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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Mar 30, 1907

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 nfTo~rirsrroiSTsrr6inronfriirnv^
°° Kingsford Smith & Co.
Stock and General
AUCTIONEERS
Commission and Real Estate Agents.
860 Granville, Vancouver.
■JLJUUUUUULJUU*^^
The Week
TL British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vancouver 8. ©.
^r**r»r«**nr**rinrr)r)rir»»»»*»
Stewart Williams K,. C. Janion
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION AND
REAL ESTATE AGENTS
$i FORT ST. VICTORIA, B. C.
lWflagIIl*tfl*Ll*.llo(*>*4-t-|MA*U*J;
Vol. IV.   No. 9
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 30, 1907
One Dollar Per Annum
The Editor's Review
Of Current Topics.
The Liberal
Debacle.
The Vancouver World in
commenting upon the
Better Terms debate of
Monday last, borrows a
title from Zola, as might not unreasonably
lave been expected by those who are acquainted with its style, and characterizes
the debate as a " debacle." It is an apt
use of the term, especially when one takes
into account the historic associations which
ed Zola to use it. It is the title of his
great work on the Fall of the Napoleonic
Dynasty and Sedan. If the Vancouver
World means to suggest that the Liberal
party in the Legislative Assembly met
their Sedan on Monday last, the use of
the term is fully justified, for the rout was
just as complete in the one case as the
other, the main difference being that
Mr. J. A. Macdonald put up a glorious
fight whilst Napoleon III indulged in an
inglorious flight. By a vote as decisive
as the verdict of the Constituencies, the
Legislative Assembly endorsed both the
action and policy of Premier McBride's
Government. There can be nothing but
admiration for the splendid dialectical
jerformance of the leader of the Opposi-
ion, all that a keen intellect judicially
trained, all that courage, skill, and obvious
sincerity of purpose could do was done by
\ir. Macdonald to cover the ignominious
defeat of his party and if possible to save
some shreds of their political reputation,
[t is not an unfair criticism to say that he
Darely saved his own. Premier McBride,
who made a far less impressive debating
though a far more effective fighting speech,
lit the nail on the head when he declared
ihat it was a splendid effort, but academic.
Just what Mr. Macdonald could do in the
.lebating arena with a good case in which
principle and conviction could go hand in
Hand, may well be imagined by those who
vitnessed his handling of a discredited
;ause in defence of which a man could
tave little heart. The only fault that
lould be found with Mr. Macdonald's
pcech is that it ignores several important
natters, for instance, when he was so un-
ust as to repeat the phrase that the Pre-
nier had been neither frank nor sincere
n his statement of what took place at the
ionference, because he failed to tell the
)ublic that in addition to the special grant
if $100,000.00 there was an increase in
he ordinary grant to the Province of
U15.000.00, Mr. Macdonald ignored the
tatement of the Premier that he was only
leal ing wilh the question of an extra spe-
ial grant and not with the Quebec sche-
lule, a characterization which he made at
he commencement of his Victoria address
ind whicli conditioned all tliat followed.
Another point in respect of which Mr.
Macdonald certainly strained thc prin-
ples of honourable debate was when he
ied to make it appear that the Premier
as playing fast and loose with the conference, on the subject of their jurisdic-
,ion. He ignored the fact that Mr. Mc-
3ride had again and again declared that
te did not consider that the Conference is
he proper body to deal Avith the subject
•f Better Terms, he protested against
heir jurisdiction, and only waived his objection and entered into consultation with
t on the advice of Sir Wilfrid Laurier.
cTo one knows better than Mr. Macdonald
hat such a waiver was not intended to and
id not affect the legal position of British
iolumbia or the right of her representa-
iive to prosecute her claims in any way
which might be constitutional. The weakness of Mr. Macdonald's criticism on this
point is seen in the fact that he did not
attempt to propose a vote of censure upon
the Premier in connection with the matter, but contented himself with a line of
criticism which could only be designated
as hyper-critical. As a matter of fact the
only ground upon which Premier McBride's conduct of the whole negotiation,
was attacked, was with reference to his
statement of the case to the Conference.
Mr. Macdonald contended that the claims
should have been based upon other
grounds than those selected by Mr. McBride, and that the chief of these should
have been that in consequence of a change
in the fiscal policy of the Federal Government, the incidence of taxation in this
Province to the Customs Department had
been more than doubled since Confederation. If Mr. Macdonald's charge had
been correct it would have been a point
well taken and would have laid the Premier open to serious and legitimate complaint, but it must ever remain a mystery
how a debater of Mr. Macdonald's skill
was led into such an error, the very point
which he so carefully elaborated and the
unfolding of which the Liberal press despatches declare was received by the House
with breathless silence, occupied a conspicuous place in the carefully prepared
printed statement which Mr. McBride
handed in to the Conference, not only so,
but it was equally conspicuous in the
statement submitted by Colonel Prior and
Mr. Eberts when they went to Ottawa five
years ago on the same mission. The matter had not in any sense been overlooked
and the only possible excuse for Mr. Macdonald's attempt to make capital out of it
is that it did not appear in large red caps
as a scare heading. This was Mr. Macdonald's only shot and when he had fired
it the rest was smoke, he struggled with
a number of fine points and the charm of
his oratory may have lulled the faithful,
though decimated, band of followers into
the belief that something was being effected. As a matter of fact nothing was
effected except an hour's intellectual entertainment, and an up-to-date illustration of
Don Quixote tilting at Wind-mills. All
the sting was taken out of Mr. Macdonald's
criticism when it was found that the show
was practically a dress rehearsal for the
benefit of the -party, and the leader of the
Opposition was obliged, before he sat
down, to endorse every salient feature of
the Government policy. He had to admit
that the offer of the Conference was totally
inadequate, or, to use his own words,
" neither fair nor reasonable." He had
to endorse the declaration of Premier McBride that " the fight must go on," nothing else matters. Tlie Vancouver World
says the result was a debacle. The voting
was twenty to eight; The Week thinks
that the term is aptly applied.
Since last issue The
More Western "Week lias received many
Octopus. endorsations on the atti
tude it took up with respect to the monopolistic policy of the
Grand Trunk Pacific in the West. The
principal development recently seems to
have been along the lines of the hold-up
game. Transportation companies have
found themselves confronted with suggestions which could not be honourablv enter
tained. A capitation fee has been demanded on passengers going north by
persons associated with thc G. T. P.,
freight has been diverted from one transportation company to another in opposition to the wishes of the consigner, because
a rake-off was refused. But while all this
is bad enough, and to a certain extent a
matter of public interest, since it is calculated to retard business and to hinder
the development of a new country, it is
perhaps in the final issue more a matter
for the internal economy of the G. T. P.
The public, however, will be greatly interested to learn from an authentic source the
latest developments in connection with the
Pacific terminus. It is only a few months
ago since the Liberal press in particular,
was flooded with inspired paragraphs,
emanating from Ottawa and Toronto, to
the effect that at last serious operations
were on foot. Thousands of Japs were to
be corralled at Prince Kupert, and thence
despatched into the interior to commence
the work of railway construction. Lumber
mills were to be erected forthwith, the
Government lands recently acquired for
terminal purposes were to be surveyed, and
the townsite of Prince Kupert laid out.
In fact, every step was to be taken to set
the gigantic machinery of this huge corporation a-rolling, and in a short time the
five hundred miles of railway from the
Rockies to the Coast was to be constructed
and the northern part of the Provinco
would blossom as the rose. All this adept
journalistic enterprise was in evidence before the Provincial elections, just as similar promises were so much in evidence
four years ago. It is not yet two months
since the elections were held, and what is
the position today? The journalistic enterprise has subsided, even the Victoria
Times has ceased to publich the Hon. Wm.
Templeman's predictions, but what is very
much more to the point, as evidencing the
actual condition of affairs and the policy
of the G. T. P. is the fact that today
Prince Kupert is practically deserted. The
last steamship from the North brought
down forty Japs, leaving only six on the
Island and practically all the white labour
which had been rushed up to Prince Rupert three months ago. Even the surveyors
have been taken off tlieir work, and their
assistants, who were hired for the coming
season, have been discharged and are baek
in Victoria. The steamship Camonsan on
her trip clown carried a messenger who
was instructed to, and actually did, cancel
every order which had been placed by the
G. T. P. for lumber, so that there is not
even the pretence of continuing even the
roughest kind of lumber building. As
things stand at present the G. T. P. have
"pulled out" of Prince Rupert, and The
Week adheres to thc opinion it has held
and expressed all along, that they have
not and never did hnve the slightest in-
tention of making it their terminus. The
whole thing has been a huge game of bluff.
Tt is just possible that if Premier McBride had been found more complaisant in
the matter of a land grant, this unselfish
corporation might have been induced to
stay at Prince Rupert, but his firm attitude on that question, coupled with the
light which has recently been thrown upon
the private relations existing between the
Federal Government and the G. T. P., as
evidenced by the negotintions for the
Mctakatln Reserve, nil tend to show thnt
the gnme of attempted hold-up is not yet
finished. Whether the abandonment of
Prince Rupert is only n bluff remains to
be seen, but it is the duty of every paper
published in British Columbin to mnke
itself acquainted with the facts nnd to let
the public know just what is being done
and what is not being done by the Western
Octopus.
Lest Worse
Befall.'
Trustee Huggett of Victoria has had a fall and
under ordinary circumstances would be entitled
to the sympathy of the community. The
circumstances, however, are not ordinary
and unless The Week is greatly mistaken
he will receive'scant sympathy from Victorians. If he were only championing a
worthier cause the fact that he is in a
minority of one would naturally arouse the
chivalrous instincts of thc race and many
would fly to his aid, but when it is found
that the cause of all the trouble is that he
is seeking to champion the cause of Toronto University against McGill the whole
complexion of the case is altered. Sooner
or later—and thc recent "University Bill"
will hasten the dny—a Provincial University for British Columbia wil bc a ' fait
accompli." Until then any move to diminish the influence of McGill and increase thnt of Toronto will be strenuously
resisted by every lover of freedom and
every true British Columbian. Education,
especially higher education, should be cosmopolitan and it is not easy for an outsider
to understand why Toronto should have
attained so unenviable a notoriety in the
West. Anyone, however, conversant with
the spirit of Toronto and the product of
Toronto University understands it thoroughly. Thc AVest is broad, generous,
tolerant, frank and honest. The Toronto
spirit is narrow, mean, bigoted, insincere
and devious. Toronto is essentially bourgeois, redolent of the nonveau riche, and
pompous. The West is suffused with a respect for decent standards of life and conduct and loves to call a spade a spade. It
makes no parade of goodness, but it exacts
decency. It does not appreciate the lessons which it has received at the hands
of Toronto millionaires in the exploitation
of get-rich-quick schemes, and above all it
resents the preaching of half-fledged sky-
pilots who think it is sorely in need of
their ministration. It resents one other
thing and perhaps this is nearer to the
subject of Trustee Huggett's policy, that
is the domination of B. C. education by a
spirit of ultra-superiority covered by a
thin veneer of Knoxism. For this reason
it shakes the dust from off its feet against
the "unco guid" of Toronto and all their
works nud prefers until it is big enough
and strong enough to erect nnd maintain
standards of its own, to fall under the
influence of McGill. which, whatever its
shortcomings, is at any rate free from
cnnt. In spile of which The Week de-
lieves there are good people even in Toronto—it, knows of one.
The Editor of the Col-
Changing ouist indignantly denied
One's Coat. in a recent issue that he
had changed his mind on
the subject of Sunday observance. The
declaration must have occasioned a little
mild surprise among those who were scandalized by his denunciations and misrepresentations of the Lord's Day Act a few
weeks ago. It enn hardly havc surprised
those who have noted his hysterical attempts to reconcile his religious page, "An
hour with the Editor," with his editorial
pronouncements on matters affecting profit
and loss. As to his admission that he
should not hesitate to change his opinions
on occasion there will be no difficulty in
frankly accepting the admission in the
light of his political career. The question
in doubt is, whicli coat is he wenring now
nnd when is the next change due? Q»S%f»f%/***tip»+*S\tt»f%ftQ  once  you  have    eaten    oysters  you
know  exactly what their  flavour  is,
At The Street
Corner
»
By THB LOUNOER
why then go to the expense of trying
the same flavour for a momentary
satisfaction? The same thing applies
to champagne and to all the other
luxuries and pleasures of life.
I was considering the matter in
bed and I came to the conclusion
that the only man who had yet solved
this problem was the man of whom I
read in the "Overseas Mail." For
thirty-seven years he had lain in bed,
A friend of mine who met me on
the street complained to me that last
week's "Lounger" was not up to the
mark. I admitted the impeachment, and only arose then because his mqth-
but pleaded as an excuse that it is er died- and l4 took the household
very difficult to get subjects on which thre<- h°u-"s and a half to find tlle
to write in this column. "If people clothes he had taken off that length
will only give me a tip of any exist- °f t'me bef°re* And theV naturally
ing abuse," I said, "I'll write it up." didn,t fit even tllen> wllich caused him
He replied that he could quite under- to be absent from the funeral. His-
stand that, and went on to say that he tory does not report whether he went
thought a little article on the subject Dack t0 Ded
of "lying" would be in order. I there- There are so many advantages at-
fore propose to bore you this week tached to spending a life in bed. For
with a short disquisition on "The Art one thing it is cheap; thc question of
of Lying." new clothes never arises; hats are out
That lying is an art cannot be dis- of the question, but there might be a
puted; we all know the clumsy liar little expense if the patient was ac-
who is perpetually being found out, customed to wear night-caps, though
but as I have made a careful study of as these are somewhat out of date
this subject I feel satisfied to give you nowadays the lack of them need not
all a few hints. Who knows, my necessarily embarrass the non-wearer,
words may lead some of you on to Also lying in bed is not the sort of
becoming statesmen or presidents of exercise which is liable to invigorate
insurance companies. the appetite.    You can lie in bed for
First of all, then, it is absolutely a long time without feeling hungry,
necessary that the beginner should and when you do you can take a
cultivate a good memory. Without comic book such as Dean Farrar's
this, the most essential quality, sue- "Eric, or Little by Little." They say
cess is absolutely unattainable. It is that laughter makes a man grow fat,
obvious that if an excuse is put up I presume it would have the same
for non-attendance at a social func- effect on a woman. All that is neces-
tion on the plea of indisposition sary, then, is to read some such book
brought on by an attack of appendi- as I have recommended, to laugh, and
citis, the falsehood will be exposed in all truth if you grow fat you can't
if later on the liar forgets the exact be starving. There would bc no oc-
disease from which he was suffering, casion to spend money on drinks, be-
and mentions the fact that he has just cause after a course of lying in bed
got over an attack of jaundice. Mem- there would not have been "the night
ory, then, must be the first considera- before" which makes the "cold grey
tion. Then practise an easy style of dawn." I admit that there would be
delivering the lie. This may be done drawbacks, for example having to
in front of the looking-glass, but the tumble out, to have the bed made
better way is to find some friend who once a month, but to my mind the
is practising the same art and lie to many compensations which would ac-
each other. In this manner the voice erue far outweigh any such petty
and face become accustomed to hear- trifles as this.
ing the tongue tell untruths, and will I mentioned a book called "Eric,"
not betray thc speaker at critical mo- which has caused my attention to be
ments. A ever be afraid of telling directed to the fact that there has
what is styled a "whopper." Often been only one book ever written on
the most extravagant untruths obtain the subject of boys' schools. I refer,
the easiest credence. It is also ad- of course, to Hughes' immortal "Tom
visable to tell the truth occasionally Brown's Schooldays." Why is it that
and give the other party an oppor- authors who profess to write books
tunity of seeing that you have not of this character never manage to
been deceiving him. In this manner depict anything which really happens,
your reputation for truthfulness will I have never met a boy yet, and I
be established, and his or her belief have many, who has ever had any
can be imposed upon with more free- use for the ordinary story as set forth
dom. by  the  ordinary    writer    on    boys'
Many people think that the best schools. It has always seemed to me
way to start in this profession is to that the writers had never been to a
run into debt and then practise on school themselves, in which case they
their creditors. This is not a bad naturally could not be expected to
idea at all, as it gives infinite scope know what to say. Take the book
to the imagination, but here again mentioned, "Eric"; for an example of
memory is an important feature in mawkish sentimentality and absolute
the make-up. If you are fortunate absurdity I have never read the like,
enough to stand a creditor off for a I invariably read it when I need amus-
month by telling him that you are ing. The rumour, for it must have
expecting a consignment from To- heen a rumour, went around that
ronto and then point out to him that Dean Farrar wrote from personal exit must have been destroyed in the perience. Well, I don't believe it,
last C. P. R. accident, it is advisable and I never shall,
to remember this and not inform him So strongly is this theory of the
next week that you are sorry but the idiocy of the ordinary book of this
money which was due from San Fran- type being inaccurate and absurd been
Cisco was drowned in a shipwreck impressed on my mind, that I am
When the first essentials such as I seriously thinking of writing a book
havc mentioned are perfected then the on the subject myself. I am quite
art of the business commences. A capable of so doing. A correct ac-
graceful liar is such a much more count of a boy's career through school
pleasant companion than an honest, life would be so uninteresting that the
straightforward speaker. Practise book would never sell. There are
gracefulness, but here, alas, I cannot funny things which might be related
help you. This is a matter for your as to his absurd answers in exam-
own individuality, for after all a grace- ination papers, but they have been
fill liar is like a poet and is born, not put before the public so often that
made. However ,a great deal can be they are stale. There are masters
done with careful attention to the few who havc been "ragged" by boys, but
remarks 1 have made, and few insur- in real life the boys have always been
ance men can be called graceful. well punished for it, whereas in books
The above subject suggests to me they invariably manage to escape. I
another. Why do we lie? 1 think that must make one other exception to my
on thc whole it may he said that we scathing criticism; 1 think that Rud-
lie to live, and that naturally brings yard Kipling's "Stalky and Co." may
me to the problem of whether life is bc classed as a hook of comparative
worth living. Honestly I don't think truth, though of course it can never
it is when once you havc "lived" in come up to "Tom Brown." However,
the sense of having had a good time. 1 will not say anything more on the
Everything palls when every pleasure subject, otherwise I shall have noth-
has been tried, and as Chevalier said, ing fresh to put in thc book, which I
"What's thc good of anything, why, feel sure you will all buy il? only to
ntifnn." Take such a little thing as help out
the question of eating oysters. When LOUNGER.
5ALE OF LOTS
IN THE FINEST SUBDIVISION YET
PUT ON THE MARKET
Bounded by Cook St., Dallas Road, Moss St.
Buy one or more lots for your home while prices are low.
BRITISH AMERICAN TRUST GO, Limited
COR. BROAD and VIEW STS.
TEL. 319
Leive Your Baggage Checks *>t thel
Pacific Transfer Co'jj
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.       A. E, KENT, Proprleto I
The Taylor Mill Co|
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St.. Victoria!
COAL.
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
I'ictoria Agents for the Nanaimo Collieries.
New Wellington Coal.
The best household coal in the marke  at
current rates.   Anthracite coal for sale.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA
THEATREGOERS!!
The Victoria Theatre seasoii
is just becoming ripe. Remember that extra hands on at the
Carlton Lounge
The old Vernon.  Opp. Theatre.
Strictly First Class.
Theatre Call Bell.
HOUSEHOLD HINTS FOR
SPRING SCRUBBING.
SCRUB BRUSHES at, each 20c, 25c and 35c
CEILING DUSTERS with long handles, each  75c
COBWEB  WHISKS with long handles,  each  40c
WHITEWASH BRUSHES, each  35c
BANNISTER BRUSHES, each  35c and 50c
BROOMS, each  25c, 35c, 40c and 50
FLOOR SWEEPERS with reversible handles, each  75c
SOFT HAIR BROOMS $1.25 and $2.00
MOPS   25c
MOP CLOTHS   25c
DIXI SOAP, six bars for   25c
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
Independent Grocers. ::       m Government St., Victoria.
MAIL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO.
prmrr
rrrrmrrrr
LOVE AFIELD.
If I were a bird, my lady,
I would sing you a song so sweet
That your heart of hearts must listen
To the lover at your feet.
If I were the breeze above us.
I would whisper as men might pray,
Of faith and of trust and honour,
Till I drove all your doubts away.
If I were a bit of sunshine,
All warm from the heaven above,
I'd touch you In golden glory
Till your heart was aglow with love.
And if I were a cloud of summer,
Then the sun would forget to shine,
I'd shadow the world about you—
Till you put your hand in mine.
—Charles I. Junkin.
The New- Deputy Commissioner.
It is well when a man's own friends
and neighbours voluntarily give him
a good testimonial. The Week could
say much in favour of Bob Renwick,
but a cutting from the Rossland
Miner will carry more weight, because
it comes from the district in which
thc newly appointed Deputy Commissioner has been working for the last
ten years:
"R. A. Renwick, who has for the
past three or four years been Gold
Commissioner and Government Agent
at Nelson, has been promoted to the
place of Deputy Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works. The appointment was a genuine reward of merit
and is simply a testimonial to the
ability which Mr. Renwick has displayed since he became a Government official. William John Goepel,
inspector of offices, was asked by the
Provincial Government to suggest for
the position the most capable man in
the Government service, and he recommended Mr. Renwick. Before Mr.
Renwick went into the employ of the
Government he was for many years
one of the most capable newspaper
men in the Kootenays, aiding John
Houston for several years in the getting out of that very bright and
newsy journal, the Nelson Tribune.
Before that he won his spurs as a
journalist at Victoria on the dailies
of that city. Being a very capable
newspaper man it was but natural
that he should make a high-class civil
servant. The Miner predicts a future
f conriderable eminence for Mr,
Renwick. His appointment meets
with the approbation of a large majority of the people of this section."
We Want Mines
''I can recommend you to a good
lawyer."
"All right; but don't let him be too
good. I'm trying to conduct my business so as to keep out of jail; not so as
to go to heaven."—Houston  Post.
or Prospects.
Copper Preferred
In forwarding us particulars
stick to facts.
We will send our expert anywhere.
A. ERSKINE SMITH & CO.
GRAND FORKS,   B. C.
Reference : Eastern Townships Bank.
The Man With a GUNN Is Satisfied
Gunn Sectional Hookcases are the bent made, fur reasons which
we will be pleased to show you if you will call upon us.
YO0    DONT   GHT     DONE    WHKN     VOU    BUY    A    GUNN
BAXTER & JOHNSON, Metropolitan Building, \]K%cZ\, THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 30 1907
COMPARISON
OF GOODS IS THE TRUEST TEST OF VALUES.
THAT WE URGE.    It is not always the low price that makes the bargain,
always right and in conformity with quality of goods purchased.    Whatever
quality with every dollar spent in our store.
It is what you get for the price.    At this store prices are
you buy of us you get full value, right price and right
LI,NOJ.E<lKI   H'gh Grade Linoleum.
0 #"'a
durable smd artistic liuoleum-
•parquet and floral effects, at,
«d #1,00.
Experience with inferior quality
floor cloth, does more to sell good
linoleum than any other influence;
it is economy to buy inlaid linoleum,
because the pattern is part of the
fabric, goes clear through to the back
and remains strong and distinct until
it is worn out. Nairn's and Greenwich is the favorites of the world and
has established a record as the most
—it wears like concrete, made in tile,
per square yard, $1.50, $1.40, $1.25
Fine Printed Linoleum.
^ou will also find a very large stock of printed linoleums in all the
imost desirable patterns at all width up to 12 feet, at, per square
yard, 90c, 80c, 70c, 60c, 50c and 40c.
Send for sample Booklets whicli shows all the different styles.
Free on request
Highest Quality Carpets
at Old Time Prices.
We have just received notice of
another raise in carpets, but being
very fortunate in buying before the
raise, can therefore sell at the old
prices, while this stock lasts, so it
B will be vastly to your advantage to
buy now, because as soon as the next shipment conies in prices will
go up. Our spring shipment hns arrived nnd amongst it will be
found the newest patterns and colorings which charm the lover of
the beautiful. They are chosen from the mills, whose goods have
won a place in the front rank, and the patterns are out of the
usual run.
CROSSLEY'S DIAMOND JUBILEE CARPETS, in the
newest and most up-to-date designs.   Per yard, 75c.
BRUSSELS CARPETS, in oriental and floral effects, beautiful
colorings.   Per yard, $1.90, $1.65, $1.50, $1.40, $1.25 and $1.00.
MAIL ORDERS RECEIVE
OUR BEST ATTENTION.
WEILER BROS.,
SEND FOR CATALOGUE
FREE ON REQUEST
Complete Home, Hotel and Club Furnishers, Victoria
lotes on
rovincial News
which it is known they will pursue is and has some sense of humour; what In many respects the Phoenix Pio- day and night, an electric light plant'
making it an easy matter to dispose he needs to keep in check is a tend- neer is well in the vanguard of the has  been  installed    and    thc  whole
of .tlie town lots. ency to shriek and cut capers.   This newspaper  world;  it  is well  edited, camp  is  a   scene  of    activity.    The
  has only been manifested once during well written and well printed, but in Nicola Valley Coal Company, opcrat-
Nelson is waking up to the neces- the two weeks of his editorship, which its latest issue it evidences a lack of ing upon an adjoining property under
sity which has long been apparent for is not unpromising for the future. acquaintance   with   actual   conditions thc management of    Mr.  Alexander
the erection of a new central school,                      or a carelessness in quoting from the Faulds, is making good progress with
by ihe  setting aside of the sum of      The Nelson Canadian, alas, is not Victoria Colonist which is inexcusa- the exploring tunnel, which has now
$i.Soo to pay for a set of plans and free from one weakness of our com- ble on the part of a paper usually so been driven more than three hundred
.                 T'  specifications. The Council has shown mon humanity; this is well illustrated reliable.   It re-hashes Editor Lugrin's feet in an eighteen-foot seam of good
e cannot be two opinions, on tlie  fVi„*  u  ._  .„  _ L  ..  lt.    ........ .......
Ihe Fernie Free Pmess ias taken
the matter of a national reserve
game, pretty maeh on the lines
rested by W. T. Hornaday of
York.   On the general question
|ils there may be room for ques-  thaf lt ls ln earnest in the matter, by its attitud
since only a competent expert and pu,c opln,on win endorse the It is an out and out opponent of the  sZ "V'T "'* ""'* ul v™**™' coal*   >-™ wnoie ot the coal required
'pronounce on all the matters in- pl;oposal to do t,,e thi»S handsomely, enforcement of thc Lord's Dav Act n   .     a„Su"day .paper ,s Poetically for use upon the Nicola and Spence's
d;  one  thing,  however,  is cer-  whe,re * would have "fused to pro- in this Province, but is the first to M„°"l         PreV'°US     * VV,,i'St °" BridRC Rai,wa>' is bci"S taken from
ceed on a niggardly scale. Nelson has squeal when a possible infringement hav^to be IT"" TJ  *  T^ ^   m,'"e'   a"d   bcforc    the   °ute-de
„ ......   ato"f a» enviable notoriety in the of that Act affects its personal com- ,    .£„-, ?■   °, w^^.    HaVC W°r'd   kn0WS   ''*'   Col't,ec   will   have
prospective  coal   mines    of  thc VM of Pro™cial education, and the fort; the soul of the editor is vexed i     i             c   7          'C°X' " mi*ht become a sec°"<- Fernie.
h  Elk.    Its  proposed boundary  Pr«eut policy is an  indication  that and  his  post-prandial  nap  disturbed "»   T »        >'    "' " W°U'd "0t	
the position will be maintained. by those wicked little boys who per ^
sist  in   playing  baseball   on   Sunday
that the proposed location is an
|jrable one, if it is not too near
An idiotic despatch from Montreal
 dated March 23 states that the G. T.
