BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

Week Jan 25, 1908

Item Metadata

Download

Media
pwv-1.0344030.pdf
Metadata
JSON: pwv-1.0344030.json
JSON-LD: pwv-1.0344030-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): pwv-1.0344030-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: pwv-1.0344030-rdf.json
Turtle: pwv-1.0344030-turtle.txt
N-Triples: pwv-1.0344030-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: pwv-1.0344030-source.json
Full Text
pwv-1.0344030-fulltext.txt
Citation
pwv-1.0344030.ris

Full Text

Array (yr_xnrr_rr_T_in^_ipr_irri
Kingsford Smith & Co.
Stock and General
AUCTIONEERS
D
» AUCTIONEERS £
a    Commission and Real Estate Agenta.    a
0 a
1 860 Granville, Vaacoaver. I
!fcX_UJUUUUULUUJLUUUAJUUUUU
Victoria Edition
The Week
R British Columbia Review,
Published at Vietoria and Vaacoaver B. G.
Vol. IV.   No. 52
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 25, 1908
A week of the session has
Parliamentary   passed and beyond a few
Proceedings,    formalities  the  record   is
confined to a prolonged debate on the action of the Lieutenant-Governor in withholding his assent to the
Bowser Bill.   This subject has been debated both on the address and on a motion
sought to be introduced by the member for
Nanaimo, which aimed at censuring the
Lieutenant-Governor, and demanding hi3
dismissal.   The debate has been carried on
mainly by the Leader of the Opposition
and the members for Delta and Yale on
the one side and the Premier, the Attorney-General, and the member for the Islands on the othre.    The occasion is an
important one, raising constitutional issues.    The' main contention of the Opposition, based upon an amendment to the
reply to the address  and censuring the
Provincial Government in connection with
the incident, was that Mr. McBride and
his advisers must be held responsible for
the   actions of the   Lieutenant-Governor.
This contention is based upon constitu-
| tional usage, and the quoted opinion  of
I great   parliamentarians,   such   as   Todd,
1 May, Bourinot, Sir John A. Macdonald,
and David Mills.   The principle of the
I contention is well expressed in the old
adage, "The King can do no wrong," and
it was contended that in this connection
lthe Lieutenant-Governor is practically the
I King.    Following this line of argument,
lthe  Opposition  further  contended  that
I whatever motive or influence may  have
J swayed the Lieutenant-Governor  in his
I decision, the Provincial Government must
[still  accept the responsibility.    It  was
j urged by all the Opposition speakers that
lthe only way in which they could have di-
I vested themselves of the implied responsibility of acquiescing in the action of the
I Lieut.-Governor was by resigning office.
lit was argued that this is the only means
I of protection furnished by constitutional
law and usage and that if they failed to
I avail themselves of it, the Government has
Ino right to complain of being charged with
J acquiescence, and the responsibility which
Ithat entails.    This main contention was
Imet by the Government, and enforced by
Icopious references to the same parliamentary authorities, by the argument that they
■had no authority over the Lieutenant-Gov-
lernor.   That when the Legislature passes
la measure and has delivered it to the Lieu-
Itenant-Governor for his assent, not only is
Itheir responsibility at an end, but there is
Ino precedent and no provision for making
Jany further representations to him.    Tlie
I submission of a measure is their final act.
[The Lieutenant-Governor enjoys privileges
lin connection with all local legislation,
among them that of withholding his assent.
[This right is unquestionably established,
Inot only by numerous precedents, but by
[reference to the highest parliamentary authorities.   In the case under consideration,
■he acted strictly within his rights, if he
J30 wished," in reserving his assent.    It is
Ihere to be noted that he did not veto the
Ineasure, an assumption which the Opposition speakers erroneously made in the
l.arly stages of the debate.    He has no
Lower to veto because there is a higher
Ituthority than the Lieutenant-Governor,
lo whom he is answerable; it is not how-
jwer, the local but the Federal Govern-
Inent.    From it he receives his appointment and his instructions ancl to it he is
Imswerable for all his official acts.   This
J)osition Avas well defined by Mr. McBride,
Ivhen he declared that the Lieutenant-Governor was the Executive officer of the Governor-General, and of the Federal Govern-
Inent.   The Governor-General and liis ad-
EDITORIAL
visers at Ottawa were cognisant of the
action of the Lieutenant-Governor in withholding his assent to the Bowser Bill, and
from that moment they were perfectly well
aware that the responsibility rested with
themselves and that the next step should be
taken at Ottawa. The power of veto rested
there, and under the circumstances the
power of endorsation could only be exercised there. The Lieutenant-Governor
had reserved his assent; reservation is not
finality; it contemplates some further action. That action could not be taken by
the local Government, because  they  had
_5%£__\ \______WR5___Sil L^^^U^^J E^__W1__%
the resignation of a Provincial Government with which it might be at political
variance, by simply instructing the Lieutenant-Governor to withhold assent to legislative acts. It is obvious that such a usage, if established, would be far more detrimental to the interests of a free people
ancl far more subversive of their constitutional rights than the course which has
been pursued by Mr. McBride and his advisers. The Opposition has endeavoured
to complicate the issue by dragging in
certain personal aspects of the question,
based upon evidence given in the enquiry
iiiniiiiminnmiiiiiiiinii-n
rs^ss^iocso
iiiiiiiiiiiillliiiiiilllllilimiiiull liinmiimTm a Ilium iiiniiinii--iM-mi*mmmimiTin-i-m
SCHOOL TRUSTEE
TO THE ELECTORS OF THE CITY OF VICTORIA:
Ladies and Gentlemen,—I have decided to offer my services as a
School Trustee in succession to Mr. Alfred Huggett, and respectfully solicit your votes.
I do not base my claims to your support on the fact that I am a
successful business man, but consider that other qualifications are
necessary.
I have had twenty years' experience as a school trustee, and
therefore claim to understand the duties and Vesponsibilities of the
position from the public standpoint.
I have reared and directed the education of a family of eight,
and therefore claim to understand the subject from the parents'
standpoint.
I have ben a close student.of education and educational methods all my life.
For two sessions, 1900 and igoi, I was Lecturer to McGill University Mining Department.
I am doing no personal canvassing, but rely entirely on the
good offices of my friends, and public endorsation of my platform.
If elected, I shall support:
1. FREE TEXT BOOKS.
2. EQUAL PAY FOR TEACHERS  OF BOTH  SEXES,  WHO
DO  EQUAL WORK.
3. INCREASED   SCHOOL   ACCOMMODATION.
4. A NORMAL SCHOOL IN VICTORIA.
5. EXTENSION OF THE PRESENT SYSTEM OF MANUAL
TRAINING.
6. INCREASED   LOCAL   FACILITIES   FOR   UNIVERSITY
EDUCATION FOR ALL CLASSES.
7. THE LETTING OF ALL CONTRACTS IN VICTORIA, IF
VICTORIA FIRMS ARE ABLE TO DO THE WORK.
8. A CLAUSE IN ALL CONTRACTS ENFORCING THE LOCAL UNION SCALE OF PAYMENT BY CONTRACTORS.
William Blakemore
|-Mmmi**-i*ffl-*M-*iffi-^  miiim—"iniiiiiiiim
I
l^^HJ^^SJS;
^^^n^aj^^^^^B
THimi^iuipuiiimniiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiuuw
IlPill.llHl--Miii-ii'fiflm«
completed their share in the transaction.
It could not be taken by the Lieutenant-
Governor on his own initiative, because he
had already reserved the matter, for the
declared purpose of leaving it to his official
superiors; it could only, therefore, rest
with the latter. All this took place in
April, 1907, and during the nine months
which have elapsed since, no further steps
had been taken either by the Lieutenant-
Governor or the Federal Government.
Apart from the question of responsibility,
thc Opposition raised a second point, viz.,
that the only constitutional course for the
McBride Administration to have pursued
was to have resigned when the Lieutenant-
Governor reserved his consent. The fallacy of this reasoning was laid bare by Mr.
McBride, when he pointed out that according to its logical conclusion it meant that
such a precedent would place it in the
power of any Federal Government to force
recently held by Mr. McKenzie    King.
But Mr. McBride   had   no   difficulty in
showing that whatever bearing this might
have upon other personal aspects of the
case, not  now  under   consideration   and
possibly not competent to be canvassed by
the Legislative Assembly, it had no bearing upon the constitutional question as to
whether the Government had acted properly  or   according  to   usage.     It   seems
to  The Week that with  all  such  matters the Local Legislature has nothing to
do.    The personal fitness or unfitness of
the Lieutenant-Governor is a matter   between himself and those  who  appointed
him, so long as he does not violate the
British Constitution, and in the present
case it seems impossible to contend that
he has done so.   The Week has no desire
to discuss so serious a matter in any but
the calmest and most judicial manner. Any
other aspects of the case have been devel-
fo  Stewtrt WilliiuM R. C Janion   -
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION AND
REAL ESTATE A6ERTS
.     (i PORT ST. VICTORIA, I. C.   a
_%ULSLXXSLSLX_ULXXSLJLXi%X»XUS
One Dollar Per Annuo
oped by the failure of the Federal Government to take cognizance of the action of
the Lieutenant-Governor in reserving his
decision and to fulfil the duty which devolved upon them in consequence, viz.,
either to endorse or veto the measure.
Either act on their part would have been
strictly constitutional, however it might
have appeared to the judgment of the
Province. But it seems as if there is no
precedent for the unconstitutional act of
ignoring the fact that a measure having
been passed by the Provincial Assembly
and reserved for final decision by their
own appointeee, the Lietuenant-Govemor,
had not received the slightest attention
from those who alone could constiution-
ally deal with it. Abandoning the judicial argument, this remains to said, that
when the Legislative Assembly of British
Columbia passed the Oriental Immigration ineasure, identical in terms with the
one which the greatest Colonial Secretary
the Empire has had, advised, the Federal
Government, as the final Court of Appeal,
neither had the courage to assent to, nor
to veto the measure. Further, whatever
may have taken place at the time when
the Lieutenant-Governor reserved his assent, they have ever since left the country
in the dark as to whether he acted upon
specific instructions or not. They have
stood by silently whilst the local Liberal
leaders have endeavoured to make political
capital out of the incident with despect to
which Premier McBride is debarred from
offering explanations. It is not going too
far to say that they have taken advantage
of the fact that Mr. McBride's lips are
sealed, to endeavour to discredit him by
means whicli would instantly be exposed
if he were at liberty to offer an explanation. This is straining constitutional privilege to the limit, but it is not difficult
to understand when read in the light of
Sir Wilfrid Laurier's declaration: "I do
not share the views of British Columbia
on the Oriental question."
Well Done
Lemieux.
This is not an encomium
upon the result of Mr.
Lemieux's mission to Japan,
but upon his manly utterance at Winnipeg on the subject of the
American Associated Press. Every word
of his stinging rebuke is well chosen, and
will prove effective. He only said what,
the Press of Canada has been saying for
a long time now, that it is nothing short
of a disgrace that Canadians should be
obliged to take tlieir news from a polluted
and alien source. Hardly an important
despatch reaches Canada without being
coloured or mangled to suit the ticket of
American politics. In the present instance
the American Associated Press declared
that Mr. Lemieux' mission had been a
failure. Even if it were true the American Press could have had no knowledge
of tho fact since Mr. Lemiux has sedulously guarded his secret until he could
entrust it to his own Government. The
basis of this canard, the fact that Mr.
Lemieux did not call upon the American
Minister at Tokio, is sufficient to show
how ridiculous was the assumption of his
failure; but* apart from that question
every loyal Canadian will hope that the
utterance of so able a Minister will give
the necessary impetus to the appeal of
the Press ancl lead the Canadian Government to take early steps to ensure the
establishment of an Associated Press of
our own. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 25,  1908.
Short Story,
TOUCH AND GO.
By Archibald Dunn.
The sun had been blazing furiously
all day, and the "cool air of the evening" was as cool as thc hot room of a
Turkish bath.
"Phe-ew!"
Jack Carstairs extended his puttee-
encased legs to their full length,
threw his arms back over his head,
and, sinking more limply than ever
upon the ground, exclaimed again,
"Phe-ew!"
Half-a-dozen  throats   endorsed  thc
sentiment,  and  half-a-dozen  pairs  of  Srol,P  weic
legs stretched out in sympathy.
They belonged—these legs—to a
party of junior ollicers having the
honour to serve in Her Majesty's
Royal Die-Hard Fusiliers, and, having
carried their owners the whole blessed day under* an African sky, were
feeling just now not quite so well as
they looked. For the sumer heat of
Zululand is something to remember
when you have marched in it for a
•nd another shout greeted this sally. ]
A spasm of energy, too stirred the j
listeners for the first time that even-1
ing. It was always good fun drawing "Miss Frances"; and, however
exhausted and tired the Die-hards
might be, they were generally ready
for a bit of fun. Therefore tney
changed tlieir positions with a lazy
effort and slanted their eyes towards
the shaded corner.
The victim, however, responded
slowly. As a rule it was not his habit
to respond at all, diffidence being a
marked feature in his character, and
experience having taught him tlie wisdom of holding his tongue. But on
this occasion he had raised himself
to a sitting posture, and the expectant
not a little startled by
the angry look flashing from his face.
"1 wasn't thinking of my precious
skin," he said, turning to Carstairs,
and ignoring Johnson, "any more
than you were thinking of yours.
Ancl, to tell the truth, I'm sick of
you and your blather, Carstairs.
you're always posing as a hero, but
you don't seem to have done anything
wonderful as yet, except talk, and—
and"	
Drake sank back, with the sentence
period, and it takes the grit and backbone out of a Western race. Of loifmished. Never before in his life,
course it does this rarely, because it P^aps, had he ventured on such an
rarely gets the chance. But on the outburst; never before had the latent
present occasion there had been trou- sPirit of a man sIlown '" hlm so °Pe»-
ble up-country. Ukimbo's tribe had ^ and now> with the cffort made* the
a detach- sense °^ anger suddenly dwindled,
and in the reaction that followed he
been at their old tricks; and
ment of the Die-hards which had
gone forth to punish them were now
(so the news had come in) in a very
tight corner themselves. They could
hold out a couple of days, the messenger said—perhaps a little longer;
but they were only fifty muskets, and
Ukimbo meant business. Two thousand on the war-trail? Well, yes, two
thousand—possibly three or four.
Who could tell?
In such circumstances one does not
wait for the sun, or, for that matter,
for anything else; one simply goes
ahead!
marched solemnly on till their backs
and their arms and their legs ached
cowered abashed and afraid before
his own temerity.
But the anger of a gentle nature is
.1 powerful weapon because of its unexpectedness possilry, or because of
its justice; and when it comes, it
comes like a thunderbolt, creating the
surest havoc and consternation. In
this instance there was no one ready
with a reply. The listeners gaped
cpni-mouthed at the speaker, and for
a minute or more remained so, staring stupidly in astonishment; then, in-
And so lhe relief coiumn"had  stinctively   and   of  one   accord, they
turned to Carstairs. lie had brought
about thc difficulty; hc was the proper person to deal with it.    Bes:des
The Merchants Bank
Canada
Established 1864.
Capital, fully paid $6,000,000
Reserve Funds    4,000,000
Head Oflice: Montreal.
Banking By Mail.
Deposits and withdrawals can
be made by mail; no delay, and
will receive prompt attention.
Savings Bank Department.
Interest allowed quarterly at
highest current rate.
Victoria Branch: R. F. TAYLOR,
Manager.
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OF
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
PHONE 893. VICTORIA
Y. W. C. A.
1208 Government Street
VICTORIA.
Reading ancl rest rooms, lunch and
tea rooms. Instruction in English,
French, Music, Physical Culture,
Needlework, Domestic Science, etc.
Bible Class. Social evening every
Wednesday.
Y.M.C.A.
A home for young men away from
home. Comfortable Reading Room,
Library, Game Room, Billiards, Hot
and Cold Shower Baths, Gymnasium
and efficient instruction.
all together, and till their faces shriv*
clled  up like kippered  herrings,  and  tllL'>' had »ot ?«* knowl1 him at fau,t
their  mouths  had  grown  drier  than
any limekiln.
"Gad! I'd like to bc sitting in the
Empire—let me see—third row of the
stalls, with a great big whisky-and-
soda in front of me, and a great big,
beautiful, white, round crystal lump
of ice bobbing up and down in thc
middle."
"Johnson," said a growling voice,
"if 1 wasn't so dog-tired I'd get up
and punch your beastly head!"
"I will punch it," said another
voice, "when this business is over."
"And 1! "And I!" chimed in another and another.
"All right, old chaps," agreed thc
delinquent, indifferently; and then the
subject dropped.
Only one of thc group had refrained from taking part iu the discussion, lie lay somewhat out of the
circle, and while the others spoke he
listened silently and at intervals
glanced almost timidly f im face to
face. Thc light from some flickering
lamp reached him now and then—
when an intervening head chanced to
move aside—and presently Jack Carstairs looked that way.
"Hallo, young un! thinking about
tliat precious ..kin of yours ancl what's
going to happen to it to-morrov*.
ch?"
Carstairs was a man of some consequence among the subalterns—he
had been in action. True, it was a tin-
pot affair in which no one was hurt
except a few savages who were incontinently shot before they lia.l tin,.'
to put up a light; bin tliat w.i* hardly
the point. Thc point was ihat Carstairs had heen in action, and that in their midst,
none of the others had; and, there- tache seemed 1
fore, when Carstairs made a joke it
in an emergency.
It was the more disappointing,
therefore, to scc that Carstairs was
only laughing rather foolishly, and
that hc had nothing better to say
than they had; and the disappointment deepened still further when the
hero, having at last found his tongue,
fell back tamely on a schoolboy retort.
"You'll sing another tune to-morrow, my lad,' he said. "It's all jolly
line, you aud your Dutch courage,
when there isn't a nigger within ten
miles, but—you'll sing another tune
to-morrow, mark my words!"
Drake shrank farther back into the
gloom and answered nothing; and the
others, apart from a mild stare of astonishment, offered no comment.
Then Carstairs, stung suddenly to
passion by a sense of his own ineffectiveness, blurted out afresh, "Talk,
indeed! That's like your infernal impudence! Talk! There'll be something else than talk to-morrow, I can
tell you. And see lo it, my fine fellow, that you don't disgrace the regiment. There'll be no quarter, mind
yi 11—these infernal niggers don't give
quarter—it's sheer murder from start
to finish, and the regiment can't afford fiinkers on its muster-roll. So
see to il. my lad, that you keep that
pretty face of yours turned thc right
way about when the time comes,
when these howling brutes start
hacking   ;;t    the    square    with    their
knives, ami  when Talk,  indeed!
Why"	
"Mr.  Carstairs!"
A small, dapper man was standing
is iron-gray 111011s-
bristle at them as
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ie spoke, and hi-- keen eyes flashed
was bound to be a good joke. For with indignation,
which reason the answering laugh "Mr. Carstairs." he repeated, in a
was prompt and noisy. sharp, incisive voice, "1 have told you
"And I owe an apology," said before Ihat I will not allow convcrsa-
Johnson, "for mentioning the Empire tion of this sort among my officers,
with ladies present." Don't  let  me  hear any  repetition  of
"lu this wise did Johnson allude it"; and, without another word, he
to the "young un's" effiminate ap- turned on his heel and walked away,
pearance, and to the fact that Francis But as he presently passed along
Drake was known amongst the Royal tlie line of pickets, with a question
Die-hards as "Miss  Frances"  Drake; Continued Page 8.
Manitoba   Free   Press  on   file  for
Middle West visitors.
40 BROAD STREET
VICTORIA
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
Best Buy.
BEST   BUT  IN   VICTORIA  OP  BUSINESS PROPERTY. WITH WATER
FRONTAGE ON JAMES BAY.
Double Corner on Wharf and Government streets, with 100 foet water
frontage on James Bay. This property
has the Post Offlce to the North, the
C. P. R. Hotel to the East, Parliament
Huildings to the South, and a Steamship Company's wharf to the West of lt.
As an Hotel Site the situation of these
lots ls unrivaled ln the City of Victoria,
hundred of thousands of dollars have
been spent ln valuable Improvements on
all sides of them by the Provincial Government, the City Council and the
C. P. R.    Price $52,600.
Easy terms can be arranged with deferred payments bearing interest at 7
per cent.
For further particulars apply to
A. O. P. FRANCIS, Broker.
610 Pender Street,
VANCOUVER. B. C.
ST. ANDREWS
COLLEGE
TORONTO
A RcsiiWatial «»d Day School ior Boys
Handsome New Buildings. Larg-
Athletic Field. Carelul Oversight in
_very Department. First Class Staff.
Lower and Upper School, Boys prepared for the Universities and Business.
Calendar sent on Request.
Rev. D. Bruce Macdonald, M.A„LL.D»
Principal
Re-opens after Xmas on Jan. 8th, 1908.
WHY   NOT   HAVE   THE   BEST
THE REPUTATION OF
James Buchanan & Co'sSCOTCH   WHISKIES
Is world-wide, and stands for the BEST that can be produced
The following brands are for sale by all the leading dealers:
RED SEAL BLACK AND WHITE
ROYAL HOUSEHOLD      VERY OLD  LIQUEUR SCOTCH
RADIGER & JANION, Sole Agents for B.C.
CHRISTMAS
GOODS
Ward's Safety Razors
Curley Ideal Safety Razors
Whiltt's Razor Strops
I. X. L. Carving Sets
I. X. L. Pocket Cutlery
Boker's Pocket Cutlery
I. X. L. Table Cutlery
All in great variety and at right prices
FOR SALE BY
E.G. PRIOR &e©..
VIOTORIA,  VANOOUVER,  KAMLOOPS,  VERNON.
LTD.
LTY.
Established 1867
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
52 Uovernment St., Victoria, B. C.
Charles Hayward, President. F. Caselton, Manager.
We make a specialty of  Undertaking and Embalming,
An experienced certificated staff available at all times, day
and night.
Phones Nos. 48, 305, 404 or 594, Victoria.
The V. B. 6. Novelty Works
ran: antique, abtistio   aud
DESIGNED WOBK MADE TO OBDEB.
ABOHIT_BOTUBA__t
I am now ready to fulfil any orders for all kinds of Banks, Stores,
Offices, Churches, Barber Shops and Hotel Bar Fixtures and Furniture
1000 Gran-rills Street VAWOOUVEB, B. O.
T.  LsOAXB,  Proprietor.
Investigate the
"Cushman" flarine flotor
As good ns the best.   Cheaper than the rest.
BAXTER & JOHNSON 811 Government Street
Victoria, B. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 25, 1908
DISTRICT   OF  RUPERT. S.W., No.  23, which is seven and one-
TAKB  NOTICE  I.  T.   S.  McPherson, half miles in a northerly direction from
Agent of Victoria, B. C, intend to apply Crown Mountain and on Bank of Upper
for  a  special   timber  license  over  the Salmon River;  thence north 80 chains;
following described lands:
west  SO  chains;  north  80  chains;  east
SO   chains   to   point   of  commencement
No. 35—Commencing at a post planted
at  the  northeast  corner No. 35,  which
chains;  south  80  chains;  vest  is  marked  W.E.S.,  N.E.
which
is five miles distant in a northerly di*
north 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked  Dec.   20th,   1007.
No. 37—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S
No. 10—Commencing at a post plant- 80 chains to point of 'commencement,
ed at the southeast corner section 3,' No. 24—Commencing at a post planted rection from Crown Mountain; thence
township 25, marked T. S. McP., No. at the southeast corner NO. 24, marked south 80 chains; west 80 chains; north
10, which is two and one-quarter miles W.E.S., S.E„.No_. 24, which is eight.and' 80 chains; east 80 chains; to point of
northerly  from  west  arm  of Quatsino, one-half   miles   distant   in   a  northerly   commencement.
Sound, thence north SO chains; west 80 direction from Crown Mountain and one No. 36—Commencing at a post planted
chains, south 80 chains; east 80 chains* mile north of the Upper Salmon River; at the northeast corner marked W.E.S.,
to point of commencement. ' thence west 80 chains; north 80 chains;   N.E. No. 36, which is six miles distant
Dec.  19th,  1907. east 80 chains; south SO.chains to point  in   a   northerly   direction   from   Crown
No. 11—Commencing at a post plant-1 of commencement. Mountain and one-half a mile south of
ed at the southwest corner of section 2, No. 25—Commencing at a post planted. Upper Salmon River; thence west 80
township 25, marked McP. *F., No. 11, at the northwest corner marked W.E.S.,. chains; south'80 chains; east SO chains:
which is two and one-quarter miles N.W., No. 25, which is seven and one-
northerly from west Arm Quatsino1 half miies distant in a northerly direc-
Sound, thence east 160 chains; north 40 tion from Crown Mountain and on the
chains, west 160 chains;, sputh 40 chs.,' Bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
to point of commencement. south 80 chains; thence east SO chains;
Geo. H. Jackson, Agent.: north SO chains; west 80 chains to point  No.   37,   S.E.,   which  is  flve  miles  dis-
Staked Dec. 19, 1907. of commencement. tant in a southwesterly direction from
No. 12—Commencing at a post plant-      No. 26—Commencing at a post planted  West Lake,    Sayward    District;  thence
ed  one and  one-half  mile  iu  a  north-, at the northeast corner marked W.E.S,,   west  80  chains;  north  SO  chains;  east
westerly  direction   from   the  west   end  N.E., No.  26, which is  seven and one-   SO chains; south 80 chains  to point of
of Nah-Wi-Ti  Lake,  and  one-half  mile, half miles distant ln a northerly direc-   commencement.
west of S. E. Corner section 1, town-' tlon from Crown Mountain and on the No. 38—Commencing at a post planted
ship 33, thence west 40 chains; thence* bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
north ICO chains; thence east 40 chains;! south 80 chains; west 80 chains; north S.W. No. 38, which is flve miles distant
thence south 160 chains to point of 80 chains; east 80 chains to point of in a southwesterly direction from West
commencement,    containing    640    acres: eommeneement. Lake, Sayward District; thence east SO
more or less. . •      No. 27—Commencing at apost planted  chains;  north 80 chains; west 80 chains;
Staked Dec. 20, 1907. . . at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,   south  80 chains to point of commence-
No. 13—Commencing at a post plant-i S.E. No. 27, which is seven and one- ment.
ed one mlle In northwesterly direction: half miles distant in a northerly direc- No. 39—Commencing at a post planted
from west end of Nah-Wl-Ti Lake, and' tion from Crown Mountain and on the at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
at N. W. corner section 31, township Bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence S.E., No. 39, which Is three and one-half
25, thence south 80 chains; thence east: north SO chains; west 80 chains; south miles distant from the south end of
80    chains;    thence   north    80    chains;, 80  chains;  east  SO  chains  to  point  of  West Lake,  where it joins  the  line of
commencement. Lot  110;  thence  north  SO  chains;  west
No. 2S—Commencing at a post planted SO chains; south 80 chains; east So
at the northeast corner which is marked chains to point of commencement.
W.E.S. N.E. No. 2S, which is eight and No. 40—Commencing at a post planted
one-quarter miles distant in a north- at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
Ti Lake in northerly direction, half westerly direction from Crown Moun- s.W. No. 40, which is three and one-half
mile north of N. W. corner section 32, tain, and di. the'south bank of Upper miles In a southwesterly direction from
township 25; thence south SO chains; Salmon River; thence west 80 chains; the south end of West Lake, where it
thence east following shore line 80- south SO chains; east 80 chains; north joins line of Block 110; thence north SO
chains; therice north 80 chains; thence SO chains to point of commencement. chains; east SO chains; south 80 chains;
west SO chains to point of commence-* No. 29—Commencing at a post planted west SO chains to point of commencement, at the southeast corner marked W.E.S., ment.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907. S.E. No. 29, which is eight and one- No. 41—Commencing at a post plant-
No. 16—Commencing at a post plant- quarter miles distant in a northwesterly ed at the southeast cor. marked W.E.S.,
ed one-half mile north of* T. L. 13222, direction from Crown Mountain and on s.E. No. 41, which Is four miles distant
and at N. E. corner section 36, town- bank of Upper Salmon River; thence in an easterly direction from south end
ship 26, thence west 160 chains; thence west SO chains; north 80 chains; east of West Lake, on line of Block HO;
south 40 chains; thence east 160 chains; SO chains; south 80 chains to point of thence west 80 chains; north SO chains;
thence north 40 cliains to point of commencement. east SO chains; south SO chains to point
commencement. No. 30—Commencing at a post planted of commencement.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907. at the northeast corner marked W.E.S., No. 42—Commencing at a post planted
No. 17—Commencing at a post plant- N.E. No. 30, which is ten miles distant at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
ed one-half mile north of T. L. 13222, in a northwesterly direction from Crown s.W. No. 42, whieh is four miles distant
of W. Corner section 31, township 19, Mountain and on bank of Upper Salmon in an easterly direction from south end
thence east SO chains; thence south SO River; thence*80 ehains south', 80 chains of West Lake, on line Block 110; thence
chains; thence west 80 chains', thence west; 80 chains north; SO chains east east SO ehains; north SO chains; west
north SO chains to point of commence-   to  point  of  commencement.. 80 chains',  south SO chains  to point of
No. 31—Commencing at a post planted ■ commencement,
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S., No. 43—Commencing at a post planted
S.E. No. 31, which is ten and one-half at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
miles distant in a northwesterly direc- s.E. No. 43, which is one ancl one-half
tion from Crown Mountain and on the miles distant in a westerly direction
bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence from the south end of West Lake, where
.,. ,,-i.   *.-.,.„„-,-,.   .,   ,   .,-   t.   a* so   chains   north;   SO   chains   west;   80  it  joins  the line of  Block  110,   thence
1A.ICE_N0TICB  that_W.  E.  Simpson   chains south, SO chains east to point of   nortn so chains; west SO chatns; south
commencement. 80  chains;  east  SO  chains   to  point  of
Staked  Doc.  19,  1907. ■    commencement.
W.  E,  SIMPSON. No, 45—Commencing at a post planted
Jan. 25      Thomas S. McPherson, Agent.   at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
thence west 80 chains to point of com-:
mencement.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
No. 14—Commencing at a post plarit-j
ed one mile from west end of Nah-Wi-
| TRAVELLERS' GUIDE   |
 VICTOBIA
STRAND HOTEL
VICTORIA
The home ot all theatrical and Ttudef Ue
artists while in the Capital city, alt* of
other kindred bohemians.
WRIQHT & FALCONER. Proprietor*.
CAMBORNE
ment containing 640 acres, more or less.
Staked Dec.  20. 1907.
T.   S.   McPHERSON,
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Sayward.
of Iowa Falls, Banker, intends to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a spocial timber licence over
the following described lands thirty
days after date.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted
at tho southeast corner marked W.E.S.
S.E. No. 12, which is seven and one-half
miles distant and in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
Bank of Upper Salmon River; thonce
north *10 chains; west 160 chains
S.W. No. 45, which is one and one-half
mlles distant from the south end of
West  Lake,  where it joins  the line of
VICTOBIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Nootka.
TAKE NOTICE that W. E. Simpson of Block 110; thence north SO chains; east
Iowa Falls, Iowa, Banker, intends to ap- 80   chains;   south   SO   chains;   west   SO
ply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands chains to point of commencement.
 .,,,,,.   „n?'[b   and Works for a special timber licence No. 46—Commencing at a post planted
40 chains' east 160 chains to noint of over the following described lands 30 at the southwest corner which is mark-
1 ™',,,™ days after date. ed W.E.S., S.W., No. 46, which ls one
? No 13—Commencing at a nost nlanted No- 1—Commencing at a post planted mile distant and in a southeasterly dial the smrtffit mi m»fS WES at the southwest corner marked W.E.S., rection from West Lake adjoining Block
at__the_southeast corner, maiked..W.E.S.,   g^ ^  ^ ___hiQ._   .__ q_.  thfi soutboast 110.   thence  north   lli0  chaina;   east  40
bank  of  Upper  Campbell  Lake,   where * chains; south 160 chains; west 40 chains
it   cuts   the   C.P.R.   line;   thence   east to  point of commencement.
ti,   in una   following the C.P.R.   line  100  chains; No. 47—Commencing at a post planted
•nm-ti*.  -sn  ,.1-,-iins-  i-.ri.-t  sn nlmlna-  smith   north SO chains; thence following shoro at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
80 chains  toi noint: of commencement        l>"e ot' said lake to point of commence- S.W., No. 47, which is two miles, north-
8°No 'i"Icomme, cing at a posplanted   1110"t' «*_&&* 6'J° acrt6s mol'f « letssi i westerly from south end of West lake
*    - — T E ■_.        No. 3—Commencing at a post, planted where  it  joins   the  line  of  Block   110;
S.E. No. 13, which is eight mlles distant in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and one mile north of Upper
Salmon   River;   thence  west   SO   chains
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S
S.W. No. 14, which is eight miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and one mile north of bank
of  Upper  Salmon  River;   thence   north
at the southwest corner marked WB..S., thence north SO chains', east 80 chains;
S.W. No. 3, which is 20 chains distant south SO chains; west SO chains to point
in a northerly direction  from the south of commencement,
east  corner of T.  L.   14S64  and  thret-      No. 4S—Commencing at a post planted
80   chains;   east   80   chains;   south   SO  J1""'
ters of a mile fro mUpper Campbell   at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
chains; west 80 chains to point of com
mencement
Lake;  thence east  SO  chains;  north  80   s.E., No. 48, which is two miles distant
chains; west SO chains; south 80 chains   and  In  a  northwesterly direction  from
Our Store
HAS A FINE LINE OF HIGH
CLASS TOILET ARTICLES.
We have just imported a fine assortment of French and English Hair
Brushes.
SEE THE NEW-SHAPED
WHALEBONE BRUSH.
USE  BOWES'  BUTTERMILK
TOLIET  LOTION  FOR
CHAPPED HANDS.
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
Government Street, near Yates St.
VICTORIA, B. C.
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining men and
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
BANFF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
Banff's Most Popular $2 a Day Hotel.
Close to Station and Sulphur
Bath-.
N. K. LUXTON, Proprietor.
PHOENIX.
BOND SIGN CO.
VANCOUVER
Signs
Deane's Hotel
PHOENIX, B. C.
New. Modern hot water system. Electrio
lighted. Tub and shower baths and laundry I*
connection.   The miners' home.
