Commencing at a post planted at the northeast corner of section 88, and marked
J. Hastle and H. J. Kirby; thence west
80 chains to northeast corner of section
87; thence north 80 chains; thence east
to western boundary of the E. & N.
Railway Company's Lands; thence following said boundary of Esquimalt and
Nanaimo Railway Company's lands to
point of commencement.
Staked March 17th, 1908.
JAMES HASTIE.
H. J. KIRBY.
April 11
CERTIFICATE   OF   THE   BEGISTBA-
TION OF AN EXTRA-PROVINCIAL
COMPANY.
"Companies Act, 1897."
I hereby certify that "The Ferro-Con-
orete Construction Company" has this
day been registered as an Extra-Provincial Company under the "Companies Act,
1897," to carry out or effect all or any
of the objects of the Company to which
the legislative authority of the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company is
situate at Cincinnati in Hamilton County, Ohio.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is five hundred thousand dollars, divided into flve thousand shares
of one hundred dollars each.
The head ofllce of the Company in this
Province   is   situate   at   Vfctoria,   and
Henry Graham Lawson, Solicitor, whose
address is Victoria, JJ.C, is the attorney
for  tlie  company. ' Not  pmpowered  to
issue and transfer stock.
Given under my hand and Seal of Office
at Victoria,  Province of British Columbia, this fourth day of April, one
thousand nine hundred and eight.
S. Y. WOOTTON.
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this company
has been established, and registered are:
Manufacturing and dealing in fire-proofing and building material of all kinds,
and constructing, equipping and owning
buildings, bridges and structures of all
kinds, and all things incident thereto,
of engaging in a general contracting
business; and of acquiring, holding, owning and disposing of all rights, patent
and otherwise, necessary and convenient for the prosecution of Its business.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of L«!nds and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
one mile west-north-west from Jesse
Island, running west 60 chains; thence
north 60 chains; thence east 60 chains:
thence south 60 chains back to place
of commencement.
Dated February 22nd, 1908.
G. E. GIBSON.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of bay Inside of
Jesse Island, one quarter of a mile
north of Jesse Island, running west 60
chains; thence north 60 chains; thence
east 60 chains; thence south 60 chains
back to the place of commencement.
Dated February 22nd, 1908.
H. G. ANDERSON.     .
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NOTICE
The bridge at Craigflower over Victoria Arm ls closed to vehicular traffic
until further notice.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Lands and Works Department, Victoria,
B.C., 9th March, 1908.
$1,000 Reward
THE GOVERNMENT of the
PROVINCE of BRITISH COLUMBIA herebv offers a reward of ONE
THOUSAND DOLLARS for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the two men who, on the
25th day of February, 1908, at the
Gorge Hotel, near the City of Victoria, B.C., armed with revolvers, entered and, while committing a robbery
in the said Hotel, shot and wounded
one Richard Dancey.
DESCRIPTION.
No. 1—Man about 5 feet 11 inches ip
height, slim build, dressed in dark-
colored clothing; wore dark cap.
No. 2—Man about 5 feet 8 or 9 inches
in height; slim build; dressed in
dark-colored clothing; wore dark
cap. Both men were armed with
dark-colored revolvers and wore
long white cotton masks.
FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS reward will be given for information
leading to the arrest and conviction of
either one of the said men.
VICTORIA  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank V. Hobbs
of Victoria, B.C., occupation gentleman,
intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described  land:
Commencing at a post planted about
eight chains in a northerly direction
from the southeast corner of section
eleven, township eleven, thence following the sinuosities of the shore line
northwesterly 17 chains, thence southwesterly 10 chains, thence northerly 10
chains, thence southeasterly to the point
of Intersection of the southeast quarter
of section eleven (11) and the southwest quarter of section twelve (12),
township 11, Renfrew District, and extending eastwards from said shore line
as before described and including the
foreshore and land covered by water.
Dated April  6,  1908.
April 18 FRANK VICTOR HOBBS.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a license to prospect for coal, on
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner of B. M. Richardson
Claim, being about one mile and a quarter northwest of Skidegate Inlet, Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence north eighty chains;
thence east eighty chains; thence south
eighty chains; thence west eighty chains
back to place of commencement, containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D. 1908.