.   .    _ —   ---    j      The  Vernon   News,   the    Phoenix  P. is negotiating fur the purchase of
San Francisco is not the only city afternoon.   Here is thc genius of thc  Pioneer  and  several      "       '       '
Iws the Elk River from Iron
Ik down to Smith's ranch, Michel
|ie.   Both on Elk River and Ford-       . „..._..
liver  are  immense  deposits  of  wl,lch   .    a." al'I" education question  whole opposition to the enforce
and within a few years large
will   be   in    operation.    This
6 that there will be a local popu-
i on the banks of the Elk rang-
inywhere from ten thousand to
y-five thousand, and the Govern-
wotiild do well to consider the
  other  interior the Canadian Northern and that Prcs-
 nient  newspapers have given a good send ident MacKenzie has been offered the
on its hands. The principal of the of the Act; if it touches me it is off to D. R. Young on the occasion munificent sum of $1.1,000.000 for the
New Westminster school is in a dif- puritanic, inconsistent, domineering, of his leaving the Okanagan to reside property. The only tiling about this
ficulty similar to that which has so and indeed anything else which can in Victoria. It is generally admitted report that could by any possibility
greatly agitated  tlie minds  of Cali-  bc described within the limits of my  that if he  *---   '- mmmmmmmmmm
forniaus   in   general    and   President  vocabulary
Roosevelt in particular.   A little B'ur-
s made some mistakes be true is that the G.'t. P. would like
The  latest  notable   contributor  to  hires.   The Ve
Mr. Young has been an energetic pio
neer both for mining and land ven
to acquire the Canadian Northern, but
thc sapient correspondent who manu-
-.-.      mese lady was desirous of completing       -  —   noiiiuie   coiur.Dutor  to  tnrc,    Th   V M ,_  _ _
l.g of this fact upon the choice   h" educatlon '» the Royal City.   She  Dr.  Fagan's  Anti-Tuberculosis  Sani-  Ho 0' n,,, I   IT T ^ 'laS   fa<!tured   ti,e   (lcspatch    '"..st   surely
duly presented  herself  but  was  re■   '    ' -     • - aone much for Vernon             • '
location  as  a  game    preserve.
from this, everything is in fa-
Iof the suggested park.   It is in
eart of the game country and
lly fault to be found with it is
should be carried further west,
|*t as far as Sheep Creek.
tanum   at  Kamloops  is   Pat   Burns,
who  has  generously donated  $1,000!
and that he  have served his apprenticeship in the
fused admission by the School Trus _^^_^_^^_^__^^^_^^_.
tees. The grounds of refusal are not More power to your elbow, Pat!
stated, nor has the Burmese Government yet made any representations
to our own, meanwhile the little Burmese lady is compelled to grow up in
ignorance of that system of education
. which  has  rendered  Canada  "a  free
&  Moffatt  are  meeting with  and enlightened country."
'pticcess in handling the Hosmer	
te.    Hosmer is destined to bc      R, J, Clarke may or may not enable
will be missed, whicli is mure than news factory of the Victoria Times,
could be said for some of his critics, nr he would have known that to give
The firm whose real estate business  the report even the slightest rescm-
J. S. Carter, for some years district
passenger agent on the Crow Line,
has   been  transferred    to    Spokane,
jnd Fernie if indeed it does not D. M. Carley to make a financial suc-
is the pioneer coal city of East cess of the Daily Canadian, that rc-
■iay.    It will be interesting to   mains to be proved; but he is bright-
he will manage in Victoria is (inan- _  	
daily strong, and  Mr. Young is ex-  to quadruple the price, and even then
pected to duplicate in thc Capital City  it is doubtful if the astute MacKenzie
^^^^^^^^^ his  successes   of  fifteen  and  twenty would give it a second thought. Whilst
where he will continue his share to  years ago in Minneapolis.
the development of the C. P. R. traf-	
lie   system   between    that    city  and      The  Boundary   Creek    Times  an-
Portland.   Joe is one of the right sort,   nounces  that  after   the  session   Mr.
has been trained in the best school,  Naden,   the
lance to probability he would have
speaking of the Canadian Northern,
an influential railway magnate who
called at The Week office a few days
ago offered to bet that the Canadian
popular    member    for  Northern  would  run  a  train  to the
and as a passenger agent has no su-  Greenwood,  will   shortly  trek   north   Pacific Coast before the G.
pcrior  in  the  employ  of  thc  great  to establish a business in the Bulkley
This
corporation whom lie has served
'the difference in the develop-   ening up thc editorial columns ,«m    ,.,„n     11 1    .. .   ,
ago was regretted by everyone who
Valley, or some other promising section of thc new Eldorado.
looks like a sure thing.
IIP, R. and that which has been   vein of originality is tempered by a
jssly mismanaged by the Crow's   few ounces of ballast, he will distil.'-  knew  him,
Pass  Company  for  ten  years,  guish himself in the profession which   now tint he TJuiZ!   v", *   ™*
iconfidence in the justice of the   he has chosen.   He writes good E, J       wil     nt 1  T °"' a"d
i ana in the enlightened policy   lish, is well posted on pXlS,  ^^ts^ ^
Poverty and want will yet be ban-
 _„_~ .— ished from thc world.   This end will
The Diamond Vale Coal Company be reached some day. The world is
of Coutlee, Nicola Valley, has com- making progress in this direction. The
menced sinking a shaft at the forks silent but most powerful forces of
of the Nicola and Cold Water Rivers, society are working noiselessly but
The Work is bcingc-mri^d^r^Jifltlj^jja-oituM^^ THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 30, 1907.
ipifipifififififififififif
* Social and        *
* Personal. *
It T
mM* -■- ^.4^»l— *m**m**m* ilj aAa tJAMAtrMMii
TUT?ITTT IT TJ7TF WwVfWTVP
VICTORIA.
The St. Andrew's Society gave one
of their popular concerts and dances
at the Victoria Hall last week. The
first part of the evening was devoted
to music, Mr. Kinnaird sang "Mary of
Argyle." Miss McCoy, in her usual
good form, sang "Cam Ye By Athol?"
Mr. Taylor gave a solo; Miss Leask
a humorous recitation, Miss Angus,
piano solo; Miss Smith danced the
Highland fling in full Highland costume. Mr. James Hill danced the
Sword dance and. Highland fling.
Messrs. Rosie, Rogers and McDonald brought the programme to an
end with selections on the bagpipes.
Dancing commenced at io p. m. and
was kept up till the early hours.
Among those present were Mr. and
Mrs. Florence, Mr. and Mrs. Givens,
Mr. and Mrs. P. J. Riddell, Mr. and
Mrs. A. Manson, Mrs. Pattison, Miss
Pattison, Mrs. Mclnnes, Miss Mclnnes, Mrs. McDonald, Mrs. Rosie,
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wilson, Mr.
and Mrs. W. Pottinger, rs. Angus,
Misses Florence, Mr. Crawford, Mr.
and Mrs. J. Findlay, Miss Findlay,
Mr. McQueen Todd, Mr. and Mrs.
James Wood, Mr. P. Ormuting, Miss
Strachen, Mr. J. Smith, Mr. and Mrs.
Harkness, Mrs. Hill, Miss M. Hill,
Mr. Cruthers, Mr. Elliot, Mr. Giles,
Mr. Stuart, Mr. Eddie, Mr. Ewing,
Mr. and Mrs. Noble, Mr. John Munroe, Mr. and Mrs. Brayshaw, Mr. and,
Mrs. J. Haggarty.
*   *   *
A most charming spring wedding
took place on Saturday, the 23rd
March, at 4.30 at Christ Church
Cathedral. Mr. James L. Cockburn
of Honolulu and Miss Eliza Victoria
King, eldest daughter of Mrs. Elliot
King of this city, were the contracting parties. The Lord Bishop of
Columbia, assisted by the Rev. Canon
Beanlands, performed the ceremony.
The groom was supported by Mr.
Claude Usburne of Vancouver.
The bride looked beautiful, gowned
in dead white pina cloth over white
satin, trimmed with old family Limerick lace. The usual soft tuille veil
and orange blossoms, carrying an exquisite bouquet of bridal roses, lillies-
of-the-valley, and white carnations.
She was given away by her uncle.
Mr. S. Y. Wooten. The bridesmaids,
Miss Adelaide King, sister to the
bride, and Miss Irving, wore pretty
dresses of soft white, hats of white
with pale pink roses, and carried bouquets of pale pink carnations; these
with a pearl brooch each were the
gift of the groom.
Mrs. King, mother of the bride,
wore a very smart costume of black
voile and black hat, with long ostrich
plume.
Mrs. K. Wilson, a sister of the
bride, wore a very pretty dress of
white crepe de chene with large black
picture hat.
Mrs. Wooten wore handsome black
satin with maltese lace.
Mrs. J. Irving, mauve gown with
hat to match.
After the ceremony an informal reception was held at the residence of
the bride's mother, which had been
artistically arranged by the many
friends of thc bride.
The table had long white streamers
of gauze and ribbon coming from the
chandelier and long ropes of smilax,
lillies, roses, fresias, carnations and
fern were in profusion.
The young couple were the recipients of many costly and beautiful
presents, the groom's present to the
bride being a locket and chain.
The bride's going-away dress, which
was very chic, was white panama
cloth, and hat with pink roses.
Among the invited guests were:
Thc Lord Bishop of Columbia and
Mrs. Perrin, Canon and Mrs. Beanlands, Mr. and Mrs. E. H, Wotten,
Mr. S. Y. Wooten, Mr. and Mrs. T.
R. Smith, Captain and Mrs. Irving
and family, Captain and Mrs. Fleet,
Miss Macdonald, Mr. and Mrs. Laun-
dy, Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Gibb, Mr. and
Mrs. Hollyer, Mr. and Mrs. Durand,
Mrs. J. D. Pemberton, Mrs. Berkeley,
Mrs. W. S. Gore, Mr. E. P. Colley,
Mr. L. Foot, Mr. George Harvey,
Miss Annie Harvey, the Misses Pitts,
Miss Kitto, Miss Angus, Mrs. R. Robertson, Mr. and Mrs. G H. Barnard,
the Rev. and Mrs. Baugh Allen, Mrs.
J. Raymur, Mr. and Mrs. Keith Wilson (Salt Spring) Mr. Bullock (Salt
Spring), Miss Marcon, Capt. and Mrs.
Gaudin and family, Miss Paula Irving,
Mrs. R. Jones, Dr. and Mrs. J.
Helmcken, Mr. and Mrs. F. Pemberton, Dr. and Mrs. Hanington, Miss
Hanington, Mr. and Mrs. Fort, Dr.
and Mrs. Powell, Miss Powell, Miss
Dupont,' Mrs. and Miss Tilton, Mr.
W. Newcombe, Miss Nccombc, Mr.
and Mrs. Stuart Robertson, Mr. and
Mrs. Blackwood, Mr. and Mrs. Mat-
son, Mr. and Mrs. Worlock, Mr. and
Mrs. Fletcher, Mr. Cookson, Captain
and Mrs. Combe and officers of cable
ship "Restorer," Mr. Maurice Royds,
and others.
Dr. and Mrs. Rundle Nelson returned last week from a three months'
visit to the Old Country.
* *   *
Miss Shubert, who has been staying here with her sister, returned to
her home last week. Mrs. R, Dunsmuir went as far as Portland with her.
* *   *
Mrs. James R. Anderson gave an
other of her delightful teas and concerts in aid of the Seamen's institute,
which has recently been affiliated with
the British and Foreign Sailors' Society of London, England.
Those who contributed to the musical programme were Miss Nellie Devereux, Miss Scowcroft, Miss Cridge,
Miss Muriel Langley, Miss Laundy,
Mrs. McB. Smith, Mrs. Richard Jones,
Mrs. Janion and the Messrs. Wills,
Henderson, Davis, Melhuish, Williams. Dainty refreshments were
served during the afternoon, which
proved in every way to be a great
success.
* *   *
Miss Phyllys Eberts is spending a
few weeks in Vancouver as the guest
of Mrs. Tait Robertson.
Mr. Alex. Gillespie, who wintered
in Ottawa, is spending a short holiday here with his parents at "High-
wood."
Mr. H. B. Mackenzie has returned
from the East. Mr. and Mrs. Mackenzie leave about May ist for Winnipeg, where the former takes up his
new duties as superintendent of the
western agencies of the Bank of B.
N. A.
* *   *
Mrs. Hermann Robertson was hostess at a charming luncheon given in
honor of Miss Shubert last week. The
table was decorated with pale pink
carnations and violets, tiny baskets of
the latter as favors for each guest.
Those present were Mrs. Robin Dunsmuir, Miss Shubert," Mrs. Genge, Mrs.
H. Pooley, Mrs. Harold Robertson,
Mrs. Audain and Mrs. B. Tye.
* *   *
The engagement is announced of
Miss E. Dudgeon to Mr. D. A. Mc-
Naughten, both well known and popular young Victorians.
* *   *
Mr. and Miss Mara, who have been
spending some months in Japan are
expected home by the next Empress.
* *   *
Mrs. J. W. Ambery entertained at a
most delightful luncheon party last
week at her pretty home on Rockland
avenue.
Mr. and Mrs. Page of Burdette
House, have left for Langley to stay
with their son, who has a ranch there.
* *   *
Mrs. Pooley Fernhill entertained
at bridge and five hundred on Saturday last.
f-
**•**.
Coats, Suits
and Waists
CAMPBELL'S
Everything
Ready to Wear
The Jumper
New York's Latest Craze In Fasniohable
Frock Wear
HURRIED FORWARD BY EXPRESS FOR YOUR EARLY INSPECTION. THE VERY LATEST AND MOST FASHIONABLE COSTUME.
A FINE ASSORTMENT IN BLUES, GRAYS, BLACKS, BROWNS
AND CHAMPAGNES. THE JUMPER IS A MARVEL OP FINE
WORKMANSHIP, AND WE ARE SELLING THESE THREE-PIECE SUITS AT
OUR USUAL MODERATE PRICES.
GLOVES, NECKWEAR, BELTS, PARASOLS AND  OTHER FASHIONABLE
FINERY AWAITS YOU AT
Anqus Campbell & Qo.
MAIL ORDERS
PROMPTLY
ATTENDED TO
THE LADIES' STORE
Promis Block, Government Street, Victoria.
SOLE AGENTS
FOR
LA VEDA
CORSETS.
V
J
Correspondence.
The Wife Voter.
To the Editor of The Week:
It was after a courtship of six
months that I married, as I then
thought, a very charming, demure
and sweet little girl of the age of 22
summers. She told me before the
nuptial day that her sole desire would
be to make my domestic life full of
roses and honey. I need hardly state
I was longing for such bliss. Two
years have now passed since that
historic event in my life occurred and
now to my undoing my dear little
wife has, contrary to my wishes,
joined an association that claims equal
rights with man and the full privilege of the franchise. I am not responsible for this strange conversion.
I have been extremely attentive to
her, and in fact she has had all her
little whims satisfied, even to drawing cheques on my bank account. I
frequently quote scripture to her, especially parts of the marriage ceremony, and remind her that the husband has been placed in authority
over the wife, intellectually inferior
though he be, but to no effect. She
has weekly 5 o'clock tea meetings,
but, alas, her visitors talk only of
politics and the defects of that animal
called man. She has now a great
scheme on hand—she intends to take
out a dog license for Pussy. My cherished and faithful dog Jack has left
the house since my wife went into
politics, and the hens have ceased
laying. I may be a "silly old donkey,"
which she now often calls me, when
I expressly deplore her political aspirations. She tells me now, with a
defiant look in her pretty blue eyes,
that she should have been born a
man. I am sorry she was not born
such, and tell her so, which only
makes things worse. My ambitions
to raise a family and establish a noble
house ar departing.
Mr.  Editor,  I implore you to tell
The BegentHotel
Grill Boon
IS HOW OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.
Those who appreciate dainty appointments, the best
of service, and more than ordinary good cooking,
will be delighted with a meal at
THE REGENT GRILL
HABBY COTTIErOHAM, PBOPBIETOB.
Hastings Street, • Vancouver, B. C.
me what medicine I should give my
once charming little wife.
A HEN-PECKED HUSBAND.
LOTS.
"Sometimes she is a child within mine
arms,—
Cowering   beneath    dark   wings that
love must chase,—
With still tears showering and averted
face,
Inexplicably filled with faint alarms:
And oft from mine own spirit's hurtling
harms
I crave the refuge of her deep embrace,—
Against   all   ills   the  fortified  strong
place
And sweet reserve of sovereign counter-
charms.
And Love, our light at night and shade
at noon,
Lulls us to rest with songs, and turns
away
All shafts of shelterless, tumultuous
day.
Like    the    moon's    growth,    his    face
gleams through his tune;
And   as   soft   waters   warble   to   the
moon,
Our    answering    spirits    chime    one
roundelay."
—Dante Gabriel Rosettl.
Of Proper Quality.
The town was so small that the
advent of a new automobile always
created a stir proportionate to the
importance of the event. When the
wealthiest citizen finally succumbed
to the popular craze and invested his
dollars in a large touring car all the
neighbors rushed out to see the new
machine speed by.
"Phew!" gasped one of the spectators. "That's the worst smelling
one of the lot!"
"It ought to be," piped the minister's youngest; "it belongs to the
richest man."
Most
Urgent
Message
Mars
Sent
Champagne
Hustle
Along
MlJMM'S
Preferred
Awaiting
Golden
Nectar from
Earth
When You Call
For a drink at the bar
TRY
Carnegie's
Swedish
Porter
It will be a revelation to you,
as it combines the purity and
strength of Dublin Stouts
with the full flavor of the
London Porters.
If the bartender has no
supply of this famous beverage tell him the
WHOLESALE AGENTS
—ARE—
PITHER&LEISER
YATES STREET,
VICTORIA, B. C.
Our Prescription
Business is Growing.!
THE REASONS WHY:
We give the Purest Drugs,
The Best Results,
The Promptest Service.
Always Reliable.
FRASER'S
30=32 Government St. I
VICTORIA. THE WEEK, SATURDAY MARCH 30, 1907
Wallpaper
CLEARANCE
SALE
The largest and by far the finest
stock of Wallpaper in the province
going at less than wholesale cost. We
must have the room for our rapidly-
growing stationery and book business. We are clearing the Wallpaper at
HALF PRICE.
Never before have British Columbia
[housekeepers   had   such   an   opportunity.   You owe it to your room—
jyou owe it to your purse to see these
papers before buying.
Samples and Prices sent by mail.
For the really good values, for up-
lo-date stock, you go to the
Thomson  Stationery
Co., Limited,
125 Hastings St., VANCOUVER
tonography
L. McLeod Gould
las opened si Stenographic Office
At 35 YATES STREET
VICTORIA
Ahead In
Service.
We are ahead of all competitors in
bur aervica to customers. Ask anybody who  knows and  then  corns
nd experience what we mean by
Dur drug stors service. We havc
he pleasantest store in town to
tade in.
" Make us prove it."
;yrus H. BOWES
CHEniST
Government St.    ::    Near Yates.
VICTORIA.
MPORTANT SALE
Invest Now In
Farm Lands
along
The Westminster-Chilliwack
Electric Tram Line
and
Make Big Profits
BURNETT, SON  & CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,   B. C.
Tel.   1373.
B.B. MIGHTON & CO.
BROKERS.
Subject to prior sale we make the
following special offerings:
300 Western Oil Cons $1.75
1,000 International Coal 62
1,000 Rambler, Cariboo 31
2,000 Alberta Coal 30
S.ooo Alameda Cons. (Ore) 26
Subject to prior purchase will buy:
1,000 Alberta Coal (pooled) 20
S.ooo White Bear, o"/£c paid 05A
3,000 Rossland Giant 02*4
1,000 La Plata  15
2,000 Diamond Vale 27
Drawer 1082. Nelson, B. C.
Drawer ISM.
jTelsea, >. 0.
faterfrontage and Trackage
Burrard Inlet.
(Under instructions from the Lands
|d Works Department I will sell on
POSTPONED
-TO-
4TH   MAY,   1907.
I  Containing about  120 acres,
perms of sale:   25 per cent cash,
lance 1, 2 and 3 years with 6 per
fit interest.
further particulars on application to
JOHN S. RANKIN
Auctioneer
Pender St.
Vancouver.
If ELSON,   B.  C—Improved  and
l       unimproved     City      Property
■'idled on commission.    F.  B. Lys,
al Estate and General Agent, West
Iker St., Nelson, B. C.
Nelson Iron Works
Machinery of all kinds built,
erected and repaired.
Complete Mining Plants
Cammell Laird Steel, Etc.
it'.w.Hinton   Hclson, B. C.
WANTED
TIMBER
LANDS
I have connections with Eastern
capitalists wanting timber lands, saw
mills and logging outfits. I would
like to meet cruisers or others having
these properties for sale.
E. R. CHANDLER
Room 8, Jones Building,
407 Hastings Street, Vancouver, B. C.
Victoria
FRUIT
and
Farm Lands
Write for "Home List" and
information.
R.   S.   DAY
and
BEAUMONT BOGGS
Realty Brokers.
44 Fort Street .... VICTORIA.
Mount Pleasant.
$2,000 handles two 8-room houses,
each on 50-foot lot, with stone retaining wall; one block from car line;
renting well and netting over 8 per
cent; balance on exceptionally long
terms.
A. 0. P. Francis & Co
Real Estate and Investment Brokers.
510 Pender Street
VANCOUVER, B. C.
The Pacific Coast
Realty Co., Ltd.
Have an exclusive list ol specially selected ACREAGE, ESTATE and FARM
PROPERTIES fer sale at prices whicli
will attract purchasers.
NOV IS THE TIIE TO BUT
Victoria Property is the safeet aad best
investment to be found in Real Estate on
the Pacific Coast.  There will be a
SO PER CERT. INCREASE
IN VALUES IN 1907.
You cannot make a mistake in buying
Business,
Residence, or
Acreage
Property.
Write or call on us for particulars.   We
can shew you how to make money.
The Pacific Coast
Realty Co., Ltd.
12 MacGregor Bl'k, Victoria, B.C.
(Opposite Driard Hotel)
REAL ESTATE
SPECIAL  BABGAINS
85,000—City lot 629.120 feet, on Douglas st.
85,000—Cottage and lot, 60x120; No. 181
Fort st.
81,350—Fine residential lot near Douglas st„ $500 cash, balance in two
years at 6 per cent.
J.    S.    MUBBAT
46 Fort Street
P. O. Box 77 Phone 1279
VICTORIA
WHEN YOU HAVE THAT
"BLUE PEELING" DROP
IN AT THE
QARRICK'S HEAD
BASTION STREET,
Nuff Sed 1
SIM & JACK, Proprietors
VICTORIA, B. C.
DEAL
CLIMATE
SOIL
and
LOCATION
FOR FRUIT
Plots,
That is what I can offer orchardists
on the shores of beautiful Kootenay
Lake.   Write for literature and maps
J. E- ANIMABLE,
The Land Man,
NELSON, B. C.
P
i\ 1 ti\ I O   and Trade Marks
obtained in all countries.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville St.
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
M.J.HENRY'S
NURSERIES
and SEEDH0USES
VANCOUVER,   B.  C.
WRITE FOR
=1907=
CATALOGUE
M.   J.   HENRY
9010    WlBTWNBTlR    ItOAl)
VANCOUVER,    B.   C.
FRUIT
LANDS
On Kootenay Lake and Wait Ann.
Lake and Blver frontage. We
bare lair* and small traota of
good land anl prlcea to suit all.
Alio several partly Improved
ranches, roll particulars willingly given.
H. E. CROASDAILE &  CO.
Nelson, B.C.
BOND SIGN CO.
VANCOUVER
Signs
Having Opened
Offices
AS
Realty,  Timber,
Stocks and
Mining Brokers
We are desirous of forming connections with up-country and
island brokers.
HAYWOOD, BROS. & CO.
(Lnto proprietors Commercial Hotel)
452  Seymour St., Vancouver.
STAMPS.
BARGAINS
-IN-
Fruit
Lands
ARROW LAKES
ELECTRIC
BOARD
METAL
BULLETIN
GLASS
COTTON
SHOW CARD
In up-to-date styles.   Estimates and
designs furnished.
Satisfied
Settlers
ABE OTO BEST FRIENDS.
Write   us   of   you   want   a   fruit
farm.
29t» Acres—4 cleared, 6 slashed, 70
fruit trees; close to C. P. R. In
Maple Ridge; $2,500; half cash.
180 Acres—With   house   and   small
clearing; only $10.00 per acre.
SO Aores—Alluvial soil, 20 acres cultivated, bearing orchard, $65.00
Der acre.
60 Acres—With    small    house   and
clearing, $1,600.
50 Acres—Near   New   Westminster,
$2,000.
York & Mitchell
Real Estate Brokers
606 Hastings St. W., Vancouver.
The B. C. Assay &
Chemical Supply
Company, Ltd.
Importers und Dealers in
Assayers' and
Chemists' Supplies
513 Pender St.
VANCOUVER,   B.   C
Now is the time to buy.   We have
large and small tracts of good land
j and prices to suit all.
Some snaps in Coast property.
Kincaid & Anderson
Real Estate, Insurance and Financial
Agents
First Street   ::   ::   Revelstoke, B. C.
Timber Wanted.
We have urgent demands for timber, especially in large bodies, both on
the coast and in the interior. Full
reports and maps wanted.
MONTANA    BROKERAGE   CO.,
336 Cambie St., Vancouver. THE WKKK, SATURDAY, MARCH 30, 1907.
The Motherland.
Smuggling a Skeleton.
A Chinese coolie landed in Singapore the other day from Sumatra. A
Chinteng was examining his luggage
for opium when he felt something
hard in a pillow. Upon opening it he
found a skull and all the bones of a
human skeleton. Teh coolie declared
that the bones were those of his
brother, and he was taking them to
China for burial.—Siam Observer,
Bankok.
Ladylike Candour.
Whatever the male attitude towards
work may be—and nobody ever yet
met a man who did not profess to
loathe his profession—there certainly
never was a woman yet who preferred
work to amusement.—Ladies' Field.
Taste for Morbid Novels.
The taste of men is less morbid in
the matter of fiction than that of women, especially of modern women, to
whom the plain, direct telling of a
story does not appeal, but who prefer
the psychology of the soul and the
infinite dissection of recondite motives and feelings to dramatic movement.—Graphic.
fulness of the American spirit, and
says that it seems almost ungrateful
to suggest even the remote possibility
of disaster. "The foreign peril lies
not in foreign acuteness, but in the
painstaking avoidance of our mistakes. Our real danger is not from
without, but from within—the danger
that comes from over-haste and lack
of thoroughness."
"The things are just as characteristic of American industry as is the
marvellous alertness that has been its
motive power. In the mechanical
arts, for instance, American methods
and workmen produce average results
of remarkable excellence; but if one
wants a bit of work done with the
utmost thoroughness and precision,
nineteen times out of twenty he will
find that the workman who has finished it is a German or Swede or
Englishman—if indeed he is able to
get it done at all. As every thoughtful manufacturer fully realises this,
there is a dearth of skilled labour,
and native American skilled labour is
the rarest kind. As a result the finest
artisans in many lines of work are
not to be found in this country, and
the goods which they produced are
imported.—Review of Reviews.
Barmaids' French Champion.
One must have lived through a dull
winter's night on the shores of the
Thames; one must have looked in the
laughing eyes of some waitress for a
reflection of the absent blue sky, in
order to understand all the horror of
the proposal to replace charming barmaids by men.—Matin, Paris.
Will Not Always Stop.
Going to  law  is  like  riding in a
motor-'bus:  you  can  never  get  out
exactly where you want to.—The Law
Clerk.
Play-writing Mechanics.
Play-writing has become a base
mechanical craft, instead of an intoxicating, fascinating struggle for fame.
—Era.
Does She Know It?
The average woman is not a queen,
but a slave; if not a slave to some
man, a slave to conventionality or to
sloth.—Ladies' Field.
Do Women Want Votes?
The best answer to the cry of
"Votes for Women" is that women
don't want votes, and it is women
who can give this answer most effectually. It is really their business
to disown the Suffragettes, and if they
did the movement would become a
self-evident absurdity, besides being a
public nuisance.—Truth.
Financing the Enemy.
The German feeds on the freedom
of British ports and builds warships
to menace our sea supremacy out of
the profits he gains in London.—Table
Talk, Melbourne.
The Wander Fever.