'• DANNY " DEANE, Proprietor
ROSSLAND
ELECTRIC
BOARD
METAL
BULLETIN
GLASS
COTTON
SHOW CARD
the south end of West Lake,  where it
joins line of Block 110; thence north 80
No. 15—Commencing at a post planted to point of commencement,
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,      No. 4—Commencing at a post planted _     . ,,.,.,, ,,,
S.E. No. 15, which ls eight and one-half at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.. chains; west SO chains, south 80 chains
miles distant from Crown mountain and S.E.  No.  4,  which   is  one  mile  distant east  80  chains  to  point  of  commence*
15  chains  west  of Island Power  Com- in   a   northerly   direction   from   Upper ment.
pany's line near bank of Upper Salmon Campbell   Lake,  and   one  mile  east   of      No. 49—Commencing at a post planted
River;   thence   north   100   chains;   west T. L. 14SG4, thence west SO chains; north at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
64   chains;   south   100   chains;   east   64 80   chains;   east   80   chains',   south   80 S.W. No. 41), which is three and one-half
chains  to  point  of  commencement. chains  to  point  of  commencement. miles   distant  in   an   easterly   direction
No. 16—Commencing at a post plant-      No. 5—Commencing at a post planted from centre of shore line of West Lake,
ed at the southeast corner marked W. at the southwest corner marked W.E.S., thence east SO chains; north SO chains;
E. S., S.E. No. 16, which is nine miles S.W. No. 5, which is one mile distant in west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains
distant  in   a   northerly  direction   from ?» northerly direction from Upper Camp- to point of commencement.
Crown Mountain  and one and  one-half bell  Lake,  and  one mile east of T.  L.      jj0  gQ Commencing at a post planted
miles  north  of  stake  12,  on  the  Bank 14S64; thenoo SO chains north; 80 chains t t)l'e southeast corner   marked W.E.S,
of   the   Upper   Salmon   River;    thence east;   80  chains  south',   SO  chains  west gB  jj0   50  w'hlch ls three and one-half
north 40 chains; west 160 chains; south to point of commencement. m^es   dlstant  in  an  easterly  direction
40 chains;  east  160  chains  to point  of      No. 6—Commencing at a post planted jrom the centre of shore line on West
commencement. .    ... at the southeast corner marked W.E.S, Lake   thence west 80 chains;  north SO
No. 17—Commencing at a post planted   s.E.   No.   6,   which   is   situated   on   the
chains', east SO chains; south SO chains
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,   north   shore   of  Upper   Campbell   Lake,   tn'nnint nf commencement
S. E. No. 17, which is nine and one-half on   the  C.P.R.    line;     thence    west  40  t0 p'"nt 0L <mmilL    unem'
miles  distant   in   a  northerly  direction   chains; north 160 chains; east 40 chains;
from Crown Mountain and two and one-  south 160 chains to point of commence-
half   miles   north   of   bank   of   Upper  ment.
Salmon  River;  thence west  80  chains',      No   7_Commenclng at a post planted
north 80  chains;  east 80 chains^ south   at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 7, which Is about four miles in
a  northwesterly  direction   from   Crown
Mountain; thence north 80 chains; west
80   chains;   south   80   chains;   east   80
80 chains to point of commencement
No. 18—Commencing at a post planted at the southwest corner marked W.
E. S., S.W.,  No.  18, which Is nine and   _i:   .,„.,,,_    ,,,„,l,,   „„   ,,„ ,    .„.,
one-half miles in a northerly direction  chalns  t0 'point of commencement.
^7n?iZno^^fta^P\nr(1slZoannRi°vnet      No. S-Commenc.ng at a post planted
thence east  SO  chains north  80 chains',
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
No. 51—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S..
S.E. No. 51, which is flve miles from
the south end of West lake, where it
joins the line of Block 110; thence north
80 chains', west SO chains; south SO
chains', east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Deo. 15, 1907.
No. 52—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 52, which is six miles westerly
from the south end of West Lake where
west SO chains; south 80 chains to point S.E.  No.  8   which  Is five miles distant   u jo|ns „ne of Bln(.k ]10, thence north
nf nnmmennpment ■•■    il   noruien.*.    rtnet lion    n om   uiown
NrTin   Commencing at a nost nlanted Mountain; thence north SO chains; west
at the s^thwe"^ c" rner marited W E S. SO   chains;   south   80   chains;   east   80
SW  No,19, which is ten am! one-half chains to point of commencement,
miles  distant   in  a  northerly  direction Staked Dec.  16th,  1907.
from Crown  Mountain and  three  miles No. 9—Commencing at a post planted
northerly  and  westerly  from  post  No. at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
12,   on   bank   of  Upper   Salmon   River; S.E. No. 9, which ls four mlles distant
thence north SO chains; east 80 chains; in   a   northerly   direction   tmm   Crown
south 80 chains; west 80 chains to point Mountain; thence north 160 chains; west
of commencement. 40   chains;   south   160   chains;   east   40
No. 20—Commencing at the southeast chains to point of commencement,
corner marked    W.E.S.,    S.E,    No.   20, No. 10—Commencing at a pest planted  at~ the"southeast" corner'marked W.E.S.,
which is ten and one-half miles distant at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,   s E   No   54, which Is two and one-half
in   a   northerly   direction   from   Crown g E _ No   10p which is two miles distant   miles   distant  in   an  easterly  direction
Mountain and three miles northwesterly ln a northerly direction from where the   from the north end of West lake, thence
from stake 12, on the bank of the Up- c.P.R. line cuts the north shore of Up-   west  80  chains;   north  80  chains;  east
per Salmon    River,    thence    north   so per   Campbell   Lake;    thence   west   SO   s0 chains; south SO chains to point of
chains; west SO chains; south SO chains, chains; north SO chains; east SO chains;   commencement.
east  SO  chains  to point  of commence- sotlth 80 cila|ns to point of commence-      No. 55—Commencing at a post planted
ment.                                                 „,„„,_,,. ment.                                                                at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
No. 21—Commencing at a post planted Nq_ j^c^,,^,,^,,,,. at a poat pIante<i   s.W. No. 55, which is two and one-half
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S., miles distant westerly from the north
No. 11, which is three miles distant in end of AVest lake; thence east 100 chains;
northerly  direction   from   where  C.P.R.   north 40 chains; west 40 chains; north
80 chains; west SO chains; south SO
chains', east 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 53—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 53, which ls six miles in a
westerly direction from the south end
of West lake, where it joins line of
Lot 110; thence north 80 chains; east
SO chains; south 80 chains; west 80
chains  to point of commencement.
No. 54—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S..
S.E. No. 21, which is eleven and one-
half miles distant In a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and four
miles In a northwesterly direction from
stake 12, on the Bank of Up'per Salmon
River; thence north 80 chains; west SO
chains; south 80 chains; east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 22—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 22, which is eleven and one-
half miles distant In a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and four
mlles In a northwesterly dlrectton from
stake 12, on the Bank of the Upper
Salmon River; thence north 80 chains;
enst SO chains; south 80 chains; west
80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. i8th, 1907.
line cuts north shore of Upper Campbell Lake, thence north 40 chains; west
160 chains; south 40 chains; east 160
chains  to point of commencement.
Staked Dec.   17,   1907.
No. 32—Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner marked W.E.S.,
N.W. No. 32, which is six miles distant
In a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain, and one-half mile south of
Upper Salmon River, thence east 80
chains; south SO chains; west SO chains,
north 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 34—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner No. 24, marked
W.E.S., N.E. No. 34. which is three miles
40   chains;   west   00   chains;   south   SO
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 14th, 1907.
W. E. SIMPSON,
Dec. 14, 1907   Thos.  S.  McPherson,  Agent.
SWEDISH
PASSAGE
TURKISH BATHS.
VIBRATOR TREATMENT.
MR.   BJORNFELT,   SWEDISH
MASSEUR.
Special  Massage  and  Hometreat-
ment by appointments.
Room 2, Vernon Block, Douglas
Street, Victoria.
Hours—11 to 12 a.m.   Phone 1629.
Hoffman House
ROSSLAND, B. C.
Rates $1.00 per day and up.   Cafe in
Connection.
QREEN & SHITH. Prop's.
NELSON.
HOTEL HUME
NELSON,   B. C,
Leading Hotel of the Kootontys.
J. FRED HUME,       -       Proprietor.
Silver King Hotel,
NELSON,  B. C.
The home of the Industrial Workers
ofthe KimiiMnus
W. B. ricCandii&h,
Proprietor
Royal Hotel
NELSON, B. C.
Tho Best Family Hotel in ths City.
$1.00 a day.
Mrs. Wm. Roberts,
Proprietress
HOLLY TREES
Price* irom 35 et»U to $5.00, according
to mc Write for iced tad tree cata-
V*
JAY & CO.
VICTORIA, B. C.
No. 23—Commencing at a post planted  distant   in  a  northerly  direction   from
at the southwest corner inarked W.E.S., Crown Mountain; tbence south SO chains,
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District nf Nootka.
Nn.  2—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner mnrked W.E.S.,
S.E.  No.   2,   situate  on  the  west  Bank
Upper Campbell Lake, where thc C.P.R.
line cuts same; thence west SO chains;
north 120 chains; east 40 chains; south
80   chains;   enst   40   chains;   south   40
chains   tn   point   of   commencement.
Staked  December  16th,   1907.
WILLIAM E. SIMPSON,
Dec. 16, '07.        T.  S.   McPherson.   Agent.
Pantage's
Theatre
JOHNSON STREET
VICTORIA, B. C.
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE
Matinees (any part of house).... 10c
Evenings, Balcony  10c
Lower Floor  20c
Boxes    S0c
Matinees
Every Afternoon
at
3 O'CIock.
Night Performances
8 and 9.15
BEDDING
PLANTS
Cheap Pi ices.   Get our price list.
Johnston's Seed Store
City Market
VICTORIA
Victoria
FRUIT
and
Farm Lands
Write  for "Home  List" and
information.
R.   S.   DAY
and
BEAUMONT BOGGS
Realty Brokers.
620 POET  STBEET TIOTOBIA.
THOMAS CATTEBA1I,
Builder  and  Ventral  Contractor.
Tenders   elvei.   on  Brick, Stone   an
Frame, Alterations, Parquetry Floorlni
Offlce, Bank, Store and Saloon Fitting!
Pile Driving, Wharres and Dock Shed:
constructed and repaired.
TIOTOBIA. THE WEEK, SATURDAY JANUARY 25, 1908
_t 9-fl?
* A Lady's Letter *
Y By  BABETTE. *f
^9|f'^-%^^**)^'%*%-)^*?j?9j?*^?
Dear Madge:
I have spent Christmas in Mexico,
the land of eternal springtime, where
the warm sun does not let mother
earth sleep, but continually forces
from her new blossoms day after
day. These mature quickly and form
lucious fruits of mellow sweetness,
while other tender buds are but
breaking through their nests of dainty
green. Thus does it seem to me
like a land of perpetual spring.
Now I must tell you of the quaint
"posadas" which are held every night
for nine nights before Christmas.
Typically Mexican, there are not many
foreigners who are privileged to see
a genuine series of these quaint feasts.
Luckily for me, kind friends arranged
that I might be present at one and
I found it most impressive and interesting. These posadas are called
jornadas in some parts of Mexico,
and both words have a peculiar significance, posada referring to the
lodging, and Jornada to the day's
journey. The legend goes that Joseph
and Mary traveled from Nazareth to
Bethlehem in nine days, and that each
night they had to beg their lodging
or posada. It is the begging for this
lodging that gives the novena or nine
days before Christmas their peculiar
religious significance, not observed
indeed, in the churches but recognized by the Mexicans who always
place very high those ancient Roman
virtues of respect for home and family life.
The journey of these two humble
subjects of the Roman Empire to
the town of their legal residence,
Bethlehem of Belen, (as it is called in
Spanish), for the taking of the census
as ordered by Augustus Caesar is thus
commemorated nightly in all Mexican
homes from December 16 to 24 the
feasts terminating on Christmas eve
with all ceremony and pomp. Several families usually arrange to hold
their posadas together, and each
family entertains the others on one
of the nights of the novenas. The
party assembles at a little after 7
o'clock in the appointed house and
each member of the party is provided
with a candle, the servants and retainers of the household being included in the party on these occasions. A procession is formed headed
by two pilgrims represented by little
statuettes, Joseph on foot and Mary
mounted on an ass, or burro, which
Joseph leads. Above the figures
hovers another, that of an angel. The
figures are usually rude, like those
sold in the Alemada about this time,
but the details of the Virgin's face,
Joseph's beard and the patient gray
burro are carried out faithfully, although the personal equation of the
sculptor enters largely into the makeup. The pair are represented as
Mexicans of the lower class, not far
off from the truth of the lowly origin
of the holy couple.
Thc procession which the chosen
people who carry the figures of Joseph and Mary head, marches down
the corridor of the house, and along
the walks of the garden, with a choir
of ladies and girls, singing the Virgin's litany of Goretto. This finished
a portion of the party enters the
drawing room and acts as its owner
in the dialogue with the pilgrims
outside. The knock, at the door, and
the appeal for a night's lodging is
met with a gruff reply and an order
to begone. But the pilgrims persist,
in a fascinating old chant, like the
litany of a mediaeval church, and
finally the obdurate householder relents, and the pair enter. They arc
given quarters in a corner of the
room, where a quaint service is held,
in which all present take part.
Prayers are offered up by a priest
if one is present and more chants are
sung. The following is a sample of
the mediaeval chant, with its translations:
Oh peregrina agraciada
Oh purisima  Maria
Yo te afrezcoel alma mia,
Para que tengais posada, etc.
O gracious pilgrim
0 purest Mary
1 offer thee my soul
To be thy refuge, etc.
The religious part of the evening
ends with this little service before
the shrine. Its close is a signal for
the youngsters, and with an assurance born of tradition they demand
sweets and a collation is passed, with
candies and little pottery toys, etc.,
that are sold in great numbers about
Xmas time. These toys are always
kept as souvenirs.
The breaking of the "pinata" then
follows, and is one of the chief features of the evening. This pinata is
nothing more than one of the big
earthenware water jars, decorated
with tissue paper tinsel, and in the
handsomer ones enveloped in great
papier mache figures of angels, men
and women of all types and races.
The pinata is filled with little presents of various sorts, clay figures
and dolls and in many cases with presents of silver and mechanical toys of
value.
This pinata is hung up either in
the middle of the room, the doorway
or in the veranda. Each member of
the party is then given a chance to
break it with three blows, being first
blindfolded and turned around three
times. This adds to the jollity of
the occasion, as those in the room
have sometimes to exercise agility in
avoiding strong blows meant to shatter the pinata, and which may cause
damage to sundry craniums. Once
the pinata is broken the whole company joins in the scramble for the
presents which  tumble to the  floor.
On Christmas eve, or the "Noche
Buena," the service and the fun both
exceed those of all the other nights.
The service of asking for lodging is
much the same, except that this time,
which marks the anniversary of the
arrival of Joseph and Mary in Bethlehem, they are lodged in a stable,
represented in one corner of the
drawing room. The special ceremony
of the evening waits until midnight.
Fifteen minutes before the midnight hour, the exercises of the
"Noche Buena" begin with the singing of the litany of the Nino Dios.
The last ten minutes are give., to
the singing of the Rorro for the
soothing of the Infant Jesus. This
Rorro is a beautiful typical epitome of
the songs of Mexican mothers to
their babies. At 12 o'clock the ceremony of the laying of the Nino Dios
in His manger takes place. A curtain
is drawn from a miniature representation of the scene described in the
New Testament, disclosing the stable
with Mary and Joseph and a brilliant
star marking the spot where the
young Christ is to lie. With the laying of the child in his cradle the
ceremony of the Nativity is completed. The typical supper follows,
and is made up of peculiar dishes, lavishly furnished, for the hosts of the
evening are always the wealthiest
and most generous of the families
who have observed the posadas together.
After supper dancing commences,
the host leading off with the honoured lady guest of the evening.
The feasts are still very generally
observed, although in some cases the
religious part is not kept up with the
interest of old times and indeed, in
mnny cases the social features far outshine the religious.
The Wheelbarrow.
The farmer's son looked up from
the sporting page.
"By heck," he said, "I wish we had
one o' them there horseless carriages."
"We have," returned the farmer;
"and now that you mention it, you
might just as well get it and fetch
up a load of turnips from the three-
acre lot."—Exchange.
WEEK 27th JANUAEY.
The New Grand
SULLIVAN A COMIBIHE,    fr.prl.4o™.
THE MUSICAL HAWAIIANS
High-class Singers and Instrumentalists—Five People—Serenading
Scene in Honolulu — Native
Dance and Songs of Hawaii.
JAMES R. WAITTE & CO.
Nautical  Tabloid  Comedy-Drama,
"At Lighthouse Point."
Edw. Ethel
ARMSTRONG AND DAVIS
Musical    Comedy    Sketch,    "The
Amateur   Chauffeur."
MEUNOTEE-LANOLE DUO
Tight-Wire Artists.
LAURETTA BOYD
Singing Comedienne,
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrator
"Down in the Old Cherry Orchard"
NEW MOVING PICTURES
"The Pirates."
"The Enchanted Pond."
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M. Nagel, Director.
Selections from "La Modiste," by
Victor Herbert.
EQUIP YOUBSELF
WITH  A THOBOUOH
BUSINESS COUBSE
SHOBTHAND
TYPEWBITING
BOOKKEEPING
Day and Night Classes. You can
enter school any time. Individual
Instruction. A diploma from this
school will enable you to secure and
hold a position with the best firms.
Terms reasonable.
For particulars write or call
THE   SHOBTHAND  SCHOOL
1109 Broad Street Viotoria, B.C.
E. A. MacMillan.
LADIES       SWEDISH       OEHTS
MASSAGE
Turkish Baths
VIBBAT0B  TBEATMENT
MB.     B-JOBXTFELT,     SWEDISH
MASSEUB.
Special   Massage and Hometreat-
ment by appointments.
Boom 2, Vernon Blk., Douglas St.
Body Development.
Hours 1 to 6. Phone 1629.
1THEATR
Herbert
Witherspoon
(BASSO)
MONDAY,   JANUABY  27TH
FBICESi $2.60, 92.00 and $1.00.
Gallery, 50c.
The Box Offlce will be opened at tlie
Victoria Theatre at 10 a.m. on Friday,
January 24th.
Lovers of sport will have no difficulty in finding enjoyment this afternoon, as sufficient games havc been
arranged to give every devotee his
choice.
In rugby, the James Bay team will
try conclusions with thc McGill College of Vancouver. This game will
be played at Beacon Hill owing to
the Oak Bay ground being in use.
In association, the Y.M.C.A. intermediates will run up against the
Ladysmith intermediates, and previous to this game the North Ward
Juniors will play the Nanaimo Juniors. While the association football
is going on, the adjoining ground will
be occupied by the hockey players.
The Victoria teams, both ladies and
men, will have for their opponents the
Vancouver clubs. In the morning the
High School girls will met the representatives from the Vancouver High
School. In the evening the High
School basketball teams from Vancouver and Victoria will line up
against each other. With this attractions to select from there is no reason why each should not be well patronized.
TIMBER
If you have any
timber for sale
list it with us
We can sell it
BURNETT, SON  & CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,   B. C.
The days ue getting Cold.
iTHE
WILSON BAR
Is Warm and Comfortable.
VISIT IT.
648 Yates St, Victoria B. C.
COAL
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Pictoria Agents for the Nanaimo Collierlei.
New Wellington Coal.
The best household coal in the marke  at
alfir
- _.. .... ..wh..^..uiu .uw iu  m.  ui.,..
Current rates.   Anthracite coal fir sale.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA
Holland French and
Japan Bulbs
For Pall Planting.
SEEDS, TREES, PLANTS
for the farm, garden, lawn, boulevard   or   conservatory.    Acclimated
stock.   Oldest established nursery on
the Mainland of B. C.   Catalogue free.
M. J. HENRY,
3010 Westminster Rd, Vancouver, B.C.
P
il I fcrl\ I S  and Trade Marks
obtained in all countriei.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville St.
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
Leave Your Baggage Checks at the
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.      A. E. KENT, Proprietor
LATEST NUMBERS
English
Magazine
CHUMS
TIT-BITS
THE STRAND
PEARSONS
PUNCH
KNIQHT'SBOOKSTORE
TIOTOBIA, B. 0.
LLOYD & CO., chimney sweepers
and house-cleaners, 716 Pandora
St. Satisfaction and cleanliness
guaranteed. All orders by post or
otherwise promptly attended to.
Trial respectfully solicited.
PHONE 191.
Will You Take
$500 a Year...
for your spare time. In other
words the man who has a couple
of hours morning and evening
and will employ it in operating
A Cyphers Incubator
at his home can make from $500
in twelve months. We have a
unique plan to work on and will
be pleased to explain it to any
one interested.    Call or write.
Watson &
McGregor
647 Johnson  Street,
VICTORIA, B. C.
SEEDS, TREES, PLANTS,
for the farm, garden, lawn, boulevard or conservatory. Acclimatised
stock. Oldest established nursery on
the Mainland.   Catalogue free.
M. J.  HENRY
3010 Westminster  Road, Vancouver
fc*\-V«*
AU Hands
Busy
AT
Fit-Reform Wardrobe
OPENING    UP    LARGE
SHIPMENTS    OF    NEW
SPRING GOODS.
1
*
'      We want you to see the   '
new SUITS with the long,
1   wide, soft roll lapels. ' 1
COATS cut a trifle short-
|   er   and   semi-form   fitting.
'   TROUSERS   in   handsome
t   stripes,    checks    and   mix-   <
tures,   in   grays,   and   new
,   shades in olives and browns.
ALLEN & CO.
Fit=Reform
Wardrobe
iaoi   GOVERNMENT  ST.,
f Victoria, B. C.
ty-Wlp-**-**
New House to Rent, or
For Sale.
I have for immediate possession to
rent or will sell on very easy terms
—small cash payment—one of the
best built dwellings in the city. Only
IS minutes' walk from Post Office,
and one block from car line. Situated in one of the best residential
sections.
Bungalow, with large balcony,
seven-roomed house, absolutely new,
with full sized cement basement, concrete floor; electric light in every
room in the house. Hot and cold
water equipment; heavy porcelain
wash bowl and bath, also separate
toilet in basement. Laundry in the
basement equipped with latest concrete tubs and hot and cold water.
Walk has been laid in extra heavy
concrete from street to verandah
steps. This is a proposition that will
be snapped up quickly. Call or
phone 1543-
G. W. DEAN
Adelphi Block   -   VICTORIA, B.C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 25, 1908.
Splendid Address.
By Mr. Thomas Taylor, Member for Revelstoke, in
Moving the Reply to Address Prom Throne.
Mr. Thomas Taylor, the member
for Revelstoke, is best known in Victoria, as the hard-working party whip,
whose chief duty it ls to keep the
Conservative members together and
to produce them in the House whenever a vote is taken. There is not
a man who has access to the corridors of the Legislative Assembly who
is not familiar with the indefatigable
labours of Mr. Taylor; there is no
busier and no harder-worked man in
the House. His duties are not only
arduous, but sometimes difficult and
occasionally delicate. He discharges
them with infinite tact, and in so doing has secured the respect of every
member of the House.
Premier McBride voiced a very
general opinion when he said on
Wednesday lnst that Mr. Taylor
might with grent advantage to the
House address it oftener. His contributions to the debate are few and
far between; no doubt this is due in
part to the demands made upon his
time by the office which he fills, but
all who know Mr. Taylor attribute it
also to his modesty. After his splendid address, which is given verbatim
below, the regret at his rare appearance as a debater will be increased.
It is not to detract from the value ot
the important utterances that have
fallen from more prominent members
to say that no abler, more lucid, more
incisive, or more weighty address has
been delivered in the House for many
sessions. As a review of the measures and policy indicated by the
Lieutenant-Governor's address, it is
admirable in every respect. Devoid
of the arts or artifices of the rhetorician, it is a calm, logical, convincing
statement. The language is that
which befits a legislative assembly,
and presents a marked contrast to the
impassioned and emotional appeals
which too often obtrude themselves
in debate. Mr. Taylor's manner was
as admirable as his matter. He stood
erect, with one hand resting upon his
desk, the other straight beside him.
He made no gestures, and rarely
raised his voice above the level of a
serious, reflective debater. His whole
air was strongly reminiscent of the
type of debater familiar to those who
have sat in the galleries of the British House of Commons. Those who
read the address, as printed below,
will agree that for style, lucidity and
well chosen language, it forms a
model for all Parliamentary debaters.
Mr. Taylor, in moving the address
in reply to the speech from the throne
said:
"Mr. Speaker,—In rising to move
the reply to the speech from the
throne, I wish to record my appreciation of the distinction accorded the
constituency I represent in tllis Legislature, and th" responsibility and
honour conferred on me by appointment to this time-honoured task.
During the recess extending over a
period of ten months, some very important public questions have engaged
the attention of the public of this
Province. Standing out prominently
—in fact, transcending all other public questions relating to the future
welfare and development of this Province is the all-absorbing question of
'Oriental Immigration.' During the
eight years in which I have had the
honour of a seat on the floor of this
House, this question has been as
often before the different Parliaments.
Session following session, legislation
has been introduced to meet the situation, and which has invariably received the unanimous support of the
members of the House. For many
yenrs this legislation has partaken of
the nature of the Natal Act, which is
in force now and has been for many
years in some of our sister colonies-
its chief provision, an educational
test imposed upon all incoming immigrants.
"Our authority and jurisdiction   to
deal with questions of this nature we
contend is vested in our Legislatures,
under the ternis of the British North
American Act. Our legislation, however, has been disallowed on coming
■ before the Liberal Government at Ottawa; the grounds for such disallowance being given as contrary to Imperial policy ultra vires of the Province, and not in accordance with Dominion policy. It is a matter of record, however, that in two almost
similarly worded despatches in 1898-9,
addressed to the then Governor-General of Canada, Right Hon. Joseph
Chamberlain, then Colonial Secretary,
advised that the passage of an Act
similarly worded to the Natal Act
which was shortly to be adopted in
Australia, and which has since been
put in force, would meet the situation
and be acceptable to the Imperial
authorities. The agitation on this
question in British Columbia dates
back to nearly thirty years ago, and
in its early stage was directed
against Chinese immigration. The
influx of Chinese at that date brought
nbout a state of affairs which called
for some action on behalf of the authorities.
"in 1885 the Hon. Mr. Chapleau was
commissioned by the Dominion Government to enquire into this question,
nnd as a result of his inquiries a head
tax of $50 was imposed on all incoming Chinese; this was later, in 1891,
increased to $100 a head, and again
in 1903, as a result of the findings of
a Commission of Inquiry, known as
the Oriental Commission—this head
tax was again increased to $500. This
action on the part of the Dominion
Government has had the result of
practically restricting altogether the
immigration of coolie labour from the
Empire of China.
Japanese Immigration.
"The Commission above mentioned,
referring to the matter of Japanese
immigration, recommended the passage of the Natal Act, if the absolute
restriction of Japanese could not be
effected by any other method. Some
negotiations were entered into, apparently between the governments of
Japan and' Ottawa, dealing with the
restriction of immigration from
Japan, and we were told repeatedly
by the Premier of Canada, as well as
by his Minister, Hon. Mr. Fisher, thnt
a written agreement existed between
the Japanese government which
would restrict the immigration from
Japan to a limited number not to exceed four or five hundred yearly. At
the 1907 meeting of the Federal
House, a treaty was ratified giving to
the Japanese the right of free and unrestricted entry into any part of Canada, and as a result of this no less
than ten thousand Japanese came on
our shores, during the year 1907.
The Premier of Canada, now declares in vindication of his Government's action, that thc written assurances of the Government of Japan as
to the restriction of immigration was
sufficient justification for thc ratification of thnt trenty. Does it not
occur to us, however, as British
Columbians, that if necessary for any
restriction existed, that that restriction should be part and parcel of the
trenty. However, we can understand
the Premier of Canada in his attitude
at this question—we can understand
it is a difficult matter indeed to bring
arguments to bear with Eastern Can-
ndians ns to thc difficulties surrounding this question. This wns clearly
demonstrated by the attitude of the
Premier in addressing a meeting at
Ottawa a few weeks ago, during the
progress of a bye-election, when hc
declared thnt British Columbia's attitude on thnt question wns wrong,
nnd our sentiments were wrong. As
I sny, we can understand the apathy
of Easterners who are not at all ac-
qunintcd with the conditions surrounding this class of immigration,
but what can be said of the course
followed by the seven Liberal members that this Province sends to Ottawa, and who certainly should be
well acquainted with the different issues involved?
Members at Ottawa.
"Hon. Mr. Templeman, whom Victorians have sent to Ottawa as Minister of the Crown for British Columbia, should be, owing to his long residence here, thoroughly conversant
with this question. The Liberal-Labor leader, Mr. Smith, of Nanaimo,
should also be very conversant with
the evil effects of Japanese unrestricted immigration. Mr. Smith has,
in his career, rubbed elbows in the
mines of this country with the sons
of the "Rising Sun." I well remember
the time when, as a member of this
House, Mr. Smith could most entertainingly nud intelligently discuss
this question, and his arguments always appealed to mc as carrying
grent force. Mr. Macpherson, of Vancouver, should also be familiar with
this question; but is it not extraordinary that those gentlemen, together
with the other members at Ottawa
from British Columbia, should on the
occasion of the ratification of the
treaty take so little interest in our
welfare and in our homes, as to allow
the confirmation of this treaty providing for unrestricted immigration
into this country, without raising
their voices in protest against it? But
MR.  THOMAS  TAYLOR,
M.P.P. for Revelstoke.
those sclf-snme gentlemen, representing us nt Ottawa must feel in no
small mensurc the blame and responsibility for those unfortunate occurrences which transpired a few months
ago in the city of Vnncouver. When
this influx was nt its height, nnd
steamer nfter steamer was unloading
its cargo of human freight on our
shores, hnd those gentlemen put up a
defence against the ratification of the
trenty unless the written assurance,
which we now hear so much nbout,
being pnrt and pnrcel of that treaty,
nnd fought the issue ns British Columbians, I am convinced that something might hnve materialized from
their efforts in this direction. It was
their plain duty to defend British Columbia on this question, until such
time as their defence received recognition or else continue the fight until
the Government would be compelled
to withdraw the treaty altogether.
Vancouver Riots.
"I am not one of those who would
wish to condone, or appear to condone rioting or mob violence under
any circumstances, We belong to -1
nice that dwells under the protection
of the flag of nn Empire, which for
centuries hns been the 'Beacon Light'
of advancing civilization and intelligent citizenship, which in all countries and climes wherever it floats is
the emblem of protection nnd of justice to all who come under its folds,
be they white, brown or blnck; but T
do sny, thnt on thc ocension of these
riots  in  the  city  of Vancouver,    of
which fact the whole world has had
notification through our press, and of
which the criticism in some directions
is very marked, the provocation was
wry great, but such a provocation
never could have arisen if our Liberal
members at Ottawa had taken advantage of the occasion and fought this
issue to the bitter end, in defence of
our home and the future development
and welfare of the Province of British
Columbia.
"Better Terms."
"The speech from the throne refers
to the question of 'Better Terms,' and
the Premier's mission to England in
connection therewith, as representative of British Columbia. It will be
remembered that shortly before the
prorogation of this Legislature lnst
year, the Premier wns obliged to proceed to England to protest against
the force of Imperial sanction being
given to certain resolutions and arrangements arrived at, at a conference, of premiers nt Ottawa, in the
year 1906, nnd to which British Columbia, represented by the Hon. Richard McBride, was not an assenting
party. The thanks of the country are
due the honourable gentleman for the
successful culmination of his visit to
the foot of the throne. The people
of British Columbia are not unmindful of the efforts put forward by the
honourable Premier at Ottawa and
doubly thankful are they at the outcome of his mission to England. The
disparaging and malicious reflections
and reports of the Liberal press of
British Columbia as to the possible
outcome of his negotintions in England must, by all, be well remembered. It was clearly apparent that it
wns the expectation and wish of thnt
press thnt his efforts in England in
defending British Columbia's case,
would be unfruitful of any good results; but I am proud to sny. ns a
supporter of that honourable gentleman, and also as a resident of British
Columbia for many years, that his
mission was entirely successful, and
never in the history of British Columbia has any of her citizens created a
better impression, or received a more
hearty and enthusiastic reception on
his home-coming, than did the honourable gentleman on his return from
his mission to England. I hnve yet
to hear any honourable gentleman,
either in tllis House or out of it, say
that the treatment accorded Britisli
Columbia at that conference, where it
was proposed to settle British Columbia's financial affairs, finally and forever, that the amount proposed to bc
granted of one hundred thousand dollars a year, for ten years, was in any
way adequate to meet the conditions
which we nre confronted with here
to-day. That being the case, would
it not havc been most cruelly unjust
for the future of British Columbia
that the resolution and imposition of
thnt conference should receive Imperial sanction as final and unaltera' Ic?
Mr. Fielding's Attitude.
"Hon. Mr. Fielding, Finance Minister at Ottawa, in a discusison of this
question a few weeks ago, ns reported
in Hansard, says: 'That the Premier
of British Columbia came to thc conference with the determination that
anything you could do for him would
not satisfy him; that instead of coming there to get an arrangement for
British Columbia, he came there to
get a grievance.' Undoubtedly, Mr.
Spenker, he got that grievance, nnd
thc electorate of British Columbia apparently felt that his grievance hnd
some weight, when on the occasion
nf his appeal to thc country lnst February, shortly nfter his return from
England, he was endorsed by the
electorate of this Province in such a
splendidly hnndsome manner. ■ Mr,
Fielding further says thnt 'we entered
Confederation of our own free will,
and if wc nre asked to live up to thc
terms of Confederation our people
should not complain'—our people, hc
says, nre not a party of children, nnd
they do not require nny 'baby act' for
their protection. British Cottlmbians
nre not children, neither do we require a 'baby act' for our protection;
but I submit, sir, when we can demonstrate by conclusive argument
nnd statistics that British Columbia
has not received fair treatment, and
that we have not been treated by Ot
tawa in accordance with the spirit!
or interest of the terms of union, that I
our case should be fought out deter-[
minedly until such time as we can secure the treatment which is due us.
Is it possible that the fathers of Con- I
federation ever anticipated or intend- [
ed that we, as citizens of this Western Province should be penalized, as
it were, for joining the Confederation
of the Province. No; on the other
hand, it was clearly the intention and
purpose of that union that each and
every Province should have an opportunity of presenting its case to the
proper authorities at Ottawa, and, if
it was found that a grievance existed,
it was the duty, and has been the custom for many years to remedy the
grievance as early as possible either
through the two Governments themselves, or by a board of arbitrators.
This is clearly demonstrated on many
occasions. Nova Scotia had its board
of arbitration, New Brunswick has
hnd the same, and many of the other
Provinces have1 been treated in like
manner.
