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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Sep 22, 1906

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 V
.• Bank of Hamilton
I ? Capital $2,500,000
Reserve (2,500,000
i~ Total Assets, $29,000,000'
r Interest paid half-yearly on deposits of
9 $1 and upwards in Savings Department.
0 Drafts and Money Orders on all parts ol
JJ the world. Vancouver Branches, cor.
r of Hasting and Hamilton Sts., Powell St.
Cedar Grove,
uuuuusjuu 9JLSM ft hjuuuuuulO
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine.
|S Pacific Coast Realty Co. Ld $
Telepboie 1086
Offices, 12 MacOrejor Block.
Lands City Lots, Timber.
P. 0. Drawer 762, Victoria, B.C.
QUULPJULPJUU
Vol. III.   No
2
VICTORIA AND  VANCOUVER,   B. C, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER aa, 1906.
One Dollar Per Annum
he Editor's Review
Gf Current Topics.
Strangers We wish to direct at-
|t the date, tention to the detailed
notice in nour news eol-
|mns dealing with the arrangements
aade for entertaining the Canadian
I Manufacturers' Association   in Vic-
oria next week.   This is no globe-
rotting convention   hurry-scurrying
rom one point to another with the
rrepressible fitfuhiess of the average
ourist, but an organization of   the
eading captains of industry who are
railding up our oommercial supremacy.   They come here not only to en-
Jfoy the natural advantages of climate
Bind   scenery   which   constitute   the
feharm of the capital city, but also to
"take stock of those infant industries
[which have already been planted on
fche Pacific coast, and which will one
|*ay make Victoria as famous for developed   as   for   natural   resources.
I Some members of the Association already have   considerable investments
jiere, and others   have   the   means
vhich are urgently needed to open up
the mining, lumbering,   and   agricul-
jlural, as well as the manufacturing
■possibilities of 'the island.   It should
>ie the aim of every citizen to cooperate in making the visit of such an
influential body of men both, pleasurable and profitable, not only because
!»f the courtesy which is due to all
trangers at our gate, and because of
ts importance to our future welfare
Is a community, but also because it
s, unfortunately, too true that Bri-
ish Columbia is comparatively little
oiown, and its claims to attention ill
•egarded by the wise men in the East.
Che Canadian Manufacturers' Asso-
1
liation is composed of men who are
pest able to appraise the value of our
irovince, and whose report will carry
nth it the weight and authority due
0 competency. Tlie various commit-
ees are working hard to make every
noment of this visit effective for
;ood. There is not a citizen of Vic-
,oria, however humble, who cannot
sontribute something to the success of
■he programme by at least being pre-
ent at the public reception on Mon-
lay evening next. With all the ilium-
nations in evidence, and the streets
hronged as was the case last Monday.
Victoria cannot fail to make a favor-
ible impression upon the men who
vill have not a little to do with the
noulding of her destiny, for the ques-
ion whether Victoria is to be a com-
laratively small residential city, or
, prosperous industrial emporium will
|e determined by Canadian manufacturers.
once." Recently at the Young
Liberal Banquet, the Hon. Wm.
Templeman said that in conversation
with Mr. Wainwright he had been
told that it was fully intended to
have the construction work finished
by the year 1911 in accordance with
the contract entered into with the
government. In five years, therefore,
the line might be expected to be in
operation through to the terminus
selected at Prince Rupert), Kaien
Island. Fourteen or fifteen survey
parties were in the field, he believed,
and it was proposed to have these
preliminaries finished this year.
But he was making no promises. Personally he was not in the confidence
of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway.
He was simply repeating some of Mr.
Wainwright's casual remarks, which
leads ordinary mortals with only
average intellects to ask how long
has the hon. gentleman not been in
the counsels of the G.T.P.? What
has happened to disrupt the family
council? Whose "casual remarks"
was he repeating at the general election? With "two voices" so palpably evident it is not easy to know
which is the "casual" and which
the "causal."
of his office with the distinguihed
ability and absolute adherence to integrity which have characterized its
incumbency by Mr. Fielding. To attempt to unseat him on purely technical grounds, and with the full admission that nothing could be alleged
against him personally may be considered a good move, according as the
game of party politics is played in
Canada, but it is neither creditable
nor clever. As long as the Liberal
party is in power at Ottawa no man,
be he Liberal or Conservative, will
wish to see anyone but Mr. Fielding
as Finance Minister. It is poor policy in the interests of the country
and cannot inure to the benefit of
either party to annoy, to embarrass
and to hinder a minister in the discharge of his always sufficiently oner-
been able to exploit the same old
shoddy. The sensation of the moment
was our old friend "Early dissolution," dressed up in a cheap suit,
labeled "December fashions." This
time the organ of truth declared specifically that the Government had decided on an election this fall, and
that they had asked and received the
consent of the Lieutenant-Governor to
hold it in December. After this rumor, which emanated from the
"Times" office before noon, was on
the street, Premier McBride was interviewed, and stalted most positively
that there was not a word of truth in
the report, and that the snbject had
never been mentioned to the Lieutenant-Governor by any member of the
Government. As the Hon. William
Templeman was in the city the Times
Tnrrrrinittrrrrfrrrrt*
 >.„y.,..„ ..», ■..-..,..»; *
--■;■   -.7'. '■ -  ■* ■ ■
lhe Two   At the last General Elec-
foices.      tion the Hon. Wm. Templeman "promised"   that
British Columbia    sent    a solid
I even to Ottawa construction would
egin "forthwith" on the Grand
'runk Pacific at both ends, and be
ushed vigorously to completion. Mr.
tays, Eon. G. A. Cox, Hon. Ray-
lond Prefontaine and Mr. F. W.
[orse confirmed this. The solid seven j
fere sent. Construction did not be-
|.n, but Mr. F. W. Morse proceeded
hold up the Provincial Govern-
ent, nnd when the bluff did not
ork he said the line would not he
impleted until 1011, "although if
s demands had been conceded con-
ruction would hnve been begun "at
Masters The Trades and Labor
and Servants. Council has during this
week held Hs annual
Convention in Victoria and has discussed so many resolutions that towards the end it was found necessary
to indulge in a very general slaughter of the innocents. The opinion of
flunking men is that the labon unions
are rapidly drifting towards political
entity, and that before long they will
form a distinct political party and
cease to co-operate for legislative
purposes, with Conservatives' or Liberals. The increased representation of
labor in the British Parliament lends
force to the argument, and the trend
of events in Canada is in the same
direction. When that day arrives we
shall probably know who are the masters and who are servanlts; at present
there seems to be more than a little
doubt. What with the assumption of
the right to dictate as to public decorations on the occasion of the Vice-
Regal visit, the uncompromising attitude of Unionism towards immigration and cheap labor in any form,
the proposal to extend opposition
even 'to British born as well as alien
races who are British subjects, and
last, but by no means least the domination of Canadian Trades Unionism
by American demagogues and American organizations all tend to warn ns
against the too obvious dangers of
rampant democracy and blatant socialism. "Come oult and be ye separate" is a good motto for th workineg-
man who seeks peace and prosperity
and who is not prepared to barter it
for strife and adversity.
tures now made should be based upon the supposition of abandoning
Elk Lake in the near future, he hulk
of the $200,000 proposed to be borrowed will be utilized as an instalment of a permanent scheme, and
would have been necessary in connection with any project for bringing
in an increased supply or for improving the distribution. This circumstance may commend the byelaw for
the approval of the ratepayers, and
it may pass, but only with the full
expectation that the first business of
the new Council will be to give the
city a perfect and complete system.
The only thing which stands in the
way is the settlement of the appeal
against the judgment in the action
with the Esquimalt Water Co., it can
only delay, it cannot alter the fact
that sooner or later Goldstream will
be our source of supply, the longer
we postpone the deal the more it will
ultimately cost.
EARL GREY
Governor-General of Canada.
JUL5LJUULOXJLJL8JL-
Poor "The Week"   wishes   to
Politics, add its protest to that of
the leading Liberal and a
few of the Conservative papers in the
Dominion against the treatment meted
ont to the Rt. Hon. W. S. Fielding.
Whilst differeing from him where
party politics are concerned, we have
nothing but the highest praise for a
mnn who has discharged the functions
ous duties. If the man suffers the
public service suffers, and the whole
transaction, in the opinion of fair-
minded men, re-acts upon those who
instigate it. We regard the action as
particularly indefensible in the case
of Mr. Fielding because his conduct
has been conspicuously free from
those failings which have laid his
colleagues open to such severe and
unfortunately well-merited condemnation. In making these remarks we
are not forgetful of the fact that proceedings equally vexatious and inexcusable have been taken against leading Conservatives, but that circumstance tloes not justify the copying nf
a bad example. We hope the day is
not far distant when in the endeavor
to realise the ardent wish for a higher standard in public affaire, such
wanton proceedings ns those instituted against Mr. Fielding will be a
thing of the past.
More The news manufacturing
Shoddy, department of the Victoria
"Times" has been working overtime again to produce a new
line of seasonable goods, but bas only
had to swallow the leek, which it did
with many grimaces and a wry face.
If the hon. gentleman had been at
Ottawa the probability is that instend of a "qualified retraction" we
should have been treated to a further display of linguistic pyrotechnics
on the lines of the vocabulary of the
tenderloin district; a rare example
of which was furnished in the Times'
editorial which dealt with Premier
McBride's denial. A more graceless
example of surrender cannot be found
even in the columns of the Times
whicli has now transferred its muckrake from the garbage of political
life to the indecencies of thc Undcr-
wold.
A Wise The report of tho Wnter
Decision. Committee of the Vietoria
Council hns been accepted
unanimously, nnd'the abortive attempt
of the Mayor to foist bis pet scheme
on the city hns received its quietus.
The decision of the Council is in line
with the recommendations of expert
Adams, who was strongly opposed to
Elk Lake as a permanent source of
supply, and advised that any expendi-
A Question We have been requested
of Finance, to call attention to a
circumstance which has
probably escaped attention diuring the
perplexing discussions   which   have
I taken place on the water question.
We do so because it seems that there
is an important principle involved,
and ono which has been violated,
with the consent, however, of the
parties more immediately interested.
The amount originally borrowed by
the city for water works purposes
was $540,000, which has been reduced
by subsequent contributions from the
sinking fund to $390,000. The annual
requirement for interest upon this
debt is $19,500. In 1905 the total income was $70,927.87 and tlie cost of
maintenance and outgoings $43,253.96,
leaving a surplus revenue of $276,73.-
91. Instead of paying the interest
ont of tlie surplus, which would seem
to be the rational, as it is certainly
the financial method, the whole of
this surplus passes into the general
revenue of the city, and a special
rnte is levied on the property owners
to pay the interest. In any future
loans tbat may be obtained for a
similar purpose, it would surely be
wise to provide that the revenue
from the public work for which the
money is borrowed should be applied
first to the payment of the charges
incielent thereto. Whilst on this subject we might also point out. that under sub-section 14 of section 50, chapter 32 of the Municipal Clauses
Act, corporations are authorized "to
I borrow upon tho security of the rents,
rates nr charges, cnforenble for t\ip
supply nf public necessities, with or
without the pledging of the credit, for
a guarantee by the municipality payable out of the annual revenue." The
city of Victoria, unlike a number of
smaller cities in the interior, should
be able to take advantage of the option provided by this clause, and no
doubt it will bo borne in mind.
The Deus   "The Week" is informed
exMachina. on good authority that on
October 1st. one   of   the
moro   important   "temporary"   arrangements in connection   with the
management of the Colonist will lie
made permanent ns the result of the
j consummation of the original scheme
1 under which control wns acquired by
"influential Eastern capitalists." THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1906.
nmuBmmnmmamamm
A School of Vice.
In its fight against poisonous patent
medicines the Vanoouver World deserves well of tlie community. It
tackled a vicious nuisance and proved
its case "up to the hilt," but alas, the
final result was worse than unsatisfactory, inasmuch as the threatened action
in the courts fell through and the patent medicine vendors received a splendid advertisement which has resulted
in largely increased sales of the noxious
product. The fact luis only been once
• more demonstrated that you cannot protect the public against itself. Now the
crusade has been started against "the
notorious school for vice;" a rather
sensational designation of the Pender
street slot machines. That gambling is
per se demoralising and morally inde-
tigation it is found that there is no
market for their labour, but that has
not yet been seriously contended by anyone familiar with the condition of the
labour market throughout the Dominion.
ROYAL AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY
OF ENGLAND.
Derby Meeting, June, 1906.
Extract from the "Implement and Machinery Review," dated July 3, 1906,
in refernce to Cream Separators.
"Friction and vibration should, as far
as possible, be reduced to microscopical
proportions in all classes of machinery,
and the extent to which this advice has
been observed is.pleasingly apparent in
the Melotte separator, exhibited by the
Melotte Separator Sales Co., Ltd., of
Bristol.   The high speed at which cream
The Week
will give a scholarship, value
$90
per se aemuianamB cu.u  ,    . separators necessarily have to run and
fensible must be at once conceded. Thatj the continuous work to which they are
at the Sprott-Shaw Business College to
the boy or girl sending in the largest
list of new subscribers before
December 1st, 1906
Full particulars in next week's issue.
it is a vice inherent in human nature
! must be admitted.   That it is the duty
of the police authorities to prevent pub-
• lie gambling in any form and juvenile
■ gambling in particular cannot be contested.   That slot machines are an evil
. in   any   community   and   a   pernicious
i evil  when they are accessible to boys
i of tender years is a well established fact
which has been legislated upon.   What,
then, is the conclusion? That boys gamble because of two defects in our social
constitution,   parental   indifference   and
the laxity of the police.   It might probably be reduced to one defect, for parents are thc ratepayers and voters, and
if they were in earnest could speedily
secure the enforcement of the law. But
. they  are not,  and  blue-coat knows  it
full well.    So docs Tommy.   President
' Roosevelt thinks the crying evil of the
age  is  race   suicide.    Is  there  not   a
greater?    Which  is better, that children should not lie torn, or that having
been brought into the world, they should
be neglected?   The true school of vice
is not on Pender street    but   in the
homes  where  neglect  and  indifference
prevail and thc responsibilities of parentage are not recognized.
"Let Good Digestion Wait On
Appetite."
THERE IS NO WAITING, IF YOU BUY
Camombert Cheese, each 25c.
Noufchatcl Cheese, each  10c.
German Breakfast Cheese, ea oh    5c.
Brick Cream Cheese, per lb 25c.
Roquefort Cheese, per lb 65c.
Limbcrgor Cheese 50c
Grated Parmesan Cheose, per bottle 22c. and 50c.
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
Ill Government St., Viotoria.
Where Mail Orders are specially cared for. R. 1658
A Serious Loss.
The resignation of thc City Clerk is
a serious blow to Vancouver.   There is
an old verse which runs something like
this: "Woe be unto you when all men
speak well of you."    Mr. McEvoy appears to  furnish  the    one    exception
which proves the rule.   There is not a
dissentient voice,  and the question on
every lip is "Now shall we get on without him?"   Well, Vancouver can get on
without even Mr. McEvoy, but not so
well, and he will be missed.   Just what
he has done far tlie city is only known
to the inner circle who are conversant
with the legal difficulties he has grappled
with  for  so long.     His acquaintance
with civic affairs is unique, his ability
and devotion to the public service unsurpassed.   We heartily   endorse   the
wish of the Council that if it is at all
possible  he should  be  retained  in  an
advisory capacity, but if, as seems to be
the case, he has other duties which cannot be laid aside thc wise thing is to
take time by the forelock and secure the
:   best possible successor.   Mr. McEvoy is
to be commended for the thoughtful-
ness   which   has   given the city six
.   months' notice of his intention.
Those Hindus Again.
In his notice of motion anent the immigration of Hindus Mr, Macpherson
makes the statement that 1,300 have already landed in Britisli Columbia.
Where he obtained this information
"The Week" does not know, but the
transportation companies, who should
know, declare that the figure is under
350. There may be reasonable grounds
of objection lo this class of immigrant,
but the argument against their admission will not be strengthened by misrepresentation or exaggeration. Hindus
are British subjects, Neither the Federal nor the Imperial Government would
sanction the imposing of disability upon them for any but thc general reasons which would apply equally to every
class of immigrant, poverty or disease.
The time has not arrived when in order lo enable local politicians to catch
a few votes cither government will
consent lo outrage British sentiment
by insulting one of the foremost of our
subject races. The immigration of
Hindus may be discouraged if on inves-
often subjected, very soon exhaust the
vitality of poorly built machines; but in
the "Melotte" purchasers have a separator which is so skilfully designed and so
nicely built that wear and   tear need
scarcely be thought of except at rare
intervals.    The materials  employed  in
this machine are of the finest quality,
and every working part is   made   to
guage within a thousandth part of an
inch, each part having, before its incorporation into a machine, to pass through
the hands of three sets of inspectors.
This care in manufacture partly accounts
for the claim which the company vouch
for, that 150,000 machines    have been
sold; whilst faith in its clean skimming
capacity and easy running is inspired by
the offer to supply specimens on trial
One secret of the "Melotte's" easy run
ning is its suspended bowl and spindle,
which revolve practically without friction and cannot, it is claimed, get out
of balance; whilst its machine cut gearing, which runs on ball bearings, is an
other feature which tells largely in its
favor.   The sizes in view ranged in ca
pacity from 18 to 130 gallons per hour,
the machine for separating the larger
quantity being fitted with a friction pulley for driving by power.   The com
pany's   sales  have  this  year  exceeded
previous records, and    from what we
personally know   regarding   past sales,
wc are justified in believing that the
current demand is highly satisfactory.
On the same stand were   to be   seen
churns,     butter-workers,    refrigerators
and other dairy goods, for the company's
specialties cover all the mechanical requirements of the dairying industry."
Upwards of 700 of these separators
are in use in the dairies of British Columbia. The sole agents for the Province are Messrs. E. G. Prior & Co.,
Ltd., Victoria, B. C.
Come
and
Examine
Quality and
Prices
TEtEPHONE 606
Johnston's Transfer
I35 Douglaa St.   VICTORIA.
RATES CUT IN TWO.
HACKS FOR HIRE.
Driving Loads 75c. per hour.
G J. JOHNSTON,
Before Buying
Elsewhere.
We Guarantee Good
Value in Footwear
WATSON'S
SHOE STORE
65 Yates Street
Moose Captured.
A fine large moose took a walk
through the town early one morning
last week, coming down Montana creek
and taking to the lake between the creek
and the wharf. Several shots were
fired at it, but it escaped to the other
side, landing at the wood camp.
