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Week Jul 31, 1909

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CHOCOLATE EGG,
MALTED MILK and
"SUNNY JIM" SUNDAE
at
Terry's Fountain
S.E. Cor. Fort and Douglas.
i.m_mjujuimjuuiAaAJuui.O
The Week
R British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria,  B. ©.
ami mrs » mm __ x k xv-sn w
HALL & WALKER
Agents
WELLINGTON   COLLIERY
COMPANY'S COAL
1232 Government St. Telephone 83
^iJLSLSLtSISLSLSUL tUUUULt 9 SUUUUlI
__
Iol. VI.   No
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 31, 1909
One Dollar Per Annum
Prohibition, the Obstacle to Real Reform
By the Reverend William A. Wasson
(Reprinted from Pearson's Magazine for August, 1909.)
■ready risen higher than its pre-
tcessor. Nor is the end yet in sight,
hiile in some sections of the coun-
iMr. Wasson is a clergyman of the The crusade not only did not solve liquor traffic, or at the regulation of had been under the license system, extensive investigation of conditions
fiscopalj Church. He thinks it 0 the liquor problem, but it compli- the traffic. These two policies are It is also very significant that the in Maine, tells the whole story of
ff^ei whiii'W%UevW'tl'ab_% cated the Problem with new difficul- extreme, opposites at every point and states that were swept off their feet the miserable failure of prohibition
\urce of immorality and crime. Some ties- The states that adopted the. pro- in every feature. The object of one by the prohibition wave fifty years throughout the whole state. Every
'ks say that it docs not "look right"  hibitory   system   soon   found   them-  is to kill, that of the other is to cure, ago, are among those states that are one that has traveled through Maine
...   _   „,.._ ...    .. ,., „. _,,...„  .,„„_,,..„ ... s^ ,,   ......   ..ffected by  the  present  knows that there is not a town in the
\$MJffi_i%l^ stead of one> tlje old dis?ase of in"  "al   Policy, .that  the  people  are  di- agitation.    And even Maine, which is  state   where  even  a  stranger,  if  he
doing his duty.   The object of a temperance and the new."remedy" of vided.today.  .    . ... the only one of these states that has take the trouble to make inquiry, can-
■hibitory liquor law is to lessen liquor prohibition.   And now, the successors      No legislative system has ever been retained prohibition all these years, is  not get aU the liquor he wishes, such
\nking.   Its effect seems just the oppo- 0f the  men  that  rallied  round   the  more   extensively   nor   fairly   tested actually  showing unmistakable  signs  as  it  is.    And  in  many  places   the
matter for'^ean andhc ex^Mns standard  of   Neal Dow . are  making than that of prohibition.   During the of genuine repentance.   It is conceded stranger is waited on by some con-
e just wherein a prohibitory law fails precisely the same, promises and pre-  last sixty years it has been tried on on  all   sides  that a decisive  verdict siderate person who asks him whether
its object.   He does not overlook the dictions that were made :of old. They the state-wide scale in many different against prohibition would have been he would not like "something."   The
'ils of the saloon.   He submits a plan assure us that the; present movement  sections   of   the. country  and   under rendered at the last state election in statist^s,relating tp.arrests.-jEg-f d,1?'?.1^-
I»//i J/?"'.^ This means business-   *They prophesy that the most, diverse social and political  Maine, when resubmission was a pro- enness and deaths from alcoholism in
tticle imll enable any man to decide th'-3  wave will  not  subside  until  it conditions,.the periods of trial rang- minent. issue, if it had not been for  Maine all  tell the same tale.    They
methcr or not a prohibitory liquor law has  swept  over  every  foot' of Am- ing from three years.in Nebraska to the  fact   that  it  was  a  presidential  spell the word failure.
V t rf°r ^ g°°d "^ HiS °Wn neigk~ erican soil and has done t0 the "rum" tifty-111^6 years in Vermont.    By its year.   Prohibition  is  generally   least     In response to the loud clamorings
'     .00 traffic what Jehovah did to the Egyp-  record, by what it has done and by popular where it is best known. of the Anti-Saloon League, the legis-
; '_ tians in the. Red Sea. what   it  has   not   done,   prohibition      If    prohibition   really    prohibited, lature of Georgia enacted a prohibi-
During the decade immediately pre- prohibitionists have simplified the must be judged. On every page of the fact ought to be reflected in thc tory law a couple of years ago. The
Iding the Civil War, a great "tem- liquor problem at the expense of that record, from beginning.to end, figures of the U. S. Revenue Depart- act went into effect January I, 1908.
prance wave" swept over the coun- truth, reason and common experience, are written the words failure, folly, ment. But, according to the govern- For a short time, the new law seemed
Within a period of five years, inStead of suiting the remedy to thc farce. Nowhere and at no time, in ment reports, the use of alcoholic to have a good effect. J'udging from
Ight states, viz., the six New Eng- disease, they have tried to make the all history, has prohibition accom- liquors actually increases with the surface idications, it looked as if proband states, Michigan and Nebras- (ijsease conform to their predeter- plished a single one of its avowed spread of prohibition. In 1893, the hibition might at last break its long
adopted prohibition.   New York, mjneti remedy. objects. Nowhere has it abolished the year the Anti-Saloon League was or- record of failure and actually stop the
Jidiana and Wisconsin also enacted xhe liquor problem is one of the liquor, traffic; nowhere has it pre- ganized, the per capita consumption sale of liquor. But, again, it was all
j-ohibitory laws , which, however, most complex of all social problems, vented the consumption of liquor nor of malt and spirituous liquors in the a dream, and a very short dream,
fever went into effect, having been \_ does not stan(I out alone, simple, lessened the evil, of intemperance, whole country was 16.6 and 1.46 gal- too. The drinkers adjusted them-
■folared unconstitutional by the high- distinct and isolated, as: prohibition-  Neither as  a  state-wide .system nor Ions* respectively. . In 1899, when only selves to the "dry" system, and were
is'ts would have us believe..: It is! at under Local. Option.has prohibition six; million people were living under soon hobnobbing as openly and bold-
|Now, again, after a lapse of fifty once a moraj..ai_ economic, a physio- ever made the slightest contribution prohibitory laws, the figures were 15.8 ly as ever with the old Demon. Con-
lars, the country is witnessing an- logical, a psychological.* and, in. its toward the solution of"thVliquor pro- and l!l(. In 1907, when approximate- ditions kept going from bad to worse,
[her "temperance wave," which has  mlai analysis, a purely personal pro-  blem.. The one solitary service, that ly 35  million people were  living in and before the law had been on the
blem.   It contains many elements and  it has rendered to society is, that of "dry" territory;, the figures had risen statute books a year, it was clearly
involves many perplexing difficulties., furnishing-a warning example of the  to   the   high-water, mark,   22.0   and evident to everybody that had  even
When we look below the surface arid supreme folly of attempting to legis-  1.58.    The   report, of   1908   shows   a half    an    eye    that    prohibition    in
ly, the "wave"  has spent its force study this problem in its deeper as- late virtue into men's lives. decrease   of   about   10   per   cent,   in Georgia had broken down,
jid appears to be receding, in other pects, we find' that its*roots are in- There could be no stronger evi- spirituous liquors as compared with Here is the testimony of two of the
Ictions it is increasing in volume extricably intertwined with those of dence of the failure' of * prohibition 1907, .while the consumption of malt prohibition leaders themselves. Rev.
Jid strength. There are, at present, other social problem's. So that gen- than the fact that.seven of the eight liquors.was about the same for both Dr. Holderby, of Atlanta, an ardent
Ight states in which statutory pro- uine and thorough temperance reform states that adopted the system fifty years. Thus.we are confronted with prohibitionist, said last winter: "The
lbition obtains—four in the South, must be conducted along1 many dif- years ago, have since abandoned, it the remarkable fact that; in 1908, when legislature is afraid to stand by the
Iree in the West and one  in New ferent lines. and gone back to the policy, of li- the prohibition    wave .had reached  very   law   which   it   enacted   twelve
liigland. Under the Local Option The liquor problem is not exclu- cense and regulation. The people of enormous proportions and was wip- months ago. Atlanta has become .1
pstem, a number of other states are sively nor chiefly a legislative pro- these states adopted prohibition in ing out saloons at the rate of 11,000 laughing stock and a stench in the
|_ing prohibitionized on the install- blem, and hence it cannot be solved good faith. They honestly and earn- a year, the American people con- nostrils of the Almighty." This con-
lent plan. Not long ago it was es- by legislation alone. The evil of in- estly desired to wipe out intemper- sumed mote liquor per capita than fession must havc been very humil-
Imated that saloons were being clos- temperance is not caused, though ance. They realized that intemper- they did in any previous year since iating to the good parson, as he had
at the rate of thirty a day—nearly it may be aggravated, by bad legisla- ance was directly or indirectly the 1893, the year 1907 alone excepted. been telling his people right along
f.ooo a year. tion,   and   it   cannot   be   removed, cause of much crime, poverty and dis-     Now let us turn for a moment to that he knew it to be a fact that the
JThe prohibition leaders boast that, though it may be lessened, by good ease; that it was a financial burden our old friend, the state of Maine. Almighty was on the side of prohibi-
Ihile ten years ago there were only legislation. The main lines of tem- on the state; and that it was a hind- That prohibition has been a failure tion. Assistant Superintendent Rich-
fx million people living in "dry" perance reform, the most potent agen- ranee to material prosperity and to and a farce in that state is a matter ards, of the Anti-Saloon League, ut-
Lrritory, there are now thirty-eight cies for the building up of moral moral progress. They thought it was of common knowledge. No one who ters this wail: "Beer is sold here
jiillion. If prohibition and temper- character (and moral character is the a better policy to abolish than to is not a blind partisan will deny this, right and left, and I know it. You
lnce be the same thing, we are cer- basis of temperance in all things), license and regulate a traffic that Four years ago, Governor Cobb, a can get whisky, too; for what does it
liinly making prodigious strides to- lie wholly outside the scope of legis- seemed to them to be the root and sincere prohibitionist and an honest, mean when twenty-seven carloads of
l/ard the millennium. But sober- lation. Legislation has, of course, its source of this evil. Now, to claim outspoken man, declared, in his in- beer and whisky are shipped here?"
Iiinded people have no faith in the part to play—and a not unimportant that prohibition was even measur- augural address, that the state ought Well, Brother Richards, it means, in
Irof'essions and promises of prohibi- part—in any comprehensive program ably successful in these states, that to be ashamed of itself to have a the first place, that tliere are a good
jonists. Fifty years ago, the leaders of temperance reform; but when leg- it accomplished even a little good, prohibitory law on its books and to many thirsty people in Atlanta, and
If the- crusade thought they saw the islation encroaches on the domain of is to insult the intelligence of the peo- make that law a laughing stock of the in the second place, that your prohi-
Jaw'n of the perfect day, when there the church and the home, when it pie of New England. No sensible nation. And he insisted that, as a bitory law is a humbug. Other lead-
j'ould riot be a dram shop nor a ventures to act as a substitute for person can believe that these seven matter of common honesty, the law ing prohibitionists speak in the same
[runkard in all the land. They were purely social and moral agencies, it states would have deliberately repu- ought to be either enforced or re- strain as the two just quoted. Con-
lonfident that the problem of intern- not only fails to accomplish any good, diated a system that they had adopt- pealed. Recorder Whelden, of Port- ditions in Atlanta arc a sample of
lerance, which had perplexed and but causes the greatest harm. Speak- ed in high hopes and with high moral land, recently made this statement: those that obtain all over the state.
Lffled mankind for thousands of ing generally, the work that legisla- purpose, if they had found that that "There are at least 400 men and wo- Just a word about prohibition under
|ears, was as good as solved. The tion can do in the moral sphere is oi system was making for sobriety, pros- men who are brought before this the Local Option system. The writer
ircat dragon was about to be slain a negative character—preventing an i  perity and good citizenship. court time and again for intoxication.'  is very familiar with the working of
Ind his dead carcass hurled into the  suppressing the evil-while work 01 a      In view of the fact that it is always  Think of it, four hundred habituals in prohibition in a number of the towns
lottomless pit.   But it turned out to positive    character'  must    be    done  easier to secure the enactment than  a city from which the liquor traffic on the east end of Long Island, and
all a dream.   The dragon was not through other agencies.   In undertak-  the repeal of laws of a reputed moral  is   supposed  to  have  been   banished from his own observation during the
he  was    not.   even   seriously ing  temperance  reform   work  along  purpose, the  repudiation  of prohibi-  sixty years ago!   During four years, last seven years he can testify to the
al
Bain;
J-ounded    If he disappeared at all, any line, we must learn to be patient, tion by these states is all the more up to January 1, 1907, in Portland, fact that in every one of these "dry"
wis only to betake himself to the and to bc modest in our expectations, significant.   The only conclusion con- liquors wcre seized on 75 streets and towns, prohibition has been a disgust-
ll-,r   to   await  the  passing  of  thc We must bear in mind that temper- sistent   with    reason   and   common alleys and at 445 different places; and ing farce every time it has been tried.
torni    In the course of a few'years, ance reform is very largely a matter sense is that the people, after years 832 different persons were brought in-  In the writer's own town the record
r.e   "temperance wave" passed away, of moral and social evolution. of bitter experience, found that they to  court  for violation of the  liquor of prohibition may be summed up in
Ind  the  frenzy    and    hysteria  that     Liquor legislation must necessarily had  built  on   false   hopes,  and  that law.