Ample Justification.
"Is there not some justification for
the attitude of thc Premier in his
strong and determined fight for better terms, when wc can point out
since 1871, when we joined Confeder-. ,
ntion, we have paid into the Qenuti-
ion Trensury no less than $20,000,000
over and above what we have received back again in public work and
other public expenditures in the Province? Is it not a matter for some
consideration that we pay into the
Dominion Treasury almost three
times as much per capita as the other
Provinces in the Dominion of Canada,
where the cost of administration, owing to our extraordinary physical conditions, our scattered population and
sparsely settled districts, must, necessarily, be enormously in excess of
any of our sister Provinces, where the
cost per capita on roads, streets and
bridges of this Province has an avef-
nge of $2.91, as compared with 13 3-5
cents in any of the other Provinces of
the Dominion where the cost of civil
govcrnmctn is nine times greater than
any of the other Provinces and so on
with the other departments of Government.
Paid for Transportation Facilities.
"Then, too, have we not paid dearly to thc Dominion Government for
the transportation facilities which we
have received? Have we not in the
first intsnnce handed over to the Dominion Government a belt of land
forty miles wide, extending from the
eastern confines of the Province to
thc shores of the Pacific, for railway
connection—have we not, on this very
islnnd, disposed of no less than two
million five hundred thousand acres
of our best lands, for this same purpose? Again, we hnve contributed no
less than three million five hundred
thousand acres in the Peace River
country for the purpose of railway
connection. We have no quarrel with
thc other provinces of Canada, while
of course wc must feel an interest in
the welfare nnd good government of
our sister Provinces, wc clnim that
this question is one which docs not
partake of thc nature of interference
by the other Provinces of Canada, bnl
is a matter of arrangement entirely
between the Ottnwa Government and
ourselves.
Will Fight to Finish,
"The Premier and people of British
Columbia enn be depended upon to
fight this issue and continue fighting
until such time ns our remedy in the
way of sufficient assistance is granted, nnd I can promise to this House
nnd thc people of British Columbia,
that we will not be found in the same
position ns Hon. Mr. iFolding, who
now criticises the Premier on his defence of better terms, and who when
ns Premier of the Province of Nova
Scotia threatened the Dominion authorities that Nova Scotia would
withdraw from thc Confederation of
the Provinces, unless her grievances
were remedied and her financial condition recognised.
Finances of Province.
"ll  will  be wtihin  thc  recollection
of members of this House that upon
the  occasion  on  which  the  Finance
Minister undertook the supervision of
Continued on Page 7. THE WEEK   SATURDAY, JANUARY 25  1908.
Incorporated 1901
Capital, $600,000.00
Capital Increased
in 1007
to  . ..11,000,000.00
Subscribed
Capital,    U60.000
Reserve . . $50,000
Surplus, Jan. $0,
1907  .  .  $110,000
J. B. KATHEBS, Gen. Kaa.
IN   CLOSING   UP   ESTATES
either as Executors or Assignees
the Dominion Trust Co., Ltd., Js
never influenced by ulterior motives. Their entire ambition,
effort, and energy is directed towards securing the best possible
returns for all concerned.
Name this company executor in
your will. Blank will forms furnished free of charge and stored
in our safety deposit vaults,
when we are made your executor.
DOMINION TRUST CO,
Limited.
338 Hastings St., West.
Vancouver, B. C.
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magaalne, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
..COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
lift   Qovernment Street. .Victoria,  B.C.
Ill  Hastings   St Vancouver,   B.C.
W. BLAKBMORB. .Manager and Bdlter
Aut Tempora
Aut Mores.
It is a venerable if not a very sage
remark that "the fashion of this world
changeth." The commonest application of so obvious a truism is to the
"fashions." If it be true that one
half the world does not know how
the other half lives, it is at least
equally true that one-half the world
and probably a little more is unable
to conceive how the other half manages to dress.
If one picks up an illustrated paper
of fifty years ago, or looks through
the old family album, in which grandfather and grandmother figure, the
extreme severity of feminine dress is
at once apparent. Of course this applies no't at all to the aristocracy, but
to the ordinary middle class and
working people, as they are designated in England.
On high days and holidays, which
meant principally on Church days,
and those never-to-be-forgotten days
on which Mother went to be photographed, a bit of ribbon or lace served
for decoration.
Mere man is not permitted the
range in his sartorial adornments
which is the prerogative of woman,
and yet one has only to turn back
to the seventeenth century to find
him in ruffles and peruke, with velvet
doublet and silken hose. Nowadays
lhe best he can tin runs to a sporting'
suit of Harris lucid, or a business
suit of worsted or serge, whilst my
lady of almost any rank is gay with
millinery, dress, mantle, to say nothing of other adornments which must
be nameless, but all of which go to
remind me thai the comic opera
writer need not have drawn the line
where he did when hc said that "Thc
little soubrette is a costly pet."
And yet nature has a wonderful
way of ringing in compensations. The
enormously increased cost of clothing one's daughters compared with
the cost fifty years ago is met by
the fact that nowadays daughters earn
money themselves, and most of thein
spend it all on their dress. 1 am
not one of those crusty old bachelors who believes that women only
dress to catch husbands. Statistics
do not show that the percentage of
marriages has increased in any sen
sible ratio with thc increase of extravagant decoration. In all civilized com
munities the percentage remains stationary except for purely temporary
fluctuations. One must therefore conclude that expensive dressing is a
natural concomitant of advancing civilization. Probably the artistic development of dressing will come later
when knowledge on this abstruse
subject is more widely diffused, but
1 am more impressed with other
changes to which I will refer. For
instance, one reads in the English
papers that it is quite the custom
nowadays for ladies to smoke in
public places.
When I was in London a few years
ago, the fashion had not set in, and
even now I can hardly believe that
it has any serious hold, it would be
rather a strange irony of fate if the
censoring of manners in this respect
should emanate from New York. We
have recently been treated to some
lv'ghly realistic accounts of the doings of the smart set in modern Babylon. One of the best written, most
picturesque and most impressive
sketches which I have read for a
long time was recently reprinted in
the Victoria Times from a New York
paper. It depicted the doings on
Broadway at Christmas, and was entitled "Nothing but Wine," and yet
we are now told that an edict has
been promulgated by the Governor
of New York forbidding ladies to
smoke in public.
I well remember the first test ease
on this matter in England. I was in
the Criterion one night when two
well known city gentlemen and their
wives were dining. After dinner the
gentlemen lit cigarettes, and one of
the ladies followed suit. The manager soon put in an appearance and
remonstrated; the upshot was a row
and the whole party was turned out
by main force.
Next day the matter came before
Mr. Lushington, one of the City-
Magistrates, who inflicted a small fine
on the manager, and very sarcastically declared that it was not illegal for
a lady to smoke in public—"it was a
matter of taste." In spite of this
decision, favourable to the fair
smokers, none of the managers of
London restaurants would permit
smoking, and no one else had the
hardihood to take them into Court.
This was in 1893, and it nipped in the
bud the attempt to introduce a fashion of more than doubtful reputation.
But whatever ladies may do in public, there is no doubt that among
the smart set, which might just as
wei be denominated the fast set, the
smoking of cigarettes in private is on
the increase. This may truly be
called a new fashion, and yet it is
only a variation of what any man
fifty years of age has seen. Many a
time have I watched an old woman
smoking a clay pipe, but always
among thc working classes, and generally in the country. I always
thought it was more a question of
relieving thc loneliness and monotony
of rural life, rather than any particular taste for the weed.
There is one other feature of social
life which always impresses me, the
freedom allowed nowadays to children, and especially to girls. This
freedom does not pertain in all civilized countries, for discipline and oversight are pretty nearly as rigid today in France and Germany as ever,
hut in England, lhe reins have been
slackened very perceptibly nnd on the
American Continent have been almost
abandoned. Many things have conspired to bring about this important
change. Co-education has been a
strong factor. The great increase in
public amusements is another, in fact
anything which has tended to throw
the sexes together without private
guardianship has produced a more independent spirit and an impatience of
control.
How it would have shocked our
grandmothers to have seen young
people forming theatre parties without a chaperone, and yet apart from
an increased tendency to waste too
much time on mere amusements the
general result has not been to lower
the moral tone of society.
What 1 most deplore is that concurrently with this development of
greater freedom for young people has
grown  up an   inclination   to   resent
authority. It is conspicuous everywhere, in the schools, in the home,
and in everyday life.. This may be
to some extent a reaction from a regime of undue severity; tiie severity
which had a .Furitan origin, whether
manifested in church, school, or social life. I often smile when I think
of the methods in vogue in English
boarding schools when I knew a great
deal more about them than I ever
want to know again. To use a
modern vulgarism the youth of today
"would not stand for them," so that
again is a change of fashion which
tends to illustrate my article.
'|T V '*' V V T-? TP 'Uf V TP *JP -T V
X Social and        *
$ Personal. __
*m ___» —__m ____ _____________ *______* ^mm ^^•-^h _____%_____■ mm* ____ —___
ITTPTTT'*1 ™ '*' '*' ™ 1' '*' ™ TT
Miss Beryl Halhed left for home
again about the beginning of week.
* *   *
Miss Holmes of Brussels, Out., is
visiting her aunt, Mrs. MacKenzie
Cleland, of Pemberton Road.
* *   *
Mr. John Berrington paid a flying
visit to the  Capital  City during the
week.
* *   *
Miss Phipps of Carberry Gardens is
entertaining some of her girl friends
this afternoon    in    honour    of    Miss
Mabel Tatlow.
* *   *
January 29th is the date settled for
the marriage of Miss Mabel Tatlow
of this city to Mr. Fitz Cornwall of
Ashcroft, B.C.     .
* *   *
Miss De Wolf of Vancouver was in
Victoria for a few days last week. She
came over for the dance given by
H. M. S. Shearwater and H.M.S.
Egeria last Friday.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. W. Holmes and son
have returned to their home in Kaslo, after a month's visit in Victoria
with Mr. and Mrs. Worlock and Col.
and Mrs. Holmes.
* *   *
The Private Skating Club started
again on Tuesday afternoon with the
following members present: Miss
Mason, Miss Doris Mason, Miss
Marian Dunsmuir, Miss Newcombe,
Miss W. Johnson, Miss P. Irvnig,
Miss O. Irving, Miss P. Mason, the
Misses Hickey, Miss Little, Miss G.
Irving, Miss Walker, and the Messrs.
Martin, Hagerty, McDougal, Fraser,
Arbuckle,   Harvey   and   Troupe.
* *   *
Mrs. W. B. Allen, Cloverdale, was
hostess at a small dance last week, for
her daughter, Miss Sybil Allen.
Among the guests were Miss Ethel
Browne, Miss Adelaide King, Mr.
Teddie King, Mr. Henry King, Mr.
Walter Barton, Mr. Willie Barton,
Mr. Walter Brown, Mr. Holmes, Miss
Rowcroft, Mr. Maurice Rowcroft,
Miss Blackwood, Miss Viva Blackwood and many others.
* *   *
The Five Hundred Club met on
Tuesday at the residence of Mrs. T. S.
Gore Oak Bay. A dainty tea was
served by Mrs. Stewart Robinson thc
table being decorated with pale pink
carnations and asparagus fern. The
prize was captured this time by Mrs.
Gibb. Among those present were:
Mrs. C. M. Roberts, Mrs. W. S. Gore,
Mrs. Spratt, Mrs. Griffiths, Mrs. Gibb,
Mrs. Matson, Mrs. H. Tye, Mrs. G.
Matthews, Mrs. C. Todd, Mrs. R.
Dunsmore Mrs. G. Courtney, Mrs. S.
Robertson, Mrs. Crosse, Mrs. Blackwood, Mrs. Hunter, Mrs. A. Gillespie, Mrs. Schubert, Mrs. Gibson.
.    *   *
An "Handkerchief Social was given
for Miss Mabel Tatlow, whose marriage takes place next week, by Mrs.
Fletcher, of Rockland Avenue. The
table was prettily decorated with
paper, white narcissus and graceful
trailing pieces of variegated periwinkle. After a dainty tea the bride-
elect was showered with many dainty
ami costly handkerchiefs. Those present were: Miss Eveline Tilton, Miss
Elinor Harrington, Miss B, Irving,
Miss G. Irving, Miss V. Mason, Miss
C. Helmcken, Miss McDowell, Miss
T. Gillespie, Miss I. Tuck, Miss Wilson, Miss McQuade, Miss Monteith,
Miss Little, Miss King, Miss D. Day,
Miss MacDonald, Miss M. Butchart,
Miss Martin (Winnipeg), Miss J.
Butchart, Miss M. Butchart, Miss E.
Pitts, Miss M. Pitts, Mrs. Alexander
Gillespie, Mrs. W. Holmes (Kaslo).
* *   *
Among the many guests dining at
thc Empress, which was opened on
Monday last were: Mr. and Mrs.
Stewart Williams, Mr. and Mrs. Ambery, Miss Mason, Col. and Mrs. Prior, Mr. and Mrs. Flumerfelt, Mr.
Langton,  Mr.  Kitto,  Mr.  Keen,   Mr.
We are just as proud of the low prices at which we sell our
beautiful Cut Glass as we are of the fact that it presents many
of the choicest productions of the most artistic and celebrated
makers. '  j
Cut Glass Bon-Bon Dishes, from  $1.75
Cut Glass Spoon Trays, from  $3.25
Cut Glass  Bowls, very handsome, from  $7.00
Cut Glass Salt Cellars (individual), from  35c
Cut Glass Salt and Pepper Shakers, silver-mounted, from.. 75c
HAND   SATCHELS  AT   HALF  PRICE.
See Our Window Display
CHALLONER & MITCHELL
47 and 49 Qovernment St., Victoria.
Victor-Berliner
Dance Music
Just imagine having a
full orchestra to play for
you  whenever you want
to dance ! How you could
dance  to such   music  as
that! And you can actually have it with a Victor-
Berliner   Gram-o-phone  in
your home.
Better music than you ever
had before—loud, clear and in
perfect time.    No expense for
musicians, nobody tied to the
piano—everybody can dance.
Besides special dance-music
the Victor and Berliner Gram-
o-phone   provides   high-class
m__________ma_-_----m------W--m__-----wm___  entertainment of every kind
between the dances. Grand opera by the greatest artists,
beautiful bailads by leading vaudeville singers, selections by
famous bands; instrumental solos and duets; "coon" songs;
popular song hits; minstrel specialties, and other good
healthy fun.
In no other way can you hear this entertainment in your
home, except on the Victor and Beniner Gram-o-phone.
z>\ The world's foremost    layers and singers make Victor
Records only, and the Vicloi aud Berliner Gram-o-phone
plays them as no other instrument can.
,'V C-*"\ Gt   to nny Vicloi or Berliner dealer's and hear
^\_ ^\. these  \vouderful instruments.     Ask him to
explain th. easy-payment plan.
Write us on  the  coup
and lull infonuati >u.
% o_   *x*.\ Write us on' the coupon  for   catalogue
\
'•-.. \V^\ The Berliner Gram-o-phone
\ \\.°o\ Company of Canada, LH.
MONTREAL,    606
Bromley, Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell, Mr.
Forbes Vernon, Capt. and Mrs.
Troupe, Mr. Eberts, Mr. Vowell, Mr.
and Mrs. Burton, Mr. and Mrs. G.
Gillespie, Miss F. Gillespie, Mr. and
Mrs. Galletly, Major and Mrs. W. A.
Jones, Dr. and Mrs. D. M. Jones, Mr.
and Mrs. Luxton, Canon and Mrs.
Beanlands, Mr. W. Pemberton, Mr.
and Mrs. Bodwell, Mr. and Mrs. Savannah, Mr. and Mrs. Landsberg, Mr.
and Mrs. W. Langley, Miss Hickey,
Miss Bulwer, Mr. J. Bridgeman, Mr.
A. W. Harvey, Mr. and Mrs. T. S.
Gore, Mr. J. Arbuckle, Mr. and Mrs.
II. Heisterman, Mr. and Mrs. 13. Heisterman, Mr. and Mrs. Brett, Mr. and
Mrs. D. R. Ker, Mr. and Mrs. H.
Helmcken,    Dr.    Todd,    Mrs.    Chas.
Todd, Mr. and Mrs. H. Gillespie, Mr.
and Mrs. Alex. Gillespie, Mrs. Butchart, Misses Butchart, Miss Hogg.
Mrs. Rattenbury, and many others.
The bouquets on the many tables
were chiefly paper, narcissus and
scarlet carnations.
"Really," said thc coy girl, "I
think I'm entitled to a Carnegie medal. I saved a life the other evening."
"The idea!" exclaimed her friend.
"Whose?"
"Jack Hansom's. He said he
couldn't live wtihout me." — Philadelphia  Press.
. THE WEEK, SATURDAY JANUARY 25   1908.
SOME TOWEL TRUTHS. I Linen Items of Interest
S*Gfe
HOW   AND   WHERE   TO   GET   TOWELS
THAT ARE BETTER-FOR THE SAME.
Is there any other household requisite that receives harder or more constant use and abuse
than a towel? Probably not. Towels are subjected to harder, and more continuous ill-use
than almost any other article around the home,
and, in the selection of these, quality should be
a foremost consideration. If nothing but the
regular visits to the laundry were to be considered, the strain on the fabric would be considerable, and the desirability of securing superior,
sound, well spun, well woven towels apparent.
When you are buying towels, don't, for a paltry
two or three cents, disregard the claims of guaranteed goodness and long life for good appearance but unqnokn quality. Let us supply you
with towels the quality of which we guarantee and
at prices little if any higher than trashy sorts are
sold for. You'll find our towel offerings represent
genuinely good values. Get the "good sorts." It
pays to buy the best, and pays to buy it here.
Shall we see you on our Second Floor Today?
Honeycomb Towels«Hard-wearing, Low-priced Styles.
These are serviceable, low-priced towels, made of soft finished cotton and are excellent values.
Their hard wearing qualities make them a very desirable towel for everyday use. Pure white,
with red stripes on each end.
Size 17x36, each ioc, per dozen 90c
Size 21x48, each 12c, per dozen $1.35
Size 18x36, each 15c, per dozen  $1.50
Size 20x45, each 12c, per dozen $1.35
Size 24x40, each 25c, per dozen $2.75
LINEN HUCK TOWELS.
These towels are made of silky spun linen, delightful to touch. There is no more pleasant
towel to use. It is a bedroom towel par excellence. This is a towel style you should investigate. Some hemstitched and damask borders.
There is a great variety of sizes and prices, ranging from $1.75 per dozen, up to, each $1.25
UNION HUCK TOWELS.
These are made of a union of linen and cotton
and combine the good qualities of each material,
making a nice hand towel much in demand by
house and hotel keepers for bedroom use. We
have a great variety of this style, and at prices
that will please you in their fairness. Come in
and let us show you these,
FINE   TURKISH   TOWELS—A   FAVORITE
STYLE WITH MANY.
This favorite weave is well known and is appreciated by a tremendous following. We stock a
very large and complete stock of this kind of
towel and offer you a superior quality towel at
a price we think will compare very favorably
with any towel offerings offered elsewhere.
Size 19x44, each  20c
Size 20x41, each  25c
Size 19x41, each  30c
Size 22x47, each  35c
Size 24x48, each  40c
Size 26x53, each  40c
Size 24x51, each  50c
Size 30x49, each  50c
Size 27x60, each  50c
Size 28x60, each  65c
Size 36x54, each  75c
Size 32x60, each  $1.00
Do you know what a superior Linen Department we have? Many
people have no idea of the immense stock of linen goods carried by this
house. We number among the hosts of customers a great many Victoria
women but we want still more to know of the excellent things we have
here for them. We want every home keeper who delights in dainty table
linen to visit this department and ask to be shown some of the dainty
creations there. Ask! Don't be afraid, the salesmen delight in showing
each superior merchandize. We list here but a few pieces from the stock.
When reading or looking remember that these are superior quality and
carry, as well as the makers', our guarantee of quality and goodness.
Sideboard Covers, embroidered, 18
x 72, each.    Price  $2.50
Sideboard    Covers,    embroidered,
16x45, each.    Price   $1.50
Tray  Cloths,  embroidered,   18x27,
Each    $1.00
Tea   Cloths,   embroidered,   36x36.
Each    $2.00
All to match, same pattern.
Sideboard Covers, drawnwork, i8x
72.    Each   $2.50
Sideboard Covers, drawnwork, i8x
72, each.   Price $1.75
Tray   Cloths,   drawnwork,   20x30.
Each  $1.50
Tray   Cloths,   drawnwork,   18x27.
Each  $1.00
Tea    Cloths,    drawnwork,    36x36.
Each  $2.50
Tea    Cloths,    drawnwork,    30x30.
Each  $2.00
All above made to match.
Hemstitched and Embroidered Tea
Cloth, very fine, 45x45 in., each.
Price  $9.00
Linen   D'Oylies,   4^2   in.   round.
Dozen  90c
Linen D'Oylies, with lace edge, 9
in. round.    Each   50c
Linen D'Oylies, with lace edge, 8
xi2.    Each   75c
Sideboard Runners, 18x72 inches.
Each  $1.75
Tray or Tea Cloths, 18x27 inches.
Each  65c
Tray or Tea Cloths, 30x30 inches.
Each $1.25
Tray or Tea Cloths, 36x36 inches.
Each  $1.75
D'Oylies, 554 in. diameter.
Each  ioc
D'Oylies, 9x12 in.    Each 25c
D'Oylies, 12x12 in.   Each 25c
D'Oylies, 18x18 in.   Each 50c
Nicely Embroidered D'Oylies, i2x
12 inches.   Each  65c
Nicely Embroidered D'Oylies, 18
xi8 inches.   Each $I-75
Sideboard Covers, nicely embroidered, 12 in. by 45 in., at, each,
$1.50, and   $1.25
Sideboard Covers, nicely embroidered, 14 in. by 68 in., at, each,
$2.25 and  $1.75
Sideboard Covers, 16x45 '"., cotton, embroidered.   Each ...$1.50
EXCELLENT ORIENTAL RUG NEWS.
Chief among the excellent values in Oriental Rugs is our fine showing
of Mirzapore Rugs from India. This is a splendid rug, with wearing qualities unexcelled. The handsome design, the fine colorings, the rugged
surface combine to make it a most suitable rug for dining-room, library,
hall or hearth. Come in and let us show you these and other "Orientals.
You are protected in buying Oriental Rugs, ro any carpets or rugs, at this
store by our guarantee of quality and satisfaction. This store with its fine
record for honest merchandise, stands back of every rug or yard of carpet
sold here. We are ready to make good any misrepresentation or defect.
You're safe in trading here.
Mirzapore Rug, size 7 ft. 3 in. x 10
ft. 2 in $35.00
Mirzapore Rug, size 8 ft. x n ft.
4 in $50.00
Mirzapore Rug, size 9 ft. 3 in. x 12
ft $60.00
Mirzapore Rug, size 10 ft. 2 in. x
13 ft. 2 in $65.00
Mirzapore Rug, size 10 ft. 5 in. x 14
ft $75.00
Mirzapore Rug, size 11 ft. 2 in. x
14 ft. 4 in $80.00
OTffTPrer?
HOME "1MOTCt AND .'CLliS-FURNISHERS-
OOOOOOOOO-OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO&o,
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO^9*'
SPLENDID ADDRESS.
Continued from Page 5.
the department of finance, conditions
were, to say the least, not at all encouraging. The public accounts for
many years had been showing deficit
running from one-half to three-quarters of a million dollars, annually. In
addition to this, the situation was
further accentuated by an overdaft
at our bankers of many hundreds of
thousands of dollars, as well as many
thousands of dollars being required
to mee the curren expenditure on
public works. After the election in
1903, an early session of the legislature was called in November of that
year. The Finance Minister introduced a measure calling for a loan
of one million dollars, which would
be retired in ten years, fey payment
of one hundred thousand dollars annually with interest at the rate of 5
per cent. Strong indeed was the opposition to this measure, and many
and diverse were the contra propositions submitted by our friends in opposition. Tt was found, however, that
none of their suggestions were practical, and after a most strenuous debate covering many days, the measure finally became law, and no
sooner were the proceeds of this loan
available than they were immediately
absorbed in the payment of the overdraft ancl current accounts, left them
as a legacy by preceding governments. At the same session a change
was made in the assessment act, with
the object in view of making the assessment of the Province more effective and equitable. The result of
this resolution was to bring about an
equilibrium between revenue and expenditure, which, by the end of the
year, resulted in a small surplus.
From that time on surpluses have
been the order of the day, increasing
each year by hundreds of thousands
of dollars, until to-day our financial
condition is as satisfactory as any
other Province in the Dominion of
Canada.
Loan Is Repaid.
"During the past year, owing in a
great measure to the extraordinary
financial stringency, the Finance Minister was approached by the holders
of the loan of 1904, to which 1 havc
just referred, with a view of arranging, if possible, for the payment of
the whole or part of it at once rather
than in yearly instalments. The Finance Minister having a large deposit
at the banks, on which a low rate of
interest was being paid to the Province, immediately consented to this
arrangement, and $500,000 of the loan
of 1904 was discharged. This repayment, together with the three preceding annual instalments of one hundred thousand dollars a year, reduced
this loan to $200,000, which, I am
pleased to inform this House, has
almost entirely been discharged quite
recently.
"In addition to this, we are advised
in the speech from the thrcne that a
substantial surplus will be presented
by the Finance Minister during the
course of this session, in fact, I am
led to understand that the surplus at
the end of the financial year will
amount to some vhere in the neighbourhood of one million dollars. It
is interesting to note, though in no
way remarkable, and I simply mention this matter in passing, that the
first surplus in the history of British
Columbia occurs coincidently with the
advent of the first Conservative administration.
Timber Policy.
"Without doubt, one of the greatest factors in bringing about this
changed condition of affairs has been
the Government's policy as regards
the timber areas of British Columbia.
In the year 1905, when it was my
pleasure to speak to a similar resolution, I advised this House and this
Government that before any very
great activity could be brought about
in the lumbering and sawmill industries, some security of title would be
necessary for the millmen to their
holdings of timber. Prior to 1905
the Land Act provided for the issuance of special timber licenses at the
rate of $115 east of the Cascade range
of mountains, and $140 west of the
same range, in areas of one mile, the
license being renewable from year to
year, at the discretion of the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works.
I pointed out that the millman was
in this position—while he might hold
sufficient areas of timber to justify
him in making big expenditures in
plant, machinery and development, at
the same time upon making application for a renewal of thc licenses he
found that his application was subject to the discretion of the Chief
Cdmmisisoner of Lands and Works,
and he might find himself at any
time with a large and expensive plant
on his hands, and no raw material behind him to keep his plant in operation.
Land Act Amended.
"Tn 1905 the Land Act in reference
to timber was amended so that a license was renewable of course, subject to certain conditions and regulations, for a period of twenty-one
years. Almost immediately the effect
of this legislation was felt on thc
revenues  of the  Province.    Millmen
came to our Province from different
points in the United States and elsewhere, brought capital to our country, develoed our resources, feeling
confident that their title to their holdings should not be affected by any decision of the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works, or any member of
the Government, and the result today is that for the year 1907 we havc
a revenue from this source alone of
not less than $1,250,000. Owing to
this increased revenue and to the increasing revenue from other sources,
thc Government feels that they will
have sufficient revenue yearly, for
many years to come, without further
alienation of the timber lands of the
Province, and as a result an Order-
in-Council was passed on the 24th
day of December reserving from further alienation any more timber lands
of the Province.
Approves of Withdrawal.
"I wish to congratulate thc Government for the course they have followed in this important question. Thc
preservation of our forests, and the
protection of our rivers and streams,
which arc, in a great measure, dependent upon thc preservation of the
forests, is one of the most vital importance to the future welfare of
British Columbia. T am sure the measure is in thc public interest, and will
bc appreciated indeed by thc whole
of the people of this Province. It is
estimated to-day that the area of 6,-
500,000 acres of timber land in this
Province is already held under timber licenses. This should keep thc
industry sufficiently well supplied
with raw material for many years to
come, and a proper preservation of
the forests will also be greatly appreciated in years to come. It is a
pleasing factor to note in the speech
from the Throne, that the industries
of the Province of British Columbia
show a healthy and flourishing state
of affairs.
Mining Industry.
"In the mining industry the increase in tonnage and receipts is quite
noticeable. However, owing to the
failing prices of the metal market,
especially as regards copper, and the
labour troubles in thc Boundary country, whieh. at one time threatened
a protracted strike, and the shutting
down of several of the mines ancl
smelters in that country, the output
of the mines there were, for the last
two months of 1907 considerably curtailed. Fortunately, however, the hitler trouble has been adjusted, and
there is every evidence of an increase
in the price of metals including cupper, silver anil lead. Thc actual receipts from the metalliferous and non-
metalliferous mines of thc Province
for the year is approximately, $30.-
000,000. This is an increase of, approximately, $-1,500,000 over the receipts of 1906. It is particularly gratifying to note an increase in ton-
nage and receipts from the coal mines
of the Province the increase in this
connection alone amounting to about
$3,000,000 and it is anticipated that
the next year's output of coal will
be far more largely increased, owing
in the doubling of the capacity of the
Crow's Xest mines and thc active operation of the C. 1? R. collieries at
Hosmer, B.C., whieh give every indication 1 if a steadily increasing output.
Lumbering and Milling.
"In the lumbering and milling industries, the conditions have not been
as favourable as they might be, owing to the financial stringency which
has greatly affected every part of this
Continued on Page 12. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 25, 1908.
TOUCH AND GO.
Continued from Page 2.
here, an order there, scrutinising, con-
sidering, and instructing, the closeness of his attention wandered at
times and an unmistakable frown of
anxiety crossed his face. The incident of a minute before had started
him on an unpleasant train of thought
and it was not easy to drive it from
his mind. For, if Major Vesey was a
veteran in experience, he had learned
the veteran's lesson that nigger-fighting is a tougher busines than it seems
and that silly talk among the youngsters does not help to lighten the
task. These schoolboys, he reflected,
came out there endowed for the most
part with a natural courage which
seldom failed them at a pinch; but
that courage needed nursing—ay,
. and careful nursing, too. Like any
other attribute of youth, it lay upon
the surface, to be displayed instantly
—at a word; and at another word to
be as readily wiped out of sight and
(Hit of existence. It had not yet become part and parcel of their being;
it had yet to be grafted there firmly
.ind enduringly by the rough hand of
hardship. Major Vesey knew this
well enough; and he knew also that,
as in a cricket-match, the most difficult thing on earth is "to stop the
rot," when it has once set in. It may
not matter much on a cricket-field—
it means life or death in face of an
assegai; and this little, dapper officer could remember dead men by the
score who were dead only because the
"rot set in" and there was nobody to
stop it. For that reason he said
something under his breath about
Carstairs, and that "something" referred to Mr. Carstairs' tongue.
And, in truth, that wagging tongue
—just like most wagging tongues—
had, as usual, managed to accomplish
its evil work. Not, mind you, that
Carstairs really meant it. Oh, dear
■me, no! For at bottom, as the regiment was quite ready to admit, Carstairs was not a bad sort. He had
"points"—a generous nature, for instance, and a kindly heart; but, as the
regiment was equally ready to admit,
"the beggar was inflated." A small
vanity might be reckoned his weakest spot, aud that weak spot had been
rubbed up this evening very roughly
indeed. The suggestion that, atfer
all, he was not such a big man as he
pretended to be, that his lighting "record" was at best a poor affair, and
that, seriously considered, he came
remarkably near to being a sham—
for such was the drift of Drake's sudden outburst—had nettled him beyond endurance; and, without pausing to think, his temper holding the
upper hand, he had blurted out an
angry and heedless reply.
On the listeners, taken collectively,
the remark had left little or no im-
| pression. Unimaginative, they hardly
realized its full import. Besides, they
were too tired to-night to care. No
quarter, indeed! Sheer murder! Well,
it would bc soon enough to think of
that in the morning; and, having
made up their minds lo this, they
rolled themselves in their blankets
and presently fell asleep.
But the human disposition i.-, in it
always cast in one mould—hardly
ever, if lhe truth be told—and tlie
differences engendered by nature are
as a rule only emphasised by habit,
and made more marked through the
strengthening force of time A peculiarity, or a sensibility, grafted on
us in that earliest start of life is all
too apt to remain where it is, and il
is but seldom that a man's environment will help him much lo foster ,1
virtue or to conquer a weakness, For
the most part, it will help him wholeheartedly thc other way; and this had
been thc case with Francis Drake.
Instinctively timid, it had not been
his good fortune as yet to experience
that rougher side nf existence which
goes to thc making of a man. A ton-
anxious mother had interfered in the
first place; some trilling delicacy, a
matter of really small account, had
given its casting vote for a tutor instead of a public school; and, that
Francis Drake's misfortune might be
the more complete, it so happened
that his sister Eileen ,a girl some
twelve  months   older   than   himself,
was living at home, Now, God forbid that one should ever utter a single syllable against the chastening influence of a woman! God forbid that
one should write down here even the
shadow of a suggestion against that
dearest place on earth—our home!
And yet, in the soberest judgment, it
is always clear that there are times
when evil may spring from good,
when the helping hand shall only hinder, and when—through the accident
of inopportunity—the kindest effort
shall lead to our undoing. At any
rate, so far as Francis Drake was concerned, this had proved to be true.
The timidity of his nature, his sensitiveness his delicate, almost effeminate spirit, had thriven in the hothouse
in which it grew; and his sister's character, reacting on his own, had left
it, like hers, gentle—indeed, lovable—
but wholly destitute of that spontaneous pluck, that strenuous energy,
which belongs of right to manhood.
A public school, in its rough-and-
ready fashion, could have cured all
this with both comfort and satisfaction to itself, had the chance been afforded; and the regiment, who were
willing enough to act as deputy,
found themselves in similar predicament, for "Miss Frances" had only
joined three weeks before, and there
had been no time to do anything with
him. And thus it came about that
now, whilst the outward evidence of
slumber sounded aggressively all
around him, he was still lying wide
awake.
And yet Drake was far from being
a coward. That distinction, between
timidity and cowardice, that broad
division which separates the sense of
fear from the weakness of yielding to
it, stood for him, as it stands for most
of us, a saving clause; and when
marching orders had reached him
three days before he had not been
long in steadying himself. For an
instant, it is true, his throat had
tightened painfully; the fluttering of
his heart had sounded in his ears like
the beating of a drum, and he had
looked around hurriedly lest the
others, too, should have heard it. But
that was impossible; they had drowned all else in their frenzied cheering,
in their wild "Hurrah!" and in that
moment of shame the hot blood had
rushed back into the boy's face, and
he had set his teeth and stiffened his
courage.
