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Week Jun 18, 1910

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 nnr> 6ws Bint irmm h smrmnnn!
Just a Little Better
Terry's
Fountain
ALWAYS IN THE LEAD
|AJLWLOJUUULJUUlJUL!Ul«JUUUl^
The Weak
A British Columbia Review, JUft %n
Published at Victoria,  B. 6.
Vol. VII.   No. 20
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 18, 1910
mnrdd _._*_-_ mnrgrm mm
HALL & WALKER
Agents
WELLINGTON   COLLIERY
COMPANY'S COAL
1232 Governmont St Telephone 83
AJUUUUUUUUUUfe
Onb Dollar Per Annum
i. ELL DONE
The Conservative smoker, held in the
0. U. W. Hall on Tuesday night, to
Irelcome Mr. G. H. Barnard, M.P., on his
|eturn from Ottawa was a fitting tribute
a good and faithful servant.    The hall
^'as crowded, as was the platform, and the
estimonies to Mr. Barnard's ability and
lopularity were obviously sincere.   He has
■pent only two sessions in Parliament, but
\e has already firmly established his repu-
ation as a painstaking, reliable, genuine
fcan.    Mr.   Cowan  described him  as  a
llean-cut, conscientious representative, and
■Premier McBride endorsed the statement
lat "his popularity at Ottawa was by no
aeans confined to his own party."   British
Columbia has every reason to be proud of
le Conservative Five who represent the
province at Ottawa, but not one of the
lonstituencies have more reason to congratulate itself on its Member than Vic-
aria.    Mr. Barnard is growing in every
lay, and is establishing such a record with
111  classes that  his  continuance  as  the
jepresentative of Victoria for many years
come is assured.   His exposition of the
Java] policy of tlie Conservative Party
the most lucid, cogent, and convincing
|hat has been placed before the public.
POBLESSE OBLIGE
At half-past four on Wednesday after-
loon, the picturesque Irish jaunting car,
Vhich has been so much in evidence in
V ictoria for the last month or so, was
leing driven down Government street by
be owner at the rate of about eight miles
In hour—quite a high rate of speed foils crowded a street as Government is during the busiest portion of the afternoon.
There  was  one   passenger,   Mr.   Justice
Martin.    As   the   car,   travelling   southwards, approached the corner of Fort and
lovernment, Mr. Herbert Fullerton was
ioming up on his bicycle;  an automobile
lear the middle of the road crowded him
Ito the east side; the driver of the jaunting
car, probably thinking that Mr. Fullerton
could get clear—which he could have done
only by running onto the sidewalk—kept
straight on without abating his pace in the
[least, with the consequence that, close by
pe red pillar-box, near the entrance of the
oyal Bank, Mr. Fullerton was literally
f'ridden down."   He and his machine were
■sent sprawling, and it was only by the
■sheerest good luck that he was not seriously
■injured.    Leaving the horse to struggle
Iwith the bicycle and extricate his feet as
Ibest he  could,  Mr.  Fullerton naturally
Imade  for the  driver,  and proceeded  to
lgive him a piece of his mind, for it was
In deliberate case of riding a man down.
• What the denouement might have been is
jmore or less uncertain.    The probability
lis that tlie driver would have received well-
Imerited eastigation, but at this juncture
IMr.   Justice  Martin  told  him   to  "drive
Ion,—drive on," and he drove on.    Corn-
Iment is unnecessary.
IMAYOR AND COUNTRY CLUB
The writer of this paragraph was in
Icourt on Wednesday morning when Mr.
JFred. Peters, K.C, acting on the instruc-
Itions of the  Acting City Solicitoi—who
{declared hc was acting' on the instructions
lof  the  Mayor—applied   to  Mr.   Justice
■Gregory for an injunction to restrain the
■Country Club from holding the advertised
six days' race-meeting on the Agricultural
grounds.    The application will no doubt
(be fully reported in the daily press.    If
ko, the ratepayers will have an object les-
pon whicli they should lay to heart.   Apart
■altogether from the merits of the question,
it must be admitted that the application
revealed an extraordinary state of things,
ancl one which can be regarded only as an
index of other happenings at the City Hall
during the present mayoral regime.   Mr.
Peters had been instructed by the Acting
City Solicitor, who in his turn had received the written authority of the Mayor;
but Mr. H. W. B. Moore, who appeared
for the Country Club and handled his case
very ably, produced a certified copy of the
minutes of the last Council meeting, showing that the Council had, by resolution,
vetoed the proposition to take further legal
proceedings in this matter.   The question
then arose whether the Mayor has authority to initiate litigation in the face of
a direct veto on the part of the Council.
Mr. Peters argued that he had, but the
strongest authority he was able to cite was
a  elause   in  the  Municipal  Act  which
vested in the Mayor the power to employ
and dismiss city servants, and to manage
the affairs of the city as the executive
head.    Mr.   Peters,  to  use an effective
slang phrase, was badly ' up against it,"
for his logical mind must have rebelled at
such an interpretation of this clause as
would have regarded the retaining of a
counsel for a special purpose as covered
by its provisions.    But apart from the
straining \of the clause which this would
involve, and which after all is only a side
issue, the main proposition still has to be
dealt with, viz., in case of difference, who
is supreme—the Mayor or the Council   It
would be an extraordinary thing, and in
every sense inimical to the public interest,
if a Mayor, or any other Executive officer,
could, on his own volition, initiate litigation whieh the Council had expressly ordered should be left alone.   It is not necessary to impute any improper motive to
Mayor Morley in order to show how such
a contention might be productive of the
rankest evil, and how, in the case of an
unscrupulous  Mayor,   he  might  subvert
such an authority to his own purpose.   Tho
decision   of   Mr.   Justice   Gregory   was
prompt and emphatic.    He could accept
only the authority of the City Council as
evidence that the City was prepared to
launch an action;   and he dismissed the
application until such authority was forthcoming.    It is difficult to see how any
other decision could have been expected;
and that the attempt of the Mayor to get
a hearing for his application was one of
his usual "bluffs" was pretty well evidenced by the fact that before the application was refused he had already summoned a special meeting of the Council
for   the   purpose   of   reconsidering   the
matter.    The  foregoing was written  on
Wednesday afternoon.   In the evening a
special meeting of the Council was held,
when the Mayor endeavoured to secure a
reconsideration of the question but was
voted down by an increased majority, the
vote standing ti to '.'>, as against 5  to 4
mi   Monday.     During the evening there
were several interesting developments, of
which the ratepayers will make a note for
future  reference.    There  was a  deputation of some fifty members of the Voters'
League,   who,   through   their  spokesman,
urged the Council to veto a race meeting
regardless of the consequences, and regardless of the lease held by tlie Country Club.
This gentleman concluded his appeal by
denominating the race meeting of 1909 as
a "saturnalia of rascality and  robbery."
Tt was pointed out that the meeting in
question    may    have    had    objectionable
features,   whicii   were  deplored  quite  as
much  by  the  advocates of racing  as  a
sport  as by the members of the  Voters'
League   or  any  other  organization,   and
that respectable citizens who attended the
meeting with  their wives and  (laughters
would strongly resent the imputation that
thev hail assisted in a saturnalia nf ras
cality ancl robbery. It is singular how
these good people are unable to carry on
their work of reform without denouncing
as rascals and robbers those who differ
from them with respect to a noble sport,
which was good enough for their late beloved King, and good enough for them.
Incidentally, an interesting glimpse was
afforded of Mayor Morley's method of conducting business. It turned out during the
discussion that he acted illegally on Monday evening last in submitting the report
of the Legislative Committee recommending litigation to the consideration of the
Council. The report had not received the
approval of a majority of the members of
the Legislative Committee, and therefore
could not be considered. Aid. Bannerman
put the case in a nutshell when he said that
in the course of a long business career he
had made many bargains, some good and
some bad, but he had never yet repudiated
a bargain however bad it was. He took
the view that when the Agricultural Association had granted a lease to the Country
Club, signed by Dr. Lewis Hall, who was
then Mayor, and as Mayor ex-officio president of the Agricultural Association, it
was not honest for the Council to repudiate that agreement. This was not a matter for litigation, but negotiation. The
spokesman of the Voters' League urged
that the Council should authorize litigation or take any steps to stop the race
meeting on the ground that the morality
of the young men of the city had to be
protected. It would be interesting to note
how many members of the deputation
argue that a sound standard of morality
was being supported by an organization
which aimed at promoting morality by
committing an immoral and dishonest act
—that of repudiation of an agreement. It
seems to The AVeek that this is rather a
poor sample of moral ethics.
PRINCE RUPERT AND THE SCOTT ACT
From the latest edition of the Prince
Rupert Empire, it may be gleaned that the
new  Northern  Capital  is  likely  to  cooperate with Dr. Spencer in making a test
of the  Scott Act in British  Columbia.
The secretary of the Local Option League
recently paid a visit to that city, and at a
meeting held in the Presbyterian church
it was unanimously resolved to take the
necessary steps to bring the Act into operation, and a large committee of citizens
was appointed to carry out the preliminaries.    The position of The Week on
this matter is so well known  that  it  is
not necessary to repeat what it has recently
said.    It would, however, point on that in
spite of every effort to the contrary, there
is just as much liquor consumed in Prince
Rupert as in nny other city of its size,
and the experience of those who know best
is to the effect that the Scott Act will not
improve the conditions, but render them
worse.    One thing will lie gained by the
decision nf the League, whicli is. that the
Lower   Mainland will have a  little rest
from    the    disturbing   activity   of    Dr.
Spencer, who has kindly consented to reside  in   Prince   Rupert   during  the   progress of the campaign.   Tt is to be hoped
that he will not run away in case the Act
should be applied, because it is in its enforcement, or rather lack of enforcement,
that the mischief lies; and those who are
so energetic in invoking it should remain
to assist in carrying out   its  provisions.
The  Week  has  always  regarded   Prince
Rupert as one of the most enlightened and
progressive of AVestern cities.   Tt declines
to believe that the citizens will take such
a retrograde step as to invoke the aid of a
measure which has been discarded by the
Eastern provinces as unworkable and un-
British.
AN INFLUENTIAL LEAGUE
There are Leagues and Leagues, and
in the multiplication of such organizations
it is the most aggressive which natural
gain the greatest publicity.   For this reason, the Navy League, of which our esteemed   fellow   citizen,   Clive   Phillips
AA'olley, is the energetic president, is frequently heard of ancl is recognized as doing
good work for the Empire.    But there is
another League, of which little is heard,
because hitherto its work has been practically confined to the Old Country.    It
is entitled the "Naval and Military Emigration League."   The President is Field
Marshal Earl Roberts,   and among  the
ATice-Presidents are the Duke of Bedford
ancl the Earl of Denbigh.    The Patrons
ancl   Council   include   such   well-known
names as thc Earl of Clanwilliam, Lord
Alwyne Compton, Hon. Arthur Brodrick,
and  Admiral Fitzgerald.    Until  a  few
weeks ago there was no Canadian representative on the Council of the League,
but at the last meeting Arthur E. Hepburn, Esq., of Vancouver, was elected as
the first  Canadian representative.    Mr.
Hepburn is a large investor in Canadian
enterprises, ancl has been the means of
introducing considerable English capital
into British Columbia.    He is intensely
interested in the subject of emigration, and
is most desirous of increasing thc influx
of British-born people into the Dominion.
It may bo interesting to note that the
Naval ancl Military Emigration League is
the organization which has lodged a protest   with   the   Dominion   Government
against   thc  unfair  restrictions  recently
imposed on British immigrants.