Your correspondent learned later
that, with the assistance of Baxter, the
early rising and industrious hardware
merchant, the moose was captured and
tied to a tree to await the opening of
the season.
You can't make laws to beat those
Canadians,
—White Horse Star.
; Trail Smelter.
The new copper furnace, blown in
last week at the Trail smelter, having a
capacity of 400 tons per day, being thus
the largest in the province, has proved
so successful in operation that it is now
the intention of the management to
bring up the capacity of the other four
furnaces immediately to the same
amount.
Trail will then have a capacity of
2,000 tons of copper ore per diem.
New improvements and discoveries at
the War Eagle-Centre Star will enable
that mine to ship in very much larger
quantities, and the purchase of ehc Iron
Mask, together with the lease of thc
Snowshoe, wil far more than compensate for any loss accruing through thc
breaking of the Le Roi contract.
Shubert Bros. Original Production
The Musical Cocktail with a menu
of music direct from a 26 weeks
run in Chicago
The
Royal Shef
With the following big cast, including,
Harry   Hermsen.   Oscar Raglaud,
Walter B. Smith, Osborne Clemson,
Gertrude Hutcheson. Elsie Frazee,
LaBelle Laurette, Stanley Pelch and
the famous Broilers.
A perfect production presented in perfection.   Sale opens 10 a.m Friday, Sep.
21st.   Prices 25, 50, 75, $1.00, $1.40.
Mail orders accompanied by cheque
will receive their usual attention.
The man who never smiles till he gets
something out of you should be watched closely.
Collectors!
I carry an assortment of 400
subjects of
Genuine
Photographic
Pos Cards
of Banff and the Canadian National
Park, also of Northwest Indium,
Monntain and Game Scenes.
PRICE 60c. PER DOZEN.
FOR THE TRADE ONLY.
My quotations by the hundred are
the lowest iu Canada. Photopost
cards made from any subject yon
may send me.
Write for particulars,
Byron Harmon
Photographic Artist,
Banff, Alberta.
V
Tho Sanitarium Hotel, which is beautifully situated, overlooking the Bow River and its lovely and
romantic valley, is a large 5-story building elegantly
fitted with ovory appointment calculated to bring
pleasure and comfort to the tourist or invalid.
A private hospital, which, though isolated, is in
close proximity to tho Sanitarium, is presided over by
skilfully trained nurses and is also fitted out with
every appliance necessary to a first class institution
of its kind.
A very commodious bath-house adjoins the hotel,
where Turkish, Russian, plunge, shower and douche
baths arc given under medical supervision, with
water direct from the celebrated hot sulphur spriugs.
A first class livery in connection so that rides and
drives through the magiiificant scenery may bo enjoyed.
Terms: (2.00 a day upwards. Special ratos by week
or month.  Open all the year.
W. H. SCARTH, Manager.
Medical Staff:
R. G. Brett, m.d ;   G. M. Atkin, m.d.;
R. H. Bkett, B.A.. M D.
JAMES BUCHANAN & CO.
LONDON AND GLASGOW
purveyors to^the Royal Family,
DISTILLERS OF HIGH GRADE  SCOTCH WHISKIES!
Buchanan's Royal Household at}i.5o'per bottle
Buchanan's Black and White at $ 1.25 per bottle
Buchanan's Red Seal at $1.00 per^bottle
ARE LEADERS AMONG THE BEST
[.For sale by all dealers,
VICTORIA, ■. C.
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OF
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
phone 893. VICTORI/ THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 32, 1906.
I    At The Street   $
J
Corner
1
By THB LOUNQER
*
My esteemed colleague Bohemian did
good turn and an ill turn last week
f his dissertation on books in general
[id the Carnegie library in particular,
ne good turn was in directing public
[tendon to some of the choicest works
|i tiie shelves. The ill turn was in dc-
iving me of the pleasure of perusing
f,em, for since the article appeared
ly have been "out." Strange to say,
is applies even to D'Annunzio's
'lame of Life," which he condemned
2 the worst of that exotic author's
ioks, but being more literary than
mmercial he forgot that the mere men-
>n of the fact that. D'Annunzio's
irks had been suppressed by the
merican censor would be sure to stim-
ate curiosity. The result shows that
ch an expectation would have been
sell founded, and is further a striking
Sustration of the value of advertising
"The Week."
(Whilst on the subject of books and
ie Carnegie libarary I want to point
it, in all kindliness, that the adminis-
jation of that Institution leaves much
i be desired. I hear numerous com-
aints of lack of civility on the part of
e attendants and have witnessed some
1'stances. Then the catalogues are a
jsgrace to scholarship. Page after
age contains egregious blunders, both
ji the spelling of author's names, the
ties of their books, and the arrange-
lent. Many of these errors betoken
^solute ignorance of the subject; well
riown authors are mis-spelt through
ck of acquaintance; and the general
■rangement is most defective. The new
|italogue just issued is no improvement on the old one in this respect,
'.hen there is one fruitful source of anoyance about which nearly every one
'jmplains, and justifiably, the anliquat-
|1 method in vogue of compelling a
isrrower to write out on a' slip of pa-
j;r the numbers of six books. One realizes the reasonableness of saving the
iirarian useless trips to the shelves,
;id this is the only possible defence,
(lit with so many 'systems of rcgislra-
JD11 in use it seems a pity that Victoria
jiould have still to resort to a system
Illicit was abolished in English villages
|rty years ago. On enquiry I was told
lat all the defects in the service' at
'ir Carnegie library are due to lack of
finds. Well, it should not take money
buy courtesy, and even registers are
P*t expensive. Surely we have not se-
(ired a white elephant ? • Let the com-
ittee ponder these things. I am but
e mouthpiece of many in giving them
Biice.
The event of the week has, of course,
:en the visit of the Governor General
id his party, which passed off with
,e greatest possible eclat. Mrs. Dtins-
Ittir bore no small share of the burden
Mailed by the entertaining and chaper-
Siing of such an illustrious bevy of
jjsitors, and her energy and gracious-
:ss were matters of general comment,
overnmeht House has certainly shown
hat can be done in the way of entcr-
»ning and the new Lieiitcnant-Gover-
ir has made a most auspicious opening
his Gubernatorial career. ■ Not a
Btle of the success of the various func-
jns was due to the admirable work of
Muskett and his efficient assistant,
Bromley. It is not often that a
fries of official functions is carried
'ough' without a slip, and in the pre-
t instance there was only one of
jiich I know, and for that they can in
\ sense be held responsible—the onus
■ts elsewhere. I venture to predict
Mr. Dunsmuir a successful incuni-
pcy of the honorable office which he
(ids, especially if, now that the im-
tant stale ceremonies arc out of the
he recognizes the popular basis of
appointment and docs not allow bini-
[f to be diverted towards exclttiive-
:s.
ly common consent the illuminations \
the public buildings and lhe streets
[passed anything ever before attempt-
in Victoria. Earl Grey, before leav-!
said that they were the finest and
1st effective he had seen in Canada.
Chinese arch, when lit up, was in
deed "a tiling of beauty," characteris
tic, georgeous, impressive. The Japanese arch with its slender construction
and severe outlines was a fine conception. But the piece de resistance was
the Parliament Buildings, Its absolute
accuracy of architectural design, its
symmetrical proportions, its massive
coronal dome, its wreath of picturesque
detail, all limned by the quivering points
of electric fire which starred it was a
veritable fairy palace, a chef d'ouvre
which has no peer in Canada, if on this
continent, and which grows more beautiful with every passing year. When
lounging in the purlieus of the reception
hall on Monday night I heard the clear
voice of Captain Trotter announce "Mr,
Rattenhury." I quickly looked up, to
see a tall, dark well built young Eng
ishnian of thirty-five who ten years ago
designed tbis splendid pile, and I thought
thae he should be crowned as the author of the most beautiful and enduring
monument yet erected in' the Dominion.
It is the fitting tribute of the twentieth
century to the nobility and greatness of
the men who blazed the trail and laid
the foundations of civilization in this
Western  world.
I have got the reception fever this
week, and my readers will have to excuse the touch of patriotism which obscures everything else when royalty and
loyalty are in question. The sight of
the Union Jack always brings a mist
before my eyes, and the strains of the
National Anthem a lump in my throat.
Just the associations—that is all, the
substance of those memories has passed
long ago, only the shadow remains, and
like thousands of my fellow countrymen I find it deepening and darkening.
I suppose the day will come when even
the bugle-call will fail to reach one's
ears in the gloom, but with many that
will only be when all is over for them
and for the
LOUNGER.
The Unmercenaries.
Jolly good  fellows who    die  for    the
death of it,
Fight for the  fun of it,  live for the
breath of it,
Catch at the instant and drink of the
minute,
Thinking not, caring not, what may be
in it;
Foolish good fellows (and all of us
know it).
They and the like of them, here's a
poet,
Giving their lives to the life of humanity,
Dreaming of fame—that extreme of in-
saniay;
Silly good fellows who labor for science,
Lighting the way for their race's reliance,
Bearing their burdens with mine of a
stoic,
Dreaming of gratitude—myth unhcroic;
All lhe good fellows who think not of
wages,
Foreign, in part, to the thing that our
age is,
Giving no heed to the weight of the
coffer,
Taking what Fate and not men have
to offer;
They and the  like  of them,  here's  a
health to them!
'Taint of our lower aims never  undo
them!
They will survive us all, passed through
the portal;
Life often jests at what death m-Aes
immortal!
—New Orleans Times-Democrat.
An Invaluable Art
When  Bret Harte was editor of a
San Francisco paper, he told this story
of one of his rival editors:
One day the office boy went to thc
editor of the "Soaring Eagle" and said:
"There is a tramp at the door, and he
says he's had nothing to eat for six
days."
"Fetch him in," said the editor. "If
we can find out how he tloes it wc can
run this blamed paper for another week."
-M. A. P.
Thc man who thinks the world owes
him a wife and that all he has to do is
to wait will get left.
Thc devil docs not keep out of a
home simply because there is a handsome bible on the parlor table.
8
Tbe Pacific Coast
Realty Go, Ltd.
Have an exclusive list of specially selected ACREAGE, ESTATE and FARM
PROPERTIES for sale at prices which
will attract purchasers.
NOW IS THE TIE TO BUY
Victoria Property is the salest and best
investment to be found in Real Estate on
the Pacific Coast.  There will be a
50 PER GENT. INCREASE
IN VALUES IN 1907.
You cannat make a mistake in buying
Business,
Residence, or
Acreage
Property.
Write or call on us for particulars.  We
can show you how to make money.
The Pacific Coast
Realty Co., Ltd.
12 MacQregor Bl'k, Victoria, B.C.
(Opposite Driard Hotel)
British American
Trust Company,
Limited
OFFICES : Vancouver, B. C.
Grand Fork*, B. C.
Victoria, B. C.
Transacts a General Financial and
Fiduciary Business. Acts as Executor, Administrator, Trustee, etc.
Buys and Sells High Grade Investment Securities. Manages, buys,
sells, rents and appraises real estate. Collects Rents and Places
Insurance. Negotiates Loans on
Heal E«tate. Makes Loans on
High Grade Securities.
Correspondence Solicited.
HAROLD M. DALY, Manager
VICTORIA,   B. C.
Week September 24
The New
Grand
SULLIVAN • CONSIDINE,    Proprietors.
Management of ROBT. JAMIESON.
Wm. Cartright and Jennie Lee
Comedy Sketch.
John W. Byrnes
Nor a liar, just a story teller.
Murrison and Roma
Dramatic Playlet,  "Leah's Violin."
Mr. and Mrs. Milo Vagge
Novelty Bag Punchers.
Frederic Roberts,
Illustsated song,
"They' 11 All Be Glad to See You."
New Moving Pictures,
"Dogs as Smugglers."
JOHN  COOPER
Taxidermist and Fur Dresser
Mounting Large Game Heads
a Specialty.
826 PENDER STREET,
VANCOUVER
TEN MILES OF
CELLARS
The "CAVES," or cellars hewn out of solid rock,
on both sides of which Q. H. MUMM & CO.
store their champagnes, aggregate
over ten miles in length.
Royal Warrants have been granted to
Messrs. G. H. Mumm & Oo. by
His Majesty
His Majesty
His Majesty
His Majesty
His Majesty
His Majesty
His Majesty
His Majesty
King Edward VII.
the German Emperor,
the Emperor of Austria,
the King of Italy,
the King of Sweden,
the King of Denmark,
the King of the Belgians,
the King of Spain.
P. L.1634
If you love your wife
BUY   HER  A  GAS STOVE
It will save her a lot ol extra work and
give her time for other things
besides cooking.
Cook Your Boast, Do Not Boast Your Cook,
VICTOKIA GAS COMPANY, LIMITED.
The Home
Seekers
Goal.
Special   Bargains  to
Wind Up An Estate.
6]4 acres in the North
End, only 20 minutes walk
to Post Office, with southern aspect, $600 per acre,
5 acres is all cleared and in
high state of cultivation.
Seaview lots from $50 to
$100 each, chiefly cleared,
and ready for building on.
Easy terms if necessary.
The B. C. Land & Investment
Agency, Ltd.
Real Kstnte, Financial and
Insurance Agents,
VICTORIA, B. C.
Old Fashioned
Furniture,
Old China,
Brass and Copper
46 Douglas Street, Victoria
Mr*. M. E. MacLeod,
Opposita Hnlmoral Hotel
SPECIAL OFFER OF
SEASONABLE
GOODS.
BEE SUPPLIES.-Buckwheat, Fall
Rye, Clover, Timothy, Lawn Grass,
Ensilage Com, Mangel, Turnip, Epe-
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Spray Pumps, Whale Oil Soap, Vegetable Plants.
Large Slock of HOME GROWN
Fruit and Ornamental Trees now matured for the fall trade.
No expense, loss or delay of fumigation or inspection.
Let me price your list before placing
your order.
' We do business on our own grounds
—no rent to pay, and am prepared to
meet all competition.
Catalogue Free.
M. J. HENRY,
3010 Westminster Foad,
Vancouver, B.C.
Real Hair
Switches
Pomnndours, Curls
all of the latest
style, nt
MADAME
KOSCHE'S
Hnir Dressing
Parlors
5S Douglas
Street
VICTORIA. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 32, 1906
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Offices:
S8V4 Government Street .... Victoria B. C.
Empire Block   Vancouver, B. C.
W. BLAKEMORE...Manager and Editor
Annual Subscription tl in Advance
Transient rates, per inch  Wc.
Legal notices (60 days), from  15.00
Theatrical, per inch  $1.00
Readers, per line   6c. to 10c.
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Lost and
Found and other small advertisements, per Insertion, from...26c. to (1.00
NOTICE.
Contributors are hereby notified
that all copy for The Week should be
delivered to the office, 88i/2 Government
Street, not later than Thursday morn
ing.
BADINAGE
By BOHEMIAN
IHUllIBilUIIiliaillllfilllliir"™
A cat may look at a king, and a yellow journal may paint a harmless little
pastoral in the lurid colors of a Bac-
chanaian revel, but a 'Weekly" may.
not say "mum"; like F. F. Montresor's
conception it may only be "the one who
looked on." Still, proverbially, lookers
on see most of the game, even when to
less observant ones the game is a
Chinese puzzle, and it would be a mistake to assume that because "The
Week" sometimes resorts to hierogly
phics that it could not speak more
plainly. With the hieroglyphics, as with
the handwriting on the wall, there is at
ways one who can read, even if only
"between the lines."   Verb. sap.
When reading the infinite variety of
jokes, anecdotes, and would-be witti
cisms that appear month after month in
the magazines, one is sometimes apt to
forget that all jokes, like all men, have
a common origin. In spite of the evolution theory there are still a faithful few
left who cling to the theory that Adam
was the father of us all—a fiction
which probably derives its strongest
support from the fact that we are so
constantly reminded by the delightful
whimsicalities and perplexing vagaries
of her sex that Eve must have been
the mother of us all—and so by an easy,
natural, and necessary transition Adam
must have been our common father.
But I fear that this may be regarded as
a digression from the sbuject which I
started out to elucidate—the antiquity
and common origin of jokes. Joe Miller was the father of them all, whoever
Joe Miller may have been. It is probable that he roamed the primeval forests in scanty attire and punned and
joked about his rudimentary or fast
vanishing appendage. It is an undoubted fact tllat as with man so with jokes
there has been a terrible falling from
grace. The family likeness is almost
obliterated. Still, patient skill may trace
it. These reflections are suggested by
a recent experience. I have introduced
into this column several good stories,
at least I thought them to be comparatively new. Judge of my surprise at
being challenged on all sides with thc remark, "Oh! another chestnut." I became so discouraged that I abandoned
story telling altogether and hardly had
the courage to print what I knew to be
original matter. This week, in thi
pages of the Smart Set, which is easily
the most up-to-date magazine of the
day, I find the following accorded a
place of honor as an up-to-date joke.
"Woman was created after man, and
she has been after him ever since."
That settles it. I happen to know that
this was one of llic earliest Joe Miller-
isms', so once more I give it up and reiterate my first staecnicnt that there is
nnthing new under the sun, not even a
joke.
Now I approach a delicate and difficult subject. My editor lias instructed
mc lo reply to a very caustic criticism
which has been levelled at my esteemed
colleague Balicltc, and which lias had
such  serious  and uiilookcd  for  results
that for the first time in its history "The
Week" appears without its most attractive feature, "A Lady's Letter," and the
staff is in mourning. The trouble arose in
this wise. To the office came by Monday's mail a letter of complaint from a
subscriber in California demanding to
know how the Editor reconciled his
"enlightened and broad minded views"
with the weekly publication of a letter
like "Babette's," "which was a perpetual glorification of the pomp and vanities of this wicked world as illustrated
by the fripperies and flummeries with
which the birds of fashion decorate
themselves. Had he never read Wagner's 'Simple Life?' Why did he not
employ a lady writer who would inculcate the virtue of simplicity in dress and
decoration as more in keeping with thc
needs of the mass of man and womankind. In an unguarded moment the
Editor handed the letter to Babette
with a curt instruction to answer it. Instead of which our delicate and sensitive
(all lady writers are delicate and sensitive, it is the artistic temperament)
contributor fainted. When she recovered she promptly resigned, and up to the
time of going to press all the blandishments of the Editor, Bohemian, the
Lounger and the Advertising Manager
combined have failed to persuade her to
write another line. And I am to defend her! Preposterous I Any one but
a plain, washed out, commonplace woman, would have known that lady writers are made of different material from
other women. In fact they are born,
not made. They are the quintescense
of artistic femininity. A product of the
highest aesthetic development of the
latest of the centuries. Aeons ago they
were birds of Paradise flitting among
the flowers of Eden in brilliant plumage
to the faint music of zephys and the
droning of honey bees. Saturated with
the acme of loveliness they inhaled the
fragrance of perennial beauty, and
when our first parents made that horrible blunder which so changed the face
of nature they were left—all that was
mortal of them—dead under the bushes
In this degenerate age they are a "reincarnation" in the form of lady contributors to the fashion pages of the press.