Then, with the effort made, that
first gripping of the resolution taken,
there ensued an inevitable reaction.
While the cheering lasted, while that
rousing "Hurrah!" still rang in his
ears, it was well enough with Francis
Drake. The exhilaration of the moment, thc picture of the Hushed, excited faces around him, the contagion of enthusiasm, struck a chord, and
his whole nature responded instantly.
But later on, in the calm of afterthought, the glamour of it melted
away. A sense of despondency stole
over him by degrees, a sense of unreality in the glory, a sense of vivid
reality in thc danger. And when the
others left him one by one, some to
see to thc packing of their kit, some
to write letters home, some to drink
success to the regiment, the black
cloud settled on him more surely,
more persistently, than before. He
could still hear them shouting—toasting each other, toasting the future.
But thc future! The future might mean
death, and the life was gone out of
thc shout. Now, as it seemed to him,
it was only the echo of a shout—no
more than that; and in that period of
loneliness, of overmastering depres
sion, it was all a mockery of joy.
And during that three days' march
bad grew steadily worse. The heat
of the sun, the over-fatigue, and more
particularly the constant strain of
watching, had exacted their sure toll
from nerves already tense to the
breaking-point. As some one had
hinted, in an uncautious moment, "one
never can tell where these black beggars may bc—a hundred miles away
or skulking in the grass at your elbow;
(me can never tell." Which, as a matter of fact, is thc truth, and a truth
unfortunately overheard by Francis
Drake. It had set him thinking again;
il had started all the old fancies
afresh—those fancies which could so
readily picture the worst aspect of
any horror;  it had shaken a  resolu
tion already wavering, and it had left
him weaker and more fearful than
ever before.
At such a moment it is that the
helpfulness of a stronger nature may
change the whole current of affairs—
a word perhaps, a look of encouragement, may suffice; the merest suggestion of personal confidence, any
trifle indeed—so delicate is the balance of a man's mind between firmness and infirmity of purpose. And
it is not always through his own
merit or fault that he shall fail or
succeed. Toppling on the brink, he
may go over with a crash, or through
some happy fortune steady himself
ere it be too late, and stand firmly
facing the danger. This has come to
most, on occasions; it had come
now to Francis Drake. He was top
phng on thc brink, and as he stood
there some one had given him a push
from behind. No quarter, murder
from start to finish, and howling dem
ons hacking at the square with their
knives! Carstairs had spoken heedlessly indeed; but he had upset the
balance, and Francis Drake was
writhing now in a very agony of tor
ture. The others were asleep; there
could be no sleep for him.
"Young un!"
Drake started at the sound. Outside all was still save for the hardly
audible tread of thc sentries, and
within the tent not one of his companions stirred. Had he been dreaming? No; there it was again: "Young
un!"
And the boy raised himself on his
elbow.    •
"Is that you, Carstairs?" he asked.
"Yes. 1 heard you tossing about, and
I—1 thought"—Carstairs spoke in a
very low tone—"I thought that perhaps something that 1 said this evening might have fright—1 mean disturbed you. You know, young ui», 1
was.only chaffing. The fact is that
this business to-morrow is a regular
one-man show, with Tommy Atkins
playing the star part. There won t
be any real fighting at all. We'll just
sail through the beggars as a liner
sails through a fishing-boat if they
come in collision. 1 was only chaffing, young un."
Drake gazed a moment at the recumbent figure; then suddenly a lump
rose in his throat.
"I—1 know that," he said; then
added, simply: "Thank you, Carstairs."
"That's all right, old man; that's
all right"; and with a sigh of relief,
Carstairs turned over on the other
side, his eyes slowly closed and presently he had forgotten the "young
un" and the niggers and all else that
belongs to thc land of the living.
But it was the first wink of sleep
he had had that night. A pricking
conscience—that best and surest recipe for wakefulness—had worked on
him with its usual effect, and had kept
him restless and unsettled; those
careless words, spoken vaingloriously
but without any thought of evil intent, had recoiled with wondrous
promptness on his own head. Strange
to the terrors born of a too lively imagination, happily unconscious of the
paralysing fear which in certain natures may underlie anticipation, he
had recked. little enough of his
thoughtless remarks at the moment
when they were uttered. They had
burst from him unrestrained in a
spasm of iritability! Then suddenly
he had noticed the change which came
over Francis Drake; suddenly he saw
the boy shrink back again within thc
shadow; suddenly he realised the
harm that hc had done. Then would
he have recalled it all; then, when it
was too late, when the mischief was
beyond repair. It was the old, old
story of unavailing regret, of a futile
repentance, and it kept him tossing
about in a fever. However—and now
hc metaphorically patted himself on
the back—it was all right again. He
had managed to straighten things up
a bit. The young un knew now that
hc had only been talking rot; and so,
with a respite at last from that troublesome conscience, with a grateful
sense of a good deed done, thc just
man fell into that calm and peaceful
slumber which is by right of heritage
the sleep of the just.
Yet it is not thus easily that thc
past is to be obliterated.   Thc accom-
\
plished fact can never be wiped out;
its effect may be modified, that is all:
In this case so much, and no more,
had been achieved. The kindliness of
Carstairs' action had touched the
boy's heart, but it was powerless to
erase from his mind that picture so
firmly embedded there. Like the mark
of a lead-pencil, it could fade beneath
the rubber, and yet remain. The
cheery encouragement had done
something—• indeed much—but it had
not done enough. Something more
was needed, some stronger touch than
this, to make the weak man strong.
And so, when the day dawned at
last, when the regiment fell in and
the march began afresh, Francis
Drake trudged along;*ide his company
iii limp and lifeless fashion. At starting he had straightened his back and
squared his shoulders, for the timid
are prone to some show of bravado;
but the effect had been short-lived.
He could ont sustain it. His pale
face spoke to that, and thc heavy
lines beneath his eyes.
"Ah, Drake!"—Major Vesey was
passing along the column—"you look
washed out, my boy. Had a bad
night, eh?"
"Yes, sir.   The—the heat, I think."
"Humph!" And the Major's critical glance added its own emphasis.
"It is trying," he said, presently, "but
the morning air'll soon pull you together." Then, as he moved forward,
he grumbled again something about
somebody's "dashed infernal tongue."
But now there were matters of
greater moment to think of. The
head of the column was passing out
of the open and had just commenced
filing through a wood. Military formation was no longer possible. Entering in single file, beating down the
undergrowth which lay thick across
the track, the men followed one another into the shadow.
"Slowly, my lads," said Major Vesey, as he watched them disappearing
one by one. "Slowly, there! And—
keep a good lookout in front."
A good lookout! Ah, yes; but could
it be done? When the trees stood
studded so closely that in places a
man could hardly squeeze between
them, when the undergrowth clutched
at one's leg and sometimes held it
fast, and when the gloom around
them was darker than the twilight,
could it be done? Perhaps—perhaps
not.
But they got along somehow, hacking a path as best they could, stumbling at times, struggling up again,
and pantingly plodding onwards. And
soon they were half-way through the
wood.
"Call this nothink?" said one of
the men. "Blest if I can see a bloom-
in' thing."
"Blest if I can either," chimed in
one of the others. "Why, old Ukim-
bo hisself might be marchin' alongside."
And Drake, who was close at hand,
had been thinking the very same
thing. To realise tbe full risk they
ran needed no veteran's experience.
The uncertain foothold; the impossibility of seeing a dozen yards away;
the hopelessness of combining in case
of attack, of even using their weapons
at all in the denseness of that foliage,
were all apparent to the least-seasoned .subaltern. A rat in a trap stood
a better chance; at least he has room
to turn about. And it was in just
such a place as this, the boy remembered, that the Highlanders were cut
to pieces two years ago. Not a man
escaped; not one of them was left
to tell the tale. Though there was
evidence enough in all conscience, the
clearest evidence in those horribly
mangled bodies, in the cruel things
that had been done to them, in the—
Crash!   Bang!   What was that?
The sound reverberated through
thc wood like a clap of thunder, and
Drake stood rooted to the spot. So,
then, it had come at last! It had
come to them as it had come to thc
Highlanders, and    No; somebody
was laughing—laughing and joking
and helping to haul somebody else
up from the ground. One of them
had tripped and fallen, and exploded
his rifle. Oh, was that all? He might
have shot some one, of course, careless beggar. But never mind; they
were only half-way through the wood.
Push along.
This last injunction came from a
sergeant.
"Push along, there!"
And the Die-hards moved forward
again—for an hour, maybe an hour
and a half; and then a shout went up.
The gloom had lightened unexpectedly, and the rays of sunshine were
stealing in. Before them the trees
were thinning and the path had turned less toilsome; a short three hundred yards ahead and they could almost see the plain. There was good
reason, then, for that cheery shout.
With a sigh of relief, Francis Drake
gazed upon the welcome sight. During all this time the nervous strain
had been growing more and more unbearable. It had mastered him with
a slow and steady persistence; it had
shaken him so that he was ready to
start at the rattle of his own accoutrements, at the sound of a neighbour's
cough, at the snapping of a twig beneath his fet; his own sigh, even, had
struck his ear strangely and had filled
him with a mortal fear.
But it was all right now. lie could
see the rays of sunshine; hc could
almost see the open space beyond.
They were so nearly out of the wood
—thank God for that! His breathing
came more regularly as the thought
was realised; his step trod more firmly, more elastically, on the turf; the
colour crept back into his cheeks; and
in a moment of renewed confidence
he gazed around. In that moment
his heart stood still! Peering at him
through the bushes, not a dozen yards
away, he saw two gleaming eyes—
eyes set in a hideous black face—the
yes, the face that he had dreamt of so
often!
"Look!"
He never knew that he had cried
out. He was conscious that something had hurtled through the air,
and that the man nearest him had
fallen with a groan; but he was only
conscious of this vaguely; his whole
attention was fixed upon that hideous
face; and as he looked a dozen others
appeared beside it, and presently thc
bush was alive with men.
Drake stared at them in an instant,
stunned and stupefied. Then suddenly the truth came home to him, the
recollection of the Highlanders who
had gone before; and in a whirlwind
of irresistible panic he turned to run.
"Mr. Drake!" A hand lay upon his
shoulder. "Mr. Drake, the enemy is
—in front!"
Checked by the words, the boy
stopped, and, looking towards the
speaker, met the firm gaze of Major
Vesey.
"Come along," said the elder man,
taking the other by the arm and turning him round. "Come along, and—
we'll put the fear of God into these
black fellows!—Steady there, lads!
Steady there!"
Major Vesey had watched the
drama as a critic watches, played in
a dozen seconds. lie had noted the
period of hesitation, the sudden wave
of terror, the shameful climax to it
all; yet, filled with that sympathy
which is born of ripe experience, he
had made allowances, he had held
forth a helping hand. And in that instant he knew that he had not held
it forth in vain.
"Come along!" he cried again, this
time with rising enthusiasm. "Come
along!"       ♦
And there was no need for him to
glance back over his shoulder. Already Drake was at his side. The
enemy is in front! That was enough;
that, and the contagious example of
a brave man. And together they rushed forward into a storm of flying assegais, into a crowd of shrieking,
naked savages, into a pandemonium
upon earth.
"Where's the Major?"
The Die-hards, such as were left of
them, had formed in the open. There
wcre still sounds of movement rustling through thc wood, but never the
sign of a black figure to be seen. Thc
bayonet had worked too busily for
them during that last half-hour, and
thc game was up. But it was a sadly
diminished square that stood facing
the scene of battle, a set of worn,
weary, panting men, labouring' for
their breath and thanking Heaven
that they were alive.
"Where's the Major?"   Carstairs re- THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANMARY 35, 1908.
singing in the air, a pattering amongst
the trees, and that oncoming mass
halted—rushed forward again—halted
peated the question, and glanced anx- ge« were employed, and when they pend on its fists, the Latin races and
iously at the rest. But the answer had exhumed the coffin they were the American people, to say nothing
came from the wood turned  out  to  make  room  for  two  of the  Oriental  races,  decline  upon
The war-cry had burst forth anew; undertakers who opened it. On the knives and revolvers. There are
the bush ceraked and swayed before day of the opening all the employees times when a man must defend him-
an oncoming mass; the assegais were a<- the Cemetery were given a holiday self with something, and it is infin-
fiyin<* ouce again; and in that mo- and were strictly excluded from the itely better that he should be trained
ment a man carrying another man grounds, being replaced by policemen, to do so without resorting to deadly
on his shoulders staggered through Within four hours of the completion weapons. These two aspects of the
the trees. A race for life or death, °f tne examination everything was re- fistic game commend it to me, and ex-
and not a yard to spare! '  stored as before- Plain why l reSret that il should be
"Quick   there   with   the   Maxims!      Now as to the press, there were two discouraged in Victoria.
Let 'em have it,'boys!" reporters present, one for the Asso- a
A steady rattle of bullets, a sharp ciated Press and one for the Central /
News.   They were sworn not to pub- _r_r__*T_r        __• O ______
lish one word except after their state- ^^0       ^^/^^_y^ti^*t
ments  had  been  censored  and  ap- 0
a   second   time-then   wivered  and Proved by the various representatives 	
fled; whilst the man with his burden present.   This was done before they     No. li-Commencing at a post planted
' . ieft .v.- srouri(l_*  the onlv intellieence at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
had been drawing nearer, and nearer, lelc lne grounus, ine omy nueiugcnce SK^ No Uj whIch is fiye and one.quar.
till  .t U_. Ui. _._._._. lAii.hin thp enunrp   which leaked out to the hundreds of ter  miles  distant   in  a  northerly  and
till at last he stooa witnin tne square. westerly  direction   from  where  C.P.R.
"Why,    good   heavens, it—it's the pressmen who were watting near the line cuts north shore of Upper Campbell
Major!"   Tenderly they lifted him to gates was that the coffin contained a J^i'S ^nV^WM
the ground "Are you much hurt sir?" body-   This was indicated by a wave to point of commencement.
"No, no;'only a broken leg.   But if °f the hand on the part of the re-      VICT0RIA LAND DISTRICT.
it hadn't been for Drake"  porters. '    District of  Rupert.
Drake!   In the excitement he had     The censors' reports were not al-     TAKE NOTICE that James Purdy
slipped aside unnoticed.    Relieved of 'owed to contain one word descrip- Nelson, of Bellingham, Wash., U.S.A.,
bis  hnrden   hc  had  thrown  himself tive of the contents of the coffin ex- occupation  broker,  intends to  apply
his  Burden, ne  naa thrown nimseit       ......        . .    ...     ...      , for a special timber license over the
upon the grass without a word, his cept  that  it  contained  the  body  of followin"g described lands:
legs  still  shaking  from  their  effort, "an   old   man  with   a   beard."    The     Commencing    at    a   post   planted
and his heart thumping like a sledge- Associated  Press  and  Central  News about 30 chains distant and in a south-
,,.-,.„    Rllt it w„ tn thumo harder undertook in advance that they would erly direction from the northwest cor-
liammer.   But it was to thump harder ■*                     o{ Leas£ Na           thence south
now-yes, much, much harder-hard not at any time supplement the cen- g(.   chains;   thenM   west   go   chains;
enough to crack his ribs I tell you, sored   report,   and   this   undertaking thence north g0 chains; thence east 80
when that   rousing    cheer   went up ^ been st"ctly observed.                     chains                „TTI)nv VWT cnv
upon the veldt.    It rang from   every One shudders to think how many             JAMES PURDY NELSON.
throat in one great chorus-the tes- columns  the  American  Press  would •   °"   » '•	
timony they paid-and it carried far have devoted to gruesome details of   KOKSAILAH MINERAL CLAIM,
and wide.   It reached the flying sav- such an event, and no one can read     Situated   in   the   Victoria   Mining
-!«•-. as thev ran and made them scur- the account furnished by the London Division   of   Helmcken   District,  on
TLrE hvTas ZtUHvil Papers without realizing that we havc ^^LfS^^^
One were behind; it reached the ani- muc-i to be thankful for in the atti-     Take Notice, that I, Lars Nicholas
mals hiding in their lairs, and made tude  of our  Government   and    our Anderson,   of   Victoria,   B.C.,
them wonder what was coming next;
it reached the Young Un's soul, and the amenities of decency,
will  remain there a memory the sweetest memory, for ever.
Free
Press towards a strict observance of Miner's Certificate No. B17380, intend
t    At The Street   f
\ Corner        h
60 days from the date hereof, ot apply
, . . to the Mining Recorder for a Certifi-
Although I can hardly claim to be cate  of improvements, for the pur-
a press man, or at any rate to rank pose of obtaining a Crown Grant of
with the distinguished representatives the above claim.
of the fourth estate who graced the     And further take notice that action
,   ,     „ tt     ,     • , under Section 37,- must be commenced
opening of the Empress Hotel with before the issuance of such Certificate
their presence,  I  did a little loung- of Improvements.
ing on my own account on the auspicious occasion.
First, as to the Hotel. It has only
one fault; it is just half large enough.
I  am satisfied that inside of a year
Dated at Victoria this 23rd day of
January, A.D. 1908.
LARS NICHOLAS ANDERSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle, of
_i     1- _ t>      -ni         it. .      . . Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James H.
the C.P.R. will have let a contract to MoLauchlan,  of Victoria,   B. C,   Con-
Gribble & Skeene to duplicate it.    I tractor,  intend  to apply for a special
.   . timber  licence  over  the  following de-
One time or another a great deal say this advisedly, for it is very easy scribed lands:
is written about the American yellow to see that a Hotel which today has ab^ tlSlS™ tt5 w«t*o?'itob'iSirfl
press.   I  do not remember a better less  accommodation   than   the   Van- Bigh^on^^mal^unna.med creek^being
illustration  of  the  contrast  between  couver Hotel will not begin to deal so chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
English and American methods than with   the    enormous   tourist   traffic ^^nVof^me^Sf * 8° °ha'n3
is afforded by the recent proceedings which will  be attracted to Victoria. June 14, 1907.      „.„_.„
l        l   r        .  li       li 1    l     re     li JAM-EjO rlAB _._.__,,
in connection with the opening of the Apart from the through trarhc there Jan n, James H. McLauchlan.
Druce vault.   In the illustrated Daily will be crowds from the South who 	
Graphic just to hand full particulars will come by water to Victoria and NB'W'
are given and there are a number of these  may  fairly  be  added   to  the
LAND   DIS-
WESTMINSTER
TRICT.
District of New Westminster.
, , ,    t-    . ,   ■.,,*    .    l   cr u- 1 TAKE NOTICE that Roman Z. Chan-
exceedingly interesting sketches which  -Last   and   West   trathc,   which   now dleri   of   Vancouver,   B. C,  ocupation
show how extremely careful the auth- makes its   home   at the   Vancouver Bj-oker, tatarf. ^apply /^special
orities were to preserve the sanctity Hotel. scribed lands: _.,.__
, ,        ,~ ,     .   . _, .  .        . ,   _-ll- _      No- 1—Commencing at a post planted
of the tomb and to render it impos-     The  appointments  and  fittings  of ten chains south of the southeast cor-
sible for curiosity mongers to intrude, the Empress are superb, and are not  »«,£. ^o,14^ KalSS^theiSS
It has taken ten years to obtain the excelled  for  comfort  and  luxury  in  south 160 chains; thence west 40 chains
., ,. TT  . . .    .,    ...   .       , ,     ,     ,,    to place of commencement, and contain-
necessary consent to open the vault, any Hotel in the West and by hardly ing 640 acres, more or less.
The first consent necessary was that any in the East.   The opening cere-     December 23, 1907.       CHANDLER
of the Druce family who own it; then mony was unique, the Press men gave
the Home Secretary had to be won the affair a great send-off, undoubted-
over; then application had to be made ly the C.P.R. know how to do things,
VICTORIA   LAND  DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle of
before the Chancellor of thc Diocese and  they  know  well  how  to   select y'0Ttorla?, B-c" - Merchant,   and   James
„ .                  „                             ..  . ,                    ,,  ,           . McLauchlan,    of   Victoria,   B.C.,   Con-
of London, Dr. Tristram.    The case their officials.    It would be easier to tractor, intend   to   apply for a  special
was argued before this important but find another President in succession J1"^ £cnednsc.e over the followln^ de"
little heard of Court in the Nave of to Sir Thomas Shaughnessy than to No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
„,    _    „     „ .,    .    .     .   ..      ,    .     (  .   .        _.       r            tt           tt ahout 4 miles to the west of Robinson's
St.  Paul s  Cathedral  at  the  foot  of find another George Ham.    He gave Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
Thorwaldsen's   statue   of   Channing. the boys a good time and didn't they ^^^^"M''^^
Mr.   Duckwcrts,  probably  the  ablest enpoy themselves? Congratulations to south 80 chains;   thence east 80 chains
,   .            _•      _.   1               1.   l.j    1,                   1         11            ,1  ,.    *ir to point of commencement,
counsel in practice today, conducted all concerned, and above all to Vic- june np 1907.
the case, and the necessary permis- toria in possessing a hostelry which .          ^^jamra^H^McLauchlan.
sion was given.    The  illustration of will bc its greatest drawing card and  ! 	
this   scene   is   very   interesting.    It which  will benefit the City quite as VICT0^I^ertADUtrictSTRICT'
much as the C.P.R. TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle, of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James H.
I am sorry that thc Mayor has seen  McLauohlan,
scene   is   vi
is  so incongruous with  one's ordinary  ideas  of a  Court  to  see  some     1 am sorry tnat tue mayor nas seen McLauchlan,   of   Victoria,   B. C„   con
twenty   important   gentlemen   seated fit to veto boxing matches although tractor, Intend  to apply for a special
„,,,_,. .     ,-   ,- T , ,,,,,-,        . licence   over    the    following   described
in a Cathedral to listen to and adjudi- I have no doubt that he did so from lands:
cate upon such an application. Coun- perfectly conscientious motives.   His JJ* ^£B^Ssw*tBtft0?°^bpi,n'Sn<!2
sel wore their robes and wigs as in reason hardly appeals to me, viz., that Bight on a small unnamed creek, being
„      . , li      tt c       _ .,  • ll     1     li v ■ the northeast corner post;  thence west
Court, and as the  Home  Secretary it is a matter for the police commis ■- --
had already given his consent, the sioners and must stand over until
proceedings were rather of the "pro- they have been appointed. My own
forma" order, but none the less ne- view is that it is a matter which can
cessary before the matter could pro- be taken care of by Chief Langley
ceed further. as well as by any body of police corn-
Then the carpenters got to work, missioners and which might have
and built a large shed, 33 feet long, safely been left in his hands,
and is feet wide over the vault; there
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains;  thence  north  80  chains
to point of commencement.
June 12, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan. 11. James H. McLauchlan.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle, of
Victoria,  B. C,   Merchant,   and    James
H. McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Con-
I know that there is a large section  tractor,   Intend   to   apply for a special
.   ,        , ,,.,,, • j1   .     , timber licence over  the  following   de*
was not even a window through which of the  community  opposed  to  box- g(.rlbed lands:
anyone might pry, but electric light ing in any form, but I am also con- a »* l^SWS^rt%? tob'in'SSS
was installed for the occasion.    Only vinced that under proper control there Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
,     ,                                     ,   ...   ,        ,  .                    ,       c . , ,          c    ., , .. the nonhwest corner post; thence south
twelve   persons   were   admitted   and is no more beneficial form of athletic ___ chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
these were barristers, surveyors and training and nothing which furnishes "%*£$V^onfmencement6''1 " °halnS
doctors  appointed by the  respective a better entertainment.    The  Anglo- June 13, 1907.
•  _        ,     •       1     j      in                      __■ o                       1        u         . . _._.*   j.     J JAMES HASTIE,
interests  involved.    Two  grave  dig- Saxon  race  has  been taught  to  de- Jan n               James H. McLauchlan.
You can always      — _      *-^   It tastes different
tell an M. B. cigar jjVf,   t5«      than others'
Union Made. Q) IQ A t* Two SizeSa
Havana Filler.       ^^IjjUl gold Everywhere.
Made by S. A. Bantly, Victoria, B. C.
He Knew
"What is it, my children," exclaimed the speaker, "that causes
men to ignore the ties of home, neglect their families, stay out
until after midnight, and get up with a bad headache in the morn
ing .
'I know," shouted a little wideawake in the room. "Well,
my little fellow, tell the others what it is." "Politics!" Unlike
Politics, there's no bad headache after Lemp's Beer—no unpleasant after effects, because Lemp's is not charged with carbonic
acid gas as some beers are. It never causes biliousness, because
it is properly aged before bting placed upon the market. Purity
and wholesomeness are inseparably linked in a bottle of "Lemp's."
At all bars, hotels and cafes. If your dealer cannot supply you
for home use, kindly telephone.
PITHER   &   LEISER
Wholesale Distributors.
SKEENA  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that William Rose, of
Ingersol, Ont., Merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted about
two miles sftuth of Refuge Bay, on the
west coast of Porcher Island and at the
northwest corner of lot 12S2, Cassiar
district; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 20 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south following coast line to
point of commencement, containing 160
acres.
WILLIAM ROSS.
Jan 11. A. O. Noake, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that Francis Joseph
Alma Green, of Quatsino, B. C, occupation Prospector, intends to apply for
a special timber licence over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 192, at the
Narrows, Quatsino Sound, thence east
about 35 chains to northeast corner of
Lot 192; thence north about 120 chains
to the southern boundary of the Indian
reserve; thence west to the shore of
Narrows; thence south along the shore
to point of commencement; 640 acres,
more or less.
Jan 11
FRANCIS JOSEPH ALMA GREEN.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
and Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C., timber dealers, intend to apply for the
right to purchase the following described lands ln Kildalla Bay, Rivers
Inlet:—Commencing at a post planted
on the east side of the bay, about one-
third of a mile from the point at the
mouth of the bay, being tho southwest
corner post; thence east 20 chains;
thence north 20 chains; thence west 20
chains to beach; thence south along
beach to point of commencement; containing 40 acres, more or less.
Staked November 26th, 1907.
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL,
Jan. 11 George Young, Agent.
4, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
6. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
4, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
6. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
4, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
6. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
3, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
7. Commencing at a post planted at
northeast corner of T. L. 16186, Section
3, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
hains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
8. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16194, Section
2, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
9. Commencing at a post planted at
northeast corner of T. L. 16194, Section
2, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dee. 17, 1907.
10. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16195, Section
1, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
thonce north 160 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
FRANK KELLY.
Jan 1S. George H. Jackson, Agent.
VICTORIA  LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Frank Kelly,
of Victoria, B.C., timber cruiser, Intend
to apply for a special timber license
over the following described lands:
1. Commencing at a post planted at
southeast corner of Section 29, Township 32, Rupert District; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
2. Commencing at post planted about
one-half mile west of southeast corner
of Section 32, Township 32; thence west
40 chains; thence north 160 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 160
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
3. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16196, Section
6, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
4. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16196, Section
Most
Particular
Smokers
Experience little or no difficulty
in finding a cigar or blend o'f
smoking mixture tliat fits their
taste.
Our Manila or Havana
Cigars can't be beaten.
We carry a most complete line of smokers'
sundries.
The Army       r»«    I J
ss* k-t   Richardson
Cigar Storo.
Phone 345 ■-^--jt'g
10
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 25, 1908
NEW
WESTMINSTER
TRICT.
LAND     DIS-
:ir
an
de
hi
ar
hi
ve
th
in
an
st*
. ta
ca
P<1
se
1'"
an
it
th
he
|>U
co
it
an
ha
wc
as
cu
roi
nd
it
as:
cei
scc
"re
stc
soi
Ca
M
j
-j
hai
its
Ca
-mc
mc
st;
"P
Sti
all,
pre
coil
tha
re 11
for
"ider
j yoi
ing
UPI
anf
C
the
i pre
rea
I we:
que
it 1
tha
ma
roi:
ant
I
alvv
eve
diff
as
ane:
strc
culi
us
too
is 1
mei
virt
thc
hea
bee
I; *
his
thai
goc
anx
firsl
mat
give
Ste.i
Fra
thc
thai
twe
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Roman Z. Chandler, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
timber broker, intends to apply for a
special timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
at northwest corner of T. L. 1S187;
thenee east SO chains along the north
line of T. L. 18187; thence north SO
chains along the west line of T. L,
12602; thenee east 80 chains along the
north line of T. L. 12502; thence nortli
80 ehains along the west line of T. L.
12503; thence in a southwesterly course
along the line of the Capilano Water Reserve to place of commencement, and
containing 640 acres of land, more or
less.
December 23, 1907.
Jan 11. ROMAN Z. CHANDLER,
NOTICE is hereby given that I, George
French, prospector, of Skidegate, B.C.,
Intend to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over 640
acres, bounded as follows:—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast
corner of Section 21, Township 4, Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Group;
thence running 80 chains north; thence
80 chains east; thence 80 chains south
to shore line; thence following shore
line to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located  December   12th,   1907.
GEORGE FRENCH, Locator.
Jan. 4 John Simister, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that I, Benjamin Kromp, of Skidegate, B. C,
rancher, intend to apply for a licence
to prospect for coal and vetroleum over
640 acres of land bounded as follows:*—
Commencing at a post planted near the
beaeh at the southeast corner of Section 20, Township 4, Graham Island,
Queen Charlotte Group; thence 80 chains
north; thence 80 chains east; thence 80
chains south and over and under water;
thence 80 chains west over and under
water to point of commencement; containing 640 acres, more or less.
Located  November  30th,   1907.
BENJAMIN KROMP, Locator.
Jan. 4 John Simister, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. Cor. of B. C. Dev. Co.'s Lot 50 and
marked the N. E. Cor.; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains, more or less, to south
boundary of lot 50; thence east SO
chatns along said boundary to point of
commencement, containing 610 acres,
more or less.
Staked December 6.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. W. C; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west SO
chains, more or less to River; thence
southerly 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more
or less
Staked December 7.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank of Kimsquit River, about 4
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H. Taylor's S. W. C; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains', thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Staked December  9.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Kimsquit River, about iy»
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. E. C; thence west 80 chains',
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Staked December 10.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
40 chains east of the N. E. Cor. of B.
C. Dev. Co.'s Lot 50, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. W. Cor.; thence east 40
chains; thence north 160 chains; thence
40 chains to bank of Salmon River;
thence south 160 ehains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Staked December 6.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE tllat Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Kimsquit River, about 2%
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. E. C; thence west 80 chains;
tiience north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Staked December 10.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains;  thence east 80
chains  to  point  of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
10. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile distant in a northerly
direction from claim No. 9, marked S.E.
Corner, Section 19, Township 36; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains',
thence south 80 chains', thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
11. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile distant in a northerly
direction from claim No. 10, marked S.E.
Corner, Section 30, Township 36; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
therice south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
12. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile distant in a northerly
direction from claim No. 11, marked S.E.
corner, Section 31, Township 36; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
T. S. McPHERSON.
Dec. 28 Per Geo. H. Jackson.
COAST LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that F. S. Buck of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation lumberman,
Intends to apply for a special timber
license over the following described
lands:
1. Commencing at a post planted on
Gilford Island, 40 chains in southerly direction from the N.E. corner of surveyed Lot 625 on north shore of lake;
thence north SO chains more or less to
the south line of T. L. 7714; thence
east 80 chains; thence south SO chains;
thence west SO chains to this post.
FRED.  S.  BUCK.
2. Commencing at a ppst planted
about about 40 chains south and 80
chains east of N. E. corner of surveyed
lot 625, thenee north 80 chains; thence
east SO chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80  chains  to this post.
Staked Dec. lst.
Dee. 28 FRED. S. BUCK.
NOTICE is hereby given that I, James
Alfred Owens, prospector, Skidegate, B.
C, intend to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over 640
acres of land bounded as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted northeast corner, near the beach on south
shore of Skidegate Inlet, B.C.; Graham
Island, Queen Charlotte Group, supposed to be Section 6, Township 1;
thence running 80 chains south; thence
SO chains west; thence 80 chains north
to shore line; thence following shore line
to point of commencement; containing
640 acres, more or less.
Located  November  29th,  1907.
JAMES ALFRED OWENS,
Jan. 4 Locator.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Dislrict of Coast. Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—*
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank of Salmon River, about 2
miles north of the N. E. C. of Lot 50
and marked T. H. Taylor's S. W. C;
thence east 80 chains', thence north SO
chains; thence west 80 chains, more or
less, to bank of river; thence southerly
80 chatns along bank of river to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Staked December 6.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Salmon River, about 5
miles north of the N. E. C. of Lot 50
and marked T. H. Taylor's S. E. C.1
thenco wost 40 chains; thence north 40
chains; thonce east 40 chains; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence east 40
chains, moro or less, to River; thence
southerly along river 160 chains to point
of commencement.
Staked  December  7.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that I, Emily
Margaret Johnston, of Victoria, B.C., intend to apply for a licence to prospect
for coal and petroleum over 640 acres
of land bounded as follows:—Commencing at a post planted at the south-east
corner of section 33, township one (1),
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Group;
thence running 80 chains north; thence
SO chains east; thence 80 chains south;
thence 80 chains west to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more
or  less.
Located December  6th,  1907.
EMILY MARGARET JOHNSTON,
Locator.
Jan. 4. Christopher Johnson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—■
Commencing at a post planted on the
east batik of Kimsqult River, about 2
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. AV. C; thence east SO chains;
thence north SO chains; thence west 80
chains to bank of river; thence south 80
chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Staked  December  9.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
Intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank of Kimsqult River, about 3
miles  north  of the N.  W.  C.  of  B.  C.
DISTRICT   OF   RUPERT.
TAKE NOTICE that I, T. S. McPherson,  agent of Victoria,  B.C.,  intend  to
apply   for   special   timber   license   over
the following described lands:
1. Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles distant in a northwesterly
direction from the head of west arm of
Quatsino sound and marked N.E. Cor.
section 25, township 37, thence south 80
chains; thence west SO chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Staked December Bth, 1907.
2. Commencing at a post planted
ahout 4 mlles and in a northwesterly
direction from the head of west arm,
Quatsino Sound, marked S.E. Cor. Section 36, Township 37, thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thenoe east SO chains
to point of commencement.
Staked December 5th,  1907.
3. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile In a westerly direction
Claim No. 2; marked N.E. Cor., Section
26, Township 37; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chatns; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to point
of commencement.
Staked December Bth, 1907.
4. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile in a westerly direction
from Claim No. 2, marked S. E. Cor.,
Section 35, Township 37; thence north
80 ehains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Staked December Bth,  1907.
5. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile ln a northwesterly direction from claim No. 4, marked N.E.
Corner, Section 34, Township 37; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Commencing at a post planted one
mile distant ln a northwesterly direction from claim No. 4, marked S. E.