BRITISH COLUMBIA INVESTMENTS
This is our growing time.    It is generally conceded that the eyes of the world
are  turned   towards  Canada,   ancl   more
particularly   towards   British   Columbia.
It is recognized in financial circles that the
Province is just recovering from the wild-
catting of the late '90's, ancl that once
more B. C. investments are meeting with
favour in Lombard street.    Many millions
havc, within the last few months, been secured for local enterprises, and although
the list is capped by the magnificent scoop
of Mr. AA'illiam Mackenzie with his forty
millions, the possibilities are by no means
exhausted.   The AVeek knows of three distinct enterprises,   each   requiring   about
five million dollars, negotiations for whicli
are well under way with the practical certainty of a successful result.    All this is
as it should be, because the natural  resources of the  Province  are  such  as to
justify almost unlimited expenditure if it
is wisely directed;  but, for this very reason, every well-wisher of the Provinee will
hope that it may be wisely directed.    Tf
there   should   be   any   repetition   of   the
fiascos of a decade ago,  there will be a
corresponding slump; the fountain of supplies will be dried up, and a period of
semi-stagnation will follow.    The Week,
however, does uot anticipate anything of
lhe kind.    Mistakes will be made, wildcats  will  get onto  the market,  concerns
will be over-capitalized;   but the percentage of such will be less than before, and
the proportion of successful and profitable
ventures will undoubtedly sustain the reputation of the Province.    All the same,
it is the duty of the Press, and it should
be a unit in the work, to put its foot on
every wild-eat the moment it is discovered.
There have been a number of oil propositions placed on the London market recently,   some  of  which   are entirely  without
( C(i\"i'iMi*:ii on P.m.k 2) THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 18, 1910
(CONTINUED FROM P.VGE 1)
merit, and many of which were
over-capitalized; but the worst instance of a gold-brick proposition
of which The Week has any
knowledge is the American and B.
C. Hydraulic Placer Company,
Limited, which was widely advertised in the London papers. The
list opened on Monday, 30th May,
and closed on Wednesday, lst
June. The company offered for
subscription 800,000 non-assessable shares of half a dollar each.
The total capital of the company
is $750,000. It claims to have
twenty-one leases of placer property ten miles south of Nelson
on the line of the Spokane Falls
and Northern Rnilwny, the property being intersected by Hall
Creek. The prospectus claims
that a large number of tests
yielded 25 cents in gold to the
cubic yard. It estimates the cost
of treatment at 4 to 6 cents per
cubic yard. The report of an engineer is quoted, a Mr. Ii. I. Key-
nolds. Superintendent of the Lincoln Gold Mining Company, Troy,
Montana. This expert says that
the gold is mostly about the size
of wheat grains, and he found a
cubic yard of gravel to yield 75
cents, but thinks the average would
be 30. lie pronounces it a good
and safe proposition. Just how
he arrives at this conclusion is not
quite obvious, because while the
engineer gives an average value of
30 cents per yard and says that
the average cost should not exceed
4 to (! cents, he places the profit
at 8 cents. However, the company
figures it out more correctly upon
the basis stated, and the prospectus
claims 20 cents profit, after deducting the mining costs. It estimates a daily output of 5,000
cubic yards, yielding an annual
profit of $300,000. the Canadian
Directors are Mr. Albert W.
Hings. Merchant, Lethbridge; Mr.
S. II. Seaney, Merchant, Nelson;
Mr. .1. AV. Falls, Mining Engineer,
Nelson; Mr. -Tno. G. Dewar, Mining Engineer, Nelson, and Mr.
Percy G. Gleazer, who is described
as "Assessor to the British Columbia Government," whatever that
may mean. Now, all thr.t The
Week has to say about this proposition is tbat since seeing this
precious prospectus it has consulted several mining men well acquainted with the Nelson District, and having personal knowledge of Hall Creek, and they are
a unit in declaring that any such
estimates as are contained in this
prospectus are as far from the
truth as the North Pole is from
the South; and that if any mining proposition which has been
put before the British investor is
rightly entitled a wild-cat, this one
has a "patent cinch" on the designation. It will be interesting to
note how many of the 800,000
shares were subscribed for between
Monday, May 30th, and AVednes-
day, .Tune 1. It would also be interesting to have heard thc verdict
of the veteran Captain Duncan on
the whole proposition.
May Roberts Opening at the Victoria
for One Week
On Monday evening, thc curtain
will ring up on one of our cleverest
actresses and an excellent company
in support, for Miss Roberts is in
every respect an actress if no ordinary merit, for during this engagement she will portray thc fact that
both the emotional and thc comedy
are entirely in her grasp. Miss
Roberts has succeeded in breaking
the records of several theatres this
season for big business, and it is
easy to say that she will find a host
of friends in Victoria, having played
the entire Dominion.
The name on the Label should be SCHMIDT'S, if you
want the best in genuine imported Clarets and Burgundies. They have been on this market for the past
fifteen years and stand for the Popular Choice.
For sale by all liquor dealers.
'RADIGER & JANION
1318 Wharf Street "British Columbia Agents
Bevan,Gore& Eliot
LIMITED
Members Vancouver, Victoria, Spokane and
Stewart Stock Exchanges
PRFVATE WIRE TO VANCOUVER
DAILY TELEGRAPHIC QUOTATIONS
ALL ACTIVE STOCKS BOUGHT AND SOLD ON
COMMISION
LISTED STOCKS SOLD ON MARGIN
STEWART TOWNSITE LOTS FOR SALE
Room 1-4, Hibben Block
1122 Government St.       =       Victoria, B.C.
P. O. Box 249
Phones 163 and 2124
Phone R313 Hand Made Goods a Specialty
LADIES' SHIRT WAISTS, UNDERWEAR, ETC
THE BON TON
. •. MRS. J. E. ELLIOTT . ■.
LADIES' AND CHILDRENS' OUTFITTERS
AN UP-TO-DATE PLACE TO BUY NECKWEAR, ETC.
730 YATES STREET
VICTORIA, B.C.
King Edward Mines
LIMITED
NON-PERSONAL LIABILITY
PORTLAND CANAL,  B C.
We are offering the balance
of the first issue of shares
in this Company at ioc per
share. For Prospectus and
full particulars apply to	
KING EDWARD MINES, Limited
Room 8, Mahon Building      P. O. Box 772
Victoria, B.C.
On Monday and Tuesday evenings
"Thc Adventuress" will be produced,
which is an exceptionally strong
characterization, based upon the hate
of an outraged and insulted Corsican,
the secret police of Rome, and the
scheming of an unscrupulous woman.
A Boy's Sermon
My boy, listen to this sermon. The
comet that you saw, or say you saw,
was fifteen million miles away when
it was nearest this old earth. It was
seen in 1835. It has been swinging
through space all those years at a
rate of one hundred and fifty thousand miles an hour or thereabouts. A
few odd thousand miles don't count
for much in this calculation. It will
go on kiting through space for another seventy-five years before it will
bc seen again from this earth. Other
worlds will  scc it, of course.    How
many, I don't know. They will take
as much interest in this "wild colt
of a comet" as you do. They'll stay
up nights and burnish their telescopes
to get a blink at it. It may be as
far away from them as it is from us,
but the alarmists will scare them just
the same. What a universe is this,
my boy! Innumerable worlds rolling
around in illimitable space, each one
having its own particular place and
use and orbit. Think of this, my boy,
for one minute, and if you can say
in your heart there is no God you're
a fool. You may read this in the
Bible, and, if you doubt, we can let
you down easy by saying you are a
skeptic, but contemplate the universe,
my boy, and, if you still doubt, you're
a fool, and a hopeless fool at that.—
Observer, in Toronto Weekly Star.
OPERA CLOAKS
SHAWLS AND EVENING ROBES
In Opera Cloaks, Shawls and Evening Robes, a
more glorious display cannot be imagined. Designs,
hand embroidery work and linings are truly magnificent. All 1910 styles—no "leftovers." We haven't got
an out-of-date one in stock.
Purchase your Summer Silks from us, our prices
are the lowest.
Open daily, 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Oriental Importing Co.
The White Front Silk House
510 CORMORANT STREET   -       -      -   OPP. E. & N. DEPOT
A Quarter Million Paid Up Capital
Enables the
M0NTELIUS PIANO HOUSE, LTD
To offer the People of Victoria the
Best Pianos in the World
At Lower cost than is often paid for the "JUST AS GOOD" kind.
See our Window and Floor Display of Genuine Piano Piano
Values and get our Prices and Terms.
We arrange Easy Monthly or Weekly Terms on ALL
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, also on EDISON and VICTOR
Talking Machines.
MONTELIUS PIANO HOUSE,
LIMITED
1104 GOVERNMENT STREET, COR. OF FORT
McLaughlin Buick
AUTOS
ARE BEST BY TEST FOR THE ROADS OF THE WEST
McLaughlin Buick Cars for 1910 are the last word in Motor
Car construction. They are easy to operate, run smoothly, and are
handsome in appearance.   Let us demonstrate one for you.
WESTERN MOTOR AND SUPPLY CO.
New Premises, 1410 Broad Street
Telephone 695 - R. P. CLARK, Manager
Headquarters    for    choice    nursery    stock
Apple,  pear,  cherry,  plum  and  peach  treej
and    small    fruits,   also    ornamental    trees!
shrubs, roses,  evergreens, etc.    Largest anq
best assorted  stock in British Columbia.
Ten per cent, cash discount on all order^
above $10.00.
PRICE LIST AND CATALOGUE ON
APPLICATION.
S. L. Wilson J. Kennedy
VICTORIA GARAGE
S. L. WILSON, Manager
REPAIRING  OF  ALL  MAKES  OF  CARS A  SPECIALTY
AUTOMOBILES STORED, CLEANED AND FOR
HIRE DAY AND NIGHT
943 FORT STREET (Opp. Skating Rink)
Telephone 2326 VICTORIA, B.C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 18, 1910
The Song and the Man
(By Johnston  McGulley)
I
Tis da song of dees country," said
ucia. "We mus' learn-a to sing."
He stood in the aisle of a colon-
-car. About him were half a hun-
ed of his countrymen. Most of
em still wore their bright-colored
rchiefs, and had rings in their ears.
the end of the vestibule stood Co-
tti, a sneer upon his lips. But Mu-
1 did not see.
''Tis da song of dees country," he
seated. "I had-a it from a coun-
,-man before we left da New York."
'Give-a us da song!" they cried,
rive-a us da song!"
Mucia glanced through the car win-
w at the miles of Montana slip-
lg by. It had been a long journey,
t every hour had been filled with
inder.    An agent had met them at
dock with promises of a season's
irk at good wages and at small ex-
nse. He had given them food and
d furnished them transportation to
: place where they were to labour,
e agent was Cosctti. Now he stood
the door of the car like a soldier
guard, refusing to let any off at a
tion. It was dangerous, he said;
;y might be left behind. And in
.-ir happiness at work so easily ob-
ned and in a free journey of sighting the men had failed to decipher
setti's sneer. They saw none but
icia, who had been their leader and
.kesman on sea and land, as he
od before them, glancing from the
idow.
'Da song!" they cried again. "Give-
is da song!"
\.nd Mucia, turning from the win-
gave it in his own way, with
ny faults of music and words, but
:h deep feeling. He struggled
ough a verse, and at the end they
iwded around him, begging him to
g again.
'It  es  da   song  uf  dees   country,"
icia said again, when hc had done,
es our song.    Wc mus' learn to
ig-a  it  well."