They bring a whiff of the beautiful
across the intervening ages. They seek
to cover up the deficiencies of the material with the plumage of the immaterial, as they mercifully fling the cloak of
charity over the peccadilloes of their
sisters in society. What would even
lovely woman be without feathers?
Woad and leaves may have been all
right ^or the early Britons, but this age
needs something to keep alive at least
the fiction of loveliness, and this is the
mission of lady writers. If you doubt
it, ask Lady Gay ,or Madge, or—I was
going to say Babette, but I fear it is
too late, and all because of a Philistine
critic. The path of the modern editor
is not strewn with roses, at any rate,
there is more than a sprinkling of
thorns. At least, it appears so to
BOHEMIAN.
P. S.—At the eleventh hour Babette
has relented, her ruffled plumage is
•smoothed and we breathe again.
Fashionable Wedding.
This morning, in the presence of the
family and a small circle of friends,
Miss Norma Flumerfelt, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Flemerfelt, was quietly married to Mr. A. Herbert Ritchie,
at the family residence, Ruhebune. The
happy pair leave by the afternoon train
for Saanich, and will spend the first
week of the honeymoon at "Mallowmot
Farm," left for the occasion by Mr. W,
J. Taylor, K. C. The engagement has
been a very brief one, only having been
announced two months ago.
Manufacturers' Association.
(Communicated.)
The members of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association are due to arrive
in Victoria by the Princess Victoria on
Monday afternoon. With them will be
principas and representatives of thc
largest industrial firms in the Dominion.
Among the many organizations which
have visited the capital city not one is
so influential or has a live interest of
such importance as that over which Harry Cocksluilt presides, and every loyal
Victorian will feci it to be his duty to
make the occasion one of thc greatest
possible interest and enjoyment to our
visitors.
James Lawson, Jr., the energetic sec
retary of the reception committee of
the Victoria Development and Tourist |
Association, will meet the visitors in
Vancouver. On arrival at Victoria a
deputation of the various committees
of the society will be on hand at the
wharf to offer a hearty greeting. By
the forethought of Mr, Lawson arrangements have been made for all public
illuminations, including the splendid
decorations of the parliament buildings,
to be lighted up on Monday evening,
when a public reception will be held at
the buildings from 9 until 11 o'clock.
The details of the reception are in the
hands of an influential ladies' committee, consisting of Mrs. Chas. Rhodes,
Mrs. H. Kent, Mrs. Burton, Mrs. and
Miss Savory, Mrs. Dr. Robertson, Mrs.
Chas. Spratt, Mrs. Stuart Robertson,
Mrs. T. W. Powell, Mrs. A. T. Goward,
Mrs. J. C. Cameron, Mrs. J. W. Church,
Mrs. Newman, Mrs. Thos. Watson,
Mrs. Geo. Simpson, Mrs. Rathom, Mrs.
Brett, Mrs. N, P. Shaw, Mrs. Lugrin,
Mrs. R. B. McMicking, Mrs. Harold
Robertson, Mrs. G. H. Barnard, Mrs.
Dr. Hasell, Mrs. and Miss Pemberton,
Mrs. Genge, Mrs. D. R. Ker, Mrs. D.
M. Rogers, Mrs. James Raymur, Mrs.
Gould, Mrs. Butchart, Mrs. Courtney,
Mrs. Webster.
The reception will be entirely informal, morning dress will be worn and a
general invitation to attend is extended
to all citizens. Among those who will
officially receive the visitors will be the
Premier, Hon. R. McBride; His Worship the Mayor, and the President of
the Board of Trade. It is hoped that
many ladies will turn out to assist the
committee.
On Tuesday morning special cars will
be provided to convey the visitors to
Esquimalt for an inspection of the dry
dock, the B. C. Marine railway, and on
their way back the Victoria Machinery
Depot, the cars leaving the corner of
Yates and Government streets at 9:30
o'clock. On Tuesdny afternoon the
members of the Manufacturers' Association, on the invitation of the committee, will be the guests of the directors
of the Provincial exhibition. At all
these functions the co-operation of the
public is earnestly desired, in order that'
our visitors may thoroughly enjoy
themselves during their brief sojourn in
this city.
BRILLIANT
THE season of dinners, bridge parties,
banquets and balls is close at hand.
Tables will need decorating with the
skill for which Victoria ladies are
justly famed. What the diamond is to the
hand of the fair sez, brilliant, sparkling cut
glass is to the dinuer table. It costs you
nothing to inspect the wealth of beautiful
cut glass in our showrooms, where, among
the many latest creations, you will find :
Salt Cellars from 50c up; Carver Rests,
per pair, $1; Beautiful Vases, from $1, $1.25,
(1.50 for the smaller sizes, right up to magnificent productions at $25, $30, $35, $40 and
$50; Latest Shaped Bon-Bon Dishes, from
$1 up; Cream Jugs. $5.50; Sugar Bowls>
$4.25; a great variety of Fruit Dishes from
$2.75 up; fine Oil and Vinegat bottles, at
$3.75; Custard Glasses, in sets of six, from
$16.50; Wine, Whiskey and Liqueur Decanters, Water Jugs and Water Bottles in endless variety.
IMPORTANT.
Our Mail Order Department gives special attention
to country orders and enquiries.
CHALLONER & MITCHELL
JEWELERS AND SILVERSMITHS
47 and 40 Government Street, Victoria, B. C.
^
CM. 1640
Mr .C. W. Munro, M. P. P., of Chilliwack, accompanied by his wife and
daughter, has gone on an eastern trip.
They will visit at the old home in Dun-
dela, Ont, and will return via Chicago,
Minneapolis and Seattle.
TIMBER  LICENSE.
Notice Is hereby given that 30 days after
date, I Intend to apply to the Hon. the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works,
for a speclnl license to cut and carry
away timber from'the following described
land:
No. 4. Commencing at a stake on the
west shore of the large lake on the
northern end of Sechelt Peninsula, about
four miles south of Captain Island, New
Westminster District; thence west 40
chains, south 80 chains, east 40 chains,
south 80 chains, east 40 chains to shore
of 'ake; thence following shore line to
point of commencement.
No. 5. Commencing at a stake on the
western shore of a lake on the north end
of Sechelt Peninsula; thence west to the
eastern boundary of Timber License No.
5.888; thence 80 chains north to the boun-
'diary of pre-emption No. 1,843; thence
80 chains east; tnence south to shore of
lake; thence following lake shore to point
of commencement.
No. 6. Commencing from the shore of
n lake at the north end of SecheJt Peninsula ; thence north about 40 chains to the
southwest corner of Timber Lease No. 072;
thence enst 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; enst 40 chnins; south 120 chains;
thence nbout 40 chains west to shore of
lake; thence following the shore to point
of commencement.
M. GREEN.
J. WEST.
Little Canyon, Sept, 1, 1000.
NOTICE Is hereby given that 00 days
from date I Intend to npply to the Chief
Commissioner of 'Lands nnd Works for
permission to purchase the following described lnnd, sftuntcd In Range 5, Skeena
River District, about one mile from Little
Canyon:
Commencing at a post planted on the
southenst corner, mnrked R. Brnun; thence
running west 80 chains to Turner's S. E.
corner; thence north 40 chnins to
Frnnk's southeast corner; thence cast
40 chains; thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 480 acres,
more or  less.
'Located September 1, 1906.
R.  BRAUN.
-Port Esslngton, 'B. C.
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt thirty (30)
days after date I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lnnds and Works
for n special licence to cut and enrry timber
from tho following described lands, situated In District of New Westminster.
1. Commencing at a post plnnted 0 quarter
of a mile from tho bench nt the head of St,
Vincent Bny, Hotham Sound, thence west
100 cluiins, thence north 40 ehnlns, thenee
•east 100 chnins, and thence south 40 chnins
to the point of commencement, containing
010 acres.
2. Commencing at the northenst comer
of No. 1 ehnln ns nbove described, thenee
north 40 ehnlns, thence west 180 chains,
thenee south 40 ehnlns, thenee enst nlong
tlle northern boiindnry of the snid No. 1
cltnln to point of commencement, containing 040 acres.
FRANK BURNETT.
Dated nt   Vancouver  this  13th dny   of
September.
MELBLACK
Melblack is the name of the new DULL
black which gives that fashionable dull
black color to Fenders, Fire Irons, Grates
and Iron and Steel Work of all description. A child can apply it. Why not
make your fenders and grates smart and
fashionable? The price is 15c. Per ^n
and it is sold only by
MELROSE CO."-
asa     40 x<ort st., Next to Five Sisters Block, Viotoria, B. C.
Has
"IF IT'S CORRECT WE HAVE IT."
M. 1666
THE
MELOTTE
CREAM SEPARATORS
A very large stock of these world-renowned Cream Separators is
earned in their various depots and warehouses by the
Sole Agents for B. C.
B.G. PRIOR & eo., Ld.
(THE BIRMINGHAM OF B. C.)
125 Government Street, Victoria, B. Q.
Also at Vancouver, Kamloops and Vernon.
P.R. 1667 THE WEEK, SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 22, 1906.
1
British Columbia
THE FRUIT GROWING RESOURCES
OF THE PROVINCE.
Fruit Growing.
British Columbia fruit is preferred
above all others in the markets of
the Middle West, where it commands
profitable prices. In 1901 a small
exhibit sent to England was awarded the gold medal of the Royal Horticultural Society, and last year
(1905) a car lot, exhibited in London, won the first prize from all competitors, while no less than eight
medals were awarded the individual
exhibits which made up the collection. This goes to prove that despite
the great distance British Columbia
fruit has secured a prominent place
in the British market, in which Oregon and California applies have heretofore sold at the highest prices.
The fruit industry of British Columbia is in its infancy, but the results so far secred are convincing as
to its future importance. The actual
extent of fruit growing land has not
yet been ascertained, but by a conservative estimate at least one million acres south of the 52nd degree
will produce all the fruits of the temperate zone. The recognized fruit
districts include the southern part
of Vancouver Island and the Gulf
Islands, Lower Fraser River Valley,
Thompson River Valley, Shuswap
Lake, Okanagan, Spallumcheen, Oso-
yoos, Similkameen, Upper Columbia
Valley, Kootenay Lake, Arrow Lake,
Lower Columbia River and Grand
Forks, which are all suited to the
best grades of fruit, and which contain extensive areas of fruit lands.
Other good fruit districts are: West
Coast of Vancouver Island, West
Coast of Mainland (where patches of
fruit lands are found at the heads of
the numerous inlets), Lower Fraser
Valley, Nicola, Grand Prairie, and
many other localities. In some of
these sections irrigation is necessary,
and, as mentioned elsewhere, water is
being supplied where the. influx of
population warrants the necessary
expenditure. Many localities, which
are now proved to be suitable for
fruit culture, were but recently "discovered," for a few years ago fruit
was only raised in the settlements
along the coast and along the rivers,
and in quantity that failed to supply
even the limited local demand. In
1891 the total orchard area of the
province was 6,500 acres. In ten
years it only increased 1,000 acres,
but from 1901 to 1905 it jumped to
22,000 acres, and it is safe to say
that that acreage will be more than
doubled again before the close of
1906. Ten years ago British Columbia did not produce enough fruit to
supply her own population. The fol-
following table of fruit shipments is
interesting in showing tho steady
growth of the industry:
Royal JiijRTJeDLTtJRAL Society
■ESTABLISHED A.D. 1804.
Tfe
INCORPORATED A.D.. 1809.
foo(»YA^^
ACrricLcnv, 2rLC3.3 lol IQOSl
J/LcrJvriOJ (ft. ^HxA^^Q^7^^^
For ■ -. boftexiiovv:o; %iMm •:;-\   [--7--.	
'Awarded to
'WZm^:
Awarded Exhibits of British Columbia Apples.
'■.'.,:'■ December ISO 5.'. ■
Nelson Pruit Pair.
By freight.    By Express. Total. Increase.
1902    1,469 tons      , 487 tons 1,956 tons
1903    1,868 tons        676 tons 2,544 tons , 588 tons
1904    2,161  tons        864 tons 3,025 tons , 481 tons
1905    3,181 tons      1,176 tons 4,357 tons 1,332 tons
An increase of over 50 per cent in four years. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1906.
The Son of
The
Song.
By Parker L. Walter.
With the fervor and absolute faith of
his age, Captain Warren crept out of
bed in the darkness, and, kneeling,
prayed for fine weather the next day, I
He then climbed back again between the
covers and fell quickly into untroubled
sleep.
When the light stole athwart his figure in the morning, he awoke to find
the justification of his faith in cloudless
skies, with no hint of danger from unfavorable winds.
It was to be the biggest day of his
eight years, and the weather bore a
great part therein, for his Aunt Jess,
while in many respects sound and reasonable for a woman, was shaky on rain
and wind, because of nerves and neuralgia.
Fancy nerves and neuralgia being
taken into consideration on shipboard
in the navy! There was no reference
to them, even in the most indirect milliner, in any of thc stories of Tucker, nor
in those read aloud, nor in any absorbed
by the Captain himself in his own
studies.
On shipboard! On lhe sea! There
you strike full and clear lhe soul-note
of thc Captain.
In this respect, and in all that bore
upon it in any degree, he was a marvel. Perhaps it was not strange. His
great grandfather had been a gentleman volunteer with John Paul Jones,
and came home with his shave of glory
and most of his left arm. His grandfather, because of some vague blemish
showed in small letters on the family
scroll, to be sure, but he was the father
of thc greatest of llicm all, Commodore
Ellis Putnam Warren, of the Warrior
fame.
Now you know, of course! You
have read your history and your newspapers, and perhaps you have heard
Jack sing lhe song—or have you really
nauiical ternis and deep-sea phrases before he had fully digested his alphabet? Every day came Tucker with pictures of ships and with wonderful toy
ships, toy anchors, loy cannon, boats
that ran by clockwork, bonis that were
magnetized to run in water, and later,
when Ellis was older, with electrical
boats and sailing models ihat actually
were able to cross the ponds in the
park.
ln his baby talk the boy was made to
box the compass and repeat odds and
ends of manuals of drill for sailors,
gunners, and marines, and the names of
ropes, rigging, and parts of war-vessels.
Un his eighth birthday came the model of the Warrior, iron-clad frigate, full-
rigged, forty inches long, and put to-
and  cost.
his inspection aud that he might hear   who sought his advice on some point  essary coaling,  while  Ensign .JHrnpa:
their stories—once on his own birthday  of geography—or maybe gin. * down veamed  for the time w'*cn thi
•      ! •"--'     .I--'-      Hi™     m,o^lo,
Past this smiling guardian slipped a
little figure. Instinctively the policeman thrust forth a detaining hand,
when a glimpse showed a uniform with
an anchor, and before he could investigate further it was too late, for the
English steward moved aside at an im-
in mid-June, and once on his father's
natal day in mid-November. They were
there now, for to-morrow mas the sec-
and of these anniversaries.
There were many of these relics—
class-pins and badges, fraternity emblems, a gunnery prize,  a medal   from 	
Congress for valor in the face of the perative call of "Gangway!"
enemy, a life-saving bronze, and two "Phat's that? Have yees a kinther-
medali of gold—a little one and a large garthen with yees?" asked the police-
one—from  England, one  for that  day   man.
on the Yellow River, and the other for      "Slowed   if  I   know!"   retorted  the
Kanday. j stcmard, laughing. "What's his goime?"
Thc crystallizing of the plot grew out j    The    pinnace    Thames,  Midshipman j
of  a  tender,  comprehending  comment j Bernard  Frawlinghatn Camperdown in
'   ' ■ -•--—■ .- —1  .„ l-T
of the mother, who knew how bravely
lhe boy was swallowing his disappoint-
gether with great precision and cost, i ed hopes of an actual visit to some pf
And with it came his uniform of cap- the ships with Tucker,
tain of the independent vessel whose j "While you arc driving along, Ellis,"
famous name was no longer carried in she said cheerfully, 'you may see some
the navy-list. There were races on the of lhe officers coming ashore. If you"
lake now, against other expensive toy i should have Captain Crablrce of the
ships with wider spread of canvas, Frobisher, pointed out to you, tell him
omned by millionaires' sons who lived on who you are, and ask him to call and
the Avenue side, but the Warrior out- \ scc an old friend who is laid up. Tell
sailed them all, and Tucker's eyes were him to bring Willy Williams with him,
full of tears as he recounted her victor-, jf he can gct away from the mob for a
ies to the boy's mother; and the Cap- j few minutes—that's the American rear-
tain's heart was full to bursting. For ( admiral, you know, and papa's dearest
the slender, dark-eyed woman who, friend. I haven't seen him for two
praised  and  petted  the  lad    was  not J years."
mother only—she was his commanding
officer, and held him within strict lines
of discipline. This was one of the articles in his code early absorbed from
Tucker; and it proved a beneficent arrangement. Girl companions Ellis
scorned peremptorily. To be coddled
by the women who came to see his
mother was an abomination. To obey
unquestionably a woman might have
seemed, in time, unseemly to the stubborn, steadfast mind of thc little man;
but the brevet rank given by the phlegmatic seaman avoiled all shoals. It was
meet and proper, and so, before the
morning kiss of greeting and afier the
last at night, the little figure in its
white robe stood erect while the brown
hand went in quick salute to the line
The Captain was dressed in his trim
uniform, with its hints of real service
decorations ,and its cap with the insignia of rank, but without accompanying marks to indicate the nationality—
for Tucker was an artist with a reverence for the real thing and a horror
of unlicensed gilt.
Ellis slipped out of the sitting-room,
where his mother's couch had been arranged beside the window, and was gone
a short time. When he came back he
was restless and uneasy, with a hot and
cold feeling of guilt pervading him;
and he kept his eyes out of range of
his mother's so she did not see the outward signs of distress already growing
from the great idea.
strange lady and
the ring and roar of it at the end of  ° JJJJ^'T^ann function of it,
and saluted in turn. .
During all his infantile nautical tram
your tongue yourself?