Corner, Section 3, Township 36; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains  to  point  of  commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
7. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile distant and In a northwest direction from claim No. 6, marked
S.E. corner, Section 9, Township 36;
thence north 80 chains', thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 6th, 1907.
8. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile ln a northwesterly direction from claim No. 7, marked S. E.
corner, section 17. township 36; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
9. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile distant in a westerly
direction from claim No. 8, marked S. E.
Corner, Section 18, Township 36; thence
COAST LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range One.
TAKE NOTICE that F. S. Buck of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation lumberman,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:
No. 3. Commencing at a post planted
on Gilford Island, at the head of a lake,
and at N.E. end of said lake, and about
40 chains south and about 60 chains
east from N.E. corner of surveyed lot
625, thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west. 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 2n, 1907.
No. 4. Commencing at a post planted
on Gilford Island, about 40 chains south
and 130 chains east from N.E. corner
of surveyed lot 625, thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains', thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Staked December 3rd, 1907.
No. 5. Commencing at a post planted
on Gilford Island, about 40 chains south
and 210 chains east from N.E. corner of
surveyed lot 625, thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west SO
chains; thence north SO chains to point
of commencement.
No. 6. Commencing at a post planted
on Gilford Island, at the S.E. corner
of T.L. 15806; thence west SO chains to
the S.W. of T. L. 16806, thence north 40
chains; thence west 20 chains; thence
south 80 chains (more or less) to north
shore of lake; thence east along shore
of lake 100 chains', thence north 40
chains (more or less) to point of commencement.
Staked December 2nd, 1907.
Dec. 28 F. S. BUCK.
No. 34—Commencing at a post planted
10 chains east of the N.W. corner of
No. 32, being about 10 chains east of
Young's River and about three miles
north of Blanked Bluff, being the S.W.
corner; thence north 160 chains; thence
east 40 chains; thence south 160 chains;
thence west 40 chains to point of commencement.
November  24th,   1907.
No. 35—Commencing at a post planted
at the S.E. corner, opposite No. 34 post,
being about 10 chains east of Young's
River, and about three miles north of
Blanket Bluff; thence north 160 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 160
chains; thence east 40 chains to point
of  commencement.
Nov.   24th,   1907.
No. 36—Commencing at a post planted
at the S.E. corner about 10 chains east
of the N.E. corner, 34 and 45 chains
east of Young's River, being flve miles
northerly from Blanket Bluff; thence
north' 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains   to   point   of   commencement.
November 24th,  1907.
.GEORGE YOUNG,
Dec. 28 J. W. Radly, Agent.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Superstructure of Swing Span.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
time for receiving tenders for the
Superstructure Metal for Swing Bridge,
North Arm, Fraser River, has been extended up to and including Friday, the
31st day of January, 1908.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., December 17th, 1907.
Dec. 28
NOTICE  TO  LOGGERS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Piles.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast.   Range   2.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young,
of Victoria, B.C., Timber Cruiser, in
tends to apply for special timber licences over the following described
lands:
No. 26—Commencing at a post planted
at the S.E. corner, near Clyak River,
being 6 mlles N.E. from the Junction
of Young and Clyak Rivers and opposite the N.E. corner of No. 16, thence
north 100 chains; thence west 64 chains;
thence south 100 chains; thence east 64
chains   to   point  of  commencement.
November   27th,   1907.
No. 27—Commencing at a post planted
at the S.W. corner, opposite the N. W.
Corner of N. 17, being about B chains
enst of Clyak River and about 7 miles
N.E. from the Junction of Young and
Clynk River, thence north 100 chains;
thence east 64 chains; thence south 100
chains; thence west 64 chains to point
of commencement.
November 27th, 1907.
No. 28—Commencing at a post planted
on the river bank at the S.W. corner
and opposite the N.W. corner of No.
27, being one-half mile northerly from
Bever Rapids, Clyak River; thence north
100 chains; thence east 64 chains; thence
south 100 chains; thence west 64 chains
to point of commencement.
November 27th,  1907.
No. 29—Commencing at a post planted
on the river bank at the S.E. corner
and opposite the N.E. corner of No.
26, being one-half mile south of Bever
Rapids, Clyak River; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains: thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
November 27th,  1907.
No. 30—Commencing at a post planted
on the bank at the S. E. corner and
opposite No. 28, being one-half mile
north of Bever Rapids, Clyak River,
thence north 100 chains; thence west 64
chains; thence south 100 chains; thence
east 64 chains to point of commencement.
November 27th,  1907.
No. 31—Commencing at a post planted
at the S. E. corner about 10 chains
west from the N.E. corner of No. 28,
on the river bank, about one and three-
quarter miles north of Bever Rapids on
Clyak River; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains to
point of commencement.
November   27th,   1907.
No. 32—Commencing at a post planted
at the S. W. corner, about flve (5)
chains east of Young's River, being
about nine and one-quarter miles from
its junction with Clyak River, and opposite the N. W. corner of No. 26; thenco
north 100 chains; thence east 64 chains;
thence south 100 chains; thence west
64 chains to point of commencement.
November 24th, 1907.
No. 33—Commencing at a post planted
at the S.E. corner about 6 chains east
of Young's River, being about nine and
one-quarter mlles from the junction of
Young and Clyak Rivers and opposite
No. 32; thence north 100 chains; thence
west 64 chains; thence south 100 chains;
thence east 64 chains to point of commencement.
November 24th, 1907.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that J. A. Johnson, of
Vancouver, cruiser, intends to apply for
a special timber licence over the following described lands:—
1. Commencing at a post planted on
the southwest corner of Leose No. 2;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west along south boundary of said lease
80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated  December  27th,  1907.
District of Rupert.
2. Commencing at a post planted on
the south bank of river running Into
Beaver Cove, and on the west boundary
of Lease No. 2; thence south 80 chains;
thence west SO chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east SO chains along bank
of said river to point of commencement.
Dated  December   27th,   1907.
District of Rupert.
3. Commencing at a post planted
about 80 chains west of west boundary
of Lease No. 2, and on south bank of
a river running into Beaver Cove; thence
south 160 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east
40 chains along bank of satd river to
point of  commencement.
Dated December 27 th, 1907.
District of Rupert.
4. Commencing at a post planted
about the southeast corner of T. L. No.
11,596; thence south 80 chains', thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chatns;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
District of Rupert.
5. Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains east of the south-east
corner of T. L. 11,395; thence east 160
chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
west 160 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
District of Rupert.
6. Commencing at a post planted
about 20 chains south of the southwest
corner of Lease No. 2; thence west 80
chains; thence south SO chains; thenee
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
Jan 4. J. A. JOHNSON.
ALTERNATIVE sealed tenders, superscribed "Tender for Piles, Bridge,
North Arm, Fraser River," will be received by the Honourable the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works,
Victoria, B. C, up to and including
Tuesday, the 31st of December, 1907,
for furnishing and delivering at the
bridge site on the North Arm of the
Fraser River, on the line of the Cemetery Road, fir and cedar piles.
About six hundred (600) will be required, varying in length from twenty
(20) to forty-five (46) feet. They must
be straight, sound, and not less than
ten (10 inches at the small end. No
butts will be accepted.
Further printed particulars can be obtained on application to the undersigned.
Tenderers must state the price per
lineal foot for piles delivered.
The successful tenderer will be furnished with a list giving the number
of piles required and the length of each.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certificate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, ln
the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars ($260), which shall be forfeited
If the party tendering decline or neglect
to enter into contract when called upon
to do so, or fail to complete the work
contracted for. The cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful ten-
tenderers will be returned to them upon  the  execution  of  the  contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the form supplied, signed
with the actual signatures of the tenderers, and enclosed in the envelope furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 30 Public Works Engineer.
LAND  REGISTRY ACT.
In the matter of an application for a
Duplicate   Certificate   of   Title   to
Lot 6 of Lot 7 of Section 10,  (Map
280),   Esquimalt   District,   Victoria
City.
Notice is hereby given that it is my
intention at the expiration of one month
from the first publication hereof to issue
a Duplicate of the Certificate  of Title
to said lot,  issued to George A. Cold-
well on the 6th day of June, 1899, and
numbered 6296C.
Land  Registry  Ofllce,   Victoria,   B.C..
the 21st day of November, 1907.
S.  Y.  WOOTTON,
Nov. 23 Registrar-General.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that Roland D. Craig,
of Vancouver, occupation Forester, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted one (1)
mile south and 20 chains west from
the southwest corner of L. 222, West
Fork of Adams River; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains.
December   20th,   1907.
Jan. 4 ROLAND D. CRAIG.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that M. J. Kinney, of
Portland, Ore., occupation Lumberman,
intends to apply for permission to lease
the  following described  land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Rupert
District, where the said line intersects
the shore line of the east side of Marble
Bay; thence northerly following the
shore line a distance of about 200
chains to the northeast corner of lot
316.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907
M. J. KINNEY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that The Quatsino
Power and Puly Company, of Victoria,
B.C., occupation, A Pulp Company, intends to apply for permission to least
the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Marble
Cove, Rupert District, where the said
line intersects the shore line on the
east side of Marble Bay; thence southerly following the shore line a distance
of about 120 chains to a point Intersecting the mouth of Marble Creek.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907.
THE QUATSINO POWER
&  PULP  COMPANY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert. Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that Enoch A. White,
of Victoria, B.C.. occupation Lumberman, Intends to apply for permission to
lease the following described foreshore:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of an Indian Reserve
at the head of Quatsino Narrows, Rupert
District, thenee southerly following the
shore line a distance of about 160 chains
to a point intersecting the mouth of
Marble Creek, Including small Island on
north   lino  of  section   10.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson. Agent.
Superstructure of Swing Span.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Superstructure Metal for
Swing Bridge, North Arm, Fraser
River," will be received by the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works, Victoria, B.C., up to and including Tuesday, the 31st of December,
1907, for manufacturing and delivering,
f. o. b., scow at Vancouver or New
Westminster, all the metal work required for the superstructure of a steel
swing span.
Drawings, specifications, condition of
contract and tender may be seen by
Intending tenderers on and after Tuesday, the 26th of November, 1907, at
the offlce of the Public Works Engineer,
Lands and Works Department, and at
the offlce of the Provincial Timber In
spector, Court House, Vancouver, B.C.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certlflcate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner in
the sum of two hundred and fifty ($260)
dollars, which shall be forfeited if the
party tendering decline or neglect to
enter into contract when called upon
to do so. The cheques or certificates
of deposit of successful tenderers will
be returned to them upon the execution
of the contract.
The successful tenderer will be
called upon to furnish a bond, himself
and two securities, satisfactory to the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, ln
the sum of $1,000 each, or to furnish a
bond of a Guarantee Company satisfactory to the Honourable the Chief
Commissioner in the sum of $3,000 for
the due fulfilment ot the work contracted for.
Upon the execution of the contract
and a satisfactory bond being supplied,
signed with the actual signatures of the
tenderers and enclosed in the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 30 Public Works Engineer.
DISTRICT  OF CASSAIR.
TAKE NOTICE that The Hidden Creek
Mining Co.,  of Vancouver,  occupation,
 , intends to apply for permission
to  lease  the  following described land,
about 40 acres:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of Lot 479; thence following high water mark south and
west to the southeast corner of Lot 308;
thence east flve chains; thence north
and east following a line parallel to
high water mark about 80 chains to a
point 5 chains south of point of commencement and thence to said point of
commencement.
Dated Nov. 26th, 1907.
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Dec. 7 Per J. Herrick MacGregor.
TAKE NOTICB that George Young
and Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C., Timber Dealers, Intend to apply for the
rite to purchase the following described
lands In Kildalla Bay, Rivers Inlet; commencing at this post planted on the east
side of the Bay about one-third of a
mile from the point at the mouth of the
Bay, being the southwest eorner post;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 90 chains to beach;
thence south along beach to point of
commencement; containing 40 acres,
more or less.
Staked Nov.  25. 1907.
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL.
Dec. 7 George Young, Agent. THE WEtiK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 25,  1908.
11
The Uncongenial Pump.
.' "That famous temperance reformer, the late Francis Murphy," said a
Pittsburg man, "had many an odd
adventure in the course of his very
useful life.
"He once told me of a case where
a drinking man with a neat joke got
for the moment a little the beter of
him in an argument.
"The man was a clubman, a bon
vivant, famous for his wine cellar,
and Mr. Murphy read him a strong
lecture on the drink evil.
. "But the bon vivant only smiled,
shook his head and said:
" 'Well, Mr. Murphy, I have seen
many a pleasant party round a table,
but I have never seen one round a
pump.' "
chase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of lot 1293, M. S.
McLeod, one-half mile west of Jap Inlet Porcher Island, thence south 20
chains; thence west SO chains; thence
north 20 chains; thehce east 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 160 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
Jan. 18 J. J. TEMPLETON.
Southeast  Corner,   situated    about    40 mouth of Evelyn River; thence east 120
chains north and 40 chains east of Lpt chains;  thence south 40 chains;  thence
325, N.E. Cor.; thence 40 chains north; west SO ehains; thence south 40 chains;
thence 40 chains west; thence 40 chains thence west 40 chains; thence north 80
south;  thence  60  chains  east  to  point chains to point of commencement,
of commencemnent, containing 240 acres. Nov. 9th,  1907.
Dated  November  16,   1907.
De. 14 MARK BRENNAN.
A Fine  Point.
"Tt?s the little things that count,"
remarked the man with mouse-colored whiskers.
"How now?"
"Once I wrote a book and called it
"How to  Grow  Beautiful.'"
"Well?"
"We didn't sell a copy. After some
cogitation I changed the title to 'How
to Remain Beautiful,' and the ladies
swamped us with orders. You've got
to study woman nature if you want
to get rich."
His Remedy.
A pompous city official upon reaching his home one evening, found the
street blockaded ancl a heap of earth
piled against his doorstep. Observing
a workman wielding his shovel in a
near-by ditch, he accosted a passing
policeman and complained that the
laborer was trespassing upon private
property.
"\vhat do yez mean by trowin'
dirrt on th' gintleman's steps?" demanded the officer, pompously.
. "Sure, an' there's no other place
t' throw it, ?1 ye mind!" replied the
workman, indifferently,
"Well, thin, in that case, yez hed
better. dig another hole and trow it
in there."
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 1—Commencing at a post
planted 80 chains west of southwest
corner of Timber Limit No. 3193, thence
north' 80 chains; thenee east SO chains;:
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th Dec, 1907.
THOMAS MILER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan 18
, VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation, Timber
Cruisers, intends to, apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 2—Commencing at a post
planted 80 chains west of southwest corner of Timber Limit No. 13193; thence
north 80 chains; thence west SO chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan 18
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
on the south bank of the Sheemahantz
River, five chains west of the mouth
of Marvel Creek, being the southeast
ccirner, thence west 64 chains; thence
north 100 chains; thence east 64 chains
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Kathleen Lake.;
TAKE NOTICE that Enoch A. White,
of   Victoria,   B.C.,   lumberman,   intends thence   south   100   chains   to   point   of
to  apply   for  a  special   timber  license commeneement.
over the foUowing described  lands: Nov. 8th, 1907.
8. Commencing at a PQSt planted at No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
the southwest corner of T. L. 16,381, on 10 chains east of the southeast corner
Kathleen Lake, marked "E. A. W.'s N.W. of T. L. 14065, and about ono and one-
corner post to Claim No. 8"; thence half miles west of the Neechantz River
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains; being the northeast corner post; thenco
thence north SO chains; thence west 80 south 100 chains; thence west 64 chains;
chains  to  commencement. thence north 100 chains; thence west 64
Staked November 30th,  1907. chains to point of commencement.
District of Rupert, Kathleen Lake. GK0RGE Y0UNG & ARTHUR BELL,
thence east 80 chains;  thence south  80
chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains distant and in an easterly direction from east bank of Quatham River, about ten and one-half miles
east of Ramsy Arm; thence west 80
chains; thence north SO chains; thence
east SO chains; thenee south SO chains.
21st December,   1907.
MAX. J. CAMERON,
Jen 18 L. W. Kingsley, Agent.
Dec. 14
George Young, Agent.
1. Commencing at a post  planted  at	
the southeast corner of T. L. 13,045, on m^tx*. wi.-si'uiiieTi'ii i lunnni-puicn
Kathleen Lake, marked "E. A. W.'s S.W. NEW WESTMINS IER LAND D1S1R1C1
corner   post   to   Claim   No.   1";   thence
District of New Westminster.
""" " ^nSi;40thXa^°rtthhef,°eeCS  l^Vy°^_^±l_tS^,
west   jiu   chains,   ineni-e   soutn   in,„nrla ,n nnlliv fnr „,,,„i.,i„n tr. iuu
thence
20 chains  to  T.  L.  13,045;  thence  fol
lowing north line of T.  L.  13,045  east
and south to commencement.
Staked  November 30th,  1907.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Dec. 21 T. D. Harris, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruiser, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 3—Commencing at a post
planted 80 chains west of southwest corner of Timber Limit No. 13193; thence
east 160 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence west 60 chains; thence north 40
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Buffling-
ton Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation Gentleman, Intends to apply for
a special timber licence over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted twenty
chains north of the northeast corner of
section 12, thence forty chains north,
one hundred and twenty chains west,
forty chains south and one hundred and
twenty chains east to point of commencement.
Dated   21st December,  1907.
FRANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
Jan  18 R. W. Wilkinson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Bufflngton
Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Gentleman, Intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of section 21, thence
eighty chains east, eighty chains south,
eighty chains west and eighty chains
north  to point  of  commencement.
Dated 21st December, 1907.
FRANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
Jan  IS R. W. Wilkinson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S.. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 5—Commene'ng at a post
planted 40 chains west of the northwest corner of Timber Limit No. 18544,
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains; thence
west 40 chains to point of commencement.
Located  Sth December,  1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan 18
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 6—Commencing at a post
planted 40 chains west and 10 chains
south of the southwest corner of timber limit No. 18546, thenee west 40
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south about 60
chains; thence easterly along shore 120
chains; thence north about 60 chains to
point of commencement.
Located 9th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan. IS
intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described  land:
Commencing at a post planted on the
N. E. Coast of Savary Island and about
25 chains from the easterly end of the
Island, thence west 20 chains to low
water mark; thence south 400 chains
along low water mark; thence east 20
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound. chains to high water mark; thence north
(c) Commencing at a post planted at  400 chains  to point of commencement,
the northeast corner of P. R.  1,745, on  and   containing   eight   hundred   acres,
Marble Creek, marked "E. A. W.'s N.W.   more or less.
corner post to Claim C";  thence south      Dated Dec.  2nd,  1907.
40 chains; thence east 40 chains; thence  Dec.14      HARRY  McMICKENKEEFER.
south 40 chains; thence east 20 chains;	
thence north  40 chains; thence east 40  NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
east 20 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 120 chains to commencement.
Staked December 5th, 1907.
Dated Victoria, B.C., Dec.  10th,  1907.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick Patrick Rogers of Vancouver, occupation
carpenter, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
(d) Commencing at a post planted at S.  W.  corner of  Lot  1347,. G.  1.,  New
the   northwest   corner  of   Lot   192,   on Westminster   district;    thence   west 20
Quatsino  Narrows, marked  "E. A. W.'s cliains;  thence north  20 chains;  thence
S. W. corner post to Claim D."; thence east 20 chains; thence south 20 chains
east  about  30  chains  to  T.   L.   14,467; to  point  of  commencement,   containing
thence   nortli   80   chains;   thence   east io acres more or less,
about 80 chains to Marble Creek; thence      Dated  November  26th,   1907.
north  and  west along shore  to  Indian FREDERICK PATRICK ROGERS.
Reserve;   thence south  and  west  along Dec.14
line of Indian Reserve to Quatsino Nat- —
rows; thence following shore of said
narrows southwesterly to commence-
ment.
Dated Victoria, December 10th, 1907.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Dec. 21
SKEENA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
NOTICE is nereoy given  that thirty
days  after date 1  intend  to apply  to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
Thomas D. Harris, Agent,   and   Works   for   a   special   license   to
Arthur Gore.
Manaser
TIMBER MAPS
Office Phone 153 _.
Residence 4-33.
ELECTRIC BLUEPRINTS, MAP CO.
VICTORIA. BC.
CHANCEI.Y    CHAMBERS,
BLUEPRINTING
SZ LANGLEY   STREET.
DRAUGHTING OFFICE.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Bufflngton
Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Gentleman, intends to apply for a spe*
cial timber licence over the following
described   lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of section 20, thence
eighty chains west, eighty chains south,
eighty chains east and eighty cliains
north  to place of commencement.
Dated  21st December,  1907.
FRANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
Jan  18 R. W. Wilkinson.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that William Croteau
of Aldermere, B.C., occupation Farmer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner; thence north 20 chains
to McClure Lake; thence along McClure
Lake In an east southerly direction 43
chains, more or less; thence west 40
chains to place of beginning and making 40 acres more or less, and known
as the southwest fractional quarter section of 36, township 5, Range 6.
Dated November 20, 1907.
Jan. 18 WILLIAM CROTEAU.
Complete    set of Maps showing alt
TIMBER   LICENCES
and other Lands  taken  up in Br itish Columbia.
Blue  Prints  can be   obtained at short notice
LICENCE TO AN EXTRA-PROVINCIAL
COMPANY.
"Companies Act, 1897.'
prospect for coal upon the following
described land, situate on Graham
Island, Queen Charlotte Group, In the
Province of British  Columbia.
Commencing at a post marked M. B.'s
S. W. Corner post, placed at the S. W.
corner of section 24, township 10, thonce
east  10 ehains; thence north 40 chains
Canada:
Province of British Columbia.
No.  417.
THIS   is   to  certify   that   "The  New   thenee west 40 chains; thence south 40
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Oresby
Wonkes of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Civil Engineer, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land—on Porcher Island:
Commencine at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 1292, about 2
miles distant and in a southeasterly direction from Jap Bay; tiience north 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing
160  acres,   more  or  less.
Dated Dec. 20th, 1907.
Jan 18 ARTHUR WOAKES.
SKEENA LAND  DISTRICT.
District  of  Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that W. N. Campbell
of Victoria, occupation Civil Engineer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase  the  following  described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of. lot 1294, (J.R.
Cody) one mlle west of Jap Inlet, Porcher Island, thence north 40 chains;
tiience west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains: thence east 40 chains, containing  160  acres.
Dated Dec. 16th, 1907.
__.  N.  CAMPBELL,
Jan IS J. J. Templeton, Agent.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that J. J. Templeton
of   Vietoria,   occupation   surveyor,   Intends  to  apply for  permission  to  pur-
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Jennie Croteau
of Aldermere, B.C., occupation housewife, intends to apply for permission to
purchase  the  following described  land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner; thence north 40 chs.;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence west 40 chains to place
of beginning and known as the northwest quarter section of 30, Tp. 6, Rge.
5,   and   containing   160   acres,   more  or
Dated  23rd of November,  1907.
Jan. IS WILLIAM CROTEAU.
'<€?_* fi}_'irr*>
LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
Private Bills.
The time limited by the rules of the
house for the presentation of petitions
for leave to introduce private bills expires on Monday, 27 January, 1908.
Bills must be presented to the house
by Thursday, 6th February, 1908.
Reports on bills will not be received
after Thursday, 13th February,  1908.
Copies of the bill, petition ancl notices must be deposited with the undersigned, and the house fees paid, not
later than Wednesday, 8th January,
1908.
Dated this 2nd clay of December,
1907.
THORNTON FELL,
Clerk of the Legislative Assembly.
Zealand   Insurance  Company"   is  aulh
orised and licensed to carry on business
within  the Province of British  Columbia, and to carry out or effect all or any   ^
of the objects of the Company to which   __?_____]_
the legislative authority of the Leglsla-     	
ture of British Columbia extends.
The  head   offlce  of  the  Company   ls
hains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
Dated November 27th, 10.30 a.m., 1907.
MURRAY BROWN.
J. E.  Doyen, Agent.
DISTRICT OS  CASSIAR.
TAKE    NOTICE    that    The    Hidden
situate at the City of Auckland, in the Creek Mining Co.,  or Vancouver,  occu-
Colony of New Zealand. patlon, , Intends to apply for per-
The   amount   of   the   capital   of   the mission to lease the following described
Company is one million pounds, divided land, about 3 acres:
into  ten  thousand  shares  of  one  nun- Commencing at a post planted at the
dred pounds each. south eaat corner post of Lot 479; thence
The   head   offlce  of  the   Company   In north  one  chain;   thence  southwesterly
this Province is situate at Victoria, and parellel  to high  water mark,  about 30
James   Hill   Lawson,   merchant,   whose chains   to   west  boundary  of  Lot  479;
address is Victoria ,B.C, is the attorney thence south about one chain forty links
for the Company. to  high  water mark and  thence along
Given   under   my   hand   and   seal   of high water mark to point of commence-
offlce  at  Victoria,   Province  of  British ment.
Columbia,  this  28th  day  of  November, Dated Nov, 25th, 1907
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Dec. 7 Per J. Herrick MacGregor.
one thousand nine hundred  and  seven.
(L. S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company   XIlr,,,, ,,,^,C,„,„T_.,C,.„„„ T ,»m™omr,,n**.
has been  established and  licensed are:   NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
To carry on the business of fire and
marine insurance in all Its branches or
District of Coast, Range 1,
TAKE NOTICE that Max. J. Cameron,
such of those branches as the Com- 0f Vancouver, Merchant, intends to ap-
pany shall from time to time determine. p|v for n special timber licence over
and to do all such other things as aro n/o following described lands
Incidental   or  conducive  to   the  attain
ment of those objects.
Dec. 14.
B.C.
Timber Maps
TAKE NOTICE that M. Brennan, of
Ootso Lake, occupation Farmer, Intends
to apply for permission to lease the
following   described   land:
Commencing at a post marked M. B.
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
ahout 6 miles from Ramsay Arm, nn the
main Quatham River, S. W. corner;
thenco east 80 chains; thence north SO
chains: thonce west SO chains; thenee
south so chains to point of commencement.
20th December, 1907.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
about 6 miles from Ramsay Arm. on the
main Quatham River: S. E. Corner:
thence 160 chains N.; 10 chains W.; 160
chains south; 10 chains east to point of
commencement.
December 20th. 1907.
No. 8—Commenolng at a.post planted
about one chain distant nnd In nn easterly direction from Quatham Ulver,
nbout seven miles east of Ramsay Arm,
thenco west SO ehnlns; thenco nortli 30
chains: thence east SO chains; thenee
south   SO chains.
■JOtli December, 1907.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about one chnln distant and In an easterly direction from Quatham River,
ahout seven miles east nf Unmsny Arm.
thonoo ensl SO chains; thence north SO
chains; thence west ,'0 chains; thenco
south SO chains.
2lst December, 1907.
No. n—Commencing at a post planted
nhout 40 chnins illslant  nnd in an east-
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT   erly  direction   from   east   bnnk   of Qua
of All Districts
VANCOUVER MAP and BLUE-PRINT CO.
Suite 20-21 Crowe and Wilson
Chambers,
VANCOUVER, B. C.
District of Coast, Range
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
and Arthur Bell of Victoria, B.C., Timber Dealers, intend to apply for special
license over the following described
lands on the Sheemahantz River, Rivers
Inlet:
tham River, nhout eight and ono.half
miles east of Unmsny Arm: thonco west
so chains: thence north SO chains; thenco
east SO chains; thence south 80 ehains.
21st Decemher, 1007.
No. 6—Commonclng at a post planted
ahout 10 ihnlns distant nnd In an east-
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted erly direction from east bank of Qun-
on tho south bank of the Sheemahantz tham Ulver. nhout nine and one-half
River at the northwest corner, being one miles enst of Ramsay Arm; thence west
mlle  east  and  10  chains   soutli  of  the   sn   chains;     thence    north     80   ehains;
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that Ed. Brown, of
Vancouver, B.C., Cruiser, intends to apply for a special timber license over the
following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
on south shore of Burke Channel, about
one mile west of Lot No. 241A; thence
south SO chains; thence east 80 chains;
thonce nortli SO chains to shore line of
Burke Channel; thence west along shore
line SO chains more or less, to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated December 16, 1907.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
on south shore of Burke Channel, about
three mlles west of Lot No.241 A; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 160 chains;
thence north 40 chains more or less, to
shore line of Burke Chanel; thence west
along shore line 160 chains more or less
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile south of Lot No. 241A,
on bank of Newcomb River, Burke Channel, thence north 80 chains; thence west
SO chains', thence south SO chains;
thenee east 80 ehains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile south of lot No. 241A,
Burke Channel, adjoining post of claim
No. 3; thence north 80 chains; thence
east SO chains; thence south SO chains;
thence west SO chains to point of commeneement, and eontalnlng 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 5—Commencing at a post planted
about 2 miles south of Lot No. 241 A,
Burke Channel, and one mile south of
corner post of claim No. 3 and 4; thence
north SO chains; thence east SO chains;
thence south SO chains; thence west SO
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 6—Commencing at a post, planted
about 4 miles south of lot No. 241A.
Burke Channel, and two mlles south of
S. W. corner of Claim No. 5; thence
west 40 chains; thence north 160 chains;
thenee east 40 chains; thence south 160
chains to point of commencement and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
about four and one-half miles south
of lot No. 241A. Burke Channel; on a
bank of a small rivor about one-half
mile east of claim No. 6; thence north
SO chains; thenee east 80 chains; thence
south SO chains; thence west SO chains
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 8—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles east of claim No. 7, on
north hank of unnamed river, emptying
Into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel, thence north SO chains; thence west
SO ehains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east SO cliains to point of commencement, and eontalnlng 610 acres more or
less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 9—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile south of Claim No. 8,
nn north bank of small river emptying
Into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel; thenee south 40 chains; thence west
160 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 160 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile east of claim No. 9,
on north bnnk of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel; thence north SO chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commeneement. and containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 11—Commencing at a post planted
ahout one mile east of Claim No. !>, and
adjoining eorner post of claim No. 10
on north bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lnke. south of Burke channel; thence west 80 ehnlns; thence south
SO chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north SO chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or
less.
Dated December 17, 1907.
No. 12—Commencing nt a post planted
about 20 chains west of Claims No. 9
and 10, on south hank of smnll river
emptying Into Koeye Lnke, south of
Burke Channel, thence north 160 chains;
thence cast 40 chains; thence south 160
ehnlns; thenco wost 10 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
Dated December 17, 1907.
Nn. 13—Commencing nt a post planted
nhout one anil one-half miles south of
the head nf Koeye Lake, snuth of litirko
Channel, thenco east SO chnins; thenee
north SO cliains; thence west SO ehains
to shoro line of Koeye Lake; thence
smith along shore line SO chains tn point
nf commencement nnd eontnlulng 640
acres  more or less.
Dated   December   18th,    1907.
No. 14—Commencing nt a post planted
about one and one-hnlf miles south of
tlio head of Kneye Lake, south of Burke
Channel, thenee oast so chnins; thence
soutli SO chains; thence west SO ehains
to shore of Koeye Lake, thence north
along shore SO chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres.
Hated December 18th, 1907.
No. 15—CommencinK at a post planted about one-half milo enst from the
foot of Koeye Lake, on the north shore
of said lake; thenee north SO chains;
thence enst SO chnins; thence soutb SO
chnins; tn shore of Koeye Lnke: thence
west along shore of said lake SO chnins
to point of commencement, nnd containing 610 ncres, more or less.
Dated December 18th, 1907.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles south of Lot 211A.
Burke Channel, nnd about one mile south
of corner post of claims No. 3 and I;
thenco north so chains; thonoe west sn
chains*, thence south so chains; thenee
ensl so ehnlns to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more nr less.
Dated December ioth. 1907.
No. 17—Commencing at a post planted
ahout two miles south of Lot No. 211 A.
Burke Channel, and one mile south of
corner post of claims No. 3 nnd *1: thehce
east SO chnins: thence south SO chains:
thence west  SO chains: thenee north  SO
ehains to point of commencement, and
containing 6 10 ncres more or loss.
Dated December 1 nth. 1907.
Jan. 18 ED. BROWN. THE WEEK, SATURDAY JANUARY 52, 1908,
SPLENDID ADDRESS.
Continued from Page 7.
continent, fortunately in a less degree in British Columbia than elsewhere. The demand for the product of our mills in the praiie country and abroad has greatly fallen off.
However, the air seems to have cleared, the financial panic seems to have
been about exhausted, and the mill-
men of the interior are making preparations for a very largely increased output for the coming season.
While dealing with the lumber industry, I would like to make a few suggestions in connection therewith.
Coming, as I do, from a constituency
where the operations in this direction
are very extensive, I have naturally
fallen very much in contact with the
operators who are engaged in this industry. The regulations under which
the industry is governed, provides for
a survey being made of the lands held
under special licenses before any timber can be removed.
Makes Suggestions.
"Now, in the staking of timber limits, like the staking of mineral claims,
which in their initial staking, do not
require any survey, it is found that
many mistakes have occurred in descriptions, and so on, of these holdings. In many instances a claim
which is supposed to cover a mile of
country is found, on a survey being
made, to contain much less, and often, too, it is found that in the case
of adjoining claims that a small strip
of timber will remain unlocated,
standing between different locations.
Now, if it were possible to arrange
by regulation that the fractions so
found could be added as a part of
one or the other of the original locations, subject to the payment of whatever should be considered reasonable
by the government from the license
holders, this land could be acquired,
and the timber cut therefrom; I am
convinced that it would have a most
splendid result in the prevention of
forest fires. It is a well known fact
that fires originate very often in old
slashings that have been cut over and
denuded of all available timber, and
if these small strips separating licenses are to be reserved, they will,
undoubtedly, fall a prey to forest
fires, which at certain seasons of the
year are so common. Another feature of the act which has been called
to my attention i sthe severe application of the act as regards the renewal
of timber licenses. Owing to the reserve which has been placed upon
timber lands, it is now a regulation
that immediately a license lapses or is
not renewed by payment of fee on the
very day upon which it lapses, that
the property immediately falls into
possession of the Crown, and the original holder has no further interest
in it. It might be possible that the
original owner had paid many thousands of dollars for his right to this
land, and through an error, probably
of a junior clerk in his office, the
application for renewal, and the necessary fees had not been forwarded
to the department. It would occur
to me that a case of this kind would
certainly bc entitled to some consideration, and I would suggest that
the act be so amended as to give the
timber holders some little concession
in the way of grade covering a period
of, say of thirty days, and subject to
a payment if necessary of some further fee, in order that his holdings
would not be forfeited in such a way.