Have you never felt the longing
that it were possible to step quietly
off your accustomed path in life and
strike out into fresh fields and pastures new? There are few of us so
contented as never to be troubled with
such a wish.—Weekly Dispatch.
Mr. Chamberlain's Holiday.
Mr. Chamberlain, who is now well
on the road towards good health, left
London on Sunday morning for the
South  of  France.    Mr.  Chamberlain
'was accompanied by his wife.
Precautions were taken to prevent
any public demonstration on the journey. Mr. Chamberlain drove from
•Highbury to the Great Western Station at Solihall, some miles distant,
and travelled to Paddington in a saloon reserved "for Mr. Bcale's party."
On arrival at Victoria Station Mr.
Chamberlain, looking far from well,
was helped out of his cairiage and
escorted to a special compartment
labelled "Mr. Cooke," in the n o'clock
boat-train.
Mr. Chamberlain was helped from
the train at Dover and walked with
difficulty to the cabin reserved for
him on the turbine steamer Queen.
Hc leant on an attendant's arm and
used a stick.
According to present arrangements,
Mr. and Mrs. Chamberlain will stay
for six weeks at the village of Vales-
cure, a summer resort two miles from
St. Raphael, in the Valley of the Garonne.
Suffragettes' Vengeance.
Two thousand women, with a sprinkling of men, gathered in Exeter Hall
at night to demand votes for women
and to send up a great cry of indignation against the anti-Suffragists in
the House of Commons.
There was a chairwoman, as became the occasion, in Mrs. Pank-
hurst, and famous Suffragettes were
scattered freely among the crowd on
the platform. Indignant murmurs ran
continuously through the great gathering as the ladies discussed together
the action of the House of Commons
in talking out the Bill.
Mrs. Pankhurst, clear-voiced, defiant, set the note of the meeting in a
ringing speech. "The party which today has abandoned the principles of
Liberalism," was her description of
the Government. She hinted at action in the future.
Mr. Philip Snowden, pale-faced and
incisive, seconded the resolution proposed by the Conservative member
for Hammersmith. "A cause like
yours," he said, "can never be defeated. The responsibility for what has
happened this afternoon clearly rests
on the Government."
iuiss Christabel Pankhurst, a slim,
girlish figure, moved the second resolution in a speech of feverish feeling.
The resolution called on the women
of the country to forget party and to
rise in opposition to the Government.
Mr. Keir Hardie told how the day's
proceedings would rouse the country,
and how thc Government would have
to consider the question of giving a
clay for the discussion of Women's
Suffrage.
HEADQUARTERS FOR
DRESS GOODS
HENRY YOUNG &C0.
SOUTHALL'S
SANITARY
TOWELS
THE NEW
"PETER PAN BLOUSE"
HAS ARRIVED, AND IS READY FOR YOUR ADORNMENT. THIS IS THE
" ALL-THE-RAGE BLOUSE," AND IS BOUND TO BE FASHION'S FAVORITE
IN SPRING WEAR.
Other New Arrivals:
WITH THE ABOVE, WE RECEIVED A SPLENDID ASSORTMENT OF
DAINTY MUSLIN BLOUSES—SHORT, MEDIUM AND LONG SLEEVES-
VERY GRACEFULLY EMBROIDERED AND TRIMMED WITH CALAIS VAL.
LACE, AT PRICES RANGING FROM $1.85 UP TO $6.40, AND AT ALL INTERMEDIATE PRICES. *
Henry Young & Co.
DRESS GOODS, MILLINERS, DRESSMAKING, ETC.
Government Street, Victoria.
UNION S. S. COMPANY OF B. C.
LIMITED.
Wake Up, Uncle Sam!
John Bull has been so urged to
"wake up," and has had thc American
workman and producer held up before
him as bright and shining examples
so long, that Dr. Louis Bell's article,
in the Engineering Magazine, "Do
American Manufacturing Methods
Imperii Her Trade " may come as a
surprise to some Britons.
Dr. Bell refers to thc wonderful
growth of American manufactures,
due largely to the immense resource-
&
AT THE CLOSED SOOB.
"The Old Love kissed you and went by;
Without  the New Love stands,
With roses red to crown your head,
New roses in his hands."
I know not if she heard at all;
I only know she bent
Above the withered blooms she held
As one too well content.
'•In this your house grown desolate
The chills of winter cling;
'i'he New Love waits without your gates
To lend you back to spring."
I  know  not  If she  heardat  all;
I only  know  she turned
Her hands above the empty hearth,
As though tho ashes burned.
The  New   Love,  singing,  went his  way
Across  the  blossomed   lands—
A little lad witb springtime glad
And  roses  in  Ills hands,
I know not if she heard at all;
I only know she pressed,
As mothers might n  little child,
The dead rose to her breast.
—Theodosla   Garrison.
This Company is not supported by
Government subsidies, but by the
good will and patronage of the travelling public and shippers.
Steamers leave Company's Wharf for
Van Anda, Lund, Heriot Bay, Hos-
kyn Inlet, Surge, Narrows, Granite
Point, Elk Bay, Hardwick Island,
Bear River, Salmon River, Port Harvey and all logging camps every Monday, 8 p. m.
Van Anda, Lund, Lewis Channel,
Shoal Bay, Port Neville, Port Harvey,
Chatham Channel, Tribune Channel,
Broughton Island, every Friday, 6
p. m.
Gibson's Pender Harbor, Nelson
Island, Marble Bay, Blubber Bay,
Lund, Manson's Whaletown, Read
Island, Bute Inlet, every Monday at
II a. m.
Tucker Bay, Van Anda, Gibson's
Welcome Pass, Pender Harbor,
Granite Island, Jervis Inlet, every Friday at 9 a.m.
Prince Rupert, Port Essington,
Portland Canal, Alert Bay, and Cannery Ports.
Monday, April ist, at g p. m.
by new steel steamer
CAMOSUN
This steamer is built in watertight
compartments with double bottom, to
insure safety of passengers in case of
collision or wreck.
For berths and passages apply at
office on wharf.
Carrall Street, Vancouver.
Last of Cheeryble House.
"Great clearance sale. Premises
coming down," are the words of a
placard on the walls of Cheeryble
House, in Cannon street, Manchester.
This means that another Dickens
landmark is to bc erased, for Cheeryble House was the home of the brothers Grant, who were the originals of
Charles Dickens' Brothers Cheeryble
in "Nicholas Nickleby."
CONTINUOUSLY SINCE 1827
John Robertson
& Son's
DUNDEE
SCOTCH
WHISKEY
HAS APPEALED TO CONNOISSEURS.
WINNIPEG
Branches in Canada
MONTREAL VANCOUVER
HENRY O. WOOTTEN, General Manager.
Canada and the United States. 41 Commons St., Montreal.
New and Second Hand Launches for sale.
A. W. LePage
Electrician and *
Gasoline Engine Expert
GASOLINE ENGINES ANE,
SUPPLIES.
General Agents for
The Rochester & Campbell
Engines, the Auto-Sparker Dynamos, the Loomis Float Feec
Carburetors, Spark Plugs, Coils
Batteries, etc.
667 Granville Street.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
2 and 4 Cycle. J
2^ to 100 H. P.
Get our list of Bargains
4. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 30, 1907
The Provincial
Assembly.
Friday, March 22.—Principal item
continued debate on Bill to amend
Assessment Act, attempt of Hawthornthwaite to introduce amendment
compelling Railway Companies operating in B. C. to issue passes to Government officials and Members of the
Legislature, in return for reduction
in taxation.
Finance Minister Tatlow pointed
out that effect of proposed amendment would bc to compel the Province to forego seven or eight thousand dollars of revenue for the granting of a few passes which could bc
purchased for a thousand dollars. Socialist not strong on arithmetic, could
j not see thc point, forced issue to a
division, lost by large majority, only
persons voting for it being Socialists, Naden and Jardine.
Hawthornthwaite's eight-hour Smel-
' ter Bill passed through Committee
(with slight verbal alteration.
Dexterous question by leader of
j Opposition intended to transfix Pre-
Imier by asking whether portion of
(Mineral Tax would be applied to re-
llief of taxation in Rossland. Premier
• pointed out that there Avas no legal
Iliability of the kind suggested, but as
la matter of equity on account of the
■'peculiar physical conditions of Ross-
lland, the matter was receiving con-
[sideration.
Monday, March 25.—After a holi-
iday extending from Friday to Mon-
Iday, the Legislature re-assambled, and
lthe long expected debate on Better
•Terms came off, there was a large
lattendance of spectators, including a
[number of ladies; the debate was
[characterized on both sides by clear,
■logical, unimpassioned statements and
la noticeable lack of enthusiasm. Pre-
Jimier's speech was admirable, but
■physically he was not in very good
Tform. J. A. Macdonald was brilliant,
land delivered one of the finest dialec-
Etical utterances ever heard in a Cana-
Idian Assembly. It was magnificent,
[but it was not war, and was justly
I characterized by the Premier as a
[splendid academic effort.
Determination to bring the debate
[ito a close, necessitated night session.
[McPhillips and Hawthornthwaite delivered rattling speeches, the later as
[inconsistent as usual; when the divi-
Ision was finally taken Socialists with-
ldrew to avoid voting; the count
Ishowed twenty for the Government,
eight for the Opposition.
I Tuesday, March 26th.—Provincial
[Secretary Dr. Young discharged his
[irst important official duty by introducing second reading of Bill providing for the setting aside of two million acres of Crown Land for the endowment of a Provincial University,
■after the usual protest from Socialists and unqualified support from
leader of Opposition, Bill passed its
[Second reading by unanimous vote.
Wednesday, March 27.—Lieutenant
tjovernor assented to number of bills
massed through the House since the
Ipening of session. Chief Commis-
iioner Fulton introduced measure to
Validate licenses for claims in district
■vf Southeast Kootenay. Another
|mendment to Vancouver Corporation
\ct introduced by James Garden.
Capt. John Irving and associates
lyere fortunate in securing endorsa-
lion of railway committee for revival
|jf Queen Charlotte Island's Railway
^.ct. This charter has been hawked
liirough Canada and the United States
[or two years, but no money has been
[pent on the island and no work done,
fcapt. John Avas politely notified that
In respect of this measure he need
[eek no further favours at the hands
Jif the railway committee.
Hawthornthwaite anxious to secure
liortion of coal tax for benefit of Na-
Laimo, evidently on the principle that
[ll taxpayers are entitled to a rebate,
rremier gave him an emphatic ttirn-
lown. In reply to question from Mr.
Irarden, Premier informed the House
[hat thc G. T. P. had not taken any
[teps to survey the terminal lands
[ranted hy thc Province, and that thc
Itovernmcnt could not proceed Avith
lieir selection until this had been
one.
The adjourned debate on thc University Act was by consent of both
"^7-r'5",.' *'*■■ ■'■  • ■ '■'■H«K*V*~ '■"■faKn'*.-< "■""~v
J&MMiB2±:
——Z^..^^^^..^J*j,^j^t± L*laii
'■'■-.'■•* -7, vM '■'■' <li.".>,
■iif     \  '    .■*!>- '-,'S V :'-'■>
MlX
By Royal Warrant.
ANGEL SEEDS
SUTTON'S MAMMOTH LONG RED
Seed of proved germinating power, per pound, 30c. '
THE FINEST TYPE OF LONG RED MANGEL.    PRODUCES AN IMMENSE WEIGHT PER ACRE SPECIALLY RECOM
MENDED FOR DEEP SOILS.
SOLE AGENTS.
The Brackman=Ker Milling Co., Limited.
Who carry a Full Stock of Sutton's Seeds at
VICTORIA
VANCOUVER
NEW WESTMINSTER
parties held over until after the
Easter recess.
William Hunter, the unusually silent, but occasionally vigorous, member for Slocan, woke up to urge the
passing of a measure entitled "An
Act to aid the Municipality of Slocan." After a plea from the Premier
the measure was allowed to pass, although it had to be admitted that it
was quite exceptional in character,
and could only be justified on emergency grounds.
Mr. Ross' bill for regulating the
hours in shops, with an addition suggested by Hawthornthwaite legalizing
the granting of half-holidays in addition to shorter hours passed without
a division.
The House adjourned to worship at
the shrine of the lily until Tuesday
next.
Correspondence.
Vancouver, B.C., March 27th.
The Editor The Week.
Dear Sir,—I am pleased to note the
stand which you have taken in connection with the Lord's Day Act, as
outlined in this week's issue of your
paper. I believe the Ast was passed
at the request of the representatives
of a great majority of the people of
Canada.
The matter was tinder consideration by the Dominion Government
for a considerable time before the
Bill was passed and I believe that
all objections made were considered
carefully by those who had the matter in charge and now that the Bill
has become law, all loyal citizens
should fall in line and observe its
provisions.
Yours truly,
THOS. T. LANGLOIS.
J L
-^^««/e. Iflo'4/".——
Strathcona       Road «,
*J>
L
MEMORY.
Dear, it was a simple touch
Of your hand In clasping mine;
Heedlessly, in like caress,
Rain falls on the stunted pine.
With a tender sympathy,
Denr, you smiled at me one day,
As the sun might gild a fern
Passing by its shaded way.
Great your life, and mine for what?
Fate spins not with you and me,
Yet you linger in my thoughts
For your sweet humanity:
And T like to dream my love
Speaks your mind a gentle ease,
As the little, west wind stirs,
Reverently, the forest trees.
it
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28 27
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Han ley      st
Kingsford Smith & Co.
860 Granville Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
will sell, without reserve, 119 choice lots in
Hastings Townsite
Friday and Saturday, 5th and 6th April, at 8 p.m.
Terms—One-fourth cash; balance 6, 12, 18 mos., 7 percent.
This popular suburb of Vancouver is rapidly advancing
in value. The land is unbroken, partly slashed, and has
absolutely no stones. It lies three minutes from the electric train and a splendid 99-foot cleared road runs right
past the property.
Country purchasers are strongly recommended to
inspect this.
Get in before the V. W. & Y. Ry.
starts construction
1
WiBJSffliil
Wndtrtatitr
35 YATES ST
PHONE,    8 9?2
Rifle Range on London Roof.
A miniature rifle range has been
opened on thc roof of thc Savings
Bank building, West Kensington, for
the use of the Post Oflice Officials'
Rifle Club, which consists of nearly
500 members. The range offers facilities for shooting at twenty-five and
fifty yards.
Established 1867
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
52 Government St., Victoria, B. C.
Charles Hayward, President.
F. Caselton, Manager.
We make a specialty  of   Undertaking and Embalming.
An experienced certificated staff available at all times, day
and night.
Phones Nos. 48, 305, 404 or 594,  Victoria. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 30, 1907.
The Motherland.
Smuggling a Skeleton.
A Chinese coolie landed in Singapore the other day from Sumatra. A
Chinteng was examining his luggage
for opium when he felt something
hard in a pillow. Upon opening it he
found a skull and all the bones of a
human skeleton. Teh coolie declared
that the bones were those of his
brother, and he was taking them to
China for burial.—Siam Observer,
Bankok.
Ladylike Candour.
Whatever the male attitude towards
work may be—and nobody ever yet
met a man who did not profess to
loathe his profession—there certainly
never was a woman yet who preferred
work to amusement.—Ladies' Field.
Taste for Morbid Novels.
The taste of men is less morbid in
the matter of fiction than that of women, especially of modern women, to
whom the plain, direct telling of a
story does not appeal, but who prefer
the psychology of the soul and the
infinite dissection of recondite motives and feelings to dramatic movement.—Graphic.
fulness of the American spirit, and
says that it seems almost ungrateful
to suggest even the remote possibility
of disaster. "The foreign peril lies
not in foreign acuteness, but in the
painstaking avoidance of our mistakes. Our real danger is not from
without, but from within—the danger
that comes from over-haste and lack
of thoroughness."
"The things are just as characteristic of American industry as is the
marvellous alertness that has been its
motive power. In the mechanical
arts, for instance, American methods
and workmen produce average results
of remarkable excellence; but if one
wants a bit of work done with the
utmost thoroughness and precision,
nineteen times out of twenty he will
find that the workman who has finished it is a German or Swede or
Englishman—if indeed he is able to
get it done at all. As every thoughtful manufacturer fully realises this,
there is a dearth of skilled labour,
and native American skilled labour is
the rarest kind. As a result the finest
artisans in many lines of work are
not to be found in this country, and
the goods which they produced are
imported.—Review of Reviews.
Barmaids' French Champion.
One must have lived through a dull
winter's night on the shores of the
Thames; one must have looked in the
laughing eyes of some waitress for a
reflection of the absent blue sky, in
order to understand all the horror of
the proposal to replace charming barmaids by men.—Matin, Paris.
Will Not Always Stop.
Going to  law  is  like  riding in  a
motor-'bus:  you  can  never  get  out
exactly where you want to.—The Law
Clerk.
Play-writing Mechanics.
Play-writing has become a base
mechanical craft, instead of an intoxicating, fascinating struggle for fame.
—Era.
Does She Know It?
The average woman is not a queen,
but a slave; if not a slave to some
man, a slave to conventionality or to
sloth.—Ladies' Field.
Do Women Want Votes?
The best answer to the cry of
"Votes for Women" is that women
don't want votes, and it is women
who can give this answer most effectually. It is really their business
to disown the Suffragettes, and if they
did the movement would become a
self-evident absurdity, besides being a
public nuisance.—Truth.
Financing the Enemy.
The German feeds on the freedom
of British ports and builds warships
to menace our sea supremacy out of
the profits he gains in London.—Table
Talk, Melbourne.
The Wander Fever.
Have you never felt the longing
that it were possible to step quietly
j off your accustomed path in life and
strike out into fresh fields and pas-
• tures new? There are few of us so
contented as never to be troubled with
such a wish.—Weekly Dispatch.
Mr. Chamberlain's Holiday.
Mr. Chamberlain, who is now well
on the road towards good health, left
London on Sunday morning for the
South  of  France.    Mr.  Chamberlain
'was accompanied by his wife.
Precautions were taken to prevent
any public demonstration on the journey. Mr. Chamberlain drove from
Highbury to the Great Western Station at Solihall, some miles distant,
and travelled to Paddington in a saloon reserved "for Mr. Beale's party."
■ On arrival at Victoria Station Mr.
Chamberlain, looking far from well,
was helped out of his cairiage and
escorted to a special compartment
labelled "Mr. Cooke," in the n o'clock
boat-train.
Mr. Chamberlain was helped from
thc train at Dover and walked with
difficulty to the cabin reserved for
him on the turbine steamer Queen.
Hc leant on an attendant's arm and
used a stick.
According to present arrangements,
Mr. and Mrs. Chamberlain will stay
for six weeks at the village of Vales-
cure, a summer resort two miles from
St. Raphael, in thc Valley of thc Garonne.
Suffragettes' Vengeance.
Two thousand women, with a sprinkling of men, gathered in Exeter Hall
at night to demand votes for women
and to send up a great cry of indignation against the anti-Suffragists in
the House of Commons.
There was a chairwoman, as became the occasion, in Mrs. Pankhurst, and famous Suffragettes were
scattered freely among the crowd on
the platform. Indignant murmurs ran
continuously through the great gathering as the ladies discussed together
thc action of the House of Commons
in talking out the Bill.
Mrs. Pankhurst, clear-voiced, defiant, set the note of the meeting in a
ringing speech. "The party which today has abandoned the principles of
Liberalism," was her description of
the Government. She hinted at action in the future.
Mr. Philip Snowden, pale-faced and
incisive, seconded the resolution proposed by the Conservative member
for Hammersmith. "A cause like
yours," he said, "can never be defeated. The responsibility for what has
happened this afternoon clearly rests
on thc Government."
miss Christabel Pankhurst, a slim,
girlish figure, moved the second resolution in a speech of feverish feeling.
The resolution called on the women
of the country to forget party and to
rise in opposition to the Government.
Mr. Keir Hardie told how the day's
proceedings would rouse the country,
and how the Government would have
to consider the question of giving a
day for the discussion of Women's
Suffrage.
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WITH THE ABOVE, WE RECEIVED A SPLENDID ASSORTMENT OF
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UNION S. S. COMPANY OF B. C,
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Wake Up, Uncle Sam!
John Bull has been so urged to
"wake up," and has had the American
workman and producer held up before
him as bright and shining examples
so long, that Dr. T.ouis Bell's article,
in thc Engineering Magazine, "Do
American Manufacturing Methods
Imperil Her Trade " may conic as a
surprise to some Britons.
Dr. Bell refers to thc wonderful
growth of American manufactures,
due largely to the immense resource-
AT THE CLOSES DOOB.
"Tlie Old Lnvc kissed you and went by;
Without  the New Love stands,
With roses rod to crown your head,
New roses in his hands."
I know not if she heard at all;
I only know she bent
Above the withered blooms she held
As one too well content.
"In this your house grown desolate
The chills of winter cling;
Tlio Now Love waits without your gates
To lend you back to spring."
I  know  not  If she  heardat  all;
I only know  she turned
Her hands above tho empty hearth,
As though thc ashes burned.
Tho Now   Love,  singing,  wont his  way
Across   tho  blossomed   hinds—
A little lad with springtime glad
Ami roses in his hands,
I know not if sho hoard at all;
I onlv know sho pressed.
As mothers might a little child,
Tlio dead rose to her breast.
—Thoodosla  Garrison.
This Company is not supported by
Government subsidies, but by the
good will and patronage of the travelling public and shippers.
Steamers leave Company's Wharf for
Van Anda, Lund, Heriot Bay, Hos-
kyn Inlet, Surge, Narrows, Granite
Point, Elk Bay, Hardwick Island,
Bear River, Salmon River, Port Harvey and all logging camps every Monday, 8 p. m.
Van Anda, Lund, Lewis Channel,
Shoal Bay, Port Neville, Port Harvey,
Chatham Channel, Tribune Channel,
Broughton Island, every Friday, 6
p. m.
Gibson's Pender Harbor, Nelson
Island, Marble Bay, Blubber Bay,
Lund, Manson's Whaletown, Read
Island, Bute Inlet, every Monday at
n a. m.
Tucker Bay, Van Anda, Gibson's
Welcome Pass, Pender Harbor,
Granite Island, Jervis Inlet, every Friday at 9 a.m.
Prince Rupert, Port Essington,
Portland Canal, Alert Bay, and Cannery Ports.
Monday, April ist, at 9 p. m.
by new steel steamer
CAMOSUN
This steamer is built in watertight
compartments with double bottom, to
insure safety of passengers in case of
collision or wreck.
For berths and passages apply at
office on wharf.
Carrall Street, Vancouver.
Last of Cheeryble House.
"Great clearance sale. Premises
coming down," are the words of a
placard on the walls of Cheeryble
House, in Cannon street, Manchester.
This means that another Dickens
landmark is to bc erased, for Cheeryble House was the home of the brothers Grant, who were the originals of
Chnrles Dickens' Brothers Cheeryble
in "Nicholas Nickleby."
CONTINUOUSLY SINCE 1827
John Robertson
& Son's
DUNDEE
SCOTCH
WHISKEY
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WINNIPEG
Branches in Canada
MONTREAL VANCOUVER
HENRY 0. WOOTTEN, General Manager.
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I New and Second Hand Launches for sale.
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Electrician and
Qasoline Engine Expert
GASOLINE ENGINES ANE|
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General Agents for
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667 Granville Street.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
2 and 4 Cycle.
2A to 100 H. P.
Get our list of Bargains THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 30, 1907
The Provincial
Assembly.
Friday, March 22.—Principal item
continued debate on Bill to amend
Assessment Act, attempt of Hawthornthwaite to introduce amendment
compelling Railway Companies operating in B. C. to issue passes to Government officials and Members of the
Legislature, in return for reduction
in taxation.
Finance Minister Tatlow pointed
out that effect of proposed amendment would be to compel thc Province to forego seven or eight thousand dollars of revenue for the granting of a few passes which could be
purchased for a thousand dollars. Socialist not strong on arithmetic, could
j not see the point, forced issue to a
division, lost by large majority, only
persons voting for it being Socially ists, Naden and Jardine.
Hawthornthwaite's eight-hour Smel-
i ter Bill passed through Committee
(with slight verbal alteration.
Dexterous question by leader of
Opposition intended to transfix Premier by asking whether portion of
Mineral Tax would be applied to re-
.1 ief of taxation in Rossland. Premier
pointed out that there was no legal
liability of the kind suggested, but as
a matter of equity on account of the
peculiar physical conditions of Rossland, the matter was receiving consideration.
Monday, March 25.—After a holiday extending from Friday to Monday, the Legislature re-assambled, and
the long expected debate on Better
Terms came off, there was a large
attendance of spectators, including a
number of ladies; the debate was
characterized on both sides by clear,
logical, unimpassioned statements and
a noticeable lack of enthusiasm. Premier's speech was admirable, but
physically he was not in very good
iform. J. A. Macdonald was brilliant,
:and delivered one of the finest dialectical utterances ever heard in a Canadian Assembly. It was magnificent,
but it was not war, and was justly
characterized by the Premier as a
splendid academic effort.
Determination to bring the debate
to a close, necessitated night session.
McPhillips and Hawthornthwaite delivered rattling speeches, the later as
inconsistent as usual; when the division was finally taken Socialists withdrew to avoid voting; the count
showed twenty for the Government,
(eight for the Opposition.
Tuesday, March 26th.—Provincial
secretary Dr. Young discharged his
first important official duty by intro-
Iluring second reading of Bill providing for the setting aside of two mil-
ion acres of Crown Land for the endowment of a Provincial University,
^fter the usual protest from Social-
Ists   and   unqualified   support   from
eader of Opposition, Bill passed its
econd reading by unanimous vote.
Wednesday, March 27.—Lieutenant
Ijovernor assented to number of bills
iassed through the House since the
ipening of session.    Chief Commissioner Fulton introduced measure to
'alidate licenses for claims in district
if    Southeast    Kootenay.      Another
amendment to Vancouver Corporation
|p.ct introduced by James Garden.
Capt.  John   Irving  and  associates
Iv-ere fortunate in securing endorsa-
ion of railway committee for revival
if Queen Charlotte Island's Railway
let. This charter has been hawked
"irough Canada and the United States
or two years, but no money has been
pent on the island and no work done.
*apt. John was politely notified that
n respect of this measure he need
eek no further favours at the hands
if the railway committee.
Hawthornthwaite anxious to secure
iortion of coal tax for benefit of Na-
.aimp, evidently on the principle that
11 taxpayers are entitled to a rebate,
'remier gave him an emphatic turn-
own. In reply to question from Mr.
larden, Premier informed the House
hat thc G. T. P. had not taken any
teps to survey the terminal lands
ranted by the Province, and that the
iovernment could .not proceed with
heir  selection  until  this    had  been
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NEW WESTMINSTER
parties held over until after the
Easter recess.
William Hunter, the unusually silent, but occasionally vigorous, member for Slocan, woke up to urge the
passing of a measure entitled "An
Act to aid the Municipality of Slocan." After a plea from the Premier
the measure was allowed to pass, although it had to be admitted that it
was quite exceptional in character,
and could only be justified on emergency grounds.
Mr. Ross' bill for regulating the
hours in shops, with an addition suggested by Hawthornthwaite legalizing
the granting of half-holidays in addition to shorter hours passed without
a division.
The House adjourned to worship at
the shrine of the lily until Tuesday
next.
Correspondence.
Vancouver, B.C., March 27th.
The Editor The Week.
Dear Sir,—I am pleased to note the
stand which you have taken in connection with the Lord's Day Act, as
outlined in this week's issue of your
paper. I believe the Ast was passed
at the request of the representatives
of a great majority of the people of
Canada.
The matter was under consideration by the Dominion Government
for a considerable time before the
Bill was passed and I believe that
all objections made were considered
carefully by those who had the matter in charge and now that the Bill
has become law, all loyal citizens
should fall in line and observe its
provisions.
Yours truly,
THOS. T. LANGLOIS.
J L
- ,5-coIt (•><»'« /"•——'
Strathcona       Road *
L
The adjourned debate on the Uni-
[ersity Act was by consent of both
MEMOKY.