Raised it, and was caused by it, died follow  one  of  two  general  policies, conditions were not only no better but
lut. It may aim
the admission of the local Anti-Saloon
Thc  Report of the Committee of leader, that "anybody can get all the
at the  abolition' of the  far worse under prohibition than they  Fifty, based on a most thorough and liquor he wants in this town under THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 31, 1909
either license ur no-license." That lt is not the liquor traffic that creates are many communities where thc ma- timately have to return to the policy church. In the course of his remar'
no-license has failed to accomplish the demand for liquor; it is the de- jority sentiment is strongly opposed of regulation, and just so long as the he referred to the miracle at Can
any good on Long Island, may be in- mand for liquor that creates the traf- to enforcement, and even prohibition- prohibitory law remains On the statute and expressed himself thus: "I hai
ferred from the fact that at the elec- lie. And just so long as the demand ists admit that, in such communities, books, just so long will the day of given this matter profound though
tions, last spring, every town on thc  continues, just so long will the supply the law becomes a mere farce. reformation be deferred.    Prohibition  and I1 wish to say to you that 1 ha\
Island was carried for-license by a de- of liquor be forthcoming in one way But even under the Local Option is like the quack doctor who cannot reached the conclusion that win
cisive majority. The Anti-Saloon ur another. The attempt to abolish system, which is supposed to insure cure the patient himself and will not Christ turned that water into wine, 1
League made the light of its life, but thc liquor traffic by a prohibitory law local majority rule, prohibition, in a allow anybody else to take the case, did what was wrong." Blind passio
it was of no use. The people knew is as futile as would be the attempt great many instances, does not actu- The present hysterical crusade is it- wild fanaticism and bitter intoleranc
r.ll about the "blessings'* of prohi- to dry up a river by building a dam. ally represent a majority of the elec- self an obstacle to reform even in are the chief, characteristics of tl
bition, and they concluded that they Prohibitionists seem to imagine that torate. And the reason is that at a places where the license law obtains, whole prohibition movement. It mu
had had enough. The prohibitionists they are dealing only with the com- local option election, a considerable It is a drain on the moral energy of be apparent to every sane and reaso
lost every town they then held, in- paratively few liquor dealers; whereas proportion of the voters do not mark the community. It creates contention, able mind that the sooner this mi
eluding conservative old East Hamp- they arc dealing with the vast multi- the excise ballot at all. ln the writer's confusion and bitter strife. It at- called "temperance" crusade is buri<
ton, which gave a majority for license Hide of men that are determined to own town, the vote on the license tracts and leads astray many well-in- out of sight and forgotten, the soon
for the first time in fifty years. use   liquor.    They   tell   us   that   the  question, during the last fifteen years, tentioned    but    unthinking    people,  the way will be cleared for genuii
Many and various arc the reasons saloon is a curse. Well, be that as it has always fallen from 12 to 20 per whose interest in moral reform and temperance reform,
why prohibition in this country has may, tlie practical question is, what cent, short of the total vote cast on whose zeal and enthusiasm would, if Finally, prohibition must be co
proved a failure. The* following con- blessing does/prohibition furnish as a other questions and for candidates for wisely directed, be of great value to demned, not only because it h
siderations will reveal a few of the substitute? Absolutely none, unless offices. During the period in question the community. These people be- failed to accomplish any good, n
more general reasons. it be the W. C. T. U. mothers' meet-  the  town  has  been  carried  for  no-  come   infatuated   with   a   blind   faith  because it is itself the source of mar
Prohibition is an attempt to deprive ing and the weekly prayer meeting, license a number of times, and in in the power of prohibition to regen- social and political evils. These evi
men of what they believe to be an These institutions, excellent as they every instance by a minority of the crate society, and they will listen to are briefly summarized as follows:
inherent right. The question of indi- are in their place, are hardly adapted total vote polled. Moreover, the pub- nothing else. If you suggest to them 1. Prohibitory legislation has nev
vidual rights is the underlying issue to satisfy the social needs of the He sentiment in favor of prohibition some proposition of reasonable re- succeeded in abolishing thc liqu
in this whole controversy. Majority masses. Students of social science, is not only not strong enough in form, they fly off into a rage and de- traffic, but it has succeeded in
rule is, of course, a sound political men who have spent years in observ- quantity to enforce the law, but even nounce you as a traitor to the country grading and demoralizing the trafl
principle,  but  it is obvious  that the ing and studying thc saloon and the  what there is of it is not of the right and an enemy of religion. by driving it into secret places.   T
application of this principle must be saloon  constituency,  whatever views quality. Prohibitionists  not  only  refuse  to liquor laws in most of the states pr
confined within reasonable limits. If they may hold as to the character of The great majority of those that support, but actively and bitterly fight hibit the use of shades in saloon wi
a majority has a right to say to a this institution as it now exists, agree vote for prohibition are full of zeal against, every plan of excise reform dows and screens in front of the ba
minority: You shall not drink beer, unanimously on the following three and enthusiasm up to the time of the that does not go to their extreme. It This wise provision is based on t
another majority has the right to say propositions: election; but after election their en- must  be abolition  or  nothing;  their common   experience   that  the  liqu
to another minority:    You shall not      1. That the saloon fills a legitimate  thusiasm dies out, and they leave it motto is rule or ruin.    In their blind business is of such  a nature that
drink tea.   Now, if the people in any  social need. to others to attend to the matter of zeal they actually rejoice in iniquity,  is far more likely to do harm wh
state or town should take it into their 2. That it is practically the only in- law enforcement. They think that in The disreputable saloon is far more it is carried on under cover than wh
heads to enact a law prohibiting thc  stitution that does fill this need. merely casting their ballots for pro- to their liking than the decent saloon,  it is open and aboveboard.   Now, pr
use of tea, what a fearful howl would 3. That it is worse than useless to hibition they have done their full duty for the more disreputable the saloon hibition forces the liquor traffic to s
go up from the camp of the W. C. T. attempt to abolish the saloon until and saved the country. The writer has the more ammunition for the cam- crete itself, not merely behind
U., and what an unenviable job the some suitable institution be establish- watched the prohibitionists in his paign. If all saloons were made dc- screen, but behind a barricaded doc
officers would have in attempting to ed as a substitute. town for seven years, and he can tes- cent and orderly, the bottom would  The door is quickly opened for tho
enforce such a law! "What, deprive The lives of the great majority tify that not two per cent, of the soon drop out of the prhibition tliat know the password, but sh
us of our right to serve tea at our are dull and monotonous. The pro- men that vote for no-license ever lift movement. Tell a prohibitionist that against the officers of the law. Tl
mothers' meetings and parlor soci- portion of pleasure and leisure is a finger or contribute one cent to such and such a saloon is certainly only practical question that confron
ables! Why, it's an outrage!" "Oh, meager and insufficient. This is as have the law enforced under either a respectable place, and you arouse his us is whether we shall permit tl
but,  good   ladies,   we,  the   majority,  true of rural as of urban life, but it  system. fiercest anger.   He would rather hear  liquor traffic to be carried on open
made up as you know of the better js too largely true of the masses The prohibition public sentiment is that a murder had been committed under the supervision and control
element, have thoroughly investigated everywhere. And whatever will lighten of that cheap, shallow, emotional va- in one of the "hell holes." In his es- the law, or whether we shall drive
this matter, and we have found that and brighten and cheer their lives riety that exhausts itself in all man- timation the respectable saloon is the into places where the arm of the la
tea is very injurious. In fact, it's a without too great a sacrifice will not ner of hysterical performances during very worst kind, as it deceives and cannot reach it. License means tl
poison. Look at the thousands of wo- be readily surrendered in the interest the campaign. Over against the in- beguiles the unwary youth to his open barroom, prohibition means tl
men  that   have   gone  down   to   tea- 0f _, questionable moral reform.     If  herent  weakness  of this  prohibition destruction. "speak easy."   Which of the two kihi
topers' graves! Look at the army of men cannot get this pleasure openly, sentiment is the public sentiment op- The real character of the prohibition is the more likely to harbor evils,^
innocent little children that have been they will get it surreptitiously, and posed to the enactment and to the movement is thus seen in the way it encourage intemperance?
left motherless," etc., etc. As a mat- even if it could be taken from them enforcement of the prohibitory law. reacts on the prohibitionists them- 2. If there is any one business mo
ter of fact, many experienced physi- by force, they would resort to sub- This sentiment is of a very different selves. They throw truth and rea- than another that, in the interest
cians believe that tea and coffee cause stitutes which, in all likelihood, would kind from the other. There is noth- son and experience to the winds, and the public, ought to be in the ham
quite as much trouble in the world be far more injurious. The saloon ing frenzied nor hysterical about it. often resort to the most contemptible of men ith conscience and mor
as alcohol. The "temperance" peo- exists because there is a demand for But it is determined, active and per- and disgusting methods to gain their principle, it is the liquor business,
pie will retort: "Yes; but there is a it. A prohibitory law certainly does sistent. It knows what it wishes and, end. Some years ago, a traveling proper kind of license law can
wide difference between beer and not remove this demand. It does not what is more to the point, it knows salesman who lives in a town in the considerable toward improving tl
tea." Of course there is, and that eradicate the social instinct and the how to get what it wishes. It doesn't Middle West, was returning home personnel of the trade. Prohibitio
is just why so many people prefer the desire to drink that lie back of the exhaust itself before election nor grow from a trip. On arriving at his sta- on the other hand, discourages d
beer. But there is no difference be- demand. In short, it does not destroy indifferent after election. Indeed, as tion, he noticed that the streets were cent, honorable men from engagu
tween the right to drink the one and a single one of the elements that soon as the town goes "dry," this filled with people. Making his way in the business, and thus throws it 11
the right to drink the other. Every- constitute the life and power of the anti-prohibition sentiment begins to through the crowd, he discovered to the hands of the most unscrupuloi
where and always, outside of Islam, saloon.   It does not introduce into the arouse itself and warm up. that a no-license parade was in pro-  and   irresponsible  men  in  the   cor
while drunkenness   has   been   con- community a single element that acts     A man in a "dry" town wishes to gress.   It was a long procession, made munity.    The  only  qualification
demned, the moderate use of alcoholic as an antidote for the saloon.    The drink, and he knows where he can get up of women and children.   They car-  quired  to  do  business  under  proh
beverages has been a common custom whole root of this institution remains it.  That man is far more interested in ried banners   and    flags,   and sang bition is the ability to beat the la
and has been regarded as the inherent jn the community intact, undisturbed getting his drink than his prohibition "temperance"    songs.      Every   child  without getting caught.   A couple
right of the individual. and -vigorous.    Under these circum- neighbor is in preventing him from WOre  a  badge  on  which  were  the years ago, in a certain town on Lor
The use of alcoholic liquors is and stances it is inevitable that the sa- getting it. And when you multiply words, "Vote for us; we cannot." At Island, one of the best hotels had I
has always been considered not only i00n, in one form or another, will con- this one drinker by a number repre- the end of the procession were sev- close its doors shortly after the drj
legitimate as a beverage, but it is con-  tinue to serve its customers. senting half or more of the male in- eral files of children dressed in rags  law went into effect.   The propneti
secrated and hallowed in the most Law enforcement is, in the long run, habitants of the community, you have and tatters. One of these, a boy, of this hotel was one of the mo
solemn and weighty rite of the Chris- dependent on public sentiment. More- an idea of the relative strength of the carried a huge banner. Printed on honored men in the community. Pn
tian Church. Now you cannot, by a 0Ver, public sentiment, in order to two kinds of public sentiment, and, if the banner, in large letters, were hibition did succeed in closing th
mere law, eradicate a sentiment and make itself felt, must be active, alert you have any power of imagination, these words: "My father is a drunk- man's bar and driving him out of tl
destroy an institution that has stood and persistent. A mere vague wish you know why prohibition does not ard." Our friends the salesman look- hotel business as well, and it close
for ages, and that is so deeply rooted that the law be enforced is not prohibit. There is said to be a good ed at the banner and then happened other decent places. But what w;
in our whole social life. Prohibition enough. The wish must be followed deal of the mule about human nature, to glance at the boy. Suddenly an the result? Why, within two yeai
condemns the conscience, the judg- up by well-organized effort. When and a prohibitory law is beautifully expression of amazement came over between fifty and sixty "kitchen s;
ment and the social habits of count- you find a community in which the adopted to bring out the mule qual- his face, and, breaking through the loons" were established in this sam
less generations of the most highlj government is ring-ridden and cor- ity. People resent the idea of being crowd, he ran up to the ragged ban- town. It is a well-known fact thi
civilized, progressive and moral peo- rUpt, it does not mean that the pub- held up by a lot of hysterical women ner bearer, and grasping him by the most of the men that ^ run thes
pics. Moreover, prohibition passes ijc sentiment is in favor of such con- and meddlesome men who conceive arm, exclaimed: "My God, what are "speak easies" in a 'dry town ai
condemnation on a great branch of in- ditions. It means that public senti- it to be their right and duty to regu- y0u doing here, my boy?" It was thoroughly satisfied with prohibitio!
dustry that has been recognized ment is impotent because it is either late the personal habits of their neigh- this gentleman's own son that had A license law would put them out c
throughout all ages as legitimate, an inactive or unorganized.   Thus it oc- bors. been dressed up in these rags by the  business.    Again,  the   only  questio
industry in which some of the most curs that small minorities can defy, Prohobition has not only failed to g00d "temperance" women and sent is: shall we encourage and prote
venerable and honored religious or- and are today defying, thc will of accomplish its avowed object, but it 0ut to carry this banner of shame the decent liquor dealer, or shall v.
ders   of  the   Christian   Church   have large majorities. has been the greatest obstacle to true and humiliation through the streets, encourage the other kind?   One km
been and are today engaged. Prohi- Just how much of this active and temperance reform in this country This exhibition is a sample of the or the other we are absolutely sui
bition    necessarily   fails   because   it determined   public   sentiment   is   re- during  the  last   fifty  years.     Other methods employed by prohibitionists  to have.
makes no discrimination between use quired  to  insure  strict law  enforce- nations  are  far ahead  of  us  in  the to gain converts to their cause. 3- Prohibition has a bad effect als
and abuse, lt arbitrarily makes a ment, depends largely on the char- way in which they handle the drink If these children really had drunken on the drinker. It tends to discouraf
legal crime of an act which is neither acter of the law. A stringent, harsh question, and one reason is that they fathers, it was unspeakably brutal and the use of the lighter alcoholic be'
wrong in itself nor contrary to the sumptuary law, like prohibition, could have not been so much disturbed by cruel to make such a spectacle of erages and to encourage the excessiv
rights and interests of society. Be* not be enforced unless it had on its "temperance waves." Prohibition at- them before the public. If their use of the stronger liquors. Th
cause two or three men use liquor to side an almost unanimous public sen- tempts to do that which is impossible fathers were not drunkards, the whole tendency is especially pronounce
excess, prohibition would compel a timent, vigilant and well-organized, and prevents the doing of that which thing was a cheap, theatrical per- wherever the attempt is made to ei
hundred temperate men to follow the Such a law has all the odds against is possible. If the liquor problem, in formance deliberately intended to force the law rigorously, eterior
rule of total abstinence. One man it. It has an uphill job from the its legislative aspects, is ever going create a false impression on the pub- tion in the quality of "quor is ai
is lame, and therefore all his neigh- outset. Public officials are, as a rule, to be solved, the solution must be lie mind. And all this fraud and vul- other one of the "blessings" intr
bors must use crutches. far more inclined to heed and yield  found  along  the  line  of  regulation,  garity   in   the   name   of  temperance duced by prohibition.   The men wl
Again, prohibition   has   failed   be-  to  the  voice  of  protest  against  thc and the sooner we set our feet on thc  and religion! run   the  "speak  easies"   often   mat
cause it is wholly negative and de- enforcement of a law of this kind right path the sooner we shall reach Here is another example of the their own "whisky," and you can in
structive.   You cannot remove an ef- than they arc to make an extraordin- the desired end. intemperate   "temperance"   of  prohi- agine the nature of the "blend,
feet until you remove the cause. You ary effort to enforce the law in obedi- Nothing is more certain than that bitionists: A professor in one of our few years ago, when the town
cannot abolish the liquor traffic until ence to the demand of the other side, every State and local community in universities accepted an invitation to which the writer lives was "dry,
you abolish the source of the traffic.  Under   state-wide   prohibition,   there  which prohibition now obtains will ul-  speak at a "temperance"  rally in  a  confirmed inebriate who lived in a THE WEEK   SATURDAY JULY 31, 1909
|imng "wet" town got in the habit
visiting this "dry" town about
■ice a fortnight. He was always
pber when he arrived and drunk
Ihen he left. He was once asked
Ihy he came from a "wet" town to
"dry" town to get liquor, and his
■lswer was: "Because I can get a
|iicker and cheaper jag on in River-
:ad than I can in ."   This is the
|ay prohibition reforms the drunkard!
is often claimed that while prohi-
|tion does not altogether prohibit, it
aes   succeed  in   reducing   the   con-
jimption of liquor.   This claim is not
jised on fact.   But even if it be true
hat less liquor is drunk in a given
Immunity   under   prohibition   than
fider the license system, the all-im-
Drtant  question,  from the point  of
lew of temperance reform is, what
lass of people are thus affected? Who
re  the  men that either cannot  get
liything to drink or cannot get  as
such  as  they  would  under  license?
|ow, everybody who is not living in
land   of   dreams,  knows   perfectly
lell that the very men in every com-
lunity who most need reforming are
\e ones that are least inconvenienced
the   prohibitory   law.   They   are
lie  first ones to  learn the  location
every "speak easy" in the  place,
lut, if prohibition cannot reform this
lass, may it not at least keep temp-
Ition out of the way of the young?
fow, the truth is that all this  talk
bout "protecting our boys" is sheer
Ivaddlc.    The protection is a myth,
[rohibition   really   creates   the most
angerous   kind   of  temptation—that
Ihich is hidden, but known.    Every
loung man that is at all liable to be
Jd astray under the license system,
far more liable to go astray under
system    that    encourages    secret
Irinking.    Who wouldn't rather have
lis son go into an open saloon and
Jet a glass of beer than to have him
Din  his  companions  in  some  back-
Dom resort?   If there is any class of
loung  men  in   the  community   that
Jesd the protection of the law, they
Ire certainly  not the ones that  frequent the  W.C.T.U.  prayer meeting
vhen the town is "dry."    While the
lood women are praying and thanking the Lord for the great blessing
If   prohibition,   these   young   fellows
Ire probably "protecting" themselves
In the "club" room at the far end of
|ome alley.