I am sure that a measure of this nature would be most generously appreciated by the millmen and others, and
I cannot see where any harm can befall the government in following the
course as I have outlined.
Agriculture and Horticulture.
"It is with pleasure we have to record, as the speech from the throne
indicates, a year of great activity of
agriculture and horticulture. It is very
gratifying to note that our fruit displays, in the able hands of Mr.
Palmer, our commissioner of freight
rates, and Mr. Burrell, a fruit grower
of thc Boundary country, are attracting so much attention at the different exhibitions in the Old Country, where they are being, at the present time, displayed. It is gratifying
to learn that a number of prizes for
fruit has again fallen to the Province
of British Columbia, in competition
with  the  whole  world.
Civil Service Reform.
Reference is made in the speech tc
the introduction of a measure applying to the civil service and the establishment of a superannuation fund
for those engaged in the civil service
of the Province. While the service
and the officials connected therewith
are second to none on this continent.
I feel convinced all will agree with
me that a reform in the system of appointments by a provision for qualifying examinations before a board of
examiners, will have a tendency to
further extend the standard of efficiency in this direction, to keep pace
with the requirements and growing
development of the province. The
feature of establishment of a superannuation fund must, I am sure, appeal to us all, and especially to those
who are associated with the service.
While the bill is not before us, and
I am not acquainted with its provis-
sions, I would suppose that an allowance is made from the general revenues of the country for a nucleus for
this fund which will be further augmented and supplemented by further
yearly or monthly allowances from
the salaries of civil servants of the
Province. As an old civil servant of
the Province, I heartily approve of
legislation in this direction, and extend my thanks to the provincial secretary for his attention to this important question.
Change in Fiscal Year.
A change in the fiscal year, outlined in the speech, from June 30, as
at present, to April, will, I am convinced, be found a move in the right
direction, especially in the department
of public works. Under the present
system the public works of the Province are generally delayed very materially through the fact that the
fiscal year does not begin until July
1, and, as a consequence, the appropriations voted by the different sessions held, as a rule, in the early
months of the year, are not available
at the time of year when a great deal
of valuable work could well be undertaken, besides which the change will
have the advantage of making our
fiscal year correspond with that of
Ottawa.
Question of Surveys.
The question of surveys in the
Province is one which has often been
under discussion in this legislature,
and is one too, of utmost importance
to the Province. The cost entailed
in a system of extensive surveys in
a Province presenting the extraordinary physical conditions of British Columbia must be enormous, but it is
fortunate, indeed, that the expanding
revenues of the Province appear to
make it possible, in the near future,
to make considerable progress in this
direction to keep pace with what is
anticipated will shortly be a very active development, especially in the
northern part of the Province.
Presents the Address.
I have, therefore, Mr. Speaker,
much pleasure in moving the following resolutions:
Mr. Taylor moved, seconded by
Mr. Schofield:
That a humble address be presented
to his honour the lieutenant-governor,
t'o thank his honour for his gracious
speech at the opening of the present
session, and further to assure his
honour that:
1. We are pleased to be congratulated on the prosperity which during the past year has prevailed in
nearly all lines of trade and industry
in this Province.
2. We shall peruse with great interest the report and recommendations of the commission on irrigation, the appointment of which was
authorized last session, and we shall
carefully consider any legislation introduced to secure a more equitable
and efficient system of distribution of
water for irrigation purposes.
3. We think the large increase in
immigration, with the consequent demand for land under pre-emptions,
warrants his honour's government in
asking that a larger sum than usual
be placed in the estimates for an extension of our provincial surveys.
5. We shall carefully consider any
measure laid  before us  with a view
Angell
Engraving Co.
PHOTO-ENORAVERS
and DESIONERS
In All Branches
518 Hastings St.
Vancouver, B. C.
to the restriction of the immigration
of undesirable persons.
5. The construction of railways
would doubtless be encouraged and
expedited by a measure exempting
from taxation for a period of ten
years from time of completion certain
railways already authorized.
6. We are pleased to be informed
that there will be submitted to us the
report of the honourable the first
minister touching his mission to London as a representative of his honour's
government, to lay before the Imperial government the fact of the refusal of the Federal government to
entertain British Columbia's claim for
more adequate and equitable treatment in the matter of provincial subsidies.
7. We consider a more efficient
service in the conduct of our public
business would be effected by a measure regulating the civil service and
creating a superannuation fund.
8. We agree with his honour that
the necessity of our youth going
abroad to perfect themselves in the
arts and sciences would be largely
obviated by the establishment of a
provincial university.
9. We deem it advisable for the
more convenient prosecution of public
works under appropriation by the
legislature, and with the object of
securing uniformity between the federal and provincial systems in the
method of accounting and in the collection of statistics, that the commencement of the financial year
should be changed from July to April.
10. We are pleased to be informed
that the finances of the Province are
in excellent condition, and that this
has enabled his honour's government
to effect a large reduction in the public debt, while still being able to show
a substantial surplus over the actual
expenditure.
11. Measures submitted to us designed to secure to the Province the
full benefits that should accrue to the
treasury from the utilization of the
resources of the Province, will have
our earnest support.
12. We learn with pleasure that
the public accounts for the past financial year, and the estimates for the
coming year, will be laid before us,
and that the estimates have been
framed with due regard to economy,
while providing for the outlay necessary to meet the requirements of the
public service in a province the scene
of important industrial development.
13. We agree with his honour in
thinking that on account of the increase in the demands for public
works and buildings, and the development taking place in the northern
parts of the Province, it is advisable
to create the office of minister of
public works.
IS. We join his honour in hoping
that our deliberations will result in
promoting the welfare of the people
of the Province.
The North Ward youngsters have
started the season with a win from
Nanaimo in a hard match. This is a
strong combination, and if kept together will make any team of their
age in the Province go some to win.
A "Ross" Limerick.
Miss Myrtle Sorella Petrina De Moss
To find out good values is never at loss;
She will read these Ad Rhymes
In the "Week," "Col." and "Times,"
To get these grand bargains of Dixi H. Ross.
TEA, the famous "Dixi" blend, per lb 35c, 50c and $1.00
COFFEE, the famous "Dixi" blend, per lb 30c, 40c and 50c
DANISH  RYE  BISCUITS
The very latest delicacy, per box     60c
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
INDEPENDENT GROCERS, 1316 GOVERNMENT ST.
The Victoria West intermediates
wcre fortunate in making a draw at
Ladysmith on Saturday, but it is expected that they will be able to make
the necessary goals to win in the
match in this city.
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
The
Poodle
Dog
Grill
Yates Street
Victoria, B. 0„ is
The only real
Grill in British
Columbia—the
only plaoe
where you oan
actually obtain
your choice of
meats and all
the delioaoies of
_________________________________________     to  season.
SMITH & SHAUGHNESSY
Proprietors
Yates Street, Victoria, B. C.
0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
When You Know
Where To Go
for your work, you find that well
made clothes cost no more than
most poorly made ones. We employ only the most thoroughly
trained union operators. We use
only the best materials and
charge only living prices.
SCOTLAND WOOLEN MILLS
39 Johnson Street,
VICTORIA.
538 Hastings Street,
VANCOUVER.
SHREWD
HOUSEHOLDERS
Soon see the great advantage,
both to health and pocket-book,
that there is in installing a good
QAS RADIATOR
Which will heat the whole room
in a few minutes. No dirt, no
bother. Saves health, money,
time and temper. Let us show
you our choice new heaters. All
prices.
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, Ltd.
CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS. , fTYinnnfVTnrvTrBTBTinniTffTsTP
Kingsford Smith & Co. i
Stock and General
AUCTIONEERS
Commission and Real Estate Agents.
WO OranviHe, Vaacoaver.
tAJULMJI_»UUUUUI,.«..M.JUUUUUUA!
Vancouver Edition
The Week
fl British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vancouver B. 6.
'OL. IV.   No. .52
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 25, 1908
Among the new legislations
'he Coal foreshadowed is an increase
'*•*• in the coal tax.    Hitherto
the royalty on coal has been
cents per ton.   Under the proposed new
iw it will be 10 cents.   In view of the
rosperous condition of the Province and
[aormous increase in the demand for fuel,
is just as reasonable that the Govern-
■lent should seek increased revenue from
ial, as from any other of our natural re-
.mrces.     All   timber   lands   have   been
laced in reserve in order that  a wise
">licy may be evolved, a policy which will
it only ensure the meeting of every de-
and for lumber, but to some extent aug-
ent the revenues.    Tlie same reasoning
iplies to coal.    Ten years ago the only
,wincing mines in the Province were on
lancoiiver Island.   Since then the tonnage
s more than doubled, and the demand
*.s never been satisfied.   Coal is selling in
ancouver at $7, a ton, and the same in
ictoria, which must leave the producer a
jar profit of at least $2 a ton.   A new
terprise is selling its stock in botli cities
I. this basis, and assures purchasers that
is able to contract for the whole of its
oduetion for years ahead on the basis of
.50 at the mine.   Other companies which
iv make less profit on raw coal, make at
ist equal if not greater profit on coke, so
it taken altogether coal operators have
possible ground to complain against the
iverninent for fixing the royalty at ten
its, and it is hardly reasonable to expect
it they will have the hardihood to seri-
■>ly oppose the proposition.   If they do,
Is certain that they will not be supported
I' public opinion, which in that event
uld undoubtedly demand an investiga-
h to ascertain all the conditions periling to coal mining.
(e New
nister.
Nothing
more   has   been
heard about the division of
the     Lands    and    Works
Department, and the crea-
■n    of    a    new    portfolio    for    tho
.er.     It    is    hoped,    however,    that
len tho choice is made, the claims of the
;erior will not be lost sight of.   During
regime of the late Chief Commissioner,
lotenay had Cabinet representation.   It
mr mining section, the largest contribute our Provincial revenues and   has
try claim undoubtedly to representation,
■ongside it is the great Okanagan coun-
■, whose agricultural and fruit-growing
bsibilities have done more to advertise
iii Province than any other section.   In
[j respected member for the Okanagan,
V. Price Ellison, the Conservative party
s a most capable and popular member,
lie who tenjoys special qualifications for
office   of   Chief   Commissioner   of
prks.   In the gifted member for Fernie,
'. W. R. Ross, also lie the potentialties
successful   Ministerial   work.    These
> gentlemen would seem to have a prior
I im to £iiy in that district, although it
ild only be fair to class with them the
jnber for Revelstoke, except that  Mr.
-dor is so invaluable in his present posi-
|i of Party Whip that he could hardly
!spared.    There is a feeling in the In-
or that the Coast has all along 1110110-
zed the Ministerial positions and that
•ould only be fair to recognize tho iin-
^ance of the Province by giving the
Portfolio to the Interior.    Undoubt-
the first consideration must be thc
and   that  such  a  consideration  is
fiermost in the mind of the Premier was
I. illustrated in his admirable choice of
Provincial Secretary, but when tho per-
al qualifications and the claims of the
trict coincide, it should not bo difficult
EDITORIAL
to recognize the principle of fairness involved, and The Week voices the very
widespread opinion throughout the Kootenay and Okanagan when it respectfully
urges the claims of Mr. Price Ellison and
Mr. Ross.
The  Week calls  attention
Fife to   a   circumstance   which
Protection.        may    not    be      generally
known, that right at our
doors we have a deposit of the
finest roofing slate, equal in every
respect to the celebrated Welsh slate. This
slate has been used upon a few large buildings in Victoria, notably upon the Drill
Shed, and it does seem an anomaly that
wooden shingles should still be used, at
any rate within the fire limits of Victoria
and Vancouver. Apart from the question
of economy, there is the question of fire
protection. Anyone who has seen a big
fire in the West, notably that whicli occurred in Victoria last summer, entailing
the loss of half a million dollars, knows
that fire spreads almost exclusively by the
lighting of sparks ou buildings. Time
and again during the great fire a single
spark would be carried hundreds of foot,
would drop upon a roof, and in a few seconds flames would start from the shingles.
This condition is rendered infinitely worse
when the shingles are old, dried, and as is
often the case, moss-covered. It ought to
be illegal to use wooden shingles in cities.
Possibly the only remedy will be the continual increase in insurance rates, and this
is sure to come. Meanwhile The Week
wishes to give publicity to the fact that at
Jervis Inlet there is a manufacturing company producing excellent slate. Last week
a cargo of 500 tons was landed in Victoria.
The first cost is about 30 per cent, more
than of wooden shingles, but the life of
the roof is simply unlimited and used in
combination with brick or stone, one gets
a permanent building. Slate is much bettor than metal of any kind. Copper is the
only metal whicli does not corrode, and it
is much dearer per square foot than slate,
as well as being less permanent. Iron in
every form is objectionable and uneconomic. There is no native industry bettor
worth encouraging than that of slato production for roofing, and it is to be hoped
that in the next City Council the architects
or fire underwriters will appreciate its
importance.
The Editor of the Saturday
The Cost Sunset is improving.  When
of Living. ]ie started  up  six  months
ago ho was a little slow in
catching on to current events, but he is
now fairly up-to-date, at any rate on some
topics. This is evidenced by the fact that
in two January issues he has discussed the
editorial which appeared in Westward Uo!
as long ago as Soptember last. As the
same subject has been dealt with at length
in The Week, further reference needs no
apology. Overlooking the banalities of
the article, and the peculiar use of the
English language, an invariable feature of
Sunset editorials, The Week wishes to
point nut the unfairness of branding the
writer in Westward Ho! as a traducor bo-
cause he has the courage to tell the truth.
Comparisons are proverbially odious, but
even modesty docs not forbid one pointing
nut that the difference between the Saturday Sunset and The Week is that the
former writes to please its advertisers, the
latter to inform the public.   The question
involved is a very simple one, and as usual
was misrepresented by the Saturday Sunset.   The writer ignored the fact that the
editorial   iu   Westward   llo!   distinctly
stated that its remarks applied to Victoria
and  Vancouver.    The  Saturday  Sunset
quoted it as applying to Vancouver only,
and so tried to create the impression, at
any rate in the minds of those who had
not read the original editorial, that Vancouver was being discriminated against. It
seems that many people,  including one
lady at least, endorsed the statement, of
Westward Ho! from tlieir own experience.
The writer in Westward Ho! was drawing
on his experience.   During fourteen years'
residence iu Canada, he has lived in nearly  every  Province,   beginning  iu  A'ova
Scotia, and finishing in British Columbia.
He has found living' dearer at the Coast
than in Halifax, Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg and Nelson, but the Editor of Saturday Sunset should be fair enough to note
that the purpose of the article in Westward
Ho! was to institute a comparison between
the cost of living in England and British
Columbia, in order that   British   immigrants who heard that wages here ranged
from $3 to $5 a day, should not imagine
that the cost of living was the saute as in
England, or anything like it.   If the Editor of Saturday Sunset had wished to be
fair he would also have given credit for
the fact that the writer in Westward Ho!
was basing his article upon the circumstance that prices in Victoria and Vancouver had recently been raised inordinately.
He might also have gone a step further and
contributed something  to   the   discussion
upon the subject of combines which  had
raised the price of commodities to an unreasonable figure.    Put perhaps this was
too much to expect in view of the advertisers.    The attitude of the writer   in
Westward Uo! has been fully justified by
the endorsation of many readers, some of
whom apparently have given the Saturday Sunset a bad quarter of an hour by
tlie fact that since September last when
the article was written the price of most
commodities has fallen from 10 to 15 per
cent.   Xo doubt a man can live as cheaply
in Victoria as in Bruce County, Ontario,
hut not in comfort.    If he is content tn
live  iu  the  kitchen and  sit  round   the
stove tn deny himself of all luxuries and
many comforts, and to reproduce at the
Pacific Coast the conditions under which
the pioneers  of  Ontario  struggled  fifty
years ago, such a inan would furnish a
correct illustration for the argument nf
the Saturday Sunset.    Hut  nion do not
001110 West to live liko that, nnd women
dn nnt come West to work themselves to
death in doing chores.   On re-reading the
article in Westward Ho!, The Week finds
nn mention of Eastern Canada  nnd no
comparison with Eastern Canadian price-.
The criticism of the   Saturday   Sunset
therefore loses whatever force il had.    In
view of this fact, The Week respectfully
asks the Saturday Sunset to explain the
pertinency of this criticism and especially
tho application of tho following concluding sentences of its editorial to anything
which appeared in Westward Eol:
"But lhe fact remains that, taken at
large, Vancouver is little if any more expensive to live in than is Montreal or To-
=> srnnnr&ry *TinrKx«Tnnrwr vym
Stewart Williams R. C Janion   -'
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION AND
HEAL ESTATE AGENTS
Si FONT ST. VICTONIA, S. C.
iAJUJLM.t_».ajU_»AJU,»JUUUUA'f
One Dollar Per Anno*
ronto. Vancouver has suffered injustice
by the constant repetition of such statements as led to my remarks last week."
Will Saturday Sunset also state whether the two main contentions of the
Westward Ho! editorial were true at the
time it was written in September last, viz.,
that the cost of living had increased in
Victoria and Vancouver during the last
few years from 20 to 30 per cent., and
also that the higher cost of living here as
compared with England is so great as to
fully justify any honest journal in pointing it out to intending immigrants.
This is a word-coining age
The English _____[ ingenuous writers have
Language.        invented   many   expressive
terms. Thus, we have English, Americanese, and Journalese, as applied to various divagations in the use of
our mother tongue, but of all these Journalese is the most amusing. Tho Week
bogs to quote a few choice specimens from
the last issue of a Coast weekly which
shall be nameless but which at least is
characterized by ingenuity if not by refinement: "Harold Begbie is simply an
ass of the very loud braying and long-
oared variety!!!!!, since he began to publish his silly twaddle iu Great Britain.
And the reason he is being noticed is tho
same as the one (sic) which would cause
the antics of a monkey in a cage of lions
to attract attention!!!!! We are new to*
the antics of literary monkeys of the Begbie type!!!!! As long as he continues to
attract attention he will chatter and shriek
and blink his eyes and bristle his neck
hairs!!!!!"
The Week learns from a re-
Recovering ]iable source that after the
Equipoise.        recent assault upon firemen
by Japanese, in whicli the
former wore badly slashed, tliere would
have been a riot and the Japanese quarters would have boon fired but for the
intervention of some of the leaders of the
Asiatic Exclusion League. It also learns
that most conspicuous among those was
Mr. Von Khoin, tlio president. The
Week has bandied the Asiatic Exclusion
League without gloves ever since its inception. It has done su because the methods adopted and the inflammatory language used by its supporters both on the
platform and in the press, were highly inimical tn the public interest and could not
be justified nn any ground. Evidences
have recently been accumulating that the
more sober-minded nion who wore induced
io join mt ihe impulse of the moment have
had enough of it, and are gradually breaking away. Such men as Mr. Von Uhoin
and Gordon Grant cannot afford to bo as-
sociated with alien agitators and professional demagogues, Their restraining influence, used at a critical moment, differentiates them from the class of men with
whom they havo unfortunately been allied
in the Asiatic Exclusion League. They
would immensely strengthen their reputation if they withdrew altogether. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 25,  1908.
Short Story.
TOUCH AND GO.
nnd another shout greeted this sally.'
A spasm of energy, too stirred the
listeners for the first time that evening. , It was always good fun drawing "Miss Frances"; and, however
exhausted and tired the Die-hards
might be, they were generally ready
for a bit of fun. Therefore tney
changed their positions with a lazy
effort and slanted their eyes towards
the shaded corner.
The victim, however, responded
slowly. As a rule it was not his habit
to respond at all, diffidence being a
marked feature in his character, and
experience having taught him the wisdom of holding his tongue. But on
this occasion he had raised himself
to a sitting posture, and the expectant
not a little startled by
the angry look flashing from his face.
"I wasn't thinking of my precious
By Archibald Dunn.
The sun had been blazing furiously
all day, and the "cool air of the evening" was as cool as the hot room of a
Turkish bath.
"Phe-ew!"
Jack Carstairs extended his puttee-
encased legs to their full length,
threw his arms back over his head,
and, sinking more limply than ever
upon the ground, exclaimed again,
"Phe-ew!"
Half-a-dozen  throats  endorsed the
sentiment,  and  half-a-dozen  pairs of 8'oup  weie
legs stretched out in sympathy.
They belonged—these legs—to ;. _^_1^^^—■———___^
party of junior officers having thc skin<" he said> turninS to Carstairs,
honour to serve in Her Majesty's and ignoring Johnson, "any more
Royal Die-Hard Fusiliers, and, having than y°u were thinking of yours,
carried their owners the whole bless- And> to te" the trutll> rm sick of
ed day under an African sky, were >'ou and y°ur *-'-"--- "—•■-'—
feeling just now not quite so well as
and    your    blather,    Carstairs.
you're always posing as a hero, but
ieeiing jiisl nuw  uu*. vjuil*- _>>_,  ..... ...
they looked.    For the sumer heat of y°u ^n'1 seem t0 have d°"e anything
Zululand  is  something to  remember wonderful as yet, except talk, and-
Drake sank back, with the sentence
unfinished.    Never before in his life,
present occasion there had been trouble up-country. Ukimbo's tribe had
been at their old tricks; and a detachment of the Die-hards which had
gone forth to punish them were now
(so the news had come in) in a very
tight corner themselves. They could
hold out a couple of days, the messenger said—perhaps a little longer;
but they were only fifty muskets, and
Ukimbo meant business. Two thousand on the war-trail? Well, yes, two
thousand—possibly three or four.
Who could tell?
In such circumstances one does not
wait for the sun, or, for that matter,
for anything else; one simply goes
ahead. And so the relief column had
marched solemnly on till their backs
and their arms and their legs ached
all together, and till their faces shriv*
clled up like kippered herrings, and
their mouths had grown drier than
any limekiln.
"Gad! I'd like to be sitting in the
Empire—let me see—third row of the
stalls, with a great big whisky-and-
soda in front of me, and a great big,
beautiful, white, round crystal lump
of ice bobbing up and down in the
middle."
"Johnson," said a growling voice,
"if 1 wasn't so dog-tired I'd get up
and punch your beastly head!"
"I will punch it," said another
voice, "when this business is over."
"And 1! "And I!" chimed in another and another.
"All right, old chaps," agreed the
delinquent, indifferently; and then the
subject dropped.
Only one of the group had refrained from taking part in the discussion. He lay somewhat out of the
circle, and while the others spoke he
listened    silently   and   at   intervals indeed I   Th_at's like_ your infernal im
glanced almost timidly f im face to
face. The light from some flickering
lamp reached him now and then—
when an intervening head chanced to
move aside—and presently Jack Carstairs looked that way.
"Hallo, young un! thinking about
that precious skin uf yours and what's
going to happen to it to-morrow.
ch?"
Carstairs was a man of some consequence among thc subalterns—he
had been in action. True, it was a tin-
pot affair in which no one was hurt
except a few savages who were incontinently shut before they ha J time
to put up a fight; but that wa.i hardly
the point. The point was that Carstairs had been in action, and that
none of thc others had;  and,  there-
The Merchants Bank
Canada
Established 1864.
Capital, fully paid $6,000,000
Reserve Funds    4,000,000
Head Office: Montreal.
Banking By Mail.
Deposits and withdrawals can
be made by mail; no delay, and
will receive prompt attention.
Savings Bank Department.
Interest allowed quarterly at
highest current rate.
Victoria Branch: R. F. TAYLOR,
Manager.
when you have marched in it for a
period, and it takes the grit and backbone   out   of   a   Western  race.    0-f**i^Bi^^^BiB«r»-__»_-__»i_____-_f_______________i_______i
course it does this rarely, because it PerhaPs* had he ventured on such an
rarely gets the chance.    But on the outburst; never before had the latent
spirit of a man shown in him so openly; and now, with tlie effort made, the
sense of anger suddenly dwindled,
and in the reaction that followed he
cowered abashed and afraid before
his own temerity.
But the anger of a gentle nature is
a powerful weapon because of its unexpectedness possib'y, or because of
its justice; and when it comes, it
comes like a thundirholt, creating the
.-urest havoc and consternation. In
this instance there was no one ready j
with a reply. The listeners gaped
cpni-niouthcd at the speaker, and for
a minute or more remained so, staring stupidly in astonishment; then, in-1
stinctively and of one accord, they
turned to Carstairs. He had brought
about the difficulty; he was the proper person to deal with it. Bes:des
they had not yet known him at fault
in an emergency.
It was the more disappointing,
therefore, to see that Carstairs was
only laughing rather foolishly, and
that he had nothing better to say
than they had; and the disappointment deepened still further when the
hero, having at last found his tongue,
fell back tamely on a schoolboy retort.
"You'll sing another tune to-morrow, my lad,' he said. "It's all jolly
fine, you and your Dutch courage,
when there isn't a nigger within ten
miles, but—you'll sing another tune
to-morrow, mark my words!"
Drake shrank farther back into the
gloom and answered nothing; and the
others, apart from a mild stare of astonishment, offered no comment.
Then Carstairs, stung suddenly to
passion by a sense of his own ineffectiveness, blurted out afresh, "Talk,
Y. W. C. A.
1208 Government Street
VICTORIA.
Reading and rest rooms, lunch and
tea rooms. Instruction in English,
French, Music, Physical Culture,
Needlework, Domestic Science, etc.
Bible Class. Social evening every
Wednesday.
Y.M.C.A.
A home for young men away from
home. Comfortable Reading Room,
Library, Game Room, Billiards, Hot
and Cold Shower Baths, Gymnasium
•ind efficient instruction.
Manitoba Free Press on file for
Middle West visitors.
40 BROAD STREET
VICTORIA
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St.. Victoria
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OF
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
PHONE 893. VICTORIA
pudencel Talk! There'll be something else than talk to-morrow, I car.
tell you. And see to it, my fine fcl-
low, that you don't disgrace the regiment. There'll be no quarter, mind
ynu—these infernal niggers don't give
quarter—it's sheer murder from start
to finish, and thc regiment can't afford funkers on its muster-roll. So
see to it, my lad, that you keep that
pretty face of yours turned the right
way about when the time comes,
when these howling brutes start
hacking   at    the    square   with   their
knives, and when Talk, indeed!
Why" *
"Mr,  Carstairs!"
A small, dapper man was standing
in their midst. His iron-gray moustache  seemed  to  bristle  at them  as
fore, when  Carstairs made a joke it hc spoke, and his  keen eyes flashed
was bound to be a good  joke.    For  with indignation.
which   reason   the   answering  laugh
was prompt and noisy.
"And   I   owe    an    apology,"    said
"Mr.  Carstairs,"  hc  repeated, in
sharp, incisive voice, "I have told you
before that I will not allow conversa-
Best Buy.
BEST  BUT  IN  VICTORIA  OF  BUSINESS PROPERTY. WITH WATER
FRONTAGE ON JAMES BAT.
Double Corner on Wharf and Gov-1
eminent streets, with 100 feet water
frontage on James Bay. This property
has ihe Post Offlce to the North, the
C. P. R. Hotel to the EaBt, Parliament
Iluildlngs to the South, and a Steamship Company's wharf to the West of It.
As an Hotel Site the situation of these
lots is unrivaled In the City of Victoria,
hundred of thousands of dollars have
been spent ln valuable improvements on
all sides of them by the Provincial Qovernment, the City Council and the
C. P. R.    Price $52,600.
Easy terms can be arranged with deferred payments bearing interest at 7
per cent.
For further particulars apply to
A O. P. FRANCIS, Broker.
510 Pender Street,
VANCOUVER. B. C.
ST. ANDREW'S
COLLEGE
TORONTO
A R-isld-Mtlal ■■«! Day School for Boys
Johnson, "for mentioning the Empire tion of this sort among my officers.
with ladies present." Don't let me hear any repetition of
"In   this   wise   did  Johnson  allude it";   and,  without  another  word,  he
to the  "young un's"   effiminate   ap- turned on his heel and walked away,
pcarancc, and to the fact that Francis But  as  he  presently  parsed  along
Drake was known amongst the Royal the  line  of  pickets,  with  a  question
Die-hards as "Miss  Frances" Drake; Continued Page 8.
Handsome New Buildings. Larg*
Athletic Field. Carelul Oversight in
every Department. First Class Staff.
Lower and Upper School. Boys prepared for the Universities and Business.
Calendar sent on Request.
Rev. D. Bruce Macdonald, M.A.,LL.D>
Principal
Re-opens after Xmas on Jan. 8th, 1908.
WHY   NOT   HAVE   THE   BEST
THE REPUTATION OF
James Buchanan & Co'sSCOTCH   WHISKIES
Is world-wide, and stands for the BEST that can he produced.
The following brands are for sale by all the leading dealers:
RED SEAL BLACK AND WHITE
ROYAL HOUSEHOLD      VERY  OLD  LIQUEUR SCOTCH
RADIGER & JANION, Sole Agents for B.C.
CHRISTMAS
GOODS
Ward's Safety Razors
Curley Ideal Safety Razors
Whiltt's Razor Strops
I. X. L. Carving Sets
I. X, L. Pocket Cutlery
Boker's Pocket Cutlery
I. X. L. Table Cutlery
All in great variety and at right prices
PGR SALE BY
e.g. prior &ee..
VIOTORIA, VANOOUVER,  KAMLOOPS,  VERNON.
LTD.
LTY.
Established 1867
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
52 Uovernment St., Victoria, B. C.
Charles Hayward, President. F. Caselton, Manager.
We make a specialty of  Undertaking and Embalming,
An experienced certificated staff available at all times, day
and night. *
Phones Nos. 48, 305, 404 or 594, Victoria.
The Y. B. e. Novelty Works
rims   AHTXQUII,   ABTIBTIO    AND    ABOHXTSOTUBAXi
DSBIOVSD WOBK MADE TO OBOEB.
I am now ready to fulfil any orders for all kinds of Banks, Stores,
Offices, Churches, Barber Shops and Hotel Bar Fixtures and Furniture.
1000 Granville ■trwt :t ___   11       VASOOUVEB, 8. O.
T.   LeOAXB,   Proprietor.
Investigate the
"Cushman" flarine Hotor
As good as the hest.   Cheaper than the rest.
BAXTER & JOHNSON 811 Qovernment Stree
Victoria, B. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 25, 1908
DISTRICT   OF   RUPERT. S.W., No.  23, which is seven and one-  west  80  chains;  north  80  chains;   east
J TAKE NOTICE I. T. S. McPherson, half miles in a northerly direction from 80 ehains to point of commencement.
Igent of Victoria, B. C, intend to apply Crown Mountain and on Bank of Upper No. 35—Commencing at a post planted
lir a special timber license over the Salmon River; thence north 80 chains; at the northeast corner No. 35, which
Allowing described lands: east  80  chains;   south  80  chains;  west  is  inarked  W.E.S.,  N.E. which
I No. 10—Commencing at a post plant- 80 chains to point of commencement. is flve miles distant in a northerly dill at the southeast corner section 3, No. 24—Commencing at a post planted rection from Crown Mountain; thence
pwnship 26, marked T. S. McP., No. at the southeast corner No. 24, marked south 80 chains; west 80 chains; north
., which is two and one-quarter miles W.E.S., S.E., No. 24, which is eight and 80 chains', east 80 chains; to point of
ortherly  from  west arm  of Quatsino  one-half  miles   distant  in  a  northerly  commencement.
pund, thence north 80 chains; west 80 direction from Crown Mountain and one No. 36—Commencing at a post planted
hains, south 80 chains', east 80 ehains mile north of the Upper Salmon River; at the northeast eorner marked W.E.S.,
j> point of commencement. thence west 80 chains; north 80 chains;  N.E. No. 36, which is six miles distant
Dee.  19th,  1907. east 80 chains; south 80 chains to point  in   a   northerly   direction   from   Crown
No. 11—Commencing at a post plant-  of commencement. Mountain and one-half a mile south of
■d at the southwest corner of seotion 2, No. 25—Commencing at a post planted Upper Salmon River; thenee west 80
lownship 25, marked McP. F., No. 11, at the northwest corner marked W.E.S., chains; south 80 chains; east 80 chains;
Vhich is two and one-quarter miles N.W., No. 26, which ls seven and one- north 80 ehains to point of commence-
lortherly    from    west    Arm    Quatsino  half miles distant in a northerly direc-  ment.
found, thenee east 160 chains; north 40  tion from Crown Mountain and on the      Staked  Dec.   20th,   1907.
lhains, west 160 ohains; south  40 chs.,  Bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence      No. 37—Commencing at a post planted
Io point of commencement. south 80 chains; thenoe east 80 chains;   at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
Geo. H. Jackson, Agent,   north 80 chains', west 80 chains to point  No.   37,   S.E.,  which  is  five  miles   dis-
Staked Dec. 19, 1907. of eommeneement. tant in a southwesterly direction from
No. 12—Commencing at a post plant- No. 26—Commencing at a post planted West Lake, Sayward District; thence
id one and one-half mile in a north- at the northeast corner marked W.E.S., west 80 ehains; north 80 chains; east
westerly direction from the west end N.E., No. 26, whieh Is seven and one- 80 chains; south 80 chains to point of
if Nah-Wi-Ti  Lake,  and  one-half mile  half miles distant in a northerly direc-  commeneement.
vest of S. E. Corner section 1, town- tion from Crown Mountain and on the No. 38—Commencing at a post planted
ihip 33, thenoe west 40 ehains; thenoe bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
lorth 160 chains; thence east 40 chains; south 80 chains; west 80 ohalns; north S.W. No. 38, which is flve miles distant
;hence south 160 chains to point of 80 chains; east 80 chains to point of in a southwesterly direction from West
iommencement,    containing    640    acres  commencement. Lake, Sayward District; thence east 80
nore or less. No. 27—Commencing at a post planted  chains; north 80 chains; west 80 chains;
Staked Dee. 20, 1907. at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,  south 80 chains to point of commence-
No. 13—-Commencing at a post plant- S.E. No. 27, which is seven and one- ment.
id one mile in northwesterly direction half miles distant in a northerly direc- No. 39—Commencing at a post planted
'rom west end of Nah-Wi-Ti Lake, and tion from Crown Mountain and on the at the southeast eorner, marked W.E.S.,
it N. W. corner section 31, township Bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence S.E., No. 39, which is three and one-half
15, thence south 80 chains; thence east north 80 chains; west 80 chains; south miles distant from the south end of
!0 chains; thence north 80 chains; 80 chains; east 80 chains to point of West Lake, where it joins the line of
;hence west 80 chains to point of com-  commencement. Lot  110;  thence north  80  chains;  west
nencement. No. 28—Commencing at a post planted  80   chains;   south   80   ohains;   east   80
Staked Dec. 20, 1907. at the northeast corner which is marked  chains  to  point of commeneement.