The next morning they were at the
mp, a jumble of huts beside a rocky
tte, where steam-shovels were
rowing aside the dirt, and where
en worked at the gra,de like so
any ants about a hill. Thc new-
mers were quartered together and
>art from the others, in a series of
acks near the track. Under the diction of overseers who spoke their
ngue they began to labour, toiling
ird in the hot sun, yet with happy
:arts.
And in the evenings, after they had
ten their portion of food, they sat
)out  the  fires  made  from  piles  of
d ties, and talked of many things
the old country and the new, but
incipally in the new,   At such times
ucia, thc leader of the group, taught
1 em the song.   Cosctti, sitting at his
:sk in the office-car, heard them, and
nilcd like the  demon that he was.
"They are brainless cattle," hc told
acGuire, the foreman.
"They're of your race,"  MacGuirc
iplied.    He had never liked Cosctti.
I     have    brains,"    said    Cosctti.
lumping the   table    with    his first.
That's  why   1   am  here.    I  get  two
ollars for every man I bring to the
imp.     That's   thc   premium,   Mac-
uire, because  men are  scarce.    No
ne  can  go  to  New  York and  get
lese green Italians when they land—
d  one except myself.    And after I
.-t them here "
"After you get them here " be-
,m MacGuirc. Then he thought bet-
of it. got upon his feet, and left
lie car, to walk clown the track to-
ard the distant bunk-houses. Co*
•tti remained behind: hc was busy
ith his reports.
MacGuire turned the curve in thc
iad that led to the first cut. Be-
ire the bunk-houses the camp-fires
trued brightly, and around them
(ere clustered the laborers. Maclure could see Mucia towering above
ithers, waving his arms to beat
ine,  and  through   the  gloom   came
the song, broken, straggling, discordant, but still the song,
My country, 'tis of thee,
Sweet land of liberty—
"They sing it well," muttered MacGuire, as he stopped to listen. "They
sing it very well for the time they
have been here."
He glanced back toward Cosetti's
office car, and then walked on. At
the nearest fire men were still eating
their poor meal. Shovels and picks
were scattered about. Broken scrapers were piled high in a scrap-heap.
To one side of the track the horses
and mules were picketed, eating their
fill of clean hay. The horses, MacGuire reflected, were better cared for
than the men. It was profitable and
easy for Cosetti to get more men; it
was not so profitable nor so easy to
furnish horses.
MacGuire noticed, as he walked
along, that some of the men saluted
him humbly. He smiled kindly, and
waved his hand now and then, but
continued down the track. He could
speak but little Italian; they could
speak no English. They realized,
dumbly, that he was a superior officer, a bigger link than they in the
chain woven, by a corporation's gold.
As he approached the fire where
Mucia stood before the crowd singing, hc .walked more slowly. There
was something wonderful in the sight,
something almost uncanny. It was
like a war-song of barbarians. He
watched the eager faces as the men
bent forward to catch the words from
Mucia's lips. In the reflection from
the fire they glowed with intense interest, an interest that approached
fanaticism. It was as though emotions were depicted: MacGuire believed he could actually see these
men learning to love their new country.
He stood for some time unobserved.
Then Mucia, at the end of a verse,
looked up and saw him, and stepped
through the crowd to greet him with
outstretched hands.
"Dey sing," he said happily. "I
mysel' have taught-a dem. Have a
little patience, my foreman, an' dey
will sing-a better. 'Tis da song of
dees country."
"They sing it well," remarked MacGuire.
"If you  will-a  stop an' listen "
began Mucia. He rushed back through
the crowd and mounted a scraper.
Then he turned tp the men, his face
glowing.
"Sing-a it again! Sing-a it well!"
he cried. "Da Mr. Foreman MacGuire es to a-listen, Sing-a it like-a
you love dees gran' country. Sing-a
it like-a you feel like-a free men.
Sing-a it."
His arms waved through the air,
and he started the song. The men
took it up, their faces turned away
from MacGuire and toward Mucia.
The foreman stood on the track, his
arms folded, watching, listening.
When it was done Mucia ran through
the crowd once more.
"You like-a it?" he asked MacGuirc.
"They  sing it    well,"    replied  the
foreman.   Then he walked back along
the track  toward Cosetti's office-car.
To his ears came the echo of thc song,
Sweet land of liberty—
II
"To-morrow," said Cosetti to Mucia. "the pay-car comes."
They were standing on thc grade.
Below them the scrapers worked their
way back and forth. Behind them
gangs of men were laying ties and
spiking down the rails. The superintendent desired to take a work-train
to the front as far as possible.
"Da pay-car," repeated Mucia.
glancing at Cosetti. "Ah, yes! 'Tis
our first pay of da American money.
We will-a be rich—rich!"
"What arc you going to do with it
when you have it?" Cosetti asked.
Mucia looked up again quickly.
"You think-a we lose it?" he laughed.
-'Ah, no! We put-a it away, Cosetti.
beiieath-a da shirt, next to da skin in
little bag. When we get-a tn da
town we put-a it in da bank until we
use it for to send to Italy.    I  know,
Give the Bride a
Good Gift
SOLID
SILVER
Hundreds of Beautiful Suggestions here:—
Cabinets of Flatware
Sandwich Trays
Cake Baskets
Comports
Candlesticks
Vases,   Bon Bons,
Creams and Sugars
Tea Sets
Salts and Peppers
Etc., Etc.
Prices Low as Possible
W. H. WILKERSON
The Jeweler
915 Government Street
Tel 1606
COMING—FOR ONE WEEK
MAY ROBERTS
AND HER COMPANY
Direction     -     Victor Gillard
MONDAY  AND TUESDAY
A Society Emotional Drama
THE ADVENTURESS
WEDNESDAY  AND  THURSDAY
A Three-Act Comedy
A   GRASS   WIDOW
FRIDAY AND  SATURDAY
A  Screaming Comedy
THE JUDGE AND THE GIRL
Prices—25c, 50c and 75c.
Seat   Sale   opens   Saturday,   10   p.m.
YAKATHA TOMBOLA
Good Prizes
Where?   Why?
DOWN at the GORGE
JAPANESE ICE
CREAM PARLORS
Cosetti. MacGuire tell-a mc what to
do with-a da money."
"You know too much," said Cosctti,
frowning. He turned away to give
some directions. Mucia looked at him
without  understanding.    "I   tell  you
 " began Cosetti.   Then hc stopped
and stepped close lo Mucia's side.
"You come over to the office-car tonight." he said. "Do you understand?
[ want lo tell you a few things.
You're buss of this gang, all right.
They do about as you want them to,
don't lhey? Well, you come over lo
the car  tonight.    Don't you  forget."
"I be-a there." replied Mucia, and
wilh his shovel he began tamping
the dirt beneath the tics. Cosetti
walked away.
In the afternoon MacGuirc. returning from headquarters after a talk
with the superintendent, met Mucia
on the new grade. Hc saw that good
progress had been made at that point
during the day. Tlie fill was gradually coming up to thc level. Some of
the men were singing at their work.
"Dey glad," Mucia explained. "Tomorrow es da pay-car, when we get-a
da money. It to da lirst we have
earned of da America. It es da—
what you call nest-egg. That es why
dey-a sing."
(To be continued)
ridJEJTIC
THEATRE
Yates Street, Just Below Government
WHERE EVERYBODY GOES
If you are dull and get the blues,
And do not know the place to choose
Come to the Majestic on Yates Street
Bring the friends you are apt to meet
And if on pleasure you are bent,
You won't regret the Dime you spent.
WE  CATER  TO  LADIES AND  CHILDREN
CHANGE OF PROGRAMME
Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday
THE
New Grand
Week of June 20
A Special Feature for the
Little Ones
CABARET'S DOG CIRCUS
Highly Trained Canine
Wonders
The Hebrew Orator
BILLY K. WELLS
In Original  Comicalities
"The Lillian Russell of
Vaudeville
MILDRED STOLLER
In a Series of Imitations of
Stage Celebrities
Harry Marie
SPINGOLD and GIRARD
Offer thc Protean  Military
Incident
"The Reveille"
WARD  and WEBBER
America's   Representative
Dancers
THOS. J. PRICE
NEW MOVING PICTURES
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
PANTAGES
THEATRE
Week of June 20
Grand
Vaudeville
SHARE and XING
Hebrew Comedians
DAISY BAKEOLL
English Comedienne
POUCHER
Sensational Cyclist
MILLE MILANO
Italian   Harpist
BIOGRAPH
Interesting
Instructive
ROMANO
THEATRE
CHANGE OF PROGRAMME THREE TIMES A WEEK
We are securing Pictures now which are absolutely new-
releases. Never been shown any place before wc get them. Will
have Pictures of our late King's funeral in a few days. Watch all
the papers closely.
COOLEST AND MOST POPULAR THEATRE IN THE CITY
ADMISSION-TEN CENTS
Jpen afternoons 2 to 5.30, evenings 7 to 11
EMPRESS
THEATRE
GOVERNMENT ST., NORTH OF JOHNSON
GEO. A. LEVELLE, Mgr.
ONLY FIRST CLASS
Motion Pictures and Illustrated Songs
Matinee every day from 2 to 5 p.m.    Evenings from 7 to 11 p.m.
Admission
10 Cents THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 18, 1910
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
♦THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
1208   Government St.,   Victoria, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE, Editor
Those who feel the fascination of the
life of the Great Dominion will find
anecdotes of all sorts and conditions
of men, from Bishop Bompas downwards, in this interesting record of a
summer excursion.—(Reprinted from
"The Spectator," London, April 30th,
1910).
Books to Read
At the Victoria Book and Stationery Co. readers of The Week can obtain three books which are well worth
reading—indeed, better worth reading
than any three that havc recently
come under our notice. The first is
Miss Agnes Deans Cameron's work
on the Northland, which has attracted wide attention and has been most
favourably reviewed by the English
press. Thc Spectator, which is not
the easiest journal in the world to
please, has nothing but praise for
Miss Cameron's work, and a copy of
its review is reproduced in our current  issue.
In the realm of fiction, one of thc
most brilliant and entertaining books
that has appeared for several years
is by a new author—Phillip Gibbs.
Its title is "The Street of Adventure."
The book deals with life in Fleet
Street, takes the reader behind the
scenes of one of the leading London
dailies, and interweaves a romance
of thc finest possible texture with
the deftest of fingers. There is more
than a suspicion in the mind of the
reader that "Phillip Gibbs" is a nom
de plume, and that the author is a
woman. Be that as it may, the story
is charming, the portraiture true > to
life, and the strenuous conditions under which newspapermen work have
never been more graphically depicted.
The third book has been before thc
public for some months, and has sold
well. It is Winston Churchill's
latest, which is by common consent
his best, even surpassing the interest
of his first notable book, "Richard
Carvel." lt is not necessary to at
tempt any review, because the main
features of the book are well known,
but it is permissible, even at this
late hour, to recommend it to anyone
who is looking for a thrilling romance.
New Grand Theatre
The big feature of next week's show
at the Grand will be a feature especially for children, Cabaret's dog circus having been billed with its highly trained canine wonders. They originally enter the stage in an automobile which becomes busted to
pieces and scatters the puppies all
over the stage. The dogs will work
the Ferris wheel and do most of their
act alone. It will be a children's feature.
Billy K. Wells is a Hebrew orator,
who will have reference to many nationalities and generally entertain in
first floor style, with his story anecdote and song.