Dear, it was a simple touch
Of your hand In clasping mine;
Heedlessly, in like caress,
Rain falls on the stunted pine.
With a tender sympathy,
Dear, you smiled at me one day,
As the sun might gild a fern
Passing by its shaded way.
Great your life,  and mine for what?
Fate spins not with ynu and me,
Yet you linger ln my thoughts
For your sweet humanity:
And I like to dream my love
.Speaks your mind a gentle ease,
As the little west wind stirs,
Reverently, the forest trees.
it'
"■rrarr
io|ii
I*
3-
\«vm
Mi, J!
22
23
24
25
Arnold     St
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22
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Donnelly     St
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Hanley       ST
B 9
B.l
Kingsford Smith & Co.
860 Granville Street,
Vancouver, B. C.
will sell, without reserve, 119 choice lots in
Hastings Townsite
Friday and Saturday, 5th and 6th April, at 8 p.m.
Terms—One-fourth cash; balance 6, 12, 18 mos., 7 percent.
This popular suburb of Vancouver is rapidly advancing
in value. The land is unbroken, partly slashed, and has
absolutely no stones. It lies three minutes from the electric train and a splendid 99-foot cleared road runs right
past thc property.
Country purchasers are strongly recommended to
inspect this.
Get in before the V. W. k Y. Ry.
starts construction
W.BISM»i?
1 WnUribUr
35 YATES s.
PHONE;    £9? 2
Rifle Range on London Roof.
A miniature rifle range has been
opened on thc roof of thc Savings
Bank building, West Kensington, for
the use ol" thc Post Office Officials'
Ride Club, which consists of nearly
500 members. The range offers facilities for shooting at twenty-five and
fifty yards.
Established 1867
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
52 Government St., Victoria, B. C,
Charles Hayward, President. F. Caselton, Manager.
We make a specialty of  Undertaking and Embalming.
An experienced certificated staff available at all times, day
and night.
Phones Nos. 48, 305, 404 or 594, Victoria. THE WEEK  SATURDAY, MARCH 30, 1907.
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
OSoea:
88%  Government Street. .Victoria, B.C.
Km. 14, McKinnon Blk. .Vancouver, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE..Manager and Editor
SOCCER.
By BOHEMIAN.
I have been asked by my editor to
write something on the most important topic of the week, and in reply to
an interrogation was curtly informed
that it was neither "Better Terms,"
Woman's Suffrage, the Real Estate
Boom, nor the Weather, but simply
"Soccer." Thi:-. subject is, or should
be, uppermost in every mind for
more good reasons than there are
digits on the hands, two of wh'ch
only will 1 recite. The first is that
Soccer has ousted every other game
from pride of place, in attractiveness
and popularity, at home. Every Saturday during the season, upwards of
half a million flock to witness the
League games alone, and $100,000 is
not an exaggerated estimate of the
gate receipts. This does not take
into account Cup ties and other
matches which in the aggregate must
at least duplicate the figures which
pertain to thc League matches, so
that every Saturday no less than one
million people in the Motherland rally
around what has undoubtedly become
the popular British game. The mere
name of Cup ties raises visions of
larger gates than are ever chronicled
in connection with League matches.
Speaking from memory, I think 50,-
000 is probably a record attendance at
a League match, and statistics of the
finals in the English Cup competition
show that more than 120,000 people
have been present on one occasion
at the Crystal Palace.
These figures are stupendous, they
dwarf into insignificance the largest
crowds ever attracted to baseball and
football matches in the United States,
it is doubtful even if the palmy days
of the Roman Empire when gladiators
contested in the arena the huge
crowds of which historians tell reached these dimensions.
One reads of the enthusiasm and
excitement aroused by Grecian and
Roman athletes, to say nothing of the
feverish abandon of American crowds
when witnessing their favourite
games, but I doubt if greater enthusiasm has ever been aroused, or pro-
founder excitement witnessed, than
has characterised many of the English
Cup finals, contested by two splendid
teams of athletes in the pink of condition, struggling on the most scientific system and under the impulse of
the manliest traits to secure the victory for their club, while the eyes of
a hundred thousand breathless spectators watched the little round sphere
dancing, bounding and whirling from
one end of the field to the other.
But this is not the place to discuss
the moral influence and the philosophic aspects of the game, it is sufficient to recite the facts I have mentioned in order to show that today
Soccer is par excellence the game of
the Motherland, the game of the
masses, for where cricket and Rugby
draw their thousands, Soccer draws
its tens and hundreds of thousands.
The effect is wholly beneficial, it takes
a million working men out into the
open air and furnishes them with
amusement, recreation and excitement, it develops the finest physical
and moral instincts of the race.
The game is just taking root in
Canada, and it should be possible to
avoid most of the mistakes which
have characterised its development at
home. We should be able to go on
from the point which has already
been reached there; if so, it will take
but a few years, say ten at the outside, to develop the game to such a
degree of excellence that a Canadian team may duplicate in Soccer thc
achievements of the "All Blacks" and
the "Spring Boks" in Rugby. In order to glance at the pitfalls which
should be avoided and to emphasize
alike the strength and the weakness
of the game, I will recall the salient
features of its history at home for the
last thirty years.
In the early seventies I saw my
first great Soccer game at Stafford
Road, Wolverhampton, against the
Old Etonians. On the former team,
in the forward ranks, was Charley
Crump, for many years the President
of the Birmingham Football Association, subsequently, and I believe at
the present, a number of the Executive of the National Football Association. On the Old Etonian team was
the inimitable MacAulay, with long
flaxen hair and the Varsity style of
dribbling which has never been entirely dropped; he made brilliant runs
and scored several times, although
the goalkeeper, Teddy Ray, was one
of the best men who ever performed
between the sticks. MacAulay has
had many successors, notable among
whom was the Cambridge man, J. M.
Cobbold, and the latest Dr. Smith,
who for so many years played centre
forward for the Corinthians. But their
style of play belongs to the past, it
is purely individual, and while it is
always spectacular and occasionally
successful, has long since been discounted by combined team play. I
well remember the first time that it
received a decided setback. This was
in the seventies when the Old Etonians and Blackburn Rovers met at
Kennington Oval in the English Cup
final. Up to that time no Northern
team had held the Cup. It had rested
for many years with the London
Wanderers, the Old Etonians and the
Old Carthusians. On this occasion
the Rovers came South to win, they
brought with them a splendid team
who had learned the art of combination play. James Hargreaves was the
Captain. I well remember one incident in connection with the match;
Hargreaves lost his boots en route
and had to play in a new pair which
blistered his feet terribly, but no one
knew of it until the match was over,
although he suffered agonies and was
lame for weeks after. In this match
little Jimmy Brown, the Rover's centre forward, and in my judgment,
considering his day, and the stage
which the game had then reached,
the finest forward who ever stepped
on a football field, distinguished himself, as did Lord Kinnaird, who today is President of the Y. M. C. A„
and on that day played centre half for
the Old Etonians. Even then he was
getting on in years for a football
player and had a long red beard. I
well remember what a quaint figure
he cut as he capered about the field.
He had the activity and agility of the
proverbial cat, was hard to pass, and
worked like a Trojan to the finish.
A. T. B. Dunn played a brilliant forward game for the Old Etonians and
laid the foundation of that fame which
he sustained for many years as an
international.
With the departure of the Cup from
the South, a change came o'er the
spirit of the game, the importation
of Scotch players became a regular
business. Archie Hunter, the mighty
and invincible, came South to Captain the Aston Villa team, and to initiate the Midland Clubs into the
Scotch style of play. I remember his
first appearance at Perry Barr, a
stranger, except to the committee, he
had lost his trunks and played in a
pair of white flannel cricket pants,
his position was centre forward, the
match was with the redoubtable Stafford Roaders, at that time champions
of Birmingham and district. Archie
Hunter drilled his men during the
progress of the game, told them when
to pass the ball, when to hold it and
when to shoot, taught them that most
brilliant and effective of all charges,
when a line of forwards dashes up
the field almost in a straight line at
full speed, passing the ball like lightning from one to another until within
striking distance, then a swift curling
shot from the wing to the centre and
bang for the goal. It is a matter of
history that Archie Hunter's efforts
in less than three years placed Aston
Villa at the top of the tree. That is
nearly twenty-five years ago, and if
the record be consulted from that
day to this, I make bold to say that
over twenty-five years no team in
England has uniformly held so high
a position in all the competitions in
which it has entered.
What Archie Hunter did for Aston
Villa other Scotch players did for
Preston North-End, Everton, Sunderland, Newcastle, and indeed for
most of the League teams, and although today there are many teams
in which English players predominate,
and many in which there are no
Scotchmen, they all play the game as
it was introduced by the Scotch players, and as it was first made famous
by the classic and never-to-be-forgotten Queen's Park.
For many years no Southern team
held a position in first-class football
when once the Wanderers and Old
Etonians and the Old Carthusians
had been dethroned. Even the mighty
Corinthians, to the constitution of
which Pa Jackson summoned the most
brilliant players of the day, was soon
discounted in goal-getting by the
League teams which played a combination game, and it was not until
ten years ago when the Southern
teams finally abandoned the individual
the Varsity style that once more they
begun to forge ahead, until today
teams like Tottenham Hotspur, Mill-
well Athletic, Southampton, Fulham,
Woolwich Arsenal, and a number of
others are just as good as almost any
of the Northern teams.
I must bring my all too discursive
letter to a close, my one excuse for
its length is that when I begin to
write about football I never know
when to stop; and as I have been a
player and a devotee all my life, and
as I know that the finest spectacular
field game in the world which has
captured the imagination of the
masses at home, sooner or later is
going to capture it, not only throug-
out Canada, but all over this Continent, I am anxious to recall a few of
its glorious men, and above all to
emphasize the two great lessons that
thirty years of the best football in the
world has taught me. The first is
that combination alone can win out,
and the second is that the sport can
only succeed if it is followed for the
love of it.
BOHEMIAN.
MEMORIES.
Of my ould loves, of their ould ways,
I sit an' think these bitther days.
(I've kissed—'gainst  rason an'  'gainst
rhyme—
More mouths than one in my mad time!)
Of their soft ways and words I dream,
But far off now, in faith, they seem.
Wid betther lives, wld betther men,
They've all long taken up again!
For me an' mine they're past an' done—
Aye, all but one—yes, all but one!
Since I kissed her 'neath Tullagh Hill
That one gurl stays close wld me still.
Och! up to mine her face she lifts,
And round us still the white May drifts;
And her soft arm, in some ould way,
Is here beside me, night an' day;
But, faith, 'twas her they buried deep,
Wid all that love she couldn't keep,
Aye, deep an' cold, in Killlnkere,
This many a year—this many a year!
—Arthur Stringer.
Question of Conscience.
A sportsman who had a five-pound
note stolen from him a few months
ago, says the Tatler, received the following letter the other day: "Dear
sir,—I stoled your money. Remorse
naws my conshence, and I send you
a sovereign. When remorse naws
agin I will send you some more-
Tip O'Rary."
Privilege.
Pointing out some of the privileges
that members of Parliament and the
clergy of the Established Church enjoy, a writer in Cassell's Journal says
that a clergyman cannot be arrested
while going to church or while leaving it, or within its walls; and even
for a crime no policeman dare arrest
and take an archbishop or a bishop
before a magistrate, except by leave
of the King. The' King is the sanctuary of the Episcopacy.
Honeymoon Trains.
A novel form of railway enterprise,
which will bring joy to the hearts of
newly wedded couples, has been introduced by the Midland Company. A
"honeymooner's carriage" is now attached to certain Midland trains. The
carriage is not conspicuously labelled, and therefore it ought not to attract unduly the curiosity of other
passengers. It is just a plain, cosy,
first-class compartment, on the coupe
principle, and it holds two persons—
and no more.
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THE WEEK, SATURDAY MARCH 30 1907.
?ififififififififififif&
**fi°
Short Story  *
THE LITTLE BROWN BIRD.
By Jessie Morelle.
(Continued from last week)
She looked down over the foothills
to the valley of the Rio Grande. The
"brilliant southern moonlight brooded
there in mystical silence. The brown
I'oothills lay massive and heavy in the
foreground. Beyond, the broad, level
plains that cherished with affectionate yielding the moods and wanderings of the river, and farther, against
lhe horizon, lay sleeping, as they had
lor ages, a soft outline against the
|ky, the Sacramentos.
There was  no   sound  except  the
llight creaking of the leather of the
(addle as the horse breathed.    For
jiore than    twenty-four    hours  her
[eart had held the most torturing,
id, necessarily, concealed   anxiety.
the majestic silence enveloped her.
lhe sat her horse like a statue, with
jer hands crossed before her on the
kddle, and looked out over the scene.
pme subtle strength    and courage
|emed to come to her.   There was
strife—just the silence that spoke
Ir all eternity woven with the joy-
us, flooding moonlight.
I She looked long into the distance.
ie usually brown  face was white
bw from suffering, and contrasted
[ith the clustering jet-black hair that
lished  front  from  under  the gray
Imbrero set back on her head, and
le large eyes,—lands    of   mingled
Kdnight and noonday.
[When, at last, she turned to travel
there were tears rolling down her
Jieeks.   She went on in softer, less
|nse mood, and when she again took
the chant of "The Little Brown
Ird" there was an even warmer mel-
hy in the notes, and the pathetic
lory  seemed  to   find    sympathetic
■lends in the trees and rocks across
le  way,  for  they   sang  the  story
Ick to her again in the same soft
Ines and lingeringly spoken words,
lid it was like a friendship to the
lave but weary heart.
|She was soon surrounded by trees
Id  rocks  and  the  mountain  sides
Jain, but she had not gone far when,
j the midst of her chanting, a faint
lice not far above her, called, "Liz."
Tiickly as a thought, she answered,
Us."
She slipped from the saddle and,
Issing the reins over the horse's
lad, threw them over a nearby bush.
I'Liz," the call came again. "I'm
fe," she answered, and in a moment
had climbed to the rocks above.
I'Are you hurt bad?" and she sank
side John as he lay there on a
pat brown boulder, protected from
aediate view from the trail by
bhes and sheltered by the tall pines.
|Ier calloused hands pushed back
hair from his forehead. "Oh,
a drink," he said, faintly.
|>he soon returned from her horse
|h a canteen of water. Very deftly
held the canteen to his lips. He
Ink with the eagerness of a thirsty
■Id. It seemed to revive him from
J semi-stupor.
IWhere you hurt, John?" and as
J asked she noticed his hand pressed
|his side, and, putting her hand on
she felt his shirt wet and saw it
Is a stain—blood.
He looked at her in a pitiful, ap-
Iling way as she bent over him. He
|d to move, but was stiff and weak,
ceased his effort, saying, broken-
"I'm done for, Liz."
|No, John," she said, stoutly, "I've
ae on Hanks. I'll take you home.
I'll be all right."
Ilowly and painfully she learned
In him that the "gang" had found
in the cabin at Bear Springs
|ut midnight the night before. He
made a dash to escape, but was
It through the leg and side and
I for dead. Since then, by thc most
ere exertion, he had pulled and
led himself to where she had found
1—a half-mile from the cabin. He
kept out of the trail for fear of
lie chance enemy, but had kept
Ir to it. Through pah* and loss of
lod he could go no farther, but was
|;ning for her.    He had felt sure
she would come.
She brought the blanket from under
the saddle and put it under his head.
She had torn a piece from the old
waist she wore as a shirt, to bathe his
face with, but when she tried to move
his hand from his side he seemed in
such agony that she stopped.
Gradually she realized that he must
be much better than now before she
could, in any way, get him home—
and would she want to if she could?
She cast the sickening thought aside
and ministered to him in all possible
ways, and most tender was the touch
of those large, bony hands. It was
such a love that moved them.
Finally he seemed to sleep, and she
lay close beside him, her elbow on
the edge of the blanket under his
head, and her head supported by her
hand and very close to his.
He murmured and muttered occasionally, but at a movement of her
hand over his face he would stop as
if soothed.   So she kept her vigil.
An owl in a nearby tree asked with
childish persistence the old question
of his race, "Who's there? who's
there?" and the cries and calls of
various wild animals sounded through
the forest.
Finally, he opened his eyes, and'
smiling up into her face said, "Sing
to me, Liz," and again the story of
"The Little Brown Bird" was told,
but the music was much broken now
by the choking in her throat—but she
must sing, and now he heard this
song of his hearthstone while in the
heart of the Black Range of New
Mexico ten thousand feet above sea-
level—miles away from even a miner's or hunter's cabin—dying. But
the smile of God was surely upon
him, for beside him was the woman
he loved and who loved him. Did
the song picture his fireside too vividly to him? Did he feel again the
moist warmth of the lips of the little
rosy-cheeked girl, asleep in her bed
at home, against his own? Some tears
gathered in his eyes and rolled off his
face and he turned it from her. The
full consciousness of his hopeless condition seemed to come to him.
"I'm done for, Liz, it's all on you
now, but Jim'll help. He's a good
boy, and you'll have Annie, Liz," and
after a long pause, "Don't take me
down, Liz." He said it very gently.
"Bury me here. You can, Liz, and if
thay's a God I'll be by you always.
You shan't be alone.   Kiss me, Liz."
He turned over to free the arm he
was lying on, but sank back with a
moan and was unconscious.
Her tender solicitude continued until, a little later, the vigil was done.
Trained by the experiences of a
hard, practical life, she answered to
the demands of the moment. When
she had satisfied herself that he was
dead she rode on up to the cabin and
found an old pick with one point
broken off, and a short-handled shovel.
She returned with them, and there,
near where he had died, she dug a
shallow grave. She broke some fir
branches and covered the bottom of
it. When all was ready she went to
the body, took off the cartridge belt
with the revolver, emptied the contents of the trousers' pockets into her
own, untied the handkerchief from
about his throat and hastily, as if
shutting out a vision, and with an
agony that made her breath come in
gasps, spread it over his face. Then,
with feverish anxiety and much difficulty, she rolled the saddle blanket
around the body and finally got it
into the grave. She picked up the
shovel to cover it with earth, but
when the sound of the gravel upon
the blanket struck her ear she dropped the shovel and with a cry of
anguish that rang through the forest
and startled the birds from the tree
above, she threw herself along the
edge of the grave and, reaching down,
frantically pulled at the blanket to
uncover the body. It was not easily
done, and before she had accomplished it, the urgent necessity of
conditions came clearly to her, and
in a frenzied manner she took up the
shovel again and filled the grave and
smoothed it over with her hands and
scattered loose stones over the top.
She put no mark. She would know.
It was her grave—hers and the children's.
With a haste born of despair she
fastened the empty canteen to the
saddle which rested without a blan-
Watch
For the Rush Into
Edmonton Next Summer
ONLY A FEW SHARES LEFT. PRICE WILL BE RAISED WITHOUT NOTICE.
FIELD WORK STARTED.
WE HAVE BEEN USING
this expression in connection with our advertising the past few months. We use it because we
firmly believe this enterprising Canadian City will shortly be heard from in a way that will cause
the eyes of the entire country to center upon it. That the time is coming in the near future when
a great many of you, who have scarcely given this city a thought will be on your way to Edmonton
and doing everything you can to get there in a hurry. When this time comes we want you to
identify it with the advertising we have been doing here in Vancouver. We expect the work of
this company to be the cause of this excitement, and we look forward to the time when the stockholders of this company will reap the harvest.   We base this prediction upon the following facts:
WE HAVE 960 ACRES OF LAND
only three miles from the new Canadian Northern Railroad, at Morinville, north of Edmonton.
We struck a flow of natural gas at a depth of 550 feet that burned to a height of twenty feet. The
supply is practically unlimited and only twenty-three miles of pipe line will market it in the enterprising City of Edmonton. There are hundreds of thousands of tons of high-grade asphalt on
our property, formed by the seepage of oil from below. Oil sand appears upon the surface in
many places on our land and crude oil gathers in pools in a twenty-foot hole. The geological
formation is similar to the rich Summerland Oil Fields in California. The Canadian Government
pays a bounty of V/2 cents per gallon all crude oil produced in this field—more than the
California market price.
We know these are strong claims—they mean that our property is worth millions. We are prepared to prove them. That we are able to do so is demonstrated by the amount of stock we have
sold. We want you to come to our offices in the Old Safe Building and see Government reports,
sworn statements, samples, etc., showing why our proposition is one in a thousand.
Success is stamped upon our enterprise, and we have every reason to feel proud of the progress we have made in four months time. It means, that the many others who have investigated
our proposition have endorsed it and look upon it in the same way that we do. They have seen
proofs that our company is backed by known deposits of commercial products—oil, asphalt and
natural gas—in demand all over the world. They realized that our company is going to make
money—big money—and they have furnished the capital to carry on the work.
On our part, we have purchased from the Oil Well Supply Company of Pittsburg, the largest
and most complete outfit of machinery ever shipped into Canada. This machinery has now arrived
in Edmonton. This is absolute proof that' the American Canadian Oil Company is a going
concern.
Our Mr. Williams is a practical field manager, having had years of experience in the famous
Summerland Oil Fields of California—in fact, he drilled the world's first submarine oil well in that
district. He is now on the company's property with a force of experienced men and the active
field work has been started.
We have every confidence in our enterprise and we are going to make it a success.
As a matter of fact, we have less than 25,000 shares of our stock to be sold at 25 cents per
share; par value $1.00.
When you can get fully-paid non-assessable treasury stock at this price it is a good buy. It
will make money for you.
This is a stock with a future and you must act immediately to obtain it.
American=Canadian Oil Co'y
BAILY& MANNING, Fiscal Agents.
SUITE 3, OLD SAFE BLOCK, 536 HASTINGS STREET WEST, VANCOUVER, B. C.
" Ask Dun & Bradstreet about us."
Chinese-made Skirts ^Overalls
MUST GO!
UNION-MADE.
CO
•6.   3£
-4    .
I5RN BRAND
BUTTING AHEAD.
ket on the hores, hung the cartridge
belt with revolver on the horn. She
turned the horse's head down the trail
and, swinging herself into the saddle,
rode down from the mountains.
She did not see the mountains—the
moonlight or the trail—nothing—just
a dull creature of necessity, whose
bidding she would do henceforth as
she walked alone.
Modern Walking.
Men occasionally walk well, but all
ought to walk beter. Women are a
despair; they shuffle, stride, waddle,
prance, scurry; and think it no disgrace to walk like a mechanical boy.
—The Lady.
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OF
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
VICTORIA
PHONE 893.
HOLLY TREES
Prices from 25 cents to $500, according
to tire. Write for seed and tree catalog.
JAY & CO.
VICTORIA, B. C.
THOMAS CATTEBAXL
Builder  and  General   Contractor.
Tenders given on Brick, Stone and
Frame, Alterations, Parquetry Flooring,
Ofllce, Bnnk, Store and Saloon Fittings.
Pile Driving, Wharves and Dock Sheds
constructed and repaired.
VICTORIA. 10
THE WEEK, SATURDAY MARCH 30, 1907.
Spartan Code of Honour.
What is wanted is a code of honour
that will oblige a fellow to be as
quick to knock himself down when he
tells a lie as he is to knock down thc
man who calls him a liar.—News Letter, San Francisco.
The Knack of Empire.
It must be admitted that if England holds a great Colonial Empire,
and if her subjects in all circumstances remain loyal to her, it is because she has the knack of keeping
them so.—Matin, Paris.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, 1 Intend lo apply to the Hon,
Chief Commission! r of Lands and Works
for a license to prospeel for coal ...m
petroleum on the following described
lands, situated on the north beach of
Graham bland, Quoen Charlotte Island
District:—
No. 24.—Commencing at a post planted on the east lino of Lot 0; thenee 10.
SI) chains; S. SO chains; W. .SO chains;
N 80 chains to place of commencement.
Mar.30 S. E. MacCLlNTON.
Notice is hereby given tnat, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lands, situated on the north beach of
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Island
District:—
No. 25.—Commencing at a post plant-
od on tho east line of Lot 6; thence E.
SO chains; N. SO chains; W. SO chains;
S. SO chains to place of eommeneement.
F. MacCLlNTON,
Mar.30 S. R. MacClinton, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lands, situated on the north beach
of Graham Island, Queen Charlotte
Island   District:—
No. 32.—Commencing at a post planted one mile oast from the N. E. corner
of F. MacClinton's Location No. 25;
thence AV. SO chains; N. SO chains; E.
SO chains; S. SO chains to place of commencement.
K. SUTHERLAND,
Mar.30 S. R. MacClinton, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lands, situated on the north beaeh of
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Island
District:—
No. 33.—Commencing at a post planted one mile east from the N. E. corner of F. MacClinton's Location No. 25;
thence W. SO chains; N. SO chains; E.
80 chains; S. SO chains to place of commencement.
K. SUTHERLAND,
Mar.30 S. R. MacClinton, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to aply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum on the following described lands, situated on the N. beach
of Graham Island, Queen Charlotte
Island District:—
No. 40.—Commencing at a post planted on the N. E. corner of A. F. Sutherland's Location No. 32; thence E. 80
chains; S. SO chains; W. SO chains, N.
80 chains to place of commencement.
W.  GREEN,
Mar.30 S. R. MacClinton, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
from date, I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for license to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lands, situated on the N. beach of
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Island
District:—
No. 41.—Commencing at a post planted on the S. W. corner, being on the
N. E. corner of A. F. Sutherland's Location No. 32; thence E. SO chains; N.
SO chains; W. SO chains, S. SO chains
to place of commencement.
M.  GREEN.
Mar.30 S. R. MacClinton, Agent.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 30 days
from date, I intend to aply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for license to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lnnds, situated on the N. beach of
Graham Island, Oucen Charlotte Island
District:—
No. 4S.—Commencing at a post planted on the N. E. corner, being one mile
east from the N. E. corner of W. E.
Green's Location No. 40; thence S. 80
chains; W. SO chains; N. 80 chains; E.
SO chains to place of commencement,
WM.  SHANNON.
Mar.30 S. R. MacClinton, Agent,
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
from date, 1 Intend to appl to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for licenses to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lands, situated on the N. beach of
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Island
District:—
No. 40,—Commencing at a post planted on the S. E. corner, being one mile
E. from tho N. E. corner of W, E.
Green's Locution No. 40; thence N. SO
chains; W. SO chains; S. SO chains; E.
SO chains to place of commencement.
E. J. SHANNON.
Mar.30 S. R. MacClinton, Agent.
NOTTCE is hereby given that, 30 davs
from date. I intend to apl to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for license to prospect for conl
and petroleum nn the following described lands, situated on the north beach of
Graham Islnnd, Quoen Charlotte Island
District:—
No. 56.—Commencing at a post planted on the N. E. corner of Wm. Shannon's location No. IS, being the N. W.
corner; thence enst SO chains; south SO
chains; west so chains; north SO chains
to place of commencement.
J. MARTIN.
Mar.30 S. K. MacClinton, Agent.
NOTTCE Is hereby given that, 30 days
from date T Intend to apply to tiie
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands anil
Works for license to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lands, situated on the north bench
of Graham Tslnnd, Queen Charlotte
Islnnd District:—
No. 57.—Commencing at a oost planted on the N. E. corner nf Wm. Shannon's location No, -is belra; the S AV.
corner; thence ea'l ^n chalnx; north *;n
chains; west mi ehnlns: '-011111 80 chains
to place of commencement,
GEO. MARTIN.
Mar.30 ::. R. MacClinton. Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
from date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
AVorks for license to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lands, situated on the N. beach of
Graham Island. Queen Charlotte Island
District:—
No. G5.—Commencing at a post planted on the N. E. corner, being one mile
E. from the N. E. corner of Geo. Martin's Location No. 57; thence AA7 SO
chains; S. SO chains; E. SO chains; N. SO
chains to place of commencement.
W.  A.  THOMPSON,
Mar.30 S. R. MacClinton, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
lion. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
AVorks for license to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lands, situated on the north -beach of
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Island
District:—
No. 00.—Commencing at a post planted on the east corner, being one mile
oust from the N. 10. corner of Geo. Martin's Location No. 57; thence W. SO
chains; N. SO chains; E. SO chains; S. 80
chains to place of commencement.