No. 14—Commencing at a post plant- W.E.S. N.E. No. 28, which is eight and No. 40—Commencing at a post planted
)d one mile from west end of Nah-Wi- one-quarter miles distant in a north- at the southwest comer marked W.E.S.,
H Lake in northerly direction, half westerly direction from Crown Moun- S.W. No. 40, which is three and one-half
nile north of N. W. corner section 32, tain, and on the south bank of Upper miles in a southwesterly direction from
ownship 25; thence south 80 chains; Salmon River; thence west 80 chains: the south end of West Lake, where it
thenoe east following shore line 80 south SO chains; east 80 chains; north joins line of Block 110; thence north 80
:hains; thence north 80 chains; thence 80 chains to point of commencement. chains; east 80 chains; south 80 chains;
vest 80 chains to point of commence- No, 29—Commencing at a post planted west 80 chains to point of commence-
nent at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,  ment.
Staked Dec. 20,  1907. S.E.   No.   29,   which  is  eight  and  one-      No. 41—Commencing at a post plant-
No. 16—Commencing at a post plant- quarter miles distant in a northwesterly ed at the southeast cor. marked W.E.S.,
id one-half mile north of T. L. 13222, direction from Crown Mountain and on s.E. No. 41, which is four miles distant
md at N. E. corner section 36, town- bank of Upper Salmon River; thence in an easterly direction from south end
ihip 26, thence west 160 chains; fience west 80 chains; north 80 ohains; east 0f West Lake, on line of Block 110;
muth 40 chains; thence east 160 chains; 80 chains; south 80 chains to point of thence west 80 chains; north 80 chains;
;hence   north   40   chains   to   point   of  commencement. east 80 chains; south 80 chains to point
ommencement. No. 30—Commencing at a post planted  0f commencement.
Staked Dee. 20, 1907. at the northeast corner marked W.E.S.,      No. 42—Commencing at a post planted
No. 17—Commencing at a post plant- N.E. No. 30, which is ten miles distant at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
\d one-half mile north of T. L. 13222, In a northwesterly direction from Crown s.W. No. 42, which is four miles distant
If W. Corner section 31, township 19, Mountain and on bank of Upper Salmon in an easterly direction from south end
Ihence east 80 chains; thence south SO River; thence 80 chains south; 80 chains 0f West Lake, on line Block 110; thence
lhains; thence west 80 chains; thence west; 80 chains north; 80 chains east east 80 chains; north 80 chains; west
lorth SO chains to point of commence-  to  point  of  commencement. 80 chains;  south 80 chains  to point of
fient containing 640 acres, more or less.      No. 31—Commencing at a post planted   commencement.
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,      No. 43—Commencing at a post planted
S.E. No.  31, which is ten and one-half  at the southeast comer marked W.E.S.,
miles distant in a northwesterly direc-  s.E. No. 43, which is one ancl one-half
tion from Crown Mountain and on the  mnes   distant   in   a   westerly   direction
bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence  from the south end of West Lake, where
.,.,,.-.*  „„™„  ,u  a   ._r   r.   _-• 80   chains   north;   80   ehains   west;   80  it  joins  the line of  Block  110,   thence
TAKE NOTICE  that W.  E.  Simpson  chains south, 80 chains east to point of  north 80 ehains; west 80 chains; south
lf J.ow?_.;?a215.' Ban.keV' Intends to apply  commencement. 80  chains;  east  80  chains  to  point  of
Staked Dec.  19, 1907. commencement.
W.  E.  SIMPSON. No. 46—Commencing at a post planted
Thomas S. McPherson, Agent.  at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
 ■  S.W. No. 46, which is one and one-half
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT. miles   distant  from   the   soutli   end  of
District of Nootka. West  Lake, where it joins  the line of
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
T.   S.   McPHERSON,
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Sayward.
lo the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
IVorks for a special timber licence over
lhe   following   described   lands   thirty   jan- 25
lays after date.
I No. 12—Commencing at a post planted
It the southeast corner marked W.E.S.
I.E. No. 12, which is seven and one-half
Up* rltstsmt nnd in n  nnrtherlv direc- TAKE NOTICE tllat W. E. Simpson of Block 110; thence north 80 chains; east
nn   from  Crown  MmfnMn  and  on  the Iowa Palls* Iowa* Banker' lntends to aP" 80   chains;    SOUth   80   ohainSi   West    S0
°"tfr°PTfnner  dalmnr   Sivpr-   thence &V to the Chief Commissioner of Lands chains to point of commencement,
ank   of  Upper  Salmon   R ver,   tiience »>   _.„„,,,, ,„„ „ ._„„,„, Hrnh.. n„on„0 nto  ■.fU-Cr.mmenein.r at a nost r,'
lh 40 chains' west 160 chains' south a"a Works for a special timber licence No. 46-Commencing at a post planted
chnins- east' K^ chains to noint of °ver the following described lands 30 at the southwest corner which Is mark-
chains,  east  160 cliains  to point or   . f.      .  . rt  WTC.S.  s.W..  No.  46.  which    s  one
lommencement.
days after date
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted mile distant and in a southeasterly di-
C'sta,   thence  west   80   cha?ns -following the  C.P.R.   line  100  chains;      No. 47-Commencing at a post planted
_tl?hSO cha ns'east^chains'  south north 80 chains; thence following shore  at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
In chafns to noint of commencement ""<> °f saia lake to point of commence-   S.W., No. 47, which is two miles north-
TVo  1?   Commencing ataMiost Xnted ment, containing 640 acres more or less,   westerly from south end of West lake,
Jt the s^thwe^corne?ma?ked WES N°- S-Comraenclng at a post planted  where  it joins  the  line  of  Block  110;
fw-Mnii   which ?se^ht  miles' dis? at the southwest corner marked WE..S.,   thence north 80 chains; east SO chains;
int In _ northSiv direction from Crown S.W. No. 3, which is 20 chains distant   south 80 chains; west SO chains to point
Ym.ntaln  anfI  one milenorth^f bank «n a northerly direction from the south   of commencement.
JTinner  Salmon  Mver-  thence  north east corner of T.  L.  14864  and  three-      No. 48-Commencing at a post planted
Yh??n«-   ..«?   80   chains-   south   80 quarters of a mile fro mUpper Campbell   at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
nlns' west 80 chains to ooint of com- Lake; thence east SO chains;  north  80   S.E., No. 48, which is two miles distant
hennement chains; west SO chains; south 80 chains  and  in a northwesterly direction  from
Imo  1 r,_r-nmmencin_r at a nost nlanted to point of commencement.                         the south end of West Lake, where it
^the^K^rnSn ™?k°S TO No. 4-Commencing at a post planted  Join, line of Block .110; thenco, north1 80
I.E. No. 15, which is eight and one-half at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,   chains; west 80 chains   south SO cha ns,
liles distant from Crown mountain and S.E.  No.   4,  which  is one  mile  distant  east  80  chains  to  point  of commence-
Ifi  chains  west of Island Power Com- in   a   northerly   direction   from   Upper  ment.
lany's line near bank of Upper Salmon Campbell   Lake,   and  one  mile  east  of      No. 49—Commencing at a post planted
kiver;   thence   north  100  chains;   west T. L. 14864, thence west 80 chains; north  at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
It   chains;   south   100   chains;   east   64 80   chains;   east   80   chains;   south   80   S.W. No. 49, which is three ancl one-half
lhains   to  point  of  commencement. chains  to  point of commencement.          miles   distant  In   an   easterly  direction
I No. 16—Commencing at a post plant- No. 6—Commencing at a post planted  from centre of shore line of West Lake,
Id at the southeast corner marked W. at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,   thence east 80 chains; north SO chains;
E. S., S.E. No. 16, which is nine miles S.W. No. 5, which is one mile distant in  west SO chains; thence south 80 chains
[istant   in   a  northerly  direction   from a northerly direction from Upper Camp-  to point of commencement.
Irown Mountain and one and  one-half bell  Lake,  and one mile east of T.  L.      No  50 Commencing at a post planted
files  north  of stake  12,  on  the  Bank 14864; thence 80 chains north; SO chains  at th'e southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
If   the   Upper   Salmon   River;   thence east;   SO  chains  south;   80  chains  west  g E  No  50, which ls three and one-half
■orth 40 chains; west 160 chains; south to point of commeneement.                       nJdeg  distant  in an  easterly  direction
|0 chains;  east 160 chains  to point of No. 6—Commencing at a post planted   from the oentre of shore line on West
lommencement. at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,   Lake,  thenoe west  80 chains;  north  80
No. 17—Commencing at a post planted s.E.  No.   6,  which  Is  situated  on  the chtllns. eagt so chains; south 80 chains
,t the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.. north   shore   of  Upper  Campbell   Lake,   .. Dolnt of commencement.
I. E. No. 17, which ls nine and one-half on  the  C.P.R.    line;    thenoe    west   10        *           n„mm.„.,r,_, «, « n_.t -ni»ntert
tiles  distant  in   a  northerly  direction chains; north 160 chains; east 40 chains;   ..N.0J JjS?tT„™B.™ri?Pd WFS
from Crown Mountain and two and one- south 160 chains to point of commence-  aVhvnM    which ?f flve  miles  from
fcXe^hVcl P tf ,K ^ commencing at a post planted  «    5HSS
hitM^K tArit^_iT^j^_ SSHurSrSiir
No. 18-Commenclng at a post plant- a  northwesterly  direction  from   Crown  ™a "eml?t
4 at the southwest corner marked W. Mmintain; thenco north 80 chains; west      4tnkedDec  15  1907
JI.  S., S.W., No.  18, which  Is nine and 80   ^(.'ns.   SOuth   80   chains-   east   80      otaitea uec. 10, i»ui.
Eno-half mlles in a northerly direction h ,      t0 ' olnt o( commencement              No* 52—Commencing at a post Planted
from Crown Mounta n ancl two and one-        „_„_,,__*   at the southeast corner, marked W.E.b.,
half miles north of Upper Salmon River, No. 8-Commencing a ta     s   planted  s E  No   __   whlch ,s slx m)les westerly
Ihence east SO chains north  80 chains; at t he 1sou theast.corner 1mar ked WE S    from the gouth end of West Lake wher0
vest 80 chains; south 80 chains to point S.E. No.  8   wllIch  Is five  miles distant  ,t joln8 „ne of Blm.1( n0* thence north
if commencement. <"   a   northerly   direction   from   Crown   80   chalng;   west   SO   chains;   south   SO
■   No. 19—Commencing at a post planted Mounta n; thence north 80 chains, nest  clmlns; east 80 chains to point of com-
lat the southwest corner marked W.E.S.. SO   chains;   south   80   chains;   east   80   mencement.
|I.W. No. 19, which is ten and one-half chains to point of commencement.               _._   B3_Commenclng at a post pianted
Tnlles  distant   ln  a  northerly  direction Staked  Dec.  16th,  1907.                            ,t the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
Ifrom Crown Mountain ancl three mlles No. 9—Commencing at a post planted  g ™.   No   63   which   is  six  miles  in  a
northerly  and  westerly  from  post  No. at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,   westerly' direction   from  the south  end
h,   on   bank  of  Upper   Salmon  River; S.E. No. 9, which is four miles distant    f  Wes't  ,ak     where   it  jolns   Une   of
[hence north 80 chains; east 80 chains; in   a   northerly   direction   trom   Crown   y   t  no    thence  north  80  chains;   east
louth 80 chains; west 80 chains to point Mountain; thence north 160 chains; west   g0   clialnS.   south   __   chains;   west   80
lif commencement. 40  chains;   south   160  chains;   east  40  chains t0 point of commencement.
I No. 20—Commencing at the southeast chains to point of commencement.                No  54_c0mmencing at a post planted
fcorner marked    W.E.S.,    S.E,    No.  20, No  10—Commencing at a post planted  at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
Ivhich is ten and one-half miles distant at tlie southeast corner marked W.E.S.,   SE   No. 54, which is two and one-half
In   a   northerly   direction   from   Crown SE| No   ]0| which is two miles distant  mnes   distant  in  an   easterly  direction
Mountain and three miles northwesterly ln a northerly direction from where the   from the north end of West lake, thenee
Irom stake 12, on the bank of the Up- c.P.R. line cuts the north shore of Up-  west  80  chains;   north  80  chains;   east
ler  Salmon    River,    thence    north  su p(,r   Campbell   Lake;   thence   west   80   go  chains; south  80 chains to point of
lhains; west 80 chains; south 80 chains; chains; north 80 chains; east 80 chains;   commencement.
last   80  chains  to  point  of commence- south so chains to point of commence-      No. 65—Commencing at a post planted
hent.                                                 _.«_4.«j ment.                                                                at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
J No. 21—Commencing at a post planted ll—Commencing at a post planted   S.W. No. 55, which is two and one-half
|t the southeast corner marked W.E.S., atX southeast corner marked W.E.S.,   miles distant westerly from  the north
[TRAVELLERS' GUIDE   I
Our Store
HAS A FINE LINE OF HIGH
CLASS TOILET ARTICLES.
We have just imported a fine assortment of French and English Hair
Brushes.
SEE THE NEW-SHAPED
WHALEBONE BRUSH.
USE  BOWES'  BUTTERMILK
TOLIET   LOTION   FOR
CHAPPED HANDS.
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
Government Street, near Yates St.
VICTORIA, B. C.
 VICTORIA	
STRAND HOTEL
VICTORIA
The home ol all theatrical and raude-f Ue
artists while in tbe Capital city, aha of
other kindred bohemiau.
WRIQHT & FALCONER, Proprietor*.
CAMBORNE
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining men and
commercial traveller!.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
BANVF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
Banff's Most Popular $2 a Day Hotel.
Close to Station and Sulphur
Baths.
N. K. LUXTON, Proprietor.
PHOENIX.
BOND SIGN CO.
VANCOUVER
Signs
Deane's Hotel
PHOENIX, B. C.
New. Modern hot water lystetn. Rlectrle
lighted. Tub and shower baths aud laundry la
connection.   The miners'home.
" DANNY " DEANE, Proprietor
ROSSLAND
ELECTRIC
BOARD
METAL
BULLETIN
GLASS
COTTON
SHOW CARD
Hoffman House
ROSSLAND, B. C.
Rates $1.00 per day and up.   Cafe in
Connection.
QREEN & SHITH. Prop's.
NELSON.
HOTEL HUME
NBLSON,   B. C,
Leading Hotel of the Kootenayi,
J. FRED HUME,       -      Proprietor.
m      xt~       Ol       fl,v,lnl,     1«     *..___,<__>_     n*.A     ftnp. n-L    1 ^    S-UULIietlSL   -curlier    Illfcirivcu     VV.l^.O., union    «"""-""     .. ~.>vv.« .,,      -. -.••-"-•,     -'■
•w- Sn J ,*lisT„,? i-n n  nnrtheriv direc No. 11, which Is three miles distant In end of West lake; thence east 100 chains*,
,a!    "JwS   rlw     Mmintnln   nnd   four northerly  direction  from  where  C.P.R. north 40 chains; west 40 chains; north
nil   i„T nSJH dwtion from "ne cuts  north   shore of Upper Camp- 40   chains;   west   GO   chains;   south   80
lilies in a nor'westerly d «ecUon fiom thence       th 4Q ch         ,vest clm,     t0 potnt of commencement.
iiake. ^„^„ n„?th sn lhl?n«- westTo ■"»>  chains;   south   40  chains;  east  160      Staked December 14th, 1907.
f^Ti.^i-r f TnLnV P.st SO chains chains  to point of commencement.                         W. E  SIMPSON
lhains; south 80 chains, east 80 chains stakefl pGC   57   -1907 Dec 14, 1(107   Thos.  S.  McPherson,  Agent.
°^01"* ^ZSHFa post planted N° st-Comme'nelng?'at a post planted
li th. ^thwe^   corner marked WES <"*- the northwest corner marked W.E.S.,
UhVn   l\   which ?Televen  and'one- N*W- No. 32, which is six miles distant
Si rt'i.C   in .  northerW direc- •»   a   northerly   direction   from   Crown       	
|alf mlles distant In a' W118"^alfre°? Mountain,   ancl   one-half  mile  south  of nt the southeast corner marked W.E.S
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Nootka.
No. .—CommencinK at a post planted
In .h.ino tn -nnlnt of commencement No. 34—Commencing at a post planted so   chains;   oast   40   chains;   south   40
|,0 chains to point of commencement.      M the northengt corner No.  24, marked chains   to   point   of   commencement.
Staked JJec. IBtli, 1907. W.E.S., N.E. No. 34, which Is three miles       staked December  10th,  1907.
No. 23—Commencing at a post planted  distant   in   a   northerly   direction   from WILLIAM E. SIMPSON,
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S., Crown Mountain; thence south SO chains, ]icc. lti.'07.       T. S.  McPherson,  Agent.
SWEDISH
-MASSAGE
TURKISH BATHS.
VIBRATOR TREATMENT.
MR.   BJORNFELT,   SWEDISH
MASSEUR.
Special  Massage  and  Hotnetreat-
ment by appointments.
Room 2, Vernon Block,  Douglas
Street, Victoria.
j Hours—11 to 12 a.m.   Phone 1629.
Silver King Hotel
NBLSON. B. C.
The home ol the Industrial Workert
ofthe Kootenayi.
W. E. McCandlish,
Proprietor
Royal Hotel
NELSON, B. C.
The Host Family Hotel in ths City.
$1.00 a day.
Mrs. Wm. Roberts,
Proprietreee
HOLLY TREES
Price* from ag eteti to 9f .oo, tecordMC
to nt  Write lor Med u4 tret catt-
JAY & CO.
VICTORIA, B. C.
Pantage's
Theatre
JOHNSON STREET
VICTORIA, B. C.
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE
Matinees (any part of house)... .10c
Evenings, Balcony  10c
Lower Floor  20c
Boxes    SOc
Matinees
Every Afternoon
at
3 O'CIock.
Night Performances
8 and 9.15
BEDDING
PLANTS
Cheap Prices.   Get our price list.
Johnston's Seed Store
City Market
VICTORIA
Victoria
FRUIT
and
Farm Lands
Write for "Home  List" and
information.
R.   S.   DAV
end
BEAUMONT BOGGS
Realty Brokers,
eao roBT btbbbt     ;:    tiotobia.
THOMAS OATTZBAXb
BnllSar   ____   general  Contractor.
Tenders  clvtk   on   Brick, Stone   an
Frame, Alterations, Parquetry Floorlni
Offlce, Bank, Store and Saloon Flttlngi
Pile Driving, Wharvee aad Dock Shed:
constructed and repaired.
TIOTOBIA. THE WEEK, SATURDAY JANUARY 25, 1908
ijp -*$-$-$$<$^<$9Jf 9$? fg?9J? sfc
*
*
*
*
*
A Lady's Letter *
By  BABETTE.
Dear Madge;
I have spent Christmas in Mexico,
the land of eternal springtime, where
the warm sun does not let mother
earth sleep, but continually forces
from her new blossoms day after
day. These mature quickly and form
lucious fruits of mellow sweetness,
while other tender buds are but
breaking through their nests of dainty
green. Thus does it seem to me
like a land of perpetual  spring.
Now I must tell you of the quaint
"posadas" which are held every night
for nine nights before Christmas.
Typically Mexican, there are not many
foreigners who are privileged to see
a genuine series of these quaint feasts.
Luckily for me, kind friends arranged
that 1 might be present at one and
I found it most impressive and interesting. These posadas are called
jornadas in some parts of Mexico,
ancl both words have a peculiar significance, posada referring to thc
lodging, and Jornada to the day's
journey. The legend goes that Joseph
ancl Mary traveled from Nazareth to
Bethlehem in nine clays, and that each
night they had to beg their lodging
or posada. lt is the begging for this
lodging that gives the novena or nine
days before Christmas their peculiar
religious significance, not observed
indeed, in the churches but recognized by thc Mexicans who always
place very high those ancient Roman
virtues of respect for home and family life.
Thc journey of these two humble
subjects of the Roman Empire to
the town of their legal residence,
Bethlehem of Belen, (as it is called in
Spanish), for the taking of thc census
as ordered by Augustus Caesar is thus
commemorated nightly in all Mexican
homes from December 16 to 24 thc
feasts terminating on Christmas eve
with all ceremony and pomp. Several families usually arrange to hold
their posadas together, and each
family entertains the others on one
of the nights of the novenas. The
party assembles at a little after 7
o'clock in thc appointed house and
each member of the party is provided
with a candle, the servants and retainers of the household being included in the party on these occasions. A procession is formed headed
by two pilgrims represented by little
statuettes, Joseph on foot ancl Mary
mounted on an ass, or burro, which
Joseph leads. Above the figures
hovers another, that of an angel. Thc
figures arc usually rude, like those
sold in thc Alemada about this time,
but the details of thc Virgin's face,
Joseph's beard and the patient gray
burro are carried out faithfully, although the personal equation of the
sculptor enters largely into thc makeup. The pair arc represented as
Mexicans of thc lower class, not far
off from the truth of thc lowly origin
of thc holy couple.
Thc procession which the chosen
people who carry thc figures of Joseph ancl Mary head, marches down
the corridor of the house, and along
thc walks of the garden, with a choir
of ladies ancl girls, singing the Virgin's litany of Goretto. This finished
a portion of the party enters the
drawing room and acts as its owner
in the dialogue with the pilgrims
outside. Thc knock, at the door, and
the appeal for a night's lodging is
met with a gruff reply and an order
to begone. But the pilgrims persist,
in a fascinating old chant, like the
litany of a mediaeval church, ancl
finally thc obdurate householder relents, and thc pair enter. They are
given quarters in a corner of the
room, where a quaint service is held,
in which all present take part.
Prayers are offered up by a priest
if one is present and more chants are
sung. The following is a sample of
thc mediaeval chant, with its translations:
Oh peregrina agraciada
Oh purisima  Maria
Yo te afrezcoel alma mia,
Para que tengais posada, etc.
O gracious pilgrim
0 purest Mary
1 offer thee my soul
To be thy refuge, etc.
The religious part of the evening-
ends with this little service before
the shrine. Its close is a signal for
the youngsters, and with an assurance born of tradition they demand
sweets and a collation is passed, with
candies ancl little pottery toys, etc.,
that are sold in great numbers about
Xmas time. These toys arc always
kept as  souvenirs.
The breaking of the "pinata" then
follows, and is one of the chief features of the evening. This pinata is
nothing more than one of the big
earthenware water jars, decorated
with tissue paper tinsel, and in the
handsomer ones enveloped in great
papier mache figures of angels, men
and women of all types and races.
The pinata is filled with little presents of various sorts, clay figures
and dolls and in many cases with presents of silver and mechanical toys of
value.
This pinata is hung up either in
the middle of the room, the doorway
or in the veranda. Each member of
the party is then given a chance to
break it with three blows, being first
blindfolded and turned around three
times. This adds to the jollity of
the occasion, as those in the room
have sometimes to exercise agility in
avoiding strong blows meant to shatter the pinata, and which may cause
damage to sundry craniums. Once
the pinata is broken the whole company joins in the scramble for the
presents  which  tumble  to  the  floor.
On Christmas eve, or the "Noche
Buena," the service and the fun both
exceed those of all the other nights.
Thc service of asking for lodging is
much the same, except that this time,
which marks the anniversary of the
arrival of Joseph and Mary in Bethlehem, they are lodged in a stable,
represented in one corner of the
drawing room. The special ceremony
of the evening waits until midnight.
Fifteen minutes before the midnight hour, the exercises of the
"Noche Buena" begin with the singing of the litany of the Nino Dios.
The last ten minutes are given to
the singing of the Rorro for the
soothing of thc Infant Jesus. This
Rorro is a beautiful typical epitome of
the songs of Mexican mothers to
their babies. At 12 o'clock the ceremony of the laying of the Nino Dios
in His manger takes place. A curtain
is drawn from a miniature representation of the scene described in the
New Testament, disclosing the stable
with Mary and Joseph and a brilliant
star marking the spot where the
young Christ is to lie. With the laying of the child in his cradle the
ceremony of the Nativity is completed. The typical supper follows,
ancl is made up of peculiar dishes, lavishly furnished, for the hosts of the
evening are always the wealthiest
and most generous of the families
who havc observed the posadas together.
After supper dancing commences,
the host leading off with the honoured lady guest of thc  evening.
The feasts are still very generally
observed, although in some cases the
religious part is not kept up with the
interest of old times ancl indeed, in
many cases the social features far outshine the religious.
The Wheelbarrow.
The farmer's son looked up from
the sporting page.
"By heck," he said, "I wish wc had
one 0' them there horseless carriages."
"Wc havc," returned thc farmer;
"ancl now that you mention it, you
might just as well get it and fetch
up a load of turnips from the three-
acre lot."—Exchange.
WEEK 27th JANUARY.
The New Grand
SULLIVAN a CONSIDINE,    Proprietor*.
Management ef HOiT. JAMIESON.
THE MUSICAL HAWAIIANS
High-class Singers and Instrumentalists—Five People—Serenading
Scene in Honolulu — Native
Dance and Songs of Hawaii.
JAMES R. WAITTE & CO.
Nautical   Tabloid   Comedy-Drama,
"At Lighthouse Point."
Edw. Ethel
ARMSTRONG AND DAVIS
Musical    Comedy    Sketch,    "The
Amateur   Chauffeur."
MEUNOTEE-LANOLE DUO
Tight-Wire Artists.
LAURETTA BOYD
Singing Comedienne.
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrator
"Down in the Old Cherry Orchard''
NEW MOVING PICTURES
"The Pirates."
"The Enchanted Pond."
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M. Nagel, Director.
Selections from "La Modiste," by
Victor Herbert.
EQUIP YOURSELF
WITH A  THOROUGH
BUSINESS COUBSE
SHORTHAND
TYPEWRITING
BOOKKEEPING
Day and Night Classes. You can
enter school any time. Individual
instruction. A diploma from this
school will enable you to secure and
hold a position with the best firms.
Terms reasonable.
For particulars write or call
THE   SHORTHAND  SCHOOL
1109 Broad Street Viotoria, B.C.
E. A. MacMillan.
BABIES        SWEDISH       GENTS
MASSAGE
Turkish Baths
VIBBATOB  TBEATMENT
KB.     BJOBNFEBT,     SWEDISH
MASSEUR.
Special   Massage and Hometreat-
ment by appointments.
Boom 2, Vernon Blk., Douglas St.
Body Development.
Hours 1 to 6. Phone 1629.
mmmm
rj<^S^_\^\:■_,■•_:_ ■_:■ ■-...:....■
Herbert
Witherspoon
(BASSO)
MONDAY,   JANUARY  27TH
PRICES: $2.50, $2.00 and $1.00.
Gallery, 50c.
The Box Office will be opened at the
Victoria Theatre at 10 a.m. on Friday,
January  24th.
Lovers of sport will have no difficulty in finding enjoyment this afternoon, as sufficient games have been
arranged to give every devotee his
choice.
In rugby, the James Bay team will
try conclusions with thc McGill College of Vancouver. This game will
be played at Beacon Hill owing to
the Oak Bay ground being in use.
In association, the Y.M.C.A. intermediates will run up against the
Ladysmith intermediates, and previous to this game the North Ward
Juniors will play the Nanaimo Juniors. While the association football
is going on, the adjoining ground will
be occupied by the hockey players.
Thc Victoria teams, both ladies and
men, will have for their opponents the
Vancouver clubs. In thc morning the
High School girls will met the representatives from the Vancouver High
School. In the evening the High
School basketball teams from Vancouver and Victoria will line up
against each other. With this attractions to select from there is no reason why each should not be well patronized.
TIMBER
If you have any
timber for sale
list it with us
We can sell it
BURNETT, SON  & CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,   B. C.
The days are getting Cold.
THE
WILSON BAR
Is Warm and Comfortable.
VISIT IT.
648 Yates St., Victoria B. C.
COAL
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Plctoria Agents for the Nanaimo Collierle*.
New Wellington Coal.
The best household coal in the marke  ar
turrent rate*.   Anthracite coal (Or sale.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA
Holland French and
Japan Bulbs
For Fall Planting.
SEEDS, TREES, PLANTS
for the farm, garden, lawn, boulevard   or   conservatory.    Acclimated
stock.   Oldest established nursery on
the Mainland of B. C.   Catalogue free.
M. J. HENRY,
3010 Westminster Rd, Vancouver, B.C.
P
,i\ 1 _U_\ I 3  a„d trade Marka
obtained in all countries.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville St.
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
Leave Your Baggage Cheeks at thc
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.       A. E, KENT, Proprietor
LATEST NUMBERS
English
Magazine
CHUMS
TIT-BITS
THE STRAND
PEARSONS
PUNCH
KNIGHT'SBOOKSTO RE
TIOTOBIA, B. O.
LLOYD  &  CO.,   chimney  sweepd
and   house-cleaners,   716   Pandol
St.     Satisfaction   and   cleanline|
guaranteed.   All orders by post
otherwise   promptly   attended
Trial respectfully solicited.
PHONE 191.
Will You Take
$500 a Year..
for your spare time. In other
words the man who has a couple
of hours morning and evening
and will employ it in operating
A Cyphers Incubator
at his home can make from $500
in twelve months. We have a
unique plan to work on and will
be pleased to explain it to any
one  interested.    Call  or  write.
Watson &
McGregor
647 Johnson  Street,
VICTORIA, B. C.
SEEDS, TREES, PLANTS,
for the farm, garden, lawn, boula
vard or conservatory. Acclimatise!
stock. Oldest established nursery o|
the Mainland.   Catalogue free.
M.  J.  HENRY
3010 Westminster  Road,  Vancouve
k»^l/_**__
All Hands
Busy
AT
Fit-Reform Wardrobe
OPENING     UP     LARGE
SHIPMENTS    OF     NEW
SPRING GOODS.
We want you to see the
new SUITS with the long,
wide, soft roll lapels.
COATS cut a trifle shorter and semi-form fitting.
TROUSERS in handsome
stripes, checks and mixtures, in grays, and new
shades in olives and browns.
ALLEN & CO.
Fit=Reform
Wardrobe
1201   GOVERNMENT  ST.,
Victoria, B. C.
New House to Rent, or
For Sale.
I have for immediate possession t<
rent or will sell on very easy term
—small cash payment—one of thi
best built dwellings in the city. Onl;
IS minutes' walk from Post Offic<
and one block from car line. Situ
ated in one of the best residentia
sections.
Bungalow, with large balcon;
seven-roomed house, absolutely nev
with full sized cement basement, cor
crete floor; electric light in ever
room in the house. Hot and col
water equipment; heavy porcelai
wash bowl and bath, also separat
toilet in basement. Laundry in th
basement equipped with latest cor
crete tubs and hot and cold wate:
Walk has been laid in extra heav
concrete from street to veranda
steps. This is a proposition that wi
be snapped up quickly. Call 0
phone 1543.
G. W. DEAN
Adelphi Block   -   VICTORIA, B.C THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 25, 1908.
Splendid Address.
By Mr. Thomas Taylor, Member for Revelstoke, in
Moving the Reply to Address Prom Throne.
Mr. Thomas Taylor, the member
or Revelstoke, is best known in Vsc-
oria, as the hard-working party whip,
vhose chief duty it ls to keep the
Conservative  members  together  and
0 produce them in the House whenever a vote is taken.    There *is not
1 man who has access to the corri-
lors of the Legislative Assembly who
s not familiar with the indefatigable
abours of Mr. Taylor; there is no
.usier and no harder-worked man in
:he House. His duties are not only
irduous, but sometimes difficult and
Dccasionally delicate. He discharges
them with infinite tact, and in so doing has secured the respect of every
member of the House.
Premier McBride voiced a very
general opinion when he said on
Wednesday last that Mr. Taylor
might with great advantage to the
House address it oftener. His contributions to the debate arc few and
'ar between; no doubt this is due in
.art to the demands made upon his
ime by the office which he fdls, but
dl who know Mr. Taylor attribute it
lso to his modesty. After his splen-
lid address, which is given verbatim
lelow, the regret at his rare appear-
nce as a debater will be increased,
t is not to detract from the value ot
he important utterances that have
alien from more prominent members
0 say that no abler, more lucid, more
ncisivc, or more weighty address has
ieeii delivered in the House for many
essions. As a review of the men-
ures and policy indicated by the
.ieutenant-Governor's address, it is
dmirable in every respect. Devoid
if the arts or artilices of the rhetoric-
in, it is a calm, logical, convincing
tatement. The language is that
|hich befits a legislative assembly,
nd presents a marked contrast to the
npassioned and emotional appeals
hich  too often  obtrude  themselves
1 debate. Mr. Taylor's manner was
3 admirable as his matter. He stood
rect, with one hand resting upon his
esk, the other straight beside him.
le made no gestures, and rarely
used his voice above the level of a
erious, reflective debater. His whole
ir was strongly reminiscent of the
i_i_ of debater familiar to those who
ave sat in the galleries of the Brit-
>h House of Commons. Those who
:ad the  address,  as  printed below,
11 agree that for style, lucidity and
:11 chosen language, it forms a
lodel for all Parliamentary debaters.
Mr. Taylor, in moving the address
reply to the speech from the throne
aid:
"Mr. Speaker,—In rising to move
ie reply to the speech from the
nrone, I wish to record my apprecia-
ion of the distinction accorded the
Constituency I represent in this Leg-
slature, and the responsibility and
lonour conferred on me by appoint-
nent to this time-honoured task.
)uring the recess extending over a
icriod of ten months, some very im-
ortant public questions have engaged
lie attention of the public of this
'rovince. Standing out prominently
-in fact, transcending all other pub-
questions relating to the future
J-elfare and development of this Prov-
|ice is the all-absorbing question of
)riental Immigration.' During the
Ight years in which I have had the
fcnour of a seat on the floor of this
louse, this question has been as
I'ten before the different Parliaments,
[.ssion following session, legislation
lis been introduced to meet the sit-
lition, and which has invariably relived the unanimous support of the
lembers of the House. For many
ears this legislation has partaken of
le nature of the Natal Act, which is
force now and has been for many
Lars in some of our sister colonies—
Is chief provision, an educational
tst imposed upon all incoming immigrants.
"Our authority and jurisdiction   to
deal with questions of this nature we
contend is vested in our Legislatures,
under the terms of the British North
American Act. Our legislation, however, has been disallowed on coming
before the Liberal Government at Ottawa; the grounds for such disallowance being given as contrary to Imperial policy ultra vires of the Province, and not in accordance with Dominion policy. It is a matter of record, however, that in two almost
similarly worded despatches in 1898-9,
addressed to the then Governor-General of Canada, Right Hon. Joseph
Chamberlain, then Colonial Secretary,
advised that the passage of an Act
similarly worded to the Natal Act
which was shortly to be adopted in
Australia, and which has since been
put in force, would meet the situation
and be acceptable to the Imperial
authorities. The agitation on this
question in British Columbia dates
back to nearly thirty years ago, and
in its early stage was directed
against Chinese immigration. The
influx of Chinese at that date brought
nbout a state of affairs which called
for some action on behalf of the authorities.
