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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Dec 14, 1912

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 L. McLeod Gould
Public Stenographer
Copying, Mailing, Editing, Expert
Journalistic Work and Adv't
Writing
Accuracy, Despatch, Privacy
1208 Government Street
Phone 1283
A British Columbia Newspaper aad Review*
PaMlsbtd at Victoria, B. C.
HALL &FWALKER
Agent*
Wellington Colliery
Company'& Goal
1232 Gov't St.
Telephone 83
Vol. X.   No,
Tenth Year
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1912
Tenth Year
One Dollar Per Annum
NAVAL DEFENCE
"No policy will be satisfactory to the
people of British Columbia which does
not include a substantial and prompt
contribution and THE ESTABLISH.
MENT OF A FLEET UNIT ON THE
PACIFIC COAST."
THE NAVAL POLICY—The oracle
has spoken. Sir Wilfrid Laurier has
delivered his counterblast to the
naval proposal of the Government. From
the stand-point of his party the speech is
undoubtedly one of the ablest he has ever
delivered. It shows a grasp of the subject;
a capacity to comprehend every detail; a
consecutiveness; a mental alertness and a
skill in selecting salient features for emphasis, which can alone be exhibited by a
really great orator. But having said this
and paid a willing tribute to the magnificent ability of the speech, it is impossible
not to regard it as the "tour de force" of
a political leader rather than as the pronouncement of a statesman. It is true that
Mr. Borden his played into the hands of
Sir Wilfrid by complicating the issues.
The strongest weapon which the Leader of
the Opposition uses is placed in his hands
by the Leader of the Government. It is a
weapon forged out of the complication of
what should have been distinct issues. The
sole ground of Sir Wilfrid's criticism is
directed against the Government proposals
as a naval policy. Such a criticism would
not have been possible if Mr. Borden had
adhered to his original intention of making
a "free and unconditional gift," unhampered and uncomplicated by any reference
to a permanent policy. Suppose he had
appeared before the House and said in
effect: "I have consulted with the British
Government and have been furnished by
j them with a Memorandum which declares
that an emergency exists; it will take
several years to elaborate a permanent
naval policy, meanwhile I desire that Canada should contribute something in the
moment of emergency, not so much because
England needs a few million dollars as because it is Canada's duty and privilege to
make a stand in the defence of the Empire
and to show that she belongs to its solidarity. I therefore propone an immediate unconditional gift of $35,000,000 to build
three Dreadnoughts; I propose that this
sum should be handed to the British Government without any stipulations and merely as a, tangible expression of our good
will. Later on I will be prepared to submit a permanent naval policy to the House
ancl the country." This would have been
the course of simplicity, of frankness, of
loyalty and of honour, and it will forever
remain a mystery to Mr. Borden's ar.mirers
why he did not adopt it. Perhaps it would
be idle to speculate on his reasons, although
it is impossible to resist the conclusion that
he must have yielded to pressure in order
to pacify some of his followers who might
not Otherwise have supported the Resolutions, But once Mr. Borden yielded to
such importunity, he opened the door to
endless trouble. By combining some of the
principles which are inseparably /eonnectetl
with a permanent naval :pplic.yJwitliJiis present proposals, he altered their character
altogether. The first result was to alienate
' Mr,. Mgnk.;. not that that,.is.in itself a very
serious matter, but, unfortunately, the proposals as now submitted to the House, show
that the French-Canadian Minister had at
least a reasonable pretext for his action.
But the really serious result is that Mr.
Borden has furnished his most formidable
opponent, Sir Wilfrid Laurier, with a pretext for attacking the present proposals as
if they were part of the permanent naval
policy. It has enabled him to rake up all
the old controversies about the Canadian
Navy, built in Canada, owned by Canada,
manned by Canadians, and controlled by
Canada, and to make an appeal to the people
upon Canadian patriotic grounds. These
are strong grounds and although Mr. Borden can very properly retort that the present resolutions look forward to a Canadian Navy in the future, he has placed
Sir Wilfrid in the position to reply: "But
I propose a Canadian Navy in the present."
The adroitness of the Leader of the Opposition is well exhibited in his remarks on
the emergency phase of the question, when
hs said that if the First Minister had come
down to the House, declared an. emergency
and asked for a money.grant to help to
meet that emergency he would have received the unanimous support of that House
for a gift even four times as large as that
now proposed. It is not necessary to accept
this statement without a grain of salt. It
savours a little too much of the • heroic
declaration of Sir Wilfrid on the floor of
the House when he said that if England
were in danger he would stump every platform in Canada in support of aid from
Canada. All the same, it is to be regretted
that Mr. Borden should have adopted a
line of policy which makes such criticism
possible. It was like asking for trouble
when the way was clear to reach the goal
without any trouble, and, at any rate, to
put all protests of loyalty to a practical
test. It is impossible to read Sir Wilfrid
Laurier's speech, which will have to be discussed in greater detail in future, without
again commenting on the subtlety and skill
with which he handles his case. Surely it
is not merely sophistry but casuistry, which
leads him to attempt to explain away his
historic statement that "when England was
at war Canada need not necessarily be at
war." Such a declaration went as far as
anything else to defeat Sir Wilfrid when
he last appealed to.the country. It was a
factor together with the Reciprocity proposals in convincing the majority of the'
electorate that the brilliant Prime Minister
was npt sound in his British policy. How
correctly the country appraised the value of
his protestations is revealed by the way in
which in his speech on Thursday night he
tried to reinstate himself in the good graces
of the country. He now says that England's wars are our wars, but that Canada
can be at war "without fighting." This is
one of those subtle distinctions which reminds one of the verbal fallacies of Mr.
Gladstone. No one knows better than Sir
Wilfrid Laurier that while a Canadian
Navy must be the ultimate goal of Canadian policy, it will take many years to develop the ship-building industry to such an
extent that a vessel can be built in Cana7
dian yards. Nobody knows better than he
that it will take just as long to establish
and train the recruits for a Canadian Navy
and that meanwhile, unless we are to disbelieve the solemn declaration of such men
as the First Lord of the Admiralty, Lord
Charles Beresford, Lord Roberts, Lord
Rosebery, Mr. Arthur Balfour, Sif Edward Grey, and many others who might be
mentioned, there is a real emergency to be
met arid* one which Canada cannot afford to
disregard for the years which would have
to elapse, before thk_fdr*mation of an effec-
tiwaGwiaJhn Navy". ,*T>|u.s is the weakness
oF-Sit^JWiifrid Laurier's* position J be., is
actoseating a good thirrg^which is not presently available; he is "apposing an inime-
diate  contribution,   the   moral   effect   of..
which will be immense both from a National and Imperial stand-point; and the
pity of it all is that whatever strength there
is in his opposition is clue to the tactical
error of hampering a simple proposition
with complicated conditions.
CIVIC AFFAIRS—Mayor Beckwith
resumed a time-honoured practice
when he assembled his fellow-aldermen at the festal board and had a Round
Table talk on the business of the City, dealing especially with the history of his own
administration. Whatever criticism may be
offered on the work of the past year, it is
only fair to give the Mayor and Council
credit for the good they have done, and
undoubtedly his Worship was justified in
emphasizing the reorganization of the
Engineering Department as the most important item. At the present time we have
a capable head in the City Engineer. The
Department has been pretty well cleaned
out and put into working shape. The recent change by which the Water Commis-
sionship was also placed in the hands of
Mr. Rust has met with general approval.
Whilst it is hardly possible to feel the same
satisfaction in the appointment of "Mr.
Thomson of Seattle" to prepare plans ancl
supervise the repair work of Smith's Hill
Reservoir, one must at least give credit for
the proper execution of the work, although
at a fabulous cost. The Week believes that
Mayor Beckwith has assumed the right
position on the subject of Government • by
Commission and that he correctly interprets
public opinion when he says that there is
no demand for it, The idea has fallen into
general disfavour during the past twelve
months; cities which contemplated it have
abandoned their intention and the net result
of the campaign in its favour has been to
set it back. It is gratifying to be able to
join with Mayor Beckwith in commenting
favourably on the appointment of Mr.
Robertson, the City Solicitor, although, fortunately, in this case the comment does not
involve any reflection on his predecessor.
There may be differences of opinion on the
manner in which the Council has handled
the Sooke contract. It cannot be denied
that in their dealings with the contractors
there has been a good deal of "backing and
filling"; but after all is said and clone the
one thing which the City requires is water,
and anything which will facilitate its early
delivery will be regarded as a boon. Viewed
from this stand-point The Week believes
that the decision of the Council to accept
a bond ancl liberate the bulk of the holdback to the contractors is justified by the
circumstances, assuming always that the
bond is good. It will have the effect of expediting the work, of greasing the financial
wheels and, let us hope of removing a constant cause of friction. The figures which
his Worship was able to quote as showing
the development of the City anci the relation of taxation and debt to assessed values
are extremely interesting. We all know that,
there is a big over-draft at the bank and
that the liabilities of the city are heavy,
but the subject of liability is a relative one,
ahd while we have had difficulties to contend with and while The Week still believes that it would have been possible to
devise a better scheme for handling all the
financial business of the City, it cannot but
regard with satisfaction the statement that
the assessed values have increased iij much
greater ratio than the indebtedness, and
that the figures quoted show that whereas,
a decade ago the general*debt was eleven,,
-per-cent.: of the total ^assessable value*,,
this year it is barely 'fiv-e |>er cent. The
magnitude of the improvement work done
this year is hardly realised by the ratepayers and it may be instructive to quote1
trie figures giveji by'tlie 'Mayflr, which show
that during 1912 twenty-four miles of pa'v-
ing have been done ai. a .cost of $1,160,000';
.Jw.enty_.and oiie|-hal,fi mjles pf sidewalks at
a cost of $191,000; thirteen miles of sewers
at a cost of $354,000, ancl thirty-three miles
of sewer and surface drain laterals at a
cost of $115,000. The programme which
his Worship outlined for the future, while
not as ambitious as that of the past year,
indicates what is required to meet the
growth of the City; sewer construction
calling for $700,000; a gaol building; extensive expenditures on parks, playgrounds
and school-buildings and better provision
for the Children's Aid and Friendly Help
Societies. Altogether the record of the past
year is a creditable one ancl the programme
for the future reasonable, and that the
property owners of the City are satisfied
with the administration is best evidenced by
the practical unanimity with which they
have this week voted the money required
under the Hospital and Ross Bay Seawall By-laws. This may be regarded as a
practical endorsement of a satisfactory
administration.
LATTER DAY SAINTS (?)— Victoria has suffered from many invasions, from the I. W. W. down,
but undoubtedly the most pernicious ancl
detestable is the one now upon us. There
is a delegation of Mormon Apostles quietly
and patiently canvassing the ladies of Victoria, who may be considered as possibly
amenable to their blandishments. How
many there are The Week does not know,
for they do not advertise, and they Work
so quietly that unless some lady who has
been insulted volunteers the information;
their whereabouts is not likely to be heard
of. There are some classes of offence
which even in a liberty-loving country can
best be j dealt with on the spur of the mo-,
ment, and without recourse even to th.e
Courts.1 We may not be prepared to follow
the lead' of England in everything, although
we might do worse, but for fifty years every
Mormon apostle who has gone to England
on a proselytizing mission has had fo encounter; a fist, a horse-whip or feathers and
tar. All are useful in their way and more
or less effective and unless some better substitute can be suggested might well be tried
in Victoria. We have troubles enough of
another kind. If our daughters are to be
molested, while the men of the household
are away at business, by the advances and
suggestions of these professional "pro-
cureurs," there does not seem to be any
valid reason why the citizens should not
take matters into their own hands. Here,
as elsewhere, the police are powerless because it is doubtful whether the offence is
a breach of the law. Still the law has been
strained at times, as for instance when'a
criminal is allowed twenty-four hours to
get out of the city; surely, it would be
justifiable to adopt the same method with
snakes.;
DEJBT COLLECTING AGENCIES
—The Debt Collecting Agency is
jone of those delightful: American
institutions which have been grafted on Canadian soil. Until a year, or two ago Victoria knew it not, and managed to wriggle
along sjomjehow with a fairly good reputation for paying its debts. But lately the
virus qf dunning has been introduced and
many cases have come to the notice of The
Week which, if they were published, would
place certain impecunious tradesmen in a
very bad light. The latest occurred, this
week, when the Canadian Collection Company of 307 Fort Street \yrotc a peremptory
letter to one of our,most respected and
prominent citizens* demanding payment of a
'trivial {unount and threatening action unless
the m()iiey was paid'immediately. * The
facts a*e that fhe'liability was incurred only
last nion th and that the accoutit had never
bccii rmdered. Thdfc-2 Facts' were admitted
by the firm who instructed the Canadian
Collection Agency to dun a respectable aiid
fayly Wealthy citizen. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1912
It has long been a matter for lamentation among the sons of men, and
among the (laughters of men too,
that they come into this world without any consent of their own and
have to tread their weary way amid
all the trials and tribulations which
beset them until the grave receives
their corporeal bodies in its kind embrace. However bored we may become with our lives, there always remains the kindly solace of the tomb,
and men and women have died in the
past knowing full well that within a
suitable period they will be conveyed
to their last resting-place either at
private or public expense. But the
present council of Victoria has prepared a new terror for mortals and
since the passing of a recent By-law
it is incumbent on a would-be corpse
to time the hour of his death so that
his funeral shall not necessitate the
use of the cemetery on Sunday. Fortunately we do not live in a tropical
climate, and it is to be presumed that
an odd day or so will not make any
sanitary difference to the community
at large, but it seems to me that there
are other aspects of the case which
need consideration.
* *   *
First of all, Sunday is to many people a far more convenient day on
which to attend a funeral. Final obsequies are not things to be hurried
over, and Sunday, which is pre-eminently the Day of Rest, would seem
to the average man the ideal day on
which to perform the last rites over
a departed friend or relative. Personally, if I die on dry land instead of
at sea, which I should prefer, I should
rather like to be buried on a Sunday.
I think that the corpse ought to be
allowed to have its own way in this
matter. It is no good saying "De
mortuis nil nisi bonum," if even such
a small wish as that pertaining to the
day of his own interment is to be
denied a dying man. Again, the excuse offered that the cemetery officials need Sunday for their day of
rest seems to me to be rather futile.
It reminds me of the grave-digger,
who, after twenty years, took a holiday and journeyed to the next parish
to see how they dug graves there. If
_ cemetery official requires one day
off in the week, it is only reasonable
to suppose that he would prefer to
have it when he can find some recreation with which to refresh his worn
out system. I am inclined to think
that the By-law is merely due to the
fact that in Victoria we have got into the habit of Sunday closing. Sunday closing of the Post-office, attempted Sunday closing of tobacconists' stores, suggested Sunday closing
of half-a-dozen things and now the
actual Sunday closing of the grave. I
do trust, however, that the Council
will be consistent and inaugurate
Sunday closing of weddings and
christenings. It seems to me that it
would not be entirely illogical if they
were to enforce Sunday closing of
churches on the ground that the parson needs his day off.
* *   *
I would utter a word of warning
to the fair ladies of Victoria. I understand that sundry members of the
Apostles of Latter Day Saints are
now in the city with a view of conducting a proselytizing campaign
among the fair sex. In other words,
the Mormons are upon us. They are
making calls from house to house,
handing in their pernicious literature
wherever it will be received. A lady
of my acquaintance interviewed one
of these precious apostles on the
door-step the other day. He announced himself by his high-sounding title,
for there is no doubt that the style
of "Apostle of the Latter Day Saints"
sounds infinitely more attractive than
does the mere word "Mormon."
However, he confessed to the latter
appellation and was left contemplating the uncharitableness of an un-
mormonized world on the wrong side
of a heavy front door. If all women
could be trusted to deal with these
missionaries in like manner, all would
be well. But it is an unfortunate fact
that many are persuaded by the honied words of their callers and leave
their homes for a life of misery in
Salt Lake City. I trust that the
proper authorities will see their way
to hound these fellows out of town
with all the expedition at their command. In the meantime, ladies, keep
them  on the  door-step    and  they'll
soon get cold feet.