Warren of Kanday! What a gathering of warships the name recalls, there
in the harbor of the capital of that turbulent kingdom, the Ultramarine Islands, when thc powers wrangled over
the white meat and second joints, and
wanted to leave thc natives the wishbone and drumsticks! And then the
storm   at Kanday—that   colossal, vol-
1,1 li""- —- ,    ;    Even the fact that a
curly hair; and she-wise| gcntieman were with his aunt did not
produce signs of panic from the Captain when it was broken to him.
"He's a dear;" the mother thought,
and she was guilty of contributory negligence to the extent ot whispering;
"Let him do pretty much as he pleases,
■■■■■■I-- _.!.:i„
command, was about to return to H. M.
S. Frobisher, when the round placid
eyes of, the owner of that illustrious
name fell upon the form of the tiniest
nauiical officer he had ever seen, in an
odd-looking uniform, with a row of
round objects fastened across the right
side of the blue coat.
The figure came rightly to attention in
strictest form and saluted, while a
childish treble happed out:
"Officer in command?"
The Britisher from pure instinct returned thc salute.
"Damned if they don't ketch 'em out
of the cradle over here!" he thought, in
sheer amazement. As a precaution
against some unknown kind of practical
joke by a mischievous telegraph messenger or hotel bell-boy, of whom lie
had encountered several officially, he
put some stiffness into his formal:
"Yes."
"Wot in 'ell is that?" queried "Able-
bodied" Hopkins audibly, of his super-
for Bosun's Mate Notting, within the
pinnace.
"Search me I" said that won', y sen-
tentiotisly; and he coolly bent forward
to inspect thc decorations of the visitor.
"Wot yer make of that?" he whispered lo Hopkins excitedly. "Blow mc it
c ain't got on real tin cups, a life-saver
from 'is Congress, and two first-class
British admiralty in gold—an'im a 'op-
o'-niy-thiimb!"
"Message from my commanding officer for Captain Crabtrcc, of the Pro
caine, submarine upheaval, with its aw-1 to  niake
ing there had been visits, of course, to
the navy-yard in Tucker's company,
and once thc launching of a battle-ship
had been witnessed; but the moment
the news came that England was sending a visiting squadron of six county
cruisers, under a semi-royal admiral,
a state visit to New Yor'c,
With heads
down yearned  for the time wVn thi
wardroom would i'slen to thU stor>
the unnatural American    infantile se|
products.
There were no more fireworks durj
ing the brief trip. Everybody sat think
ing except the stranger, who took
the outlines of the gray, grim cruisq
thye were approaching. His interel
and admiration appealed to the otheij
in a way they thought they had overt
come from usage.
"Starboard gangway, sir?" asked tjj
coxswain, with a grin.
The ensign nodded and smiled. Whc1
you are nobody in particular, you Ian
on the port side of an anchored wa
ship. The admiral's wife, royalty, t!|
President, or thc ways and means siij
committee on appropriations in tf
navy department, turn up to the staf
board. B_
If the visitor tmdersood the signij
cance of the honor paid him, he mal
no sign, much to Hawkins' disgug
Netting, in the meantime, had but ol
dominant thought. It ran like this:
that there 'Awkins opens 'is mug coil
cerning me an' that kiddy, 'e'll think lj
fell asleep under the starboard pimiaq
when 'er davits biist."f^^^^^^^_
With .a little bow, thc ensign motioil
ed to the companionway, and he foi
lowed the small figure to the gun-decl
where stood the watch-keeper, ti\
equivalent of the officer of the watch
our navy.
Second Lieutenant Tollemache wl!
a smart officer, a genial Irishman, an
the centre of attraction, when at h
on leave, of a half-score of nepiievj
and nieces still in tlie nursery. H
swept a puzzled glance over the invade]
of the quarter-deck, and then he cauglj
thc speaking look in the midshipman!
eyes as he saluted.
"Says his commanding officer sell
him with a message to Captain Crall
tree, sir," reported the midshipman, anl
to make it more formal, he added curl
ly to his passenger by way of present^
tion: "Watch-keeper, Second LieuteJ
ant Tollemache."
The boy, who had waited in the prJ
ficer tor Laptam crauuee, ui ......         mc ^i - -—- „.i„tJ
bisher, sir," same coolly from thc an-    er respectful   «*** «wj*
omaly.     ^^^^^
"What  price  that    game?"   retorted
the ensign, with a faint smile.
The little man was plainly puzzled by
ne upneavai, witu iu *w-| . ^ way
ful results! Vessel after vessel was every", g ^ ^ ^ ^ ^
dashed ashore. German warships, and oget ■ ^ with his bigl sen-
English gunboats, and scores of merch-1 tne J stu(Ued the technique of
ant marine craft were swept high up on | °"> 8 ' > and renewed acquamt-
the sandy beach. The British flagship the vim. 7merican fleet that was
high up on the sandy beach The Brit- j ***** ^ ^
ish flagship Kamorrin, helpless in the, to oo ^ ^ pUms made
trough of the sea, swept shoreward, ap-1    La°L1 -    . „«1v«   fnr
mi tlO preuy mm... .... ...   ,	
Jess. If he wants to get out awhile, | lhe idionl( but he seemed to catch tllc
don't worry. He can care for himself,! derision in the tone, and with added
and he is wrapped up in the ships." j dignity aml a shrewdness that had its
And so the path of the plotter was . efjcct |le answered:
made smooth; and when the carriage
reached Seventy-ninth street, where the
pier was used as a common landing-
place for tlle small craft from both
fleets, Aunt Jess acquiesced in Ellis'
request to slip down for a nearer look
at the figures in uniform.
"Be careful, Elly!" she cried, as he
sped away.   "You will find us waiting
Eager and many v.^ «■••- v. I 5i"-u a""'V   ,
•   ■ for visits to the vessels themselves, fo    just bey0nd the corner,
parently doomed, but with her men m  ™ rear-admiral in command     c     fup    oh, these women
station and her band spiritedly playing I was not ...    _..., ,w
  !    How
11     i    ■    I wis not the rear-aanmai ... —----- Lareiui:    un,  i»«-	
ly Playmg)^ the sch00lmate a„d dearly ^ he expected to know how
lhe national anthem, for all the world   °i  » ^ father; and was noti      men  fcel;    ..eame„ who    roam the
as if they were at anchor in Plymouth  trjena q{ ^ Frobishcr, the  ^ w,ft ,ivcs in their hands?
Hoc.   Then it was, when the canvas had . Lap ta ^^  q{  {athers trumpery, narrow little landing-
been  torn  to  shreds,    that    Captain   Englisn _     b American white can
Warren on U. S. S. the Warrior, man-j good friends, ^ ^  stage,
ned his yards with his sailors, and used j    But, alas.   urn a ^
their compact bodies  as  sails  lo gahi; autumn  sk.es    aded ^.^
steerage-way to the open harbor and the   days before the^ni. ^ ^^
'broke his leg, and had to be car-
sea.
Feeling safe for himself, thc Ameri-
can officer risked a helping hand for
the English flag-ship. By skill and good
luck a hawser was passed. The Warrior
fought her way seaward, with the Kamorrin valiantly seconding with all her
steam, and together they sailed out to
the open in safety and roelc out the
storm.
It was after distinguished service in
thc Sapnish War, and while safely
homeward bound, that the brave commodore was drowned in attempting to
save the life of a seaman who had fallen overboard. The seaman was picked
up safely, but bis commander had injured himself fatally in diving.
And so it happened that the commodore's widow and little son came back
lo New York lo live. Here suddenly
appeared Tucker, ex-boatswain, orderly, and favorite of the Warrior's captain. He had come into a small inheritance, and fastened himself upon thc son
of thc man he had served and loved so
many years. Never had boy so faithful
a slave, and never was young stomach
given such doses of sea-food.
Was it any wonder that thc little
chap   was   a    comical   encyclopedia  of
aud ui^^  „,
ried to a hospital, where he lay uncoil]
sorted, elespite the news that the bone
was well set, and despite even a visit
from the Captain and his mother—for
thc Captain's heart couldn't be expected
to overflow with good cheer in the face
of such an unlooked-for catastrophe.
Then added horrors; thc Commanding
Officer was taken ill with bronchitis, and
there was no one but; Aunt Jess to
take the sorely disheartened commander
of thc Warrior lo view the visiting
fleet. Thus it happened that on the eve
of that momentous event the young
hero poured out his heart in supplication for fair weather, fearful lest even
Aunt Jess milh nerves and neuralgia
lo reckon wilh, might  fail him at the
last moment.
But thc day had dawned bright and
clear,
Captain's heart was hap-
•e, he could nol visit the
Tucker; ho could only—
 land th
py,   To be si
ships without
"17 icLbox in his mother's bureau
drawer   lay  the   chief   objects
Captain's awe and reverence
vas-roofed launches took on or unload-
ed passengers, was at the Seventy-
ninth Street pier. Here came stanch
little boats with thirty-two horse-power
engines, that could do their nine and
ten knots, or tow a fleet of heavy row-
boats for a sudden tlescent on lhe enemy's coast, or in time of need take
hold of a barge of coal and bring it
ship-shape beside the monster that was
to be fed upon its contents. Here, too,
came the smoke-gray English picket-
boats, or armored pinnaces, heavy powdered and smartly handled, and lighter
launches with trim engines and a business-like air, managed with a speed and
get-away that made the visitors stare.
Thc crowd stood a dozen deep, watching thc arrivals and departures, chatting
with lounging Jackies or petty officers,
bargaining for visits to the fleets on
passenger launches run by speculators,
or chaffing those who came or went |
dowu the narrow, rough stairway from'
thc picr-edge to thc floating-stage, at
i lhe head of which stood two good-
i,attired, resourceful policemen. One
had the smooth roughness of the southern end of Ireland in his  speech, but
"Message for thc captain from a person he knows."
The assurance and the sturdy air together began the softening of thc officer's mood.
"Beg pardon, sir!" at this instant
broke in the suggestive voice of Notting, who had dry-nursed many a middy to his betterment, and who was
sworn henchman of this particular one.
"May I 'avc just a word, sir?" and in
a low tone be made some rapid remarks,
ending with, "and so I soy, it may be
some Yankee 'anky-panky, sir, but 'e's
real, 'e is!"
There might be a laugh in it against
hiin, perhaps, reflected Camperdown,
but then, again, il was blessed odd about
the two big "tin cups," and, after all,
he concluded sagely, a laugh might be
turned   against   somebody  else  on  the
sly.
"We're the Frobishcr's launch. Conic
aboard," he said gruffly; and when he
i saw that Notting had spoken truly of
thc metlals he burned with curiosity,
but, being not only English but young
English, he  was  silent.
Thc passenger's eyes were bright
with excitement and curiosily, and they
roamed over every article of equipment
in sight, as well as over the uniforms
of lhe crew.
The eyes at length rested on Notting,
wilh an expression which made him uneasy, and presently, as if in reply to a
question, he saluted, and in a respectful but puzzled tone he said:
"Yessir?"
"Oh, nothing!" said lhe passenger,
politely. "Only our bosun's males always wear their lanyards and pipes on
duty."
Notting's hand went to his neck, am'
found that, by
some strange oversight
of  the
cc—his fa*11
inosnerity in America had dulled any : ln sp smart a sailor, that farm bar badge
lostilc view, he might have held inj0f office was missing. Well, 1 am
•he iang'-'sync towards the Sassenach;   demned!" he exclaimed, with a fervor
, ,      r   v. , vear they came' and he fraternized jovially with an mi- j as beautiful as it was sincere,
out rilie^tvoi^ox a"  the bank for   rfcr-steward  from .he English flagship,      Hawkins giggled and took to unnee
lifted his cap and stood at attention.!
"May I ask your service and rankl
asked  Tollemache,  with  a  twinkle  '
comprehension.
"I'm  captain of the Warrior, indl
pendent cruiser." "
"Who's your ranking officer?"
"My—I'd rather tell the captain, sirl
"Go    tell the    old    man   yoursel
Campy," said Tollemache, in an asic
"He is by the forrard port turret,
in' to Head Steward Gaines.   What yd
make of it?" ^^^^^^
"Notting says he's real," replied Carl
perdown, shaking with suppressed mini
"Oh, such a yam!   Pipe his Admirall
tin cups!" and he hastened to find ll
commander. ^^^^^^^
"What's this about the Warrior, indl
pendent cruiser, lieutenant?" said a tal
bluff, red-faced man with a droopiil
mustache, gray hair, and a look of frej
fulness, as he came up. I
"He says he's her captain," said tl
lieutenant, indicating the visitor. "Sal
he has a private message for you, \S'J
from his commanding officer"; aij
dropping his voice, he added quicklj
"He's an all right sort, sir. If thcrj
any hocus, he's been played."
Something in the boy's face and ma
ncr seemed to convey tbe same ide
for lhe newcomer said affably:
"Weli, sir? I'm Captain Crabtrcc.j
thought there was no Warrior in col
mission now?"
"Ob,  please,"  the  boy's  high,  ch|
voice said hurriedly, after he had
luted impressively, "she's my own b
sir—she's  only  a  sailing model,  sil
and it was Tucker got' mc the iinifol
There isn't anything real ill that p|
of  it,"   he  concluded   in   a  distre
tone, greatly  fearing misapprehensic
"Who  sent  you  with  a  message I
me?" demanded the captain abruptly
'It wasn't cgzactly sent, sir—not
a note or a tellegram," stammered
little man bravely; "but mother saitj
I did sec Captain Crabtree, to say
was laid up with a cold, and to tell
to bring Willy Williams, loo—he's
rear-admiral, you know—to scc hei
the flat."
He felt that he was making a nj
of things somehow, but he could I
grasp the weak point, being full of j
own appreciation of his laudable ini THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1906.
tions, and the knowledge that this
should be a friend instead of a man in
undress uniform with a scowl.
At his last words there was a sound
of a supressed snicker from some one
in the group which stood about, and
the little face flushed scarlet.
"What't your name, Captain?" broke
in Tollemache, in a kindly way, to help
out the lad's growing embarrassment.
It was the right note at last.
"I'm Ellis Putnam Warren—same as
my father, thank you," the boy evplain-
ed with all the pride in the name that
had been planted so deeply in him.
"Great God!" cried Captain Crabtree.
'Putt Warren's little lad!   Why, son,
I had you on my knee once when you
Were a mite!   And is your mother ill?
1 Where is she?" and with that the big
|l captain had picked up the little one and
kissed him as if he was his own.
1 "Gad, he's a chip of the old block!
Putt Warren's boy, Tolly, and I've
been wiring Washington for word of
his mother! Do you understand who
this is, gentlemen?" he went on, with
a sudden gravity and a strong touch
of feeling. "He's the son of Commodore Warren of the Warrior, the Kanday man, the man who saved me in lhe
Yellow Sea, the best fellom ever afloat.
Ellis, we'll go below, son, and clear
decks up to date;" and there was 'something like a faint cheer as the pair
marched off to the captain's quarters.
It was about ten minutes after, whiie
the ship's company was bubbling with
the story, that word was passed aft
for Signal Officer Drew to report to
the report to the captain, and a trifle
later Rear-Admiral Williams on the
Penobscot received this curious message semaphored from the Frobisher: I
Private. \
Dear Bill: Going to call informally!
in a few minutes, with a visitor.   Get
shore togs on for immediate use.        j
Crabtree.    i
And the admiral, knowing the usual
formal character of his closeset personal friend in a foreign service, wondered greatly. I
In the captain's cabin, Ellis had reveled in confidences and the manner of
their reception. He was fed on all
sorts of cakes and odds and ends of
sweets. His head buzzed with the questions poured out on him, and the Englishman roared out a hearty sailor's
laugh of delight at the tale of how first
his pinnace and then his ship had been
boarded. He got out the pictures of his
two little girls and their mother, and
then, truth a tenderness all the more
touching in a bluff martinet, he showed
the boy a photograph of his father, the
commodore, in thc same leather case.
"He was the best, the straightest,
they ever had over here," he declared
forcibly. "He saved me and my boat,
too, laddie, and never you let me forget it."
Then came a tour of the ship and its
wonders. The boy's eager questions
amazed the man, because of their direct
knowledge and singular appreciation of
modern war-ships and their equipment,
'Must be a wonder, that fellow
Tucker!" he thought.
Then  was   a   greater  happening  to
come to the sensitive boy.    They had
looked   through   the   forecastle,   which
was almost deserted, and bad stepped
out  upon  the  gun-deck,   where   were
gathered not only llic watch, but most
of the creni not on shore leave.   When
the bny appeared, there was a murmur
that caught thc captain's instant attcn-
, tion.   Among the men were nearly all
\ the petty  officers, the idshipmcii,  and
several of the mess.   They crowded up
1 respectfully to get a  close look, with
■ Notting in the front rank, his face one
iibig smile.    He was now the oracle of
I the ship.
"I knowed he was a right 'tin, that
kiddy!"  he  had  repeated    again    and
\ again.   "I sez so right off, I did,"
Captain Crabtree.  in his great good
I humor, called out cheerily:
"Men, here's a visitor you want to
remember. This is the son of that
great American sailor and friend of our
service, Commodore Warren, of the
Warrior. Haven't I heard a song about
him ?"
Thc hint was late in coming. Some
otic had sprung it long before, and lhey
were readyfi as two sturdy chantey men
stepped forth and rolled out thc song
of Warren of Kanday, of the Warrior
nnd the Kamorrin, which runs thus, in
part;
And don't you go a-thinkin'  that the
time mill come again
When  England  and your  Uncle  Sam
care tuppence for the main
That rolls its leagues between 'em; 'tis
only their front lawn;
They let the neighbors play there, but
for bisness—ah, gwan!
CHORUS.
Here's to Captin Ellis Warren!
He's our cousin—Jnothin' foreign
'Bout that Yankee Doodle Dandy!
See!   He's shifted of his helm,
Though the seas may overwhelm!
And it rings throughout the realm
How he saved the old Kamorrin
On that ragin', roarin', hell-day there
at  Kanday!
Did they roll it out, these chaps in
blue, with half a dozen of the men who
had been on the English flag-ship that
awful day among them? They did—
right royally. And when it ended, before Captain Crabtree could say a
word, the son of the song took off his
little gold-corded cap and, stepping out
a pace, looked at them with moist eyes,
and said, with perfect simplicity;'
"Thank you for singing father's song.
I never heard it like that.   I'll tell my
mother—she'll like it, too " then he
choked, and Crabtree led him off, himself almost as much affected as the lad.
Iiso6ahi78oo$ 12345 0$  ..56 56 $htmw
Ellis' face was washed and his hair
was brushed, and he was spick and
span when he came up on the quarterdeck, where he was introduced to all
hands before they set out in the captain's picket-boat for the Penobscot.
There was no hanging fire to the welcome here. The rear-admiral was not
given time to wonder what was up before the Englishman blurted out.