The Lilian Russell of vaudeville,
Mildred Stoller is billed here next
week, and as this impersonator and
imitator has caused a furore on the
circuit with her clever imitations of
the most notable actresses and actors
in the land, she should prove one of
the very big drawing cards for next
week, doing thc kind of act that is
always popular.
Harry Spingold and Marie Girard
will present the military sketch, "The
Reveille," based on the Civil war. It
has for a plot a love story showing
how love laughs at war and locksmiths, as well as at other things.
Thc drama is stirring and intense in
its telling, and both Mr. Spingold and
Miss Girard make the best of the
many opportunities offered for dramatic presentation.
Ward and Webber will have a dance
turn, of the college boy kind. They
arc billed .as representative dancers,
but they introduce novelties that relieve the act from the regular clog
and buck and wing business.
Thomas J. Price, the illustrated
song singer, and the moving pictures
will be billed as usual.
The New North
Thc New North. By Agnes Deans
Cameron. (D. Appleton and Co. 10s
6d net.)—Miss, Cameron made the
journey from Edmonton to the mouth
of the ackenzie, and enjoyed herself so thoroughly, and kept her eyes
and ears open to such gcod purpose,
that if any energetic lady wants to
have a good time she cannot do better than read Thc New North, even
if she does not stir out of the house.
Cheery, humorous, observant, nothing escapes Miss Cameron's notice or
"upsets her equanimity. She is
doubtless one of those fortunate individuals who know how to travel, to
whom travel is a joy, and who have
the secret of getting on with people,
the true traveller's tact. Her style,
commonly restrained, sometimes almost sensational, reflects all these
characteristics and also the dialect
and the phrases of the many races
and individuals she met on her descent of the Mackenzie to the Arctic
Ocean. Occasionally there arc pages
with distinct literary charm, and wc
find these as we approach the land of
the Eskimo. The spirit and vigour
of her portraits are undeniable, and
she has the knack of seizing on certain traits of habits and speech which
bring the Indians, the Hudson Bay
men and the Eskimo vividly before
us. There arc a host of entertaining
facts, stories, little touches of character and scenery, which appear on
every page, and make the book most
entertaining. 11 is an astonishing
country this New Northland, and we
do not suppose any one quite understands how vegetables and grain can
be grown up to the Arctic Circle;
but the facts remain that its agricultural capacity is, latitude for latitude,
quite unique as well as something of
a puzzle. Miss Cameron fell in love
with the Eskimo, who seems to have
discovered the art of being cheerful.
The   One   and   Only
W. T. Stead, in a cablegram to
the New York American, says "it is
about time truth was spoken with
emphasis in order that the mass of
lying, calumnious statements" about
King George "should be dispelled
once for all." And Stead is just the
man to speak it, for, says he, "I am
not a courtier, and am so far from
being persona grata with the new
King that the last time that he expressed his opinion about me and my
activities, it was with the bluntness
of a sailor man, and with the expletives which arc more familiar on
quarter-deck than in the palaces of
Kings." Mr. Stead thereupon denies
the "abominable libel" that King
George is a hard drinker.—Isn't it
handsome that a great man should
come forward at this time and, forgetting his own personal injuries, do
justice to another great man? ll,
makes me feel kindly toward Mr.
Stead himself, and, although he has
no use for me (for only a few weeks
ago he used very offensive language
in speaking of me to thc Kaiser), yet
in the interests of truth and justice,
I think it necessary to characterize as
it deserves the abominable libel that
has frequently been repeated from
mouth to mouth, that Mr. Stead is the
man who committed the Jack thc Ripper crimes.
His Revenge
"How do you feel," I asked the
steeplejack, "when you are working
on top of a high steeple?"
"How do I feel?" he repeated, a
murderous gleam shooting from his
steady eyes. "I feel that I should
like to look down and see the man
who said 'There is always room on
top' climbing up to prove his statement."
PRESENTS
For the June Bride
At this season of the year, a
season of weddings, the question of gift-giving is uppermost,
and we take pleasure in asking
you to inspect our exclusive
stock of appropriate articles
suitable for wedding presentations.
Redfern & Sons
1009 Government Street
VICTORIA, B.C.
Baxter & Johnson Co, Ltd.
TRANSFER
CASES
Towards the end of the
month you're thinking of transferring your full files. In this
direction we can bc of service
to you.
CALL  UP   730
Baxter & Johnson Co., Ltd.
REMEMBER
We   are   the   only   firm   that
can please in
ARTISTIC DECORATING,
PAINTING,
PAPER-HANGING or
SIGN WORK
C H. Tite & Co.
Phone 2050   - 620 Johnston St.
SWEDISH MASSAGE
MEDICAL GYMNASTICS
VIBRATORY TREATMENT
S. Bjornfelt, S.M.
Phone 1856
821 Fort St.
DEPARTMENT   OF   PUBLIC   WORKS
The heaven of the dry goods clerk:
"Where the serges cease to roll."
Supervising Arehlteet
Applications will be received by the
Minister  of  Public Works  up  to  Monday, the 27th day of June, 1910, for the
position of Supervising Architect at a
salary of $158.33 per month.
F. C. GAMBLE,
je 18 Public Works Engineer
DEPARTMENT   OF   PUBLIC   WORKS,
P      T,IAMENT BUILDINGS
Stei tings—Vauus
NOTICE is hereby given that the
time for receiving tenders for "Steel
Fittings, Vaults, Parliament Buildings,"
Is extended up to noon of Saturday, the
18th day of June, 1910.
F.  C.  GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer
Department of Pulblc Works,
Victoria,  B.C..  7th June,  1910.
Jell
Sauces and Salad Dressings
Lea & Perrin's Sauce, per bottle, $1, 65c and 35c
Holbrook's Sauce, per bottle, 35c and  25c
Mellor's Sauce, per bottle, 75c, 35c and   20c
Gillard's   Sauce,   per   bottle    25c
Tabasco Sauce, per bottle  60c
Indian Sauce, per bottle    50c
Mandalay Sauce, per  bottle    .35c
Punch Sauce, per bottle  25c
Anchovy Sauce, per bottle 35c
Yorkshire Relish, per bottle, 50c and   25c
Harvey's Sauce, per bottle   35c
Heinz Chili Sauce, per bottle   45c
Green (or Red) Pepper Sauce, per bottle  25c
C. & B. Salad Dressing, per bottle  50c
Durkee's Salad Dressing, per bottle, 75c and 40c
Snider's Salad Dressing, per bottle, 50c and 25c
DIXI  H. ROSS du CO.
Independent Grocers and Wine Merchants
Tels.: 50, 51, 52 and 1590 1317 Government Street
Farm, 34 acres cleared, the best of soil, excellent buildings, considerable stock, close to city, only $15,000.   Good terms.
13 acres, very good soil, nearly all cleared, new house well built,
large and good outbuildings, 4 miles from city, only $8,500.
500 acres on "Hardy Bay," the coming great industrial and shipping center of Vancouver Island.
A. WILLIAMS & CO., Limited
ESTABLISHED 1883
Real Estate and Financial Agents
Phone 2046
704 Yates Street
SNAP!
Four Miles From Town
ELEVEN ACRES—All in high state of cultivation, and fenced,
with a vegetable farm; connected with City water; fine large
8-roomed house, barn and stables $7,800
"IDEAL" MODEL FARM—Happy Valley road, 26 acres, iz
acres in cultivation, balance easily worked, good new house of
five rooms, outbuildings, etc.; stock and implements $4,500
ALBERT TOLLER
Room 5 Imperial Bank Chambers
Amateurs' printing and developing done at shortest
notice.
A. H. MAYNARD, 715 Pandora St.
PARLIAMENT BIULDINGS
Offlce Annex
Sealed Tenders, superscribed tenders
for "Alterations, Offlce Annex, Parliament Buildings," will be received by the
Hon. the Minister of Public Works up
to noon of Thursday, the 30th lnst., for
certain alterations and repairs to a
frame building situated in the grounds
of the Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Drawing, specifications, contract form,
and form of tender may be seen on and
after Tuesday, the 14th inst., at the
offlce of the Department of Public
Works,   Parliament  Buildings,  Vietoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank
of Canada, made payable to the Hon.
the Minister of Public Works, ln a sum
of $600, which shall be forfeited if the
party tendering decline to enter Into
contract when called upon to do so, or
when he falls to complete the work contracted for.
The cheques or certificates of deposit
of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them upon the execution of
the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the form supplied, signed
by the actual signature of the tenderer,
and enclosed in the envelope furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C.  GAMBLE,
JelS Public Works Engineer
"LAND   REGISTRY  ACT"
tl
In the matter of an application for
Duplicate   Certificate   of   Title
Subdivisions  Nos.  3,  53  and  54
Section   XXV    (Richmond   Estate!
Victoria District.
NOTICE is hereby given that lt
my Intention at the expiration of onl
month from the date of the first pun
lication hereof, to issue a Duplicate
Certificate of Title to above land issue!
to Robert Paterson Rithet on the 23rT
day of August, 1882, and numberel
4016A.
Land   Registry  Office,   Viotoria,   B.(
the 9th day of June, 1910.
J.  P.  McLEOD, J
je 11 Deputy Reglstrar-Generil
Out of the Picture
"How  pleasant  it  must  be  to
before a blazing fire while the win|
vainly rages outside."
"Yes," answered Farmer Corntof
sel. "I 'spose it would be right plea|
ant."
"Why, you ought to know. Yo
live in the country."
"Yes, but I ain't the feller that sil
by the fire. I'm the feller that fetch!
in thc wood." THE WEEK, SATURDAY. JUNE 18, 1910
VICTORIA  COUNTRY  CLUB
The Directors beg to announce that
there will be
SIX DAYS'
RACING
AT THE
Agricultural Grounds
Commencing; on
TODAY, JUNE 18th,
And Continuing on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and
Saturday, June 21st to 25th.
The RESTAURANT will be open and Refreshments will be provided on
the Grounds
Admission, (including o^d stand)   =    =   $1.00 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 18, 1910
Yachting News
Judging from the energetic and capable manner in which the respective
committees have formulated the programme of races and entertainments
for the International Regatta, the
prospects are auspicious for a notable
success.
July 4th, 5th and 6th will see many
visiting yachtsmen in Victoria, and
Regatta week is being eagerly anticipated by both local and visiting
sportsmen.
It is rumoured that a large contingent of the fair sex is likely to be
on hand, and in consequence the social side of yachting will receive an
impetus which will add largely to the
gaiety and enjoyment of the affair.
Many delightful functions are being
arranged, including a garden party at
"Robleda," the beautiful home of Mr.
Arbuthnot, Vice-Commodore of thc
Victoria Yacht Club.
The preliminary programme of
events has been printed and there
should be many spirited contests, as
classes have been arranged for all
sorts and sizes of craft.
Great interest is aroused at the possibility of a fourteen-foot dinghy race,
and it is hoped that there will be a
large entry in this class.
The motor boat enthusiast will be
out in full force, both as a contestor
and spectator. There is an ever-increasing number of local craft, and
the races for power boats are attracting a great deal of attention.
PROVINCIAL TAXES
Special Notice to Taxpayers
TAXPAYERS are hereby reminded
that Thursday, 30th June, 1910, il th*
last day on which taxes must be paid
to the collector in order to be allowed
a discount. By an amendment to the
Assessment Act passed after all the
tax notices were Issued an alteration
of the rate of discount is permitted,
namely, 26 per cent, discount is allowed
on improved real property, personal
property and Income for the current
year in place of the 10 per cent shown
on the notices. When sending your
tax to the collector do not deduct from
the net amount shown on Form No. 9
an additional 15 per cent, but dednot
only 25 per oent from the total taxes
on improved real property, personal
property and income. There is no alteration on the discount of ten per cent
on wild land, eoal land and timber land.