4. Prohibition- creates   widespread
Ind habitual law-breaking.    Consider
lhe number of crimes that are com-
hiittecl  every  hour  of the  day  in  a
[dry"  state.    And  consider  the  bad
hioral   effect   of   this   habit   of   law-
Ireaking on the civic life.    It creates
|he spirit of lawlessness,    lt tends to
veaken and break down that respect
lor  the  principle  of  law  and  order
Ivhich is so essential to good citizenship.   The following story shows how
|.ven good men are unconsciously affected    by    this    baneful    influence:
Some years ago a clergyman went to
li  certain    summer    resort    in  New
■Hampshire to spend his vacation. On
lirriving in the town, he went to the
feading hotel.    While waiting in the
Dffice for the supper bell, he happened to open a door, and found, in the
next room, a well-appointed bar. The
Iproprietor was in this room, and the
Iclergyman, pointing to the bar, said,
"Why, Mr. , how is this?" "How's
|what?" answered the proprietor.
•Why, you have a bar here, and you
hire evidently open for business."
The hotel man looked puzzled and
■said: "Of course I have a bar.
ICouldn't you get what you wanted?"
"Oh, .L didn't .wish anything," answer-*
led the minister, "but I wondered how
lyou could run an open bar in a prohibition town." The genial host felt
(relieved when he found that his guest
Iwas not complaining about the ser-
Ivice. "Well, well," he said, "I didn't
lunderstand what you meant. ' Why,
■that's easy. I'll tell you how we work
lit up here. You see, I was high
Isheriff of this county last term, and,
awhile I dislike to' blow my own horn,
II want to tell you that I did whatt
Ivery few men in this county would
■have done. E.very three months I
(raided my own bar and had myself
Ifined." As he finished this sentence,
■there was a look of genuine pride in
Ithe ex-sherlff's face. He seemed to
|t_e blissfullV  unconscious  that there
' was anything wrong about violating
the law. This story was told to the
writer by the ev. Dr. E. A. Wasson,
of Newark, N.J., who was himself the
clergyman that had this conversation
with the hotel man.
Here is another story which shows
the effect of prohibition as a breeder
of rank hypocrisy. About four years
ago, shortly after a certain town on
Long Island went "dry," a hotel
keeper in this town received a letter
from a wholesale whisky concern in
Kentucky, reading something like
this: "Will you kindly send us the
names of any persons in your town
who, you think, might be likely to
purchase wet goods. We have a very
tine brand of whisky (naming the
brand) that we should like to introduce in your town. We shall be glad
to extend to you the usual courtesy
of ten per cent, commission on all
sales that we may make through the
list you send us." Well, the hotel
man tnought he would have a little
fun, and so he made a list of about
thirty-five of the most rabid prohibitionists in the place, and sent the list
to the whisky firm. He thought it
would be a fine joke on the prohibitionists to have them deluged with
whisky circulars. And it turned out
to be a better joke than he thought.
For, at the end of three months, he
received a letter from the whisky
people thanking hiin for what he had
done, and inclosing a dieque for
$27 commission. Tnis story throws
light on the curious circumstance already referred to, that, as the prohibition movement spreads, the consumption of liquor increases.
Ex-President Eliot of Harvard sums
up the whole case against prohibition
in its effects on the social and political life.' He says: "The efferost to
enforce it (prohibition) during forty
years past have had some unlooked-
for effects on public respect for
courts, judicial procedure, oaths and
law, legislatures and public servants.
The public have seen law defied, a
whole generation of habitual lawbreakers, schooled in evasion
and shamelessness, courts ineffective
through fluctuations of policy, delays,
perjuries, negligences and other miscarriages of justice, officers of the
law double-faced and mercenary, legislators timid and insincere." Such is
the character and the record of prohibition.
The writer of the present article
does not wish to minimize the evils
and abuses that have been allowed
to grow up and intrench themselves
in the liquor traffic. There is no
doubt that some liquor dealers have
condoned and encouraged conditions
repugnant to moral sense and destructive of decency and good order. They
have encouraged other vices, such as
gambling and the social evil. They
have catered and pandered to the
worst passions and impulses in human nature. And they have done all
this in a cold-blooded desire to increase the volume of their business.
But the number of such dealers is
comparatively small. At the same
time, one such man in the business is
one too many. Liquor laws should
be so framed, that it would be extremely difficult, if not impossible, for
men of this stamp to get into the
liquor business, and the law should
also provide a simple and easy way
to drive out those that have gotten in.
The limits of this article preclude
a lengthy discussion of tlle question
of a legislative remedy for the evils
connected with the liquor traffic. But
it will not be amiss to suggest a plan
of regulation whicli, in the judgment
of the writer, would be a step in thc
right direction.
In formulating liquor legislation, we
should be guided by two fundamental
principles. The first is practicability.
The question to be determined at the
outset is, * what kind of excise law,
under given conditions, with men as
they are in their individual and social life, and with political standards
as they are, will effect the best results. The trouble with much of our
legislation is that it has ignored limitations imposed by actual conditions.
Legislation is not the expression of
ideals nor of moral yearnings. The
law should represent the nearest approach to the ideal that present con
ditions will admit of. Another equally important consideration, following
on this is that the same legislation is
not adapted for all communities.
Hence, liquor legislation should provide for a very large measure ot home
rule. But there is a right and wrong
kind of home rule. The so-called
local-option system that now obtains
in many of tlie states, is the wrong
kind, lt is unsound i.. principle and
demoralizing in its effects, lt is at
variance with the general policy of
regulation, lt is part of the policy
and progr.am of prohibition. It is
an instrument placed in the hands of
prohibitionists to enable them to gain
their end little by little. Now, all
the features and provisions of a state
liquor law should be mutually consistent and harmonious. All parts of
the law should have the same general intent and conform with the same
general policy, tint, under tne present local-option system, the state is
loliovving two opposite policies at the
same time. This kind of local option gives tne local community too
much power and too little power.
The people have no power to say
wno shall receive licenses and what
moral and otner qualifications shall be
lequirecl. iney nave no power to determine the question of prohibited
days and hours; no power to determine the amount of the license fee,
nor to set a limit on the number of
licenses to be issued. There is no
option on any of tnese matters of
practical administration that properly
come within the scope of local self-
government. The community has option on only one question—whetner
tne liquor traffic shall be legalized or
prohibited. This local option scheme
reverses the true order of political
administration. It withholds from the
local community those minor but important powers that the people in tne
local community are in the best position to exercise wisely, while it confers upon the local community that
supreme power of life or death over
the liquor traffic which ought to be
reserved in the hands of the state.
Under this system the liquor dealers
and the public are in a constant state
of uncertainty as to the fundamental
question of regulation or abolition.
At every local-option election, there
is the possibility of a complete revolution of policy. Today the liquor
business is just as legitimate as any
other business; tomorrow, it may be
under tne ban of the law. The ques
tion is never settled. Neither side
ever wins a permanent victory. The
state alone should settle this all-important question of the legality of thc
liquor traffic, A question like this,
involving the fundamental rights of
property and of personal liberty,
should not be left to the decision of
a majority vote at a local election.
On the other hand, the state, after
establishing the legality of the liquor
business everywhere within its borders, should grant to the local community the fullest freedom and power
in the matter of regulation.
Starting with this general principle
of state rule in matters of general
policy and home rule in matters of
local administration, the following is
a rough outline of the plan of regulation that the writer has in mind as
a substitute for the present local-
option system.
That the people in each local community (the township is probably tlie
best unit) be empowered to elect their
own Board of Excise Commissioners,
twelve in number, to serve for a term
of say two years. This Board should
have power to determine the amount
of thc license fee (within maximum
and minimum limits fixed by the
state); to determine how many licenses should be issued (within maximum and minimum limits fixed by
the state); to determine the question of prohibited days and hours,
and all other questions of a purely
local nature. The Board should have
sole power to grant and revoke licenses, subject to certain rules of
procedure. The applicant should be
required to present to the Board a
certificate of good moral character,
signed by twelve reputable persons,
who should bc property owners and
residents of thc community. The
Board  should be required to hold a
public hearing on all applications for
license, and an opportunity be given
to remonstrants, should there be any,
to present their objections. After
this hearing, the Board should have
full discretionary power by a majority
vote to grant or refuse any application. And tliere should be no appcil
from their decision. This power to
grant licenses is the most important
of all. lt is the key to the whole situation. And this key should be placed
in the hands of the people most nearly affected. If we can prevent unfit
persons from getting into the liquor
business, we have, at the very outset,
solved nine-tenths of the problem of
regulation. The trouble now is that
almost anybody that has the price,
whether he is morally fit or not, can
get a license and start up a saloon.
The law may require that the licensee
be a person of good moral character,
but that requirement amounts to simply nothing at all unless some person or persons be empowered to determine in each case the question of
moral fitness. And who is better
qualified to exercise this power than
twelve men elected by and responsible to the people of the community?
The Board should also possess the
sole power to revoke licenses. On
the complaint of any citizen tha,t a
certain liquor dealer was violating the
law or that he was maintaining a
nuisance of any kind, it would bc the
duty of the Board to hold a public
trial of the matter, summon and swear
witnesses, and give the accused person an opportunity to defend himself.
After  hearing  all   the  evidence,   the
Board should have power by a two-
thirds vote to dismiss the case or
suspend or revoke the license. And
there should be no appeal from their
decision.
Of course it will be objected that
this plan places too much power in
the hands of the Excise Board. Well,
if you give men in this position so
little power that they could not possibly do any harm, you make it impossible for them to do any good.
There is not the remotest likelihood
that such a Board, elected by the
people, could be unduly influenced to
grant a license to a man of known
unfitness or to drive a decent, law-
abiding liquor dealer out of business.
There would certainly be far less likelihood of abuse of power under such
a system than there is now under the
local-option system. For, under the
hitter system, a bare majority of tlvj
voters can, at one stroke, revoke
every license in the town without
trial or hearing or reason. The most
reputable liquor dealer is no safer
than tne dive keeper. The proposed
plan is home rule of the right kind.
It gives tlie people all the power they
need to regulate, but no power to destroy and confiscate. Under this system, the liquor business would be
placed on a permanent footing. Every
dealer would be absolutely sure that
his license was secure as long as he
obeyed the law and conducted his
business decently. The only person-;
that would be put out of business
would be the disreputable liquor
dealer and the prohibition agitator.
asKaxaaaeiesasifei^^
FOUL BAY
Tea Rooms ___
Bath Houses
are now open.    We want everyone there.    These tea rooms arc
under the management of
THE COSY CORNER
Music.    Public Telephone No. 2110.
A Bit of Old England
WHERE COMFORT AND SERVICE ARE ONE.
To sit and eat in comfort is perhaps a rarity outside of your
own home, but it is in this point that we excel others.
BREAKFASTS       LUNCHES
AFTERNOON TEAS
DINNERS
To prove what we state pay us a visit.
We grow our own produce.
Parties catered to and tables reserved.
Cosy Corner Cafe and Tea Rooms
616 Fort Street   -   Phone 1440
sisie!$^^!eBi^B^eee^Bie*eeB-s^9K -?e^!e}ee^e{SieieBeB5ae!«)eBi^eB9K
Headquarters for choice nursery stock.
Apple, pear, cherry, plum and peach trees
and small fruits, also ornamental trees,
shrubs, roses, evergreens, etc. Largest and
best assorted stock in  British  Columbia.
Ten per cent, cash discount on all orders
above $10.00.
PRICE LIST AND CATALOGUE ON
APPLICATION.
| THE  UNDERWOOD  LEADS     |
I OTHERS FOLLOW.                                      *
I CASH REGISTERS.    SAFES.     DESKS,
$ FILING CABINETS,     OFFICE FURNITURE,
| TYPEWRITINGG PAPER,     CARBON3.
| BAXTER & JOHNSON      809 Government Street
$ A well furnished office is a good advertisement THE WEEK, SATURDAY JULY 31, iyi.9
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
MME WfcEis." PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
1208  Government St., Victoria, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE, Editor.
Tiie Hon. William
Minister 01 Pugsley, Minister
Public works.   0f   j>ublic    Works,
has paid his first
official visit to Victoria. It is an
undoubted advantage that those responsible for tlie administration of
affairs of the country should visit
every part of the Dominion, and
get iii touch with local conditions,
it is especially important that sucn
a policy should be followed by the
heads of the great spending departments, and Mr. Pugsley is to
be commended for making his
Western tour. There are two ways
of looking at public works; the one
is, to confine the vision to the local
effect and the benefits resulting;
the other is, to regard all such expenditures from a .National standpoint. The former view often
looms so large before the eyes of
Boards of Trade and other organizations that the latter is obscured.
It is the duty of a Minister to put
National considerations before
local, even though this course often results iu disappointment. An
application of this principle will
help to assess at their real value
the probable results of the Minister's recent visit to Victoria.
Take the first work of importance
to which his attention was directed, the improvement of the Inner
Harbour, and the building of a
breakwater to protect the Outer.
The expenditure on this work is
large and yet it is absolutely-necessary if Victoria is to line up with
the requirements of a section of
the Province which is rapidly developing. The Minister, however,
will have to look further than this
and his reply showed that he was
keenly alive to an aspect of the
question whicli it is as reasonable,
as it is imperative, for him to consider. He said in effect: "Show
me that the building of a breakwater would create a valuable
National asset, and that it would
result in such a development of
shipping as would justify the expenditure." ' In other words:
"Show me that the benefit would
be connnensurate with the outlay
and that it would not be purely
local." This is the right way of
looking at a big subject, and the
Board of Trade should have no
difficulty iu complying with the
condition. Victoria is much more
than a British Columbian it is a
Canadian port; it is at present
the chief Oriental port. A large
proportion of its imports are transferred to the railway systems and
carried all across Canada before
reacliiwr tlieir ultimate destination. 'The development of the
greatest1. Western industry—Lum-'
bering and Pulp making'—will necessitate vastly increased harbour
accommodation, and on all these
grounds Victoria is entitled to be
regarded as a National port. Passing to the question of railway construction it can reasonably be
urged that Canada requires, and
urgently requires, the development
of. the resources of Vancouver
Tsland. This is especially true of
lumber,' fruit and coah Only a
small proportion of these products
will be consumed locally. The
bulk of them will bc required on
the Mainland, and some of them
as far East as Winnipeg. It is
reasonable therefore that the Dom-
inion Government should recognize
its responsibility to co-operate in
the construction of any line which
will establish communication witli
the Mainland, and bring these resources within reach of the market.