"Rear-Admiral Williams, I have the
honor to present to you the captain of
the independent frigate, the Warrior"—
and then he spoiled it all by crying:
"Bill, this is Putt Warren's son—and,
my eye! he's a corker! Let's go below!"
Again the boy was put through his
paces by his admiring escort for the
benefit of another and even a closer
friend of his father.
In due course he was shown throughout the ship, while smiles and salutes
met the party on all sides, directed
more at the youngster than at the older
pair.
As they stood by the door of the
foreward conning-tower,' they paused to
look at the greatest line of war craft
New York had ever seen in the Hudson.
"What do you make of us as compared with Crabtrec's old pot?" demanded the American officer jestingly,
of Ellis.
The boy colored. crimson and looked
distressed. He was too truthful to
know how to escape.
"Go ahead!" criew Williams, delight
e'.lly. "Don't be afraid, Ellis—we're all
friends.
"You're smarter, sir," the boy said,
sagely. "You look cleaner on the
decks, too; but thc English arc smarter
with their launches and little boats
than ours."
There was a roar of appreciative
laughter which made Ellis' ears tingle
while Crabtree exclaimed:
"Right   you   arc,   laddie,   and   we're
smarter with thc big  'tins.    We were 1
makin' sixteen knots one minute before j
we anchored yesterday."
Ellis peered through the conning
slits, handled thc wheel-spokes with an
adoring look, studied thc devices to
instantly close all the water-tight com-1
partments, spelled out "Armor-piercing"
and "Canister" on thc signals to thc j
batteries, and then stood still.
"Tucker says lhe  Japs  didn't navigate from thc conning-towers, and thc
Russians did and got jolly smashed up
and  couldn't  serve  the  ships,"  he  re-1
marked oracularly.
"Right he is!" said the rear-admiral 1
promptly. "Stick to Tucker, son. lie's ]
a wise one I"
It seems that Notting was not satis-1
lied with his English honors, ami, having gotten himself detailed lo take his |
captain ashore, he had promtply spread
the news  of the  lad's  identity to  llic j
crew of thc Penobscot.   The result was 1
that a message came from the men to
the   rear-admiral,   who     laughed    and,
nodded, and the trio proceeded to the!
after gun-deck, where nearly every maul
aboard was gathered.
They were younger men, as a rule,
than the Englishmen, these Jackies, and
there were few of them who had
served in the days when Warren's fame
was brightest, but they knew the song,
and did not intend to let the visiting
fleet outdo them in appreciation and
courtesy.
Once more the Kanday song rang
out, with all hands, from rear-admiral
to Japanese stewards, in the chorus.
Again, without prompting, the little
captain made due reply. "Thank you
all," he cried, clearly. "They sang it
for me over tliere on the Frobisher,
but it sounds better here, 'cause we .ae
all United States people."
Maybe they didn't give him a re tsing
round of cheers and cries at this! It
was about all he could do to pre.ent
complete breakdown and humiliati.ni.
And so it came that a rear-ac.minl
of the United States and a captain of
his Britannic Majesty's County Squadron escorted a Captain of a Central
Park independent frigate to shore, and
landed with much aplomb, to the delight and -mystery of the crowd.
When they reached the elevator in
the apartment house, the junior officer
called a moment's halt and began to
take oft* the medals he wore.
"P'raps mother'd better not know I
had 'em till after you go," he said ingenuously.    "She  might worry."
At sight of the trio, the Commanding
Officer's tears of anxiety were changed
to smiles of pride and wonder.
Upon the mantel, across from his
bed, morning and night the eyes of the
Captain fall first or last upon a small
silver loving-cup with two handles. It
is decorated with the crossed naval ensigns of England and the United States,
and it has engraved upon it:
Presented by the officers and men "of
the ships of His Britannic Majesty and
of the United States in New York
Harbor, November 16, 1905, to Captain
Ellis Putnam Warren, of the independent frigate the Warrior, the son of the
song.
TRAVELLERS' GUIDE
CAMBORNE
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining men and
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
REVELSTOKE
Hotel Victoria
REVELSTOKE, B. C.
Headquarters for miners and
lumbermen.
ROBT. LAUGHTON, Prop'r.
BANFF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
I Banff's Most Popular $1 a Day Hotel.
I Close to Station and Sulphur
I Baths.
N. K. LUXTON, Proprietor.
PHOENIX.
Deane's Hotel
PHOENIX, B. C.
New. Modern hot water system. Electric
lighted. Tub nnd shower baths nnd laundry in
connection.   The miners' htine,
" DAMNY " DEANE, Proprietor
You can't tell some men, but you can
always telephone.
It wouldn't take much of a hypnotist
to make monkeys look like some men.
Special   Summer Courses
For Teachers
IN THE
Sprott-Shaw   Business   Institute, Limited.
R J. Sprott, B.A., Principal.
H. A. Scriven, B.A., Vice-Principal.
J. R. Cunningham, Secretary.
336 HASTINGS STREET, W.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Dr.
Jaeger's
Goods
Jaeger's Underwear.
Jaeger's Nightshirts.
Jaeger's Cholera  Belts.
Jaeger's Blankets.
Jaeger's Rugs.
Jaeger's Sweaters.
Jaeger's Cardigan Jackets.
Jaeger's Cardigan   Norfolk  Jackets.
Jaeger's Dressing Gowns.
Jaeger's Slippers for gentlemen.
Jaeger's Slippers for ladies.
Jaeger's Caps.
Jaeger's Putters.
1
E. CHAPMAN
DAVIS  CHAHBERS
Opposite Strand Hotel,
Vancouver.
Stewart Williams
AUCTIONEER  and  COMMISSION  AGENT
Will Hold Weekly Sales at his
Auction Mart,
51 FORT STREET
Sales at Private Residences by
Arrangement.
T e AnctioDMr,   Stewart Williams
START RIGHT AT 1
SCHOOL
WITH A PAIR OF OUR NEW STOCK  OF
BOOTS AND SHOES
JUST RECEIVED FOR BOYS AND GIRLS
I
.30 Pairs Boys' Calf, Good value at  $2.00
30 Pairs  Youths'  Box Calf Lace  Boots, at  1.50
Oo Pairs Misses' Box Calf Lnce Blucher  1.75
30 Pairs Children's Box Calf Lace Bluiher  1.25
(.0 Pairs Low  Heel Lace Boots of Ladies' Sizes,  >\'„ (o 6  2.00
60 Pairs Spring Heels for Ladies, 2\'., 10 li  2.50
35 Pairs Men's Box Calf Goodyear Welt  3.00
60 Pairs Men's Blucher Box Calf  3.00
24 Pairs Ladies' Fine Lace Boots  2.50
40 Pairs Ladies' Goodyear Welt  2.50
School Bags in Great Variety.
JAMES MAYNARD,
▼
♦
♦
Phone 1232
85 DOUGLAS STREET
Odd Fellows' Block
►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1966.
1
Hi
THE   MOTHERLAND
Exchanges With Our Kindred.
Hands Across the Sea,
Britain Still First.
It is reported that the Hamburg-
American Company will give to a British yard the order for that steamship
which is to eclipse the Lusitania in size
and speed. If the story is true in all
particulars the Germans are evidently
disposed to surrender their present supremacy in constructive skill. The
Deutschland and the Kaiser Wilhelm II.,
we believe, were hoth built in Germany.
—"Tribune, New York,
» Neglected Wooing.
Why are so many British manufacturers still indifferent to the chances
whiach Canada offers? Again and again
Canada has made advances, and year by
year the wooing grows more persistent;
yet an inexplicable and dangerous
apathy prevents many of those British
traders, whose opportunities in other directions are being circumscribed by hostile tariffs, and the keen competition of
foreign rivals, from even attempting to
get a fotting in Canadian markets.—
"Canada."
Bad for Blondes .
A physician is responsible for a statement which is at once novel and surprising. He declares that the chances of
dark women obtaining husbands are to
those of fair women in the proportion
of three to two; and that this conclusion
is proved by statistics.—Family Doctor.
Barmaids' Good Influence.
Barmaids exercise refining influence
in the bars where they are. employed,
it is certain that a man, be he councillor, clerk, or costermonger, is far more
careful about the language he uses and
more particularly the "yarns" he spins
when there is a woman behind the bar.
Cheese Is Booming.
Cheese is higher in price, owing, it is
said, to the revelations about Chicago's
canned comestibles. People who went in
for tinned foods now prefer cheese.
Some sensational prices were realised
at the Preston Cheese Fair. Cheese of
medium quality sold for 57s. 6d. to 60s.
per cwt., fine cheese from 62s. 6d. to
65s., superfine for 69s. The normal
prices are from 7s. to 10s. per cwt. less.
Gaiters for All the Clergy.
It is being gravely mooted that the
picturesque dress of bishops, deans, and
archdeacons might be extended to the
rest of the clergy. As a matter of fact
the 74th canon prescribes that identical
dress for the whole of the clergy, and
they are, in consequence, entitled, if not
in duty bound, to adopt it.—Vanity Fair.
Not Germany's View.
Britain's navy, "the most beautiful in
the world," as the Kaiser expressed himself, is not a danger to Germany, but a
guarantee of peace. It cannot be Germany's endeavor to wrest Britain's sea-
power from her, because the British
can and will build two ships for every
German one.—Nile Frie Presse, Vienna. |i
Christians and Polygamy.
Can a native of the African tropics
be imbued with the principles of Christianity and remain a polygamist?—West
African Mail.
Ridiculed by the Press.
The American Press pours ridicule on
President Roosevelt's decree, "Literary
earthquake," "word murder," language
butchery," are a few of the epithets applied to the proposal. Mr. Eliot, president of Harvard, will not accept the
new spelling, and even the officials at
Washington regard the matter as a
huge joke.
Beauty's Penalties.
In her earnest desire to fulfil her
first duty, which is to be beautiful, woman sticks at little; she will starve, she
will eat what is distasteful, she will
endure boredom at dull "cures," she
will pursue ridiculous exercises, and suffer herself to be steamed and scraped
and pommelled at the hands of beauty
specialists.—"Ambrosia," in World.
Golf Mania.
Golf is, after all, the important thing
in life, and to suggest it as a relaxation is an insult. Why, a man would
rather his business went to the dogs
than he should lose his drive.—Golf
Illustrated.
Wholesome Beer.
"We English owe much to our cereals. The early Britons strengthened
themselves on 'frumenty,' a kind of
gruel or porridge made of wheal; the
Scottish have grown old on oatmeal
porridge and oatcake; and the elements
in these cereals present in malt liquor
have contributed to the virility of the
British race. That is not to endorse indiscriminate and gluttonous drinking,
but the wise use of the fruits of the
earth. Indeed, I know of no body of
men so sadly in need of education upon
a subject on which they dogmatise as
thc temperance advocates,
"I divide alcoholic drink into three
classes: Beer, which I prefer to call
'malt tea'; wine or fruit juices; and
spirits—brandy, rum, whisky, gin, etc.
1 understand Sir Victor Horslcy classes
these together, and denounces their use
as worthless and injurious. Such condemnation is absurd. The habitual use
of alcohol as a beverage is to be condemned. It should not be used at all
by the young, and middle-aged and aged
people should use it with intelligence."
Modern Bathing Dresses.
Here and there, it is true, one now
sees a skinless bathing costume which
somewhat too plainly outlines the figure
and is cut,, maybe, a trifle too low, but
these are most emphatically the exception and not the rule. By all means let
us have bathing dresses of every hue
that will stand sea-water, and let us
have them as dainty as possible.—Lady's
Pictorial.
Bishop Condemns Education.
The Bishop Carlisi. spoke with great
bitterness at Carlisle on Tuesday of the
effects of modem education. He said
that' there were:
Fewer burglaries, but more forgeries.
Less drunkenness, hut more gambling.
Fewer murders, but greater immorality.
The number of simple,    happy   homes
was decreasing.
The bishop added that education was
fostering "despicable notions of work,"
lie had been told that he had dishonored his episcopal office because he had
taken off his coat to lend a helping hand
in his little haylield.
Sartorial Anarchy.
The innovations in masculine dress
this season notably, at public functions,
have placed a great number of men in
a curious predicament. Some steps
should be taken to standardise masculine
costume at future public social events.
—Vanity Fair.
The Premier's Betort.
An old lady who has been in the habit
of meeting Sir Henry Campbell-Ban-
licrman at Maricnbad was particularly effusive in her compliments when she
met him there for the first time this
year. Her absolute frankness is one of
her characteristics. T had no idea last
year," she said, "that you were likely to
be Prime Minister. My friends told me
you were simply a warming-pan for
Lord Rosebery." "Scotsmen never
make good warming-pans," was the
Premier's reply.
The Talkative Maiden.
The popularity of the talkative girl
is a most curious sign of the times, for
she is quite a modem product, and
would have horrified our mid-Victorian
forbears, who did not think it at all
"nice" for young ladies to talk much.—
"Ine World and His Wife."
The King's Welsh.
The King, who was Prince of Wales
for a longer period than any of his predecessors, is said to speak a few words
of Welsh. There is a story told of a
Chicago girl, the daughter of a millionaire, who, in the days before His Majesty had ascended the throne, had determined to visit England. A friend
found her studying Welsh, and in reply to a question thc girl said: "I'm going to be presented to tlle Prince of
Wales when I'm in London, and I
should like to be able to speak to him in
his real native lagnuage,"
It sometimes happens that the first
steps for divorce are taken at a dancing school.
M ftT I ^ C"   ---■ •'---h~~ad-e "--™ent which HAYOR MORLEY
  REFUSED TO  SANCTION  after our Ad. Agent had
===================  arranged for it, subject to the endorsation of the Executive.      His   excuse   was  that   THE WEEK  had
criticized his conduct as Mayor I!!   We are running the Advertisement gratis
in the interests of Victoria and the Provincial Exhibition.
1906
PROVINCIAL EXHIBITION
AT VICTORIA, B.C.
SEPT. 25 TO 29
$10,000 in Premiums and Valuable Special Prizes.
3Days' Horse Racing, $3,000 IN PRIZES
Grand Stock Parades Daily, SkeBtest stock in the Province
BANDS,   SPORTS,   GAMES
AND NEW EXCITING ATTRACTIONS.
<LV?Afl   in   Dfi'rac? and Champion Belt of British Columbia for
vlvv in rrueb    bronco busting competitions.
WRITE FOR PRIZE LISTS
A. J. MORLEY, Mayor, President. J, E. SMART, Secretary.
a FEATURE of the
**■ Semi-ready trousers—one found no place
else than high grade
custom tailoring—is the
high waist.
The waist is made to
fit perfectly and yet give
comfort—plenty of cloth
— as you can see for
yourself.
There are straps on
the back of each pair to
tighten—but you won't
need them; these trousers fit.
The legs are neatly
shaped — conventional
in width and "set" beautifully.
Delivered two hours after trying on.
B. WILLI A
68-70 Yates Street,   SOLE AGENTS.
At $10, $12, $15, $18, $20, $22 and $25.
TROUSERS—At $3, $4, $5, and $6.
TWO THOUSANDIGARMENTS CARRIED IN STOOK AT THE
SEni-READY WARDROBE THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1906.
WHITNEY Go-earts and Baby Carriages.
We give a few illustrations of 1906 styles of the famous Whitney Go-Carts and Baby Carriages. For nearly fifty years these celebrated Carriages
and Go-Carts have been the acknowledged standard of excellence. That is why we have confidence in recommending them to our customers and carrying
the largest stock in Western Canada. If the Whitney Carriages and Go-Carts were not the best we dare not take these risks. We also carry extra parts,
such as Wheels, Rubber Tires, Springs, Handles, etc.   This is a great advantage to our customers.
WHITNEY  FOLDING GO-CART.
No. H 46'   Price $375-
Body.—Steel and hardwood frame;
varnished.
Gear All steel. Four 10-inch rubber tire wheels. Patent wheel fastener.   Dark green enamel finish.
WHITNEY RECLINING FOLDING
GO-CART.
No, H 49, with Cushion and Parasol.
Price $6.25.
No. H 49 P, with Parasol only.   Price
$3-50.
Body.—Steel   and   hardwood   frame.
Wood front and back.   Varnished.
Cushion.—Grade No. 11. Parasol.—
No. 02 B.
Gear.—All steel. Four 10-inch rubber
tire' wheels. Patent wheel fastener.
Dark green enamel finish.
WHITNEY RECLINING FOLDING
GO-CART.
No. H S3, with Cushion and Parasol.
Price $10.
No. H S3, with Parasol only. Price
$9.2S-
Body.—Reed,  varnished.
Cushion.—Grade No. 11. Parasol.—
03 C, No. 13.
Gear.—All steel. Fur 10-inch rubber
tire wheels. Patent wheel fastener.
Dark green enamel finish.
We are Sole Agents for THE WHITNEY.
We buy them in carload lots at the lowest prices, and get the best possible freight rates,
the advantage of which we give to our customers.
WHITNEY RECLINING FOLDING
GO-CART.
No. H 59, U. & P. as Illustrated.
Price $14.
Body.—Reed, varnished.
Upholstering.—Grade No. 21. Parasol.—02 B.
Gear.—All steel. Four 12-inch rubber tire wheels. Patent wheel fastener.
Foot brake. Folding cross reach. Dark
green enamel finish. White enamel
push bar.
WHITNEY RECLINING GO-CART.
No. H 8, C. & P.
Price $18.00.
Not uphol-
Body.—Reed, varnished,
stered.
Mattress Cushion.—Grade No. 2.
Parasol.—4C, No. 15.
Gear.—All steel. Four 16-inch rubber tire wheels. Whitney patent antifriction wheel fastener. Whitney patent foot brake. Enamel finish, green or
maroon.   White enamel push bar.
WHITNEY RECLINING FOLDING
GO-CART.
No. H 70, C. & P., Not Upholstered.
Price $22.50.
Body.—Reed, varnished.
Cushion.—No. 23. Parasol.—05 C,
No. 23.
Gear.—All steel. Four 12-inch rubber tire wheels. Patent wheel fastener.
Foot brake. Folding cross reach.
Dark green enamel finish. White
enamel push bar.
WHITNEY RECLINING GO-CART.
No. H 18, C. & P.   Price $25.
Body.—Reed, varnished. Not upholstered.
Mattress Cushion.—Grade No. 3.
Parasol.—No. 5 E.
Gear.—All steel. Four i6xi/?-inch
rubber tire wheels. Whitney anti-friction wheel fastener. Whitney patent
foot brake. Enamel finish, green or
maroon.   White enamel push bar.