D. R. YOUNG.
Mch 21 William Woods, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
(30) days after date, I intend to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal, on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the B. M. Richardson Claim, being about one mile and a
quarter northwest of Skidegate Inlet,
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence north eighty chains;
thence west eighty chains; thence south
eighty chains; thence east eighty chains
back to place of commencement, containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D. 1908.
C. A. YOUNG,
Mch 21 William Woods, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
(30) days after date, I intend to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal, on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile and a quarter north of Skidegate Inlet and mouth of the Honna
River, Graham Island, Queen Charlotte
Islands Group; thence south eighty
chains; thence east eighty chains; thence
north eighty chains; thence west eighty
chains back to place of commencement,
containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D. 1908.
B. M. RICHARDSON.
Mch 21 William Woods, Agent,
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
(30) days after date, I intend to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for coal
on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest eorner of B. M. Richardson
Claim, being about one mile and a
quarter northwest of Skidegate Inlet,
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence south eighty chains;
thence east eighty chains; thence north
eighty chains; thence west eighty
chains; back to place of commencement,
containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D. 1908.
R. W. RAYSAY,
Mch 21 William Woods, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of Blinkinsop Bay,
about 100 feet west of the wharf; running west 60 chains; thence north 60
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south along the shore back to the place
of commencement.
Dated  February  24th,   1908.
March 14 C. G. JOHNSTONE.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of Bllnklnsop Bay,
three-quarters of a mile from the entrance of said bay, running wost SO
chains; thence south GO chains; thence
east along the shore of bay Inside of
Jesse Island; thence northerly along the
shore of Blinkinsop Bay to the place
of commencement.
Dated February 22nd, 1908.
O. C. BASS.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
TIMBER
If you have any
timber for sale
list it with us
We can sell it
BURNETT, SON  & CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,   B. C.
The days are getting Warm.
THE
WILSON BAR
Is Comfortable.
VISIT IT.
648 Yates St., Victoria, B. C.
Most
Particular
Smokers
Experience little or no difficulty
in finding a cigar or blend of
smoking mixture that fits their
taste.
Our Manila or Havana
Cigars can't be beaten.
We carry a most complete line of smokers'
sundries.
SnsvT   Richardson
Cigar Store.
Phone 345
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days from date I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Landa
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted In the
southwest corner and marked Initial
Post No. 1; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chatns to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated March 7th, 1908.
Graham Island, B.C.
Apl. 4 R. D. HOYT.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Frank Kelly,
of Victoria, B.C., timber cruiser, Intend
to apply for a special timber license
over the following described lands:
6. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
3, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres,  more or less.
December 17th,  1907.
Apl 4 FRANK KELLY.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for the purchase of the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the east shore of Bllnklnsop
Bay, three-quarters of a mlle from the
outlet of the creek at the head of bay.
running north along the shore 60 chains;
thence east 60 chains; thenco south CO
chains; thence west 60 ehains back to
the place of commencement.
Dated February 24th, 1908.
L. P. LOCKE.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agenl.
By order,
F. S. HUSSEY,
Superintendent of Provincial Police.
Victoria, B.C., 26th February, 1008.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, Intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the head of Bllnklnsop Bay, 60 feet
north of the creek running to the bay;
running west 60 chains', thenco north
60 chains; thence east 60 chains; thence
south 60 chains back to the place of
commencement.
Dated February 24th,  1908.
M. J. G. WHITE.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
days from date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum on the following
described lands, on Graham Island, B.C.:
Commencing at a post planted In the
southwest corner and marked Initial
Post No. 1, theuce east 80 chains; thence
north SO chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated  March  7th,  1908.
Graham Island, B.C.
Apl 4 J, O. HOYT.
NOTICE ls hereby given that thirty
days from date I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum on the following
described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted in the
southwest corno rand marked Initial
Post No. I, thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated March 7th, 1908.
Graham  Island,  B.C.
Apl.  1 W. L. ARCHAMBEAU.
NOTICE ls hereby given that thirty
days from date I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum on the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted ln the
northwest corner and marked Initial
Post No. 1; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains to place of commencement containing 640 acres.
Dated   March  7th,  1908.
Graham Island, B.C.