Dominion aid has been granted to
railways which would confer far
less benefit on the Dominion than
those which are desired on Vancouver Island. The third important topic discussed by Mr. Pugsley was the question of a dry dock
at Esquimalt. While this would
be of immense local benefit it must
of necessity be a link in the chain
of Imperial Defence, and final adjudication on the subject will be
determined by that consideration;
but there is little doubt that in any
such scheme it must figure, and it
is equally certain that on the whole
of the Pacific Coast there is no
finer or safer harbour than Esquimalt. It will, therefore, follow as
a matter of course that when the
scheme is finally developed it will
include this important public
work. The" Songhees Reserve
question, while mainly a local one,
involves issues which stamp it with
a broader significance because all
over the Dominion, and especially
in the West, the question of Indian Reserves is a live one, and
any dealing with a single case involves the establishment of a precedent. This condition necessitates the utmost caution, and also
determines the necessity for importing the National element into
the settlement of each individual
ed a tendency to initiate changes.
However, all's well that ends well,
and when the agreement is
signed, sealed and delivered Victoria will have ensured the expenditure iu at least $1,500,000, and
possibly more, on a local project
which will find employment for
nunuieus of men, anil ensure the
expenditure of $1,000,000 for
labour and supplies. This should
help Victoria to tide over the balance 01 the slack period before the
next boom is due.
OMINECA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District ot Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that John Fitch, o£
Moyie, B.C., occupation Merchant, intends 10 apply tor permission to pu_-
chase   uie  following described  lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-west corner ot Section 17, Township eaal ot Township 1, Range 4, Nechaco Valley; thence north 60 chains;
Uieuce _a-i 80 chains; thence south oo
chains; mence west st) chains to point
ot eommeneement, and being 5liU aeres
ot said .Section 17.
April *uh, moa.
JOHN FITCH.
june12
cast'
Hitherto all dealings with
the Indians have been dominated
by the utmost regard for their
vested interests; they have been
treated with the same scrupulous
fairness tind legality as a Ward in
Chancery, and recent occurrences
in connection with the Songhees
Reserve emphasize the impossibility of adopting any other principle. It would be a mistake to
expect too much from the visit of
Mr. Pugsley. It was part of his
business to conciliate each constituency. He has endeavoured to
do this by holding out hopes of
important public works. It is
only fair to say that he has been
more conservative in his promises
than some of his colleagues, and
there is therefore more reason to
expect that they will not be as
ineffective.
"Although the agree-
TheB.C.E.R. ment between the
Agreement. city and the British Columbia Electric Railway Company has not
actually been signed it has reached
the final stages, and there seems
no reason to doubt that it will be
executed within a week or so. The
Week believes that this is a matter of congratulation to the city.
It is not necessary to recount all
the advantages which it secures,
but they are such as will place it
on an equality with Vancouver in
respect of chlip power and light,
and for a city_,of 40,000 to get as
favourable terms in this connection
as a city of 100,000 must be considered good business. There have
been regrettable delays, and ill-
advised changes, and but for the
patience of the representatives of
the Company the issue might have
been different. It was a case, of
trained business men on the one
side negotiating with a Council
which did not know its own mind,
and which changes it as often as. a
woman. During the negotiations
it developed that the legal advisers
of the Council are apt at times
to'assume a little more authority
than they are entitled to; for, Instead of carrying out .the instructions of ,tlie Cotincii-. they develop-
OMi.NECA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District ot Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Minnie A. Currie,
of Glencoe, Ontario, occupation, Married
Woman, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
land:—
Commencing at a post planted one
mile east of the north-east corner of
Section 12, Township 1, Range 4, Nechaco Valley, thence south SO chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north uu
chains; thence east 80 chains to point
of commencement, and being Section 7
East of Township 1, Range 4.
April *ith, 1909.
jel2 MINNIE  A.   CURRIE.
OMINECA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that James J. Harpell,
of Toronto, Ontario, occupation Editor,
intends to apply for permission to purchase  the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted 1 mile
east of lhe south-east corner of Section 12, Township 1, Range 4, Neehaeo
Valley; Uieuce south 80 chains; thenee
east 6U cliains; ihence north 80 chains;
thenee west 80 cliains to point of commencement, and being Section 5, Township eust of Township 1, Range 4.
April   uth,  11109.
JelJ JAMES  J. HARPELL.
OMINECA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Wm. Harriot, of
Winnipeg, Manitoba, occupation Grain
Merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
land:—
Commencing at a post planted 1 mue
east of the south-east corner of Section
12, Township 1, Range 4, Nechaco Valley; thence south 80 ehains; thenee
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement and being Section 6 East,
of Township 1, Range 4.
April 6th, 1909.
je 12 WM.  HARRIOT.
OMINECA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that H. L. Donalley,
of St. Paul, Minnesota, occupation Telegrapher, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following describeu
land:—
Commencing at a post planted 1 mile
east of the south-east corner of Section
1, Township 1, Range 4, Nechaco Valley, thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement and being Section 31, Township east of Township  8,  Range  ..
April 5th, 1909.
je 12 H. L. DONALLEY.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Frank Vlcker
Hobbs, of Victoria, B.C., occupation retired, intends to apply for permission
io lease the following described land:—
Commencing at a post planted about
eight chains in a northerly direction
irom the south-east corner of Section
11, Township 11; thence following the
.sinuosities of the shore line northwesterly 17 chains; thence south-easterly 10 chains; thence northerly 10 chains;
thence south-easterly to the point of intersection of the south-east quarter of
Section eleven (11) and the south-wesi
quarter of section twelve (12), Township 11, Renfrew District, and extending eastwards from said shore line as
before described, and Including the foreshore and land covered by water.
Dated  June  2nd,   1909.
je 12 FRANK VICKER HOBBS.
No. 391 No. 10
CERTIFICATE   OF   THE   REGISTRATION   OF   AN  EXTRA-PROVINCIAL  COMPANY.
"Companies Act, 1897."
I HEREBY CERTIFY that the "E. M.
Miller Co.", an Extra-Provincial Company, has this day been registered under the "Companies Act, 1897," to carry
out or effect all or any of the objects
of the Company to which the legislative authority of the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company is
situate at Quincy, in the County of
Adams,  State of  Illinois.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is fifty thousand dollars, divided Into five hundred shares ot one
hundred  dollars  each.
The head offlce of the Company in
this Province is situate at Victoria,
and Frank Higgins, Barrister at law,
whose address is Law Chambers, Victoria, B.C., is the attorney for the Company, not empowered to issue and
transfer stock.
The time of the existence of the
Company is fifty years, from March
27th,  1909.     .
The Company is limited.
Given  under  my  Hand  and  Seal  of
Offlce at  Victoria,  Province of British
Columbia, this second day of July, one
thousand nine hundred and nine.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this company
has been established and registered are:
To manufacture, buy, sell and 1 repair
vehicles of all descriptions, parts, appliances and accessories thereto, harness and other merchandise. oi -*f
OMINECA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur H. Mansfield, of Kenora, Ontario, occupation
Train Despatcher, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land:—
Commencing at a post planted abput
3 miles east of the north-east cornei
of section 12, Township 1, Range 4, Nechaco Valley; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 4u
ehains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement and being the soutn
half of Section lo of Township east of
Township 1, Range 4.
April 6th, 1909.
je 12 ARTHUR H. MANSFIELD.
OMINECA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that James C. Mas-
son, of Toronto, Ontario, occupation
Physician, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following describea
land:
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile east of the southeast corner of
Section 36, Township 1, Range 4, Nechaco Valley; theuce north 80 chains;
tiience east 40 chains; thence south 8U
ehains; thence west 40 chains to point
of commencement and being the west
half of Section 32 of Townsnip east of
Township 1, Range 4.
April 3rd, 1909.
je 12 James c masson.
OMINECA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Helen McDonald,
of London, Ontario, occupation Married
Woman, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
land:—
Commencing at a post planted about
seven miles northwesterly from Stella
Indian Reserve on the left bank of En-
dico River 60 chains west and about 20
chains south of Gray's trail post mara-
ed LXX, thence north 40 chains; thehce
east 80 chains; thence south 40 chains,
more or less, to Endico River; thence
meandering said River west 80 chains
to point of commencement, and containing 320 acres, more or less.
April 18th, 1909.
je 12 HELEN McDONALD.
OMINECA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Alexander Chisholm, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
land:—
Commencing at a post planted one
mile east of the northeast corner ot
Section 12, Township 1, Range 4, Nechaco Valley; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement, and being Section 8
of Township east of Township 1, Range
4.
April 4th, 1909.
je 12 ALEXANDER CHISHOLM.
OMINECA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that John C. Elliot, of
Glencoe, Ontario, occupation Barrister,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following land:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of Section 18, Township east of Township 1, Range 4, Nechaco Valley; thence north 80 ehains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 40 chains to point
of commencement, and being the east
half of said Section 18.
April 4th, 1909.
1e 12 JOHN C. ELLIOT.
OMINECA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Malcolm G. Cameron, of Goderich, Ontario, occupation
Barrister, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
land:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of section 31, Township east of Township 1, Range 4, Nechaco Valley; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement, and being Seotion 31
of Township east of Township 1, Range
April 3rd,  1909.
je 12 MALCOLM G. CAMERON.
OMINECA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Duncan R. Campbell, of Chatham, Ontario, occupation
Factory Superintendent, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of Seotion 36, Township 1, Range 4, Nechaco Valley; thence
south forty chains; thence east eighty
chains; thence north forty chains;
thence west eighty chains to point oi
commencement, and containing 320
acres, more or less.
April 3rd, 1909.
je 12 DUNCAN R. CAMPBELL.
OMINECA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Wm. H. Martin,
of Regina, Saskatchewan, occupation
Barrister, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
land:—
Commencing at a post planted about
three miles east of the north-east corner of Section 12, Township 1, Range
4, Nechaco Valley, thence north 40 chs;
thence west 80 ohalns; thence south 40
chains; thence east 80 chains to point
of commencement, and being the south
half of section 16 of Township east of
Township 1, Range 4.
April 6th, 1909.
je 12 WM. H. MARTIN.
CANCELLATION  OF RESERVE.
NOTICE ls hereby given that the Reserve existing on Crown Lands ln the
vicinity of Babine Lake, Range 6, Coast
District, notice of which was published
in the British Columbia Gazette ot the
17th December, 1908, is cancelled ln bo
far as it relates to Lots No. 1,463 to
1,500, both Inclusive, Range 6, Coast Distriot
ROBERT A, RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B.C., June 6th, 1909.
je 12
UP=TO=DATE BILL!
WEEK AUGUST 2.
The New Grand!
Telephone 618
SULLIVAN * CONSIDINE,    Proprietor*
Management of ROBT. JAMIESON.
Extraordinary Announcement.
"The Event of the Summer Vaudeville Season."
VERA  DE  BASSINI
The Italian Nightingale.
THE BROTHERS WOOD
In Their Remarkable Double Ringi|
Act.
TOM BATEMAN
 "A Jolly Tar."
HARVARD and CORNELLE
Presenting
"The Actress and The Dude."
THE TWO AHLBERGS
Comedy Act and Hand Balancers.]
THOS. J. PRICE
Song Illustrator.
"I'm Tying the Leaves So Theyl
Won't Come Down."
NEW MOVING PICTURES
"A Lunatic's Power."
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
mM_w_mmmmm_wmmmifi'.
I No Place ■ = No Show
1 To Win
Every Time
tfc      Dudleigh's  mixture  does  not J
|? burn.   Smoked by all classes.
1
I'ESe. Richardson
i§ Phone 346
__
Mrs. Melville Parry |
SOPRANO
CONCERT,
ORATORIO,
OPERA
VOICE PRODUCTION AND
EXPRESSION IN SINGING
Pupils Received at Residence.
1645 OAK BAY AVENUE,
(Near Terrace Ave.)::
% " "              H
i A
I NEW
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I EDISON
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I The FIRESIDE
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& This  model   plays   both   the
_% 2 and 4-minute Records and is
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P •
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I i
I M. W. WAITT & CO.. Limited
•I LAROEST EDISON DEALERS
1 1004 Qovernment  Street. _,
%m&#®m_mmmtmmi^^ THE WEEK, SATURDAY,'JULY .y, 1909.
Having Eyes, But
They See Not
By BOHEMIAN.
I have always considered Othello
the greatest of Shakespeare's plays,
on the stage, as Hamlet is in the
study. The former cannot vie with
the latter in philosophic range, in
profundity, and in subtlety, but it is
far more picturesque, less sombre,
and better constructed as an acting
play. This, however, is, I am afraid
beside the mark for it is uot so much
of the play that I was thinking as of
one impressive though from which
I can never get away when I either
see or read the masterpiece. I think
there is nothing more pathetic in
■Shakespeard than that scene where
in his fallen greatness, Othello turns
to the onlookers with "Soft, a word
—I have' done the States some service." But the thought which is in
my mind is suggested by the comparison which he institutes between
himself and
"That base Judean,
:   Who  threw  a   pearl  away,   richer
than all his tribe."
1 have recently spoken of the mis
understandings of life as its greatest
tragedy, and this is one of them
The failure to recognize the pearl
The casting away of something or
someone, who would have enriched
life and made it worth while, because they were mistaken for dross,
It occurs to me that the philosophy
of this subject will force itself on the
consideration of the twentieth century before long and will become one
of the foremost topics of the day.
To give it is most material application, the spread of divorce is not
only weakening the marriage tie but
is undermining every phase of the
marriage relationship. In countries
-•-where divorces are hardly obtainable
on any terms marriage is entered into with more seriousness and consideration. The permanence of the tie
has some weight, at any rate in the
majority of instances, but even if it
does not deter it at least developes
prudence after marriage; for no man
or woman with an atom of sense
would set out on the journey of married life without some regard for delicacy, and adeptation, if they know
that the balance of their lives is to
be spent together. Easy divorce removes the last obstacles to inconsiderate and selfish conduct, and as a
consequence there is less of the
spirit of self-sacrifice or even self-
denial, and the feeling becomes uppermost that one need not put up
with personal inconveniences because
they can always be got rid of by
cutting the Gordian knot in the divorce court. In this way many a
man, and perhaps many a woman,
throws away a pearl of priceless value
and impoverishes their own life.
But there are other ways of shutting one's eyes to the greatest blessing of life, and one of the most prolific is insiderateness. There are many
flowers which only thrive in the sun
shine, and indeed very few in the
shade. There are many husbands
who at the end of the honeymoon
deliberately plant their wives in the
chillest place, where the sunshine of
sympathy, of appreciation, and of
confidence can never reach them, and
then incessantly complain if they become icicles. Woman's nature in particular is so constituted that she cannot be happy without appreciation. A
man may work for her, and load her
with gifts; he may even say that he
loves her, but unless he shows by a
thousand little signs' that she has his
full confidence, that he appreciates
her worth and that he is proud to
share his every secret with her he will
never find a resting place in her
heart.
There is something wrong with any
man whom no woman loves; it matters not what his weaknesses or failings. It matters not how many, and
how great mistakes there may be in
his life. It matters not what kind of
a horrid past he may have had, he
can win the love and the fidelity of
some woman if he is true to her and
shows her his whole heart. On the
other hand a man may have a clean
record with his fellows, there may not
be a plot on any page of his history,
he may pass for a good husband and
father, and be regarded in every sense
as a respectable member of society,
and yet he may never learn the secret, the open se-same to a woman's
heart; and all because though' having eyes he sees not.