* *   *
I should like to find someone who
will tell me the best way in which to
get thick, heavy oil from barrels into
cellars. The way which is being at
present employed is for the dirty barrel to be placed on the sidewalk and
left there, while the oil takes its time
about running down a pipe line into
the cellar below. Examples of this
method are being daily furnished on
View street, outside the Union Bank
building. I have tried to make it a
principle never to make a "kick" unless I have a satisfactory suggestion
to offer. I try to live up to a constructive policy as opposed to a destructive one, but in this case, though
I can see the countless reasons why
the oil should not be transmitted in
this manner, I cannot suggest any
other. The barrels are greasy and
well calculated to spoil the dresses
of the ladies and the trouser-ends of
the gentlemen who happen by ill
chance to brush up against them. Will
some kind reader bring his intellect
to bear on this vexed question and
advise me how I may best provide a
remedy for this nuisance?
* *   *
I have recently come across one of
the most fascinating hand-books I
have yet seen dealing with the ever-
interesting subject of Victoria and her
Hinterland. Messrs. Tracksell-Doug-
las & Co., who are responsible for
getting out this work of art, have certainly made a first-class job of it. The
book, which is handsomely bound in
royal blue, is full of excellent illustrations of the city and its environs,
showing some of the principal buildings and residences in the city proper,
and typical views of scenes in the
country lying to the north. Accompanying the illustrations is a very
readable letterpress tracing the history of Vancouver Island and Victoria
City, and pointing out the marvelous
development which has taken place
during late years. The whole offering is gotten up in a manner which
reflects the greatest credit on the enterprising firm mentioned.
* *   *
There are few places which show
more clearly the imperative need we
have in Victoria for a new post-office
than the office where money-orders
are issued and cashed. More particularly at this time of the year the
crowd waiting round the wickets reminds one of a bargain counter at a
dry-goods sale. A very few years ago
this portion of the post-office was
usually deserted; at the present day
I defy any person to buy a money-
order within ten minutes of his entering the door, and if he gets it as
quickly as that he is wonderfully
lucky. I suppose that this is a most
satisfactory state of affairs; it shows
the enormous increase in population
of late years; it also shows that there
is plenty of money flying around. But
one forgets these feelings of pride in
the annoyance which is caused by
having to wait so long in the crowd.
However, we are reasonably certain
of a new building in good time and
one which will be worthy of the city
it graces.
* *   *
It is a curious thing that in a town
like Victoria many of the inhabitants
should have lived so long without
knowing that there is one place where
good water can be obtained. Those
in the know have been in the habit
of drajwing their supply of drinking
water from the spring which wells up
on Ric'hardson street, but it is only
comparatively lately that this has
been made a source of income to
some enterprising persons, and now-
a-days quite a number of Victorians
are in the habit of buying pure water
for their houses. Many of the restaurants have fallen in line also and
their patrons are enabled to quaff
liquid which is not guaranteed to fill
them with germs, more or less harmless. This shows a solicitude for the
health of the citizens which has been
always lacking from the minds of the
City Council, when discussing water
problems, and shows a spirit of enterprise which deserves well of the
public. It is at one of these restaurants that one can always find the
o£
<rzoi<^
Vr.
^ up Hotel
sarru
'CHAS.PEMY, M6JP.
TlffBESTOrmmHING
IN THE HEART OF THE CITY
HOSE & BROOKS CO. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, Distributor! for B. C.
JOHN E. TURTON
Canadian Representative, 3 Front St. E., Toronto
PACIFIC      COAST      HOCKEY
ASSOCIATION
Season 1913-19x3
The following Official League
Games will be played in the
"Arena," Victoria, B. C, as
scheduled below:
Dec. 13—'Westminster vs. Victoria.
Dec. 37—Vancouver vs. Victoria.
Jan. 9—Westminster vs. Victoria.
Jan. 17—Vancouver vs. Victoria.
Jan. 31—Westminster vs. Victoria.
Feb. 1J—Vancouver vs. Victoria.
Feb. a 1—Westminster vs. Victoria.
March 4—Vancouver vs. Victoria.
Matches start at 8.30 p.m.
G. H. Mumm & Co's
Champagnes
Used at All Important Public
Functions
1912
Sept,
Sept.
3—Banquet given at Zurich at the Baur au I<ac Hotel by the Swiss Federal
Council to His Majesty the German Emperor;
Champagne, G. H. MUMM, Cordon Rouge.
7—Banquet   given   at  the   Capsa's   Palace,   Sinala   Hotel,   in   honor   of   His
Eminence, Sir George Barclay, British Ambassador.
Champagne, G. H. MUMM, Cordon Rouge.
Sept. 29—Banquet given by the Swiss Royal Geographical Society at Stockholm in
honor of the Explorer, Roald Amundsen.
Champagne, G. H. MUMM, Cordon Rouge.
Sept. 30—Banquet given  at the Capsa's,  Sinala  Hotel,  in honor  of M,   Schebeko,
Russian Ambassador.
Champagne, G. H. MUMM.
22—Reception at the "Sophiensaal," Vienna, in honor of the members of the
International Congress of Hotel Keepers.
Champagne, G. fl. MUMM, Extra Dry.
25—Banquet given at the "Schloss Weimar" on the occasion of the Christening
of the Grand Duke Heir of Saxe-Weimar.
Champagne, G. H. MUMM, Extra Dry.
PITHER  &  LEISER
Wholesale Agents for B. C.
Victoria        Vanc$uver        Nelson
Oct.
Oct.
VICTORIA'S   IDEAL  STORE
Get That Gift at
Gordons
IF you did so last year, you'll do it again
—of course; but to those who don't
know, let us hint some reasons for
doing Christmas Shopping at the beautiful
Yates Street Store. Of course we have-
considered the children first. A whole big
department has been reserved for the
display of things they love and it is indeed
a "Wonderland." Some of the useful
appropriate and low-priced gifts that await
your choice in other sections are Pine
Linens, Fancy Work, Neckwear, Gloves,
Perfumery, Slippers, Evening Wraps,
Laces, Jewelry and Purs. Choose at Gordons
739 Yates Street
Telephone 1391 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1912
"A Romance of the Underworld."
I went to the Victoria theatre on
Wednesday evening prepared to be
thrilled by drama, melodrama perhaps; I sat through a most enjoyable performance and came to the
conclusion that I had been seeing
farce comedy. I do not remember
any play where tragedy and comedy
are so inextricably mixed as they are
in "The Romance of the Underworld." The first act opens with a
burlesque of a New York court of
general sessions. The second act continues .the burlesque in a scene from
The Tombs, where a warder straight
from pantomine, a comic pickpocket,
and a most melodramatic villain in
the form of a detective force the
audience to believe that the play is
roaring comedy. The third act
brings the actoin back to the court
and here comedy takes the second
place and a little drama is seen, growing into melodrama' towards the conclusion and finding its way back into burlesque. The last act is a happy
mixture of everything except burlesque, and it is here that the one serious note is openly struck, when attention is drawn to the difficulty of an
ex-convict getting a square deal from
the police.
It must not be imagined from the
above, however, that "A Romance of
the Underworld" is not a successful
play. Probably from the very fact
that it is such a strange conglomeration it exercises a fascination. There
is an under-current of seriousness
■running through it and one feels that
its conception was inspired by such
events as led up to the* late deplorable
climax in the city of New York,
where the action of the play is laid.
The dividing line between comedy and
■tragedy is but carelesly drawn in real
life and the burlesque which appears
so frequently in the play seen here
last Wednesday is merely a vehicle to
convey the lesson which the playwright probably had in mind, viz:
the prostitution of the law to politics
and plutocracy.
Two characters in the cast stand
out pre-eminently, those of "Tom
McDcrmott," played by Mr. Holbrook Blinn, and "Podesta," played
by Benjamin Piazza. Mr. Blinn is
seen in a role which suits him admirably and he combines with excellent effect the jauntiness of the
ex-newspaperman with the seriousness of the newly fledged lawyer on
the threshold of his career. Mr. Piazza as the excitable Italian gang
boss was perfectly at home in the
part and provided much of the humour of the evening. The remaining
parts were all well taken.
Princess Theatre
"What Every Woman Knows" is
an artistic as well as a financial success at the Princess this week. And
the staging of it would do credit to
any high priced attraction, as not one
detail that could add to the play is
lacking. The play suited the company
admirably.
Next week they put on "A Runaway Match," and that means a laughing week, for though there is a splendid plot to it there is also much comedy. The story hinges on a widow
and her daughter, who both elope
with a father and son. The widow,
strange to say, choosing the son, the
daughter the father. A breakdown of
the different vehicles in which they
are running away, causes them to
meet at an* out of the way hotel, and
the complications that ensue are very
laughable.
For the benefit of our readers we
publish the terms of the Princess theatre Christmas Present. Deposit a
slip of paper with your name written
on it, in a box provided for the purpose. Christmas Eve three names will
be drawn from the box; the first
name will receive a present of $25.00,
the second $10.00 and the third $5.00.
The Empress Theatre
There is nothing very startling to
chronicle at the local vaudeville house
this week, but there is a well-balanced bill, all the performers in which
are up to a very fair standard. Jacob's
Dogs are clever animals, who do all
the usual stunts of their kind with a
few additions, and do them well. Don
Carney proves to be quite an amusing
entertainer who combines an aptitude
on the piano with a ready flow of
comedy, and his songs are laughable
enough. The playlet, "The Girl With
a Taking Way," is too far-fetched
and has little to recommend it. Miss
Virginia Grant, however, is a very
fascinating damsel with a pleasing
voice and a good repertoire. Her first
night audience gave her an enthusiastic encore which was well deserved.
The opening turn by De Vere &
Lewis is an instrumental duologue
well rendered.
The Crystal Theatre
Few vaudeville turns are as popular as those which entail the use of
roller skates and the "Bruces" at the
beginning of the week delighted the
patrons of the Crystal theatre with
their really clever work in this department. McGrevy & Davis, who
undertook the other act showed
themselves experts in the slack wire
business. A picture unreeled this
week came at a most appropriate moment, ' seeing that recently the local
branch of the life-saving associatoin
have held their annual meeting, and
was entitled "Swimming and Life-
Saving." Perhaps the feats therein
depicted may stir up a spirit of emulation in the minds of some of those
who saw them.
Romano's Theatre
A modern version of Robinson
Crusoe, with a change of sex and a
slightly different setting provided a
good deal of entertainment this week
at Romano's. One could not help
feeling sorry for the poor cannibals
who had really behaved very nicely
and deserved a better fate than they
encountered, but the film was a good
double one and was certainly most
original.
The Majestic Theatre
"The Daughter of the Spy" was a
most dramatic episode told in picture
form, which really held the crowded
houses at the Majestic theatre spellbound while they waited for the denouement. This was one of the most
powerful and realistic films which has
been seen for some time in Victoria
and well sustained the reputation
which the management of the Yates
street house has gained for itself.
"The House That Jack Built"
On Friday and Saturday next, December 20th and 21st, the Victoria
theatre will be occupied by the Victoria Amateur Dramatic Society, who
will present an original play entitled
"The House that Jack Built." This
is the product of a local pen and will
represent the state of affairs in the
purely mythical city of Vantoria, B.
C. (which, of course, means that the
action took place before the beginning of the Christian era). Just exactly what happened in Vantoria is
a secret which has been well maintained, a marvellous thing when it
is remembered that rehearsals have
been going on for the last two
months, but it is anticipated that a
resemblance will be traced to the
conditions which prevail in modern
Western cities in the year of grace,
1012. The fact that the City of Vantoria will be represented as in the
throes of a municipal election arouses
the expectation that' many points of
resemblance to our own city will be
seen, and if this is the case the author has doubtless provided many a
quip at the expense of some we wot
qf. But this is mere speculation. The
surest way, however, to gain a just
insight into our own qualities is to
see ourselves as others see us, and i
there is the slightest chance of the
mirror being held up to our own Victoria on Friday and Saturday next,
it is the duty of every citizen to take
a good look at the reflection. The
Victoria Amateur Dramatic Society
has done good work in the past and
deserves every encouragement. Those
who attend the performances will be
glad they went; those who stay away
will be sorry that they did so.
"The Kiss Waltz"
At the Victoria theatre on Thursday, December 26th, Valeska Suratt,
heralded as the reigning queen of art
models, will appear, in the celebrated
New York Casino year-and-a-half
musical success, "The Kiss Waltz."
Ziehrer, composer of Fritzi Scheff's
popular piece, "Mlle. Mischief," composed the work and though he finished in in a year's time, it must be
the result of true inspiration, for the
New York, Boston and Chicago reviewers proclaim it fully equal to the
best melody of the sweetest Gilbert
and Sullivan scores. Also the critics
who have seen Miss Suratt in the operetta this season say the new work
is more suited to her peculiar art and
personal charms than anything the
noted beauty has previously appeared
in. There are two acts in the new
opera, each depicting polite gaiety in
the Viennese capital. Miss Suratt interprets a fascinating flirt of historical reputation and she is surrounded
by a brilliant gathering of men and
women of fashion, artists, military officers, et al. The star and others in
the cast and chorus, of alluring feminine character are said to disport in
the latest fashions in London and
Paris gowns, and the management
promises an exceptionally augmented
orchestra and the most extravagant
scenic display ever attempted in operetta. Miss Suratt's supporting company is made up of a host of well
known Broadway singers and comedians and a chorus of feminine
beauty rarely seen outside of the
most extravagant musical comedy
idea. Edgar Smith wrote the story
of the operetta, Matthew Woodward
is credited with most of the lyrical
numbers, J. C. Huffman and William
J. Wilson did the staging, and Melville Ellis designed the fashionable
feminine frocks. The music, dancing
and gownings are the main features
of the operetta. Ziehrer, who is one
of the best of the younger composers of the continent, has done nothing better, not even excepting his
latest work, "Love in Pawn." There
are so many, pretty numbers described in the programme, that it is difficult to single out any one or two.
That which takes first on account of
its relation to the story is, of course,
"The Kiss Waltz," which is sung and
danced by the two principal characters, Guido Spini, a musician and
Nclla, the Baroness von Barnau
(Miss Suratt), with whom hc falls in
love. In point of attractiveness, the
most striking number is said to be
that called "Good-bye, Little Girl."
This is rendered by the chorus and
one of the male principals. The operetta abounds in charming duets and
ensembles, as was the case with "The
Chocolate S -Idler." Other popular
numbers arc: "Love is Like a Little
Rubber Band," "Love is Making
Sport of Me," "Fan Me With a Movement Slow," "Woe Betide," "Jealousy," "Help, I Implore" and "Fishing."
"The Quaker Girl"
The story of "The Quaker Girl,"
the great musical success which
comes to the Victoria theatre on January 7'th and 8th, centres around the
adventures and love affairs of a
Quaker girl after she has left the restrictions ai"' conventionalities of
her own people and gone to Paris to
scc the world. Ilcr innocence and
ingenuous ignorance combined with
her loveliness and charm attract the
The Crystal Theatre
Broad Street
The Largest, Best Furnished and Most Comfortable Vaudeville and
Picture Theatre in the City.
Two Acts of Vaudeville, changing Mondays and Thursdays.   Four
Reels of First Run Pictures, changing Monday, Wednesday
and   Friday.   The   Best   Music—three-piece
Orchestra—in the City.
The biggest Fan on the Coast, removing 37,000 cubic feet of air every
five minutes, insuring you fresh and cool air.
Hours: Pictures from 1.30 to 5.30 and 6.30 to 11.00.
Vaudeville, 3.00 to 4.00 and 7.00 to 11.00.
VICTORIA THEATRE
 (	
The Victoria Amateur
Dramatic Society
Will Present
The Original Pantomime
uThe House that Jack Built
in Vantoria, B. C."
Friday and Saturday, December 20th and 21st 1912
Saturday Matinee at 2.30
Prices, $1.00, 75c, 50c
Seat Sale Commences Wednesday, December 18th
attention of those in high places and
win for her the love of Tony Chute,
the hero of the play, and the admiration of a prince and a minister of
state. She becomes a model in a famous dressmaking establishment and
handles and displays many gorgeously beautiful gowns, to the delectation
of the audience. She takes lessons
in dancing and love-making from
Tony Chute and goes to a grand ball
as the guest of a prince which brings
on a quarrel with her sweetheart,
which is followed by a delightful reconciliation and a heart song which
is touching and tuneful. Victor Morley takes the role of Tony Chute and
romps away with the honours of the
production.