Very Important
Coupon.
The above list of illustrations shows
only a few styles and prices out of our
very large stock of Whitney Go-Carts
and Carriages. If you desire further
information we will gladly mail you one
of our large illustrated sheets and a
booklet giving full illustrations and information. It is mailed to you free.
Just write our mail order department,
enclosing this coupon.
WHITNEY RECLINING GO-CART.
No. H 29, C. & P.   Price $30.
Body.—Reed, varnished.
Box Cushion.—Grade No. 4.
Parasol.—No. 6 A.
Gear.—All steel. Four 16-inch cushion rubber tire wheels. Whitney patent anti-friction wheel fastentr. Whitney patent foot brake. Enamel finish,
green or maroon. White enamel push
bar.
WHITNEY RECLINING GO-CART.
No. H 31, C. & P.   Price $35.
Body.—Reed, varnished. Not upholstered.
Box Cushion—Grade No. 5.
Parasol.—7 C, No. 28.
Gtar.—All steel. Four 16-inch cushion rubber tire wheels. Whitney patent anti-friction wheel fastener. Whitney patent foot brake. Enamel finish,
green or maroon. White enamel push
bar.
A Free Gift
Coupon.
We will present a free gift of a set
of five beautiful while toilet-table mats
to every lady who will just cut out and
mail to us five announcements of births
from the local papers, our object being
to mail the happy parents one of our
illustrated sheets of Whitney Go-Carts
and Baby Carriages.
Cut out this Coupon and mail it
with the notices.
WAREHOUSE:
Cor. of Broad and Broughton Sts.,
Victoria, B. C.
Weiler Bros.
Complete Home, Hotel, Club and Office Furnishers,
SHOWROOMS:
To which you are cordially invited to inspect all that is best in Furnishings
from London, Paris, New York, Vienna and Berlin.
33 GOVERNMENT STREET
Corner of Broughton and Government Streets, Victoria, B. C.
FACTORY:
HUMBOLDT  STREET
Victoria, B. C. 10
THE WEEK  SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1906.
NOTES ON PROVINCIAL NEWS
Beating the Air.
The Rossland Miner makes itself
ridiculous by editorially attacking King
Edward for being so wicked as to
make $2,500,000 by gambling in stocks,
and after a cheap sneer entirely out of
place in a Canadian paper at "The Royal
Edward" it moralizes on the terrible
consequences that may ensue, and declares that gambling in stocks has been
greatly popularised by the King's action. To all of which we have to say
that the Rossland Miner is probably the
and  the    Canadian    attitude    towards
both.
''For a piece of extravagant tommyrot
that letter of Winston Churchill to
Hamar Greenwood, meant as a sort of
pastoral to the Johnny Canucks, is quite
unequalled. Yet, there is little else to
be expected from a youth whose self-
conceit soared to such a pitch that he
would try to belitle his own father by
saying of him that "Randolph Churchill
would only be known in history as the
father  of  Winston    Churchill."    This
only Canadian paper which could have  verdant bumptious youth who thinks he
been imposed upon by so ridiculous a
canard, which was promptly contradicted in the London press. What it is not
so easy to understand is why any editor
who could derive satisfaction in belittling
the King, should desire to publish a paper in the King's dominions. There are
other places where he would receive a
hearty welcome, but the Union Jack
does not float over them.
That Spelling Reform.
can pereptuate the memory of what he
shamelessly intimates was a nondescript
father, by silly endeavors to emulate
the freaks of Billy Hohenzollern, apparently still has savvy enough to grasp the
idea that British Liberalism is thoroughly discredited in Canada, and he
wants his friend, Tongs Greenwood, to
reassure Canadians that now that he
(Winston) was in the government,
things would be better. British Liberalism  undoubtedly is,    and,    for   many
It is rather amusing to notice that, | years for very good reasons, has been
with very few exceptions, the only
newspapers north of the international
boundary line which favor spelling reform are edited by Americans, who not
unnaturally sympathise with the project
of President Roosevelt and Andrew
Carnegie to establish an American Lexicon. One notable exception to this rule
is the case of Billy McLean, the. eccentric proprietor of the Toronto World,
and to most people his approval would
furnish the strongest ground of objection; If we mistake not the opinion of
the average man is that Carnegie has
a spelling bee in his  Scotch bonnet.
discredited here, both for the weakness
of its foreign policy by which British
prestige invariably suffered, and for a
domestic policy that catered to the
whims of little Englanders, and in
which sympathy with the colonies had
never any lot or part. If Winston
Churchill wants Canadians to take any
stock in him or his colleagues of the
Camphell-Bannerman outfit, let him and
them modify their attitude towards
Chamberlain and his views."
To the Point.
The Fernie Ledger, in commenting
upon the manifesto issued by the Manager of the Colonist denying Chinese
ownership  for  that    venerable    organ
Cry "of Wolf.
The Kamloops Standard pokes fun at
the Vancouver World in the following  gets very near the pith of the matter in
I the following pregnant sentences:
"It is very evident that the new owner of the Colonist is not a Chinaman,
but it remains to he seen just how far
that paper is prepared to go in the way
of open, fair dealing with the public,
and its influence with the public will be
co-extensive with its frankness and
square dealing.
The little fellows who fondly imagine
that they can have the confidence of the
people while refusing the people their
own confidence, are further behind the
times than the heathen Chinee, and if
such a fellow has bought the Colonist
with the idea that he is going to fool
anybody, he had better go take a few
lessons in common, everyday business
sense from Yip Sang.
In the meantime, the Colonist is losing prestige and influence on account of
all this speculation as to who owns it,
and what interest it is itended to foster
ill its future policy."
Upper Columbia Valley.
The Wilmer Outcrop has been repeatedly referred to in the columns of
The Week as one of the most enterprising sheets in thc interior, and one
which  never  fails  to keep before
words
The World has unearthed another
"mare's nest," and is paving the way
for an attack upon another member of
the government. It has failed so woefully in its campaign against the Department of Lands and Works, that we
should think its space would be given
over to something of more interest to
its readers, who must, by this time,
have become tired of the cry of "wolf."
Thou Shalt Not Covet.
Under the above caption the Mail-
Herald reads thc good people of Revelstoke a lesson which may not be unnecessary in other places. Thc point of
its screed is that the development of
the city is retarded by the attitude of
the residents towards new comers, who,
instead of being encouraged lo make
permanent investments and settle down
in thc city, arc fleeced and driven away.
Jhc concluding paragraph of thc article
is worth reproducing;
Fair treatment in all dealings is the
best policy to ensure thc growth and
popularity of Revelstoke; and, citizens,
don't be like so many leeches all ready
to get your fill of blood from the first
likely looking stranger that comes along!
Above all, pull together, work each for j public the attractions and resources of
the city's good and the resut will soon | the Upper Columbia Valley,
show itself. Windermere and Wilmer are two of
  the prettiest towns  in the interior of
Loyal Nelson. this  province,    and    thc    surrounding
On the occasion of thc recent visit of country is rapidly being taken up and
His Excellency the Governor-General, developed for ranching and fruit grow-
the capital of the Kootenays certainly ing purposes. Thc editor of Thc Outdid credit to itself, and to the reputation crop need not be discouraged; he has
it has always enjoyed for hospitality and done good work, .ind if he keeps on peg-
loyalty. There was no formality, ging away both he and lhe country he
every citizen took part in the festivities,, seeks to advertise will reap the benefit,
and   the  impression   produced on   the
thc
mind of Mis Excellency was admirably
expressed in thc glowing and eloquent
address which he delivered before leaving. Nelson has entertained many important visitors, but none so illustrious
as the Governor-General of Canada,
who carries away the happiest recollections of a pleasant visit, and will be
certain to sound the praises of the Kootenay where his message will not be
unheeded.
Western Wording.
The editor of the Hedley Gazette is
a man who thinks clearly and writes
forcibly. Making due allowance for a
little western hreczincss, and the subordination of style to effectiveness, it
would be hard to beat the following editorial for an acettrate conception of
Winston Churchill,    British Liberalism
While we sympathise with his complaint
in 'a recent issue we have no hesitation
in  endorsing his  prediction;
"Can it he that thc Coast newspapers
are jealous of the magnificent scenery
of the Upper Columbia Valley? They
know it is here, yet they seldom mention thc fact. But thc day is not far
distant when these newspapers will be
clamoring for news and cuts of this
valley."
Women arc thc flowers of humanity,
but they get a good deal of their perfume from the drug store.
The three ages of a woman are the
real age, ihcn what her friends think it
is, and what she says it is.
The second baby may weigh three
pounds more than thc first without causing half as much excitement.
Canadian
Wheat Flakes
Is the name of our New Cereal. It is made
from the Finest Selected Wheat, treated by
a special process which removes all useless
parts and leaves only those portions of the
wheat kernel giving the largest amount of
the.most healthy food for both body and
brain.   It is ENTIRELY PURE.
CANADIAN WHEAT FLAKES differ from ALL IMPORTED Cereals, not
only in 'being more carefully manufactured from FINER wheat, but Jso in
the fact that they are ABSOLUTELY FRESH. Your grocer is in touch with
our mills, which are situated in all the leading centres in Western Canada.
There is no need for storage,nor risk of musty flavor.
In every package you will find a
MOST USEFUL GIFT
Of Chinaware, consisting of Berry Dishes, Cereal Dishes, Plates, Cups and
Saucers, daintily decorated with ;"-ral and fruit designs. It is q;:!.tt easy
to colect a complete Tea, Berry or Cer eal Set if you simply
Ask Your Grocer for
CANADIAN WHEAT FLAKES
'..,..•,..     ,;,,'   1   MANUFACTURED SOLELY BY
BRACKMAN-KER MILLING CO., LTD.
125 Government St., Victoria, B. C.
B-K 1635
Ckinese-made Skirts £* Overalls
MUST GO •
UNION-MADE.
RN BRAND
BUTTING AHEAD.
Fashionable Pastime of the Day
ROLLER
SKATING
AT ASSEMBLY HALL,
Afternoons 2 to 5, evenings 7.30 to 10.30
Saturday mornings 10 to 12.
Courteous and competent instructors
free for ladies.
Boys under 16 not allowed on floor at
evening sessions.
Excellent orchestra.
Only first-class patronage solicited.
THE NEW GROCERY STORE
74 Port Street.
COAL.
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo', Colliertc;.
New Wellington Coal.
The best household coal in the market at
current rates.   Anthracite coal for sale..
Dealersl'n Cord and Cut Wood.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA
t
Cap Flom1,100 lb. sk  $2 75
"     "       50 lb. sk    1 40
Try onr Ceylon Pekoe Ten at 30c-
per lb.
REMEMBER THE PLACE
47 FORT STREET
VICTORIA.
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
Cook WithJGood
Baking
Powder
That means our Baking Powder, t
cause it is as good as Pure Cream
Tartar,   Pure   Soda    and  other  go
things can make.
The large sale our Baking Powd
is having shows that lots of good coo
are using it.
TRY IT FOR BISCUITS
Price 25c. Per Poun
CYRUS H. BOWES,
CHEMIST
I Government St., near Yates Str
J** THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22 1906.
11
Notice
Southeast Kootenay Railway Co.
I Take Notice that the first meeting of
he shareholders of the Southeast Koo-
anay Railway Company will be held
! the office of Messrs. McPhillips &
^eisterman, Davie Chambers, Bastion
%., Victoria, B. C, on Thursday, the
Sth day of October, 1906, at the hour of
130 p.m.
R. B. Punnbtt, Secretary.
I-SIXTY, days after date I intend to
taply to the 'Ohlef Commissioner of Lands
fed Works for permission to purchase the
hllowlng described land, commencing at
J; post planted on the left bnnk of the
lieent river, about three and one-
Vlf miles above the Lakelse river
Ld Joining John Neidhardt'a N. E.
Krner and marked L. W. S.'s northwest
llrner and running south 160 chains,
Aenee east 40 chains, thence north 100
Bains, -more or less, to left hank of the
Tieena river, thence westwardly along the
fceena river to point of commencement
Jul containing 640 acres, more or less.
f.Port Esslngton, B. C.
* L. W. SLOAN, Locator.
E. BATEMAN, Agent.
■SIXTY    days    after date I  intend    to
iply to the Chief Commissioner of .Lands
id Works for permission to purchase the
.'[lowing described land,   commencing  at
fcpost planted on the left bank of  the
leenn, about four miles above the Lakelse
&er and adjoining L. W. S.'s northeast
irner and marked N. M. J.'s northwest
rimer, and running south along the enflt-
kh boundary of L. W. S.'s application 160
nains, thence east 40 chains, thence north
'tf chains, more or less, to hank of the
■fieena  river,   thence  westerly  along the
Jkeena  river to  point  of  commencement
I id containing 640 acres, mare or less.
(Port Esslngton, li. C.
N. M. JOSEPH, T-ocator.
E. BATEMAN, Agent.
Notice is hereby given that thirty days
ter date I intend to apply to the Hon,
ie Chief Commissioner of Lands and
orks for a special license to cut and carry
vny timber from the following described
nd, situated in Port Renfrew District
,1 the north side of San Juan river, and
^Joining John Young on his north bound-
•y: Commencing at a post marked
Uexr. Young," thence 40 chains west,
jence 80 chains north, thence 80 chains
[ist, thence 80 chains south, thence 40
lalns west to place of commencement, con-
Ining 640 acres.
Dated at Fort Renfrew this 20th day of
igust, 1906.
ALEXR. YOUNG.
TIMBER LICENSE.
[Notice Is hereby given that thirty days
ter date I intend to apply to the Hon.
(e  Chief   -Commissioner of    Lands  and
I'orks for a special license to cut and
Irry away timber from the following de-
Iribed land, situated on   the   San   Juan
t'er,   Renfrew   District,    and    adjoining
(hn Young east boundary:    Commencing
a post marked "Alexr. Young," thenee
chains south, thence 80   chains   east,
lence 80 chains north, thence 80 chains
lest, thence 40 chains south to place of
lmmencement,   containing  640 acres.
■Dated at Port Renfrew, Renfrew District,
lis 19th day of August, 1906
■' ALEXR. YOUNG.
TIMBER LICENSE.
{Notice is hereby given that thirty days
Iter date I intend to apply to the Hon.
le Chief Commissioner of Lands and
[orks for  a special  license to  cut  and
.try away timber from the following 4e-
li'ibed land, situated ln Port Renfrew,
l-nfrew District: Commencing at a post
[uited 40 chains north of Alexr. Young
Jithenst corner, marked "John Young"
Tithwest corner," thence 80 chains north,
knee 80 chains east, thence 80 chains
lith, thence 80 chains west to place ot
lmmencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew this 16th day of
ligust,  1906.
JOHN YOUNG.
TIMBER LICENSE.
■Notice Is hereby given that thirty days
fev date I intend to apply to the Hon.
'• Chief Commissioner of Lands and
urks for a special license to cut and
rry away timber from the following de-
llbed land, situated on the San Juan
ler, Renfrew District, and adjoining E.
I Palmer on his east boundary: Com-
Inclng at a post marked "John Young,"
■.•nee 40 chains north, thence 80 chains
1st, thence 80 chains south, thence 80
kins east, thence 40 chains north to
Ice of commencement, containing 640
les.
Tinted at Port Renfrew this 18th day of
gust,   1906.
JOHN YOUNG.
L'otico   is   hereby given that, 60 days
ler date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
|ef Commissioner of Lands and Works
permission to purchase the following
Icrlbed   land   on   the   Skeena River,
lige V., Coast District: Commencing at
pst located at the S. W. corner of K.
dcGeachle's land and marked "J. M.
Jeachle's    N.    W.    corner";    thence
Ith 40 chains:   thence east 40 chains;
lice north 40 chains;  thence  west   40
Tins  to point of commencement,  eon-
ling 160 acres, more or less.
J.  M. McGEACHIE.
■OTICE Is hereby given thnt 60 dnys
Ir date I Intend t» apply 'to the Hon.
•Chief Commissioner of Lands nnd Works
•(permission to purchnse the following
Iribed land:
Ismnll mummed Islnnd outside the S.E.
ler of Campbell bny, off the enst const
Jllnyne Islnnd nnd situate nbout 30
|ns 'to tiie southeastward of the north-
conier of section nine, Mnyne islnnd,
J containing nbout 10 acres.
Ittcd this 19th  (lay of September. 1)100.
I GEORGE GEOUOESON.
|)TICE is hereby niven thnt 00 dnys
T dnte, I intend to npply to the
If Commissioner of .Lnnds nnd Works,
■permission to purchase the following
" near Knlen Islnnd, In Skecnt district:
JiniiioncliiK nt n stnke plnnted nt
lieiist corner of Hot 640, mnrked
1 C's. corner,'" tiience enst 40 chains;
Le south about 65 chnins to W. Motto's north boundary; thence west 20
Is to A. G. II. Pott's enst boundary!
|-e nortli nbout 30 chnins to A, G. II.
norllienst corner; thence west nloiiK
I boundary 20 ehnlns to enst line of
llflA: thenee north 20 ehnlns to point
]:oniinencemciit,    containing 140 acres
or less.
WILLIAM   COPELAND.
NOTICE is hereby gtren that Thirty (;
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about eight miles from'the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner on the bank of a stream
running into Yakoun river and marked
"Initial post No. 1, H. W. Treat's N. W.
corner," and running east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains to place ot commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
H. W. TREAT.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queeu Charlotte group,
about ten miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, J. D. Meenach's S. W. corner," and
running north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains to the place of commencement,
containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
J. D. MEENACH.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of -Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about five miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner and marked "Initial post
No. 1, Walter Oakes's S. B. corner" and running north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
WALTER OAKES.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on -Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about six miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner nnd marked "Initial Post
No. 1, G. A. Brown's N. W. corner" and
running south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
G. A. BROWN.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of -Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about six miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, S. U. Williams's N. W. corner" and
running south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
S. U. WILLIAMS.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about flve miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, G. E. Beardslee's N. E. corner" and
running south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
G. E. BEARDSLEE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about nine miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
, Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, D. H. Jarvls's S. E. corner" and running north 80 chnins; thence west 80 chalna;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
D. H. JARVIS.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
dnys after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
nsphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Grahnm Islnnd, Queen Chnrlotte group,
nbout six miles from thc west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing nt a post planted at the
southwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, G. J. Hodge's S. W. corner" and
running north 80 chains; thence east 80
ehnlns; thenee south 80 chains; thence west
80 chnins to plnce of commencement, containing 610 ncres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
G. J. HODGE.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
dnys nfter dnte I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Ohlef Commissioner of Lnnds and
-Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
nsphultum and petroleum on lands loented
on Grnhnm Islnnd, Queen Chnrlotte group,
nbout six miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post plnnted nt the
southwest corner and mnrked "Initial Post
No. 1, F. M. Mnnger's S. W. corner" and
running north 80 ehnlns; thence enst 80
chnins; thence south 80 chnins; thence west
SO ehnlns to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Loented August 2nd, 1906.