As a rule it is because, he will not
take the trouble to see, *it is because
his innate selfishness leads him to
concentrate his attention on himself,
his hobbies, or his vices. It is because he. has mapped out his life from
the wrong starting point, it is because his principle is "take" instead of
"give." There comes a time when
all eyes are open; when, like Othello,
the impetuous, the thoughtless, and
the inconsiderate alike realize that
their opportunity has slipped away;
that the pearl has gone, perhaps into
the keeping of another who will
cherish it, and awaken all its hidden
beauty, or perhaps it is dissolved in
the acrid tears of bitterness, or perhaps in a few instances it is crushed
in the hand that should have preserved and protected it, but in any
event I conclude' as I begun in the belief that the greatest tragedy of life
springs from misunderstandings, and
that the most fatal misunderstanding
is to have eyes and yet not to see.
i-:i._)i__-t£_-i_-ii_
CORRESPONDENCE
The Week accepts no responsibility
for the views expressed by its correspondents.
Communications will be inserted
whether signed by the real name of
the writer or a nom de plume, but the
writer's name and address must be
given to the Editor as an evidence of
bona fides. In no case will it be
divulged without consent.
Cowichan Bay, July 26.
Plagiarism.
Dear Sir,—I think 1 can supply
you with another explanation of plagiarism and a pretty story of a well
known author. Many years ago 1 had
a story in the press and on coming
down to my chambers found my
stable companion in a state of gloom.
He threw me a copy of one of the
London illustrated papers, saying:
"What are you going to do about
that?" "That," was an illustration
to one of Mr. Grant Allen's serials,
in which a train was going over a
trestle of really phenomenal height,
whilst the hero of the story was
hang on from below. On reading
the story 1 found that Grant Allen's
man had been caught on the trestle,
had slipped through and hung on
ind after the train had passed was
so exhausted by the nervous strain
that he could not pull himself up.
You can work out the situation for
yourself. The devil of it was that
Grant Allen had worked it out almost in the same words as I had
done and our two incidents and the
telling of them were almost identical.
I sat down at once and wrote to
Grant Allen, telling him what had
happened, and that my book though
not yet issued was printed, and pointing out that I could not possibly have
seen his yarn until that day. The
result was a charmingly courteous
letter acquitting mc of all sin and
concluding with a statement that he
had read all my stories with great
interest and had taken the trouble
to make enquiries about me, from
which he had learned that, like himself, I had been a wanderer on the
earth and that there was nothing even
surprising in the fact that two men,
given to writing, should be struck
with the sacred idea when crossing a
C.P.R. trestle, or in their working
two incidents out in very much the
same way.
The letter is now in the possession
of Mrs. LeFevre of Vancouver, and'
I like to tell the story because it
shows that uncharitableness is not a
characteristic of all authors.
Yours truly,
CLIVE PHILLIPPS WOLLEY.
X Social and        *
* Personal. *
v if j
______ _____ ___.!______.!___*. __________ ____!_■ ____.§__ ■J«t_M____U__l_i_____i>_u
Colonel and Mrs. Landes of Seattle ,
were in Victoria for a few days early
in   the  week  and   during  tlieir  stay
here  were the  guests of  Mrs.  Cecil
Roberts. j
Mrs. James Norman, who has been
visiting for some time in Victoria, left
for Vancouver last Saturday. 1
* *   *
Mrs. Stephen Phipps of Cowichan
was registered at the Empress during
the week. 1
* *   * .    ".'
Mr. Stanley Johnson came down
from Prince Rupert during the week.
* *    w 1
Mrs. Fagan has returned home af-1
ter a trip spent on the Mainland.      I
* *   * .1
Miss   Ryan,    the    popular   tennis |
player,  is  the  guest  of  Mrs.  C.   E.
Pooley. ■
* *   w j
Messrs. Lowrie, Cambie and Monteith spent a couple of days at Col.
Prior's  summer  residence  on  Shaw- j
nigan Lake last week. 1
Victoria Fuel Co.
PHONE 1377
You want the best Coal, the "Burn all" kind, absolutely free
from Slate, Stones and Klinkers.
We are Sole Agents for The South Wellington Coal Mines
Company (Ltd.).
THIS COAL is admitted by all to be the finest Domestic Coal
mined.
Let us know if you want it quick.
YieTORm FUEL eOMPftNY
PHONE 1377 618 TROUNCE AVE.
The Misses Laura and Betty Jukes,
of Vancouver are in the city for thc
tennis tournament. |
* *   *
Mr. James  Lawson returned from'
the  Mainland early in  the  week.      |
* *   * j
Among those present at Mrs. Flum-'
erfelt's delightful garden party last j
week were: Mrs. Trewartha James 111
shell pink satin, veiled with chiffon
in same tone, Mrs. McPhillips in 1
cream satin Princess gown trimmed i
with lace, Mrs. C. V. Spratt in pale !
blue silk and black hat, Mrs. R.!
Jones in Alice blue with black hat,
Mrs. Sampson in blue cloth skirt with 1
silk coat, Mrs. Davie in white lin-1
gerie frock, black and cerise hat, Mrs.'
J. Dunsmuir in French blue, hat to •
match, Miss Butchart in green satin
Princess gown, Mrs. Matthews in
black and white frock, pale blue picture hat, Misses Irving, Mrs. J. Harvey, Mrs. Gaudin, Mrs. Geo. Gillespie, Miss Gillespie, Miss T. Monteith,
Mrs. Frank Barnard, Mrs. Pooley,
Miss Dupont, Mrs. Matson, Mrs.
Coles, Mrs. and Miss Heyland, Miss
Eberts, Mr. and Mrs. Lampman, Mrs.
Holyer, Mrs. Helmcken, Miss Helmcken, Mrs. Troup, Mr. and Mrs. Gresley, Mrs. and Miss Alister Robertson, Mrs. Day, Miss Day, Mr. and
Mrs. Eliot, Mr. and Mrs. Gore, Mr.
A. Gore, Mrs. C. Todd, Mrs. S. H.
Gillespie, Mrs. J. H. Todd, Mrs. A.
Gillespie, Miss Mara, Mrs. Laing, Mrs.
Kirk, Miss Hanington, Mrs. Rome,
Mrs. Blaiklock, Col. Holmes, Mrs.
Holmes, Miss McKay, Mrs. Irving,
Miss P. Irving, Mrs. Solby, Mrs.
Fitzgibbons, Miss Fitzgibbons, Mrs.
Fleet Robertson, Mrs. Hasell, Mrs.
Blackwood, Misses Blackwood, Mrs.
Courtney, Mrs. Harold Robertson,
Mrs. Hugo Beavan, Miss Ellis, Mrs.
Gibb, Mrs. J. Hunter, Mr. and Mrs.
Cambell McCallum, Misses Dunsmuir,
Mrs. Peters, Miss H. Peters, Misses
Angus, Misses Pitts, Mrs. Arthur
Robertson, Mrs. H. Pooley, Mrs.
Alexis Martin, Msr. Ambery, Mrs.
Raymour, Mrs. Corsan, Mrs. Rithet,
Mrs. Ker, Mrs. B. Heisterman, Miss
Drake, Miss Rome, Mrs. Bullen, Miss
Bell, Mrs. F. Pemberton, Mrs. and
Miss Savage, Mrs. and Miss Arbuthnot, Mrs. Henry Martin, Mrs. Wilby,
Mrs. Fulton, Mrs. R. Janion, Mrs.
Powell, Mrs. Muskett, Mrs. McBride,
Mrs. Tye, Mrs. Charles, Mrs. Tuck,
Miss Goward and many others.
Something New
We are now able to offer to our patrons
A   GUARANTEE
on our splendid line of PLATED KNIVES, FORKS and SPOONS.
This line which is specially made for us is guaranteed to have
MORE SILVER than any other standard make and we GUARANTEE to replace
Free of Charge
any of these goods which, a ter use, do not prove satisfactory. This
condition we believe accompanies no other flatware made.
Prices as follows:—
COFFEE SPOONS  per doz.   $2.70
TEASPOONS  " 3-15
DESSERTSPOONS   " 4-95
TABLESPOONS  " S*S
DESSERT FORKS   " 4-95
TABLE FORKS   " 5^5
DESSERT KNIVES    " 4.95
TABLE KNIVES    " 5.40
Challoner & Mitchell
Diamond Merchants and Silversmiths
1017 Qovernment Street
Victoria, B. C.
No. 21
COAL PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Bupert District.
NOTICE is hereby given that Maude
G. Hewke will within 30 days from this
date, apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a license to prospect for coal on the lands
and under the area described as follows:
Commencing at a post at the N. AV.
corner of Section 14, Township 27,
thence east one mile, thence south one
mile, thence west one mile, thence north
one mile to place of beginning.
IG June  1909.
jy 24     LORENZO ALHXANDER, Agent.
No. 30
COAL PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Rupert District.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Olaf
Strandwald will within 30 days from
this date, apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
license to prospect for coal on the lanas
at Victoria, for a license to prospect
for coal on the lands and under the
area described  as  follows:
Commencing at a post at the S. W
corner of Section 21, Township 27!
thence north one mile, thence east one
mile, thence south one mile, thence weat
one mile to place of beginning.
16 June, 1909.
Jy 24      LORENZO ALEXANDER, Agent THE WEEKrSAT,URDAY,:JU|^^ ^99,
%it?3t"t»*t"tf^^V't?^^_
_t '"ilt"
t A Lady's Letter *
*f* By BABETTE. .'if-
if i?
if if if if if i< if if if i?if ifi*
Dear Madge:
The Japanese—of all people in the
world—have started the ■ idea of
classes for the teaching of common
sense. The wiseacres who are responsible for this new departure in school
curriculum argue with great solemnity that it is the absence of common sense which is responsible for
most of the ills of this world. "Had
people sufficient common sense," they
say, "there would be no such thing
as war or revolution; while in the
domestic realm the upheavals and
storms that wreck lives would cease
to exist." One can heartily agree
with the statement. Tliere was never
a war yet that those outside clashing
interests could not have settled over
the dinner-table. The common sense
which could see how much ought
really to be given and how much
ought really to be taken; the common sense which would realise the
strength of a tyranny and the futility
of struggling against it—the common
sense that has recently saved Europe
from a universal war. This is the
common sense that Japan wants to
teach -her little sons and daughters.
And this wider common sense, which
would regulate the fate of nations,
will be equally efficacious in the affairs of the home. 1 have not seen
the plan of the lessons which arc to
raise young people to one great level
jpf common sense. I snould dearly
like to do so. One wonders if tiie
same professor will teach the same
rules to both boys and girls, it su
often 'happens that what seems common sense to the woman is considered nonsense by the man—and
vice  versa.
Flow arc the two standards to be
reconciled, unless, indeed, as descriptions of their home life, rather jr.
clines us to believe only one standard—thc man's—reigns in Japan.
Then, again, take youth and age. The
common-sense methods which the
young man uses to push his budding
business his father regards as rank
improvidence, while the common-
sense maxims of thc experienced
father are confidentially described by
his offspring as "the before-the-Klood
ideas of the pater." If we try to
bring mothers and (laughters on to
the same plane of common sense we
meet with similar incongruities. Did
any girl ever yet adopt what her
mother would describe as common-
sense tactics where the eligible men
of their circle were concerned? On
husbands and clothes and amusements the common sense preached by
mamma spells the road for spinster-
hood to Clara. As to mother-in-law
and daughter-in-law, even a Japanese
professor would surely not attempt to
get them to have the same views as
to the most common-sense treatment
of the man they are interested in
from maternal and wifely points of
view. The more, in fact, one thinks
of it, the less one believes in a school
for the teaching of common sense.
There is only one school in which it
can be taught—Life; only one teacher
who can rub in its maxims—Experience. And more often than'no!, they
fail in the task. Stranger sti)l, we
prefer their failures to their successes*.
When we arc at a loss for something
io say of a person we*' turn to "she
has plenty of common sense." And
«an we honestly say that the impress?
15111 conveyed is quite favourable? Indeed, if we look through a list -o{ otir
fr'ends and relatives, we sliafl Very
often find that the person wV love
most is the least endowed with common sense.
By this I do not mean that the
giddy, the. careless, and the flippant
get first place in our affections. There
is a common sense which is more
truly common sense than that which
usually goes by the name—a common sense which makes its own
standard as to the things that matter,   and   whose   estimate   of   people
Good Skates
Good Instructors
GRAND OPENING
Roller   Rink, at Assembly
SEPTEMBER   1st,   1909
Good Music
Good Time
gets beneath the coat; a common
sense which goes side by side with
the charity which covereth a multi- \
tude of sins. Still, people possessed '
of this type of common sense do not j
as a rule drive good bargains. They
are apt to be out of fashion in their j
appreciation of book or play or pic-!
ture; they very often refuse to consider social conventions as cast-iron
rules; and the general estimation of]
the world with regard to them may
be summed up in this oft-repeated
verdict of their friends: "He (or she,
as the case may be) is a dear, but
without a spark of common sense."
One dear old friend of mine could be
put in this category; I think perhaps
I have mentioned him in this connection before. He was that bogey of
the Charity Organization Society—a
promiscuous giver—and whenever he
was caught in his surreptitious bestowal of coppers he smiled apologetically and said: "To give is to
get." He certainly would never be
pointed to by the man in the street
as a model of common sense; yet
recently I was reading the autobiography of John D. Rockefeller, and
when .1 found that all his strivings
ancl his successes only brought him
to this philosophy of wealth—that the
only happiness to be got from money
lay in being able to give it back again
to those you took it from—1 really
was not able to see that hc had
reached very much further on the
road to common sense than my old
friend, and I doubt if he hasbeen at
any time of his life as happy a man.
(Concluded Next Week)
«JM«8-8«m*»»»»^»»»»»»»^
if
if
if
if
if
if
if
if
if
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if
li
SEE BOLDEN
THE CARPENTER AND
BUILDER.
Fort Street
POUB FEB CENT. OH
DEPOSIT.
We pay four per cent. Interest
on deposits of $1  (one dollar) *t-
and up, withdrawable by cheque. £
Special attention given to deposits made by mail.
Paid up Capital over $1,000,000
Assets over   -       -       2,000,000
B. C. PERMANENT LOAN CO.,
1210   Government   Street,
Victoria, B.C.
♦
and!
if
if
if
if
= if
Empire Hotel
Restaurant
I WHOLESOME
MEALS
20c.
if
'■f
'■f
      if
      if
WINES, LIQUORS AND     H
if
CIGARS. >.*
Family trade catered to. $*t
Rooms, 25c and up. jjjj
Telephone 841. ^
if
A. LIPSKY, Proprietor,
Milne Block
568 Johnson Street,
VICTORIA, B.C. 8
Social and Personal
Mrs. II. Anderson and son are
staying with Mrs. James Gaudin,
Craigflower Road.
Mrs. M. C. Dumbleton, Misses
Dumbleton and Miss Price left last
Saturday via C.P.R. for England.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Farquhar Macrae
were in Victoria for a short visit
this week.
Mrs. J. S. Clute and Miss Doris
Clute of N'cw Westminster arc visiting in Victoria.
w    *    *
Miss Hoskinson of Seattle was thc
guest of the Misses Eberts this week.
* *   *
Mr. II. J. Cambie of Vancouver was
registered at thc Empress during the
week.
About the Size of It.
"All men are born equal, quoted
the moralizer.
"Yes," rejoined thc demoralizer,
"and the equality stops right there.
LAST DAY
FIFTY CENTS A YEAB
Up to and including July 31 the subscription to The Week for one year tor
new subscribers will be 50 cents, to date
from date of receipt of 50 cents. In
sending- in subscription, write name ana
address plainly, and send to: Circulation
Manager, The Week, Victoria, B.C.