Apl. 4 JOHN DEAr.30RN. THE WEEK, SATURDAY APRIL 18, 1908,
4*4»H^Tk4?^ri?&'__?4?-,'_h*fr'4*   Mr- R- G- Ward came in from
*****4.*****<Tr*   Metchosin to take in "Mrs. Patrick
*
if
if
Cft/Mal   n-nA Campbell" at the theatre last Monday.
20-wlal anQ •»$» He was a guest at the Balmoral.
PerSOnai*     j      Miss Wilson of Duncans arrived in
*f* Victoria last  Monday and was  the
4'^^^i»^'i»»H<'4'Hrt|r'4' f^1of Mrs-w-F- Bullen> Es<iuimalt
III
Mr. F. G. Crickmay of Vancouver ,,_■_. ,_,.„.
is the guest of Mrs. Sherwood. , Mr. and Mrs Stewart Williams and
* *   * children  are  the  guests  of  Mrs.   R.
Mr. E. R. Rickett is on a short visit J-  Roberts, Kuper Island.
here   from   Vancouver. *   *   *
* *   * ,       Mrs. W. Fisher, Metchosin, came in
Mr. E. M. Yarwood of Nanaimo is for Mrs. Patrick Campbell, returning
in Victoria on a short visit. home a few days later.
* *   * *   *   *
Dr. Stewart of Mission is a visitor Mrs. Freeman and Miss Little leave
in town. next Tuesday on an extended visit to
* *   * be spent with friends and relatives in
Mr.  and   Mrs. Dighton,  Cowichan San Francisco.
Bay, came down on Wednesday. *   *   *
* *   * ,    , Mr. R. G. Monteith and Mr. Foote
Mrs.   Fitzgibbons   returned   from 0f teh Canadian Bank of Commerce
Seattle during the week. are   spending   their   Easter   holidays
* *   * fishing at Cowichan River.
Mr.  F.  Hamilton of Agassiz is in *   *   *
Victoria-           *   *   * Mr- R- Matthews, on the staff of the
. . . Bank of Montreal in Vancouver, is
Mrs. Wilemar of Comox is visiting spending his holidays in Victoria and
friends here. is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Bulwer,
* Esquimalt.
Mr. R. Ross of Fernie was a guest *   *   *
at the Empress for a short time. ..     .   T   _.     ,   ..    ,  _
r     *   *   * Mr. J. J. Theobald of San  Fran-
„,     T    T ,       ,r ...       cisco   accompanied   by   Mr.   Webb,
Mr.   J.   Jukes,  .Vancouver   was   a f      £       .     [     { ;   •
visitor here early in the week. ^ wefik and ^ guests a*he Em*
-.r    t*..-,    _, r*.       1   it, press.   They left on Wednesday for
Mr. J. Maitland-Dougal of Duncans  Seattle,
arrived in the city on Wednesday.
* *   * *   *   *
The members of the Alexander Club Mrs. Gordon, beautifully gowned in
are giving a tea next Wednesday. grey panne velvet, relieved bv touches
* *   * of old lace, made a most charming
Mrs   Bfrt Powell, Vancouver, was hostess at a smart little luncheon on
staying   with   relatives   here during  Monday at the Empress.    The table
the week. was very Pretty anc-* dainty, having
* *   * as a centre piece a large basket of
Mrs.   Biggerstaff Wilson  is enter-  daffodils, asparagus and maiden hair
taining her friends at "five hundred"  fern-  and iar«lessly scattered  round
on Thursday next. " were daffodils and fern frons.  The
* *   * guests were Mrs. J. R. Anderson, Mrs.
Mrs.   Heisterman  has  issued  invi-  Rocke Ro^ertsc"' Mrs' *_**> ,Mrs-
tations for an "at home" next Wed- RoSer|;   Mrs.   Hermann   Robertson,
, Mrs. H. Barnard, Mrs. Harold Rob-
y' *   *   * ertson, Mrs. T. S. Gore, Mrs. Pooley,
,, , ».      „ _,       , ,,* Mrs. W. S. Gore, Mrs. James, Mrs.