F. M. MUNGER.
NOTICE is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
dnys nfter dnte I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd
Works for a licence to prospect for conl.
nsplinltnm nnd petroleum on lnnds loented
on Grnhnm Islnnd, Queen Chnrlotte group,
nbout seven miles from the west const
thereof nnd described as follows;
Commencing nt n post plnnted nt the
northeast corner nnd mnrked "Initlnl Post
No. 1, II. P. Fogh's N. E. corner" nnd running south 80 chnins; thence west 80
chnins; thence north 80 chnins; thence east
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
H. P. FOGH.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about seven miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, Edgar C. 'Fogh's S. B. corner" and
running north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
EDGAR C. FOGH.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about seven miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, H. L. Emmons's S. W. corner" and
running north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
H. L. EMMONS.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about seven miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, Victor Vlgellus's N. W. corner" and
running south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 2nd, 1906. \
VICTOR VIGELIUS.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
dnys after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about Uve miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, M. G. Munley's! N. E. corner" and
running south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
M. G. MUNLBY.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about five miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, E. H. Guie's S. E. corner" and running north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
E.  H. GUIE.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
nsphnltuin and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about seven miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southenst corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, W. Langllle's S. E. corner" and running north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
W. LANG1LLB.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Grnhnm Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about five miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner and marked! "Initial Post
No. 1, W. P. Flint's N. W. corner" and
running south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 89 chains; thence
west 80 chnins to place of commencement,
containing 640 acres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
W. P.  FLINT.
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
dnys nfter dnte I Intend to apply to thc
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds and
Works for n licence to prospect for conl,
nsphnltuin nnd petroleum on lnnds loented
on Grnhnm Islnnd, Queen Chnrlotte group,
nbout six miles from the west const
thereof nnd described ns follows:
Commencing at a post plnnted nt thc
northwest corner nnd marked- "Initial Post
No. 1, F. W. Crnry's N. W. corner" nnd
running south 80 chains; thenee enst 80
chains; thence north 80 chnins; thence west
80 chnins to place of commencement, con-
tnlning 640 ncres.
Loented August 2nd, 1906.
F. W. CRARY.
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
dnys nfter dnte 1 Intend to npply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds and
Works for a licence to prospect for conl,
nsphnltum nud petroleum on lnnds located
on Grnhnm Islnnd, Queen Charlotte group,
nbout seven miles from the west const
thereof nnd described ns follows;
Commencing nt n post plnnted nt thc
northenst corner nnd marked "Initlnl Post
No. 1, J. Albert Johnson's N. E. corner"
nnd running south 80 chnins; thence enst
80 chnins; thence north 80 chnins; thence
west 80 ehnlns to plnce of commencement,
containing 040 acres.
Located August 2nd, 1006.
J. ALBERT JOHNSON.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of -Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about eight miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, R. S. Eskrldge's N. E. corner," and
running south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
R.   S.   ESKRIDGE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that 60 days
after date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to purchase the following land,
situated on Works Channel: Commencing
at a post marked "Initial Post T. H. W.,"
thence east 20 chains, thence north 20
chains, thence west 20 chains, thence north
20 chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
south 40 chains, more or less, to shore
line; thence following shore line to point
of commencement, containing 240 acres
more or less.
8t T. H. WATSON.
Port Simpson, B. C, Aug. 16, 1906.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about seven miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, C. D. Emmons's N. W. corner" and
running south 80 chains; thence enst 80
Sa ns! thence DorQi *> chains; thence west
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
 C. D. EMMONS.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 dajs
after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the west half
or southeast quarter and west half of
northeast quarter, all In Section 8, Township 6, Coast Range 5, Bulkley Valley;
containing one hundred and sixty (160)
acres, more or less.
Dated July 25th, 1906.
8ul1 ERNEST MORIN.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
SS *?*• l,lStmi t0 "PP'y t« the Hon
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the southwest
quarter section 17, Township 6, Coast
Range 5, Bulkley Valley; containing (160)
one hundred and sixty acre" more'or less
JOS. BOURGON.
Aldermere. July 25,  190& ,nll
Claim No. 1     N0TICE-
H„^rrh?r. taJe notlce that 30 days after
S? f I m^d to apply to the Honorable
r?rrfaC«0„,nMliSl8ner of Lands "d Works
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described
lands, commencing at post planted at the
N. E. corner of T. L. 7197, or on the line
at corner of said claim, thence W. 80
Chans, N. 80 chains, E. 80 chains, S.
chains to point of commencement.
Dated this 18th day of July, 1906.
 p. Mcdonald.
Claim No. r.
Take notice that 30 days after date I
intend to apply to the Honorable Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for a
special license to cut and carry away
timber from the following described
lands: Commencing at post planted 30
chains from S. W. corner on the line of
T. L. 7197, thence N. 80 chains, thence W.
80 chains, S. 80 chains, E. 80 chains to
point of commencement.
Dated this 18th day of July, 1906.
p. Mcdonald
No. 20.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Tahsish Arm, Kyuquot Sound, Hupert
District:
Beginning at a post planted on the
east boundary of Application No. 13,
about 60 chains south of the northeast
corner thereof, thence east 160 chains,
thence north 40 chains, thence west 160
chains, thence south along said boundary
40 chains to point of commencement,
Kyuquot Sound. June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH
No. a.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,  Rupert  District;
Beginning at a post planted at the
southeast corner of No. 8 Application on
Tahsish Arm, thence north along the east
boundary of No. 8 40 chains, thence east
80 chains, Ihence north 40 chains, thence
east 80 chnins, thence south about 20
chains to the shore, thence following the
shore southwesterly to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or
less.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. 22.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
Intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away limber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,   Rupert   Distriot:
Beginning at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Application No. 8 on
Kokshittle Arm, thence eas: 40 chains,
north 80 chains, west 110 chuins, south to
the shore of Kokshittle Arm, thence
southeasterly along said shore to get one
mile of southing, thence cast about 40
chains to a point north of the Initial
stake, Ihence south 40 chains to point of
commencement.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
Notice Is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lnnds and Works
for a lease of the foreshore opposite Lots
45, 46 and 47, Esquimau District.
ALBERT A. ARGYLE.
Vancouver, B. C, July 4th, 1906.
No. 23.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
Intend to npply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from lhe
following described lnnd, situate on
the Ka-o-winch Kiver, Kokshittle Arm,
Kyuquot   Sound,   Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted on the
north boundary about 20 chains west of
tho northeast corner of Application No.
7, on the east bank of the Ka-o-winch
Ulver, Ihence enst 20 chain's, north UK)
chains, east 20 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or
less.
Kyuquot Sound. June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. 27.
Take notice that, 30 days after date. I
intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Laads and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,  Rupert District:
Beginning at a post planted near the
initial post of Application No. 26, thenee
east 40 chains, thence south 80 chains,
west 80 chains, north 80 chains, east 3
chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. 28.
Take notice that, 30 days after date. I
intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cui and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquol  Sound,  Rupert District:
Beginning at a post planted on the
west side of Union Island about 20 chain*
south of a group of small islands in Blind
Entrance, thence 80 chains east, thence W
chains north, thence 40 chains west,
thence 40 chains north, thence west about
20 chains to the shore of Blind Entrance,
thence southerly along said shore to
point of commencement.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
Notice is hereby given that, 60 daya
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Worka
for a lease of the foreshore opposite Lota
53 and 54, Metchosin District.
ALBERT A. ARGYLE.
Vancouver, B. C, July 4th, 1906.
No. 24.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
Intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot Sound, Bupert District:
Beginning at a post planted on the
south shore of Narrow Gut Inlet, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 40 chains,
thence north 40 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence about 40 chains north to
the shore of Narrow Gut Inlet, thence
following the shore in a westerly direction lo point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906,
JOHN HIKSCH.
No. 25.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
intend to apply to the Chiei Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,  Rupert District:
Beginning at a post planted at the
southeast corner of Application No. 1, on
Kokshittle Arm, thence west 80 chains,
thence south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence nortji 80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 040 acres more
or less.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. 26.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
Intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,  Rupert District:
Beginning at a post planted on the
east side of a river unnamed entering into Clan nlnick Harbor about 1% mile*
from the mouth, thence east 60 chains,
north 81) chains, wesl SO chains, south 80
chains, east 20 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or
less.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
TIMBER   LICENSE.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
(30) days after date, I Intend to apply to
the Hon. the Chief Commissioner of Land!
and Works for a special license to cat
and carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated In Port Renfrew,
Renfrew District: Commencing at a pott
planted at the southeast corner ot Section
Eighteen (18), Township Ten (10), marked
"Alexr. Young, S. E. Corner," thence
eighty chains west; thence eighty chalna
north; thence eighty chalna east; thence
eighty chains south to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated at   Port  Renfrew   this 11th day
of August, 1906.
aulS ALEX.  YOUNG.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 60 day*
after date, I, the undersigned, will apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to lease or purchase
the following described land, namely, ln
Hesnlt Harbor, Tlupana Arm, Nootka
Sound, commencing at a post marked i.
Mortimer, Southeast Corner, running 40
chains west, thence north to shore line,
thence following the shore line to the
point of commencement, containing 80
acres, more or less.
Victoria, B.  C, July  11th, 1906.
»u!8 JOHN   MORTIMER.
Notice is hereby given that, 30 days
alter date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for special license to cut and carry uwuy
timber from the following described land
in Port Renfrew District, Vancouver Island, on tlio west side of lhe <JurJon
River, adjoining A. Wheeler's claim on
the southeast corner. Commencing at a
post on the northeast corner marked J.
Young's northeast corner, ihence south
SO chains, west 80 chains, north 80 chains,
and east 80 chains to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres. Located June 9th, 1906.
J. YOUNG.
Notice Is hereby given tliat. 30 days
after date, 1 intend lo apply lo the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for special license to cut and carry away
timber from thc following described land
in Port Renfrew District, Vancouver Island, adjoining A. E. Mannell's claims on
the southeast corner: Commencing at a
post on the northeast corner marked A.
Wheeler's (jr.) northeast corner, Ihence
south 80 chains, west SO chains, north 80
chains, nnd cast 80 chnins to Die place
of  commencement,   containing  010 i.cres.
Located June 9th, 1906.
A. WHEELER, Ji
Notice Is hereby given that, CO days
nfler dale, I Intend to apply <i the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands nnd Works
for "jeriiilsslon to purchase the following
described land on the Skeena River,
Range V., C< ast District: Starting from a
post located at the northeast corner of
the Kitsilas Indian Reserve, and marked
15. J. MoGeaohle, S. W. comer"; thenee
north 40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains; tbence west 41
chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, moro or less.
15. J. McGEACHIE.
Kitsilas, May 2Sth, 1906. 12
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22. 1906.
<bWlP'&ififififi?ifipi?
•it $?
♦ A Lady's Letter f
^ ly BABETTE. **
Is there ever a hiatus, I wonder, in
the world of fashion? I think not; and
yet, this glorious month, I intend only
to give a very few hints of the fash
ions of the future. The observant wo
man will discover in the modes of the
moment indications of things to come,
It suffices, therefore, for me to say that
for the next six weeks the tailors will
be first in command, and will arrange
many of the new styles for autumn.
What a change has come over the
spirit of sartorial art during the last
few years! We see now at least three
distinct classes of tailor-made—the
smart race-gowns; the real sporting garments; and, lastly, the cult of the ready
made. An enormous number of "coat-
and-skirt" women have to be catered
for today, and the result is that the
manufacturers are able to produce well-
made garments at very moderate prices.
The ready-made coat and skirt is a perfect boon t'o the woman of average size,
although we should naturally prefer, if
we could afford it, a model which has
been brought to perfection by a sartorial expert. There are so many women,
however, who have to dress on a small
income, and in these days of almost uni
versal travelling we have recognized
that the American tailor-made girl (not
necessarily the daughter or wife of a
millionaire) always looks suitably at
tired in a neat coat and skirt, or the
orthodox blue serge.
To every woman of every grade of
society, I say, "Do not be without a
blue serge in your wardrobe." Some of
the very smartest models are in blue
serge, from the race-gown to the golfing
costume, although somehow we always
associate the moors of the "north coun-
trie" with delightfully tweed-clad sportswomen.
This month we always see the most
charming variety of travelling costumes.
And here I may tell you that the revival
of the ulster is a feature of sartorial
fashion. The very word recalls visions
of many years ago, and very ugly garments ; but not so today. And the travelling ulster, or whatever you like to
call it, has nothing dowdy about it. It
is in a brown tweed mixture, for brown
is again the favourite autumnal. colour
among Parisians. It shows outside
seams, which always add to the smartness of tailor garments, arid the most
delightful collar and cuffs of brown
moire, with a band of the same covered
with a lattice work of thick brown
braid. The diamond-shaped buttons are
treated in the same way. The strap is
just caught in military fashion across
the ulster back, and can be passed under the front piece or worn over, as
shown here. The squaring of the shoulder is arranged by a strap, and I advise
the majority of the women to square
their shoulders, especially in these
heavy coats; where they look dowdy is
in the drooping effect which appears to
to be bearing down the wearer.
The coat is worn with a curious
brown silky mackintosh sailor hat with
a brown and white waterproofed chiffon
veil. It is worth remembering that all
chiffon can be waterproofed nowadays
for motoring purposes.
A smart and very exclusive fabric at
the moment for coats is known as "Sel-
vytine." It is near akin to the selvyt
with which we clean our bicycles, but it
goes through a process which brings up
the pile while still preserving its soft
and washable qualities. It closely resembles velvet in appearance, and may
be had in various shades, though the
original birscuit shade is very becoming
when trimmed with braids of deeper
tone. This fabric strikes a note of novelty as a trimming, for it can be used
very successful for cuffs and collars on
weather-resisting garments.
House frocks will come in next
month among new autumn clothes, but
for the moment we are going to remain
content with the smartest plain and embroidered skirts and most elaborate of
painted muslin blouses. In fact, nothing
else is possible at such places as Trou-'
ville, Ostcnd, Dieppe, Maricnbad, and
Aix.
In conclusion ,lct me say a few words
on  the  etceteras  of dress—an  all-im
portant problem of which women, alas!
seldom quite realise the full importance.
In hosiery, plain silk specimens with
openwork fronts or embroidered clox
are the best style. Many coloured
stockings are being worn to match our
best frocks, for the most exclusive women dress in a harmony of colour.
Brown will be one of the favourite early autumn tones, and this is perhaps the
easiest colour in which to carry out a
complete costume. It need not be one
but many browns. Navy blue is also
very often successful, and myrtle green
is chic for those who can wear it. The
smartest boots are of patent leather
with cloth tops, though there is nothing
very new about these. With tea-gowns
there is a fancy for old Louis XV. brocaded shoes with the high heels of that
period. With the revival of moire" and
stiff duchesse satin we shall see the
return of shoes made of the same fabric.
Heavily stitched white kid gloves with
a gauntlet cuff are worn with tailor-
made frocks, and pale mushroom and
tan shades are also used. With recep-
tion-gOwns white and very delicate
shade sof kid and suede gloves are
worn.
As . for veils, the changes are not
great. All kinds of chiffon, lace, and
coloured ' chenille-spoted makes are
worn, but I shall probably have something new to tell you about these next
month. Hats are somewhat at a transition stage, and no one quite knows
whether the very large or the very small
will be fashionable. Personally, I think
a compromise between the two will prevail. Wings and quills will be much
used.
»i"H"t"tf ifififififififif
% Social and        *
♦ Personal. $
* if
alitii-^"^-^-*^--^' fcaaaaaaaaaaataa^aaaMaBaaalaaMaa
VICTORIA.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Barnard returned
last week from a visit to Banff. They
were accompanied by Miss Eva Loewen.
* *  *
Miss Kate Gaudin returned on Saturday from-Calgary, where she has been
visiting for the past month.
* *   *
Mrs. Gore entertained a number of
friends informally at the tea hour on
Monday afternoon.
* *   *
Mrs. Beatrice Norton, certificated
London College of Music, London,
England. Tuition in piano and theory.
Studio Rae St.   Hours io until 6.
* *   *
The Misses Ryan left for their home
in Los Angeles on Saturday last. The
young ladies will be missed in society
circles, where both were great favorites.
* *   * •■
Mrs. (Major) Blandy was hostess at
a large and most enjoyable "at home'"
given on Thursday afternoon last at
Work Point Barracks. The function
was in the nature of a gymkhana, the
two tennis courts being turned into a
suitable court for the sports, which
were keenly contested.. A large number of Mrs. Blandy's friends were present, and notwithstanding the inclement
weather, greatly enjoyed the affair.
Some very handsome dresses were worn
by the ladies present, Mrs. Blandy appearing to advantage in a pale blue embroidered   crepe de   chine and   white
chapeau.
* *   *
The reception on Monday evening at
the Government Buildings was a most
brilliant affair in every way, no efforts
having been spared to make the event
enjoyable. The gowns of the ladies
were magnificent, and the tout ensemble resembled a fairy scene both inside
and outside of the buildings. Of course
the Government House party was the
cynosure of all eyes, and the impression produced by the ladies who accompanied His Excellency and the Lieutenant Governor was mo«t marked. Capt.
Trotter and Capt. Drake performed
their important duties to perfection.
Tndced, it would be hard to imagine
how these official functions would ,be
regulated without the watchful and experienced eye of the latter. A gratifying feature of thc reception was the
large attendance of elderly gentlemen.
Rarely, if ever, has Victoria been so
well represented by her veterans, who
ndded dienity and eclat to the occasion. Amone the most elepantly rown-
cd of thc ladies were Mrs. Robin Dunsmuir, Mrs. Rattenbury, Mrs. R. H.
Pooley nnd Mrs. Hirsch. Conspicuous
!>mnng the eentleman visitors was Sir
T. G. Shnucrhnessv, who was also a guest
nt the official dinner at Government
House. The function was brief and
thoroughly cnioyable. being entirely devoid of that air of stiffness and formal
ity which too often characterizes such
gatherings.    The following is a complete list of those present:
A
Captain R. Angus, Miss Adair, The
Rev. W. Baugh Allen, Mrs. W. Baugh
Allen, Rev. G. K. B. Adams, Margaret
Arbuckle, James R. Anderson, J. A. Anderson.