OMINECA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Ferrand P. Hall,
of Toronto, Ontario, occupation Commercial Traveller, intends to apply rur
permission to purchase the following
described land:—
Commencing at a post planted aboul
3 miles east of tlie south-east corner of
Section 12, Township 1, Range 4. Nechaco Valley, thence south SO chains;
thence west SO chains; thence north SO
chains; thence east SO chains to point of
commencement, and being Section 4.
Township East of Township 1, Range 4.
April 6th, 1909.
je 12 FERRAND P. HALU
His Reason.
Daughter—Pa, why do you hang
around the parlor while Mr. Sikes is
calling on me?
Father—I'm afraid you'll say something to him that will make him a
burden on me for the rest of my life.
The Unbelievable.
"I understand that manager is paying  fabulous  salaries  to  his  leading
llf-^fe:" *     ,    ,
'•J''X(y..*f.a1lnilous,    rejoined the cyni-
caDlifess agent; "fictitious."
r    *.' .       '.
'  -        Technical Objection.
"You-may-take the witness stand,
madam,"  said the lawyer.
"Where is thc stand, sir?" demanded the austere matron, adjusting her
eye-glasses, "1 see nothing but a
chair."
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
No. .-_
Parsons Hill  School.
A Motor Confidence.
"What on earth made you crawl
under the car? There's nothing the
matter with it?"
"I know; biit that lady who just
passed was once my wife, and if she
saw me with this new runabout she'd
expect me to double her alimony!"
Sealed Tenders, superscribed "Tender for School-house," will be received
by the Hon. the Minister of Public
Works up to and including Monday,
the Kith day of August, 1909, for the
erection and completion of a small one-
room frame school-house at Parsons
Hill, in the Chilliwack Electoral District.
Plans,    specifications,    contract    and
forms   of  tender  may  be  seen  on  and
after   the   27th   day   of   July,   1909,   at
the offices of the Government Agent at
j New Westminster, B.C., Chas. W. Webb,
j Esq.,   Secretary   of   the   School   Board,
: Chilliwack,   B.C.,   and   at   the   Depart-
! ment   of   Public  AVorks,   Victoria,   B.C.
Eacli  proposal  must  be  accompanied
1 by an  accepted bank  chedue.  or Certificate of deposit on a chartered bank In
Canada,  made payable  to  the Hon.  the
I Minister  of  Public   Works   for  a   sum
I equivalent' to    ten    per    cent,    of  the
amount  of  the  tender,   which  shall  be
forfeited.if the party tendering decline
to enter  into contract when  called upon  to  do so, or if he fail  to complete
the work contracted for.
Tlle cheques or certificates of deposit
of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them upon the execution of
the  contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless made out on the forms supplied,
signed with the actual signature of the
tenderer, and enclosed ln the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not neces-
. sarlly accepted.
F.  C.  GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
1 Public  Works Department,
Victoria. B.C., 24th July,  1909.
jy 31
Oriental Cream
OB MAGICAL BEAUTIFIES
BEAUTY THAT LASTS.
Where is the woman who has not
the praiseworthy desire to enhance
her personal charms and preserve as
long as possible her delightful power
of enchantment, which lasts as long
as her beauty? The Oriental Cream,
prepared by Dr. T. Felix Gouraud, of
New York City, is a harmless preparation for preserving the delicacy
of the complexion and removing
blemishes. It is the favorite toilet
article of the leading professional
artists, who owe so much of their
popularity to their personal charms.
Scarcely a star dressing room in the
land is without Gouraud's Oriental
Cream, which is the most wholesome
and perfect beautifier known. Druggists will supply you. No. 8.
SPECIAL
NOTICE
We have some large water-
f-ont lots at Cadboro Bay.
These are rapidly being sold.
We have some choice ones left
which are admirably suited for
building a summer home. The
scenery is unsurpassed and the
lots command a beautiful view. Lots range from one-third to one-
half acre each.    Prices from $450 to $550.
EASY TERMS.
SOVEREIGN REALTY CO.
COSY CORNER TEA ROOMS
616 FORT STREET        -        -        -        VICTORIA, B.C.
rwn
JAMES BUCHANAN & CO.
By Royal Warrants
PURVEYORS TO THE ROYAL FAMILY.
Distillers of the
WORLD-FAMOUS RED SEAL AND BLACK AND WHITE
SCOTCH WHISKIES.
Unsurpassed for AGE, PURITY or FLAVOR.
For Sale by all Dealers.
General Agents for B.C. and the Yukon District.
RADIGER & JANION,
Hot Point Electric Flatirons
We have just received a
shipment of these famous
irons. They do splendid
work; are economical and
handy. You really cannot
afford to be without one.
In two sizes, 5 lbs. and 6 lbs.
Price
$5 and J5.35
See our te ndays' free trial
offer.
B. C. Electric Railway Co., Limited
Corner Fort and Langley Streets
IB. C. Funeral Furnishing Co'y
;•! 1016 Qovernment Street, Victoria, B. C.
Chas. Hayward, Pres
R. Hayward, Sec.
F, Caselton, Manager
Oldest and most up-to-date
Undertaking Establishment
in B.C.
Established 1867
|
_
%
'.% Telephones—48,   594,   1905,   305,   or   404. Jj! THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 31, 1909
NEW
ARRIVALS
IN
CHINA
Yesterday saw the arrival and saw the first showing of some
decidedly interesting new china tableware. This shipment include?
some rich and attractive pieces of dainty china, hand painted and
pleasingly, decorated with gold. For such ware we believe you
will find these prices, fair indeed. Pleased to have you visit the
china store and see these and the other late additions to this stock.
Last week we added some charming tea sets from the famous
Aynsley potteries. They have attracted a great deal of attention
and* they'll interest too.   Shown on the balcony—first floor.
HERE ARE A FEW PRICES ON THESE
Cups and Saucers, at 75c and 50c
Cream Jugs, at 35c
Sugars and Creams, pair..$1.25
Tea Pot, Sugar, Cream and Six
Cups and Saucers, price for
all    $4.50
Salts and Peppers, at 15c
Mustards, at  35c
Bon Bons, at  50c
Bowls, at each  75c
Celery Trays, at $1.25 and.. ,75c
Tea Pot, Sugar and Cream..$3.oo
Bread  and  Butter  Plates,  per
dozen   $4.50
Hair Receivers, at 60c
Pin Boxes, at 60c
SUMMER
OFFERINGS in
FURNITURE
j" This establishment is splendidly prepared with summer furniture needs and can fill your wants in these lines from larger assortments than you'll find elsewhere. The offerings include every
good style in porch and lawn furniture—many exclusive lines being
shown. Old hickory, for instance, is a charming style. You'll
find it only at this store. The newest and latest in sea grass and
reed furniture is also shown. Camp furniture needs are supplied
from a splendid stock of Gold Medal folding furniture—the very
best steel reinforced folding camp furniture made. Camp crockery
is offered on the first floor and excellent values abound—odd lines
being placed on sale at little ..prices. Camp bedding and such needs
in linen in plenty, too.
KITCHEN CABINETS
THREE NEW ARRIVALS
There are three new arrivals, on the fourth
floor which should ' interest every woman who
spends some of her time in thc kitchen—at work.
We refer to the new kitchen cabinets we have
just received. These kitchen cabinets are great
labor savers. When bread, pastry or other eatables must be prepared all the necessary ingredients are in the one corner of the kitchen—
there is a great saving in time and air, absence
of tiresome travel.
Kitchen Cabinet—An excellent low-priced style.
Finely made and finished in birch finish. Has
2 large bins, 2 drawers, large top finished
natural. Top section has drop bin, cupboard
with racks, tins, etc., glass doors, 2 drawers
and top shelf. A convenient cabinet at a
popular price   $18
Kitchen Cabinet—This cabinet is also finished in
the birch finish. Has large drop bin, large
cupboard with racks, tins, etc., 2 pastry boards
and large top, finished natural. Top section
has drop bin, cupboard with glass doors and
4 drawers.    Priced at  .'. .$20
Kitchen Cabinet—This is a very handsome finished light maple finish. Has drop bin, cupboard with tins, racks, etc., 2 pastry boards
and lafg'*: top. Top section has 2 bin drawers,
2 cupboards with glass doors, cupboard with
mirror door, 1 drawer.   Priced at  $30
Fourth Floor.
DRINK PURE WATER
Solve the summer water question by drinking
water filtered through one of these filters. Prices
are little and you'll be free from any possible
dangers.    Let us  send one home today:
Doulton's  Patent  Stoneware  Filters   are  priced
from $8.50 to '.'. $3.00
Other Styles, priced from $8 to  $1.50
******
A*...
FOR
VOUR
DINING ROOM
AN INTERESTING COLLECTION AWAITS YOU |
We don't remember ever having been so well prepared to
furnish your dining-room, as now. Present stocks are most com- *
plete and sparkling with new and stylish furniture pieces you'll
enjoy looking at. The newest ideas from the leading makers arc.*
shown. Matters little what your "scheme" may be, we arei'j
equipped to execute your wishes with the most complete showing1'
of dining-room furniture and furnishings shown in the West. Ins!
china, silverware, carpets.and draperies of all descriptions wej-
excel.   Wc promise you superior merchandise at fairest prices.     ,"*
Dining-room Tables—Extension
tables   in   many   styles   and
finishes. Priced from. ..$7.50
-v
Sideboards-Big choice of styles,
woods and finishes. Prices
range up from, each $16
Buffets—In buffets the choice is
broad. Many chic styles are
shown with prices starting
at    ....$25
Dining  Chairs—A  big  variety,/
priced from  $1 '■'■
Third and Fourth Floors.
We havc a few interesting values in carpet remnants and,;
samples left from last week's selling. These rangs frojhi V/i to 2%
yards in length. All carpet styles are represented. 1 Prices are '■
but a fraction of regular.    Excellent for rugs. Second Floor.:?
Are You Furnishing a Home?
I :■;
Few things are more conducive to your home comfort than I
the furniture and furnishings of your home.   The buying of these I
is a very important matter.   You must live vvith the carpets, the
curtains and the furniture, so exercise care and good judgment hii/
the choosing.   Then, too, you don't want to be continually refill ii-V
ishing, to see that the quality is right.   The best possible selection :
of practical home comforts is to be found in our offerings.' The >
cost is thc fairest.    In a few isolated instances "bait" prices may';
be lower but on the whole bill our offerings will average less and-
then its guaranteed quality against—uncertainty.    If you are contemplating thc furnishing of a new home or the re-furnishing ofa
thc present one you should visit this establishment artd investigate,
the offerings.   You'll be money iu pocket.
TO RETAILERS
.'. Isn't it poor business to
carry a large stock in your
little town when the quantities you require may be purchased from us on short
notice. We help you. Prompt
and satisfactory service guaranteed.
WEILER BROS.
Complete Home Furnishers
VICTORIA, B. C.
TO DEALERS
We solicit correspondence,
from dealers, wjjo are not
already acquainted with ut
and who wish to get
acquainted with the largest
wholesalers of Homefurnish-
ings in the West. Try furniture as a "side-line"—we
help you.
May We Ne'er Want a Friend
or a Drappie Tae Gie  Him
Rainer Beer, quarts, per dozen $2.25; pints $1.50
Victoria Phoenix Beer, quarts, per dozen, $1.75, pints 90c
Silver Spring Ale and Stout, quarts, per dozen $1.75; pints 90c
Seagram's 83 Rye, per bottle  $i.co
Seagram's Star Rye, per bottle 85c
Walker's Club Rye, per bottle $1.00
Walker's Imperial Rye, per bottle..'.   85c
Maple Leaf Rye, I'mpferial quart bottle .$1.00
Blue Funnel Scotch, per bottle $1.25
3 Star Glenlivet Scotch, per bottle  ■ -.-•••• 85c
Perrier Water, finest' of all Mineral Waters, per dozen $1.75
II
DIXI H. ROSS & CO., Independent Grocers
1317 Government St., and 1316 Broad St.   Tels 52, 1052, 1590.
ESQUIMALT & MMIMO RAILWAY CO.
ALBBKNI BRANCH
Proposals for Grading and
Bridging
Sealed Tenders will be received by
the undersigned up to Noon of Monday, September 6th, for the grading
and bridging of the Alberni Branch
from the 108th Mile to Alberni
(27^ miles) according to plans and
specifications to be seen on and after
August 7th at the office of Mr. Bain-
bridge, Division Engineer, E. & N.
Railway, Victoria, and Mt. H. J.
Cambie, Chief Engineer, E. & N.
Railway, Vancouver.
The lowest or any tender not
necessarily  accepted.
R. MARPOLE,
Vice-President.
Vancouver, B.C.,
July 20th, 1909.
No'. 31
CERTIFICATE   OP   THE   REGISTRATION   OF   AN   EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANY.
THEY ALL GO TO SEE
Moving Pictures of a good class, both comic
and melo-dramatic, at
EMPRESS
THEATRE
Complete   change  of  programme   on   Mondays,  Wednesdays
and Fridays. ;
Continuous performance:   2.00 to .30—7.00 to ,10.30 p.m.
Children's Matinees: Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday—Five Cents.
Admission - Ten Cents
"Companies Act, 1897."
I HEREBY CERTIFY that the "John
J. Sessnon Company," an Extra-Provincial Company, has this day been registered as a Company under the "Companies Act, 1897," to carry out or. effect
all or any of the objects of the Company to whicli the legislative authority
of the Legislature of British Columbia
extends.
The head offlce of the Company is
situate at the City of San Francisco,
State of California.
The amount of the capital of the
Company ls fifty thousand dollars, divided into five thousand shares of ten
dollars each.
The head office of the Company in this
Province is situate at Chancery Chambers, Langley Street, in the City of Victoria, and Charles James Prior, bar-
rister-at-law, whose address is Chancery
Chambers, Langley Street aforesaid, is
the attorney for the Company (not empowered  to  issue  and  transfer  stock).
The time of the existence of the
Company ls 50 years from the 6th day
of May, A.D. 1903.
Given under my hand and seal 01
oflice at Victoria, Province of Brltlsn
Columbia, this 16th day of July, one
thousand nine hundred and nine.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has been established and registered are:
1. Buying, selling, mortgaging, leasing, developing, working and dealing in
mines, mining locations, mining claims
and mining properties:
2. Buying, selling, mortgaging, leasing,  manufacturing, constructing,  oper
ating and dealing in quartz and other
mills, machinery, tools, implements and
appliances of every kind and character:
3. Buying, selling, mortgaging, leasing, constructing and dealing in ditches,
flumes and aqueducts, and the buying,
selling, mortgaging, leasing and dealing
in water and water rights:
4. Buying, selling and dealing in patents and patent rights:
5. Buying, selling, mortgaging, leasing, chartering, constructing and operating lighters, barges, sailing vessels,
steamboats, steamships, tugs and water
craft of  every  kind and  character:
. 6. Buying, selling, mortgaging, leasing, improving and dealing iri real estate:.
7. Buying, selling, leasing,, handling,
trading and dealing ln all kinds of personal property:
8. Borrowing and lending money.
9. Buying, selling and dealing In the
stocks, bonds and securities of other
corporations, public and private, and the
buying and leasing of the business,
franchises and properties of other corporations:
10. Buying, selling and dealing m
merchandise and goods of all kinds:
11. The establishment, maintenance,
buying, .selling, mortgaging and leasing
of stores, trading stations and trading
posts: "
12. The conducting of a general
lightering and stevedore business:,
18. The conducting of a general forwarding, shipping and express business:
14. The conducting of a general mining, milling, manufacturing, mercantile, trading and contracting Business:
15. The doing .of all things incident
to the purposes for which said corporation is formed:
10. To earry on its business In tlie
Province of British Columbia, and to
carry out or effect any of the purposes
or objects of the Company to which the
legislative authority of the legislature
of the Province of British Columbia
extends. Jy 24
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Range III Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that William C. Juneau, of Seattle, Washington, occupation Lumberman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted ten
chains south of the northeast corner of
timber limit No. 36055, on Chatfleld
Island, Ihence running south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
ehains; thence west along the shore line
to the northeast corner of said limit;
thence south ten chains to the point or
beginning, and containing six hundred
and forty (40) acres of land, more or
less.