Mr. and Mrs. Butler of Vancouver w   R B„      M'rs   Car^ther^ and
were  in   Victoria  and  registered   at  ot|lers
the  Empress  during their  stay. •      ■ • _
* *    % www
Mr.  J.  N.  Ellis,  of the Terminal ,  Mr?' Patrick Campbell's appearance
City was a guest for a few days at hcre lasi Monday was about the only
the Empress event of much interest in social cir-
* *   * cles,   t naturally having been a very
Mr.  C.  D.  Morkill  of Vancouver ^ week.    Among those who at-
was a guest at the Empress during £"£«*« Pfr°r?}ance 7«re: „M"-
his visit in this city. £. C. Flumerfelt, Mr. and Mrs. HA.
* *   * Ritchie,   Mr.   A.» W.   Bridgmai;,   Dr.
Mr.  and  Mrs.  James  Douglas   of ">* Mrs, 0. M. Jones, Mr. and Mrs.
Seattle were guests at the Empress T' s-Gore> Dr and Mrs. Rundel Nel-
during tlieir stay in the city. s°n> Dr- and Mrs. H   Robertson, Mr.
* *   * Henry  Croft,   Mr.  J.   R.  Anderson,
Mrs. Dunne, Miss Dunne, Mr. D. Miss Clute, Miss L. Wark, Mr  Hag-
McLeod and Mr. J. W. Stewart of «ty,  Mr.  McDougal, Mr   and  Mrs.
Kenora are guests at the Empress.      Piggott    Mr.   and   Mrs.   Rant,   the
* *   * Misses   Rant,   Mr.  and  Mrs.   Hogg,
Mrs. A. Koeing of Shawnigan Lake  fMr', C HoS«< M„r' Kenah, Mrs. Rat-
£_£_£'    Cit/ rCgiSterCd    ^ th£  Pow^anfj5 i.T^T^
uommion.        ^   ^   ._ bertoil) m$s Dupont> Mr  Bell> Miss
J. Bell, Miss N. Dupont, Miss Newcombe,   Mr.   Brady,   Miss   Monteith,
518 Hastings St.W.
VANCOUVER.BC.
Mr. R. L. Morse of Seattle, after a
few days    here,   left   for   home on MUg -J,   Monteith> 'Mr. and Mrs. W.
Thursday.         #   _    ^ g   Gore| Mr   A   Gore| Miss Hickey>
,,*',.         „,    .   T ,                  , Miss   Hickey,   Mr.   Blakemore,   Miss
Mrs. Nixon, Thetis Island, was the Blakemore, Mrs. P. de Noe Walker,
guest of Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Crease Mr> Ai W. Harvey, Mrs. Blackwood,
during the week.        ^ Mme. Kerpeydron, Mr. Sampson, Mr.
J. Bridgman, Mr. Charles Newcombe,
Mr. J. Anderson left on Thursday Miss  Cobauld,   Mrs.   Ni.\on,   Mr.   R.
for  Saanich  where  he  will   spend  a Roberts,  Mrs.    Costerton,    Mr.    W.
few days'  fishing. Newcombe,  Mr.  and  Mrs. V.   Eliot,
* *   * Mrs. Langley, Miss Langley, Mr. M.
Mr. R. G. Roberts of Kuper Island Hills, Mr. Ward, Mr. G. Williams, Mr.
after a few days in Victoria returned Cookson,   Mr.   Burroughs,   Mrs.   W.
home last Tuesday. Fisher,   Mr.  W.   Fisher,  Miss   King,
* *   * Mr.  and  Mrs.  Carew  Gibson,   Mrs.
Mr.   and  Mrs.   P.   Spicer  of  Van- King, Mr. Stewart Williams, Mr. and
couver are in Victoria and are mak- Mrs.   Hillinghurst,   Miss  Miles,   Mrs.
ing the  Empress their headquarters. White  Fraser,   Mr.  B.  Parker,   Mrs.
* *   * Tuck, Miss Tuck, Mrs. Archer Mar-
Mr.  and  Mrs.  R.   P.  Roberts  and tin,  Mr.  Newton,  Miss Tilton,  Mrs.
Mr.   Greig   of   Kuper   Island   came Coles, Mrs. Matson, Mrs. J. O. Gra-
down last week and were guests at liamc, Mrs. Kirk, Mr. T. Swinnerton.
the  Balmoral, the two latter leaving Mr.  and  Mrs.   H.   Hardy and  many
for the North a day or so later. others too numerous to mention.