B
Canon Beanlands, Mrs. Beanlands,
Miss Butchart, Mrs. R. Pirn Butchart,
Miss Mary Butchart, Miss Brae, F. D.
Brae, H. R. Beaven, Bishop of Columbia, Miss. Blakemore, Miss Zoe Bucknam, Sidney Booth, Mrs. E. Grover
Burke, Miss Browne, Mr. Godfrey
Booth, Mr. Beaumont Boggs, Miss Nina
Bouter, Mrs. Gavin Hamilton Bums,
W.' Blakemore, Mrs. Crow-Baker, M.
Bellasis, Mrs. Bridgman, Miss Bell, Mr.
J. J. C. Bridgman, Mr. Gavin Hamilton
Burns, Mrs. Wentworth Bell.
C
Mrs. H. Mackenzie Cleland. Miss
Josephine Crease, Rev. Hermon A. Carson, Mr. Wm. Christie, Captain James
D. Curtis, R. N., Mrs. Cobbett, Miss
Carter, Mrs. Crawford, Mr. and Mrs.
J. W.' Church, Miss Kathleen Crofton,
Dr R. V. Crawford, Rev. Dr. Campbell,
Mr. Maurice Cane, Mr. Geo. L. Courtney, Rev. W. Leslie Clay, Mrs. Chas,
E. Clarke, Capt. Chas. E. Clarke, Miss
Ida Cambie, E. and Mrs. Cooper, Mrs.
Geo. L. Courtney, Lindley Crease, Rev.
C. E. Cooper.
D
Mrs. J. E. Durand, Mr. J. E. Dur-
and, Mrs. Dumbleton, Mr. C. G. Stewart Duncan, Fifth Regt., C. A., Miss
Frances Tyrwhitt Drake, Mr. and Mrs.
Thomas Davis, Miss Josephine Doolit-
tle, Miss Doolittle, Miss Amy Dupont,
Mr. H. M. Dumbleton, Mr. James A.
Douglas, Mrs. James A. Douglas and
Miss Williams, Mr. Ralph W. Deans,
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Davies, Miss Dupont,'Mr. A. J. Dallain, J. P., Mrs. P.
A. Doolittle, Mrs. C G. Stewart Duncan,
ffl E
Miss Lorna Eberts, Miss Eberts, Mr.
Peter. Ellison, R. C. G. A., V. A. G.
Eliot, Mrs. D. M. Eberts, Mrs. Duncan
W. Eberts.
F
Captain Ernest Fleet, Mrs. Thornton
Fell, Thornton Fell, Mrs. Ernest Flett,
James Foreman, Mrs. James Foreman,
Octavius Field, T. L. Futcher, J. P.,
Leonard Foot, Mrs. Charles J, Fagan,
T. R. Futcher, Donald A. Fraser, Mrs.
Flumerfelt, Dr. Fagan,
G
Mr. L. McLeod Gould, Mr. Albert^ F.
Griffiths, Mr. Charles F. Gardiner, Mr.
J. Sidney Gibb, Mrs. R. F. Green, Mr.
T, L. Gore, Hon. R. F. Green, Mrs.
Grant, Mr. Archd. J. C. Galletly, Ralph
Geoffrey Grey, Mr. R. E-Gosnell, Mr.
Wm. Gordon, Col. H. F. Garretson,
Miss Susie Emily Garretson, Miss Gibb,
Rev. Thos. W. Gladstone, Mrs. A. J.
C. Galletly, Mr. Louis Garnett, Mr. and
Mrs. B. G. Goward, Mrs. A. J. Garesche, Mrs. Griffith, Mr. and Mrs. Louis
Garnett, Mrs. Charles F. Gardiner, Miss
Gladys Green, Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Car-
ew Gibson, Mr. J. Sidney Gibb, Mrs.
Gladstone, Miss Gladstone, Mrs. G.
Hunter Ogilvie, Mr. A. J. Garesche,
Mrs. Thomas Sinclair Gore, Mrs. A. F.
Griffiths, Mrs. Genge.   . .
H
Mrs. A. J. Hollyer, Mr. Ernest A.
Harris, Major J. P. Hibben, Mr. H.
Dallas Helmcken, Lieut. Col. J. A. Hall,
Mrs. J. H. Hargreaves, Miss Hadwen,
Mrs. Richard' Irvine Howitt, Mrs. H.
Dallas Helmcken, Mrs. T. Hooper, Miss
Edna Henry, Mr. M. Hills, Mrs. W.
Ralph Higgins, Doctor and Mrs. Hasell, Miss Harvey, Capt. E. C. Hart, P.
A. M. C, Mr. R. I. Howitt, Col. Herchmer, The Chief Justice and Mrs. Hunter, William Henderson,  Col,  Holmes,
D. 0. C, M. D, Mrs. H. Thorsby
Hughes, Mr. Alfred John Hollyer, Mrs.
J. Hirsch, Major J.. P. Hibben, Mr.
George J. Harvey, Mrs. Herchmer.
Mr. Justice Irving, Mrs. Justice Irving.
J
Mrs. Arthur Jones, Lt. Colonel A. W.
Jones, Mr. and Mrs. R. Chestyre Janion,
H. M. Johnson.
K
Mr. J. Kingham, Mrs. J. Kingham,
Thomas Kiddie.
L
James H. Lawson, Jr., Miss Le Neven,
Miss Marguerite Little, Mrs. Henry F.
Langton, Judge Lampman, F. M. Logan,
Miss Loewen, Miss Eva Loewen, Arthur Longfield, Arthur James Leary,
Charles H. Lugrin, Mrs. M-. M. Lang,
Miss Jennie Lang. Cornelius Leary,
Miss Logan. Miss Lawson, T. J. Len-
drum, Mrs. M. M. Lang, Miss Langley,
Mrs. 1. W. Laing, Miss Louise Lugrin.
Mrs. j. W. Laing, Miss Leitch, Mrs. C.
Spencer, D. S. Spencer, Mrs." David
Spencer, E. 0. S. Scholefield, Miss Dorothy Sehl, Mrs. Robert H. Swinerton.
M
Senntor Macdonald, Mr. Justice Martin, Miss Macdonald. Major J. M. Mutter, Mr, C. S. McKilligan, Mr. E. B.
McKay, Mrs. H. B. Mackenzie. Mr. H.
R. Mackenzie, Captain Michell, Miss
Musirravc. Mayor Morley, Mr. Rowland
Machine, Mrs. Macdonald, Mrs. E. B.
McKay, Mr. Edward Mohun, Miss
Winifred McGill. J. H. McKay, Miss
McGrecor, Mrs. James McGregor, Mr.
C. F. Moore, Mr. J. Musgrave. Mr. Albert Martin, Mr. and Mrs. Richard McBride. i     ;  • t ■ i
Mrs. Perrin, Miss Pemberton, Charles
James Prior, Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Pool-
e)', Mrs. Lisle Petrie, Miss Gladys Perry, Miss Pither, B. G. Prior, Mrs.
Phipps, L. Pither, Miss iPtts, Mrs. E.
G. Prior, Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Pooley,
Miss Pooley, Miss Violet Pooley, Sidney I, Pitts, Lt.-Col. the Hon. E. G.
Prior Miss Marian Pitts, Miss Pooley.
R
Mrs. William Fleet Robertson, ..Sidney
Roberts, Dr. Hermann M. Robertson,
Harold B. Robertson, E. G. Russell,
Mrs. Harold B. Robertson, Mr. and Mrs.
F. M. Rattenbury, Mrs. Hermann M.
Robertson, Mr. and Mrs. A. Stuart
Robertson.
S
Miss Shibley, Miss Violet Sweet, Miss
Ada Spencer, Mr. Robt. H. Swinerton,
Mr. David Spencer, Mrs. Frank Scott.
T
Mrs. A. B. Taylor, R. G. Tatlow, R.
Garnett Tatlow, Miss Mabel G. Tatlow.
W
W. G. Winterbum, J. Wight, C. E.
Wilson, Captain Walbran, C. G. S., Lt.-
Col. R. Wolfenden, I. S. ., V. D, James
Kilvington Worsfold, W. T. Williams,
Mrs. W. H. Wood, Miss Walker, Mrs.
Walker, W. Walkem Wilson, Mrs. W,.
Walkem Wilson, Major J. Wilson, S. Y.
Wootton, Mrs. Muspratt-Williams, Mrs.
Edward Wootton, Captain W. Ridwgay
Wilson, Miss Williams, Stewart Williams.
The Official Dinner
An official dinner was given by His
Honor, the Lieut. Governor, the Hon.
James Dunsmuir, at Government House
at 7:3o on Tuesday evening, in honor of
hi sillustrious guests, Their Excellencies the Earl and Countess Grey at
which, in addition to the distinguished
members of the house party, members
of the Dominion and provincial ministries, representatives of the naval and
military establishments and the church
and bench, nearly all the leading members of the community were present.
The house party consisted of His Excellency, the Governor General, Her Excellency, the Countess Grey, His Honor, the Lieut. Governor, Mrs. Dunsmuir, Lady Sybil Grey, Lady Evelyn
Grey, Miss Elinor Dunsmuir, Miss Marion Dunsmuir, Mrs. R. W. Dunsmuir,
Mrs. Audain, Mr. Leveson Gower, the
comptroller of His Excellency's household, Captain Trotter, A. D. C, Major
Audain, Capt. B. Tyrrwhitt Drake, Mr.
Muskett, Mr. H. A. Bromley.
The list of invited guests was as follows :
Archbishop Orth, The Bishop of Columbia, Mrs. Perrin, Hon. Wm. Templeman, Mrs. Templeman, Chief Justice
Hunter and Mrs. Hunter,, Hon. Edgar
Dewdney, Lieut. Col. Hon. E. G. Prior,
Mrs. Prior, Hon. W. J. Macdonald,
Mrs. Macdonald, Hon. G. Riley, Mrs.
Riley, Sir Thomas Shaughnessy, Capt.
Hunt, R. N., Hon. Mr. Justice Irving,
Mrs. Irving, Hon. Mr. Justice Martin,
Mrs. Martin, Hon. Mr. Justice Duff,
Mrs. Duff, Hon. Mr. Justice Morrison,
Mrs. Morrison, Hon. G. D. Walkem,
Hon. . W. Tyrrwhitt Drake, Hon. R.
Smith, Mrs. Smith,' Mr. Sloan, Mrs.
Sloan, Mr. R. G. Macpherson, Mrs.
Macpherson, Mr. James Kennedy, Mrs.
Kenndy, Mr. W. A. Gallaher, Mrs. Gal-
laher, Mr. Duncan Ross, Mrs. Ross,
Hon. The Premier of British Columbia
and Mrs. McBride, Hon. R. G. Tatlow,
Mrs. Tatlow, Hon. F. J. Fulton, K. C,
Hon. R. Green and Mrs. Green, Hon.
F. Carter-Cotton, Mrs. Carter-Cotton,
Hon. the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly and Mrs. Pooley, Col. Holmes,
D. . G, Mrs. Homes, His Worship, the
Mayor, Mrs. Morley, Capt. Elliston, A.
D. C, Col. Call, Mrs. Hall, Miss Macdonald, Miss Pooley, Miss Tatlow, Miss
Drake.
NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that sixity
days after date after date I intend
to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for permission
to purchase the following described
land, tarting from a post planted on
the souWi line of lot 199, at the head
of Union Bay thence forty chains
east, thence forty chains south, thence
forty chains west to shore line, thence
northerly along shore line of Union
Bay to point of oemmencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
Staked September 4th, 1906.
JOHN G-. JOHNSTON.
NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that Sixty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
following described land starting
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land starting
from a post marked C. B. F.'s north
west corner thence south forty chains,
thence north forty chains to shoreline, thence west along shoreline to
point of commencement containing
160 acres more or less.
Staked September 4th, 1906.
C. B. FLEWIN.
NOTICE is hereby given that the Llenj
tenant-Governor In Council has been p'eased*
to order as follows, namely:
That tbe boundaries of the Assessment
Districts of Lillooet lEast and West) and
of Quesnel Forks, as described ln tbe Brltl
lab. Columbia Gazette dated 25th April, 18061
in pursuance of the Order in Council Nol
232, be rescinded and cancelled, and thjf
following boundaries substituted thereto/
Lillooet Assessment District.
1. West  Lillooet.—Commencing  at  thi
junction of  the Chllcotln  river with thi
Jfrnser river;  thence southerly,  following
the course of the Fraser river to the 518
parallel of latitude; thence east along Ball
parallel of latitude to its crossing: oft
(Lillooet and  Alexandria Wagon Boad
the 53-mlle post; thence southeasterly, Wl
lowing the divide between Pavilion creel
and Maiden creek to Its intersection wlti
the western boundary of the Railway Bef
In Township 22,   Range 27  west of th
sixth  Initial  meridian;   thence   souUierll
following  the   western boundary   of  ta
Railway Belt to a point due west frofl
Lytton on the boundary of said Rallwa"
Belt; thence west to a point where th
12«h  meridian of   west   longitude  Intel
sects the north shore of Queens ReacH
Jervis Inlet; thence due north along
124th meridian of west longitude to
51st parallel of latitude; thence due wesl
along the said 51st parallel of latitude tl
its,Intersection with the 125th meridian ol
west longitude (a point on the Homalkf
river about seven miles from Waddlngtof
Harbor); thence due north along the 125t]
meridian of west longitude to Its Intersect
tion  with the 52nd  parallel of  latltndel
thence due east along the 52nd parallel <J
latitude to Its Intersection with the centn
of Tatla lake; thence easterly following thj
centre of Tatla lake, Chilanco Tlver anj
Chllcotln river to the (mouth ot Anahan]
creek; thence northerly up Anaham creel
to the crossing of the wagon road; thencl
southeasterly and northeasterly, fouowlnl
the wagon road past Harper's lake to till
(Fraser river at the mouth of Chimney ereeaf
thence southerly, following the fraser rlvej
to the point of commencement.
2. East   Lillooet.—Commencing at   th
junction of the Chllcotln river with thi
Fraser river;  thence southerly, followlnl
the course of the Fraser river to the 51s|
parallel of latitude; thence east along sail
parallel of latitude to Its crossing of thi
Lillooet antif Alexandria Wagon Road at thi
63-mlle post; thence southeasterly, follov*
Ing the divide between Pavilion creek aal
Maiden creek to its intersection with thi
western boundary of the Railway Belt 11
Township 22, Range 27 west of the slxtl
Initial  meridian;  thence  south,  foUowlnl
the western boundary of the Railway BeJ
to Its Intersection with the northern homy
dary of Township 21, Range 27 west of tly
sixth Initial meridian; thence eaBt, follov)
tag the northern boundary of Township 2]
in Ranges 27,  26, 25, 24, 23 and 22 w«"
of the sixth Initial meridian to the nortl
cast corner of said Township 21, in Rang
22  west of    the  sixth Initial    meridlari
thence north, following the east boundarl
of Townships 22, 23 and 24 to the nortlT
em boundary of the Railway Belt ln Towjj
ship 24; thence east along the north bona
dary of the Railway Belt to its lnterse
tion with  the eastern boundary of Kar
loops Assessment District at the southes
corner of Section 27, Township 23, Rana
18 west of the sixth initial meridian; thenq
north, following the west boundary of thi
Kamloops District to a point on the 52nl
parallel of latitude north of Mnhood laker
thence west along the said 52nd parallel <f
latitude to Its Intersection with thc Frase]
river; thence following southerly along Ui
Fraser river to the point of comimencemen,
Quesnel  Forks Assessment  District,!
Commencing at a point on the wea
boundary of the Kootenay Land Distill
on the 52nd parallel of latitude, ten mill
west of the Columbia river; thence dif
west, following the 52nd parallel of latltud
to its intersection with the Fraser rlvei
thence northerly, following the course C
the iFrasar river to the Intersection of till
Wagon Road at the mouth of Chlmnel
creek; thence southwesterly and nortli
westerly, following the Wagon Road pal
Harper's lake to Anaham creek; thena
southerly down Anaham creek to its mouttj
thence westerly, following the course <f
the Chllcotln rfver to Its junction with tu
Chilanco Tlver; thence westerly, followlnl
the course of the Chilanco river and tn
centre of Tatla lake to the Intersection J
the centre line of said Tatla lake, wll
the 52nd parallel of latitude; thence du
west, following the 62nd parallel of latltul
to Its intersection with the 125th merldld
of west longitude; thence north on tl|
height of land between the watershed
the Chllcotln and Blackwater rivers to t
west of Tsa-cha lake; thence easterly, fl
lowing the northern watershed of ti
Blackwater river four miles below tl
mouth of the Nagco river; thence easterl
to the Fraser river, opposite QuesnoJ
thence south, following the centre of tl
IFraser river four miles; thence east to tl
south end of Dragon lake; thence southeal
to Twenty-mile creek; thence followln
Twenty-Mile creek to Its headwaten
thence following the height of land fori
Ing the watershed between Quesnel rlva
Cariboo lake, and Swamp river on tl
south, and Swift river and Willow rlvl
and its tributaries on the north, crossll
Swamp river two miles south of Sanl
lake and following the height of land forj
Ing the watershed between the South Fa
of thc Fraser river and Canoe river to I
enst boundary of the Kootenny provlna
thence south along the east boundary [
the province to the northern boundary I
Kootenay District; thence west and soil
along the boundary of the Kootenay
triot to the point of commencement.
It. Is further ordered thnt the Assess!
nnd Collectors of the said Lillooet al
Quesnel Forks Assessment Districts be al
nie hereby Invested with jurisdiction wll
in the Assessment Districts hereby deflnl
and that the boundaries as now defltl
tnke effect as from the 30th day of Jul
1006. Thnt the Assessment Rolls for I
yenr 1906, ns finally passed, shall be acl
upon by the Assessors and Collectors I
snid Districts until the said 30th dayl
June, 1006, and thnt nil taxes shnll be (f
looted ln nccordnnce therewith up to and J
eluding thnt date. That Immediately afj
snid 30th Jane, where lt mny be ne'eessi
to trnnsfer the nnmes of the assessed il
sons on the rolls of the respective Assi
ment Districts, or to transfer the desci
tlons of assessed property ftT
one district to the other dlstrl
In consequence of the change In L
boundnrles between the snid two Assl
ment Districts, the Assessors and Colli
ors nre authorized to mnke such trans!
nnd to collect uny nrrenrs of taxes duef
snid 30th dny of June by the persons I
property so transferred to their respecl
Assessment Districts. \
Treasury Depnrtment, 21st August, 111
iii.

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