W. RADLEY,
Mar.30 S. R. MacClinton, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
from dnte I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissionei* of Lands and
AVorks for license lo prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lands, situated on the north beach of
Graham island, Queen Charlotte island
District:—-
No. 00.—Commencing at a post planted on the north corner, being on the N.
E. corner of W. A. Thompson's Location
No. 65; thenee E. SO chnins; S. SO chains:
AV. SO chains; N. SO chains to place of
commencement.
M. POWELL,
Mar.30 S. R. MacClinton, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
from date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for license to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lands, situated on the north beach of
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Island
District:—
No. 70.—Commencing at a post planted on the S. W. corner, being the N. E.
corner of W. A. Thompson's Location
No. 05; thence E. SO chains; N. 80
chains; W. 80 chains; S. 80 chains to
place of commencement.
C. HARRISON,
Mar.30 S. R. MacClinton, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
from date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands: Commencing at a stake
about 20 chains east of S. E. corner of
Lot 225; thence south 100 chains; thonce
west 60 chains; thence north 100 chains;
thonce east 60 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more
or less.
A. PRICHARD.
Thurlow, March 16th, 1907. Mar30
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for, a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands:
1. Commencing at a post at the S.
W. corner of Oyees Reserve, running 80
chains east; thence SO chains south;
thence 80 chains west; thence 80 schains
north,  to point of commencement.
EDWARD E. HARDWICK.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to aply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands in Clayoquot District:
1. Commencing at the S. W. corner
post, situate near the E. boundary of
T. L. 10,080; thence 40 chains E.; thence
100 chains N.; thence SO chains W.;
thence S. to N. boundary of T. L. 10,989;
thence following the boundary 40 E.;
thence S. to point of commencement.
B. D. LEVERSON.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
March 3rd, 1907.
2. Commencing at N. W. corner post,
same point as No. 1; thence 40 chains
E.; thence S. to N. boundary of T. L.
10.9S6; thence W. to shore of Andersou
Lake; thence following shore to E. boundary of T. L. 10,989; thence N. to point
of  commencement.
E. D. LEVERSON.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
March 3rd, 1907.
3. Commencing at the S. E. corner
post, situate about 40 chains N. of the
E. extremity of Pipestem Inlet; thence
40 chains N.; thence 120 chains AV.;
thence SO chains S.; thence 40 chains
E.; thence 40 chains N.; thence E. to
point of commencement.
E. D. LEVERSON.
March  6th,  1907.
4. Commencing at S. W. corner post,
same point as No. 3; thence 60 chains
N.; thence 40 E.; thence 40 N.; thence
40 E.; thence S. to N. boundary of T.
L. 8,032; thence following same W. and
S. to a point E. of initial post; thence
AV. to point of commencement.
E. D. LEVERSON.
March 0th, 1907.
5. Commencing at N. E. corner post,
same point as No. 4; thence SO chains
AV.; thence 40 S.; tbence SO W.i thence
S. to shore of Pipestem Inlet; thence
easterly to point S. of Initial post;
thence N. to point of commencement.
E. D. LEVERSON.
March  6th,  1907.
7. Commencing at a post on the N.
shore of Effingham Inlet, at the head
of same; thence 40 chains E.; thence N.
40 chains; thence AA'. 100 chains; thence
S. 100 chains; thence E. to shore line;
theuce following shore line round to
point of commencement.
E. D. LEVERSON.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
March  Sth,  1907.
S. Commencing  at   the  S.  E.   corner,
situate on E. shore of Effingham Inlet,
at   a   point   nearly   opposite  the  N.   E.
corner of T. L. S.032; thence 100 cnains
N.;  thence 50 AA'.; thence 60 N; thence
•10 AV.;  thence S.  to  shore t;hence following shore to point of commencement.
10. ]>. LEVERSON.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
March  Sth,  1907.
9. Commencing at S. W. corner post,
situate on the E. Fork of Nahmiit River,
about SO chnins from same; thonce 40
chains 10.; thence 160 N; theuce 40 AV.;
tiience S. 100 chains to point of commencement.
10. D. LEVERSON.
March 10th, 1907.
10. Commencing nt S. E. corner post,
same point as No. H; thence 40 chains
AV.: thenee 160 X.; Ihence in 10.; thonce
S,  lo  point of commencement.
10. D. LEVERSON,
March   10th,   1907.
11. Commencing at lower N. B. corner
post, same point as No. 10; thence 40
chains W.; thence 75 N.; thence W. to E.
boundary of Lot 657; thence following
boundary S. and E. to a point due S.
of initial post; thence N. to point of
commencement.
E. D. LEVERSON.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
March 10th,  1907.
12. Commencing at N. W. corner post,
same post as No. 11; thence 60 chains
E.; thenee 40 S.; thence 75 E.; thence
S. to N. boundary of Lot 657; thence
AV. and N., following boundary to a
point due S. of initial post; thence N.
to point of commencement.
B. D. LEVERSON.
AV. B. GARRARD, Agent.
March 10th, 1907. Mai*.::::
1ICEHSE TO AN BXSEA-FBOVINCIAI.
COMPANY.
"Companies Act, 1S97."
Canada,
Province of British Columbia,
No. 'iho.
This is to certify that "The Vancouver
Portland Cement Company (Limited" is
authorised and licensed tu carry on business within the Province of British Columbia, and to carry out or elfect all
or any of the objects of tlie Company
to which the legislative authority or the
Legislature of Britisli Columbia extends.
The head ollice of the Company is
situate in tlie City of Toronto.
The amount of tiie capital of the
Company is one million live hundred
thousand dollars, divided Into lifteen
thousand shares of one hundred dollars each.
The head ollice of tho Company In this
Province is situate In the City of Victoria, and Harry A. Ross, accountant,
whose address is A'ictoria, B. C, is the
attorney for the Company.
The Company is Limited.
Given   under   my   hand   and   seal   of
-office   at   Victoria,   Province   of   British
Columbia, this 19th day of March,  one
thousand nine hundred and seven.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has been  established  and  licensed  are:
(a) To search for, make merchantable, manufacture, use, produce, adapt,
prepare, buy, sell and deal in Portland Cement and all kinds of natural
and other cements and products Into
which cement enters, either as a part
or as a whole, and all kinds of building
materials, and to dig, mine, dredge or
otherwise procure earth, marl, clay,
stone, artificial stone, shale, slate, clay,
granite or other minerals necessary to
the manufacture of cements, building
materials and other products aforesaid;
(b) To prospect for, open, explore,
develop, work, improve, maintain and
manage gold, silver, copper, coal, iron
and other mines, quarries, mineral and
other deposits and properties, and to
dig for, raise, crush, wash, smelt, roast,
assay, analyze, reduce, amalgamate,
make and otherwise treat coal, coke,
ores, metals, clays and minerals, whether belonging to the Company or not,
and to render the same merchantable,
and to sell and otherwise dispose of the
same or any part thereof, or any interest therein, and generally to carry on
the business of a mining, milling, reduction, quarry and development company;
(e) To acquire by purchase, lease,
concession, license, exchange ,or other
legal title, mines, mining lands, easements, mineral properties, or any interest therein, minerals and ores and mining claims, options, powers, privileges,
water and other rights, patent rights,
letters patent of invention, processes
and mechanical or other contrivances,
and either absolutely or conditionally,
and either solely or jointly with others,
and as principals, agents, contractors or
otherwise, and to lease, mortgage, place
under license, hypothecate, sell, dispose
of and otherwise deal with the same or
any part thereof, or any interest ehere-
in;
(d) Generally to carry on the business of a producer and refiner of and
a dealer in gas and petroleum, oil and
by-products thereof, and for the said
purposes to prospect for, open, explore,
develop, work, improve, maintain and
manage, acquire by purchase, lease or
otherwise, and sell, lease or otherwise
dispose of gas and petroleum oil lands,
or rights or interest therein, and to purchase, buy, sell and deal In gas, crude
petroleum oil, and other oils and other
products thereof; and to sink gas and
oil wells; to erect, acquire by purchase,
lease or otherwise maintain and operate gas works, and oil refineries; to
store, tank and AVarehouse refined and
crude petroleum oil, gas and by-products
thereof; to construct and operate pipe
lines for transportation of gas and oil;
(e) To acquire by purchase or otherwise, and hold lands, timber limits or
licenses, water lots, water privileges and
powers, and rights and interests therein, and to build upon, develop, cultivate,
farm, settle and otherwise improve and
utilise the same; and to mortgage, lease,
sell or otherwise deal with or dispose
of tlie same, and generally to carry on
the business of a land and a land improvement company; and to aid and assist by way of bonus, advances of
money or otherwise, with or without
security, settlers and intending settlers
upon any lands belonging to or sold by
the Company, or in the neighborhood of
such lands, and generally to promote the
settlement of said lands;
(f) To carry on business as a manufacturer of and dealer ln logs, lumber,
timber, wood, metal; all articles Into
the manufacture of which wood or metal
enters, and all kinds of natural products and by-products thereof, and to
carry on the business of a general dealer
in merchandise;
(g) To develop, generate and produce
electric, steam, pneumatic, hydraulic or
other power or force, and to acquire
the same by lease, purchase or otherwise, and to use, sell, lease or otherwise
dispose of the same, and all power and
force produced by the Company, for the
purposes of light, heat and power or
other purposes;
(h) To construct, maintain, alter,
make, work and operate on the property of the Company, and for the
purposes of the Company, or on property controlled by the Company, tramways, ropeways, telegraph or telephone
lines, reservoirs, dams, Humes, race and
other ways, water powers, aqueducts,
wells, roads, piers, wharves, buildings,
shops, stamping mills and other works
and machinery, plant and electrical and
other  appliances   of  every   description;
(I) To construct, acquire, charter,
operate, hire, lease, mortgage, sell or
otherwise dispose of all kinds of steam
aud sailing vessels, boats, barges and
other vessels, wharves, docks, elevators,
warehouses, freight sheds and other
buildings; and generally to carry on
the business of an elevator, navigation
ami transportation company;
(j) To purchase or otherwise, acquire
and undertake and assume all or any
pnrt of the assets, business, property.
privileges, contracts, rights, obligations
nnd liabilities nf any person, firm or
company carrying on any business which
this Company Is authorized to carry on,
or any business .similar thereto or possessed of property suitable for the purposes  thereof;
(k) 'i'o carry on any other business,
whether   manufacturing   or   otherwise,
which may seem to the Company capable
of being conveniently carried on or in
compaction with the business or objects
of tho Company;
(1) To raise and assist in raising
money for and to aid by way of bonus,
loan, promise, endorsement, guarantee
or otherwise, any corporation in the
capital stock of which the Company
holds shares or with which it may have
business relations, and to act as employee, agent or manager of any such
corporation; and to guarantee the performance of contracts by any such corporation, or by any person or persons
witli whom tlie Company may have
business relations;
On) To enter into partnership, or into
any agreement for sharing profits, union
of interests, co-operation, joint adventure, reciprocal concessions or otherwise, with any person or company carrying on or engaged in, or about to
carry on or engage in, any business or
transaction which this Company is authorised to carry on or engage in;
(n) To amalgamate with any other
Company having objects similar to those
of this Company;
(o) To lease, sell or otherwise dispone of thc property and assets of the
Company, or any part thereof, for such
consideration as tho Company may deem
lit, including shares, debentures or securities of any company;
(p) To do all acts and exercise all
powers, and carry on all business incidental lo the due carrying out of the
objects for which the Company is incorporated, and necessary to enable the
Company to profitably carry on its undertaking;
(q) To do ail or any of the above
things in Canada or elsewhere, and as
principals,  agents,  or attorneys.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, 1 intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and AVorks
for permission to purchase the following tract of land in Rupert District:
Commencing at a post marked G. S.
AAr., N. E. corner, about one mile south
of the northwest corner of Lot 3, Rupert District; thence west SO chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; and thence north to point, of
commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located Feb.  20, 1907.
Meh. 30. G. S. WRIGHT.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following tract of land:
Commencing at a post marked J. W.
W., S. E. corner, about one mile east of
the southeast corner of Pre-emption No.
2004; thence north SO chains; thence
west SO chains; thence south 80 chains,
and thence to point of commencement,
containing 640 acres.
Located Feb. 27, 1907.
Meh. 30. J. W. WRAY.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
ing tract of land in Rupert District:
Commencing at a post marked J. L.
L., S. E. corner, near the northwest corner of Lot 3, Rupert District; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located Feb. 26, 1907.
Meh. 30. J.   L.   LEESON.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following tract of land in Rupert District:
Commencing at a post marked A. J.
F., S. E. corner, about one mile south
of the northwest corner of Lot 3, Rupert District; thence north SO chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located Feb. 26, 1907.
Meh. 30. A. J. FIRES.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intenu lu apply '.0
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described land, situated on the South
Bank of the Skeena River, opposite
Telegraph Point, about forty chains
from the said bank; starting at the
southwest corner of my pre-emption;
thence south SO chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
West 80 chains to point of commencement.
HERMAN HELIN.
Staked March 8th, 1907. Mar. 30
NOTICE is hereby given that, sixty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, situated on
Porcher Island:
Commencing at a post marked "G.
M. Davis' N. W. Corner"; thence east 80
chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence 40 chains north
to point of commencement.
Staked January 10th, 1907.
G. M. DAVIS,
Mar. 30       Per E. A. Hudson, Locator.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
AVorks for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands in Queen Charlotte
Islands:
No. 1. Commencing at a point one
mile soutb of Gray's Harbor, Moresby
Island, and running eighty chains west,
eighty chains north, eighty chains east
and eighty chains south to point of
commencement.
No. 2. Commencing at a point one mile
south of Gray's Harbor, Moresby Island,
and running eighty chains west, eighty
chains south, eighty chains east and
eighty chains north to place of commencement.
No. 3. Commencing at a point three
miles south of Gray's Harbor, Moresby
Island, thence eighty chains west;
eighty chains north; eighty chains east;
eighty chains south to point of commencement.
No. 4. Commencing at a point three
miles south of Gray's Harbour, Moresby
Island, thence west eighty chains;
thence eighty chains south, thence east
eighty chains; thence north eighty
chains to point of commencement.
No. 5. Commencing at a point one
mile north of Mackay's Harbor on
Gunlshewa Inlet, Moresby Island, thence
north eighty chains; thence west eighty
chains; thence south eighty chains;
thence east eighty chains to point of
commencement.
No. 6. Commencing at a point, west
and north of Gunlshewa Reservation.
Moresby Island, being southwest corner,
thence east one hundred and twenty
chains; thence north eighty chains;
thence west forty chains; thence south
forty chains; west eighty chains; south
forty chains to point of commencement.
No. 7. Commencing at the N. W. corner nf limit No. 70S!; thence norih
eighty chains; thence east eighty
chnins; thence south eighty chnins;
thence west eighty chnins to point of
commencement.
Mar.30 HENRY  E.   DODGE.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 da:
after date, I intend to apply to the Chi
Commissioner of Lands and AVorks f
permission to purchase the follow!;,
described land on Porcher Island, abol
three miles In an easterly direction fro
Refuge Bay:
Commencing at a post marked S. A.
Finch's  N.  E.  corner post,  running
chains   south;   thence   20   chains   we:1'
tiience SO chains north; thence 20 ehal
east   to   point   of   commencement,   cei
taining 100 acres, more or less. J1
S. A. G. FINCH.
Per AV. AV. Clarke, Locator,
March 11, 1907. Mar
THIRTY days after date I intend ijj
apply   to   the   Chief   Commissioner ,'
Lands and Works for permission to c
and carry away timber from the folio
ing   described   land   on   the   Tsulqus
River, Rupert District:
Commencing at a post planted aboj
■10 chains south of the N. AV. corner
J. A. Coates' claim and marked AV. Bi^
man's N, E. corner; tiience west *i
chains; thence south SO chains; thera
east SO chains; tiience north SO chai'
to point of commencement.
Located January 1, 1907.
AV.  BULMAN.   fl
Per J. A. Coates
A'ictoria, B. C, March 27, 1907.
March 30.
I
NOTICE is hereby given that, 00 da.
after date, 1 intend to apply to the Hj
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Won
for permission to purchase the folic
ing described land on Porcher Isla
situated about four miles in an easto
direction from Refuge Bay:
Commencing at a post marked M
Jennio Johnson's N. AV. corner pci
thence running east SO chains; the;
south 20 chains; thence west SO chai
thence north 20 chains to point of c<;
mencement, containing 160 acres, m,
or less.
MISS JENNIE JOHNSON, Locato-1
A. McKAY, Agenl
March 12, 1907. MchJ
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 di
after date, I intend to apply to the Ejfc
Chief Commissioner of Lands and WqH
for permission to purchase the folllp
ing  described  land   on   Porcher  Islif
situated one mile south of Refuge ll
Commencing  at  a  post  marked    ■
McKay's  N.  AV.  corner;  thenee eastM
chains;  thence north  40 chains;  tlu-j
west 40 chains; thence following bel
to  point  of  commencement,   contairf
160 acres, more or less.
GEORGE J.  HIBBARD.',
A. McKAY, Agenl
March 11, 1907. MclJ
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 d
after date, I intend to apply to the IJ
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Wc
for permission to purchase the follow
described land on Porchcer Island,
uated about six miles in an easti
direction from Refifge Bay:
Commencing at a post marked I
S. W. Mosby's S. W. corner post; tin
running east 80 chains; thence north
chains; thence west SO chains; the
south 40 chains to point of commei
ment, containing 320 acres, more or 1
MRS. S. W. MOSBY, Locator. J
A. McKAY, Agenl
March 12, 1907. MchJ
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 dl
after date, I intend to apply to the H
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Wcl
for permission to purchase the follow!
described land on Porcher Island, f
uated about four miles in an eastij
direction from Refuge Bay:
Commencing at a post marked I
Jennie Johnson's N. W. corner; tht
running east SO chains; thence nortr
chains; thence west 80 chains; the
south 20 chains to point of comme:
ment, containing 160 acres, more orl
MAUDE S. McKAY, Locator.
A. McKAY, Agen
March 12, 1907. Mel
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 60
after date, I intend to apply to the 11
Chief Commissionei* of Lands and WJ
for permission to purchase the follov
described  land  on  Porcher  Island,
uated   about  six   miles   in  an   easl
direction from Refuge Bay:
Commencing at a post marked I
Young's N. W. corner post; thence
nlng 80 chains east; thence 20 ch
south; thenee 80 chains west; thenc
chains north to point of commencen
containing 160 acres, more-or less.
DELLA YOUNG, Locator.
A. McKAY, Agei
March 12, 1907. Mc
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60
after date, I intend to apply to the ■
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Wl
for permission to purchase the folj
ing described land on Porcher IsT
situated about six miles in an easfl
direction from Refuge Bay:
Commencing at a post marked
S. W. Mosby's S. W. corner post; th
running east 80 chains; thence sout
chains; thence west SO chains; th
north 20 chains to point of comm<
ment, containing 160 acres, more or
MARGARET McLEOD, Locator
A. McKAY, Age
March  12, 1907. Mc
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 ■
after date, I intend to apply to the (1
Commissioner of Lands and Works]
permission to purchase the folloi
described land on Porcher Island,!
uated about one mile south of.RoJ
Bay:
Commencing at a post marked
McKay's N. W. corner post; thence
80 chains; thence south 80 ch
thence west SO chains, to beach; tl*
following beaeh to point of commc
ment, containing 640 ncres. more or
KAY McKAY
A. McKAY, Age
March 11, 1907. Mc
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 I
after date, I Intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and AA
for permission to purchnse the fo
ing described land on Porcher Is
situated about six miles In an eas
direction from Refuge Bay:
Commencing at a post marked V
Newlon's N. W. corner; thence rnr
south 80 chains; thence east 40 ch
thenee north SO chains; thence we;
chains to point of commencement,
taining 320 acres, more or less. 1
W. D. NEWLON. Locatoi!
A. McKAY, Agel
March  13,   1907. M(|
NOTICE is hereby given thnt, 60
nfter   date,   T   intend   tn   npply   to
Chief Commissioner of Lands and AA
for permission  tn purchase the fo
ing    land:    Commencing    nt    a
planted  on  the bank  of the Zymj
River,   about   one   mile   and   a   qti
from   Skeena   River   nnd   marked
O.'s  S.  W.  Cor.   Post":   thence  eaif
chains along the lino of Beatrice  L
man's    application:    thence    nortli
chains;   thence  west   SO  chains;   til
south  20  chains  to point of conimf
ment,   containing   160   acres,   morf
less.
ANDREW OLSON. Locator.   .
Mar.23 J. E. BATEMAN, Age| THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 30, 1907.
tt
r THE BIG FOOTBALL MATCH
ch.
Saturday was a red letter day for
ccer enthusiasts at the Coast, the
0 strongest teams which had ever
tagonised each other in the Prov-
e met at Victoria, and after a hard
an contest neither the Island nor
Mainland could claim superiority,
game ending in" a draw of three
The Mainland learn played the
ore scientific game, a game more
osely resembling football as it is
ayed in England today by the
ague teams, pretty combination,
iselfish passing, fast runs up the
ng, flying centres, and judicious
ding of the forwards by the half-
cks, were prominent features of the
me played by the Mainland. In
arly all these points they excelled
Island, and in addition they were
icker on the ball. Why then did
ey not win?   Some critics have laid
blame on the referee, but although
made some obvious blunders they
not materially affect the result;
disallowed a good goal to each
e, and all through seemed at sea
the interpretation of the rules of
game.    At this point I want to
in a plea for the appointment of
ire experienced footballers to the
ponsible position of referee. The
t referees in England today are
n between forty-live and fifty-five
rs of age, veterans at the game
were playing football in the
enties and eighties. Refereeing is
entially an occupation which re-
res the confidence, knowledge and
urance which can only come both
m experience and age.
.he reason the Mainlanders did not
by a substantial margin is pre-
ly the same as the reason why
ston North-End in the very zenith
their glory, playing a scientific
nbination game which has never
n equalled, time and again went
vn to defeat at the hands of a team
inferior to them in style and occu-
ng a lower position in the League;
efer to the Wolverhampton Wan-
ers. For the first half of the game
rth-End would make rings round
Wanderers, and probably get two
hree goals ahead, then Jack Brodie
entre forward would rally his men,
onslaught would commence in
ich every man would play to the
ounce of his weight, and worth,
il by sheer dogged persistence ard
uthless determination which noth-
could withstand, ■■ Ae^1 ?<**»*£»f*of
wn would wear doWn tne then of
nee and romp home decisive win-
>.    History nearly repeated itself
Saturday, for during the last half
r of the second half any disinter-
d observer would have bet dollars
doughnuts on the Islanders; the
: Brodie of the day was Jimmy
ms.    Time and again he led his
1 with a brilliance and dash that
ling could withstand, and towards
finish it must be frankly admitted
the Mainlanders were, thoroughly
pped, and that if the game had
1 prolonged they would have been
sively beaten,
he moral of this is not that science
be superseded by any other qual-
n sport, but science without des-
tion is ineffective and when teams
pretty evenly balanceu it is en-
- which wins out.
ever was the best lesson taught
ihysical contests better illustrated
1 in Saturday's game; it was stt-
1 to watch the irresistible efforts
he Island men to overcome stt-
or skill, and as the two teams
ycd  backwards  and  forwards   in
arena no thoughtful observer
d fail to be struck with the splen-
comparison instituted between the
itics which win out on thc fool
field and those which triumph in
battle of life.
f the individual players I cannot
k too highly; the star of the
ih was undoubtedly Jimmy Ad-
He is in a class entirely by
ielf, and in spite of the really
iant play of two or three others
in I shall mention, no other player
oached him for skill, courage, dentation, and all thc finest qualities
h go to'make a football cham-
.   I have no hesitation in saying
there is not in Canada today a
re forward of equal merit or who
d achieve as great success against
nternational team as the Lady
smith captain. Individually, the next
best man was Mitchell, the outside
right of the Mainland team, his centres
being particularly fine; moreover, he
kept his place, not hampering the inside forwards by getting too near the
centre. Graham, the Mainland captain, is the third best man; he played
a sterling, capable, effective game, and
held his men together in fine shape.
He is a sound footballer and subordinates everything to scoring. Provins
and Shawcross were scarcely behind
the two last mentioned, and considering that the former was up against the
strongest back on the field his performance was highly meritorious.
Apart from a tendency to foul, Hewitt was the strongest back playing,
and prevented at least three certain
scores. Capt. Goward was the next
best man, and both he and Lorimer
played the best game they have put
up this season. The half-back line of
the Island team was as a whole distinctly inferior to the Mainland, and
the same may be said of the goalkeeper, who was off colour.
I should have said that Schwengers
played a good game, but it was a decided mistake to place him on the
wing. He is not quite fast enough
and, moreover, his forte is shooting.
If he had been inside right, I think
he would have been able to take advantage of several opportunities which
Gillmor missed.
The match was extremely enjoyable, was a fine contest of strength
and skill, and has undoubtedly done
much to arouse public interest in a
game which is as surely destined to
become the national game of Canada
as it .has already become the popular
game in the Old Country.
Britain the Peacemaker.
Nobody doubts the perfect loyalty
of Great Britain and her zealous participation in the campaign which has
been carried on for so long in favour
of peace. That campaign has not
proved fruitless. No one can ignore
the fact that it has on important occasions influenced the decisions of
those who were disposed to have recourse to war.—Siecle, Paris.
Overflowing
WM Easter
Novelties.
And tli* key-note li a parfsot
selection of everything that will
harmonize with Eaater festivities.
The particularly pretty things will
have first attention, and will he first
to go. It's desirable that you should
see them at once.
KID  GLOVES FOB EASTEB
Ladles' guaranteed real French Kid
Gloves, " Perrin's make," in tan,
mode, light and dark brown and
black; Chas. W. Hills
& Co.'s price, per ^<| OC
pair 4*p 1. 4£ O
DBESS  SKIRTS FOB  EASTEB
You'll be satisfied with the style,
make, finish and material In our
Dress Skirts for Easter.
Tweed Skirts from $3.35 to $9.75.
Lustre Skirts from $3.50 to $7.50.
Cloth Skirti from $4.50 to $8.50.
Missei' Skirts from $3.00 to $7.50.
EASTEB MILLINERY
The millinery on Tuesday and following days will be more radiant
than on the first reception day. New
hats will be on display to make this
exhibit of Easter Millinery peerless.
SILK WAISTS FOB EASTEB
Ladies' dainty Silk Shirtwaists In
all tho latest New York styles. Chas.
W. Hills & Co.'s special prices are
from  $1.75  to JG.50 only.
SALE OF MAIfUFACTUBEBS'
SAMPLE  WAISTS
With new additions, our sale
of a prominent manufacturer's entire
range of Mull and Lawn Waists,
richly trimmed with lace and handsomely embroidered, will be continued this week—and we'll save you
a third.
NECXWEAB AND HOSIERY WITE
EASTEB BELTb
Cashmere Hosiery,
Per pair  25c to 75c
Neckwear,
Each, from 7*4c to $1.75
Silk Belts,
Each, from 25c to $2.50
Leather Belts.
Each, from   25c to $2.00
Embroidered Belts,
Each  25c and 50o
Chas. W. Hills & Co.
MAIL   ORDER
Ladies' Outfitters and Milliners',
940 GRANVILLE STR2ET
VANCOUVER.
COAL IS KING!
No branch of the mining industry offers such FEBMANENT
ADVANTAGES as coal mining. The seam does not peter out.
You do not have to go deeper down to recover values. You
do not have to seek a market, because the DEMAND
IS GREATER THAN Til SUPPLY. The coming coal field of
the West is the NICOLA VALLEY; it is the nearest to the Coast
and to the great consuming  centres.
There ls NO PROMOTERS' STOCK, every dollar subscribed
goes into development. ■;
The Company is ALREADY MINING AN EIGKTEEN-FOOT
SEAM OF COAL TTNDBB EXPBBT MANAGEMENT.
Write for prospectus maps and reports regarding this
SPLENDID OFFEB to
STRAND HOTEL
VICTORIA
The home nl all theatrical and vaudev He
artists while in the Capital city, also of
other kindred bohemians.