Dnte May 9,  1909.
Je 26 WILLIAM C. JUNEAU.
SATURNA ISLAND.
NOTICE is hereby given that L. S.
Cokely will, after the expiration of 30
days from this date, apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands and
Works, at Victoria, for a Coal Prospecting License over the following described area on and adjoining Saturna
Island:—
Commencing at the north-east corner of Section 11, thence north one mile;
thence west one mile; thence south one
mile; thence east one mile to place of
commencement.
Dated June 16th, 1909.
L. S. COKELY,
Je 26 Per A. W. McVittie, Agent.
No. 22
COAL PROSPECTING. NOTICE.
Rupert District.
NOTICE ls hereby given that Leah
A. Massey will, within 30 days from this
date, apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a license to prospect for coal on the lands
and under the area described as follows:
Commencing at a post at the SI W.
corner of Section 21,' Township 18,
thenee north one mile, thence east one
mile, thenee south one rhilq,' thence west
one mile to place of beginning.
15 June, 1909.
jy 24     LORENZO ALEXANDER, Agent.
OMINECA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
' TAKE NOTICE that J. Digman, of St.
Paul, Minnesota, occupation Barber, intends  tb apply for permission  to purchase the following described land:—
Commencing at a post planted 1 mile
east of tlie north-east corner of Section
36, Township 8, Range 4, Neehaeo Valley; thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 32, Township
east of Township S, Range 4.
April 6th, 1909. '
Je  12  "J,  DIOMAN.
OMINECA LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coaat. ■*
TAKE NOTICE that William Meredith, of Moyie, B.C., occupation Rancher
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted about
3 miles east of the south-east corner
of Soction 12, Township 1, Range 4
Nechaco Valley; thence nbrtb 80 chains-'
thence east 80 chains; thence aouth 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement, and being Section 10
of Township east of Township 1, Range
'April Sth, 1909.
Je 12 WILLIAM MEREDITH.
OMINECA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Davrd J. Lewis
of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation
Clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
land:—
Commencing at a post planted about
3 miles east of the south-east corner
of Section 12, Township 1, Range 4
Nechaco Valley, thence north 80 chains'
thence west 80 chains; thence south lo
chains; thence east 80 chains to point
of commencement and being Section q
of Township east of Township l, Range
' April Bth, ISO*.
Je 12 DAVID J.  L.EWI8. I
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 31, 1909
There Is Nothing Uncertain
About a Gas Stove
The flame is as hot at the beginning as it ever gets, it is no hotter today than yesterday.
If you have something to cook which takes hours, set the stove right, go away and do your
shopping if you like, and you'll find the gas just exactly as you left it hours before.
Let one of our men set up a gas range in your kitchen
ancl you'll have the most modern, convenient and
economical cooking apparatus of the age. The great
advantage of gas over the dirt, smell and danger
attendant on the use of oil is obvious to all. Gas
is the safest of all fuel,—no danger of turning over,
exploding or other accidents.
When you come to talk of economy gas is far in the
lead. If you have gas, there are no more backaches
from lifting heavy coal scuttles or chopping wood.
No kindlings to cut. No cinders to carry out. No
more dirt from removing ashes. With gas you can
make tea or cook a regular course dinner in one-half
the time you can with a coal or' wood stove.
Gas is the ideal fuel summer or winter.
Gas is a pleasant luxury all the year round, but in summer time it is indispensable. Visit
our showrooms and allow us to practically demonstrate the great merits of gas for cooking
purposes. We would like to show you the very newest ideas in gas stoves and gas
ranges.    Easy monthly payments if you desire to purchase on that plan.
Victoria Gas Company, Limited
Cor. Fort and Langley Streets     -     Victoria, B.C.
No. 9
LICENSE    TO    AN    EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANY.
"Companies Act, 1897."
CANADA,
Province of British Columbia,
,  No: 496.        *
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that the "Canada' West Fire Insurance Company" is
authorized and licensed to carry on business within the Province of British Columbia, and to earry out or effect all or
pny of the objects of the Company to
which the legislative authority of the
Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head ofllce of the Company is
situate at the City of Winnipeg, in
the Province of Manitoba.
The amount of the Capital of the
Company is live hundred thousand dollars, divided into flve thousand shares
of  one  hundred  dollars  each.
The head offlce of the Company in this
Province Is situate at Victoria and
Frederick B. Pemberton, Insurance
Agent, whose address is Victoria aforesaid is the Attorney for the Company.
Given  under  my Hand  and  Seal  of
Oflice at Victoria,  Province of British
Columbia, this seventh day of June, one
thousand nine hundred and nine.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has been established and licensed are:
For effecting insurance against any
losses or damage by flre or windstoorm,
and for effecting contracts of Inland
marine insurance and inland transportation insurance. jy 10
LAST DAY
PIPTT CENTS A ____»
Vp to and including* July 31 the inb-
icription to Th* Week for one year for
now enbicriberi will bo 60 oonti, to date
from date of receipt of 50 centi. In
lending1 ln inscription, write name and
addreie plainly, and lend to: Circulation
Manager, The Week, viotoria, B.O.
* No. 24
COAL PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Rupert District.
NOTICE is hereby given that Elizabeth Street will within 30 days from
date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a license to prospect for coal on the lands
and under the area described as follows:
Commencing at a post at the S. W.
corner of Section 19, Township 18,
thence north one mile, thence east one
mile, thence south one mile, thence west
one mile to place of beginning.
18 June, 1909.
jy 24     LORENZO ALEXANDER, Agent.
No. 1
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE  that  M.  U.  Morrison
of Vancouver, occupation Clerk, intends
lo apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
7 miles Easterly from head of Anaham
Lake and about 4 miles North of Salmon River, thence south 80 chains;
thence East 80 chains; thence North
SO chains; thence West 80 chains to
point of commeneement.
Dated June 26th, 1909.
MATTHEW G. MORRISON,
jy 10 Per J. R. Morrison, Agent.
No. 2
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Distriot  of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE  that  F.  G.  Dagg of
Tatla Lake, occupation rancher, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
7 miles Easterly from head of Anaham
Lake and about 4 miles north of Salmon River; thence South 80 chains;
thence West 80 chains; thence North SO
ehains; thence East 80 chains to point
of commencement.
Dated June 26th, 1909.
FRANCIS G. DAGG,
jy 10 Per J. R. Morrison, Agent.
No. 3
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that John J. Finnerty
of Victoria, occupation farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase thc
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
one mlle South of Blayneys pre-emption
Anaham Lake, thence South 80 chains;
thence East 40 chains more or less to
Lake; thence North 80 chains more or
less along Lake; thence West 40 chains
more or less to point of commencement.
Dated June 17th, 1909.
JOHN JOSEPH FINNERTY,
jy 10 Per J. R. Morrison, Agent.
No. 4
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Marjorie Davies
of Victoria, occupation stenographer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following desoribed lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
3 miles East of the Salmon River and
about 15 miles North of Anaham Lake,
thence North 80 chains; thence East 40
chains; thence South 80 chains; thence
West 40 chains to point of commeneement.
Dated June 16th, 1909.
MARJORIE DAVIES,
jy 10 Per J. R. Morrison, Agent.
' No. 5
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
1       District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that T. B. Monk of
Victoria, occupation clerk, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted on the
West bank of Salmon River about 10
chains north of ford on the Bella Coola
Sotsa Lake trail and near the foot of
Anaham Lake; thence West 40 chains;
thence South 40 chains', thence East 80
chains more or less to river; thence
Northerly along River to point of commencement.
Dated  June  17th,   1909.
THEODORE B. MONK,
jy 10 Per J. R. Morrison, Agent.
No.  6
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Susan Phipps of
Victoria, occupation widow,  intends  tu
apply  for permission  to  purchase  the
foUowing described  lands:
Commencing: at a post planted about
20 chains North of the North-West corner of Lot 25. Anaham Lake, thence
West 80 chains; thence South 40 chains;
thence East SO chains; thence North 40
chains to point of commencement.
Dated June 17th,  1909.
SUSAN STEWART PHIPPS,
jy 10 Per J. R. Morrison, Agent.
No. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE    NOTICE    that    Victoria    A.
Phipps  of   Victoria,   occupation  stenographer, intends to apply for permission
to   purchase   the   following   described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
80 chains South of the South-East eorner Of Lot 28 near Anaham Lake; thenee
East 80 chains; thence South 40 chains;
thence West 80 chains; thenee North 40
chains to point of commeneement.
Dated   June  17th,   1909.
VICTORIA A. PHIPPS,
jy 10 Per J. R. Morrison, Agent.
No.  388. No.  8
CERTIFICATE   OF   THE   REGISTRATION   OF   AN   EXTRA-PROVINCIAL  COMPANY.
"Companies Act, 1897."
I HEREBY CERTIFY that the "United
Iron Works," an Extra-Provincial Company, has this day been registered as a
Company, under the "Companies Act,
1897," to carry out or effect all or any
of the objects of the Company to which
the legislative authority of the Legislature   of  British   Columbia  extends.
The head offlce of the Company is situate at the City of Oakland, in the
County of Alameda, State of California.
The amount of the capital of the Company is flve hundred thousand dollars,
divided into flve thousand shares of one
hundred dollars each.
The head offlce of the Company in this
Province is situate at Vancouver, and
Crickmay Bros., Agents, whose address
is Vancouver aforesaid, ls the attorney
for the Company, not empowered to
issue and transfer stock.
The time of the existence of the Company is fifty years, from July 2nd, 1903.
Given under my hand and seal of
offlce at Victoria, Province of British
Columbia, this 21st day of June, one
thousand nine hundred and nine.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The following are the objects for
which the Company has been incorporated:—
(a) To carry on and conduct a general foundry business, machine shop and
boiler shop:
(b) To buy, sell, trade in and deal
with, mould, make, build, manufacture,
construct and erect all kinds of ironwork, machinery and other structures
composed of wood, metal and other materials, either separately or in any form
of combination, and to carry on and
conduct any and all kinds of business
connected therewith:
tc) To buy, sell, trade in and deal
with, construct, equip, repair and own
vessels and water craft of every kind,
and to carry on and conduct any and
every kind of business connected therewith:
(_) To construct and erect wharves,
docks, dry docks and to carry on anu
conduct any and every kind of business
connected therewith:
le) To manufacture, buy, sell, trade
in and deal with supplies, material,
merchandise and personal property of
any and every class or description necessary for the above purposes, ana to
hold, own, mortgage, sell or otherwise
dispose of, trade in and deal with the
same:
(f) To act as an agent and factor; to
receive goods on consignment, and to
sell the same and account for tne
proceeds thereof:
(g) To make consignments of any and
all kinds of personal proper-ty, and ip
compel an accounting thereof:
(h) To acquire and undertake, hold,
buy and sell the good will, property,
rights, franchises, trade, business and
assets of any and every kind of any
person, firm, association or corporation,
either wholly or partly, and pay for
the same in cash, merchandise, shares
of the capital stock, or bonds of this
or any other corporation:
(i) To enter into, make, perform and
carry out contracts of any and every
kind, for any lawful purpose with any
person, Arm, association or corporation:
(j) To buy, barter for, sell, exchange
and deal in the shares of its own capital
stock or bonds, and ln the snares of
the capital stock, bonds or debentures,
or other evidence of indebtedness of Individuals, firms or other corporations,
and while the owner, to exercise all the
rights and privileges of the ownership
thereof:
(k) To borrow money, mortgage and
hypothecate any or all of the corporation property, and to draw, make, issue, indorse, discount, execute promissory notes, bonds, bills of exchange and
other evidences of indebtedness therefor:
(1) To buy, barter for, lease or otherwise acquire the use of inventions, letters patent and patent rights of every
kind and nature, and to hold, use, sell
or otherwise dispose of the same:
(m) To buy, lease or otherwise acquire real property and to lease, mortgage or sell the same; and to carry on,
conduct and engage in any business
transaction or transactions which may
or can be included in, or which appertain to any of the matters aforesaid;
and to do and perform any and all other
and further acts or things which may
be necessary, useful, convenient or
auxiliary to any of the purposes of the
corporation. JylO
No. .11
LAND  REGISTRY ACT.
In the matter of an application for a
Duplicate    Certificate    of Title to
Section 4, Rupert District.
NOTICE ls hereby given that it is my
intention at the expiration of one month
from the date of the first publication
hereof to issue a duplicate Certificate of
Title to said lands Issued to the Right
Reverend Charles Lord Bishop of Caledonia, on the 19th day of June,  1899,
and numbered 8865A.
Land Registry Offlce, Victoria, the 6th
day of July, 1909.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
jylO Registrar-General of Titles.
Q*f%f**fy*m*tflti**t**t\/*t/%f_Q ]
At The Street   f
Corner vi
f By THE LOUNOER t*
ty*f%/**t%/**-t\**m*fffr_**f%/*fi
I ran across a very entertaining in-;
dividual this week in one of my favorite lounges; his name I will not give
because I cannot.    It is too fearfully
and wonderfully made, but he himself*,
is the most perfect type of Bohemian*-/
I have met on this continent, or fori
the matter of that anywhere outside*
a Parisian atelier.   He is a big, loose-j
jointed, good looking, healthy, happy-!
go-lucky fellow, who hails at present)
from  Australia,  but who  must  havej
spent most of his life time in the art-!
ists'  quarters  of  London and  Paris.)
Like all true Bohemians he i sa hu-|
mourist,  and a  good  tempered  one)
at that.    He has the inevitable dashj
of cynicism which in his case takes]
the form of easy tolerance. He claims'
to   be   beating   his   way   round   the.
world on a pencil, which fairly well]
expresses the truth.   As a matter of!
fact   he  is  travelling  round   on   thej
Princesses and at odd times frequent-;
ing the more comfortable hosteleriesj
of Victoria, sketching silhouettes,    if
have seen better drawings, indeed as
a caricaturist, he is inferior to Ben-:
gough,   but   then   he   has   no   liver,
never heard of dyspepsia, and consequently makes  life  look a  little  bit
brighter for everyone who comes in,
contact with him.   I shelled out fifty
cents on the promise that he would
transfer my lineaments to cardboard
and make me look beautiful forever!
he succeeded but no one who knows
me recognizes the portrait, which 1
suppose is a joke on myself.   All thf
same he is an interesting fellow, whe
knows how to make his way, and t<
get the best out of life.   I  imagini
that his insouicance is only skin deep
and that beneath the surface he is m
mean   philosopher.   I   also   surmisi
that at the end of the trip it will noj THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 31, 1909
Ibe the pencil but the pen which will
Itell the story, and from my little chat
ll have no doubt he will give many
la pen picture of the raciest type, and
[possibly more recognizable than his
Is'ilhouettes.      ,     #    #
;!l have been very much amused at
Ithe antics of Mayor Hall, and Alder-
linan Henderson, who have been putt-
ling up  a grand  stand  play  for  the
[benefit of the illiterate and unthink-
ling   electors.     I   say  this   advisedly
[because their tactics would stand no
(chance  of success  with a man  who
Ir'eads the newspapers, and then does
la little bit of thinking on his own ac-
Icount.    That Sunday Closing By-law
lis  about  the   funniest  thing  I  ever
Icame  across;   both   the   Mayor  and
■Alderman must know that they can-
piot frame a by-law which will close
jthe fruit and candy stores on Sunday
|f  the licensees  wish to keep  them
Dpen.   The public demand fruit food,
and will get it.   In spite of this, however they would like to make the electors believe that they are consumed
vith a burning anxiety to comply with
|he request of those who are clamouring  for  additional  legislation   on
fchis  matter;    They  should know,  if
|hey do not, that the functions of the
Zity Council are not legislative, and
that they are  in every respect  subject to the statutes of the Dominion.