"Naughty Marietta"
"Naughty Marietta," a comic opera by Victor Herbert and Rida Johnson Young, played to capacity business during its six months' run at the
Manhattan Opera House in New
York City. Since then, the business
in other cities has been phenomenal
—and justly so too, for Oscar Hammerstein has maintained the high
standard which won such gcnral commendation in thc metropolis.
After careful search throughout
both European and American musical circles, hc selected Florence Webber for the stellar role—and her won-
tlefful success justifies his selection.
Besides possessing youth and beauty
in abundance, Miss Webber has a
wonderfully pure and powerful dramatic soprano voice which she uses
intelligently and with artistic effect.
And her dramatic ability also has aided her in attaining the lofty position
she now occupies in theatricals. Miss
Webber and her sixty associates and
special orchestra come to the Victoria theatre on Monday, January 13.
Princess Theatre
Fonmrlr A.O.U.W. Hill
Cor. Yates & Blanchard Sts.
WEEK    COMMENCING    MONDAY
DECEMBER 16
The Williams Stock Co.
Will Present
The   I.aughaltle   Comedy
"A Runaway Match"
Prices 10c, 20c and 30c
Matinees Wednesday and Saturday
ioc and 20c
Curtain, 8.31* p.m. Matinees, a.45
Reserved   Seats   on   sale   at   Dean   &
Hiscock's, cor.   Ilroad  and   Yates Sts.
fmpress
WEEK DECEMBER 16
Three  Times  Daily—3.00 p.m.,
7.30 p.m., 9.00 p.m.
Europe's Big Musical Hit
THE FIVE MUSICAL LUNDS
In  a  Spectacular  Musical   Ensemble
Reappearance of the Popular
Favorites
FOX & WARD
The Minstrel Men
Al—WALLACE  &  MACK—Murray
Tenor Baritone
In a  Medley of Old-time  Songs
"That Kid"
JACK RANAHAN
A Little Lad of Transcendent Talent
Graceful Gymnasts
THE THREE HEDDERS
TWILIGHT PICTURES THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1912
The Week
A Provincial Newspaper and Review
published every Saturday by
"The Week" Publishing
Company, Limited
Published  at  1208  Government  St.,
Victoria, B, C, Canada
WILLIAM BLAKEMORE, Editor
Concerning Demand and Supply
By Bohemian
It is becoming increasingly difficult,
as the ages roll by, to distinguish between the operative values of the
laws regulating Demand and Supply.
When civilization was young in the
world we know that Demand created
the Supply and as the centuries took
their course the. very fulfilment of
this natural law brought about the
civilization which we enjoy at the
present .time. But it is a question
whether the relations existing between Demand and Supply have not
changed of late, so that Supply
creates Demand. It is a modern version of the old problem put before
aspirants in the Schools of Logic, the
same problem which has kept awake
the intellect of the owl, who ponders
day and night on the vexed question
as to whether the egg or the chicken
was created first.
In the abstract it might seem absurd to think that there is any difficulty in deciding whether Demand or
Supply takes the prior place in the
modern order of things. The public
demand caviare, and to meet their
wishes, inexhaustible supplies are
forthcoming, base imitation usually
taking the place of the genuine article, so that there shall be no breaking of the natural law. The conquest
of the air has been demanded since
the time that Daedalus made his daring flight from Crete, and to meet
•the demand lives have been sacrificed
wholesale, until today we see the victory won. Earnest desire is for the
most part but the prelude to acquirement, and what a man wants with all
his heart with that will he be supplied.
In the same way, however, that
draughts of alcohol stimulate the
thirst, the fulfilment of desire but
whets the appetite for more, and the
accumulation of supplies increases
the demand. It is not so long ago
that the general public began to get
tired of reading solid literature. Essays and philosophical treatises became ill-suited to men who spent their
days in heavy brain work and required mental recreation. There
arose, therefore, an army of novelists
to meet the demand for their works
and now-a-days the output of novels
is so large that no one man can keep
pace with it. But his desire to keep
abreast of the times is keen and he
has acquired the taste for novels and
thus it is that the ever-increasing supply of light literature is met by an
ever-increasing horde of eager readers. It is as much a necessity for an
educated person to keep in touch with
the leading novelists of the day as it
is for him to speak familiarly of the
works of the departed giants of their
craft. The supply in this instance
has surely retaliated and created the
demand.
Year by year we see that the luxuries of the last generation have become the necessities of this. Now that
we have found out how pleasant life
can become under certain conditions,
we not merely ask for these conditions but we insist upon them. Because things are easily obtainable we
find ourselves unable to do without
them. Five hundred years ago most
people of gentle birth used their fingers as a vehicle for food; now the
meanest household can supply a fork,
and as the scale of social standing
ascends, more forks, of different
shapes and sizes, are "de rigueur,"
the supply being so great that the
demand is created.
It is hard to see where the ending
will be. Mankind is wearing itself
out in strenuous efforts to attain the
unattainable, not for the sake of the
object when gained, but merely to exhibit the genius with which humanity
is endowed, and to have a vantage
place whence those who can avail
themselves of new privileges can survey with contemptuous scorn the
others who feebly follow in their
wake. When Supply becomes so
great that it satisfies Demand, then
it automatically creates the demand
for something fresh. And thus we
have the anomaly of Supply creating
a demand for something that it not
yet in existence. It is thus that civilization progresses.
It is many years since the storied
magician patrolled the streets of the
Eastern city ci'ying his wares and offering new lamps for old. But the
spirit of the magician is abroad today, and everywhere men and women
are standing at the doors of their
houses eagerly bartering the prized
possessions of yesterday for the untried novelties which the great Magician, Time, brings with him on his
diurnal course. And yet we prate of
the cost of living! How can living
fail to be costly when every business
and profession requires such close adherence to the scale adopted by its
wealthiest members? Not long ago I
was talking to a real estate agent who
bemoaned his fate because of the recent rise in the price of gasoline. He
protested that an automobile was an
actual necessity for a man in his profession, and as all his colleagues say
the same thing, I suppose it is. But
our fathers were prosperous real estate agents before automobiles were
invented. It will not be many years
before' the motor-car is discarded for
the aeroplane and that will mean the
added burden of extra accident insurance policies. Already the automobile is being regarded as too much
the property of the multitude; no
longer does its possession signify an
advanced position in the social or financial scale, and for that reason it
is doomed to follow the bicycle,
which, in its turn, took the place of
the velocipede.
What will follow the aeroplane no
man can say as yet, but we may rest
assured that as soon as the demand
for vessels of the air has been amply
satisfied by an inordinate supply, a
corresponding craving will arise for a
supply of something not yet dreamed
of in man's philosophy.
Psychical Cases
Written specially for The Week hy
J. Arthur Hill
In a recent article, I promised a
small selection of cases in support of
the scientific belief in the survival of
human personality past the crisis of
bodily death. These I now proceed
to give. It must be understood that
these are only a few samples of a
very large mass of evidence. I select
one of each of several types, for the
sake of variety.
A Mind's-Eye Vision
"I was attending a young man who
was dying of consumption at an outlying farm. One day, on my way
thither, but quite five minutes before
I came in sight of the house, I had
a sudden mind's-eye vision. I saw the
room, the young man lying on the
bed, dead; his mother, weeping, his
father, and a brother; also Miss
Grant"—(a church district visitor,
known to me. J. A. H.)—"reading
from the Bible. When I reached the
farm, a younger brother—not the one
seen in the vision—came to the door
and took me to the bedroom. Everything was as I had seen it. Each person was exactly in the position, attitude, and occupation, as I had seen.
't gave me a shock which I remember vividly.
"Of course I knew the young man
would die before long, and it was natural to expect to see his father,
mother and brother in the room; but
I had never seen Miss Grant in the
house before, did not expect to see
'er, and was not thinking about her.
And the fact of their positions, etc.,
corresponding to the vision, was very
striking to me."
[Note by J. A. H.—The foregoing
acount is from a friend of mine whom
I have known for twenty years. He
is not a spiritualist, does not believe
in "that sort of thing," and this one
experience is the only event of its
kind that has ever happened to him.
As to the explanation, we may either
suppose that one of the survivors in
the bedroom sent the telepathic message, unconsciously, or that the just-
released spirit of the young man
went to meet the coming visitor and
flashed a picture on the latter's mind
informing him of how matters stood.
For various reasons, too long to detail here, I regard the latter as the
more probable supposition. But, of
course, I do not regard this case as a
"proof," or even as particularly good
evidence; the alternative hypothesis
of telepathy from the living, or even
of chance coincidence, is possible,
though I think either of these explanations would be unsatisfactory
and certainly not demonstrable.]
In the foregoing case it was a
mind's-eye vision; but the intimation
often takes the form of a definite apparition. For example, Lord Brougham, while taking a warm bath in
Sweden, saw an apparition of a school
friend whom he had not seen for
many years, but with whom he had
long ago "committed the folly of
drawing up an agreement written
with our blood, to the effect that
whichever of us died first should appear to the other, and thus solve any
doubts we had entertained of the life
after death." Lord Brougham afterwards found that his friend had died
in India on the day of the apparition
—exact time not known.
The well-known traveller, Mrs.
Bishop—then Miss Bird—had a somewhat similar experience. She happened to have established a great influence over a half-caste Indian named
"Mountain Jim"; and at their last
parting he vowed that he would see
her again when he died. Later on,
when in Switzerland, she saw his
phantasm. It turned out that he had
died at the time, in Colorado.
These cases in which a promise or
arrangement, is made, are called
"compact cases." The following is
a specially interesting example, on
account of the details which render
a subjective-hallucination theory untenable. I give it in the words of
the narrator, Captain G. F. Russell
Colt.
Ghost From the Crimea
"I was at home for my holidays,
and residing with my father and
mother, at Inveresk House, Midlothian. My bedroom was a curious
old room, long and narrow, with a
v/indow at one end and a door at the
other. My bed was on the right of
the window, looking towards the
door. I had a very dear brother (my
eldest brother) Oliver, lieutenant in
the 7th Royal Fusiliers. He was about
nineteen years old, and-had at that
time been some months before Sebastopol. I corresponded frequently with
him; and once when he wrote in low
spirits, not being well, I said in answer that he was to cheer up, but that
if anything did happen to him, he
must let me know by appearing to
me in my room, where we had often
as boys together sat at nigiht and
indulged in a surreptitious pipe and
chat. This letter (I found subsequently) he received as he was starting to receive the Sacrament from a
clergyman who has since related the
fact to me. Having done this, he
went to the entrenchments and never
returned, as in a few hours afterwards
the storming of the Redan commenced. He ,on the captain of his company falling, took his place, and led
his men bravely on. He had just led
them within the walls, though already wounded in several places,
when a bullet struck him on the right
temple, and he fell amongst heaps of
others, where he was found in a sort
of kneeling posture (being propped
up by other dead bodies) thirty-six
hours afterwards. His death took
place, or rather he fell, though he may
not have died immediately, on the
Sth of September, 1855.
"That night I awoke suddenly, and
saw facing the window of my room,
by my bedside, surrounded by a light
sort  of  phosphorescent  mist,   as   it
were, my brother kneeling. I tried
to speak but could not. I buried my
head in the bed-clothes, not at all
afraid (because we had been brought
up not to believe in ghosts or apparitions) but simply to collect my
ideas, because I had not been thinking of him, and, indeed, had forgotten all about what I had written to
him a fortnight before. I decided that
it must be fancy, and the moonlight
playing on a towel, or something out
of place. But on looking up, there
he was again, looking lovingly, imploringly and sadly at me. I tried
again to speak, but found myself
tongue-tied. I sprang out of bed,
glanced through the window, and saw
that there was no moon, but it was
very dark and raining hard, by the
sound against the panes. I turned,
and still saw poor Oliver. I shut my
eyes, walked through it, and reached
the door of the room. As I turned
the handle, I looked once more back.
The apparition turned round his head
slowly and again looked anxiously
and lovingly at me and I saw then
for the first time a wound on the
right temple with a red stream from
if. His face was of a waxy pale tint,
but transparent-looknig. I left the
room and went into a friend's room
and lay on a sofa the rest of the
night. I told him why. I told others
in the house, but when I told my
father he ordered me not to repeat
such nonsense, and especially not to
let my mother know.
"When the news came, later, both
the colonel of the regiment and one
or two officers, who saw the body
confirmed the fact that the appearance was much according to my description, and the death-wound was
exactly where I had seen it." (F. W.
H. Myers, Human Personality and
Its Survival of Bodily Death, ii, p.
349.)
We have collected many thousand
cases of this kind, varying greatly, of
course, in their evidential quality. If
the percipient happens to know that
the person whose phantasm appears
is ill, the evidence is weakened, for
the apparition may then be due to
expectancy, and may be only subjective—i.e., a hallucination, with no real
connection with the distant event.
Turning from these phenomena to
another branch of the subject, we find
very good evidence sometimes given
by means of automatic writing. Some
people can write with a pencil in
the ordinary way, letting it rest on
a sheet of paper, and making the
mind as passive as possible. Most
people, however, require some device
such as planchette, which is a heart
shaped piece of board with wheels
at two corners and a perpendicuiai
pencil at the other. Two people rest
their finger-tips on the board, whicii
presently begins to move abonr, the
pencil thereby writing words or sentences without the conscious volit.on
of those touching the apparatus. The
explanation is, generally, that the operators are doing it, but doing it subconsciously: the agent at work is the
dream-stratum of the mind.
Sometimes, however, this explanation does not cover the facts; as, e.g.,
when something is written which the
operators probably could not have
known. For example, in one case
known to me, a looker-on said to two
planchettists: "Write the name I am
thinking of," and the name was written—evidently a case of thought-
transference. In some other cases—
rather rare ones—the results seem inexplicable by thought transference,
and the agency of a departed human
being is indicated. During the last
few years, this kind of evidence has
been increasing. We have reteived
the same messages—or mutually confirmatory ones—from an alleged
spirit, through several different and
widely-separated non-professional mediums, one of them a classical lecturer at Cambridge university, and all
of them people of unquestioned integrity. This evidence is too complex
for summarizing here; but it can at
least be said, as* indication of its cogency, that it has converted several
of the most vigorous sceptics of the
Society of Psychical Research—converted them to the opinion that at
last the hypothesis of the survival
of human personality past the crisis
of bodily death, is scientifically justified by sheer weight    of    evidential
facts. We are proceeding further
with these investigations, and 'hope
to raise the "hypothesis" to something approaching the dignity of an
established and proven fact in nature.
The British Columbia Coast Line
—Its Protection
Written Specially for The Week
by C. B. S.
Boating and amateur yachting and
seafaring generally are popular
amusements in British Columbia and
more especially about Vancouver Island; with proper encouragement
these attractive pastimes could be put
to efficient use in assisting towards
the protection of the coasts. If a
meeting were called of representative
officials of all maritime sports clubs
with a view to encouraging coast
boat-gracing adaptable to all sorts of
craft—sail, steam, motorjeven hydroplanes—programmes of meetings
could be arranged and regattas held,
the ultimate object of which would be
to create a class of amateur pilotage
and gain a better knowledge of the
recesses and harbours with which the
coasts of this province abound.
Though the contests would be
chiefly for Canadian and British subjects, international events could also
be arranged for—there would be risks
connected with these races involving
danger to individuals, and possible
loss of life, but the knowledge of seamanship and coast locality acquired
would be a valuable asset to assisting those who might be burdened
with the defence of the country in
time of need. We cannot make omelets without breaking eggs—nor can
we make war safe.
A maritime sports club with headquarters at or in the vicinity of Victoria, the aims and objects of which
would be those roughly outlined
above, would be well placed from a
geographical point of view and might
even give a lead to more important
results in the way of encouraging the
shipbuilding trade. A feature of the
club should be to keep a log in which
would be recorded brief accounts of
cruising trips from which information likely to be of use for defence
purposes could be extracted. The adventures and misadventures of daring
and enterprising spirits when placed
on record would encourage further
hazardous trips, and in this way something material will show itself in the
training of personnel, which at present is so conspicuous by its absence.