WRIQHT & FALCONER, Proprietors.
CAMBORNE
S. J. CASTLEMAN,
General Agent for the Company.
Eooms 21 and 22, Imperial Block,  Vancouvek, B.  0.
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarter! for mining men and
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
REVELSTOKB
The GREATEST INVENTION OF THE AGE
The Burglar and
Safety Pocket.
No Wide-awake Man should be without one.   The "Piccadilly"
clothes have them.
MANUFACTURED BY
H. E.BOND &e©.,Ltd.,      *
TORONTO
Lighting a Home.
^
The ehar^of ap artistic hom^ depends upon the arrangement
of its lighting facilities.
fl
Electric Lights—really artistic^tftiirti—will do much* to render
a beautiful interior even more beautiful. ■
While, VICE VERSA, POOR lighting arrangements will mar
the beauty of the most magnificent home.
It's a subject worthy of serious consideration—and we wish
you would let US help you.
The Hinton Electric Co., Ltd.
J)
VICTORIA,
29 Government Street.
VANCOUVER,
66 Granville Street.
Established 1856
M. R. SMITH & CO.
Factory and Hend Office *
VICTORIA
Manufacturers of
Warehouse and Office
VANCOUVER
BISCUITS - CONFECTIONERY
Note Our Leader   -   SMITH'S SWISS CREAHS
The True Test of Merit
Is proved by the constantly increasing demand for
BUCHANAN'S Scotch Whiskies
£ Due entirely to their purity, old .tfie und line flavor.
T   Ask your wine merchant for Red Seal, at M per bottle;  Black & White,
«"> at SI. 25 per bottle; Royal Household at $1.50 per bottle ;
b Liqueur Scotch, nt $1.75 per bottle.
I   JAMES BUCHArfAN ft CO., by Royal Warradt Purveyor! to Royal family
♦ »♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦».».»<
Hotel Victoria
REVELSTOKE, B. C.
Headquarters for miners and
lumbermen.
ROBT. LAUQHTON, Prop'r.
BANFF, A.LTA
hi
Hoiel King fcdward
Banff's Host' Popular $3 a |Dav Hotel.
Close to Station and Siiilphurj
Baths.
N. K. LUXTON, Propriotor.
PHOENIX.
Deane's Hotel
PHOENIX, B. C.
New. Modern hot water system. Electric
lighted. Tub and shower baths aud lai ldry iu
counectlon.   The miners'home.
"DAMNY" DEANE, Proprietor
ROSSLAND
Hoffman House
ROSSLAND, B. C.
Rates $1.00 per day and up.   Cafe in
Connection.
GREEN & SniTH. Prop's.
NELSON.
HOTEL HUME
\Hli        NELSON,  a. c,
Leading Hots! of tha -tootcm/a.
J. FRED HUME,
ftasaaailaiis. iti*'
Silver King Hotel,
NELSON.  B. C.
The homo of the Industrial Workers
ot the Koutena's.
W. E. ncCandllsh,     -      Proprietor
Royal Hotel
NELSON, B. C.
Tho Host Family Hotol in tlio City.
$1.0011 day,
Mm. Wm. Roberts,        Proprietress
Do you want a quiet place to
smoke and read the paper while
waiting for   that appointment?
Try then, my friend
The Wilson Bar
VICTORIA, B. C.
Rsneath Osrclnn Hetel Vales Atrxt
Subscribe for THE WEEK.
Sweet Peas
The up-to-date selection.
7 Varieties, separate, from bulk, 25c
15 Varieties, 50c
Johnston's Seed Store
City Market.
VICTORIA 12
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 30, 1907.
ifif$ifififififififi!ifif
1
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if
if
if
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A Lady's Letter *
____^^^^ if
if
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By  BABETTE.
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Dear Madge;
We women are supposed to be very
complex creatures, but this complexity most certainly arises chiefly from
the fact that we are always hearing
it said that we are so.   We are probably quite as commonplace as men,
but by always living up to this reputation  for  complex  brains  we  can
arrive at the most remarkable results,
and a thoroughly commonplace woman trying to be obscure can achieve
a  most    intolerable    oddness.    But
though there are certainly more ordinary women than not, there is one
spot in our brains that seems differently  constructed   in    almost  every
feminine creature; that is our outlook
upon the morality of make-up—as regards our appearance,  I mean, not
fibs.
The average woman has generally
,    an ordinary, useful  stock of morals
* w-Jijch vary very little, but when it
cometf to improving her appearance
there seems no end to the shades of
morality in V.vhich  she believes.    A
certain  numbfer  will  look  furiously
indignant  at (being  offered  powder,
and with a vikuous toss exclaim that
they "never vise anything but Fuller's
earth."   Now/, why should Fuller's be
moral and this or that, say, be immoral?   Then there are plenty of the
most desperately proper ladies who
would scream with horror at even the
thought of Fuller's earth and would
almost faint at the thought of violet
powder o*  rouge who will with perfect com, ilacency wear false hair I   I
have see 1 old ladies of most perfect
virtue w.io go to "sewing bees" and
afternoon teas with the most blatant
false knots or "fronts."   There again
—does a thing being blatantly false
make it virtuous?   It is certainly the
case that the more proper the wearer,
the worse the false hair matches the
head it is pinned upon.   A woman will
brighten  her hair    who  would  not
dream of pencilling her eyes, but on
the other hand I do not believe there
are any women    who    pencil their
eyes who would not willingly brighten their hair.
What possible beginning can all
these shades of conscience have had?
Between the woman who wholeheartedly improves her appearance by
every aid she can lay her hands upon
and the woman to whom Brown
Windsor and a hair pin or two is all
sufficient there are a thousand shades
of virtue that cause such endless bewilderment for the indignation of the
woman with the graduated brains, if
you make a mistake in her particular
"aid," it is like a thunderclap about
your head. The woman who possesses grades of virtue about her hair
has just been passing through a time
of new doubt. The fashion of little
careless curls scattered about the coiffure has at last thoroughly soaked
into the slow-working brains of this
Island we are upon, and this has
given rise to another small morality.
Some women are convinced that to
buy a curl or two outright is deceitful and a shameful sham, but they
arrive at the extra curls by having
combings made up into them. This
apparently quite excuses thc deception. No doubt unimaginatively, I
should have thought it was the pin
the curl was on that made it immoral,
but this is no doubt a point to be
adjusted by one's own conscience.
However, as thc curl has arrived I
can give thc wearers one comforting
word—there is not a curl to be seen
in Paris. If they arc supposed to be
the last thing in the smart Frenchwoman's hairdressing, the wearers of
the curl must be told that they fall a
little flat.
Turning from fashions to something
at any rate more intellectual, I am
reminded that occultism is the craze
of the moment, the fashion of tbe
hour. To certain minds it has always appealed, but now it permeates
through every circle, and has taken ..
firm hold on society. There is this
to bc said in its favour: that if conversation on psychical mysteries su
persedes that on physical mysteries,
it will be a thing to be thankful for.
In the case of Operations vs. Occultism, let us espouse the cause of the
latter, however soon we may find ourselves out of our depth.
The word "occultism" has fallen on
evil days. With its dictionary meaning of "the undiscovered," it is full
of dignity of sound. Unfortunately,
the trickery and fraud with which it
is so often connected had besmirched
its fair name. The Black Arts of the
Middle Ages with their subsequent
persecutions, brought all the occult
sciences into disrepute, causing more
than one discovery then considered
supernatural to fall under the ban of
the law.
But, as Mr. Hichens once said,
"Science is often a thief," and science
has certainly stolen many secrets
from magic black and white, relabelled them with new and intricate
names, and chained them to her car
in all the odour of respectability.
People in general are beginning to
agree with Hamlet that there are
more things in heaven and earth than
are dreamed of in their philosophy,
though some of them are inclined to
deny it against their better judgments: the average man so dislikes
admitting that something may exist
which he can neither understand nor
account for. The fact has forced itself into recognition that the Orient
has acquired spiritual powers of far
greater magnitude than the Occident,
but whether the latter may safely
venture into those realms of thought
it is impossible to say. The balance
of the mind is so delicate that to play
with unknown forces and set in motion vibrations of whose power we
know little or nothing is undoubtedly
a danger. But that is the serious
view of occultism, which is not to be
pursued here.
Curiosity, the much-abused foundation of all knowledge, is inherent in
human nature. The legend of our
first parents even assures us of that.
But, as a rule, the daughters of Eve
are intent on peering into the future,
while the sons of Adam gaze into the
past. Man seeks to know what was,
woman what will be. For this reason, women in all ages have been attracted by every form of magic. They
have sought, and are still seeking,
their fortunes in the stars, in crystals,
in cards, in colours, in their hands,
and even in their teacups. As an
amusement it is not particularly harmful, because, generally speaking, they
only believe in what pleases them. It
assumes a different aspect when made
a matter of real importance, because
women are so easily duped. They
can so rarely distinguish between the
genuine seer and the charlatan.
Without the gift of clairvoyance,
any testimony is valueless, the instruments being largely used as aids to
the promotion of concentration and
of the clairvoyant condition, one that
cannot always be commanded at will.
And in addition to this, there is an
unwritten law known to every student
of the occult that powers used unlawfully (which includes money-making)
are weakened and sometimes lost. To
fill the gap empiricism is resorted to,
and is the cause that occultism can
so seldom clear itself from discreditable allegations.
If the idle women of the present
day spent the time they waste speculating on the future in acquiring self-
control, mental and physical, the future would bc less furrowed by
nerves.
BABETTE.
HUB CONFESSION.
Once In my lady's garden bower
I hid me when she came,
And heard her whisper to a flower
A secret and a name:
She held it In her finger-tips
A little while, and then
Pressed It against her scarlet lips—
Kissed it, and said Amen!
Till she had gone I did not stir;
One dear desire was mine—
To win the rose that talked with her
In Love's leaf-fashioned shrine:
Hut all ln vain I mado my quest,
For when she went she wore
That fragrant token on her breast—
What rose could ask for more!
I found her at the garden's gate,
All sweetness and surprise:
in the old rose I read my rate—
My fortune in her eyes:
And when I told her I had heard—
Anmn again said she,
Suiting tho action to the word,
Then gave tho rose to me.
—Frank Dompster Sherman.
GOOD LUCK
GOOD HEALTH
AND
GOOD FELLOWSHIP
follow the opening of each
sparkling bottle of
White
Rock
THE
INCOMPARABLE
MINERAL WATER
—the beverage which refreshes and delights with its
natural   effervescent   purity.
Negligee Shirts.
IN Zephyrs, Madras cloths
and Oxfords, but it is the
patterns to which we desire
to draw your attention; they
are masterpieces of the designers' art and a perfect
match for this season's fashionable tints in men's furnishings. Prices range from
I1.35 up to $3.50.
ALSO a glorious assortment of neckwear to blend
harmoniously with the negligee shirts, from 50c up.
SEA&
GOWEN
THE OENTLEMEN'S
STORE
64 GOVERNMENT ST.
VICTORIA, B. C.
Who make a specialty of Mail
Orders.
What a Man
Wears
Easter Sunday
will be apt to count a good deal in
unexpected places. Make no mistake,
but select your Hat, Tie, Gloves, etc.,
from
E. Chapman
Davis Chambers.
615   HASTINGS   ST.,   WEST.
VANCOUVER.
Sole agent in British Columbia for
Atkinson's  Royal  Irish  Poplin  Ties.
GREAT
REAL ESTATE
Auction Sale.
By instructions from Ross & Shaw, Vancouver, A. M. BEATTIE
will conduct an
Important Sale of Real Estate
-ON-
APRIL 2nd
In the O'Brien Hall at 2.30 p. m. and in the Pender Hall, at 8 p.m.
VANCOUVER. '
U
I))
HftZELTON
The wholesale Distributing Point for the great interior. This
has been the distributing point for all places north for the last
fifty years by the
HUDSON'S BAY COrtPANY
It is the only outlet for the Guggenheims and Heintz's great
copper and coal interests.
Read facts and you will be convinced. It is now an assured
fact, and on record at Ottawa that the G. T. P. has accepted the
survey, and is now building the road on the east of the Buckley
River and will cross at
HHZELTON
going down the north side of the Skeena River to PRINCE
RUPERT.
What does this mean for HAZELTON? It means that
Hazelton, 175 miles from Prince Rupert, at the head of navigation
with both railroad and steam navigation to that point—is bound to
be the wholesale point for all time for all interior trade. The two
best places to invest are at the head of navigation at Hazelton and
the outlet to Prince Rupert. YOU WILL SEE BUSY TIMES
UP THERE THIS SUMMER. Get in now; don't wait till lots
go away up.   Call on
ROSS & SHAW
318 HASTINGS, WEST
or at my oflice for maps and particulars.
Only last week a capitalist of Hazelton passed through Vancouver for New York to perfect plans for building a smelter at
Hazelton. With a smelter, steam, and railroads, what effect do you
think this will have on lots at this point?   They will simply soar.
Do not fail to investigate the advantage this place has over all
other points in the North, and you will be satisfied.
ASK ANY  HUDSON'S BAY FACTOR; THE ANSWER IS
ALWAYS THE SAME.
The best distributing centre for the whole North for 50 years.
What will it be with Railroads?   Be on hand at 2.30 p. m. sharp.
Terms, which will be announced at the time of the sale, will
be favorable.
A. M. Beattie,
CORDOVA STREET.
AUCTIONEER.
VANCOUVER. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 30 1907.
13
I THE BEST INVESTMENT
OF ALL
15
VANCOUVER WATERFRONT I
Lot 193,New Westminster district, with a frontage of half a mile on Burrard Inlet,
just east of Seymour Creek and the projected V. W. & Y. railway bridge, has
been subdivided and placed in my hands for sale.   For a few days I
can offer waterfront lots, 25 feet by from 500 to 1000 feet, at
ONLY  $40   PER   FOOT
This price is very low and will certainly not hold longer than a few days. This is
absolutely the best proposition in the Terminal City market today. Terms : One-
third cash;   balance six, twelve and eighteen months.      INQUIRE AT ONCE.
NORMAN NORCROSS, Agent
606 Hastings St., West
VANCOUVER
MUSIC AND     |
THE STAGE $
VICTORIA.
Jn    Wednesday    night    Blanche
ilsh appeared at the Victoria Thea-
in "The Straight Road," support-
by a company of all-round excel-
ce, and a leading man in Charles
lton who is equal to the best on
road.   There was a crowded and
husiastic house, and as far as the
rk of the company is concerned,
hing better could be desired.   The
r was in her best form, her acting
he celebrated third act constituting
our de force.   It is not to blame
is Walsh to say that the play is
illy unworthy of her splendid abili-
, the mere fact that the part suited
and that she gave an artistic ren-
ing of a drunken Sottish woman
leither to paliate nor to justify the
k of Clyde Fitch, who will never
in to conceive the  style of play
able   for   an   actress   of   Miss
Ish's calibre.   Salambo and Mas-
were   worthy  vehicles   for   an
less   who  is  both    majestic and
ric.   Her management would make
nistake by giving her a chance in
kespearian stellar roles.   It is not
jmuch to believe that she is capa-
of grasping a character which has
I been acceptably represented for
Ity years, when Miss Glyn left the
ie, I refer to Lady Macbeth.   Of
(the actresses whom I have seen
then, Miss Walsh is the only
J who possesses all the character-
Is of a Lady Macbeth.    In any
|t it is certain that her splendid
ers are absolutely wasted on the
lalities and   banalities    of Clyde
|ie performance at thc New Grand
week has  been slightly mixed.
|e of thc productions have been
some bad, and some a little
|ar. The illustrated song has been
about up to the average, and this
followed by Welch and Made-
who were excellent; the acting
lie former as a waiter was well
[e the average on vaudeville
and he was well supported by
partner. Eugene Emmet as a
h comedian hardly came up to
reports which were circulated
t him. For one thing he was
ictly hard to hear, but his song
The Strawberry Girl" was really
Tuttle and May put on one
le best comedy acts that I have
seen in Victoria; if not entirely
nial, being an adoption from
malion and Galatea," or at least
struck mc, the acting was good
the dialogue was amusing. Then
:ome to J. Bernard Dyllyn, a
r monologuist who, however,
not grasp the fact that all audi-
; do not like vulgarity. I must
:ss that there is something about
of his stories which was witty
and convulsed not only myself but
the whole house, but at the same time
I was very glad that I had not taken
my sister, or any girl whom I respected, to hear him. Whatever may
go down in Seattle, Victoria is distinctly averse from such suggestive
oratory. He makes a mistake when
he tries to sing a "Coster" song; I
would remind him that the Coster
says "rahnd" and " 'ave," not "round"
and "have." His representation of
Roosevelt was excellent, and if he
would be a little more careful in his
selections he would do well. Lavine
and Leonard caused me more laughter than I have enjoyed for many a
long day in their absurdity turn with
an automobile, in addition to which
the latter is a most wonedrful juggler
with a top-hat. The moving pictures
were poor.
It will be a great entertainment for
youngsters at the New Grand next
week. This applies particularly to the
headline act, although there are other
features that should make the programme more than usually interesting
both for adults and children. The
feature act for the coming week will
be Herbert's Educated Dogs. The
entry of these dogs is entirely novel.
They come on the stage in a massive
four-wheeled car drawn by a big
greyhound. A dog rides on each of
the four hubs, balancing himself as
the wheels go round. Four other
dogs amuse themselves by running
in and out of the spokes of the wheels
while they are revolving. Another
big dog helps things along by pushing from behind. Others of the
troupe of twenty-five animals ride in
the numerous seats of the car. During their act one of the dogs runs
round the entire inner circumference
of an upright circle of wood, eight
feet in diameter. This dog thus loops
the loop, running with his back downwards for part of the time. Other
dogs leap high barriers. The act includes a large number of new tricks,
many of which have never before
been attempted by trained dogs.
Other numbers on the bill include
The Rigleys, sensational balancing
acrobats; Tanner and Gilbert, in a
comedy sketch entitled "How to
Make Love"; Miss Ida Howell, singing comedienne; George F. Keane in
the illustrated song, "We'll Be Together When the Clouds Roll By"; a
new lot of moving pictures entitled
"The Bad Son" and "The Master's
Tea Service," and Prof. Nagel's orchestra.
MOMUS.
narrow and confining labor imposed
by duty to others ,this man of half-
Latin instincts and intellectuality finds
himself adrift and alone, too old for
easy initiative and too young for easy
indifference. To him appear, on the
one hand, Poppy St. John, half saint,
half wanton and all woman, and
withal one of the most brilliantly
sketched characters of modern fiction;
and on the other, the call, the promise, and the beauty of his native
but long forgotten faith. The nicety
of portrayal and the delicacy of suggestion with which these characters
and this issue are handled are the
core and substance of the book. The
other characters, Dominic's employers, Poppy's unsuccessful husband,
and some Protestant scapegoats in
the background of the tale, are done
with a lack of tact and with a crude
effect of exaggerated foreshortening
that can be overlooked only because
of the comparative unimportance of
the characters, but that nevertheless
mars an otherwise unblemished whole.
Mrs. Harrison's prose is, of its kind,
a marvel and a delight. She writes
by ear, if one may so express her
constant and unerring sense of tonal
harmony, the varied but unfailing balance of her style,, and the relevancy
of sound to sense. Yet unlike most
writers with this ever-present subconscious deference to the vocal value
of their words, she is not betrayed by
it and, if seldom driven to sacrifice
it, one recalls no instance in which
she has sacrificed to it.
The "Far Horizon"  is on sale at
the Victoria Book and Stationery Co.
makes him forever a wanderer on the
face of the earth. The malignant
cruelty of this Governor is perhaps
the one thing in the book that seems
overdrawn; and yet the author states
that this central incident is no product of the imagination, but a sober
historical fact.
The recital of Stepan's struggle
with his fate, his alternate success
and failure in the effort to wring happiness out of his lot, make up the
story. Strangely enough, much of
the tale, in spite of the tragic background, pictures a life of fairly
idyllic happiness. And even when
the ultimate catastrophe comes, as
come it must, the tragedy is by no
means unrelieved. In the end Stepan's courage and steadfastness
triumph in spite of the odds against
him, and the final note is one of victory. With all the tragic suggestions
of its theme, the total effect of the
book is one of uplift rather than depression.
Aside from the striking originality
of its fundamental idea, "The Long
Road" is remarkable for the skill
with which the principal characters
are delineated, and for the quiet beauty of its style., The figures of Ste-
pan and his wife Katia, of her father
Vasili and the old Jew, Peter Krop,
are drawn with remarkable fidelity
to human nature. The story is told
too with a quiet sincerity that makes
its foreign setting and characters
seem very familiar and life-like. It
would not be at all surprising if by
should take his place as one of the
strongest novelists of the day.
WEEK APRIL I
The New Grand
SULLIVAN 4 CONSIDINt,    Proarlrtora.
Managamcnt af HOST. JAMIESON.
PROF.   HERBERT'S   GREAT
DOG CIRCUS
25 Trained Dogs, including the
Loop-the-loop Dog.
THE RIZLEYS
Sensational Balancing Acrobats.
TANNER AND GILBERT
Comedy Sketch
"How to Make Love."
MISS IDA HOWELL
Singing Comedienne.
GEORGE F. KEANE
Song Illustrator
"We'll Be Together When the
Clouds Roll By."
NEW MOVING PICTURES
"The Bad Son," "The Master's
Tea Service."
PROF. NAGEL'S ORCHESTRA
:
The Hill, a romance of friendship
by Horace Annesley Vachell, is an
admirably conceived and well written
book of school days, while it lags
behind the immortal Tom Brown it
is much nearer in interest, style and
literary quality to Sentimental Tommy, which resembles in many respects. Atheltics naturally figure
largely and the emulation of sport is
well to the fore. Thc book is healthy
in tone and will form an admirable
Easter present for school boys of
any age. "The Hill" is on sale at T.
N. Hibben & Co., Booksellers, Victoria.
Reviews.
In "The Far Horizon," Mrs. Harrison has formulated, with all the
force of demonstration as opposed to
argument, the eternal appeal to the
human heart of religious symbolism
and tradition. Dominic Inglesias, an
Englishman of Spanish extraction, is
the character in whose personality
this influence is made manifest. Released at the age of fifty-five from a
A story of unusual and almost
unaccountable charm, of blended
strength and delicacy—such is the
first impression made by John Oxen-
ham's "The Long Road" (The Macmillan Company). Mr. Oxenham is
the author of a number of successful
novels, but he has never before
touched so high a level as in his
latest book. Both in subpect and in
treatment the story is indeed strongly marked with originality. Its motive is as unusual as it is rich in
possibilities of dramatic effect. The
scene is laid in Siberia, and thc story
has to do with the life of Stephan
Iline, the son of a Russian political
exile. Stephan comes into conflict
with the brutal Governor of his province, who devises for him an extraordinarily ingenious punishment that
Could Not Be Mistaken.
The attention of the smoke-room
company on a Liverpool Atlantic
liner was held by an assertive Chi-
cagoan reconteur, whose tale, full of
insidious hits at denizens of New
York, created much laughter. When
it had subsided a New York gentleman who had been quietly listening,
took up the running.
"Say," he commenced, "guess I
opinionated you a Lakcsidcr vurry
first day aboard."
"Haow?" questioned the former
speaker.
"Sat close to you at lunch and noticed you ax'nt."
"Huh! my ax'nt?" exclaimed thc
man from the porcine city. "Why,
first day aboard I grubbed entirely by
myself, and spoke nary a word to a
soul."
"Jes so," rejoined the other, "but I
could hear you eatin' pie."
THE   PARTICULAR
^ DRESSER
HAS HIS CLOTHES
MADE BY
PEDEN
DO YOU?
Peden's
Tailoring     Parlors
FORT STREET
VICTORIA
i >
<»
' >
o
il
I'
d
O
o
II
II
o
n
Just how superficial some of the
opposition to the Lord's Day Act is,
may be judged from the attitude of
thc annual meeting of thc Associated
Boards of Trade at Greenwood, when
the convention first of all passed a
resolution condemning thc application
of the Act to British Columbia, and
then, on the president handing his
resignation, added a rider to the contrary, in order to meet his views. In
this, as in many other matters, Mr.
G.  O.   Buchanan demonstrated  him
self to be wiser than thc Associated
Boards.
Arithmetical  Progression.
"You are so popular," sighs thc
swain.   "You havc so many suitors."
"Thc idea!" smiles thc fair young
thing. "Why, I can count them all
on thc fingers of my left hand. See.
The index finger is Mr. Smugforth,
the second linger is Mr. Balder, and
the third finger—the third finger of
my left hand—thc third finger is you."
Next day he got thc ring for it. 14
THE WEEK, SATURDAY MARCH 30 1907
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following land: Commencing at a post planted
on the right bank of the Skeena Elver,
about one mile east of mouth of Zym-
gotitz River, marked "E. O.'s Initial
Post"; thence north 60 chains; thence
east 40 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 20 chains; thence south 15
chains, more or less, to bank of Skeena
River: thence along river bank southwesterly to point of commencement,
containing 160 acres, more or less.
E.  OLSON,   Locator.
Mar.23 J. E. BATEMAN, Agent.
I
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I Intend to make application to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for the following
described lands: Commencing at Peter
Palnswlth N. W. shore of Harret's Harbour, Moresby Island, Queen Charlotte
Island; thence S. 80 chains; thence E.
20 chains; thence N. SO chains; thence
W. 20 chains to place of beginning, containing 160 acres, more or less.
A. BENCHLEY.
L. T. WATSON, Agent.
Staked 9th March, 11)07. Mar.23
NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days
after date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following
described land, situated In the Kitsumkalum Valley: Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner of W.
Brace's purchase claim, marked L. S.
F.'s S. E. Corner, running 40 chains
west; thence 40 chains north; thence 40
chains east; thence 40 chains south to
post of commencement, containing 160
acres more or less.
Located   13th  December,   1906.
L. S. FERGUSON, Locator.
F. W. BOHLER, Agent.
Dated 20th February, 1907.       Mar.16
No.  21.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I Intend to apply to the
.Honoroble the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for special license to
cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands, situate on
Iron Creek on the West Arm of Quatslmo Sound, Rupert District, Vancouver Island: Commencing at a post
marked "E. J. Mathews' northwest corner post," planted at or near the northwest corner of section 3B, township 26,
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
to  point  of commencement,  80  chains.
Located the 6th day of March,  1907
E. J. MATHEWS.
Mar.23 JOHN McNEIL, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
from date, I Intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase 160 acres of
land on Skeena Coast District, B.C.:
Commencing at a post marked J. Mo-
Gown, S. E. Corner, on west bank of
Skeena River, one-half mile above R.
Lowry s pre-emption; thence west 40
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence
east 40 chains; tiience following the
meandering of the Skeena to point of
commencement, containing 160 aeres.
more or less.
J. McGOWN.
December 24th, 1906. Mar.23
LICENSE TO AN EXTBA-PBOVINCIAI.
COMPAUY.
"Companies Act, 1897."
Canada:
Province of British Columbia.
No  382
This is to certify that "The Brandon
Fire Insurance Company, Limited," is
authorized and licensed to carry on business within the Province of British
Columbia, and to carry out or effect all
or any of the objects of the Company
to which the legislative authority of
the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head office is situate at the City
of Brandon, Province of Manitoba, Canada.
The amount of capital of the Com-
S!*n,*4 ls,flve hundred thousand dollars,
divided Into flve thousand shares of one
hundred dollars each.
., ThS. he,ad offlce of the Company in
this Province is situate at Victoria, and
Harold Mayne Daly, Agent, whose address is Victoria, B. C, is the attorney
for the Company.
Given under my hand and Seal of
Office Ht Vietoria, Province of British
Columbia, this eighth day of March,
etie tun-sand -lfm. hundred and seven.