See that the correct amount is sent
early, so that unnecessary correspondence may be avoided. No discount is
allowed on arrears.
E. E. LEASON,
Assessor and Collector,
Victoria Assessment District
Victoria, lst June, 1910.
je4
Dr. Spencer Again
(Reprinted from the Merritt Herald)
At a recent mass meeting held by
Dr. Spencer, the "grand-master of
local option," is credited with having made the statement that the people of this province could have local
option whether or no and states in
effect that in spite of many political
artifices there was a plurality of 3,600
votes in favour of the local option
law. Dr. Spencer says that, having
gathered up all facts and figures, he
at once invoked the Canada Temperance Act,—which is a Dominion
measure—and had his solicitor draw
up an amendment to meet the needs
of this province. The old Act, which
applies only to counties, would be
about as much in place in British
Columbia as a yearling heifer at a
Sunday evening church service—as
here each county is greater than some
of the provinces. Therefore, he maintains, he has been instrumental in
having the Act so amended as to
make it applicable to municipalities
and small districts.
Whether local option in British Columbia would be a success or not,
we cannot, of course, say. The Scott
Act and the Duncan Act in the East
were both fizzles and from what we
can gather did much more harm than
good. We trust this would not be
the case in the "last province," but
we are not so sure of this. There is
one thing about it, however: For instance, were Vancouver "dry" and
North Vancouver "wet," it would be
no time before the second narrows
bridge would be built, several ferry
lines in operation, big, sky-scraping
booze joints going up across the inlet—to say nothing of the slump in
Vancouver real estate to the enhancement of property values at the sister
city. We wonder what effect local
option would have upon the excellent
hotel accommodation for guests prevailing generally throughout the province today. Of course, there are
many arguments to present upon both
sides, but we opine there is only one
YALE LAND DISTRICT
District of Yale
NOTICE is hereby given that Lewis
Hind, of Victoria, B.C. intends to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum on the following described
lands, situate on the South Fork of the
Tulameen River:—Commencing at a
post planted about two mlles from and
south of the junction of the South Fork
and the Tulameen Rivers, and marked
"Lewis Hind, S.W. Corner," thence
north eighty chains; thence east eighty
chains; thence south eighty chains;
thence west eighty chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640 acres.
Dated 7th April, 1910.
LEWIS HIND.
my21 P. Y. Smith, Agent.
YALE LAND DISTRICT
District of Yale
NOTICE is hereby given that Charles
Willarson, of Princeton, B.C., intends
to apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum on the following described lands, situate on the South Fori-:
of the Tulameen River:—Commencing
at a post planted about four miles from
and south of the junction of the South
Fork and the Tulameen Rivers, and
marked "C. Willarson, S.E. Corner,"
thence north eighty chains; thence west
eighty chains; thence south eighty
chains; thence east eighty ohains to
point of commencement, and containing
640 acres.
Dated 7th April, 1910.
C. WILLARSON.
my21 P. Y. Smith, Agent.
YALE LAND DISTRICT
Distriot of Yale
NOTICE is hereby given that Peter
Johnson, of Princeton, B.C., intends to
apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands fbr a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lands, situate on the South
Fork of the Tulameen River:—Commencing at a post planted about four
miles from and south of the junction
of the South Fork and the Tulameen
Rivers, and marked "P. Johnson, N. E.
Corner," thence south eighty ehains;
thence west eighty ehains; thenee north
eighty chains; thenee east eighty ehains
to point of eommeneement, and containing   640   acres.
Dated 7th April, 1910.
my 21 PETER JOHNSON.
YALE LAND DISTRICT
District of Yale
NOTICE is hereby given that Francis
J. O'Reilly, of Victoria, B.C., intends
to apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands for a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lands situate on the South Fork of
the Tulameen River:—Commencing at a
post planted about eight miles from
and south of the junction of the South
Fork and the Tulameen Rivers, and
marked "F. J. O'Reilly, S.W. Corner,"
thenee north eighty ehains; thence east
eighty chains; thence south eighty
chains; thenee west eighty chains to
point of eommeneement, and containing
640 acres.
Dated 7th April,  1910.
F.   J.   O'REILLY.
my21 P. Y. Smith, Agent.
YALE LAND DISTRICT
District of Yale
YALE LAND DISTRICT
District of Yale
NOTICE is hereby given that John
Henry Jackson, of Tulameen, B.C., intends to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum on the
following described lands, situate on the
South Fork of the Tulameen River:—
Commencing at a post planted about
two miles from and south of the junction of the South Fork and the Tulameen Rivers, and marked "J. H. Jackson, S.E. Corner," thence north eighty
chains; thence west eighty chains;
thence south eighty chains; thence east
eighty chains to point of commencement, and containing 64p acres.
Dated  7th  April,  1910.
J. H. JACKSON.
my21 P. Y. Smith, Agent.
YALE LAND DISTRICT
Distriot of Yale
NOTICE is hereby given that Edith
Mary Hind, of Victoria, B.C., intends
to apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands for a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lands situate on the South Fork
of the Tulameen River:—Commencing
at a post planted about two miles from
and south of the junction of the South
Fork and the Tulameen Rivers, and
marked "E. M. Hind, N.E. Corner,"
thence south eighty chains; thence west
eighty chains; thence north eighty
chains; thence east eighty chains to
point of commencement, and containing
640 acres.
Dated 7th April, 1910.
EDITH M.  HIND.
my21 P. Y. Smith, Agent.
YALE LAND DISTRICT
District of Yale
NOTICE is hereby given that Mary
Hewat, of Princeton B. C, intends to
apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands for a License to prospect for
coal and petroleum on the following
described lands, situate on the South
Fork of the Tulameen River:—Commencing at a post planted about four
miles from and south of the junction
of the South Fork and the Tulameen
Rivers, and marked "M. Hewat, N.W.
Corner," thence south eighty chains;
thence east eighty chains; thenee north
eighty chains; thence west eighty
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 aeres.
Dated  7th  April,  1910.
M. HEWAT.
my21 P. T. Smith, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that William P. Walker, of Vietoria, B.C., intends to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands for a License to prospect for coal and petroleum on the following described lands, situate on the
South Fork of the Tulameen River:—
Commencing at a post planted about
eight miles from and south of the
junction of the South Fork and the Tulameen Rivers, and marked "W. P.
Walker, N.W. Corner," thence south
eighty ehains; thence east eighty chains;
thenee north eighty ehains; thence west
eighty chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres.
Dated   7th   April,   1910.
W. P. WALKER,
my21 P. Y. Smith, Agent.
COWICHAN LAND DISTRICT
District of Victoria        WLmi
TAKE NOTICE that Eustace Dowman!
Maude, of Mayne Island, B.C., occupation, Rancher, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described
foreshore land:—
Commencing at a post planted at high
water mark on the line between the
lands of E. Maude and Mrs. Rowbotham,
Section 14, Mayne Island; thenoe following the meander of the shore line
about 18 chains to the west line of
Lighthouse lands; thenee north-west to
low water mark and following its meander to a point 60 feet north of the
point of commencement; thence 50 feetl
south to point of commencement, containing about two and a half acres,
more or less.
Dated 7th April, 1910. ,
apl 16       EUSTACE DOWMAN MAUDE.il
COWICHAN -jLAND DISTBICT
District  of Victoria,  B.C.
TAKE  NOTICE  that  Joseph  Burrill,',
of Galiano Island, occupation, a merch-1
ant, intends to apply for permission to
lease the following described foreshore'
land:— .
Commencing at a post planted at the I'
north-east corner of Section  1, Galiano I
Island, Cowichan District; thenee south- ■
erly following the meander of the shore!
26 chains more or less to a post marked B;  thence east one-half chain; thence
north  26  chains;   thence  west one-half1
chain   to  the  point  of  eommeneement
and    containing   one   and    one-quarter;
acres, more or less.
Dated this 9th day of April, 1910.
apl 16 JOSEPH BURRILL.
YALE LAND DISTRICT
District of Yale
NOTICE is hereby given that Emilie
A. I. Martin, of Victoria, B.C., intends
to apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands for a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lands, situate on the South Fork of
the Tulameen River:—Commencing at a
post planted about six miles from and
south of the junction of the South Fork
and the Tulameen Rivers, and marked
"E. A. I. Martin. S.W. Corner," thence
north eighty chains; thenee east eighty
chains; thence south eighty chains;
thence west eighty chains to point of
commencement, and containing 6*10
acres.
Dated  7th  April,  1910.
E.  A.  I.  MARTIN.
my21 P. Y. Smith, Agent.
YALE LAND DISTRICT
District of Yale
NOTICE is hereby given that Rowland Fennlngs Taylor, of Victoria, B.C.,
intends to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum on the following described lands, situate on the
South Fork of the Tulameen River:—
Commencing at a post planted about
two miles from and south of the junction of the South Fork and the Tulameen Rivers, and marked "R. F. Taylor,
N.W. Corner," thence south eighty
chains; thence east eighty chains;
thenee north eighty chains; thence west
eighty chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres.
Dated   7th   April,   1910.
R.  F.  TAYLOR.
my21 P. Y. Smith, Agent.
YALE LAND DISTRICT
District of Yale
NOTICE Is hereby given that Philip
Y. Smith, of Princeton, B.C., intends
to apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands for a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lands, situate on the South Fork of
the Tulameen River:—Commencing at a
post planted about six miles from and
south of the junction of the South Fork
and the Tulameen Rivers, and marked
"P. Y. Smith, S.E. Corner," thence
north eighty chains; thence west eighty
chains; thence south eighty chains;
thence east eighty ehains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres.
Dated 7th April, 1910.
my21 P. Y. SMITH.
YALE LAND DISTRICT
District of Yale
NOTICE is hereby given that Harriet
E. Oldlng, of Grand Forks, B.C., intends
to apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands for a licence to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lands, situate on the South Fork of
the Tulameen River:—Commencing at a
post planted about eight miles from
and South of the junction of the South
Fork and the Tulameen Rivers, and
marked "H. E. Oldlng, S.E. Corner,"
thence north eighty ehains; thence west
eighty ehains; thence south eighty
chains; thence east eighty chains to
point of commencement, and containing
640  acres.
Dated 7th April,  1910.
H.  E. OLDING.
my21 P. Y. Smith, Agent.
YALE LAND DISTRICT
District of Yale
NOTICE Is hereby given that Alexis
Martin, of Vietoria, B.C., intends to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum on the following described
lands, situate on the South Fork of the
Tulameen River:—Commencing at a
post planted about six miles from and
south of the junction of the South Fork
and the Tulameen Rivers, and marked
"A. Mlartin, N.W. Corner," thence south
eighty chains; thence east eighty chains;
thence north eighty chains; thence west
eighty chains to point of eommeneement, and containing 640 aores.
Dated 7th April, 1910.
A. MARTIN.
my21 P. Y. Smith, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
TAKE NOTICE that I, Charles Hall,
of Galiano Island, B.C., occupation
Rancher, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described
land:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
beach at high water mark 4 chains more
or  less  from  the  south-east  corner  of
Section  6,  Galiano    Island,    Cowichan
Land District, B.C.; thenee in a northerly direction along the beach following j
the meander of the shore 30 ehains more
or less; thence in a westerly direction '
half a chain more or less to the point
of  commencement,  and  containing one j
and a half acres, more or less.