This suggestion is in no way intended to blanket the efforts of the
Navy League or other volunteer, or
amateur movements, which require
and deserve every encouragement,
but, whereas the tone of most volunteer recruiting takes the form of an
appeal to the better feelings of the
individual and some even suggest an
acknowledgment of shame at not having trained earlier, which idea is not
naturally attractive, it seems that
fresh ground can be opened up.
From recent correspondence in the
daily press it would appear that the
Borden Naval Programme does not
seem to coincide with the hard and
fast policy of the local Navy League.
Naturally the Dominion Government
has acted in the interests of the Empire and Canada generally and beyond perhaps accepting the reliance
of the provincial branches has not
been able to accept their suggestions
"in foto."
If the fleet unit on the Pacific has
pro tem not been mentioned it does
not mean that it is not provided for
in the general scheme. The suggestion outlined above, if only acted on,
would largely help towards the creation of the fleet unit required and a
B. C. Maritime Sports Club would become an efficient "kindergarten" for
the object in view.
Hardup—"Madeleine, I cannot live without
you."
Madeleine—"You have told that to other
girls."
Hardup—"Yes, but nn my honour as a
gentleman, never when the cost of living was
what it is today 1" THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1912
BUILDING PERMITS
December 4 to 10.
December 4—
S. Joyce—Lillian Rd.—Dwelling $ 2,000
R. P. Vick—Macaskiel—Temp, carpenter shop  200
Engstrand & Larsen—Moss—Dwelling  3,000
Geo. Ulrich—Superior—Store     500
E. T. B. Hill—Howe-Garage  ISO
R. S. Kinnear—Sumas—Dwelling   1,500
December 5!—
Wm. H. Munsie—Howe—Dwelling  3,750
Quong Yen and Joe Gar Chow—Fisguard and Herald-
Lodging house  14,000
E. H. Anderson—Cornwall—Dwelling  4,800
December 6—
B. C. E. Ry. Co.—Fort and Langley—Alterations   6,000
J. Donegan—Hereward—Dwelling   1,600
December 7—
E. O. Griffiths—Scott—Dwelling  1,200
Building & Finance Ltd.—Burton—Dwelling    1,750
Mrs. S. Furnell—Bay and Empire—Dwelling   2,800
Reliance Investment & Bldg. Co.—Howe—Dwelling  5,000
H. C. Larsen—Cedar Hill Rd.—Dwelling  1,600
Jas. Gadsden—Rear of Blanchard—Warehouse  200
December 9—
Tuck & Grant—Albany—Dwelling   1,900
A. Allen—Emma—Dwelling  3,000
F. Hawes—Linden—Dwelling  3,000
Bungalow Construction Co.—Walton—Dwelling   3,000
Allan Campbell—Johnson—Alterations   200
December 10—
H. T. Knott—Yates-Office   2,000
Richard Harrison—Bank—Basement   3,000
Richard Harrison—Bevan—Dwelling  3,000
Lim Bang & Wong Jan Woy—Herald—Store and residence 25,000
Henry Streeter—Chester—Dwelling  4,000
Cummings & McGaskell—Clare—Dwelling  3,000
CONTROL OF COMPANIES
Jurisdiction of Dominion and Provinces Over Incorporation and Regulation
of Commercial Companies
The following is a statement of the facts in the case of the John
Deere Plow Company, Limited, versus Agnew, together with the text
of the judgment of Mr. Justice Murphy, dismissing action. This case
raises in an acute form one phase of the general issue which is now
before the Supreme Court in the form of a reference as to the jurisdiction of the Dominion and the provinces over incorporation and control of commercial companies, states Mr. F. W. Wegenast, secretary of
the legal department of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association.
The John Deere Plow Company is operating under a Dominion
charter, with head office at Winnipeg. The company applied for a
license but was refused because there was already an American company of the same name registered in the province and under a provision of the act the registrar of companies was forbidden to register
two companies of the same name. The company was, therefore, if the
act is valid, completely shut out of British Columbia, though it had a
charter from the Dominion entitling it to carry on business throughout
Canada.
WILL AFFECT STATUS OF COMPANIES
The company sued on a number of notes which it held against a
merchant in the province taken for goods sold and delivered to him.
The merchant sets up no defence on the merits but relies entirely on the
provision declaring the company in the absence of a license incapable
of taking any proceedings in the courts of the provinces. The company
pleads that the act is so far as it purports to apply to Dominion companies is invalid and unconstitutional as beyond the powers of the provincial legislature under the British North America Act.
If the contention of the plaintiff is upheld it will affect the status
of Dominion companies under the extra provincial licensing and foreign
companies acts in the other provinces as well and will render it unnecessary for Dominion companies to comply with these acts. The
case has been set down in the Supreme Court for hearing at the present
sittings.
The plaintiff is a company incorporated under the Companies Act
of Canada under a charter authorizing it amongst other things to
carry on throughout Canada the business of dealers in agricultural
implements, carriages and wagons, machinery and a general agency,
commission and mercantile business.
The defendant is a merchant residing and carrying on business at
Elko, British Columbia.
TRANSACTIONS UNDER AGREEMENT
The plaintiff ancl defendant entered into an agreement at Winnipeg, Manitoba, under which the company agreed to give him the exclusive right within a certain territory of selling the company's goods.
Blue Printing
Maps
Draughting
Surveyors' Instruments and
Drawing  Office  Supplies
Electric Blue Print & Map
Company
214 Central Bldg., View Street
Phone 1534       Victoria, B. C.
Fire Insurance, Employers'
Liability & Contractors'
Bonds Written
See us about Real Estate
Investments
Green & Burdick Bros.
Limited
Cor. Broughton and Langley Streets
Telephone 4169                                 Telephone 4170
'Che
Taylor Mill Co.
Limited
All kinds of Building Material
Lumber   .'   Sash   .'   Dooi
Telephone 564
North GoTemment Street, Vietoria
Royal Bank Chambers
Vkftoria, B. C.
Thomas Hooper
Architect
522 Winch Building
Vancouver, B. C.
The Rent Makes Payments
on this Positive House
Snap
We can deliver for only $500 cash, a practically new,  modern, 5
roomed cottage, modern in every way, with cement floor in basement,
furnace pipes, fireplace, built-in bookcases, etc.     The lot is within
half a block of the Oak Bay Car Line.    Garage built six months
ago.    There are several fine Oak trees on the property.   The owner
has a client who will take lease for six months at $35.00 per month.
The payments are only $35.00 per month.
Will you let us show you this at once
Price $4500
With $500 cash and $35 per month
PEMBERTON & SON
CORNER PORT AND BROAD STREETS
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Contains 252,800,000 acres of rich farm
and  fruit  lands,   timtrr,  mineral  and
coal lands.   Railroads now building will
open up to settlers and investors.   We
specialize on British Columbia Investments and can tell you about opportunities to GET  IN  AT  THE BEGINNING in town lots, townsite subdivisions or farm, timber, mineral, coal
lands and water powers, wholesale or
retail.    Your name and address on a
postcard    will    bring    you    valuable
information FREEI
WRITE OR CALL
Natural Resources
Security Co., Ltd
Paid-up Capital $250,000
Joint  Owners  and  Sole Agents  Fort
George Townsite
tis Bower Building, Vancouver, B.C.
may 18                                         aug 17
A. W. Bridgman
Real Estate, Financial and Insurance Agent
Conveyancer and Notary Public
Established 1858
A irp<nt Commercial  Union  Assurance  Co.,   Ltd.
Jigen? of Londoni England
Canada Accident Insurance Company
Imperial Underwriters' Corporation
Northern  Counties  Investment Trust,   Limited
of Bradford, England.
1007 Government Street                      Victoria, B. C.
L
What Shall I
Give Her?
Why not send her a box of Our
Chocolates?   A more appropriate and suitable gift could not
be found.
The Palace of Sweets
747 Fort Street
Victoria, B. C.
Chas. Hayward                            Reginald Hayward                            F. Caselton
President                                          Sec'y-Treas.                                 Manager
i
The B. C. Funeral Co.
(Successors to Charles Hayward)
Late of 1016 Government Street, have .removed to their new building,
734 Broughton Street, above Douglas.
Phones aa35.  "36,  "37.  "38,                                                          Established 1867
Mrs. D. B. McLaren
Teacher of Singing and
Voice Production
Terms on Application    Phone X_?3o8
P. O. Bex 449 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1912
The company agreed to mail to a list (to be supplied by the defendant),
of persons within this territory, a newspaper published by the plaintiffs in which a full-page advertisement was to appear of the defendant
as dealer in the plaintiff's goods. The defendant agreed to deal exclusively in the company's good in certain specified lines, and not to sell
these goods below certain specified prices. The contract contained a
list of prices at which the goods ordered by the defendant would be
paid. The property and the title to all goods shipped was to remain
in the company adn not to pass from it until all the obligations given
in respect of them were satisfied. Moneys received by the defendant
on account of goods supplied by the company were to be held by the
defendant in trust for the company. It was further agreed that whenever requested by the company the defendant would obtain as security
for goods sold to customers lien notes or other securities payable by
the customers direct to the company.
Under this agreement the defendant ordered at various times certain goods to be shipped by the plaintiff f.o.b. Calgary, Alberta, consigned to the defendant at Elko. Part of the goods were ordered by
the defendant personally at Winnipeg ancl part were ordered by letters
posted by the defendant at Elko directed to the plaintiff at Winnipeg
and fulfilled by the plaintiff by shipping the goods to Elko.
QUESTIONS OP LAW ARISING
In respect of the goods shipped by the plaintiff to the defendant
the defendant gave to the plaintiff four promissory notes. All these
notes were dated at Winnipeg and payable at Elko, but two of the notes
were in fact signed at Elko.
The plaintiff had not complied with Part VI. of the Companies
Act of British Columbia, requiring companies incorporated otherwise
than under the authority of the legislature of British Columbia to become licensed before carrying on any part of their business in British
Columbia.
The parties to the case agreed to a statement of facts and concurred in stating the question of law arising upon the facts for the consideration of the Court.
The questions submitted for the opinion of the court were as
follows:
First:—Whether the plaintiff is in the absence of a license under
Part VI. of the Companies Act of British Columbia (10 Edw. VII. c.
7), precluded from carrying on business in British Columbia or from
maintaining action in respect of any of the claims or note's aforesaid.
Second:—Whether the provisions of the said Part VI. of the Companies Act are, in so far as they purport to prohibit the plaintiff from
carrying on business in the Province of British Columbia and to maintain actions in the courts of the said province, intra vires of the Legislature of the Province of British Columbia.
—Reprinted from The Monetary Times.
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE NOTICE that  I,  Archibald  Paterson, of Vancouver,  B.C.,  occupation Gentleman, intends to apply for permission to purchase   the   following   described   lands:—Commencing at  a  post planted about two  miles
west from the western extremity of Nahlouza
Lake, marked S.  E. Corner, thence north 80
chains; west 80 chains; south 80 chains; east
80  chains;  to  point  of commencement,  containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated 13th October, 1912.
ARCHIBALD PATERSON.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, John Friers, of Vancouver,   B.C.,   occupation   Baker,   intends   to
apply   for   permission   to   purchase   the   following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post planted about § miles distant and in a
north-westerly direction from the north-western extremity of Sigutla Lake, marked S. W.
corner, thence north 80 chains, east 80 chains,
south 80 chains, west 80 chains, to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres, more or
less.
Dated 21st August,  1912.
JOHN FRIERS.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 Jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, Albert Boyce, of Nanaimo, B.C., occupation Rancher, intends to
apply for permission tr*- purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about six miles in a westerly direction
from the western extremity of Kwalcho Lake,
marked N. E. corner, thence south 40 chains,
west 80 chains, north 40 chains, east 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing 320
acres, more or less.
Dated 25th August, 1912.
ALBERT BOYCE,
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 11
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Thomas Bone of Luton,
England, occupation Postmaster, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about one mile east from the
north-western extremity of Sigutla Lake,
marked S. W. Corner, thence north 80 chains,
east 40 chains, south 80 chains, west 40
chains to point of commencement, containing
320 acres, more or less.       ,
Dated 12th October, 1912.
THOMAS BONE,
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, Alfred Hills, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Laborer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about  one  mile west  and  one  mile
north from the western extremity of Nahlouza
Lake, marked S. W. corner, thence north 80
chains, east 80 chains, soutn 80 chains, west
80 chains  to  point  of commencement,   containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated 13th October, 1912.
ALFRED HILLS,
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Hubert Lee  Harris, of
Bella Coola,  B.C., occupation prospector, intends   to   apply   for   permission   to   purchase
the  following   described  lands:—Commencing
at  a post planted  about  three miles distant
and  in   a   north-westerly   direction   from   the
north-western    extremity    of    Sigutla    Lake,
marked  South-west   Corner,   thence  north  80
chains, i east 80 chains, south 80 chains, west
80  chains   to   point   of  commencement,   containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated 20th August,  1912.
HUBERT LEE HARRIS,
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, Manley E. Marsh, of
Vancouver, B. C, occupation Mason, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post planted about two miles distant and in
a  westerly   direction   from   the   Western   extremity of Kwalcho Lake, marked N. W. Corner, thence south 80 chains, east 80 chains,
north 80 chains, west 80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres, more or
less.
Dated 25th August, 1912.
MANLEY E. MARSH.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 Jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE  notice  that, Charley   Don, of  Vancouver, B.C., occupation Labourer, intends to
apply   for   permission   to   purchase   the   following   described   lands:—Comemncing   at   a
post planted about 7 miles in a westerly direction from the western extremity of Kwalcho
Lal^e, marked N. E; Corner, thence south 80
chains, west 80 chains, north 80 chains, east
80  chains,   to  point  of commencement,   containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated 27th August,  1912.
CHARLEY  DON,
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Annie Charlotte Gadsden,
of Bella Coola, B.C., occupation Housewife,
intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted one mile distant and in a
north-westerly direction from the northwestern extremity of Sigutla Lake, marked S.
W. corner, thence north 80 chains, east 80
chains, south 80 chains, west 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated 20th August, 1912.
ANNIE CHARLOTTE GADSDEN.
Percy Gadsden, Agent.
nov. 9
jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE   notice   that   I,   Robert   Boyce,   of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Rancher, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following   described   lands :<—Commencing   at   a
post planted about 6 (miles distant and in a
north-westerly    direction    from    the    northwestern   extremity   of   Sigutla   Lake,   marked
S.  W.  Corner,  tnence north 80 chains, east
80 chains,   south  80  chains,  west 80  chains
to  point   of   commencement,   containing   640
acres, more or less.
Dated 21st August,  1912.
ROBERT BOYCE.
Percy Gadsden, Agent.
nov. 9
Jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that  I, George  Brinkley, of
Vancouver,   B.C.,   occupation   Bricklayer,   intends   to   apply   for   permission   to   purchase
the  following described  lands;—Commencing
at  a post  planted  at  the western  extremity
of Nahlouza    Lake,    marked    N. E. Corner,
thence south 80 chains, west 80 chains, north
80  chains,  east  80  chains  to  point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated 12th October, 1912.
GEORGE BRINKLEY,
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 j'an. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE   notice   that   Robert   Beveridge,   of
Vancouver,   B.C.,   occupation   Miner,   intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post   planted   at   the   western   extremity   of
Nahlouza Lake, marked S. E. Corner, thence
north   80  chains,   west   80  chains,   south   80
chains, east 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated 12th October, 1912.
ROBERT BEVERIDGE,
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, Edward Smith, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Laborer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north shore of Nahlouza
Lake, marked S. E. Corner, thence north 80
chains, west 80 chains, south 80 chains, east
80 chains to point of commencement, contain-
ng 640 acres, more or less.
t)a(  '      '   "     '
ated' 12th October,
EDWARD SMITH.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov.9 jan.4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Frederick Dodds, of Vancouver,  B.C.,  occupation Laborer, intends to
apply for permission to purcnase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 8 miles in a westerly direction
from the western extremity of Kwalcho Lake,
marked N. E. corner, thence south 40 chains,
west 80 chains, north 40 chains, east 80 chains
to   point of commencement,   containing   320
acres, more or less.