'Mi' S. Y. WOOTO.-N,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has boen established and licensed are >"
make and effect contracts of -hsur-'nee
with any person 6r persons or bodies
pontic or corporate upon horses, mares,
mules, and all kinds and classes of
cattle and live stock generally, against
death or damage from accident or disease, and upon houses, stores or other
buildings whatsoever, and on any shipping or vessels whatsoever, whithersoever proceeding, against loss or damage
from fire, lightning or wind, or either
or any of them, and in like manner on
any goods, chattels or personal estate
whatsoever against loss or damage from
flro, lightning and Wind, er either or
any of them, for such time or times,
and for such premiums or consideration?, and under such modifications or
restrictions, and upon such conditions as
may be bargained or agreed upon or
set forth by and between the company
and the person or persons or corporations insured or to be Insured; and to
cause themselves to he re-Insured
against any loss or risk they may have
incurred in the course of the business;
And generally to do and perform all
other necessary matters and things connected with and proper to promote the
objects for whicli said company Is In
corporated; and all policies and eoiv
tracts Issued or entered into by tho said
eompany shall bo under seal of the said
company, and shall he signed by the
president or vice-president, and countersigned by the manager Or otherwise
as may be directed by the by-laws, rules
nnd regulations of thc company, and,
being sb sealed, signed and countersigned, Bhall be doomed valid and binding upon the said company according to
the tenor and meaning thereof.
Mar.16
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days
from date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to cut and carry away timber from the following described lands
In Rupert District:
1. Commencing at a post planted at
the South East corner of J. A. Hinton's
No. 1 claim on Shushartu River and
marked initial post South West corner,
thence 160 chains easterly along the
north bank of the said river; thence
north 40 chains; thence west 160 chains;
thence south 40 chains to point of commencement.
Located March 4th, 1907.
2. Commencing at a post planted at
the South East corner of W. Bulman's
No. 1 claim and marked Initial Post
South West Corner; thence 160 chains
easterly along the north bank of the
Shushartu River; thence north 40
chains; thence west 160 chains; thenee
south 40 chains, to point of commencement
Located March 4th, 1907.
3. Commencing at a post planted on
the south bank of the Shushartu River
about one mile east of the head of the
Canyon, marked Initial Post North
West corner; thence 160 chains easterly
along the south bank of said river;
thence south 40 chains; thence west 160
chains; thence north 40 chains, to point
of commencement.
Located March  4th,  1907.
W. BULMAN,
Per Geo. W. Allison.
Dated March 11th, 1907. Mar.16
TIMBEB NOTICB.
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days
after date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
a special license to cut and carry away
timber from the following described
lands, situated in the Skeena District, as
follows:
1. Commencing at a stake planted on
the shore of Kumeolon Inlet or Salt
Lake, thence north 40 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 40
chains, to point of commencement.
Staked 22nd February,  1907.
C. TAKADA.
2. Commencing at a stake planted 40
chains west of the shore of Kumeolon
Inlet, thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement. Staked 21st February, 1907.
C. TAKADA.
3. Commencing at a stake planted on
the shore of Clam Bay, Granville Channel; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement. Staked 25th February, 1905.
Mar.16 C. TAKADA.
NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days
after date we intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following lands in the Nechaco Valley, Coast
District:
1. Commencing at a post planted at
the South West corner of Section 32,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey,
thence north 80 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 40 chains to place of beginning,
being the west half of said section 32.
CHARLES F. MAXWELL, JR.
September 20, 1906. Mar.16
NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days
after date I Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following
described land, situated ln the Kitsumkalum Valley: Commencing at a post
planted at the S. W. corner of E. J.
Coyle's purchase claim, marked G. H.
M.'s S. E. Corner, running 40 chains
west; thence 40 chains north; thence 40
chains east; thence 40 chains south, to
post of commencement, containing 160
acres more or less.
Located  13th  December,   1906.
G. H. MILLER, Locator.
F. W. BOHLER, Agent.
Dated 20th February, 1907.        Mar.16
2. Commencing at the south east corner of Section 31, Township 12, Range 5,
Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains;
thenee west 80 chains; thenco south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; to place
of beginning, being said section 31.
WM.  LANE.
September 20, 1906. Mar.16
3. Commencing at the South East corner of Section 31, Township 1, Range 4,
Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; south SO chains;
thence east 80 chains to place of beginning, being said section 31.
, N.  A.  WALLINGER.
August 5, 1906, Mar.16
4. Commencing at the South West corner of Section 32, Township 1, Range 4,
Poudrier Survey; thence *io'fth SO. chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence"south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to place
pf beginning, being sa,id section 33,
■THOS. STARBiRD.
August 5, 1906. Mar.16
5. Commencing at the North East corner of Section 30, Township 1, Range 4,
Poudrier Survey; thence west SO chains;
thence south SO chains; thence east 80
chains; thenee north 80 chains to place
of beginning, being said section 30.
L. BIRKETT.
August 5, 1906. Mar.16
6. Commencing at the North West corner of Section 29, Township 1, Range 4,
Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains;
thence east SO chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to place
pf beginning, being said section 29.
HOWARD  H.  PORTER.
August 6, 1906. Mar.16
NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days
after date I Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
a twenty-one year lease of the following lands In the Coast District:
Commencing at the North East angle
of Section 21, Township 1, Range 4,
Poudrier Survey, thence south four
miles, thonce west six miles; thence
north four miles; thence east, six miles
to place of beginning.
T..  ENGEV.
August 5, 1906. Mar.16
7. Commencing at the North East corner of section 28, Township 1, Range 4,
Poudrier Survey; thenee west 80 chains;
thence south SO chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains to place
of beginning, being said section 28.
C. J.  MANSFIELD.
August 6, 1906. Mar.16
8. Commencing at the North West corner of Section 27, Township 1, Range 4,
Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains, to place
of beginning, being said section 27,
L.  W.  PATMORE.
August 6,  1906. Mar.16
NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days
after date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following
described land, situated in the Kitsumkalum Valley: Commencing at a post
planted at the N. W. Corner of L. S.
Ferguson's purchase claim, marked E.
J. Co.'s S. E. corner, running 40 chains
west; thence 40 chains north; thence
40 chains east; thenee 40 chains south,
to point of commencement, containing
160  acres more or less.
Located   13th  December,   1906.
E. J. COYLE, Locator.
F. W. BOHLER, Agent.
Dated February 20th, 1907.       Mar.16
NOTICE Is hereby given that 60 days
after date I intend to aplpy to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following
described land, situated in the Kitsumkalum Valley: Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner of G. H.
Miller's purchase claim, marked E. S.
F.'s S. E. Corner, running 40 chains
west; thence 40 chains north; thence 40
chains east; thence 40 chains south to
point of commencement, containing 160
acres, more or less.
Located 13th December, 1906.
E. S. IRONSIDE,  Locator.
F. W.  BOHLER,  Agent.
Dated 20th February, 1907. Mar.16
NOTICE ls hereby given that 60 days
after date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lunds and Works for
permission to purchase the following
described land, situated in the Kitsumkalum Valley: Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner of E. J
Coyle's purchase claim, marked D. M.
M.'s S. E. Corner, running 40 chains
west; thence 40 chains north; thence 40
chains east; thence 40 chains south, to
post of commencement, containing 160
acres, more or less.
Located 13th December, 1906.
D. M. MOORE, Loeator.
F. W. BOHLER, Agent.
Dated 20th February, 1907.       Mar.16
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days
after date I intend to apply to the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry timber from the following lands,
situated in Renfrew District, Vancouver
Island, B. C. ,
Claim No. 0. Commencing at a post
marked "A. Deakin," 80 chajns distant
from the northeast corner of timber
limit No. 9305; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains, to point
of commencement.
Claim No. 1. Commencing at a post
marked "A. Deakin," on the northeast
corner of section No. 0, thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Claim No. 2. Commencing at the
southwest corner of sectjon No. 1, thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Claim No. 3. Commencing at the
northeast corner of section No. 2; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains, to point of commencement.
Claim No. 4. Commencing at a
post on the southwest corner of section No. 3, thence south SO chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains, to po|nt
of commencement.
Dated February 13th, 1907.
Claim No. 5. Commencing at a post
on the southwest corner of section No.
3, thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Claim No. 6. Commencing at a post
on the southwest corner of section No.
5; thence south 80 chains; thonce west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Claim No. 7. Commencing at a post
on the southwest corner of jsctjon No.
5; thenee north 80 chains; thenee west
80 chains; thence south SI chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated February 14th, 1907.
Claim No. 8. Commencing at a post
on the northwest corner of section No.
7; thenee north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Claim No. 9.—Commencing at a post
on the northwest corner of section No.
8, thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Claim No. 10. Commencing at a post
on the northeast corner of section No.
7, thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Claim No. 11. Commencing at a post
on the northeast corner of section No.
8, thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south' 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Claim No. 12. Commencing at a post
on the northeast corner of section No.
5, thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Claim No. 13. Commencing at a post
on the northeast corner of section No.
10; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.    ,
Claim No. 14. Commencing at a post
on the northeast corner of section No.
3; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Claim No. 16. Commencing at a post
?n the northeast corner of section No.
12; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated February 16th, 1907.
SEWELL P. MOODY,
Mar* 9 A. DEAKIN, Agent.
No   9
NOTICE ls hereby given that, thirty
days after date, 1 intend to apply to
tlie Honorable the Chief Commissionei'
of Lands and Works for special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands, situate in
Rupert District, Quatsimo Sound, Van'
couver Island: Commencing at a post
marked E. J. Mathews' northwest corner post, planted SO chains north of the
southeast corner post of Lot 192 on
the east side of the southeast arm of
Quatsimo Sound, thence east 80 ohains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west to
the east boundary of Lot 243, thenco
nortli 20 chains; thence west 20 chains;
thence north to point of commencement.
Located on the 4th day of February,
1907.
E. J. MATHEWS.
Mar.23 JOHN McNEIL, Agent.
No. 10.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to
the Honourable the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands, situate in
Rupert District, Quatsimo Sound, Vancouver Island: Commencing at a post
marked E. J. Mathews' southwest corner post, planted at the northeast corner post of Lot 192 on the east side
of the southeast arm of Quatsimo
Sound, Rupert District, Vancouver-
Island, thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west SO chains;
thence SO chains to point of commencement.
Located 5th day of February, 1907,
E. J. MATHEWS.
Mar.23 JOHN McNEIL, Agent.
No.  13.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to the:
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for special license to
cut and carry away timber from the:
following described lands, situate on
Iron Creek on the west arm of Quatsimo Sound, Rupert District, Vancouver
Island: Commencing at a post marked
"E. J. Mathews' southwest corner post,
planted on Iron Creek about one mile-
from head of Creek; thence Si) chains
east; thence SO chains north; thence 80'
chains west; thence 80 chains to point
of commencement.
Located 6th day of March, 1907.
E. J. MATHEWS.
Mar.23 JOHN McNEIL, Agent.
No. 16.
NOTICE ls hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Honorable the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands, situate on
Iron Creek on the West Arm of Quatsimo Sound, Rupert District, Vancouver
Island: Commencing at a post marked
E. J. Mathews' northwest corner post,
planted at the southwest corner of
Claim No. 13, thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence to point of commencement,   80   chains.
Located 6th day of February, 1907.
E. J. MATHEWS.
Mar.23 JOHN McNEIL, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days
from date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to cut and carry away timber from the following described lands
In Rupert District:
1. Commencing at a post on the west
side of the main channel of Shushartle
River, marked Initial Post North East
corner; thence west 40 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence east 60
chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
east 40 chains; thence north 40 chains,
to lot 19; thenee west 20 chains; thence
north 80 chains along the west side
of lot 19, to point of commencement,
Located March 5th, 1907.
2. Commencing at a post planted at
the North East corner Of I. 1, Skinner's
land, Shushartu Bay, and marked initial
post, North West corner; thence 120
chains in an easterly direction along the
shore line of Goletas Channel; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 40 chains, to point
of commencement.
Located March 6th.  1907.
J. A. HINTON,
Per Geo. W. Allison.
Dated March 11th. 1907. Mar.16
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following described land, situated on the head
of the Bulkly River: Commencing at
a post marked R. B., N. W. corner,
thence running west 60 chains; thence
south 60 chains; tbence east 60 chains;
thence north 60 chains to point of commencement, and containing 480 acres,
more or less.
W. N. CLARK. Locator.
Bulkly Valley, July 3rd, 1906.     Mar.16
NOTI-E Is hereby given that 60 days
after date I Intend tn apply to the Chief
Commissioner nf Lands and Works fnr
n. twenty-one voir lease of the following lands In the Const District:
Commencing nt the North East angle
of Section 36, Township 2, Range 4,
Poudrier Survey; thence south four
miles; thence west six miles: thence
north four miles; thence east six miles
to  place of beginning.
FREDERICK G.  SPARLING.
August 6, 1906. Mar.16
NOTICE Is hereby given that 60 dnys
after date I Intend tn apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands nnd Works for
a twentv-one year lease of the following lands In the Coast District:
Commencing at the South East angle
of Lot 25. Township 13, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north flve miles;
thence west six miles; thence south flve
miles; thence east six miles to place
of beginning. .;-__.
J. LUND.
September 15, 1906. Maris
LEASE NOTICES.
NOTICE Is hereby given that 60 days
aftor date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a twenty-one year lease of the following lands In the Coast District:
Commencing at a post planted at the
North West angle of section 31, Township 10, Range 6, Poudrier Survey,
thonce east six miles; thence south four
miles; thence west two miles, thence
north one milo; thonce west two miles;
thence north ono mile; thence west four
miles;, thence north three miles to
place of beginning. ,
FRED ENGEN.
August 10, 1906. Mar.16
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following described land, situated on Graham
Island, commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner of Lot 8, Mas-
set Inlet, Graham Island, marked "W.
E. Green's N. W. corner'1; thence running east 40 chains; south 80 chains;
east 20 chains, more or less, to shore;
thence following shore northerly back
to point of commencement, containing
200 acres, more or less.
W. E. GREEN.
J. GRAHAM, Locator.
Located Jan. 3, 1907. Feb. 9
NOTICE is herehy given that 60 days
after date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
a twenty-one years lease of tho following lnnds, in the Coast District:
Commencing at the North East angle
of Lot 24, Township 13. Range 6, Poudrier Survey; thonce south three miles;
tnence west six miles; thence north
three miles; tbence east six miles to
place of bcglnnln*r.
HELMER MICKLEBURG.
September 15th, 1906. Mar.16
NOTICE ls hereby given that sixty
days after date, I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for permission to purchase
the following described land, situated In
Range 5, Skeena River District, abnul
one mile from Little Canyon, commencing' at a post planted on the southeast
corner, marked "R. Braun"; thence run
nlng west 80 chains to Turner's southeast corner; thence north 40 chains tn
Frank's southeast corner; thence east 40
chains; thence north 40 chains to Johnson's southeast corner; thence east 40
chains; thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 480 acres,
more or leas.
Located September 1st, 1906,
R. BRAUN.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following described land, situated ln Masset
Inlet, Graham Island, commencing at a
post planted on the east bank of Anon
River, near mouth, Shannon Bay, and
marked "Charles Graham's S. W. corner"; thence east 40 chains to shore;
thence following shore northeasterly 40
chains; thence 40 chains along shore
northerly; thence southerly, following
shore to place of commencement, containing 300 acres, more or less.
CHARLES GRAHAM.
Staked Feb. 6, 1907. Feb. 9
No. 15.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I Intend to apply to
the Honorable the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands, situate an
Iron Creek, on the West Arm of Quatsimo Sound, Rupert District, Vancouver
Island: Commencing at a post marked
E. J. Mathews' northwest corner post,
planted at the southwest corner of
Claim No. 13, thence south SO chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence nortli SO
chains; thence to point of commencement, SO chains.
Located 6th day of February, 1907.
E. J. MATHEWS.
Mar.23 JOHN McNEIL, Agent.
No. IS.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Honorable the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands, situate on
Iron Creek on the West Arm of Quatsimo Sound, Rupert District, Vancouver Island: Commencing at a post
marked E. J. Mathews' northwest corner post, planted on Iron Creek, about
one mile southeast of the northwest corner of Claim 16, thence south SO chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north SO
chains; thence 80 chains to point of
commencement.
Located 6th day of March, 1907.
E. J. MATHEWS.
Mar.23 JOHN McNEIL, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following
described lands ln Bulkley Valley, viz.:
South half of Section five (6), Township
six (6), containing 320 acres.
Jan. 19 SYDNEY COOPER.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, sixty
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works, for permission to purchase an
Island, situated In Saanich Inlet, opposite Tunnel on E. & N. R. R.
Dated February 27th, 1907.
ROBERT   J.   PORTER,
Mar. 2 Locator.
NOTICE ls hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following described land, situated In Skeena
District: Commencing at a post on left
bank of Skeena River about 4 miles
from Port Esslngton, marked "J. C.'s
N. W. Cor."; thence S. 20 chains; thence
E. 20 chains; thenee N. 20 chains to
hank of Skeena River: thenee westerly
along the bank to point of commencement, containing 40 acres, more or less.
JOHN  CUNNINGHAM.
Port Essington. B. C. Deo. 10, 1906.
Jan. 19.
PRIVATE BILLS NOTICE.
The time limited by the Rules of
the House for receiving petitions for
Private Bills will expire on Saturday,
the i6th day of March, 1907.
Bills must be presented to the
House not later than the 28th day of
March, 1907.
Reports from Committees on Private Bills will not be received after
the 4th day of April, 1907.
Dated this 2nd day of lanuarv. 1907.
THORNTON FELL.
Clerk of the Legislative Assembly.
No. 20.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Honorable the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following d> scribed lands, situate on
Iron Creek on the West Arm of Quatslmo Sound, Rupert District, Vancouver
Island: Commencing lit a post marked
"E. J. Mathews' northwest corner post,"
planted at a point on Iron Creek, about
one mile southeasterly from the northwest corner of Claim No. IS; thence
south 80 chains; thence east SO chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Located on the 6th day of March, 1907..
K. J. MATHEWS.
Mar.23 JOHN McNEIL, Agent.
NOTICE Is hereby given that 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following land, situated in the Kitsumkalum
Valley, commencing at a post planted
at the S. W. corner of W. Bruce purchase claim, marked T, D. P.'s N. E.
corner, running west 40 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains, to point of
commencement, containing 160 acres,
more or le*>s.
Located 23rd January. 1907.
T. D. PECKARD, Locator.
F. W. BOHLER, Agent
Feb. 23.
NOTICE Is hereby given that 30 days
after date T Intend to npply tn the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands, situated In the Renfrew
District, B. C, as follows:
Claim 1. Post located at the southeast corner of Lot 167; thence 60 chains
north; thence 60 chains east; thence 60
north; thence 40 east; thence south to
coast and along coast to point of commencement.
Claim No. 2. Post located at the
southwest corner of 157; thence so
chains north; SO chains west; SO chains
south; SO chains east to point of commencement.
3. Commencing at a post planted at
the northeast corner of Lot No. 1,
thence running east SO chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west SO chains;
thence north to point of commencement.
Claim No. 4. Post located at the
southwestern corner of No. 2, 80 chains
north; thence 80 chains west; thence SO
chains south; thence SO chains east, to
point of commencement.
Claim No. 5. Post plnnted at the
northwest corner of T. L. No. 78S5;
thence SO chains west; thence SO chains
south; thenee SO chains east; thence SO
chains north.
Victoria, March,  190".
Mar, 23
FREDERICK H. DEPPE.
Alfred  Deakin,  Agent. the week, Saturday march 30, 1907
15
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands on Porcher Island:
mencement.
No. 1. Commencing at a post marked
Joseph Griffin's S. E. corner, situate near
the west end of Swan Lake, Porcher
Island, the line runs north 160 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 160
. chains; thenee east 40 chains; thence
south 160 chains; thence east 40 chains
' to place of commencement.
[ No. 2. Commencing at a post marked
Joseph Griffin's S. W. corner, situate
adjoining No. 1 post, the line runs north
' 160   chains;   thence     east     40   chains;
| thence south 160 chains; thence west 40
. chains to place of commencement.
•Meh. 30 E. S. TOPPING.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
J after date, we intend to apply to the
Honorable Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
I and carry away from the following de-
I scribed lands, situated in Rupert District, B. C:
No. 1. Commencing at a post planted
Ion a small creek, without a name, about
J three miles from Its outlet, the mouth
lof the creek about flve miles northwest
rof Robson Bight, thence SO chains east;
Ithence SO chains south; thence SO chains
[west to point of commencement,
I No, 2. Commencing at same post as
INo. 1 (marked S. W. corner); thence 80
Ichains west; thence SO chains north;
Ithence SO chains east; thence 80 chains
|south to point of commencement.
No. 3.   Commencing at same post as
>Io.  2; thence 80 chains south; thence
chains west; thence 80 chains north;
(thence 80 chains west to point of com-
nencement.
Staked March 11, 1907. Meh. 30
D. T. RUSON.
STEVEN COOK.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
lhe Chief Commissioner of Lands and
IVorks to purchase the following de-
lcribed land, situated on the nortli aide
North BentincK Arm:
Commencing at the S. W. corner of
Lot 125, Range 3, Coast Dltsrlct; thence
10 chains north to base of mountain;
lience 20 chains west; thence 20 chains
puth to shore line; thence following
a line 20 chains east to point of
pmmencement; containing in all 40
s, more or less.
CHAS. TUCKER.
Bella Coola, B. C.
| Dated March 14, 1907. Meh. 30
south 80 chajns to point of commencement.
9. Commencing at a post planted at
the northeast corner of Lot No. 6,
thence 80 chains north; thence 80 chains
east; thence SO chains south; thence 80
chains west to point of commencement.
10. Commencing at a post planted at
the northwest corner of Lot No. 9,
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east to point of commencement.
11. Starting at same post as Lot No.
10; thence running north 80 chains;
thence east SO chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west to point of commencement.
12. Commencing at a post planted on
the northwest corner of Lot No. 11;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement.
FREDERICK   H.   DEPPE.
Alfred Deakin, Agent.
Victoria, B. C. March 19th, 1907.
Mar.23
No. 11.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Honorable the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for special license
to cut and carry away timber from
the following described lands, situate
In Rupert District, Quatslmo Sound,
Vancouver Island: Commencing at a
post marked E. J. Mathews' northeast
corner post, planted about four chains
east of the mouth of Cayuse River at
the southeast corner post of the Indian Reserve, thence west 40 chains;
thence south 60 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 60 chains; thence
east to shore and along shore to point
of commencement.
Located 3rd day of February, 1907.
E. J. MATHEWS.
Mar.23 JOHN McNEIL, Agent.
[NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
rter date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
hief Commissioner of Lands and Works
permission to purchase the follow-
tract of laud in Rupert District:
^Commencing at a post marked T. W„
W. corner, at the southeast corner of
,ot 11 in Township 31, Rupert District;
aence north 20 chains; thence east 80
fains; thence south to the water and
allowing the shore line west to point
commencement; containing about 200
Ires.
IDated this 26th day of November, 1906.
THOMAS WILLIAMS.
Ich. 30. Per B. W. LEESON.
INOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
Iter date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Iiief Commissioner of Lands and Works
Ir permission to purchase the follow-
Ig tract of land In Rupert District:
• Commencing at a post marked W. J. J.
| the west side of an Island lying
Irthwest from Lot 6, Rupert District;
Id thence following the shore of the
and to the point of commencement,
of said Island, about 200 acres.
Located Feb. 27, 1907.
ph. 30. W. J. JONES.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to make application
to the Hon. Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described tract in the Coast
District: Commencing at a post planted
at the mouth of Kitsomschultz River on
the north bank of the Skeena River,
marked "S. W. Cor. Wilfred Loiselle's
Timber Claim," thence north 40 chains;
thence east 160 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence west 100 chains, to point
of commencement.
C. A. DUNLOP, Agent.
Dated February 27th, 1907. Mar. 2
6. Commencing 160 chains south of
southeast corner of lot 173 and running
as follows: 160 chains south; thence 40
chains west; thence 160 chains north;
thence 40 chains to point of commencement.
Dated the 12th day of March, 1907.
J. V. BLADIS.
Mar.16      FRANK PATTERSON, Agent.
7. Commencing 160 chains south of
southeast corner of lot 173 and running
as follows: 40 chains east; thence 160
chains south; thence 40 chains west;
thence 160 chains north to the point of
commencement.
Dated the 12th day of March, 1907.
J. V. BLADIS.
Mar.16      FRANK PATTERSON, Agent.
8. Commencing at the northeast corner of License No. 7, and running as
follows: 40 chains east; thence 160
chains south; thence 40 chains west;
thence 160 chains north to point of
commencement.
Dated the 12th day of March, 1907.
J. V. BLADIS.
Mar.16      FRANK PATTERSON, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for license to prospect for coal and
petroleum on the following described
lands, situated at Cape Caution, Range
2, Coast District:—
1. Commencing at a post marked "M.
G„ N. E. Corner"; thence west 80 chains;
south SO chains; east 80 chains; north
80 chains,  to place of commencement.
M. GREEN.
J. McConville, Agent.
2. Commencing at a post placed at M.
Green's N. E. Corner, marked "S. E. R.,
S. E. Corner"; thence west 80 chains;
north 80 chains; east 60 chains; south
SO  chains,  to place of commencement.
S. E. ROBERTS.
J. McConville, Agent.
Staked 4th and Sth March, 1907.
Mar. 16
■JOTICE ls hereby given  that thirty
,ys after date I Intend to apply to the
inorable  the  Chief  Commissioner  of
fnds and Works for permission to cut
carry away timber from the follow-
,   described   lands   s.ltuate   in   Coast
Strict, Group No. 1, Southgate River:
No. 1. Commencing at a post planted
. the north side of Southgate  River,
.ir   the   southwest   corner   of   T.   L.
|S4,   thence   west   SO   chains;   thence
Ith 40 chains; thence west 40 chains;
lnce south 40 chains; thence east 40
lins;  thence north 40 chains;  thence
t 40 chains; thence north 40 chains
point of commencement.
!o. 2. Commencing at a post planted
the   south   side   of   the   Southgate
fer,   about   30   chains   south   of   the
Itheast   corner  of  T.   L.   114S7,   and
nt  100  feet north  of the first  big
utarv creek; thence north SO chains:
nee east 80 chains; thence south 80
ins;  thence west 80 chains to point
Commencement
3. Commencing at a post planted
lie north side of the Southgate
er, about 15 chains east of the east
ndary of T. L. 7520, thence east 40
Ins; thenee south 40 chains; thence
T 40 chains; thence north 40 chains;
hce east 40 chains; thence north 40
Ins; thence west 120 chains; thence
lh 40 chains to point of commence-
ft.
o. 4. Commencing at a post planted
northeast  corner  of  T.   L.   561
8),   thence  east   80   chains;   thence
'   40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
e north SO chains; thence west 120
s; thenco south 40 chains to point
lommencement.
CECIL  H.  EDMOND,  Locator,
laked  Feb.  19,  1907. Mar.23
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands, situated near Nitnat Lake,
in Barclay District:
No, 7. Commencing at a post placed
at the N. W. corner of No. 6; thence
VV. 80 chains; thence S. 80 chains; thence
E. SO chains; thence N. 80 chains, to
point of commencement.
No. 8. Commencing at a post placed at
the S. E. corner of Timber Lease 69,
Tp. 1, thence E. 80 chains; thence N. 80
chains; thence W. 80 chains; thence S.
80 chains, to point of commencement.
No. 9. Commencing at a post placed
at the N. E. corner of No. 8; thence N.
SO chains; thence W. 80 chains; thence
S. SO chains; thence E. 80 chains, to
point  of  commencement.
No. 10. Commencing at a post placed
on the W. shore of the Nitnat Lake,
directly W. from the N. W. corner of
the Oyees Indian Reserve; thence W. SO
chains; thence N. SO chains; thence E.
SO chains; thence S. SO chains, to point
of commencement.
No. 11. Commencing at a post planted
about 60 chains W. of post No. 10;
thence W. 80 chains; thence S. 80 chains;
thence E. SO chains; tiience N. 80 chains,
to point of commencement.
No. 12. Commencing at a post planted
20 chains South of the N. E. corner of
No. 10; thence N. 80 chains; thence E.