Dated this 8th day of April, 1910.
apl  16 CHARLES  HALL.
YALE LAND DISTRICT
District of Yale
NOTICE is hereby given that Robert
Joseph Harlow, of Vietoria, B.C., intends to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands for a License to prospect for coal and petroleum on the following described lands, situate on the
South Fork of the Tulameen River:—
Commencing at a post planted about
ten miles from and south of the junction of the South Fork and the Tulameen Rivers, and marked "R. J. Harlow, S.W. Corner," thence north eighty
chains; thence east eighty chains; thence
south eighty chains; thence west eighty
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres.
Dated 7th April, 1910.
R.  J.  HARLOW,
my21 P. Y. Smith, Agent.
PARLIAMENT   BUILDINGS
option—that is how he makes his living. We do think, however, that thc
sweeping statement he makes derogatory to the integrity of our present
premier, should meet with general
disfavour.
Wendell Phillips was, on one occasion, lecturing in Ohio, and while
on a railroad journey going to keep
one of his appointments he met in a
 ^^^^^^^ car a crowd of clergy, returning from
successful way to eliminate the booze | some sort of convention.   One of the
ministers felt called upon to approach
Mr. Phillips, and asked him: "Arc
you   Mr.   Phillips?"
"I am, sir."
"Are you trying to free the niggers?"
"Yes, sir; I am an abolitionist."
"Well, why do you preach your
doctrine up here? Why don't you go
over into Kentucky."
"Excuse me, are you a preacher?"
"I am sir."
"Are you trying to save souls from
traffic and that is to prohibit its
manufacture. The sole handling of
liquor by government dispensing has
been quite successful in thc lessening
of thc number of "booze artists" in
some of the states.
Be this as it may, we believe, however, that Dr. Spencer has quite a
large order upon his hands when lie
accuses general illegal manipulation
of thc plebiscite ballots by thc deputy
returning officers at the last British
Columbia election. We are in a position to know that the voter did not
in all cases hy any means have to
specifically ask the officers for the
local option ballot.
We have no quarrel with Dr. Spencer for advocating local or any other
liel!      ^^^^^
"Yes, sir: that's
"Well,  why
The    assail:
smoker  amid
laughter.
my business."
don't  you  go  there?"
nt    hurried    into    thc
a  roar  of  unsanctificd
Steel Fittings—Vaults
Sealed Tenders, indorsed "Steel Fittings, Vaults, Parliament Buildings,"
accompanied by plans and specifications
addressed to the Minister of Public
Works, will be received up to noon of
Saturday, the llth day of June next,
for furnishing and setting in place, steel
shelving, etc., required for the vaults
of the Department of Public Works
and Department of Lands In the Parliament  Buildings,  Victoria,   B.C.
Intending tenderers shall take their
own measurements of the vaults, and
upon application to the Deputy Commissioner of Lands and to the undersigned will be given information as to
the requirements of each Department.
Each tender shall have enclosed therewith an accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank
of Canada, made payable to the Minister of Public Works, in the sum of
two thousand dollars ($2,000), which
shall be forfeited If the party tendering
decline to enter Into contract when
called upon to do so, or if he fail to
complete the work contracted for.
Tenders will not be considered unless
complying with the terms above stated,
made out on the form supplied, signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed in the envelope
furnished
F.  C.  GAMBLE,
my 28 Public Works Engineer.
YALE LAND DISTRICT
District  of Yale
NOTICE  Is  hereby given  that Elizabeth   Oldlng,   of   Vancouver,   B.C.,   intends   to  apply  to   the  Chief  Commissioner of Lands  for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum on the following described  lands,  situate  on  the
South  Fork of  the  Tulameen  River:—
Commencing  at  a  post  planted  about
eight mlles from and south of the junction of the South Fork and the Tulameen   Rivers,   and  marked   "E.   Oldlng,
N.E.     Corner,"    thence    south    eighty
chains;    thence    west    eighty    chains;
thence north eighty chains; thence east
eighty   chains   to   point  of  commeneement, and containing 640 acres.
Dated 7th April, 1910.
E.  OLDING.
my21 P. Y. Smith, Agent.
YALE LAND DISTRICT
District of Yale
NOTICE is hereby given that Henry
Thoresby Hughes, of Kingston, Ont., Intends to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum on the following described lands situate on the
South Fork of the Tulameen River:—
Commencing at a post planted about
ten mlles from and south of the junction of the South Fork and the Tulameen Rivers, and marked "H. T. Hughes,
S.E. Corner," thenoe north eighty
chains; thence west eighty chains;
thence south eighty chains; thence east
eighty chains to point of commencement,  and  containing 640  acres.
Dated 7th April, 1910.
H.  T. HUGHES,
my21 P. Y. Smith, Agent.
COAST LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 1
TAKE NOTICE that I, William Nelson Draper, agent for T. J. Sullivan,
of Cloverdale, occupation Manufacturer,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land;*—
Commencing at a post planted one chain
from the shore of a small cove about
one mile easterly from Boulder Point,
Knight's Inlet; thence easterly (60)
sixty chains; thence northerly (20)
twenty chains; thence westerly (60)
sixty chains; thence southerly (20)
twenty chains to point of commencement.
Dated Srd May,  1910.
T. J.  SULLIVAN,
my 14 By W. N. Draper.
RENFREW LAND DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Roderick McDonald, of Port Renfrew, occupation
Farmer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
20 to 25 chains north of N.W. corner
of lot 204; thence north 80 chains;
thenee west 10 chains; thence south
about 15 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence west 20
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 10 chains; thence south 60 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thenee south
about 10 chains; thence east 40 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated April 9, 1910.
ROBERT ELLIOTT,
my 14 Agent for Roderick McDonald
YALE LAND DISTRICT
District  of Yale
NOTICE Is hereby given that Jessie
Renton Hunter, of Princeton. B.C., Intends to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum on the following described lands, situate on the
South Fork of the Tulameen River:—
Commencing at a post planted about six
miles from and south of the junction of
the South Fork and the Tulameen
Rivers, and marked "J. R. Hunter, N.E.
Corner," thence south eighty chains;
thence west eighty chains; thence north
eighty chains; thence east eighty ehains
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres.
Dated  7th  April,  1910.
JJ. R. HUNTER.
my21 P. Y. Smith. Agent.
YALE LAND DISTRICT
District of Yale
NOTICE is hereby given that Casimir S. Gzowski, of Vancouver, B.C.,
Intends to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands for a license to prospect for eoal and petroleum on the following described lands, situate on the
South Fork of the Tulameen River:—
Commencing at a post planted about ten
miles from and south of the junction of
the South Fork and the Tulameen
Rivers, and marked, "C. S. Gzowski,
N.E. Corner," thence South eighty
chains; thence west eighty chains;
thence north eighty chains; thence east
eighty ehains to point of commencement,  and  containing 640  acres.
Dated  7th April,  1910.
C. S. GZOWSKI,
my21 P, Y. Smith, Agent.
YALE LAND DISTRICT
District of Yale
NOTICE is hereby given that Charles
C. Bennett, of Viotoria, B.C., intends to
apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands for a license to prospect for eoal
and petroleum on the following described lands, situate on the South Fork of
the Tulameen River:—Commencing at
a post planted about ten miles from
and south of the junction of the South
Fork and Tulameen Rivers, marked "C.
C. Bennett, N.W. Corner," thence south
eighty chains; thence east eighty
chains; thence north eighty chains;
thence west eighty chains to point of
commencement and containing 640 acres.
Dated 7th April, 1910.
C. C. BENNETT.
my21 P. Y. Smith, Agent.
I
TAKE NOTTCE that Louis De Voln
of Hazelton, B.C.. Publisher, Intends to
apply for a licence to prospect for coal
and petroleum on the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the north side of Salmon
Creek ahout _Y_ miles from the Skeena
River and ahout S miles In a northerly
direction from Hazelton, thence east SO
chains; thonoe south 80 chains; thenco
west SO chains; thenoe north 80 chains
to  point  of commencement.
Dated  23  April,  1910.
my28 LOUIS DE VOIN.
YALE LAND DISTRICT
District  of Yale
NOTICE Is hereby given that John
Willis Ambery of Alctorla, B.C., intends
to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum on the following described Iands, situate on the South Fork
of the Tulameen River:—Commencing
at a post planted about four miles from
and south of tho junction of the South
Fork nnd tho Tulameen Rivers, and
marked "J. W Ambery. S.W. Corner,"
thence north eighty ohalns; thence east
eighty chains; thenoe south eighty
chains; thenoe west eighty ohalns to
point of commencement, and containing
640 acres.
Dated 7th April. 1910.
J. W. AMBERY.
my21 P. Y. Smith, Agent.
COAST RANGE III
TAKE NOTICE that Lewis Hind, of
Victoria, B.C., occupation Mining Engineer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands—Commencing at a post planted at
a point about twenty (20) ehains distant
in an easterly direction from the outlet of the Salmon River into Dean
Channel, thence north forty (40) chains,
thence west twenty (20) chains; thence
following the south bank of the Salmon River and shore of Dean Channel
to point of commencement, and containing eighty (80) acres, more or less.
Dated 3rd May, 1910.
my 7 LEWIS   HIND.
COAST RANGE III
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Fellows
of Victoria. B.C., occupation Gentleman,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at a
point about twenty (20) chains distant in an easterly direction from the
outlet of the Salmon River into Dean
Channel, thence north twenty (20)
chains; thence east twenty (20) chains;
thence south twenty (20) chains; thence
following tho shore of Dean Channel to
point of commencement, and containing
forty  (40) acres more or less.
Dated 3rd May, 1910.
my 7 ARTHUR FELLOWS. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 18,  tgia
Of All Her Gifts Most Welcome
NO. ...      CMf.M
NEW BRILLIANT PATTERN
,  No  ...     ...... •"-.
No. JJ PATTERN
NO   ...      T.H.II.
NBW BRILLIANT PATTERN
No  ...     .....
' NEW BRILLIANT PATTERN
No. .OO    ..MM Co.
SENORA PATTERN '
Cut Glass makes the ideal wedding gift—that is if it is good cut glass—if it is "Libbey's."   A dainty piece of Libbey Cut Glass would be
most welcome of all her gifts.
Should the gift be cut glass, her first thought will be:   "Is it Libbey's?"   If it isn't—disappointment.   If it is—unrestrained delight.
For the very simple, but very excellent, reason that no other cut glass can seriously pretend to approach it iu loveliness—that is why, in your
gift choosing, you should look for the name "Libbey" graven in the glass.
We have just received a big shipment of this lovely cut glass, and we extend to you a hearty invitation to come in and see it sparkle in a
specially constructed cut glass room.   The showing offers an easy and satisfactory solution of the wedding gift problem.
Nappies, from each  $2.50
Bowls, from each  $6.00
Vases, from, each  $3.50
Sugars and Creams, per pair  $10.00
Water Jugs, from, each  $7.50
Water Bottles, from, each  $6.00
Decanters, from, each  $10.00
Butter Dishes, from, each  $5.00
Compotes, from, each  $6.00
Flower Baskets, from, each  $10.00
Punch Bowls, small size, at  $30.00
Finger Bowls, at, per doz $35.00
Ice Plates, at, per doz $45.00
Tumblers, at, per doz $20.00
Oil Bottles, from, each  $3.50
Candlesticks, from, each   $6.00
Ice Tubs, from, each  $15.00
Rose Bowls, from, each    $7.00
Knife and Fork Rests, from, pair  $4.00
Loving Cups, from  $16.00
Puff Boxes, from each  $9.00
Hair Receivers, from $9.00
Large Ice-Cream Plates, at ..- $15.00
Perfume Bottles, from  ! $5.00
Hundreds of Gifts in China, Glass, Furniture, Draperies, Etc.