Dated 27th August, 1912.
FREDERICK DODDS,
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 Jan. 11
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, Robert J. Baxter, of
Vancouver, B. C, occupation Gentleman, intends   to   apply   for   permission   to   purchase
the following  described  lands:—Commencing
at a post planted two miles west from the
western extremity of Nahlouza Lake, marked
N.   E.  corner,  thence  south 80  chains,  west
80 chains, north 80 chains, east 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated  13th October,  1012.
ROBERT J. BAXTER.
Percy Gadsden, Agent.
nov. 9
jan. 4
LIQUOR ACT, 1910
(Section 42.)
NOTICE is hereby given that, on the first
day   of   December   next,   application   will   be
made   to   the   Superintendent   of   Provincial
Police for renewal of the hotel licence to sell
liquor  by retail  in  the hotel  known   as  the
Parsons   Bridge   Hotel,   situate   at   Parsons
Bridge, Esquimalt District, in the Province of
British Columbia.
Dated this 25th day of October, 1912.
RICHARD PRICE, Applicant,
nov. 2 nov. 30
Have YOU Thought of It?
Have you thought that one of
the best Christmas Presents
you could make a lady who has
not got one would be an—
ELECTRIC IRON
B. C. Electric Railway Company, Ltd.
Light and Power Department Telephone 1609 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1912
Mount Pleasant Subdivision
Shawnigan Lake
Are you acquainted with the fact that there is a Development League being organized for the advertising of this most Beautiful
Summer Resort all over the world? Do you know what this means to this property? The C. N. R. are now grading within a few
feet of these Lots, and it is certain that when the C. N. R. are running an up-to-date service, which will be no doubt in the coming
year, these Lots will double.   Why not get in on the ground floor and secure your Lot before the increase?
Each lot is 55 x 132, making
a splendid large lot. A week
or two at this resort means
a renewal of health and
strength. The price of each
lot is within the reach of
every person, being only
$125 each, with a small cash
payment of $25, and the
balance only $5 per month.
D
Any lots left after January
lst will be increased in price
to $150 per lot.
This Sub-division is situated
almost opposite the beautiful Strathcona Hotel, and
commands a beautiful view
of the Lake, where excellent
boating and fishing can be
enjoyed.
Any lots left after January
lst will be increased in price
to $150 per lot.
Price $125 per Lot—Terms $25 Cash, Balance $5 per Month
W. CROW
732 YATES STREET
COMPANY,
Phone 975 P. O. Box 1109
Real Estate Brokers
Financial Agents
VICTORIA, B. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1912
Six Cardinal Rules
The foresters in charge of the national forest of Arizona have printed
a placard as follows:
The six rules for care with fire in
the mountains:
If every member of the public strictly observes these simple rules the
great annual loss by forest fires will
be reduced to a minimum.
1. Be sure your match is out before
you throw it away.
2. Knock out your pipe ashes or
throw your cigar or cigarette stump
where there is nothing to catch fire.
3. Don't build a campfire any larger
than is absolutely necessary. Never
leave it, even for a short time, without
putting it out with water or earth.
4. Don't build a campfire against a
tree or log. Build a small one where
you can scrape away the needles,
leaves or grass from all sides of it.
5. Don't build bonfires. The wind
may come up at any time and start a
fire which you cannot control.
6. If you discover a fire, put it out
if possible; if yoti can't, get word of
it to the nearest United States forest
ranger or State fire warden as quickly
as you possibly can.
MENTAL PILLS
"It may be clever to say sharp things, but
it is often more clever not to say them."
"Many people take no care of their money
till they have come nearly to an end of it,
and others do just the same with their time."
"Men show their character in nothing more
clearly than by what they think laughable."
"An obstinate man does not hold opinions*
they hold him."
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
North Saanich School
Cowichan School
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed "Tender
for North Saanich School," will be received by
the Honourable the Minister of Public Works
up to noon of Friday, the 27th day of pe-
cember, 1912, for the erection and completion
of a large one-room frame school building on
concrete foundations at North Saanich, in the
Islands Electoral District.
Plans, specifications, contract, and forms of
tender may be seen on and after the 12th day
of Decemoer, 1912, at thc office of F. W.
Anderson, Secretary of the School Board, Sidney, B.C., and the Department of Public
Works, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B. C.
Each proposal must be accompanied by an
accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit
on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable
to the Honourable the Minister of Public
Works, for a sum equal to 10 per cent, of the
tender, which shall he forfeited if the party
tendering decline to enter into contract when
called upon to do so, or if he fail to complete
the work contracted for. The cheques or
certificates of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers
will be returned to them upon the execution
of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless made
out on the forms supplied, signed with the
actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed
in the envelopes furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily
accepted.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C., December ioth, 1912.
dcc. 14
dec. 21
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed "Tender
for Cowichan School," will be received by
the Honourable the Minister of Public Works
up lo noon of Friday, the 27th day of December, 1912, for the erection and completion
of a two-room frame school building on concrete foundations at Cowichan, in the
Cowichan Electoral Dislrict, B. C.
Plans, specifications, contract, and forms of
tender may be seen on and after the 12th day
of December, 1912, at thc office of F. W.
Anderson, Secretary of the School Board, Sidney, B.C., and the Department of Public
Works,  Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B. C.
Each proposal must bc accompanied by an
accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit
on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable
to the Honourable the Minister of Public
Works, for a sum equal to 10 per cent, of the
tender, which shall lie forfeited if the party
tendering decline to enter into contract when
called upon to do so, or if he fail to complete
tlie work contracted for. The cheques or
certificates of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers
will be returned to them upon thc execution
of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless made
out on the forms supplied, sinned wilh the
actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed
in the envelopes furnished.
Thc lowest or any tender not necessarily
accepted.
J. R. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C., December 10th, 1912.
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Annie Peterson, of Bella
Coola, B.C., occupation Housewife, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted  about  three  miles  distant  and  in  a
westerly direction from the western extremity
of   Kwalcho   Lake,   marked   N.   E.   Corner,
tnence south 40 chains, west 80 chains, north
40  chains, east 80 chains,  to, point of commencement, containing 320 acres, more or less.
Dated 25th August, 1912.
ANNIE PETERSON.
Percy Gadsden, Agent.
nov. 9
jan. 4
dec. 14
dcc. 21
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range j
TAKE notice that Margaret Harris, of Bella
Coola, B.C., occupation Housewife, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
Planted   at   the   north-western   extremity   of
igutla Lake,  marked  S.  W.   Corner,  tnence
north   80   chains,   east   80   chains,   south   80
chains, west 80 chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated 20th August,  1912.
MARGARET HARRIS.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 Jan. 4
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Motor Launches
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed "Tender for Motor Launches," will be received by
the Hon. the Minister of Public Works up
to and including 23rd day of December, 1912,
for the construction of two 55-foot and four
36-foot motor launches.
Plans, specifications, contract, and forms of
tender may be seen at the offices of the
Government Agents at Vancouver and New
Westminster, and the Department of Public
Works, Victoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied by an
accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit
on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable
to the Hon. the Minister of Public Works, for
a sum equivalent to ten per cent of the amount
of the tender, which shall be forfeited if the
party tendering decline to enter into contract
when called upon to do so, or if he fail to
complete the work contracted for. The
cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them upon
the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless made
out on the forms supplied, signed by the
actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed
in the envelopes furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily
accepted.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., 29th November, 1912.
dec. 7 dec. 21
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Motor Launches
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed "Tender for Motor Launches," will be received by
the Hon. the Minister of Public Works up
to 12 o'clock noon of Monday, 2-jrd day of
December, 1912, for the construction of two
25-foot motor  launches.
Intending bidders will give full description
of the hull, engine, etc.
the
ivery:    l
at Nelsi
other
Each proposal must be accompanied by an
accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit
on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable
to the Hon. the Minister of Public Works, for
a sum equivalent to ten per cent of the amount
of the tender, which shall be forfeited if the
party tendering decline to enter into contract
when called .upon to do so, or if he fail to
complete the work contracted for. The
cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them upon
the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless made
out on: the forms supplied, signed by the
actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed
in the envelopes furnished.
Forms of tender can be obtained from the
Government Agents at Vancouver, New Westminster, Revelstoke, and Nelson, and the Department of Public Works, Victoria.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily
accepted,
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Public Works  Department,
Victoria, B.C., 29th November, 1912.
dec. 7 dcc. 2i
VICTORIA  (RENFREW)  LAND
DISTRICT
TAKE NOTICE that Caroline Hemington
Muir, of Victoria, B. C., occupation Married
Woman, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the cast
boundary of Lot 50, Renfrew District, about
20 chains north of the S. E. corner of the
said Lot 50; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 20 chains, more or less, to the soutii
boundary of T. L. 1728; thence west along the
south boundaries of T L.'s 1728 and 1727
to the cast boundary of said Lot 50, a distance
of 80 chains, more or less; thence soutli 20
chains to point of commencement, containing
160 acres more or less.
Dated November 6th,  1912.
CAROLINE HEMINGTON MUIR.
Harold W. Duckitt, Ag;cnt.
nov. 30 jan. 25
"LAND REGISTRY ACT"
In thc Matter of an application for a fresh
Certificate   of   Title   to   Part   111   feet   6
Inches by 50 feet of Lot 33, Block 4, Map
132,    Hillside    Extension,   of   the   Work
Estate, Victoria City.
NOTICE is hereby Riven of my intention
at the expiration of one calendar month from
tlu*  first  publication   hereof  to  issue  a  fresh
Certificate of Title in lira of ihe Certificate «l
Title issued to Charles Nelson Brown on the
and May, 19m, and numbered -**-*99i C, which
has been lost.
Dated   at   I,ami   Registry   Office,   Victoria,
11. C, this 21st dav of November, 1912.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar-General of Titles,
dcc. 14 Jan. 11
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that the Order-
in-Council, approved August 17th, 1895, reserving and setting apart for the sole use
of Her Majesty's Government for military
and naval purposes that portion of the Sand
Spit at the Lagoon, Esquimalt, which is the
property of the Province, is rescinded; and
that the lands described in the aforesaid
Order-in-Council are reserved for Government
purposes.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
29th October, 1912.
nov. 2 feb. 2
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, Ralph Sweet, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Carpenter, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted   about   four   miles   distant   and   in   a
north-westerly    direction    from    the    northwestern  extremity   of  Sigutla   Lake,   marked
S.   W.  Corner, tnence north 80  chains,  east
80  chains,  south 80  chains,  west 80  chains,
to point   of   commencement,   containing   640
acres, more or less.
Dated 21st August, 1912.
RALPH SWEET.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 Jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE  notice   that   George   E.   Hartshorn,
of  Vancouver,   B.C.,   occupation   Logger,  intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a
post   planted   one   mile   west   and   one   mile
north from the western extremity of Nahlouza
Lake, marked S. E.  Corner, thence north 80
chains, west 80 chains, south 80 chains, east
80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated  13th October,  1912.
GEORGE E. HARTSHORN.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 Jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, William A. Walton, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Laborer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post planted about  one  mile  distant  and  in
a westerly direction from the western extremity of Nahlouza Lake, marked S. E. Corner,
thence north 80 chains, west 80 chains, south
80  chains,  east 80  chains  to  point of commencement,   containing   640   acres,   more   or
less.
Dated 13th October, 1912.
WILLIAM A. WALTON.
Percj Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan.4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Percy Gadsden, of Bella
Coola, B.C., occupation Farmer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about two miles distant and in a
north-westerly direction from the northwesterly extremity of Sigutla Lake, marked
S. W. Corner, tnence north 80 chains, east
80 chains, south 80 chains, west 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated 20th August, 1912.
PERCY   GADSDEN,
nov. 9 jan. 4
VICTORIA (RENFREW) LAND
DISTRICT
TAKE NOTICE that Hanna Mary Green,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Spinster, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north boundary of the
Carmanah I. R., about 15 chains east of the
N. W. corner of the Carmanah I. R.; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; tnence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated November 5th, 1012
HANNA MARY GREEN.
Harold W. Duckitt, Agent,
nov. 30 Jan. 25
"LAND REGISTRY ACT"
In thc Matter of an  application for a fresh
Certificate of Title to Lot  1874, Victoria
Town (now City).
NOTICE is hereby given of my intention
at the expiration of one calendar month from
thc  first publication  hereof to issue a fresh
Certificate of Title in lieu of the Certificate
of Title issued to Edward Truran on the 8th
day of September,  1863, and numbered  1345,
whicii has been lost.
Dated   at   Land   Registry   Office,   Victoria,
British Columbia, this 13th day of November,
'9'2' S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar-General of Titles,
nov. 16 dec. 14
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, Mark Smith, of Vancouver,  B.C., occupation Laborer, intends to
apply   for   permission   to   purchase   the   following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post planted on the north shore of Nahlouza
Lake,   marked   S.   W.   Corner,   thence   north
80  cnains,  east  80  chains,   south   80  chains,
west   80   chains  to  point   of   commencement,
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated 12th August, 1912.
MARK SMITH.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 Jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, Edith Bone, of Luton,
England, occupation Married Woman, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post  planted   about  one  mile   east  and  two
miles north from the north-western extremity
of Sigutla Lake, marked S. W. Corner, thence
north   80   chains,   east   80   chains,   south   80
chains, west 80 chains to point of commencement,  containing  640  acres,  more  or  less.
Dated 20th August,   1512.
EDITH BONE.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 Jan. 4
COMPANIES'  ACT
TAKE NOTICE that the Grand Trunk Pacific Land Company, an extra Provincial Company, registered under the laws of the Province of British Columbia, whose registered
office is situate at 918 Government Street, in
thc City of Victoria, B.C., intends on thc 17th
dny of December. 1912, to apply to the Registrar of Joint Stock Companies for the change
of the name of the said Company to "Canadian Land and Securities Corporation, Ltd."
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this 8th day of
November,  1912.
BODWELL & LAWSON,
Solicitors for the Company,
nov. 16 dec. 14
SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING REGULATIONS.
Coal mining rights of the Dominion, in
Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, the
Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories
and in a portion of the Province of British
Columbia, may be leased for a term of
twenty-one years at an annual rental of $1
an acre. Not more than 2,560 acres will be
leased to one applicant.
Applications for a lease must be made by
the applicant in person to the Agent or Sub
Agent of the district in which the rights applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or legal sub-divisions
of sections, and in unsurveyed territory the
tract applied for shall be staked out by the
applicant himself.
Each application must be accompanied by
a fee of $5 which will be refunded if the
rights applied for are not available, but not
otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on the
merchantable output of the mine at the rate
of five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall furnish the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the full quantity of merchantable
coal mined and pay the royalty thereon. If
the coal mining rights are not being operated, such returns should be furnished at
least once a year.
The lease will include the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted
to purchase whatever available surface rights
may be considered necessary for the working of the mine at the rate of $10.00 an acre.
For full information application should be
made to the Secretary of the Department of
the Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or
Sub-Agent  of  Dominion  Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.   B.—Unauthorized   publication   of   this
advertisement will  not be paid for.
sept. 21
NOTICE OF CANCELLATION
NOTICE i» hereby given that the Reserve
existing over the lands included within Special
Timber Licences Nos. 39318 and 39319, situated on the North Thompson River in the
Kamloops Division of Yale District, by reason of a notice published in the British Columbia Gazette on December 27th, 1907, is
cancelled and that the said lands will be open
for entry by pre-emption on Thursday, December 19th, at 9 o'clock in the forenoon.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
ioth September, 1912.
sept. 14 dec. 14
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing upon Crown lands in the Kootenay
District, formerly held under Special Timber
Licences numbered 4481, 5255, 5256, 5832,
8534, 9081, 9082, 10259, 10260, 10261, 10262,
10499, 10500, 11249, 11347, 13824, 16727, 21907,
22661, 23116, 24432, 26737, 26926, 28182, 28183.