SO chains; thence S. SO chains; thence
W. 80 chains, to point of commencement.
No. 13. Commencing at a post planted
at the N. E. corner of No. 4; thence S.
SO chains; thenee E. SO chains; thence
N. 80 chains; thence W. 80 chains, to
point of commencement.
No. 14. Commencing at the N. E. corner of No. 13; thence S. 80 chains;
thence E. SO chains; thence N. SO chains;
thence W. 80 chains, to point of commencement.
No. 15. Commencing at a post planted
on S. shore of lake near N. E. corner nf
No. 14; thence S. 80 chains; thence E.
SO chains; thence N. 80 chains; thence
W. 80 chains, to point of commencement.
No. 16. Commencing at a post planted
at S. E. corner of Homltah Reserve;
thonce W. 100 chains; thence S. 60
60 chains along E. line of No. 16; thence
E. 100 chains; thence N. 60 chains to
point of commencement.
No. 17. Commencing at a post planted
at the S. W. corner of No. 16; thence
south 105 chains; thence E. 60 chains;
thonce N. 105 chains; thence W. 60
chains to point of commencement.
Mar.i6   EDWARD E. HARDWICK.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Honorable the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license to cut and carry away timber
from the following described lands,
situate on the north shore of Stuart
Lake, about nineteen (19) miles from
Fort St. James in the Coast District of
the Province of British Columbia, more
particularly described as follows, namely: Commencing at a post marked
" J. A. H, S. W„" and thence astronomically north eighty chains, thence
astronomically east eighty chains,
thence astronomically south eighty
chains, and thence astronomically west
eighty chains to point of commencement, and containing six hundred and
forty acres.
March 9 J. A. HICKEY.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described land, situated on Redouda Island,
Coast District: Commencing at a stake
planted on Pryce Channel. 100 yards
west of George Point; thence south 80
ohains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to shore; thence along
shore to point of commencement.
MAX J. CAMERON.
J. T. Jenkins, James Brown, Agents.
Mar.16
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, we Intend to make application to the Hon. Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for special licence to
cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands situated on
Baker's Inlet, Coast District, B. C:
No. 6. Commencing at a post planted
at the S. E. corner; thence north 40
chains; west 160 chains; south 40
chains; east 160 chains, to point of
commencement.
No. 6. Commencing at a post planted
at the S. W. corner; thence north 40
chains; east 160 chains; south 40 chains;
west 160 chains, to point of commencement.
No. 7. Commencing at a post planted
at the S. W. corner; thence north 80
chains; east 80 chains; south 80 chains;
west 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Staked February 12, 1907.
THE    BRITISH    COLUMBIA    TIE    &
TIMBER COMPANY, LTD,       Mch2
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, we Intend to make application to the Hon. Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for special licence to
cut and carry away timber from the
following desclrbed lands situated on
Porcher Island, Coast District, B. C:
No. 1. Commencing at a post planted
at the N. E. corner on the Onna River;
thence west 160 chains; south 40 chains;
east 160 chains; north 40 chains, to
point of commencement. Staked Feb,
8, 1907.
No. 2. Commencing at a post planted
at the S. E. corner on the Onna River;
thence north 40 chains; west 160 chains;
south 40 chains; east 160 chains, to
point of commencement. Staked Feb.
8, 1907.
No. 3. Commencing at a post planted
at the H. W. corner on the Onna River;
thence north 80 chains; east 80 chains;
south 80 chains; west 80 chains, to
point of commencement. Staked Feb.
8, 1907.
No. 4. Commencing at a post planted
at the N. E. corner on the Spiller River;
thence west 110 chains; south 110
chains; thence along bank of river to
point of commencement. Staked Jan.
30, 1907.
THE    BRITISH    COLUMBIA    TIE    &
TIMBER COMPANY, LTD.      Mch2
NOTICE Is hereby given that sixty
days after date, 1 intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for permission to purchase
the following described lands, situated
near Works Channel, in Skeena District: Commencing at a post on T. H.
Watson's East boundary and marked
"G. J. C.'s West corner," thence north
20 Chains, along T. H. Watson's claim;
thence East 40 chains; thence South 20
chains; thence West 40 chains, to point
of commencement, containing SO acres.
more or less.
G.  J. CAMPBELL,  Locator,
March 9 T. H. WATSON, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from tlie following described land, situated on Cortes Island,
Coast District: Commencing v.t a stake
planted on the shore of Lewis Channel; thence south 40 chains; thence west
10 chains; thence north 40 chains;
theuce west 10 chains; thence north SO
chains; thence east 40 chains, to shore;
thence southerly along shore to point
of commencement.
MAX J. CAMERON.
J. T. Jenkins, James Brown, Agents.
Mar. 16
PTICE Is hereby given that, 30 days
■  date,   I   Intend   to   apply   to   the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
|k.s for a special license to cut and
away timber from  the following
Jrlbed   lands,   In   Renfrew   District,
...nmenclng at a post planted In
centre of Section 14, Township 11,
J Renfrew District, B. C.| thence
li SO chains; thence cist SO chains;
]ee soutli SO chains; thence wost to
of commencement.
ICommencing   at    n    post    planted
It  20  chains  east  from  the  north-
corner of Lot No. 1; thence north
|ialns; thence east SO chains; thence
SO chains: thence west SO chains
hint  of commencement.
Commencing   at    a   post    planted
■10  chillis  east  from  the  north-
Icorner of lot No.  1; thence north
fains; thence east SO chains; thence
SO chains; thence west SO chains
'nt of commencement.
Commencing at a post planted at
i-oiitliea.st   corner   of   Lot   No.    4;
|e north  SO chains:  thence east  SO
thence south SO  chains;  thence
I SO  chains  to point of commence-
I'nmmenclng at  a post  planted  at
(northeast    corner   of   Lot    No. 4.
|e west 80 chains; thence north  SO
s:   thonce cast  SO  chains;   thence
to place of commencement.
Komtnonclng at a post planted at
■northeast    corner   of   Lot    No. 4;
|e  north  SO  chains;  thenco east   SO
tiience south SO chains:  thence
ito plnce of commencement,
pommenefng at a post planted  nt
northeast    corner   of   Lot   No. (i.
ivest  SO chains; thence north  SO j
thence   east  SO  chains;   thence   Mar.16
NOTICE ls hereby given that 30 days
after date I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands, situated In Rupert District:
1. Commencing at the southeast corner of Puly Limit, post marked lot
173-65, running 40 chains east; thence
160 chains south; thence 40 chains west;
thence 160 chains north to point of
commencement.
Dated this  11th day of March,   1907.
J. V. BLADIS.
Mar.16      FRANK PATTERSON, Agent.
2. Commencing at the southeast corner of lot 173 and running 40 chains
sluth; thence 160 chains west; thence
40 chains north; thence 160 chains east
to point of commencement.
Dated the 11th day of March, 1907.
J. V. BLADIS.
Mar.16      FRANK PATTERSON, Agent.
3. Commencing 40 chains south of
the southeast corner of lot 173 and
running 40 chains south; thence 160
chains west; thence 40 chains north;
thence 160 chains east to point of commencement.
Dated the 11 th day of March, 1907.
J. V. BLADIS.
Mar.!6      FRANK PATTERSON. Agent.
4. Commencing SO chains south of thc
southeast corner of lot 173 and running
as follows: SO chains south; thonce SO
chains west; thence SO chains north;
thence SO chains east to point of commencement.
Dated the 1ltb clay of March, 11107.
J. V. BLADIS.
Mar.16      FRANK PATTERSON, Agent.
5. Commencing 120 chains south of
tho southeast corner of lot 173, and
running as follows: 160 chains east;
thence 40 chains south; thence 101
chains west; thenee 40 chains nortli to
point nf commencement.
Dated tho 11th day of March, 1907.
J. V, BLADIS.
FRANK PATTERSON, Agent.
TAKE NOTICE that I intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of i.aiij*
and Works for permission to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands in Rupert  District:
Commencing at a stake planted about
one and one-half miles from the mouth
of a river locally know nas Big River.
and on the north bank of the west fork
of said river marked initial post southwest corner; thonce east 80 chains;
thenco nortli 80 chains; thence west SO
chains; thence south to point of commencement.
Located Feb. IS, 1907.
W. BULMAN,
Per O. VV. ALLISON.
Victoria, B. C, Feb. 27, 1907.       Mch.2
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands:
No. 1. Situate about the middle of
Banks Island on the north shore, Range
4, Coast District, east of Bald Mountain; commencing at a post marked "J.
G. J., notrhwest corner"; thence south
40 chains; thence east 125 chains; thence
north 62 chains to shore, more or less;
thence 125 chains along shore In a
westerly direction to place of commencement.
No. 2. Situate about eight miles from
the southeast end of Banks Island on
the north shore, Range 4, Coast District,
commencing at a post marked "J. G. J.'s
southeast corner post"; running south
40 chains; thence west SO chains; thence
north 40 chains; thence wost 80 chains;
thence north 40 chains to shore; thence
along shore 160 chains to place of commencement, the whole containing 640
acres, less Indian reserve about four
acres.
No. 3. Situated about six miles from
southeast of Banks Island on northeast
side, commencing at a post marked "J.
G. J.'s southeast shore of Banks Island
southeast corner"; running south 411
chains; thence west 40 chains; thence
onrth 40 chains; thence west 96 chains;
thence north 60 chains to shore, more
nr less; thence along shore to place of
beginning.
Meh.2 JOHN G. JOHNSTON.
THIRTY days after date I Intend to
apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for permission to
cut and carry away timber from the
following  land  In  Highland  District.
Commencing at a post N. E. corner
section 48; thence S. 40 chains; thonce
E, 60 chains; thenco S. 40 chains;
thence W. 120 chains; thence N. 40
chains; thence N. E. following shore
to point of commencement.
W.  A.   LORIMER.
Dated  Feb.  2fith,  1907. Mar. 2
Situated about seven miles from south
end Pitt Island ln a small Inlet on west
short of island.
No. 1. Commencing at a post marked
"J. G. J.'s" and planted about one mile
from head of Inlet on southeast shore;
thence running east 80 chains; thenco
south SO chains; thence west 80 chains;
thenco north 80 chains to place of le-
ginning.
No. 2. Commencing at a post market!
"J. G. J." and planted on southcut
shore of Inlet about two miles south-
west from No. 1 claim; thence south 40
chains; thence east 125 chains; Ihence
north 62 chains to shore, more or loss:
thonce 125 chains along shore westerly
to place of beginning.
No. 3. Situate about one mile from
High Point, south end Pitt Island, on
oast shore, commencing at a post marked "J. G. J.," planted at the hen 1 of
Bay; thence south 50 chains; tl.nnce
west SO chains; thence north SO chains:
thence east 80 chains; thence south 30
chains to place of commencemetn.
Meh.2 JOHN G. JOHNSTON.
Situated on east side of Granville
Channel, about 3 miles from Klewnug-
get, southeast on Granville Channel on
shore.
Commencing at a post on N. W. corner marked "J. G. J."; thence north in
chains; thence east 80 chains, thence
south 40 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 40 chains to shore, more
nr less; thence along shore In n northwesterly direction, 160 chains, more or
less, to place of beginning.
Meh.2 JOHN G, JOHNSTON
NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days
From date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commlsslone rof Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following
doscribed land, adjoining Lot 646,
Skeena District:
Commencing at a post marked "A.
C.'s N. W. Corner"; thence east 40
chains along south boundayr of E.
Flewln's claim; thonce south 40 chains;
thonce west 40 chains; thence nortli 40
•hains, along east boundary of Lot 616
to point of commencement, containing
160 acres, more or loss.
Mar. 2 ANNIE COPELAND.
NOTICE Is hereby given that 60 days
from date I Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands nnd Works for
permission to purchase the following described land, adjoining Lot 646, Skeena
District:
Commencing at a post marked "A
C.'s N. W. Corner"; thence east 4 0 chains
along south boundary of T. Flewln's
claim; thence south 40 chains; thence
west 40 chains: thence nnrth 40 chains,
along east boundary of Lot 646 to point
of commencement, containing 160 acres
mnf or eiss.
Mar. 2 ANNIE COPELAND.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
r'lilef Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber oft tho following described
lands, situated in San Juan, Renfrew
District:
No. 1. Commencing at n post planted
ahnut three and a half mlcls southeast
nf San Juan Itiver, marked "O. Young's
northwest corner"; thence south S"
• •hains; thenee east 80 chains; thonce
north SO chnins; thenco west SO chains
to place of commencement.
No. 2. Commencing nt a post planted
at the northeast corner of No. 1; thence
south SO chains; thence east SO chains;
thence north SO chains; thence west 80
chains to place of commencement.
No. 3. Commencing at a pnst planted
40 chains cast of No. 2. from a post
marked "G. Young's northwest corner";
thenco south SO chains: thence east SO
chains; thence north so chains; thence
west SO chains to placo of commencement,
Nn. 4. Commencing nt a post planted
at the northeast corner of No. 3; thence
With 80 chnins; thenee cist SO chains:
'hence nnrlh SO chains; thence west SO
chains to place of commencement,
No. 6. Commencing at a pnst marked
"O. Ynung's southwest corner." nnd .adjoining Nn. 1; thence east 160 chains:
thenco nnrth 10 chain.'-; thenee west 160
ihnlns; thenee south in chains to place
•if commencement, Each claim containing 610 .acres.
Dated Feb. 10, 1907.
Meh.2 GEORGE  YOUNG.
Claim No. 1. Commencing at a stake
planted on the south shore of Skidegate
Inlet, one mile from the point of Graham Island nearest to Maud Island;
thence south SO chains; thence east to
shore; thence following shore to point
of commencement.
Claim No. 4. Commencing at a stoke
planted on the south side of Skidegate
Inlet, near Cristie Point; thence south
60 chains; thence west about 30 chains
to shore; thence following the shore
northerly and eastward to point of commencement.
Claim No. 5. Commencing at a stake
on the south shore of Skidegate Inlet,
at the S. W. corner of Claim No. 4;
tbence east 40 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west SO chains; thence
north to shore; thence following the
shore easterly to point of commencement.
Claim No. 6. Commencing at a stake
planted on the south shore of Skidegate
Inlet, about 160 chains west of the N.
W. corner of Claim No. 5; thence soutb
40 chains; thence east 160 chains; thenco
north to shore; thence westerly along
shore to point of commencement.
Claim No. 7. Commencing at a stake
planted at the N. W. corner of Claim
No. 6; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north to shore;
thence following shore to place of commencement.
Claim No. 8. Commencing at a stake
planted on Maud Island, at the N. W.
corner of the Indian Reserve; thence
south 40 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence west to
shore; thence following the shore easterly to point of commencement.
Claim No. 9. Commencing at a stake
on the shore of a small bay on the north
end of Lena Island; thence south 40
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south to point of commencement.
Claim No. 10. Commencing at a stake
planted on the west shore of Skidegate
Inlet, about one mile from the west end
of Leaa Island; thence west 40 chains;
thonce north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south to shore; thence
westward along shore to place of commencement.
Claim No. 11. Commencing at a stake
on the north shore of Bear Skin Bay,
Skidegate Inlet, about 20 chains east of
the mouth of Honna River; thence west
40 chains; thence north 160 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south to
point of commencement.
Claim No. 12. Commencing at a stake
on the north shore of Bear Skin Bay,
80 chains east of the S. E. corner of
Claim 11; thonce north SO chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south to shore;
thence east along shore to point of commencement.
Claim No. 13. Commencing et a stake
on the north shore of Bear Skin Bay,
80 chains east of the S. E. corner of
Claim No. 12; thence north 80 chains:
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains, more or less, to shore; thence
east along shore to place of commencement.
Claim No. 14. Commencing at a stake
on the north shore of Bear Skin Bay, 80
chains east of the S. E. corner of Claim
No. 13; thence north SO chains; thence
wots SO chains; thenco north SO chains;
thence west SO chains; thence south to
shore; thence following tho shore cast
to point of commencement.
Claim No. 16. Commencing at a stake
at the S. E. corner of Claim No. 14;
thence north 100 chains; thence east
SO chains; thence south 60 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south to
shore: thonce west along shore to point
of commencement.
Claim No. 16. Commencing at a stake
at the N. E. corner of Claim No. 14;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Claim No. 17 Commencing nt a stake
at tho N. E. corner of Claim No. 13;
thence north SO chnins; thence west SO
chains; thence south SO chains; thence
cast SO chains to point of commencement.
Claim No. IS. Commencing at a stake
at the N. E. corner of Claim No. 12;
thonce nnrth 80 chains; thence west 80
chnins: tiience south 80 chains; thence
east SO chains to point of commencement.
Claim No. 19. Commencing st a stake
on Ihe north shore of Skidgate Inlet,
about four miles N. E. from Skidgate
Vilalge; thenee west 60 chains; thonce
north SO ch-ilns; thence east to shore;
thenee south-westerly along shore to
point  of commencement.
Claim No. 20. Commencing nt a stake
at the (■'. E. corner nf claim 19; thence
west 120 chains; thence south SO chains;
thonce east to shore: thence following
sho-e to place of commencement.
Claim Nn. 21. Commencing at the
N. R enrne rnf the Skidegate Indian
Reserve; tiience west 60 chnins; thence
north SO chains; thence cast to shore;
thonce nlong shore to point of commencement.
W. OLIVER.
Dated Feb. 28, 1907. Meh. 2
i-'OTTCE Is hereby given that, 30 days
after da'». T Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands nnd
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber off the following
Inscribed lands, situated In Port Snn
Juan,   Renfrew  District:—
No. 3. Commencing nt n pnst marked
"G. Young," painted 40 chains east nf
I"!. Young's T.neatlmi No. 2; thenee south
40 chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 160 chains; thence west 40 chains*
thenee south 120 chnins to place of
commencement.
No. 4. Commencing nt n pnst planted
40 chains nnrth nf sea shnre, marked
"O. Young," adjoining No. 3: thenee
south 40 chains; thenee east 40 chains;
thenco north 160 chains: thenee west .10
chains; thenee south 120 chalus to place
of commencement,
Nn. 6. Commencing nt pnst marked
"0. Young's S. W. corner." and n-llnln-
Ing No. 4; thence east in chains; thence
north 160 chains: tiience west 40 chains*
thenee soulh 160 chains to place of
commencement.
GEORGE YOUNG, Locator.
Dated Feb. L'Sth. 1907. Mnr. 2.
NOTICE Is hereliy given that, 30 days
after date, T intend to make application to the Hon. Chief Commissioner nf
lands and Works fnr a special license
'n cut and enrry away tlmbor from the
following described innds, situated ln
Skeena District:
No. 1. Situate nn the east shore of
I'nlnn Passage nt Ihe south entrance nf
snme. commencing nt a pnst marked
"J. O. ,T„ southeast enruer." nn shorn
opposite Small Island: thenee east 51
chains: thenee nnrth 125 chains; thence
west 61 chains; thenee snuth 12,1 chains
to place of enmmeneement.
Nn. 2. Commencing about one and
one-half miles from snuth entrance tn
I'nlnn Passage, on east shnre adlolnlng
tho boundary of No. i claim, marked
"J. O. J."; thence east 60 chains; tne„ee
nnrth 101 cbalns to shore; thenee west
along shnre 60 chains; thenee smith
alnng shnre 105 chains, more or less, to
place of enmmeneement.
Nn, 3. Situate about three miles from
entrance nn south side nf Union Passage
en west, shore nf same, close to Indian
roierve, commencing at a post marked
"■!. C. J.'s norllienst corner"; thence
*vc«t nn chains: thence sooth SO chains!
Ihence enst SO chains; thenco nnrtli
along shore tn place nf commencement
Meh.2 JOHN O. JOHNSTON.  ' i6
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 30 1907
Vancouver Notes.
With hundreds of newcomers pouring into Vancouver every week, with
the hotels taxed to capacity and
boarding houses turning guests away,
a man with a family is having a hard
time to obtain accommodation. There
is absolutely not a house for rent in
the whole city and the cry has gone
forth that rents in many instances will
be raised in May. The realty market
is active, particularly in suburban
holdings, and auction sales of subdivisions are held almost every day.
What Vancouver needs, and needs
badly is the man with capital to erect
modern cottages and homes that long
before the last shingle was on the
roof would find occupants. For the
moment the whole interest is centered
in speculation and the real estate auctions are always crowded with eager
buyers. In this particular line Kings-
ford, Smith & Co. have held several
successful sales of suburban holdings
and on Friday and Saturday next at
their Mart, 860 Granville St., will hold
a sale of 119 lots in the Hastings
townsite. On Tuesday A. M. Beattie,
under instructions from Ross & Shaw,
will auction lots in the townsite of
Hazelton. Much interest is being
manifested and a goodly crowd of
buyers from both the north and the
Island is expected to be on hand to
take a "flyer" in the northern metropolis.
Several new business houses are
making their appearance. It was The
Week who first foretold of Gordon
Drysdale opening upon Granville
street on his own account. A four-
storey business block is now under
construction which he has leased for
a term of years. It will be news
to the trade to learn that the well
known Scotch whiskey house of John
Robertson & Son, Ltd., is to open up
here. Premises have been secured
under the store of The Fit-Rite on
Hastings street and are now being
remodelled. Henry 0. Wootten of
Montreal, general manager in Canada
and the United States, has been here
for the past ten days arranging matters. Mr. Wootten is enthusiastic on
the possibilities of the Pacific Coast
and as he is one of the best known
and most extensive travellers in the
trade, the advent of John Robertson
& Son will mean keen competition.
Many friends of Charles W. Hills,
formerly with the Westside people in
Victoria, will be pleased to learn of
his opening up here on his own account. He has secured a splendid
location at 940 Granville street, and
though only in business but a few
weeks has pretty thoroughly established himself.
The writer was out a few days
since to the Nursery of M. J. Henry
at 3010 Westminster Road. Mr. Henry has been in business for the past
18 years, having built his trade principally by the "mail order" system.
Besides his extensive greenhouses,
packing sheds and nursery grounds
for ornamental stock on Westminster
Road, he has a branch nursery of
ten acres in extent, one mile south
of the city, where are grown over
100,000 trees and plants. As this is
the season of the year when the
householder, farmer and fruit grower
is selecting his stock of seeds and
trees it would not be amiss to send
for Mr. Henry's 1907 catalogue of
garden, field and flower seeds. It is
a splendidly illustrated publication of
124 pages, and besides being a descriptive and priced catalogue, contains much useful matter of a general
character relating to the garden, field
and orchard.
The retail clerks of Vancouver are
out for a Wednesday half-holiday. A
largely attended meeting was held
yesterday at which an organization
was perfected to be called the "Clerks
Association." It was decided to strike
out the name "retail" in deference to
the wish of the wholesale clerks who
desired to affiliate. The organization
elected the following officers: President, W. J. Copp; Vice-President, J.
Kelly; Secretary, Randolph R. Fox,
and Treasurer, W. H. Kendall.
Among the new amusement features for the summer months is to be
the erection of one of the finest roller skating rinks in Canada out at
English Bay, directly opposite the
bathing pavilion. The English Bay
Amusement Co., Ltd., with a capital
of $60,000, financed by Seattle and
Portland men, is behind the enterprise. The proposed rink will have
a floor area of 76x194 feet and a seating capacity of 600.
5th Regiment, C. A.
Regimental Orders by Lt.-Col. J.
A.  Hall, commanding:
Regimental   Headquarters,
Victoria, B. C, March 27.
1—Discharges: The following men
having meen granted their discharge
are struck off the strength of the
regiment: No. 241, Gnr. John J.
Clarke, March 25, 1907; No. 217, Gnr.
G. Duncan, March 25, 1907.
2—Enlistments: The following men
having been duly attested are taken
on the strength of the regiment, and
will assume the regimental numbers
opposite their names: No. 179, Gnr.
George E. White, March 27, 1907;
No. 261, Gnr. Fred. W. Savory, March
27, 1907; No. IIS, Trmptr. F. C. Carter, March 27, 1907.
3—Re-engaged: The following man
having been re-attested is continued
on the strength of the regiment for
a further term of three (3) years:
No. 152, Gnr. Dan J. Miller, March
27, 1907.
4—Inspection of Recruits: All recruits will parade under Sergt.-Major
Warder, R. C. A., next Wednesday,
April 3rd, for inspection by the Adjutant. Company officers will notify
all the men on the lists recently furnished to them of this parade.
5—Drill Hall Closed: Monday next
April ist, being a Dominion holiday,
the Drill Hall will be closed on that
day.
6—Officers Meeting: The regular
monthly meeting of the Officers' Mess
will be held in the Drill Hall on
Thursday next, April 4th, at 8 p. m.
Dress—Undress uniform.
By Order,
(Signed)
W. RIDGWAY-WILSON, Capt.,
Adjutant Sth Regt., C.A.
Memo.—The officer commanding
will meet the Secretaries of Company
Associations and Sergeants' Mess on
Wednesday next, April 3rd, at 9 p.m.
Are You Think'
ing of Buying
a New Piano
IF SO, IT WILL PAY YOU TO WRITE TO US OR VISIT
OUR WAREROOMS.
WE ARE  SOLE AGENTS   FOR   THE   CELEBRATED
"GERHARD HEINTZMAN"
"MARTIN = ORME"
"MENDELSSOHN"
and "KARN"
Pianos
FLETCHER BROS.
93 Government St VICTORIA.
Its Benefit Made Apparent.
"No, sir," the boy's father said,
with a good deal of severity, "you
can't be excused from school simply
because you have a sore thumb. I've
made up my mind that you've got to
be educated. You can't see the good
of it, but I can. If I only had my
life to live over, I tell you I wouldn't
miss a single chance to get the bene-
of schooling. It's the greatest thing
in the world. I can see that now,
though I couldn't once."
"Ain't you educated, pa?"
"All the education I have I picked
up myself. I realise, though, what
education is worth to a man."
"And didn't you go to school at
all?"
"Nope, I never had "
"Then I'll go."
The Bride's Wedding Present.
A Congressman on a visit to New
York the other day called on an old
friend, an alderman, down town.
While they were chatting an Italian
couple came in and asked in broken
English if the alderman would unite
them in marriage. The alderman
performed the ceremony, and, after
accepting the modest fee, politely
handed thc bride an umbrella. The
Congressman observed the proceedings gravell, and, after the couple
went out, asked—"Do you always do
that, Charles?" "Do what? Marry
them? Oh, yes." "No, I mean give
the bride a present." "A present!
Why, wasn't that her umbrella?"
gasped thc alderman. "No, it was
mine," replied the Congressman sadly.
The Misses Blakemore have removed to 135 Menzies street and will
be pleased to scc their friends on the
first and third Fridays of the month.
THEATR
TUESDAY, APRIL 2nd.
RICHARD CARLE'S  BEST
EFFORT
The Tenderfoot
Oscar L. Figman, Ruth White and
over half a hundred others.
A Cony Corner at the Poodle Dog.
The
Poodle Dog
Grill,
Yates St.,
Victoria, B. C, is
the only real
"grill" in British
Columbia—the
only place where
you can
•XCTUALlv
obtain your
choice of meats
and all the deli*
cacies of the
season.
SMITH & SHAUGHNESSY
Proprietors.
Qefiymari^
It Is A'ancouver's leading cafe.    Excellent service.    French Chef.
All seasonable delicacies.    Orchestra  noon,  afternoon and  evening.
THE BISMARK
McKinnon & Bancroft, Proprietors.
Coiner Abbott and Hastings Street!.
VANCOUVER.
Models of Inventions
DESIGNED, BUILT OR PERFECTED FOR
INVENTORS and PATENTEES
DRAWINGS      AND      BLUEPRINTS
Write for Particulars
VANCOUVER riODEL   HACHINE  AND
rVn P   WnDk"<i    980 ORANVILLE   ST.,   VANCOUVER
-WlVfUC;    VVUKIVO, W. T. WATSON, Proprietor
KODAKS
For 1907 Catalogues of Kodaks and
Kodak Supplies write
Will Marsden
THE KODAK SPECIALIST
665 Granville Street     VANCOUVER, B. C.

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