: ROOFING SLATE J
Pacific Slate Coy |
LIMITED
♦
♦
t
♦
♦
♦
♦
a  For Prices and Particulars apply to
UNFADING BLUE BLACK
Non-Oxidizing
ALL STANDARD SIZES
HEAD  OFFICE-CHANCERY CHAMBERS
YARD-HUDSON'S BAY WHARF
J. S. FLOYD, Secretary-Treasurer ♦
P
i\ 1 —,_\ I S   and Trade Mark
obtained in all countries.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville St.,
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
"In the Spring the Sneezer's fancy
Turns to Thoughts of prime Old Scotch."
NOTHING LIKE GOOD WHISKY TO CURE
A BAD COLD
Simpson's Blue Funnel Scotch, per bottle $1.25
Spey Royal Scotch, per bottle  $1.25
Strathmill, per bottle 90c
Gilbey's Invalid Port, per bottle $1.25
Gilbey's Dry Gin, per bottle, $1; Pint  50c
Plymouth Dry Gin, per bottle, $1; Pint 50c
AROMATIC SCHNAPPS.
Distilled from Juniper, recommended by leading physicians for
all   diseases   of   the   Kidney,   Rheumatism,   Neuralgia, etc.
Per bottle  $1.25
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
Up-to-Date Grocers.
1317 Government Street. Tels. 52, 1052, 1590
000000
r.
JUST A WORD
ABOUT   PLANS
My ambition is to fill Canada
with Beautiful Homes. Now
and then some man tries to
build his house without plans.
Have you noticed the usual results? Properly drawn plans
will save on thet cost of the
house, furthermore, completely
drawn plans will enable the
owner to take competitive bids
on the wrok.
Remember specially drawn
plans cost you a little more
than the stock pattern book designs, why not have what you
desire—the cost of a set of
drawings for a home to cost
say $1,000 would be $20. If
you can afford to build at all,
you acn afford to build right.
Send me your ideas and I will
work them into practical shape
for $2.00. A copy of my booklet on "Homes" will be mailed
to you for B cents. Better
write me now for-a copy.
E. STANLEY MITT0N
Architect
Vancouver, B.O.
ft-eF"1
When you wear one of our
toupees you have the satisfaction of knowing that it is a
perfect fit and is natural in
colour and correct in style.
Write today for our descriptive catalogue and price list of
toupees, wigs, switches and
transformations.
B. C. HAIR GOODS CO.
436   Granville   Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
AGENTS WANTED
We pay resident agents good
salary to represent us during
their spare time.
PACIFIC  COAST  GBOWN
SEEDS, TREES
For the Farm, Garden, Lawn, or
Conservatory.
Reliable,   approved   varieties,   at
reasonable prices.
No Borers.    No Scale.    No fumigation to damage stock.
No  windy  agents  to annoy  you.
Buy   direct   and   get   trees   and
seeds   that   GROW.
Bee   Supplies,   Spray   Pumps,
Spraying Material  and
Cut Flowers.
Catalogue Free.
M. J. HENRY
3010   Westminsted   Road
VANCOUVEB, B. 0.
>OOOOOOOOOOOS
OOOOOO'
OOOOOO
000000
j0000000000000005
I The
Poodle Dog
Hotel
50000000000000004
When staying at the office in the evening or going to the
theatre, a dinner at the "Poodle Dog" will be appreciated by
those who enjoy a good meal promptly served. We know our
efforts have been appreciated because we have been told so.
—A Centre of Good Cheer is
—the cosy Grill-Room.
Smith & Shaughnessy, Proprietors
YATES ST., Victoria, B. C.
oooooooooooooooooooooooooo^
IN THE HOT WEATHER
A Gas Stove feels good.   You
kitchen   wlil   be   as   cool   and
comfortable as any other part
of the house If you
Cook by Gas
You are then spared the heat,
dirt, worry and inconvenience
attendant on a coal range and
you escape the awful danger of
an oil stove. Gas for cooking
is positively unsurpassed. We
have a splendid lot of new
Gas Ranges in our Showrooms
which we would like to have
you see.
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, Ltd.
CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS.
KODAK
DAYS
ARE
AT
HAND
Write me for 1908
Catalogue
Will Marsden
665 Granville Street,      Vancouver, B. C.I

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