28184, 30358. 31180, 31184, 31185, 31201, 31208,
31212, 31213, 31308, 31330, 31481, 32022, 32654,
3265S1 32711, 334°*5, 334H, 33449, 33459, 334&>,
34221, 34273, 34310, 34311, 34386, 35631, 36502,
36553, 30554. 3758o, 37993. 37994. 39° u. 39202,
39359. 40406, 41078, 41344. 41426 and 43.176,
by reason of the notice published in the British
Columbia Gazette on December 27th, 1907, is
cancelled for the purpose of offering the said
lands for sale at public auction.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
ioth  October,  1912.
oct. 19
jan. 18
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Thomas J. Williams, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Laborer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about one mile distant and in a
westerly direction from the western extremity
of Nahlouza Lake, marked N. E. Corner,
thence south 80 chains, west 80 chains, north
80 chains, east 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or
less.
Dated 13th October, 1912.
THOMAS J. WILLIAMS.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 ian. 4
WATER NOTICE
I, Samuel McCullough of Royal Oak, South
Saanich, in the Province of British Columbia,
give notice that on the 18th day of December,
1912, I intend to apply to the Water Commissioner at his office in Victoria, for a licence
to take and use four cubic feet of water per
second from springs on Section 87, Block 1,
Lot 8, on Section 86, Block 2, Lot 20, on
Section 86, Block 3, Lot 4, all of Range I
East, Lake District, Province of British Columbia, Plan No. 1373, and to form a reservoir
for storage from said springs on that portion
of Lot II, lying within Section 86, Block 2,
Range I East, aforesaid.
The water is to be taken from said reservoir and is to be used on Section 87, Block I,
Lot 4, Lake District aforesaid, for domestic
purposes and also to irrigate land in the
above mentioned Sections 86 and 87.
Dated and posted this :6th day of November,  1912.
SAMUEL McCULLOUGH.
ir. 23 dec. 14
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
covering the parcel of land formerly held
under Timber Licence No. 40026, situated on
the Columbia River in the vicinity of Arrow
Park, by reason of the notice published in the
British Columbia Gazette on the 27th December, 1907, is cancelled: and that the vacant
lands formerly covered by the before mentioned licence will be open to pre-emption
only on and after the 28.(1 day of December,
1912.
R. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
24th September, 1912.
sept. 28 dec. 28
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing over the lands included in Special
Timber Licence No. 14830, situated on Upper
Rendezvous Island, Sayward District, by reason of a notice published in the British Columbia Gazetter on the 27th of December, 1907,
is cancelled, and that the said lands will be 1
open for entry by pre-emption on January
15th, 1913, at 9 o'clock in the forenoon.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
25th September, 1912.
oct. 5
Jan. 4
"LAND REGISTRY ACT"
IN the Matter of an application for a fresh
Certificate  of  Title  to  Lots  Nos.   182A,
182G and 1294, Victoria City.    Also part
of Section XIX, Esquimalt District, British Columbia.
NOTICE is hereby given of my intention
at the expiration of one calendar month from
the first publication  hereof to issue  a  fresh
Certificate of Title in lieu of the Certificate
of Title issued to Donald Fraser on the 6th
day of December,  1872 and numbered 698A,
which has been lost.
Dated   at   Land   Registry   Office,   Victoria,
British Columbia, this 28th day of June, 1912.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar-General of Titles,
nov. 16 dec. 14
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, Hannah Jane Gadsden, of Luton, England, occupation  Married
Woman, intends to apply  for permission  to
purchase # the   following    described   lands:—-
Commencing   at   a   post   planted   about   one
mile east and one mile north from the northwestern  extremity  of  Sigutla  Lake,   marked
S. W. Corner, thence north 80 chains, east 80
chains,  soutii  80  chains,  west 80  cnains,  to
point of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated 20th August,  1912.
HANNAH JANE GADSDEN.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 4
SEALED TENDERS will be received by
the Minister of Lands not later than noon
on the 3rd day of March, 1913, for the purchase of Licence No. X9 to cut 45,300,000 feet
of timber and 4,000 cedar poles standing on
Lot 671, Malaspina Strait, New Westminster
District.
Particulars of Chief Forester, Victoria, B. C.
nov. 30 mar. 1
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing on Lot 10, Group I, Kootenay District, by reason of a notice bearing date
March 26th, 1888, and published in tlle B. C.
Gazette under date of March 31st, 1888, is
cancelled for the purpose of offering the said
land for sale at public auction.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands,
nov. 30 mar. 1
WATER ACT
Notice   of   Application   for   the   Approval   of
Works
TAKE notice that the Sidney Water and
Power Company, Limited, will apply to the
Comptroller of Water Rights for the approval
of the plans of the works to be constructed
for the utilization of the water from a well
on Section 5, Range 2 E., North Saanich,
which the applicant is, by Water Licence No.
30, authorized to take, store, and use for
municipal purposes.
The plans and particvlars required by subsection (1) of section 70 of the "Water Act"
as amended havc been filed with the Comptroller of Water Riphts at Victoria and with
the Water Recorder at Victoria, B.C.
Objections to the application may be filed
with the Comptroller of Water Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this 2nd day of
December, 1912.
BcRT n WHITE,
Agent of the Applicant,
dec. 7 Jan. 3 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1912
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YATES STREET AT BROAD
THE DEBATE on the ADDRESS
The Member for Victoria Speaks on the Bribing
of Constituencies
On Wednesday, November 27th,
the Debate on the Address was resumed and below will be found the
verbatim report of the speech delivered by Mr. G. H. Barnard, member
for Victoria City:
Mr. Speaker, I had not intended to
intervene in this debate had it not
been for some words which fell from
the lips of the right hon. the Leader
of the Opposition in the course of his
remark on Monday. Before dealing
with those particular remarks. I wish
to say that I am sure it is a source of
gratification to every member of this
House, irrespective of party, to hear
that the prosperity of the country is
so great. So far as the constituency
which I have the honour to represent
is concerned, never in its history has
it been as prosperous, and all indications are that this prosperity will continue and constantly increase. The
post office returns and the customs
returns are increasing at an unpre-
Bank clearing are increasing tremendously; the tonnage of the oceangoing and coasting trade is increasing to such an extent that the docks
and harbours of the Pacific coast
province are in danger of being seriously overtaxed. In view of the coming completion of the Panama canal,
scarcely a week passes that we do not
see representatives of the great European shipping companies spying out
the land, and making arrangements
for carrying on their trade as soon as
the canal is opened; and I am glad
to say that the present Government
has shown its appreciation of the importance of the harbours upon that
coast, and a disposition to assist in
the necessary development of the
ports of the province.
Coming as I do from the province
of British Columbia, I need scarcely
say that it was with great pleasure
that I heard the reference in the
Speech from the Throne to the question of naval defence. I do not propose today to go into that question,
because I hope to have an early opportunity to try and put before the
members of this House the views of
my constituents upon it. But I can assure the right hon. Leader of the
Government that, so far as the people of the province of British Columbia are concerned, he need have no
fear of erring on the side of generosity. He cannot do too much to please
the people of the Pacific province.
With regard to the land defences of
that province, I am sorry to say that
matters are not in a satisfactory condition. The land defences of the
province have not, for some years
past, received the attention they
should have received at the hands of
the different governments in power
at Ottawa. Since the Imperial troops
were taken away from Esquimalt, and
since this Government undertook to
control the land defences, the forces
have been reduced from 500 or 600,
under the Imperial authorities, to
barely 100. Now, I am perfectly willing to admit that a Canadian soldier
is just as good as, and probably a
little bit better than an English soldier, but it is stretching my admiration a little too far to suggest that
the proportion is one to five. Esquimalt, where the fortifications are, lies
within two or three miles of the capital city of British Columbia. In that
city are stored public documents of
untold value. Esquimalt is fortified. I
have always been under the impression that it is a rule of international
law that a fortified city may be bombarded by a foreign force, but that
it is contrary to the usages of international law to bombard an unfortified city. If that be so, the capital
city of British Columbia, which is my
constituency, labours under the disadvantage of having just enough fortifications to be called a defended and
fortified place, and yet it has not the
means whereby to defend itself. For
these reasons, I would submit to the
Minister of Militia that his fortifications are a menace rather than a protection, and I would ask him to lose
no time in strengthening the land defences at that point.
I wish to deal, just for a moment,
with the statements made by the
right hon. the Leader of the Opposition, with reference to an occurrence
during the bye-election in the county
of Richelieu a few weeks ago. The
right hon. the Leader of the Opposition, in somewhat melodramatic language, accused the Minister of Public
Works of having endeavoured to
bribe the constituency by a promise
of certain public works. I assume that
the right hon. the Leader of the Opposition was quarreling more with
the words in which the promise was
made, than with the substance of the
promise, or its effect; and I am inclined to think, judging from some remarks made by that right hon. gentleman at previous elections in this country, that if my friend the Minister
of Public Works had couched his
promise in scriptural language, the
Leader of the Opposition might have
found less objection to it. For I find,
in the 'Canadian Annual Review' for
1911, at page 163, an account by Mr.
Castell Hopkins of the recent general
election, and the following reference
to a speech made by the late Prime
Minister at Ste. Julienne in the province of Quebec:
The speech was notable for one of
the Premier's Scriptural references:
the Liberal Government is like the
Kingdom of Heaven, "Ask and you
will receive." When St. Donat asked
for a railway extension from Raw-
don, I say, "ask and you will receive."
This railway should be constructed to
put Montreal in communication with
the Transcontinental.
So that it would appear that if my
friend the Minister of Public Works
had promised his marine railway in
the language of Scripture, in all probability the Leader of the Opposition
would have made little objection. I
must say that upon hearing the remarks and the tones—I was almost
going to say the anguish, but I shall
say the tones of indignation—in
which he condemned the Minister of
Public Works for promising a marine
railway at Richelieu, I could hardly
believe my ears. I could hardly think
it was the leader of the Liberal party
who was so righteously indignant 'n
a matter of this kind. The hon. the
Leader of the Opposition charged
bribery, or an attempt to bribe the
constituency, and claimed that his
candidate had not received fair play.
He arraigned the Minister of Public
Works in the following words:
I charge the Minister of Public
Works, and arraign him before Parliament, with having tried to bribe the
electors of Richelieu.
Well, I am only a humble member
of this House, and a follower of the
Leader of the Government. I do not
know just what effect an arraignment
of that kind has, but if it is a very
terrible thing. I just wish to say, in
have the fact that the Hon. Mr. Tem-
his own language, I arraign the right
hon. the Leader of the Opposition
before Parliament with having in a
general election in 1911 tried to bribe
the electors of the city of Victoria.
He proceeds:
I call as witness a member of this
House, the hon. member for Charlevoix.
Well, I call as a witness a member
of this House, the hon. member for
St. John, the Minister of Public
Works in the late administration. I
also call as a witness the Hon. Mr.
Templeman, now, alas! no longer a
member of this House. He cites in
support of his contention a quotation
from "La Patrie," which he says is a
Government paper. I quote, in support of my arraignment, the Victoria
"Daily Times," the personal organ of
the Hon. Mr. Templeman, and the
Liberal organ in the city of Victoria.
What were the facts? Just before the
general election of 1911, as a matter
of fact on nomination day, the 14th
of September, 1911, there appeared in
the Victoria "Daily Times," the
newspaper of the Hon. William Templeman, candidate for the Liberal
party in Victoria, the folowing telegram:
Victoria, B.C., Sept. 9. 1911.
Hon. W. Pugsley, St. John, N.B.
I propose issuing an address to the
electois in which I will state that the
Government will make Victoria a port
of first class" by building breakwaters
and deepening outer and inner harbours to adequate depth to accommodate all shipping. The cost, on Reefer's estimates, will be about $2,000,-
000 for breakwater, and about $1,000,-
000 for deepening harbour, annual expenditure to be about $500,000. These
proposed works have been approved
of for years, and the harbour work
that has been carried out for the last
eight years has been with the definite
object of securing the results contemplated in above project. At the present rate of progress it will take twenty or thirty years to do what should
be done in at the most three or four
years. The opening of the Panama
canal three years hence makes this
work a national necessity. I will be
pleased to have your approval of
above.
WM. TEMPLEMAN.
Mr. PUGSLEY: I am glad to
know the work is going on now.
Mr. BARNARD: It ought to have
been done several years before. But
it is somewhat peculiar that it was
not until nomination day that its urgency occurred to the Hon. Mr. Templeman. In reply the following telegram was received from the Hon.
William Pugsley, then Minister of
Public Works:
Montreal, Que., Sept. 10,1911.
Hon. Wm. Templeman, Victoria, B.C.
Your telegram of the 9th inst. re
harbour improvements Victoria received. When I was in your city—
By the way that was two years before this telegram was written:
When I was in your city I looked
thoroughly into the situation and was
impressed with the urgent necessity
of the improvements now recommended by you.and will heartily endorse your proposals as contained in
said telegram.
WILLIAM PUGSLEY.
Mr. PUGSLEY: Will my hon.
friend allow me to ask him a question?
Mr. BARNARD: Certainly.
Mr. PUGSLEY: Is there anywhere
in that telegram the statement made
chat the carrying on of the public
improvements in Victoria was conditional on the electors supporting the
Government?
Mr. BARNARD: No, but we have
the facts before us, and it is very
easy to deduce a meaning from them.
We have the fact that this telegram
was published on nomination day, we
JAMES BUCHANAN & CO., by Royal Appointment
Purveyors to H. M. King George the V. and the Royal Household.
Distillers of the popular
"Black & White" Scotch Whisky
Unsurpassed in Purity, Age and Flavor -Ml Dealers
A GOOD HABIT—Tea when you are
tired, particularly if it's
LIPTONS TEA
Goes farthest for the money
pieman announced to the Hon. Mr.
Pugsley one week before the election,
that he proposed issuing an address
to the electors and asking that these
works be carried on. I do not know
whether the Hon. Mr. Templeman
had some experience which he did
not like as regards the promises of
the then Minister of Public Works,
but apparentliy there was some dissatisfaction in his mind. At any rate
Mr. Templeman may not have been
quite satisfied with this endorsement
of the then Minister of Public Works,
possibly the then Minister of Public
Works had the idea that his promises would not be quite satisfactory to
the electors of the city of Victoria, or
possibly the Hon. Mr. Pugsley and
the Hon. Mr. Templeman combined
thought that the promise of the Minister of Public Works was not calculated to carry great weight with
the electors. At any rate, on the 12th
of September two days after this, another telegram was sent by Hon. Mr.
Pugsley, reading as follows:
St. John, N.B., Sept. 12, 1911.
W. Templeman, Victoria, B. C.
My wire was sent after I had seen
Sir Wilfrid.
W. PUGSLEY.
Mr. PUGSLEY: Hear, hear-a
statement of the policy of the Government, that is entirely different
from the Richelieu affair.
Mr. BARNARD: So much for the
consistency of the right hon. the
Leader of the Opposition, and his
sincerity in attacking the Minister of
Public Works (Mr. Rogers) with regard to this Richelieu election. Apparently it is a highly meritorious
thing for the Liberal Government to
promise a public work just before an
election, but it is a political crime of
the worst kind if a Conservative government should make a like promise.
According to the ethics of the right
hon1. the Leader of the Opposition,
when a Conservative does such a
thing it is bribery, but when done by
a Liberal it is simply good policy.
These gentlemen opposite say when
a Conservative makes a promise of
that kind, that it is trying to steal the
elections, but when exactly the same
thing is done by a Liberal Govern*-
ment they think it is good ball and
the fairest kind of play. Now, Mr.
Speaker, if, as is alleged by the right
hon. the Leader of the Opposition,
constituencies in Canada have been
debauched, then I say that the blame
does not lies at the doors of the Conservative party. We have not to go
hack very far to find instances of glaring impropriety perpetrated by the
Liberal party and without going into
Bowes for Sensible Gifts
There Are
Few Men
who don't shave, and the
means of making the daily
shave a source of pleasure
and comfort would make a
gift for which any man
would be thankful.
The Perforated Rasor Hone
makes the razor edge perfect,
even in the hands of a novice.