FURNISHERS OF
CHURCHES
SCHOOLS
BOATS
SINCE 1862
AT VICTORIA, B.C.
Complete Home Furnishers
Victoria, B.C.
FURNISHERS OF
HOMES
HOTELS
CLUBS
SINCE 1862
AT VICTORIA, B.O.
Mr.   T.   Harrison,   from   Duncan,
>ent the week end in town.
* *   *
Mr. E. J. Palmer from Chemainus
a visitor in the city.
* *   *
Mr. Villiers from the Okanagan
listrict, is in town on a short visit.
* *   *
Mr. T. O. McKay was a visitor to
'ancouver during the week.
* *   *
Mr. Macdonald is the guest of Cap-
lin Elliston at his ranch at Saanich.
* *   *
Mrs. T. Spring, from Seattle, is the
uest of her aunt, Mrs. Robert Fort,
eacon Hill.
* *   *
Dr. Newcombe, Mr. Wm. New-
ombe and Mr. R. G. Monteith have
:ft on a month's cruise, in their
ninch, to  Queen  Charlotte  Islands.
* *   *
Mr. Percy Rowcliffe and Mr. Wm.
owcliffe are recent arrivals in town
om the Old Country.
* *   *
Mrs. G. S. Courtney and children,
ho have returned from a visit to
suthern California, arc the guests of
rs. E.  E. Blackwood. Linden Ave.
Miss Gaudin, who has been visiting in Southern California, returned
recently to her home in this city.
* *   *
A Vancouver engagement which
has been recently announced is that
of Miss Mignonne Bumham Davis
Aubin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D.
E. Aubin, to Mr. Harold H. Richardson. The wedding has been arranged
to take place on July 7th.
* *   *
Mrs. Henry Hereford, from Tacoma, is visiting her relatives in Victoria.
* *   *
Mrs. Rocke Robertson Robertson
is the guest of Mrs. Tate McEwan
Robertson of Vancouver.
* *   *
Miss Dorothy Bulwer is a guest
at the Shawnigan Lake Hotel.
* *   *
Mrs. W. Langley has returned from
a short visit spent in Seattle.
* *   *
Mrs. G. C. Shaw, sister of Mrs. O.
M. Jones, is on a short visit in Victoria.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Brookfield
and son from Halifax were guests
in  Victoria  last week.
The officers at Work Point Barracks were hosts last Monday evening of a very enjoyable dance. The
dancing hall was very prettily decorated with flags aud Miss Thain's orchestra played a delightful programme
of dance music. Mrs. Peters, wife of
Col. Peters, received the guests.
Some of those present were: Miss
Greet, Miss Kate Bennett, Miss Bryden, Miss Mara, Miss Pitts and Miss
Gladys Pitts, Miss Helmcken, Miss
Mason, Miss Doris Mason, Miss
Eberts, Miss Lorna Eberts, Miss
Monteith, Miss Day, Miss Olive Day,
Miss Perry, Miss Pooley, Miss Violet
Pooley, Miss Muriel Dunsmuir, Mrs.
J. Bryden, Miss Gladys Peters, Miss
Butchart. Miss J. Butchart, Miss Irving, and the Messrs. Bromley, G
Johnson. Tillard, W. Todd, D. Bullen. H. Eberts, A. Pitts, J. James,
Macdonald, Stern, Selfc, Western, F.
Peters. T. Crease, Kirkbride, Villiers,
Thomas, D. Gillespie and others.
*   *   *
Among the Seattle visitors, who1
arc in town at present are: Mrs. O. j
Sander, and the Misses Sander, Mr.!
A. Sander, Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Ross, j
Mr. and Mrs. R. Thompson, Mrs. I
George Haskins, Mrs. J. C. Jackson, j
Dr. and Mrs. Scott. Mr. J. J. Mar- j
wey. and Mr. C. E. Perry.
Victoria Horticultural Society
FIFTH ANNUAL
Rose Show
=To be held at 1
The Rink, Fort Street on
Friday,  June  24th, 1910
An orchestra will be in attendance and a vocal programme will
be rendered on the evening of the Show.
ADMISSION
25 Cents
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Janion, who
havc been visiting Mr. and Mrs.
Roger Wilby, have returned to Vancouver. *    *    *
Mr. and Mrs. A. J. C. Galletly left
last Monday via the Northern Pacific on a tour of Yellowstone Park.
* *    *
St. Paul's branch, Esquimalt, Women's Auxiliary, will hold its annual
garden party in the Rectory grounds
on Thursday, June 23rd, from 3 to
10 p.m. *   *   *
The Misses Brown, who havc been
thc guests of Mrs. Fagan, Esquimalt
Road, for the last month, returned
to their home in New Westminster
on last Wednesday afternoon's boat.
* *    *
A very pretty wedding was celebrated recently in Vancouver at St.
James church, when Mr. J. T. Ken-
worthy, London, Eng., and Miss Sidney Twigge were united in marriage.
Thc Rev. H. G. Fiennes-Clinton officiated at thc ceremony. The bride
who wore a very pretty travelling
costume was given away by Mr. C.
E. Wynn Johnson. After the ceremony a small reception was held at
the home of Mrs. Johnson, Pender
street. Mr. and Mrs. Kenworthy are
spending their honeymoon in the interior. *    *   *
A wedding of interest to Victorians
took place in Keremeos, B.C. The
contracting parties were Mr. 'Max
Bethunc-Ewart of Sidmouth, South
Devon. Eng., and Miss Margaret
Emily Lowe, youngest daughter of
the late William Hamilton Lowe and
Mrs. Lowe of Keremeos, B.C. The
bride, who looked very charming, was
attended by Miss Violet Kirby, Mr.
Gordon R. Mason of Penticton, B.C.,
supported thc groom. After the ceremony the party drove to the home
of the bride's mother, where a reception was held. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 18, 1910
TO*'Sf_RV*e quick-
-US£_C.AS
For a Wedding
=Present==
What could be better than something to lighten the wife's labors and help to build up the husband's bank account, too with
A Modern Gas Cooking Apparatus
Solve the difficult problem of June Wedding Gift-
giving by calling here to select one of these
Excellent Gas Ranges
We offer a handsome, nickle-plated, single-oven GURNEY SUCCESS GAS RANGE, with 164 inch bake oven
4 hole and one simmering burner, set up in your
kitchen ready to burn for only $20.00
Victoria Gas Company, Limited
Cor. Fort and Langley Sts., Victoria, B.C.
Telephone 1609
Getting Rich Quick
Jt would seem as if the fool killer
was not doing his work properly of
late. The crop of fools increases all
the time, much to the delectation of
a lot of schemers who live off the
fat of the land. Why work when you
can get a fortune for nothing? The
old fashioned green-goods game has
been exposed until one would suppose that every man, woman, and
child in the country understood it,
but the harvest is rich each year. The
Spanish prisoner swindle continues to
make money for those who understand how to play on human credulity. The latest game seems to be
the foreign heir to vast property in
tllis country left by "a friend of your
father."
There is a psychological basis to
all these swindles. At bottom everyone would like to get something for
nothing, if it is possible. The
chances of doing so are about one
in a million, but the gambling spirit
is rampant. Thc games where the
chances against thc player are greatest are those which are the most
popular. There is a large collection
of swindlers in this country who manage to thrive for a lime on the credulity of human nature. Plausibility
is their chief asset. They can lind
out the weak spot in the armor of
many persons and pierce it. at the
same time getting to the pocketbook.
The two men arrested last week may
be wholly innocent, but there is a
large fraternity engaged in such practices as are charged, and the only
thing possible to do under the circumstances is to warn people against
the folly of expecting to got something for nothing under such circumstances.
In these days the cost of living
is so high that many persons are well-
Pax Vobis-cum
Thou slnilf not know tlie changeless till thou know
Tliat all things change—
Tbat joys most beautiful aud dear must go
Beyond thy range;
That heart's desire must be deceived and cross'd
That heart's delight must be denied and lost,
That every moment's gladness pays its cost;
That every joy of spirit or of sense.
Hath its commensurate hour of recompense.
Yet shalt thou learn that, midst all fluctuant tides
One test abides,
On the low rock whose breakers beat its sides;
There is seeureness and infinitude
Mid restless wind and mood.
All is not lost nor all untimely spent,
Privation  hath  its fruit  and  its content.
Thou hast won much if in its calm control
Xo lash of fortune can perturb thy soul—
Xo sting or poison, no polluting strife
Reach to the fortress of thv secret  life.
nigh desperate and are willing to take : be the greatest of Americans.   Spend
almost  any  risk ou  the ground that   less than you earn and buy nothing
they cannot be much worse off than  because it is cheap.—Philadelphia In-
they are.   This is bad philosophy and . quirer.
bad   economics.     The   true   basis   of
economics is that  laid down by Mr.
Micawber.    If you  spend  sixpense  a
year more than your income, yon are
miserable; if sixpence less, the result
is   happiness.     This   is   entirely   too
simple  for most  persons.    They  run
into  debt   gleefully  and  have  a  hard
time   getting   out.     If   there   were   a
modem Hen Franklin who could wield
the   proportionate   influence   that   the
sage did  in  his own  day,  he   would
June Weddings
"And hearts are warmed and faces bloom
As drinking health to bride and groom
We wish   them   store   of   happy days."
—Tkx.nyso.n
The Bridal Toast must, of course, be given in the
King of all Wines, G. 11. jMunnn's Champagne, the
wine of ceremony ancl joy. Xo wedding is complete
without G. H. Mumm k Go's ••Cordon Rouge,"
"Extra Dry" or "Selected Brut," the champagnes
that are used exclusively at all the high class banquet^
and other functions throughout the civilized world.
Do not allow your dealer to provide you with an
inferior substitute for this best of all brands of
champagne. If he does not handle G. II. Mumm &
Co's Champagne kindly nsk him to procure it from
Pither eV Leiser, cor. Fort and Wharf Sts., Victoria.
I
A Wise Move
"I wonder if this actress lady who
retired and married will be happy
darning socks."
"lt all depends on the stage management. If I were her husband. I'd
get her a nice silk stock to darn, install a pianola to furnish slow music,
and arrange the library as a spot
light."
TAKE NOTICE that Louis De Voin
of Hazelton, B.C., Publisher, intends to
apply for a licence to prospect for coal
ancl petroleum on the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the north side of Salmon
Creek, about ._ miles from the Skeena
River and about 8 miles In a northerly
direction from Hazelton, thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 ehains; thence north 80 ehains
to  point of commencement.
Dated 23  April,  1910.
my 28 LOUIS   DE   VOIN.
LIQUOR   LICENSE   ACT,   1900
I,   Richard  Price,  hereby give  noti
that one month from date hereof, I w
apply to the Superintendent of Provl
cial Police at Victoria for a renewal
my  license  to  sell  intoxicating llquo
at the premises  known as the Parso
Bridge Hotel, situated at Parsons Brid;
In  the  District   of  Esquimalt,  to  coi
mence on the 1st day of July, 1910.
Dated this eleventh day of May, 191
(Signed) RICHARD PRICE,
my 14 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE i8, 1910
DANGER!
DO YOU KNOW that there are more fatal diseases contracted
from the dust you sweep  off your  floors and carpets, than
from any other source?
AND YET at the cost of a few cents a week, by using our sweeping compound, Dustlcss Waxine, you need run no such risk.