L?hey  violated  these  statutes   in  the
Iby-law which  was    declared    "ultra
Ivia-s"  by  Mr.  Justice Irving.    Now
Ithey  are  trying  to  throw  the  onus
pn to the shoulders of the Provincial
IGovemment    by    saying    in    effect,
"bring the Lord's Day Act into force
|to enable us to put this by-law into
effect;  if you  refuse  the blame will
Irest on you and not on us."    It is
lhardly likely that the Provincial Government will abandon its policy in or-
Ider to secure a little kudos for the
[Mayor and the Aldermen.   They have
[raised a bogey and will have to fight
lit themselves.   Meanwhile the man in
|fhe street can  afford to smile since
[_& is still able to get his oranges and
lice cream.
*   *   *
I am glad that the City Council has
labandoned its intention to establish a
Irock quarry within the City limits,
lit is one of the few decisions which
Iwill be remembered to its credit.
[Douglas Hill should stand for many
[reasons, but chiefly because to remove
[it would create an intolerable nuis-
lance for the residents of the Ross
[Bay district, and would greatly de-
Ipreciate the value of their property.
II am, however, still at a loss to understand why the city should not
[blast rock where, by so doing, they
|would be making new streets. This
[will have to be done by somebody,
[and as it would mean free rock I
[fail to see why such an arrangement
[should not be regarded as a good
[bargain. *     *     ♦
A few weeks ago I commented on
lthe unsatisfactory service in the Etn-
I press Grill Room and regret to say
[that for once my paragraph did not
[have the desired effect. I have taken
[lunch there twice since I wrote and
[am not able to chronicle any im
[provement. Luckily I am not known
Ito the waiters or possibly I should
have come away lunchless, but it is
a fact, which is often commented on
J by the regular frequenters of the
! room, that the service is in no sense
[on a par with the general appoint-
1 ments. One gentleman, who pro-
Ibably uses the room as much as any-
lone, told me this week that he complained to an official and received the
I reply in very supercilious tones: "Oh,
1 we don't trouble about the local trade,
I we only cater for visitors." I am
[afraid there is too much truth in this,
[but the management should remem-
[ber that the tourist season is a brief
[one, and while it may be legitimate
[to cater principally for that, the residents are entitled to some consideration, and will be here to keep the
grill room going with their dollars
when the tourists are scattered all
over the face of the earth, and Victoria knows them no more.
^^g^
Tsimpsean Light &
Power Company
Notice is hereby given that an Ordinary General Meeting of the Tsimpsean Light and Power Company will
be held at 1304 Government Street,
being corner of Yates and Government Streets, in the city of Victoria,
on Tuesday, the 17th day of August,
1909, at 4 o'clock in the afternoon, to
consider the Profit and Loss Account
and Balance Sheet, the report of the
Directors and the Auditors, to elect
Directors and other Officers in place
of those retiring, and to transact any
other business which, under the
"Companies Clauses Act, 1897," ought
to be transacted at an Ordinary General Meeting.
Dated this 31st day of July, A.D.
1909. By order,
JOHN DEAN,
Secretary.
V A G A t I O IM
Toilet Accessories
It is "going-away" time and
we would like you to remember
the fact that we have the most
complete stock of sundries carried by any drug store, in the.
west:
Hair and Fancy Combs, Hair
Brushes, Bath Brushes, Soaps,
Sponges, Rubber Goods, Tooth
Pastes, Powders, Perfumes, Face
Preparations, Tooth Brushes, etc.
Everything for the up-to-date
person. Everything sold at
popular price.
CYRUS H. BOWES, Chemist
Govt. St., Near Yates.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. W. MacFarlane, of Bella Coola, occupation Civn
Engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following describea
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
South bank of Sawmill Creek, about oue
mile from Tatla Lake, thence west _v
chains; thence north 20 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 20 cnains
to point of commencement.
Dated June 26th, 1909.
Jy 3 JOSEPH W. MacPARLANE.
No. 23
COAL PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Rupert District.
NOTICE is hereby given that Hugh
A. Massey will within 30 days from
this date, apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
license to prospect for coal on the lands
and under the area described as follows:
Commencing at a post at the S. E,
corner of Section 20, Township is,
thence north one mile, thence west one
mile, thence south one mile, thence east
one mile to place of beginning.
15 June, 1909.
Jy 24     LORENZO ALEXANDER, Agent.
No. 26
COAL PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Rupert District.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thomas
N. Street will within 30 days from this
date, apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a license to prospect for coal on the lands
and under the area described as follows:
Commencing at a post at the S. E,
corner of Section 24, Township 2i,
thence north one mile, thence west one
mile, thence south one mile, thence east
one mile to place of beginning.
16 June,  1909.
Jy 24     LORENZO ALEXANDER, Agent.
No. 26
COAL PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Rupert District.
NOTICE is hereby given that Walter
R. Bulwer will within 30 days from
this date, apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
license to prospect for coal on the land
and under the area described as follows:
Commencing at a post at the N. E.
corner of Section 13, Township 27,
thence west one mile, thence south one
mile, thence east one mile, thence nortn
one mile to place of beginning.
16 June, 1909.
Jy 24     LORENZO ALEXANDER, Agent.
No. 27
COAL PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Rupert District.
NOTICE is hereby given that Dorotny
M. Bulwer will within 30 days from
this date, apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
license to prospect for coal on the lands
and under the area described as follows:
Commencing at a post at the N. W.
corner of Section 18, Township 18,
thence east one mile, thence south one
mile, thence west one mile, thence north
one mile to place of beginning.
16 July, 1909.
Jy 24     LORENZO ALEXANDER, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Emma Martenu
Olson, of Houston, Minnesota, occupation, a single lady, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following
described land:—
Commencing at a post planted about
40 chains east of G. W. Proctor's Preemption on south shore of small lake
and about 15 chains more or less north
of J. J. Forbes' Southeast corner, thence
soutli 15 chains more or less, thenee
west 40 ehains, thence south 20 chains,
theuce east 80 chains, tiience north 20
chains, thence west 5 chain's more or
less lo small lake, thenee meandering
south shure of said lake to point of
commencement, and being 160 aeres,
mure or less.
May 25th, 1909.
je 26 liMMA MARTENA OLSON.
No. 28
COAL PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Rupert District.
NOTICE is hereby given that Henry
Allen Bulwer will within 30 days from
this date, apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
license to prospect for coal on the lands
and under the area described as follows:
Commencing at a post at the N. W.
corner of Section 11, Township 27,
thence east one mile, thence south one
mile, thence west one mile, thence nortn
one mile to place of beginning.
16 June, 1909.
Jy 24      LORENZO ALEXANDER, Agent.
No. 29
COAL PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Rupert District.
NOTICE is hereby given that Ralph
H. Loundes will within 30 days from
this date, apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
license to prospect for coal on the
lands and under the area described
as follows:
Commencing at a post at the N. E.
corner of Section 10, Township 27,
thence west one mile, thence south one
mlle, thence east one mile, thence north
one mile to place of beginning.
16 June, 1909.
Jy 24     LORENZO ALEXANDER, Agent.
NOTICE.
"Mineral Act."
King   Solomon   Mineral   Claim,   situate
in    Victoria    Mining   Division    of
Helmcken   District,   near   Koksilah
River.
TAKE NOTICE that I, James Humes,
Free Miner's Certificate No. B30100, intend, sixty days from the date hereof,
to apply to the Mining Recorder for a
Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of the
above claim.
And further take notice that action,
under section 37, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated this 17th day of June, A.D. 1909.
Je 26
NOTICE.
"Mineral Act."
Queen of Sheba Mineral Claim, situate
in    Victoria   Mining   Division    of
Helmcken   District,   near   Koksllan
River.
TAKE NOTICE that I, James Humes,
Free Miner's Certificate No. B30100, intend, sixty days from the date hereoi,
to apply to the Mining Recorder tor a
Certificate   of   Improvements,   for   tne
purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of
the above claim.
And further take notice that action,
under section 37, must be commenced
before the Issuance of such Certificate
of improvements.
Dated  this  17th  day  of  June,   A.D.,
1909.
Je 26
NOTICE.
No. 17
"Water Act, 1909."
Attention ls called to section 192 of
the "Water Act,   1909,"  whieh  requires
any person to whom any power or authority has been granted, pursuant to the
"Rivers and Streams Act," to surrender
such authority within one year of the
passage of said  "Water Act,"  and  receive a licence for same thereunder,
FRED. J. FULTON,
Chief Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, 19th July, 1909.
Jy24
No. 18
COAL PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Rupert Dist ict
NOTICE ls hereby give*. :hat Harold
Strandwald will within 30 days from
this date, apply to tht> Assistant Com
missioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
license to prospect for eoal on the
lands and under the area described as
follows:
Commencing at a post at the N. W.
corner of Section 15, Township 27;
thence south one mile; thence east one
mile, thence north one mile, thence west
one mile to place of beginning.
16  June,  1909.
Jy 24      LORENZO ALEXANDER, Agent.
No. 19
COAL PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Rupert District.
NOTICE ls hereby given that C. D.
Johnson will within 30 days from this
date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria for a 11
cense to prospect for coal on the land
and under the area described as follows:
Commencing at a post on the S. W.
corner of Section 23, Township 2i,
thence north one mile, thence east one
mile, thence south one mile, thence west
one mile to place of beginning.
16 June,  1909.
Jy 24     LORENZO ALEXANDER, Agent.
No. 20
COAL PROSPECTING NOTICE.
Rupert District.
NOTICE is hereby given that Herbert
Hewke will within 30 days from this
date, apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Vietoria, for a 11*
cense to prospect for coal on the lands
and under the area described as foi*
lows:
Commencing at a post at the S. W.
eorner of Section 23, Township 27,
thence north one mlle, thence east one
mile, thence south one mile, thence
west one mile to place of beginning.
15  June,  1909.
Jy 24     LORENZO ALEXANDER, Agent.
CANCELLATION
RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve existing on lands on Mud River.
in. Cariboo District, and Range 4, Coast
District, notice of which was published
in the British Columbia Gazette of July
2nd, 1908, and bearing date of June
30th,  1908,  is  cancelled.
ROBERT A, RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., May lst, 1909.
may 8
NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the Reserve existing on Lot 223, Rupert District, ls cancelled.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Department   of   Lands,
Victoria, B.C., March 17th, 1909.
NOTICE.
NOTICE ls hereby given that the Reserve on Lot 29a, Range 4, Coast District, Is cancelled.
R. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of
Lands and Works.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., 16th October, 1908.
3m
-RESERVE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that the following Lots, situated in Cariboo District, are reserved for University purposes from pre-emption, sale or other
alienation under the Land Act:—Lots
1,464; 1,452; 1,465; 1,473; 1,456; 1,455:
1,453; 1,451; 1.464; 1,472; 1,326; 1,438:
1,444; 1,460; 1,463; 1,471; 1,325; 1,437;
1,443, 1,449 and 1.462.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., May 27th, 1909.
may 29
urn
RESERVE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that the following Lots, situated ln Cariboo District,
are reserved from alienation under the
Land Act, except by pre-emption:—Lots
1,470; 1.316; 1,324; 1,442; 1,461; 1,312;
1,319; 1,329; 1,447; 1,468; 999a; 1,314:
1,322; 1,440; 1.459; 1,481; 1,310; 1,317;
1,327; 1,445; 1,466; 1,476; -1,479 and 1.476
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Viotoria, B.C., May 27th, 1909.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve existing on lands on the Black-
water and Euchlntko Rivers, in Cariboo
District, and Range 4, Coast District,
notice of which was published In the
British Columbia Gazette of July 2nd.
1908, and bearing date of June 30th,
1908, Is cancelled.
ROBERT A, RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., May lst, 1909.
may 8
NOTICE.
No. 14
"Water Act, 1909."
Applications will be received by the
undersigned up to and including Saturday, the fourteenth day of August next,
from Civil and Hydraulic Engineers, for
the position of Chief Water Commissioner under the above Act. Applicants
to state briefly qualifications and date
when services would be available.
Salary,  $250 per month.
FRED. J. FULTON,
Chief Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B.C., 12th July, 1909.     Jyl7
NOTICE.
No. 16
NOTICE is hereby given that the
Reserve existing on the lands embraced
in special Timber Licence No. 23,290,
situated on Gambler Island, New Westminster District, is cancelled.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Department of Lands,
14th July, 1909. Jy 17
SATURNA ISLAND.
NOTICE is hereby given that L. Alexander will, after the expiration of 30
days from this date, apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands and
Works, at Victoria, for a Coal Prospecting License over the following described
area on Saturna Island:
Commencing at the North-east corner
of the South-east quarter or section 17,
thence south one mile, and east one
mile, and north one mile, and west one
mile to the place of beginning.
Dated June 16th, 1909.
L. ALEXANDER,
Je'2« Per A. W. MCVIttle, Agent.
JALLAND BROS.
Fine Groceries
FRESH  FRUIT  DAILY.
6a3 Yates St.    -    VICTORIA B.C.
WING ON
Employment Agent.
Wood and Coal for Sale.
Also Scavenging.
1709 Government St. Phone 93
VICTORIA, B.C.
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
No. 13
Do you want farmling land along the
proposed route of the
Grand Trunk Pacific Ry?
I can stake you lands, in the fertile
vallies through which this great transcontinental railway will pass.
The Government of British Columbia are selling first class farming
lands at $5.00 per acre. Why not
have a good farm yourself?
Write for particulars to
E. H. HICKS BEACH
Real Estate and Insurance Agent
Hazelton, British Columbia.
I Prompt, Careful.
a
H Leave Your <
I Baggage Checks at
I  The Pacific
I    Transfer
1       Co.
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
A. B, KENT, Proprietor     |
Phooe 240.
MAPS
OF
Timber and Land.
The   kind   that   show   what's
taken  up  and   what's  vacant.
Electric Blue Print & Map Co.
1218 Langley Street
Victoria. B. C •
Houses Built
ON THE
Instalment
Plan
d. hTbale   j;
Contractor and BnQder.
Phone 114a
Cor. Fort and Stadacona Strtetfe THE WEEK, SATURDAY JULY  31,  rqog.
#!
^
Victoria Country Club
Summer Race Meeting
June 5th to August 14th
The
Sport
SCENES AT THE COURSE.
The
King
of
Sports
.; v
IDates of the Principal Stakes yet to be decided
July 31.  The Exposition Selling Stakes   1 1-16 Miles      $500
Aug.   7,  The Farewell Handicap One Mile $500
rti
Six Races Daily, Rain or Shine
1st Race at 2.30 p.m. Sharp
;*■:*.-** I fJOl
For Private Boxes and Season Tickets apply to
R. F. LEiaii'lON, J. E. SMAET,
A.     *..   -   ./ ■• -      / ... 7
D.-i
Manager.
%
%  11"
Secretary,

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