Only $1.00
Cyrus H. Bowes
Chemist
1228 Government Strut
Tels. 425 and 450
Roy*!   Art   OIim   Workl   ud   Store
91S Pandora St,  Victoria, B. C.
Albert F. Roy
Over  thirty  yeari'  cxpericmea  ia
Art Glau
LIAOID  LIGHTS
Sola manufacturer ol Steel-Cored Lead
for  Cnurc-hei,  Schoola,   Public   Bnild-
infe and private Dwellinia.   Plain aid
Glaaa Sold.   Saabea Glared by
Fancy   _
Contract
Eatimatca   free.   Phone 5M
details there naturally flashes across
one's mind the Newmarket canal and
the sawdust wharf. Do hon. gentlemen opposite say that these transactions were good public policy. I have
not much use for the tu quoque argument, and I am absolutely opposed to
anythings savouring of debauching
the constituencies, but I do say that
if in the course of his peregrinations
around this vale of tears the devil occasionally finds he is fought by fire,
complaint does not lie in the mouth of
His Satanic Majesty. 10
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1912
Society
Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Palmer, of
Kamloops, are staying at the Empress
■hotel.
* *   *
Miss Perry French, Vancouver, is
among the guests at    the    Empress
hotel.
* *   *
Mrs. G. A. Henderson, who has
been enjoying a holiday in Victoria,
has left for her home in Vernon, B.C.
* *   *
Mr. Arthur Miller, of Nelson, is on
a short visit to Victoria.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. George Vernon and
family have left on a visit to England.
* *   *
. Mr. C. C. Wheeler, of Duncan, was
registered at the Dominion hotel during the week.
* *   *
Mr. G. A. Smith, Alberni, has been
a guest at the Empress hotel.
* *   *
Mrs. Alfred Green, from Cowichan
Lake, is making a short stay with
relatives in Victoria.
Mr. Thomas Meredith is registered
at the Empress hotel from Vancouver.
-*<   *■*••   *
Mr. J. A. Gibson, of Nelson, is
spending a few days in town on business.
*   *   *
Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Wilson are in
the city from Merritt and are staying
at the Empress hotel.
* *   *
Mr. J. S. Matterson, who has been
on an extended trip to the Old Country, has returned to Victoria.
* *   *
Miss Moore, of Vancouver, registered at the'Empress hotel during the
week.
* *   *
Mr. T. C. Boulton, from Cowichan,
spent a few days in town during the
past week.
* *   *
Mr. J. Leslie Bell, of Calgary, has
arrived in town'and is staying at the
Empress hotel.
* *   *
Mr. S. Long, of Saanich, B. C, has
been enjoying a short visit to the
city,
* *   *
Mrs. W. C. Crane, accompanied by
her two sons, left town last week, for
San Diego, where they will spend the
winter months.
* *   *
Mr. A. M. Knox is paying a short
visit to the city from Duncan and
is registered at the King Edward
hotel.
* <¥     #
Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Munn and family left on Monday last for California.
Mr.'Munn will join Mr. R. T. Elliott,
of this city, at San Francisco, who
will accompany him on a trip to Australia.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Jones,
"Brierley," Head Street, left on Wednesday last on a visit to the South,
where they will spend about a couple
of   months    touring   the    Southern
States.
* *   *
A quiet but pretty wedding was
celebrated at St. Barnabas' church on
Wednesday, the 4th, when the Rev.
E. G. Miller united in marriage Mr.
Stanley Russell Anderson, fourth son
of Mr. J. A. Anderson, auditor-general, and Florence Stephanie Walker,
daughter of Mrs. W. J. Walker, of
Saanichton, B. C. The bride, who
looked charming in her wedding
costume, was given away by her
father, while the groom was supported by Mr. A. Douglas Anderson. Only
the immediate relatives of the bride
and bridegroom were present at the
ceremony. Later in the afternoon the
happy couple left on the 4-30 boat for
Seattle, where the honeymoon will be
spent. On their return they will take
up their residence in Victoria.
* *   *
Mrs. Bullen, Esquimalt Road, was
among last week's hostesses and entertained a number of her friends at
Bridge and Five Hundred. Among
the guests were: Mrs. Dtipont, Mrs.
D. Hunter, Mrs. Butchart, Miss McNaughton jones, Mrs. Musgrave, Mrs.
Wasson, Mrs. Tuck, Mrs. Troup, Mrs.
Chas. Todd, Mrs. Stuart Robertson,
Mrs. Fleet Robertson, Mrs. Payne.
Mrs. Peters, Mrs. Phipps, Mrs.
Pearce, Mrs, McCallum, Mrs. Kirk,
Mrs. Geo. Matthews, Mrs. A. Jones,
Mrs. Hevland, Mrs. J. Hunter, Mrs.
R. W. Gibson, Mrs. T. S. Gore, Mrs.
Flummerfelt. Mrs. Dunsmuir. Mrs.
Crawford, Mrs. Coles, Mrs. Charles.
Mrs. Bowser.    Mrs.    Butchart,    Mrs.
Berkeley, Mrs. E. V. Bodwell, Mrs.
F.'S. Barnard, Mrs. Blaiklock and
others. Mrs. Dupont, Mrs. D. Hunter and Mrs. Butchart were fortunate
in winning prizes.
*   *   *
A large excursion party of some
thirty-seven Victorians, under the
management of Claude A. Solly, left
last week on the Princess Charlotte
en route for the Old Country. Mr.
Solly accompanied them as far as
New York and saw them safely
aboard the trans-Atlantic liners. The
party consisted of the following: Geo.
Buss, C. Matthews, S. J. Calnan, P.
Lowther, E. L. Routh, N. Heaton, H.
Bendelow, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Barnes
and son, John Barnes, W. Smith, W.
Stanford, Wm. Thompson, Mr. and
Mrs. E. H. Beaney, Mrs. W. E.
Beaney, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Watkin-
son, Miss Agnes Watkinson, F. Monk,
Miss Hilda Childs, Miss Gertrude
Childs, Mr. and Mrs. J. N. Findlay,
A. Thatcher, Mrs. L. W. Evans, Miss
Ellen Robertson, Miss L. Cob'old,
Miss Elsie Redfern, Miss Elsie Beg-
wood, Chas. H. Foxwell, Mr. and
Mrs. Gillis, Al. Baker and James McPhee.
'Mrs. R. Ford Verrinder was hostess
on Saturday evening last of a very
charming dance at which she entertained a number of young people. She
was assisted in receiving the guests
by Miss Marguerite and Regina Verrinder, who wore dainty dresses of
old rose. Some of those present
were: Miss Wheatley, Miss V. Leth-
waite, Miss* E. Floyd, Miss Dora Lauder, Miss Peggy McBride, Miss K.
Bradshaw, Miss Tommy Monteith,
Miss Ola Balcom, Miss G. Smith,
Miss G. Copely, Miss Nora Jones,
Miss D. Dunne, Miss Ruth Jones,
Miss Florence Miller, Miss Bertha
Miller, Miss Hazelteen, Miss E. Miller, Miss G. Wilkes, Miss Margaret
Carly, Miss Gertrude Scott and the
Messrs. Ryn Lauder, P. Ogden, Joe
Shires, M. Scott, R. Day, Geo. Pauline, Vernon* Miller, Charley Baxter,
Simpson, Harry Yates, D. Wotton, C.
Carey, D. McDonald, B. Wilkerson,
Ingram, Talbot Wheatley, Dennis
Deispecker, Derman Deispecker, Haz
elteen, G Morton and others.
Correspondence
The Week accepts no responsibility for
the views expressed by its correspondents.
Communications will be inserted whether
signed by the real name of the writer
or a nom de plume, but the writer's
name and address must be given to the
Editor as an evidence of bona fides. In no
case will it be divulged without consent.
OWING AND PAYING
Victoria, Dec. 12, 1912.
Editor, The Week:
Dear Sir,—A correspondent ("Cui-
que") in the Victoria Times agrees
with the main contention of Mr.
Clive Phillips Wolley that "Canada
owes something to England," but
churlishly attempts to belittle the
obligations by mentioning the comparatively trifling amount Canada has
done for England.
He says "Canada's sons have been
transported year after year to the
lonely prairie to till new land and
raise crops to fill the capacious mow
of England."
"Cuique" does not mention if those
exiled sons of Canada accepted any
payment for their lonely job—perhaps
the only employment they were fully
competent to fill. Taking an unsentimental view of it, and granting there
was quid pro quo for the job I fail
to comprehend how this necessary
raising of crops places England under
any obligation, or fill her "capacious
mow" one whit more than it does the
pockets of those well paid exiles on
the "lonely prairie." "Cuique" gives
only one more instance worth noticing, of all Canada has done for her
Mother Country. He says, "In the
late South African War Canada sent
several volunteer corps to serve
against thc Boers." Is he oblivious
of the fact that the "boys" who comprised these corps, arrived in Canada
barely in time to volunteer for the
Boer War; from England, Ireland
and Scotland?
Then is Canada to receive all the
kudos for the prowess of the boys
from the old land who remained for
only a few weeks in Canada?
I knew some of the first contingent
that left Alberta, who volunteered
three days after arriving at their destination in that province I
"CUI  BONO."
name indicates, the new store is full
of new ideas, and not only of ideas
but of the wherewithal with which
to satisfy them when once formed.
Specialties are made of articles to
suit ladies and children, and the opening of this "New Idea" store coincides most appropriately with the advent of Christmas. 648 Johnson
street is a good 'lumber and street
address for Christmas shoppers to
remember.
SIGNS
Two eyes  were given  mc,
Life's windows they;
Yet curtained well they be,
Lest light should stray.
A tongue was given me,
Heart's truth to tell;
Yet, lest it gambol free,
'Tis barriered well.
Oh, heart, hid deep within,
A prisoner thou
Lest one thy fortress win—
Whisht 1    Listeners now I
—Mary Bell.
Patronized
by the
B0SNEU2
Cherry
mm
The New Idea Store
It will bc good news to many Victorian shoppers, especially at this
present buying season of the year, to
learn tliat Mrs. Elliott, formerly of
the "Bon-Tnn" store, is acting as
manager of a new store located at
(148 Johnson street, of which Mrs.
Fullerton  is  the proprietor.    As its
■Mass FROM HSM
Queen  |
These words found
on every lube or jar
of Gosnell's Cherry
Tooth Paste mean
that after a consideration of the very
finest dentrifices the
world produces,
Queen Alexandra has
chosen
Gosnell's Cherry
Tooth Paste
as the Ucst and has
given its makers the
gracious favor of a
Royal Appointment.
Surely such a critical
selection as this
should mean something to you.
Get them at your
druggists    today    or
NERLICH & COMPANY
I146    Front    St    W.,
TORONTO
BOOK NOTES
At the Victoria Book and Stationery Co., 1004 Government
St., Victoria, B.C.:
"The Red Lane," by Holman
Day.   $1.50.
"The   Mind-the-Paint   Girl,"
by Louis Tracy.   $1.50.
"The Net," by Rex Beach.
"The Money Moon."   $1.50.
JUST
OPENED
The New Idea
Store
With a Complete New Line of Stock
Hand Made Xmas Presents our Specialty
648 JOHNSON STREET VICTORIA, B. C.
Why, then, methinks, 'tis time to smile again "
Munro's Grand Highland Liqueur
Twenty Years Old and from
Dalwhinnie
The Best $1.25 Scotch we ever
offered you
H. 0. Kirkham £# Co.
Limited 741-743-745 Fort Street
n
•52 "$•   t-
. m
__h_*j$i_-
Raphael Tuck's Cards and Calendars
Finest in the World—Now on Sale at
Victoria Book & Stationery Co., Ltd.
1004 Government Street Telephone 63
What you want, the way you want it
Afternoon Tea, Dainty Luncheons,
Special Teas for parties by arrangement.    Do not forget—We always
keep on hand guaranteed
New Laid Eggs.
Ihe TEA KETTLE   n» douglas st.
MISS M. WOOLDRIDGE, Proprietress        Opposite the Victoria Theatre
Xmas Suggestions
We can reduce your Christmas worry to a minimum with our endless
variety of Christmas gifts to choose from: Smoking Jackets,
Lounging Robes, Knitted Vests, Neckwear, Gloves, Neck Scarfs,
Leather Goods, Suit Cases, Umbrellas, Jaegerwear, Sweater Coats, etc.
STORE OF
F. A. 60WEN, Managing Director
1114 Government Street
We Offer
A   first   class   stock   o[
Apples,   Pears,   Cherries,
Prunes,  Plums,  Peaches,
Apricots and small fruits.
Also Ornamental Trees and Shrubs, decidious and evergreen, Roses, etc.
The very finest quality and best assortment grown in H. C.    Catalogue
free.      Personal   inspection   invited.     Now    is   the* time    to   order.
LAYRITZ NURSERIES
CAREY ROAD, VICTORIA BRANCH AT KELOWNA, B. C.
PHONE M2054 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1912
i\
"Solid Voce
The Week's Rumours and
Humours
(By The Hornet)
ff
That Victoria is no place for Mormon missionaries.
* *   *
That several towns in the Old
Country taught them the lesson that
their room was preferable to their
company.
* *   *
That the sooner they learn the
same lesson in Victoria the better,
* *   *
That "Hornet" would willingly assist in a "tar and feather" ceremony.
That next Friday and Saturday will
see the production of an original play
at the Victoria theatre.
That as "The House That Jack
Built" is the outcome of a local brain
and will be played by local talent,
the theatre ought to be filled to capacity.
* *.   *
That in all probability the city of
Vantoria will be able to give a few
pointers to the city of Victoria.
* *   *
That all is not gold that glitters
and the Vancouver hold-up man did
not appreciate stage-money.
* *   *
That the leasing of the Palace corner will cause many heart-burnings
among the seafaring fraternity.
* *   *
That the Palace Saloon has the reputation of putting out the best
schooners in town.
* *   *
That the stand which Seattle has
taken on the advertising question
might well be followed by its neighbours.
* *   *
That if Victoria were up-to-date
the horror at the corner of Yates and
Government street would not be allowed.
* *   *
That a "Tornado" sale of boots is
no excuse for an "Inferno" of advertising on the corner.
* *   *
That those responsible for it ought
to be shoo-ed away.
What
Shall
I Give
Him
ASK
The
Commonwealth
Dome ol Hobberlin Clothes
606-608 Yates St.
Tailoring Branch al 720 Yates SI.
That the Fifth Regiment once
more is entitled to the hearty congratulations of the community.
* *   *»
That this is a species of monotony
which does not pall.
«   *   *
That the Federal authorities have
started well in t'heir treatment of the
Fusiliers.
* *   *
That it is no wonder that the Australians  were  favourably    impressed
with the Vancouver cadets.
* *   *
That all things point to the regeneration of Lower Johnson  street.
* . *   *
That some day it will be one of the
most important streets in the city.
•*   *   *
That the workmen employed in
putting in the switch at the corner of
Fort and Douglas street were all
British subjects, or looked it.
* *   *
That if this were so a most praiseworthy example was set.
* *   *
That the plans for the new University provide for a magnificent structure.
* *   *
That future generations will live to
bless the name of Dr. Young.
* *   *
That the Victoria Times seems to
be unable to differentiate between a
resignation and a dismissal.
* *   »
That the best way to make the suffragettes see reason would be to mail
them money-orders.
That they might lack the altruistic
sentiments of the scrub-woman.
* *   *
That the attention of the City Engineer is directed to the state of the
sidewalk on View street, between
Broad and Douglas.
* *   »
That the inside portion has sunk,
leaving the curb as a menace to
Christmas shoppers at Spencer's.
* *   *
That if you want to be buried in
good time, you must do your dying
early in the week.
* *   *
That " the better the day the better the deed" will not now avail the
dead. .
* *   *
That though one swallow does not
make summer, one meeting of the
Moral Reform squad in Victoria .is a
sure sign of an election.
* *   *
That though the money was voted
for new police headquarters, alterations are now being made for another
purpose in the market building.
* * '*
That the new Directors of the Provincial Exhibition might well consider
the advisability of erecting a manufacturers' building,
»  •*  .♦
That it is no good following the
example of Vancouver and waiting for
a population of 150,000 before appreciating the value of industrial concerns.'