WAXINE collects all dirt and dust as you sweep it across your
rooms and saves you the necessity of dusting.
WAXINE contains a disinfectant that is sure destruction to germs
and microbes.
WAXINE also contains an expensive essence that will drive away
fleas and other pests.
WAXINE will keep an oiled floor, or oilcloth, always bright and
glossy, and carpets sweet and clean.
WAXINE leaves a refreshing odor in your rooms.
WAXINE is cheaper than anything else of its kind on the market.
WAXINE is used by many of the principal stores, offices, banks,
theatres and private houses of Victoria and Vancouver.
WAXINE is manufactured in Victoria by Victoria people, who
spend their money in Victoria.
Prices:
25-lb box, $1.00; 50-lb box, $2.00; 100-lb box, $3.75; 250-lb box, $7.50
AMBERINE FLOOR OIL—Our Floor Oil will stand the test as
against any other make, in fact it is the best floor oil made.
Use it.   Per gallon  $1.00
ACME METAL POLISH—Our Metal Polish, which is unequalled,
should be used by everybody.
IMPERIAL WAXINE CO.
PHONE 1968
1602 DOUGLAS STREET
Corner
_wf\f*_/^ftty
At The Street    ^
___.
By THE LOUNGER /*
Itow many people realise the rose-
wing qualities of Victoria?  I don't
eve  that  half  the folk who just
gc  in  thc  city  have  thc  vaguest
|t of the enormous possibilities of
rose-growing    industry    in   this
Rn.   Wherever   1 go,  I   see roses,
editor  puts  some  in  the  office;
landlady puts some in my room;
|cs   arc   on   my   lunch   tabic.      I
i't  think  that  I   ever  appreciated
feature of Victoria before, but it
happens   that   every   morning   I
I^e to pass down a road where the
uses arc simply laden with the
ie flower. And when all is said
1 done flowers play a bigger part
our life than we are aware of. They
humanising; they represent passes; they make thc home, home in
ray in which no other feature does,
here goes  for Victoria  and  her
Nes.
*     *     *
had the privilege recently of go-
over ''The Restorer."   This is a
|_le-laying steamer, and it has been
ng at the  Outer Wharf.    I  think
previously   to   my  visit   I   had
tared the common belief that you
d a cable by trailing a wire along
the end of a boat. I am wiser
w. 1 find that a cable steamer lays
cable at the approximate rate of
e miles an hour; that in shallow
iter it pays out thc cable over the
that it loads its cable at about
Iro and a half miles an hour. Thc
.tail on one of these boats passes
Imprehension, and it is an experi-
icc which no one should miss.
•i* *■ *
Another boat T lately visited was
.he Prince Rupert." She was
vn open to the public on Satur-
iy last, and the public certainly took
(vantage of thc fact. Of the boat
have nothing but thc highest praise,
but the public. Oh, certainly thc
cragc public when it takes its girl
t for a Saturday afternoon "treat"
a veritable picnic. It always in-
its on explaining things of which it
ows nothing. For example, I over-
ard a man explaining the reason for
c existence of two ship's telegraphs
the bridge.   "You sec, the captain
Imds here," hc said, pointing to the
ice!, "and the first mate stands at
e telegraph on his right, and the
:ond mate stands on his left." Now
it sort of thing is very ridiculous,
t, unfortunately, it is very common,
rhaps such an absurdity does not
:ur once in a lifetime, but the prin-
ile  is  the  same.    Incorrect  infor
mation is bartered about all the time,
and those who know least talk most.
* *     *
Another thing which worries me is
the noise which domestic animals
make. I have written about poultry
till I am tired of it; I want to write
about dogs now. There is a dog
near my rooms; he barks all the
time. I don't know to whom it is
that' he belongs, but I consider him
a perfect nuisance. There is a jackass also; he makes a noise like a
cow; he starts singing about five
o'clock in the morning. Why should
he be allowed to disturb honest people in their beds? There is too much
soft talk put up by kindly folk on the
subject of dumb animals. I am a
great supporter of the S. P. C. A.,
but at the same time I do think that
dumb creation get the better of the
talkers in many ways. I have never
annoyed poultry by crowing in the
morning; I have never barked like a
dog; I don't think that I have ever
brayed like a jackass. These animals,
however, all worry me. But, of
course I am a person of extraordinary
nerves, ancl I- ought to like these
noises, but  I  don't.
* *     *
How slack Victoria business men
are in the mornings. It is not often
that I get up early, but the o,ther day
I was down town about half past
live. Not a soul was about, not a
funeral note. The only people I saw
were a few city employees going to
work. No stores were even thinking
of getting open; it is true that there
was practically nobody in town to
justify their so doing. It is just
thc tendency of the place. We don't
want to get up early and we don't
do it.    And who is to blame us?
* *     *
1 insert below a couple of clippings
from thc London "Over Seas Daily
Mail." They may be of interest to
many Old Countrymen in the Province:
ofa
0~lt*£l*',
HARROW   HEADMASTERSHIP
Rev.   Lionel   Ford   Appointed   From
Repton
Thc hcadmastership of Harrow
School, vacant through the resignation of the Rev. Dr. Wood, which
was announced some weeks ago, has
been offered to and accepted by tho
Rev. Lionel George Bridges Justice
Ford. Headmaster of Repton School.
Mr. Ford is equally distinguished
as a scholar, a preacher, and a cricketer. Born in 1865, he was the most
brilliant of a family of cricketers, all
of  whom  wcre   educated  at   Repton
Cold Storage
Vancouver Island
Cold Storage and
Ice Company
VICTORIA, B.C.
Goods received at all hours.
Expert attention given.
Consignments solicited
Phone 2282    P.O. Box 875
School. In 1884 he obtained an open
scholarship at King's College, Cambridge. His academis career was
most distinguished, as he gained a
first class in Classical Tripos and the
Chancellor's Medal.
He played for his university eleven
at cricket for the four years from
1887 to 1890. He was a clever bowler
and a mighty bat. Indeed, in 1890
he headed the Cambridge batting average and made the best score of any
batsman on either side in the match
with Oxford. On leaving Cambridge
he played for Middlesex from time to
time.
In 1888 he was appointed an assistant master at Eton, but left Eton in
1901, when he was offered the head-
mastership of Repton, for which he
had not even applied. He married
in 1904 Mary Catherine Talbot,
daughter of the Bishop of Southwark. I
He has been Select Preacher at
Cambridge University and is examining chaplain to the Bishop of Southwark. He is an ideal headmaster—
tall, handsome, ancl dignified in presence, ancl has thc art of making
himself liked and obeyed.
XEW "HEAD" OF HARROW
Secrets  of  the   Rev.   Lionel   Ford's
Success
His reign at Harrow promises well,
for he is young, enthusiastic, and experienced. He believes in the primal
necessity for the "pastoral side" of
a headmaster's work—in the building
up of character, the deepening of the
moral and religious life of a school.
He believes that a headmaster should
have an intimate personal knowledge
of his boys, and that the two great
levers of public school work are a
strong prefect system (the guidance
by good leading boys) and the influence of the school chapel.
In the much-discussed -question of
the wisdom of a classical education
his views are pronounced. While
alive to the modern side of education
he holds by Latin and Greek.
Mr. Ford is the embodiment of thc
cricket reputation of Repton. Repton
produced the Palairets, C. B. Fry,
and the headmaster's brothers, F. G.
J. Ford, A. F. J. Ford, and W. J.
Ford; in R. A. Young and J. N.
Crawford she furnished the two
youngest men who ever went with an
English eleven to Australia; and last
summer but one five members of her
school eleven were invited to play
for first-class counties during the
holidays. One is still at Repton, thc
captain of the school  eleven.
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 664
North Qovernment St.. Victoria
MAXES ONE FEEL FINE
"Liverine," Bowes' famous Effervescent Saline, touches the
right spot—your liver—yet it is
exceptionally nice to take. Just
one teaspoonful before breakfast
in a glass of cold water and
liver keeps in perfect working
order.
joe Bottle, this Store Only . >
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
1228 Government Street
Near Yates
Satisfaction
We guarantee quality and satisfaction with every purchase of
Groceries.
Phone orders carefully attended to.
A. POOL
623 Yates St.      "    Phone 448
Watson's Old Stand
BLUE PRINTS
Any Length in One Piece
Six Cents per foot
TIMBER AND LAND
MAPS
DRAUGHTING
Electric Blue Print &
Map Co.
11218 Langley St. - Victoria,'B.C.
Success has a knack of coming unsought to the Rev. Lionel G. B. J.
Ford, the new headmaster of Harrow.
N'inc years ago hc was appointed
headmaster of Repton without applying for the post; his new position
has also come to him unsought, as
the result of the unanimous offer of
the governors of Harrow.
He is famous as a scholar and as a
master, as an administrator ancl as an
athlete. He is particularly famous
for the relations which exist between
him and his boys. In spite of his
firm hand on the reins he is still a
boy among boys, and shows every
likelihood of remaining one. It is
his delight to "potter about at the
nets."
A Sure Shot at Livers
"I hear, doctor, that my friend
Brown, whom you have been treating so long for liver trouble, has
died of stomach trouble," said one
of the physician's patients.
"Don't you believe all you hear," replied the doctor. "When I treat a
man for liver trouble, hc dies of liver
trouble."
BRITISH     COLUMBIA     _     _Va.__K_.__
BAILWAY COMPANY
Notice to Stockholder!
The lirst general meetlne- ot stockholders will be held at the ofTici* of the
Companv. 514 Fort Street, Victoria, British Columbia, on July 20th. 11)10, at 2
p.m.. to eleet a permanent Board of
Directors to consider the acts of the
provisional Board, and transact such
other business as may properly come
before the meeting.
Dated, Victoria, B.C., June 10th, 1910.
HAROLD B. ROBERTSON,
je IS Secretary.
There's
Nothing half
So Sweet
In Life as
Love and
Dudleigh's
Mixture
SUB?   Richardsonl
Cigar Store.
I Phone 346 §
i:-:+:-:*:-:«:*:-:*K^-:*:-:*K^^^*»|
NOTICE is hereby given that the
waters of Shoo-wah-tlans and Wood-
worth Lakes, in Itange 6, Coast District,
and the waters of all streams flowing
into said lakes, and all streams flowing
therefrom, are reserved, subject to the
rights of existing records only, for the
use of the Crown.
ROBERT A. RENWICK.
Deputy Commissioner of Lands
Lands Department,
Victoria, B.C., April 29th, 1910.
apr 30 01
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 18, 1910
Only FOUR More Days to Reserve
THESE LOTS at the Upset Price!
We Ask You to Consider the Following Points of Advantage:
Transcontinental Railways.   Immense Timber Areas for which HOPE is the
only outlet and Manufacturing Centre
Unlimited power to be developed from the Coquihalla
and Silver Rivers for manufacturing purposes,
making HOPE the industrial centre of the Province
Scenic beauty unsurpassed in America.
Go and look! Convince yourself that our statements
are correct.
THREE   hours'   ride   from  Vancouver,   week-end
rate, $3.00.
BY PUBLIC AUCTION AT
THE DRIARD HALL, VICTORIA, JUNE 23rd, 1910
STEWART WILLIAMS,    -    Auctioneer
Lots may be reserved at the upset price at the following offices by making a small deposit
CROSS & CO., PEMBERTON & SONS, W. E. BURR1S,
622 Fort Street
614 Fort Street
Hope Land & Improvement Co.
Room 12, Hibben Bldg.
622 Fort St.
_

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