*■•*.*
That now is the time to induce capital to invest in such things as sugar
refineries, which have already been
under contemplation.
* *   *
That if the merchants would give
the City a square deal, the Council
would not have to go outside to make
their purchases.
* *   »
That some men, not content with
the substance, try to grab the shadow
also. ;•  , ■       ,    *  *
* *    *
That ice hockey will be going
strong this season,    r
* *   *
That the formation of three amateur teams in Victoria will make for
increased popularity.
* *   *
That* personally conducted tours
from the Equator to the North Pole
will shortly be undertaken in Victoria. ,
* *   *
That the expeditions will start from
the Post-office and end up at the
Land Registry Office.
* *   *
That the Seven Sleepers of Broughton street object to dances    at the
Alexandra Club.
* *' *
That they complain that the automobiles in attendance contribute staccato notes to the dance music'
That motor cars have a knack of
making more noise than they ought
to.
* *   *
That the invitation to deliver the
Charter Day Address at the University of California is a compliment and
an* appreciation of the qualities of
British Columbia's Premier.
¥      *      *
That the National Fire Protection
Association has issued some seasonable warnings.
* *   *
That national rejoicings are often
the prelude to local catastrophes.
* *   *
That the production of a play like
"A Romance from the Underworld" is
not calculated to raise the estimation
in which American Justice is generally held.
* *   *
That like most caricatures it offers
a strong criticism.
* *   *
That the fulsome courtesies interchanged by the two daily papers are
becoming tedious.
* *   *
That it is mot always so much what
you say, but the nasty way in which
you say, that matters.
* *   *
That "sometimes" is but a little
word, but used at the proper moment
has great effect.
* *   *
That as long as Mr. Green remains
in the House no members will be
anxious to remain seated during the
singing of the National Anthem.
* *   *
That from the Liberal point of view
Mr. Barnard has a most exasperating-
ly good memory.
* »   *
That it is still inadvisable for
people who live in glass houses to
indulge in stone-throwing.
* *   *
That Vancouver has but two topics
of conversation now-a-days.
* ¥      »
That the police say that they have
at last put a stopper on the hold-up
men, and the citizens fervently hope
so.
* *   *
That if it had not been for the
pluck of a civilian, the police wouldn't
be so confident.
* *   *
That there are many advantages in
living on an Island.
* *   *
That before a man advertises that
he will not be responsible for his
wife's debts, he had better made sure
who had been paying his own.
* *   *
That it must be annoying to have
the public informed that the wife carried the bag.
* *   *
That at last Victorian property-
owners have shown their strength.
* *    ¥
That a hospital worthy of the city
is assured.
»      ¥      ¥
That congratulations are in order
to the Hospital Board, the ladies
and the indefatigable "Harry" Price.
* *   *
That the new wing of the Empress
Hotel will be at the disposal of
members during the coming Session
of Parliament.
* *   *
That there is only one hotel—the
Empress.
* *   *
That there is only one 'hotel-
manager—Jackson.
* *   *
That today the Empress hotel is
the best managecl hotel on the C. P.
R. system.
A Vienna telegram states that the war may
spread to the Poles. Our latest information,
however, is to the effect that the North Pole
is keeping cool.
. A woman wearing a long hatpin may be
ejected from a public conveyance in Berlin.
In London the rest of the folks have to get
out.
If you are Interested in
Victoria Carnival
Week
August 1 to 6, iqi3
Please send names and present addresses of former residents of Victoria to the Secretary of the Victoria Citizens
Committee, P. 0. Box 1311.
An Invitation to View a
Rare Showing 0/Suitable Christmas
Gifts
We invite Christmas shoppers to view our superb
stock of appropriate and useful gifts selected from
the finest markets in the world. We make a
specialty of European Novelties in Jewellery,
Watches, Silverware, Leather Goods, Cut Glass and
all the Precious and Semi-Precious Stones, such as
Diamonds, Rubies, Emeralds, Sapphires, Pearls,
Black Opals, Aquamarines, Turquoises, Peridots,
Topazes, Amethysts, Chrysophrases, Garnets,
Tourmalines, Coral and Malachite.
il
Articles Laid Aside till Christmas
Store Open Evenings
W. H. WILKERSON
The Gift Store
915 Government Street Victoria, B. C.
After Theatre— SUPPER AT THE
BALMORAL
° CAFE °
ORCHESTRA EVERY
EVENING 6.30 to 12.30
MR. M. NAGEL, MUSICAL DIR.
OPPOSITE THE
OPERA HOUSE
ON DOUGLAS STREET
Skating Boots at Cost
Men's Black Lightening Hitch Hockey Boot, with skates attached, at $4.65
Women's Tan or Black Lightning Hitch Hockey Boot, with skates attached at.. .$3-93
Ben's Best Black or Tan Skating Boot, with Goodyear welted sole, at $3.83
Women's Black Skating Boot with Whitctrim stays, at  $1.85
Women's Tan Skating Boot, best quality, at $3.35
Women's Best Black Skating Boot, at  $3.50
Misses Best Black Skating Boot, at  $9.00
Youths' Best Black Skating Boot, at $1.35
Men's  Black Lightning  Hitch  Skating Boot,  with  tan  outside,  counter  tan
trimmed and with padded ankle support at  $3.35
W. CATHCART £? CO.
Successors to H. B. Hammond Shoe Co.
Pemberton Building
-J
The Union Steamship Company, Ltd. of B. C.
The Boscowitz Steamship Co., Ltd.
COAST SERVICE
Sailings every Wednesday for Campbell River, Hardy Bay, Rivers
Inlet, Ocean Falls, Bella Coola.
Sailings every Saturday for Namu, Bella Bella, Skeena River,
Prince Rupert, Naas, Granby Bay, Stewart.
JOHN BARNSLEY, Agent,
Phone 1925. 1003 Government Street 12
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1912
Correspondence
The Week accepts no responsibility lor
the views expressed by its correspondents.
Communications will be inserted whether
signed by the real name of the writer
or a nom de plume, but the writer's
name and address must be given to the
Editor as an evidence ot bona fides. In no
case will it be divulged without consent.
CAPT. VANCOUVER AND
CAPT. COOK
Victoria, B.C., Dec. 12, 1912.
To the Editor of The Week:
Sir,—The fallowing letter which I
have just received from Arthur Kit-
son, Esq., of Groombridge, Sussex,
England, referring to some of the
early history of our patron saint of
Vancouver Island, Captain George
Vancouver, R.N., will no doubt be of
interest to many readers of The
Week.
The reference to the cause of the
death of Captain Cook, our great cir-
cum-navigator, in the letter, is most
interesting and amusing. May I state
that Mr. Kitson is the author of the
latest and most accurate life of Captain Cook ever published. The account of Captain Vancouver was
kindly made for me by Mr. Kitson
at the "Records Office," in London.
JOHN T. WALBRAN.
Marton,
Croombridge,
Sussex,
23. XI. 12.
Capt.-J. T. Walbran, J. P.:
'. Dear Sir,—I have turned up the record of Geqirge Vancouver in the
Muster Rolls'of-H, M.S. Resolution
and find that he was entered on' January 17th as No. 117, said to be born
jn London,* but places of birth were
often inaccurate, . (He was born in
king's tynn, JuWe'-22nd, 1757- J- T.
W.). aged 15, and was rated as A. B.
throughout the whole voyage. On
turning to the pay-sheet for the voyage I find that he was paid as A. B.
"Began wages 29th May, 1772.
Ehde-ll'w-ages^Sth August, 1775."
Paid off that day at Pay Office,
Deptford.
The amount of wages £2:2:7—
£2:5:0 two months advance—£3:6:1
Slop Chest — making a total of
£47:13:8 for three years' pay; not a
very munificent sum.
I saw .somewhere (but have forgotten where), the other day a letter
from a clergyman, giving a new version of the reason of Cook's murder
by the Hawaiians, which appears to
me as grotesque as most of the missionary yarns from the South Seas.
He gravely states that Cook landed
smoking a cigar and was therefore
taken for the Devil and was incontinently killed. Now t'he reverend gentleman fails to inform us how these
natives had any knowledge of the
Old Gentleman (no missionaries had
been there to introduce him), nor
have we any knowledge that Cook
used tobacco, and though some of the
men spent what seems a considerable
amount, in some cases as much as
five or six pounds, yet there is no
charge whatever for that item against
Cook. Still 'he might have used a
private store, but I have no remembrance of any reference to the fragrant weed from him, any of his officers, or Banks, or Wales.
I think the above will be of interest
to you.
Yours truly,
ARTHUR KITSON.
struggle for the Allan Cup, which may
be called the "blue riband" of Canadian ice hockey. To a very large
extent the success of the local representatives depends on the encouragement meted out to them during the
winter months by devotees of the
game, and it is hoped that the
matches played in the Arena will be
well patronized.
Amateur Ice Hockey
On Friday next, December 20, the
first of a series of amateur matches
will be played at the Arenq. Victoria
is now in the envibale position of possessing three amateur teams, viz: the
Y. M. C. A.' team, the Bell Telephone
team and the Victorias. Local interest has been aroused in this sport,
which is comparatively new to Western climes and throughout the season
matches will be played amongst these
teams and against Vancouver. From
the ultimate winner will be chosen
the team to represent Victoria in the
The School Magazine
The first number of the second volume of the School Magazine is to
hand and presents a most attractive
appearance. The opening article,
contributed by the editor, Mr. Clive
Phillipps-Wolley, deals with the business of our race and draws many valuable lessons from the life of Nelson.
The "thoroughness" of the great
naval hero is insisted upon and the
whole article should be an inspiration
to the boys who read it. Mr. J. Herrick McGregor is responsible for a
most interesting disquisition on "Big
Ships and Little Ships," as well as
for an immigration story which is as
fascinating as it is simple. A sketch
of the career of Admiral Lord Collingwood by Fleet-Surgeon W. E.
Hume, R.N., completes the issue.
"DIZZYISMS"
"It is the spirit of man that says, "I will
be great,' bnt it is the sympathy of woman
that usually makes him so!"
"There is no quality in business more dangerous than delicacy."
"Tobacco is the tomb of love."
"There is no fascination so irresistible as
the  smile of a  married  woman."
"A majority is always better than the best
repartee." "The Pocket Disraeli," compiled
by J. B, Linderbaum.   Mills and Boon. is. net.
Suffragettes   have   been   pouring
jam
and
corrosive acid into the pillar-boxes.
Just
one
more   instance   of   their   contempt
for
His
Majcstey's   males.
Modern and Up-to-Date
The newly opened offices of the
Northwestern Telegraph Company in
the Central Building, 614 View street,
represent the fulfilment of a long
cherished idea on the part of the
management. Everything in connection with the new quarters of the
company is modern and up-to-date;
even the messenger boys have been
put into uniform to consort with the
general spick and span appearance of
the office fixings. The Great Northwestern Telegraph Company, which
connects exclusively with the Western Union Telegraph, guarantees a
service in keeping with its first-class
appointments.
HIS HONOUR the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council has been pleased to appoint Messrs.
W. H. Hayward, of the City of Duncan;
Alexander Lucas, of the City of Vancouver;
S. Shannon, of Cloverdale; William Duncan,
of Comox: J. J. Campbell, of the City of
Nelson; Thomas Kidd, of Steveston; and J.
Kidston, of the City of Vernon, to be Commissioners under the "Public Inquiries Act,"
for the purpose of making an enquiry into
and concerning the conditions affecting agriculture in all its branches throughout the
Province.
The Commissioners will hold their first sitting at the Parliament Buildings on Tuesday,
the 17th day of December instant, at 10
o'clock in the forenoon, of whicii all persons
interested are hereby to take notice and govern
themselves accordingly.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
12th December, 1912.
dec. 14 dec. 14
WATER NOTICE
For a Licence to Store or Pen Back Water
NOTICE is hereby given that Herbert
Cuthbert, of Victoria, B. C, will apply for a
licence to store or pen back two acre-feet of
water from unnamed creek, a stream flowing
in an easterly direction and emptying into
Esquimalt Lagoon, near its head. The water
will be stored in a reservoir of 00,000 ft. capacity, built or to be built 011 said property, and
win be used for domestic purposes, under a
notice of application for a licence to take and
use water, posted herewith, on the land described as part of Section 35, Esquimalt
District.
This notice was posted on the ground on
the ioth day of December, 1912. The application will be filed in the office of the Water
Recorder at Victoria, B. C.
Objections may be filed with the said Water
Recorder or  with  the Comptroller of Water
Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B. C.
HERBERT CUTHBERT, Applicant.
By R. G. Gilchrist, Agent.
dec. 14 jan. 11
HIS HONOR the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council has been pleased to appoint Messrs.
H. G. Parson, of Golden; A. M. Harper, of
the City of Vancouver; J. A. McKelvie, of the
City of Vernon; R. A. Stoney, of the City of
New Westminster; and John Tardine, of the
City of Victoria, to be Commissioners under
the "Public Inquiries Act" to enquire generally into labour conditions in the Province,
and particularly the contracts and relations
between employers and employes, the hours
of labour, the conditions surrounding the employes during their employment, and the time
and manner of payment of wages in mines,
smelters, canneries, shops, factories, logging
and railway construction camps, or in any
other work, and on tramways; the working
and enforcement of tbe "Truck Act," the
"Master and Servant Act," the "Deceived
Workmen Act," the "Woodman's Lien for
Wages Act," and any other legislation affecting labour, the precautions taken for the protection of life, the preservation of the health
and  the prevention of unsanitary conditions.
The Commissioners will hold their first
meeting at the Parliament Buildings on Saturday, the 28th day of December instant, at
10 o'clock in the forenoon, of which all persons interested are hereby to take notice and
fovern themselves accordingly,
rovincial Secretary's Office,
12th December, 1912.
dec- '4 dec. 28
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of South Saanich
TAKE notice that Henry Puckle, of Victoria, B.C., occupation Fruit Grower, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands;—Commencing at a
post planted on the southeast corner of Section five; Range six east, South Saanich
District, thence west 10 chains; thence north
ten chains; thence east 10 chains; thence
southa 10 chains to point of commencement,
containing 40 acres, more or less.
Dated 26th November,  1912.
HENRY PUCKLE.
nov. 30 Jan. 25
LAND REGISTRY ACT.
IN THE MATTER of an application for
a fresh Certificates of Title to Lots 1602 and
1604, Victoria City.
NOTICE is hereby, given of my intention at
the expiration of one calendar month from
thc first publication hereof to issue fresh Certificates of Title in lieu of the Certificates of
Title issued to Bernard Sigisrhund Heisterman and James Forman on the 25th day of
February, 1910, and numbered 22110 C, and
to Wesley N. Mitchell and William Nelson
Mitchell on the 25th day of February, 1911,
and numbered 22547 C, which have been lost
or destroyed.
Dated   at   Land   Registry   Office,   Victoria,
B. C, this 4th day of December, A. D. 1912.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar General of Titles,
dec. 7
jan. 4
Our Big Store Teeming with
Christmas Gift Suggestions
>i i
—the kind of things to give that add to the permanent comfort of the
recipient—that keep the giver in fond remembrance every day in
the year.
•Give Him a Desk for His
Office or Studio
A Beautiful Mahogany Roll-Top (Low Roll) Desk, seven drawers,
size 37 x 60 inches, pigeon hole drawers, sanjitary design.. .$150
Same style desk as above, in Golden Oak, 34 x 60 inches . $85
Early English ahd Golden Finished Roll Top Desks, 30x52 in.... .$50
An Excellent Value is bur Roll Top Desk in Golden finish,
30 x 48 inches., , $37.50
Flat Top Desk in Early English, Golden and Fumed, 6 drawers .$60
Typewriter Desks, drop styles, Early. English and Golden $37.50
Stenographer's Desk, Golden and Early English finishes, up from. .$6
Handsome Mahogany Revolving Office Chair   $30
A huge range of Revolving Office Chairs in Golden, Early English and
fumed finishes at prices ranging up from $6.50
HOME
o'lptrtfiVlSHERS   <
the sroM __$k t sa ves Wu mone y
!Hvictoria;s
„„, .HQME,m ,.,
FURNISHER^ V]

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