"In 1885 the Hon. Mr. Chapleau was
commissioned by the Dominion Government to enquire into this question,
and as a result of his inquiries a head
tax of $50 was imposed on all incoming Chinese; this was later, in 1891,
increased to $100 a head, and again
in 1903, as a result of the findings of
a Commission of Inquiry, known as
the Oriental Commission—this head
tax was again increased to $500. This
action on the part of the Dominion
Government has had the result of
practically restricting altogether thc
immigration of coolie labour from thc
Empire of China.
Japanese Immigration.
"The Commission above mentioned,
referring to the matter of Japanese
immigration, recommended the passage of the Natal Act, if the absolute
restriction of Japanese could not be
effected by any other method. Some
negotiations were entered into, apparently between the governments of
Japan and Ottawa, dealing with the
restriction of immigration from
Japan, and we were told repeatedly
by the Premier of Canada, as well as
by his Minister, Hon. Mr. Fisher, that
a written agreement existed between
the Japanese government which
would restrict the immigration from
Japan to a limited number not to exceed four or five hundred yearly. At
the 1907 meeting of the Federal
House, a treaty was ratified giving to
the Japanese the right of free and unrestricted entry into any part of Canada, and as a result of this no less
than ten thousand Japanese came on
our shores, during the year 1907.
The Premier of Canada, now declares in vindication of his Government's action, that the written assurances of the Government of Japan as
to the restriction of immigration was
sufficient justification for the ratification of that treaty. Does it not
occur to us, however, as British
Columbians, that if necessary for any
restriction existed, that that restriction should be part and parcel of the
treaty. However, we can understand
the Premier of Canada in his attitude
at this question—we can understand
it is a difficult matter indeed to bring
arguments to bear with Eastern Canadians as to the difficulties surrounding this question. This was clearly
demonstrated by the attitude of the
Premier in addressing a meeting at
Ottawa a few weeks ago, during the
progress of a bye-election, when he
declared that British Columbia's, attitude on that question was wrong,
and our sentiments were wrong. As
I say, we can understand the apathy
of Easterners who are not at all acquainted with the conditions surrounding this class of immigration,
but what can  be said of the course
followed by the seven Liberal members that this Province sends to Ottawa, and who certainly should be
well acquainted with the different issues involved?
Members at Ottawa.
"Hon. Mr. Templeman, whom Victorians have sent to Ottawa as Minister of the Crown for British Columbia, should be, owing to his long residence here, thoroughly conversant
with this question. The Liberal-Labor leader, Mr. Smith, of Nanaimo,
should also be very conversant with
the evil effects of Japanese unrestricted immigration. Mr. Smith has,
in his career, rubbed elbows in the
mines of this country with the sons
of the "Rising Sun." I well remember
the time when, as a member of this
House, Mr. Smith could most entertainingly and intelligently discuss
this question, and his arguments always appealed to me as carrying
great force. Mr. Macpherson, of Vancouver, should also be familiar with
this question; but is it not extraordinary that those gentlemen, together
with the other members at Ottawa
from British Columbia, should on the
occasion of the ratification of the
treaty take so little interest in our
welfare and in our homes, as to allow
the confirmation of this treaty providing for unrestricted immigration
into this country, without raising
their voices in protest against it? But
MR.  THOMAS  TAYLOR,
M.P.P. for  Revelstoke.
those self-same gentlemen, representing us at Ottawa must feel in no
small measure the blame and responsibility for those unfortunate occurrences which transpired a few months
ago in the city of Vancouver. When
this influx was at its height, and
steamer after steamer was unloading
its cargo of human freight on our
shores, had those gentlemen put up a
defence against the ratification of the
treaty unless the written assurance,
which we now hear so much about,
being part and parcel of that treaty,
and fought the issue as British Columbians, I am convinced that something might have materialized from
their efforts in this direction. It was
their plain duty to defend British Columbia on this question, until such
time as their defence received recognition or else continue the fight until
the Government would be compelled
to withdraw the treaty altogether.
Vancouver Riots.
"1 nm not one of those who would
wish to condone, or appear to condone rioting or mob violence under
any circumstances. We belong to -1
race that dwells under the protection
nf the flag of an Empire, which for
centuries has been the 'Beacon Light'
of advancing civilization and intelligent citizenship, which in all countries and climes wherever it floats is
the emblem of protection and of justice to all who come under its folds,
be they white, brown or black; but I
do say. that on the occasion of these
riots  in  the  city  of Vancouver,    of
which fact the whole world has had
notification through our press, and of
which the criticism in some directions
is very marked, the provocation was
very great, but such a provocation
never could have arisen if our Liberal
members at Ottawa had taken advantage of the occasion and fought this
issue to the bitter end, in defence of
our home and the future development
and welfare of the Province of British
Columbia.
"Better Terms."
"The speech from the throne refers
to the question of 'Better Terms,' and
the Premier's mission to England in
connection therewith, as representative of British Columbia. It will be
remembered that shortly before the
prorogation of this Legislature last
year, the Premier was obliged to proceed to England to protest against
the force of Imperial .sanction being
given to certain resolutions and arrangements arrived at, at a conference of premiers at Ottawa, in the
year 1906, and to which British Columbia, represented by the Hon. Richard McBride, was not an assenting
party. The thanks of the country are
due the honourable gentleman for thc
successful culmination of his visit to
the foot of the throne. The people
of British Columbia are not unmindful of the efforts put forward by the
honourable Premier at Ottawa and
doubly thankful are they at the outcome of his mission to England. The
disparaging and malicious reflections
and reports of the Liberal press of
British Columbia as to the possible
outcome of his negotiations in England must, by all, be well remembered. It was clearly apparent that it
was the expectation and wish of that
press that his efforts in England in
defending British Columbia's case,
would be unfruitful of any good results; but I am proud to say, as a
supporter of that honourable gentleman, and also as a resident of British
Columbia for many years, that his
mission was entirely successful, and
never in the history of British Columbia has any of her citizens created a
better impression, or received a more
hearty and enthusiastic reception on
his home-coming, than did the honourable gentleman on his return from
his mission to England. I have yet
to hear any honourable gentleman,
either in this House or out of it, say
that the treatment accorded British
Columbia at that conference, where it
was proposed to settle British Columbia's financial affairs, finally and forever, that the amount proposed to bc
granted of one hundred thousand dollars a year, for ten years, was in any
way adequate to meet the conditions
which we are confronted with here
to-day. That being thc case, would
it not have been most cruelly unjust
for the future of British Columbia
that the resolution and imposition of
that conference should receive Imperial sanction as final and unalterable?
Mr. Fielding's Attitude.
"Hon. Mr. Fielding, Finance Minister at Ottawa, in a discusison of this
question a few weeks ago, as reported
in Hansard, says: 'That the Premier
of British Columbia came to the conference with the determination that
anything you could do for him would
not satisfy him; that instead of coming there to get an arrangement for
British Columbia, he came there to
get a grievance' Undoubtedly, Mr.
Speaker, he got that grievance, and
the electorate of British Columbia apparently felt that his grievance had
some weight, when on the occasion
of his appeal to the country last February, shortly after his return from
England, he was endorsed by thc
electorate of this Province in such ;•
splendidly handsome manner. Mr.
Fielding further says that 'we entered
Confederation of our own free will,
nnd if we are nsked to live up to thc
terms of Confederation our people
should not complain'—our people, hc
says, nre not a party of children, nnd
they do not require nny 'baby net' for
their protection. British Coulmbians
are not children, neither do wc require a 'baby net' for our protection;
but I submit, sir, when wc can demonstrate by conclusive argument
and statistics that British Columbia
has not received fair treatment, and
that we have not been treated by Ot
tawa in accordance with the spirit
or interest of the terms of union, that
our case should be fought out determinedly until such time as we can secure the treatment which is due us.
Is it possible that the fathers of Confederation 'ever anticipated or intended that we, as citizens of this Western Province should be penalized, as
it were, for joining the Confederation
of the Province. No; on the other
hand, it was clearly the intention and
purpose of that union that each and
every Province should have an opportunity of presenting its case to the
proper authorities at Ottawa, and, if
it was found that a grievance existed,
it was the duty, and has been the custom for many years to remedy the
grievance as early as possible either
through the two Governments themselves, or by a board of arbitrators.
This is clearly demonstrated on many
occasions. Nova Scotia had its board
of arbitration, New Brunswick has
had the same, and many of the other
Provinces have been treated in like
manner.
Ample Justification.
"Is there not some justification for
the attitude of the Premier in his
strong and determined fight for better terms, when we can point out
since 1871, when wc joined Confederation, wc have paid into the Dominion Treasury no less than $20,000,000
over and above what we have received back again in public work and
other public expenditures in the Province? Is it not a matter for some
consideration that we pay into the
Dominion Treasury almost three
times as much per capita as the other
Provinces in the Dominion of Canada,
where the cost of administration, owing to our extraordinary physical conditions, our scattered population and
sparsely settled districts, must, necessarily, be enormously in excess of
any of our sister Provinces, where the
cost per enpita on roads, streets and
bridges of this Province has an average of $2.91, as compared with 13 3-5
cents in nny of the other Provinces of
the Dominion where the cost of civil
govcrnmetn is nine times grenter than
any of the other Provinces and so on
with the other departments of Government.
Paid for Transportation Facilities.
"Then, too, have we not pnid dearly to the Dominion Government for
the transportation facilities which we
have received? Hnve we not in the
first intsance handed over to the Dominion Government a belt of land
forty miles wide, extending from thc
eastern confines of thc Province to
the shores of thc Pacific, for railway
connection—hnve we not, on this very
island, disposed of no less than two
million five hundred thousand acres
of our best lands, for this same purpose? Again, we have contributed no
less thnn three million five hundred
thousand ncres in the Peace River
country for thc purpose of railway
connection. We hnve no quarrel with
the other provinces of Canada, while
of course we must feel nn interest in
the welfare nnd good government of
our sister Provinces, wc clnim that
ihis question is one which docs not
partake of the nature nf interference
hy tlie other Provinces of Cnnndn, hut
is n mntter of arrangement entirely
between the Ottawa Government nnd
ourselves.
Will Fight to Finish.
"The Premier nnd people of British
Columbia enn be depended upon to
fight this issue and continue fighting
until such time as our remedy in thc
wny of sufficient assistance is granted, nnd I enn promise to this House
nnd the people of British Columbia,
thnt wc will not be found in the same
position ns Hon. Mr. iFclding, who
now criticises the Premier on his defence of better terms, nnd who when
ns Premier of thc Province of Nova
Scotia threatened thc Dominion authorities thnt Nova Scotin would
withdraw from thc Confederation of
the Provinces, unless her grievances
were remedied nnd her financial con-
dition recognised.
Finances of Province.
"ll  will he wtihin the recollection
of members of this House thnt upon
thc  occasion  on  which  the  Finance
Minister undertook the supervision of
Continued on Pnge 7. THE WEEK   SATURDAY, JANUARY 25  1908.
Incorporated liOi,
Capital, 1500,000.00
Capital Increased
ln 1007
to ...11,004,000.00
Subscribed
Capital,    JI60.000
Reserve . . $80,000
Surplus, Jan. 10,
1907  . .  $110,000
J. B. MATHERS, Oan. Ham.
IR   CLOSING   UP   ESTATES
either as Executors or Assignees
the Dominion Trust Co., Ltd., is
never Influenced by ulterior motives. Their entire ambition,
effort, and energy is directed towards securing the best possible
returns for all concerned.
Name this company executor ln
your will. Blank will forms furnished free of charge and stored
ln our safety deposit vaults,
when we are made your executor.
DOMINION TRUST CO,
Limited.
338 Hastings St., West.
Vancouver, B. C.
The Week
A Provincial Review and Mafaxlna, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
^COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
IIVi  Government Street. .Victoria, B.C.
Ill  Heatings  St Vancouver,  B.C.
W. BLAKKMORfi..Manager and Bdlter
Aut Tempora
Aut Mores.
It is a venerable if not a very sage
remark that "thc fashion of this worid
changeth." Thc commonest application of so obvious a truism is to thc
"fashions." il" it bc true that one
half thc world does not know how
the other half lives, it is at least
equally true that one-half the world
and probably a little more is unable
to conceive how the other half manages to dress.
If one picks up an illustrated paper
of fifty years ago, or looks through
the old family album, in which grandfather and grandmother figure, the
extreme severity of feminine dress is
at once apparent. Of course this applies not at all to the aristocracy, but
to the ordinary middle class aud
working people, as they are designated in England.
On high days and holidays, which
meant principally on Church days,
and those nevcr-to-bc-forgotten days
on which Mother went to be photographed, a bit of ribbon or lace served
.for decoration.
Mere man is not permitted the
range in his sartorial adornments
which is the prerogative of woman,
and yet one has only to turn back
to the seventeenth century to find
him iu ruffles and peruke, with velvet
doublet and silken hose. Nowadays
lhe best hc can do runs to a sporting
suit of Harris tweed, or a business
suit of worsted or serge, whilst my
lady of almost any rank is gay with
millinery, dress, mantle, lo say nothing of other adornments which must
be nameless, but all of which go to
remind me thai lhe comic opera
writer need not have drawn lhe line
where he did when he said th.it "The
little soubrette is a costly pet."
And yet nature has a wonderful
way of ringing in compensations. The
enormously increased cost of clothing one's daughters compared with
the cost fifty years ago is met by
the fact that nowadays daughters cam
money themselves, and most of them
spend it all on their dress. I am
not one of those crusty old bachelors who believe*, ihat women only
dress to catch husbands. Statistics
do nol show that the percentage of
marriages has increased in any sen
sible ratio with the increase of extravagant decoration. In all civilized com
munities the percentage remains stationary except for purely temporary
fluctuations. One must therefore conclude that expensive dressing is a
natural concomitant of advancing civilization. Probably the artistic development of dressing will come later
when knowledge on this abstruse
subject is more widely diffused, but
1 am more impressed with other
changes to which I will refer. For
instance, one reads in the English
papers that it is quite the custom
nowadays for ladies to smoke hi
public places.
When 1 was in London a few years
ago, the fashion had not set in, ancl
even now I can hardly believe that
it has any serious hold, it would be
rather a strange irony of fate if the
censoring of manners in this respect
should emanate from New York. We
have recently been treated to some
h'ghly realistic accounts of the doings of the smart set in modern Babylon. One of the best written, most
picturesque and most impressive
sketches which I have read for a
long time was recently reprinted in
the Victoria Times from a New York
paper. It depicted the doings on
Broadway at Christmas, and was entitled "Nothing but Wine," and yet
we are now told that an edict has
been promulgated by the Governor
of New York forbidding ladies to
smoke in public.
1 well remember the first test case
on this matter in England. I was in
the Criterion one night when two
well known city gentlemen and their
wives were dining. After dinner the
gentlemen lit cigarettes, and one of
the ladies followed suit. The manager soon put in an appearance and
remonstrated; the upshot was a row
and the whole party was turned out
by main force.
Next day the matter came before
Mr. Lushington, one of the City
Magistrates, who inflicted a small fine
on the manager, and very sarcastically declared that it was not illegal for
a lady to smoke in public—"it was a
matter of taste." In spite of this
decision, favourable to the fair
smokers, none of the managers of
London restaurants would permit
smoking, and no one else had the
hardihood to take them into Court.
This was in 1893, and it nipped in the
bud the attempt to introduce a fashion of more than doubtful reputation.
But whatever ladies may do in public, there is no doubt that among
the smart set, which might just as
wei be denominated the fast set, the
smoking of cigarettes in private is on
the increase. This may truly be
called a new fashion, and yet it is
only a variation of what any man
fifty years of age has seen. Many a
time have I watched an old woman
smoking a clay pipe, but always
among the working classes, and generally in the country. 1 always
thought it was more a question of
relieving the loneliness and monotony
of rural lile, rather than any particular taste for the weed.
There is one other feature of social
life which always impresses me, the
freedom allowed nowadays to children, and especially to girls. This
freedom docs not pertain in all civilized countries, for discipline and oversight are pretty nearly as rigid today iu France and Germany as ever,
but in England, thc reins have been
slackened very perceptibly and on the
American Continent have been almost
abandoned. Many things have conspired to bring about this important
change. Co-education has been .
strong factor. The great increase in
public amusements is another, in fact
anything which has tended to throw
the sexes together without private
guardianship has produced a more independent spirit and an impatience oi
control.
How it would have shocked our
grandmothers to havc seen young
people forming theatre parties without a chaperone, and yet apart from
an increased tendency to waste too
much time mi mere amusements the
general result has not been to lower
tiie moral tone of society.
What I most deplore is that concurrently with this development of
greater freedom for young people has
grown up an   inclination   to   resent
authority. It is conspicuous everywhere, in the schools, in the home,
and in everyday life. This may be
to some extent a reaction from a regime of undue severity; the severity
which had a Puritan origin, whether
manifested in church, school, or social life. I often smile when I think
of the methods in vogue in English
boarding schools when I knew a great
deal more about them than I ever
want to know again. To use a
modern vulgarism the youth of today
"would not stand for them," so that
again is a change of fashion which
tends to illustrate my article.
% Social and        %
J Personal. J
*__. ____________________ __________-__________>__________-*_!_• __:____■ _______■ __il_s __*\m _mi _____\_t
Miss Beryl Halhed left for home
again about the beginning of week,
* *   *
Miss Holmes of Brussels, Out., is
visiting   her   aunt,   Mrs.   MacKenzie
Cleland, of Pemberton Road.
* *   *
Mr. John Berrington paid a flying
visit to the Capital City during the
week.
* *   *
Miss Phipps of Carberry Gardens is
entertaining some of her girl friends
this afternoon   in   honour   of   Miss
Mabel Tatlow.
* *   *
January 29th is the date settled for
the marriage of Miss Mabel Tatlow
of this city to Mr. Fitz Cornwall of
Ashcroft, B.C.
* *   *
Miss De Wolf of Vancouver was in
Victoria for a few days last week. She
came over for the dance given by
H. M. S. Shearwater and H.M.S.
Egeria last Friday.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. W. Holmes ancl son
have returned to their home in Kaslo, after a month's visit in Victoria
with Mr. and Mrs. Worlock and Col
and Mrs. Holmes.
* *   *
The Private Skating Club started
again on Tuesday afternoon with the
following members present: Miss
Mason, Miss Doris Mason, Miss
Marian Dunsmuir, Miss Newcombe,
Miss W. Johnson, Miss P. Irvnig,
Miss O. Irving, Miss P. Mason, the
Misses Hickey, Miss Little, Miss G,
Irving, Miss Walker, and the Messrs
Martin, Hagerty, McDougal, Fraser,
Arbuckle,   Harvey   and   Troupe.
* *   *
Mrs. W. B. Allen, Cloverdale, was
hostess at a small dance last week, for
her daughter, Miss Sybil Allen.
Among the guests were Miss Ethel
Browne, Miss Adelaide King, Mr.
Teddie King, Mr. Henry King, Mr.
Walter Barton, Mr. Willie Barton,
Mr. Walter Brown, Mr. Holmes, Miss
Rowcroft, Mr. Maurice Rowcroft
Miss Blackwood, .Miss Viva Blackwood and many others.
The Five Hundred Club met on
Tuesday at the residence of Mrs. T. S.
Gore Oak Bay. A dainty tea was
served by Mrs. Stewart Robinson the
table being decorated with pale pink
carnations and asparagus fern. The
prize was captured this time by Mrs.
Gibb. Among those present were:
Mrs. C. M. Roberts, Mrs. W. S. Gore,
Mrs. Spratt, Mrs. Griffiths, Mrs. Gibb,
Mrs. Matson, Mrs. II. Tye, Mrs. G.
Matthews, Mrs. C. Todd, Mrs. R.
Dunsmore Mrs. G. Courtney, Mrs. S.
Robertson, Mrs. Crosse, Mrs. Blackwood, Mrs. Hunter, Mrs. A. Gillespie,  Mrs. Schubert, Mrs. Gibson.
An "Handkerchief Social was given
for Miss Mabel Tatlow, whose marriage takes place next week, by Mrs.
Fletcher, of Rockland Avenue. Thc
table was prettily decorated with
paper, white narcissus and graceful
trailing pieces of variegated periwinkle. After a dainty tea the bridc-
clect was showered with many dainty
and costly handkerchiefs. Those present were: Miss Eveline Tilton, Miss
Elinor Harrington, Miss B. Irving,
Miss G. Irving, Miss V. Mason, Miss
C. Helmcken, Miss McDowell, Miss
T. Gillespie. Miss I. Tuck, Miss Wilson, Miss McQuade, Miss Monteith,
Mis: Little, Miss King, Miss D. Day,
Miss MacDonald, Miss M. Butchart,
Miss Martin (Winnipeg), Miss J.
Butchart, Miss M. Butchart, Miss E.
Pitts, Miss M. Pitts, Mrs. Alexander
Gillespie, Mrs. W. Holmes (Kaslo).
*   *   *
Among tlle many guests dining at
the Empress, which was opened on
Monday last were: Mr. and Mrs.
Stewart Williams, Mr. and Mrs. Ambery, Miss Mason, Col. and Mrs. Prior, Mr. and Mrs. Flumerfelt, Mr.
Langton,  Mr.  Kitto,  Mr.  Keen,  Mr.
Beautiful
We are just as proud of the low prices at which we sell our
beautiful Cut Glass as we are of the fact that it presents many
of the choicest productions of the most artistic and celebrated
makers. '    ■■"•'.*'/     j
Cut Glass Bon-Bon Dishes, from  $1.75
Cut Glass Spoon Trays, from  $3.25
Cut Glass  Bowls, very handsome, from  $7.00
Cut Glass Salt Cellars (individual), from  35c
Cut Glass Salt and Pepper Shakers, silver-mounted, from.. 75c
HAND  SATCHELS  AT  HALF  PRICE.
See Our Window Display
CHALLONER & MITCHELL
47 and 49 Qovernment St., Victoria.
Victor-Berliner
Dance Music
Just imagine having a
full orchestra to play for
you  whenever  you want
to dance ! How you could
dance to such   music as
that! And you can actually have it with a Victor-
Berliner   Gram-o-plione  in
your home.
Better music than you ever
had before—loud, clear and in
perfect time.    No expense for
musicians, nobody tied to the
piano—everybody can dance.
Besides special dance-music
the Victor and Berliner Gram-
o-phone   provides   high-class
m____-_m_-------m__m---_m_-u----u_-_-m  entertainment of every kind
between the dances. Grand opera by the greatest artists,
beautiful bailads by leading vaudeville singers, selections by
famous bands; instrumental solos and duets; "coon" songs;
popular song hits; • minstrel specialties, and other good
healthy fun.
In no other way can you hear this entertainment in your
home, except on the Victor and Beniner Gram-o-phone.
...v. The world's foremost    layers and singers make Victor
\x\ Records only, and the Victoi and Berliner Gram-o-phone
plays them as no other instrument can
■v.. --v.     _■, X
■_
_ VS. G< t0 a,,v '/":'"' ■»' Bei-lmei dealer's and hear
. 0t> ^\. ""■**-' wonderful instruments. Ask him to
%  C 9-v-v esp-i-n tli - easy-payment plan.
\-?<*\ Write tis on  the coupon for   catalogue
%,_i \\and full information,
'-., \%°<s\ Company of Canada, Ltd.
The Berliner Gram-o-phone
MOHTREIL.    606
rata
Bromley, Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell, Mr.
Forbes Vernon, Capt. and Mrs.
Troupe, Mr. Eberts, Mr. Vowell, Mr.
and Mrs. Burton, Mr. and Mrs. G.
Gillespie, Miss F. Gillespie, Mr. and
Mrs. Galletly, Major and Mrs. W. A.
Jones, Dr. and Mrs. D. M. Jones, Mr.
and Mrs. Luxton, Canon and Mrs.
Beanlands, Mr. W. Pemberton, Mr.
and Mrs. Bodwell, Mr. and Mrs. Savannah, Mr. ancl Mrs. Landsbcrg, Mr.
and Mrs. W. Langley, Miss Hickey,
Miss Bulwer, Mr. J. Bridgeman, Mr.
A. W. Harvey, Mr. and Mrs. T. S.
Gore, Mr. J. Arbuckle, Mr. and Mrs.
H. Heisterman, Mr. and Mrs. B. Heisterman, Mr. and Mrs. Brett, Mr. and
Mrs. D. R. Ker, Mr. and Mrs. H,
Helmcken,    Dr.    Todd,    Mrs.    Chas.
Todd, Mr. and Mrs. H. Gillespie, _*.
and Mrs. Alex. Gillespie, Mrs. B*
chart, Misses Butchart, Miss Ho|
Mrs. Rattenbury, and many othe
The bouquets on the many tabl
were chiefly paper, narcissus
scarlet carnations.
"Really,"   said   the    coy   girl
think I'm entitled to a Carnegie m
al.    I  saved  a life  the  other eve
ing."
"The idea!" exclaimed   her   fri
"Whose?"
"Jack    Hansom's.     He    said
couldn't   live   wtihout   me." — Ph
delphia Press. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY.u, 1908
DISTRICT   OF  RUPERT. S.W.,  No.  23, which is  seven and one-  west  SO  chains;   north  80 chains;  east
TAKE NOTICE I. T. S. McPherson, half mlles in a northerly direction from SO chains to point of commencement.
Agent of Victoria, B. C, intend to apply Crown Mountain and on Bank of Upper No. 35—Commencing at a post planted
for a special timber license over the Salmon River; thence north 80 chains; at the northeast corner No. 36, which
following' described lands: east   SO  chains;  south   80  chains;  west   is  marked W.E.S.,   N.E.' which
No. 10—Commencing at a post plant- 80 chains to point of commeneement. is flve' miles distant In a northerly died at the southeast corner section 3, No. 24—Commencing at a post planted rection from Crown Mountain; thence
township 25, marked T. S. McP., No. at the southeast corner No. 24, marked south SO chains; west 80 chains; north
10, which is two and one-quarter miles W.E.S., S.E., No. 24, which is eight and SO chains; east 80 chains; to point of
northerly  from  west  arm  of  Quatsino  one-half  miles   distant   in  a  northerly  commencement.
Sound, thence north 80 chains; west 80 direction from Crown Mountain and one No. 36—Commencing at a post planted
chains, south 80 chains; east 80 chains mile north of the Upper Salmon River; at the northeast corner marked W.E.S.,
to point of commencement. thence west 80 chains; north 80 chains;   N.E. No. 36, which is six miles distant
Dec. 19th,  1907. east 80 chains; south 80 chains to point  in   a   northerly   direction   from   Crown
No. 11—Commencing at a post plant-  of commencement. Mountain and one-half a mlle south of
ed at the southwest comer of section 2, No. 25—Commencing at a post planted Upper Salmon River; thence west SO
township 25, marked McP. P., No. 11, at the northwest corner marked W.E.S., chains; south 80 chains; east 80 chains;
which is two and one-quarter miles N.W., No. 25, which is seven and one- north 80 chains to point of commence-
northerly    from    west    Arm    Quatsino  half miles distant in a northerly direc-   ment.
Sound, thence east 160 chains; north 40  tion from Crown Mountain and on the      Staked  Dec.   20th,   1907.
chains, west 160 chains; south  40 chs.,  Bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence      No. 37—Commencing at a post planted
to point of commencement. south SO chains; thence east SO chains;   at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
Geo. H. Jackson, Agent,   north SO chains; west 80 chains to point  No.   37,   S.E.,   which  is  flve  miles  dis-
Staked Dec. 19,  1907. of commencement. tant in a southwesterly direction from
No. 12—Commencing at a post plant-      No. 26—Commencing at a post planted  West Lake,    Sayward    District;  thenco
ed  one  and  one-half  mile  In  a  north-  at the northeast corner marked W.E.S.,   west  80  chains;   north  80  chains;  east
westerly  direction  from   the  west  end  N.E., No.  26,  which is seven and one-   SO ehains; south SO ohalns to point of
|of Nah-Wi-Ti  Lake,  and one-half mile half miles distant in a northerly direc-   commencement.
west of S. E. Corner section 1, town- tlon from Crown Mountain and on the No. 38—Commencing at a post planted
ship 33, thence west 40 chains; thence hank of the Upper Salmon River; thence at the southwest comer marked W.E.S.,
north 160 chains; thence east 40 chains; south 80 chains; west 80 chains', north S.W. No. 38, which is live miles distant
thence south 160 chains to point of 80 chains; east SO chains to point of in a southwesterly direction from West
commencement,    containing    640    acres  commencement. Lake, Sayward District; thence east  SO
more or less. No. 27—Commencing at a post planted  chains; north 80 chains; west 80 chains;
Staked Dec. 20, 1907. at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,   south  80 chains to point of commence-
No. 13—Commencing at a post plant-  S.E.  No.   27,  which  is  seven  and  one-   ment. •
ed one mile in northwesterly direction half miles distant in a northerly direc- No. 39—Commencing at a post planted
from west end of Nah-Wi-Ti Lake, and tion from Crown Mountain and on the at the southeast eorner, marked 'W.E.S.,
at N. W. corner section 31, township Bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence S.E., No. 39, which is three and one-half
25, thence south 80 chains; thence east north 80 chains; west 80 chains; south miles distant from the south end of
80 chains; thence north 80 chains; 80 chains; east 80 chains to point of West Lake, where it joins the line of
thence west 80 chains to point of com-  commencement. Lot 110;  thence north  80  chains;  west
mencement. No. 28—Commencing at a post planted   80   chains;   south   80   chains;   east   SO
Staked Dec. 20, 1907. at the northeast corner which is marked  chains  to point  of  commencement.
No. 14—Commencing at a post plant- W.E.S. N.E. No. 28, which is eight and No. 40—Commencing at a post planted
ed one mile from west end of Nah-Wi- one-quarter miles distant in a north- at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
Ti Lake in northerly direction, half westerly direction from Crown Moun- s.W. No. 40, which is three and one-half
mile north of N. W. corner section 32, tain, and on the south bank of Upper miles in a southwesterly direction from
township 25; thence south 80 chains; Salmon River; thence west 80 chains; the south end of West Lake, where it
thence east following shore line 80 south SO chains; east 80 chains; north joins line of Block 110; thence north SO
chains; thenee north 80 chains; thence SO chains to point of commencement. chains', east 80 chains; south SO chains;
west 80 chains to point of commence- No. 29—Commencing at a post planted west 80 chains to point of commencement at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,   ment.
Staked Dee.  20,  1907. S.E.   No.   29,  which   is  eight  and  one-      No. 41—Commencing at a post plant-
No. 16—Commencing at a post plant- quarter miles distant ln a northwesterly ed at the southeast cor. marked W.E.S.,
ed one-half mile north of T. L. 13222, direction from Crown Mountain and on s.E. No. 41, which is four miles distant
and at N. E. corner section 36, town- bank of Upper Salmon River; thence in an easterly direction from south end
ship 26, thence west 160 chains; thence west 80 chains; north 80 chains; east of West Lake, on line of Block 110;
south 40 chains', thence east 160 chains; 80 chains; south 80 chains to point of thence west 80 chains; north SO chains;
thenee   north   40   chains   to   point   of  commencement. east SO chains; south 80 ehains to point
commencement. No. 30—Commencing at a post planted   of commencement.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907. at the northeast corner marked W.E.S.,      No. 42—Commencing at a post planted
No. 17—Commencing at a post plant- N.E. No. 30, which is ten miles distant at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
ed one-half mile north of T. L. 13222, in a northwesterly direction from Crown s.W. No. 42, which is four miles distant
of W. Corner section 31, township 19, Mountain and on bank of Upper Salmon jn an easterly direction from south end
thence east SO chains; thence south 80 River; thence SO chains south; 80 chains 0f West Lake, on line Block 110; thence
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence west; SO chains north; SO chains east east 80 chains; north 80 chains; west
north SO chains to point of commence-  to  point  of  commencement. 80 chatns;  south  SO chains  to point of
No. 31—Commencing at a post planted commencement,
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S., No. 43—Commencing* at a post planted
S.E. No. 31, which is ten and one-half at the southeast comer marked W.E.S.,
miles distant in a northwesterly direc- s._ No. 43, which is one and one-half
tion from Crown Mountain and on the mneg distant in a westerly direction
bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence   from the south end of West Lake, where
mnvv vn-nwu  «,„.   nr   w   a* 0„„   80   chains   north;   SO   chains   west;   80  lt  j0ins  the  line  of Block  110,   thence
TAKE NOTICE  that W.  E.  Simpson  chains south, 80 chains east to point of  n0rth 80 ehains: west SO chains; south
I
TRAVELLERS' GUIDE
]
VICTORIA
STRAND HOTEL
VICTORIA
The home ot all theatrical and rauder lie
artists while in the Capital city, alto of
other kindred bohemiaus.
WRIQHT & FALCONER, Proprietor*.
CAMBORNE
ment containing 640 acres, more or less.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
Jan. 11, T. S. McPHERSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Sayward.
SO  chains;  east  80  chains  to point  of
commencement.
No. 45—Commencing at a post planted
of Iowa Palis, Banker, intends to apply commencement
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Staked Dec.  19,  1907.
Works for a special timber licence over w.  E.  SIMPSON. _,„  ,._., ,„....,..,.,.„„ ... „ „.,„.  „,,„,,.„
the   following   described   lands   thirty Jan. 11.     Thomas S. McPherson, Agent, at th'e southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
days a,fter date                              „-,-„..„ ■ S.W. No. 45, which is one and one-half
of I-™!, ,-Lr mn?S»nPww<? VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT. miles   distant   from   the   south   end   of
Ie  No  1    which is seven a^ onY-haft Dlstrict ot Nootka' West Lake'  wnere « -1oins  the llne o£
O.lii.    INO,    li,    WI1M.I1    IS    M,\l,n    .IUU    UIM-M.lll mAT7W   XTrVPTnTO   thnt   TW     T?.     Ql-mnonn    nf 151rtolr     11H'     thanna    nnnHi     Qfl    Clial-HS'     east
St       SO
""n^rown1 Motfntain'^on'The Iowa Falls, Iowa, Banker,- intends^to ap- 80   chains'; "south   80"chains;   wes
Bank  of  Tinner  SalmorRiver   thenci P^ to the chlef Commissioner of Lands chains to point of commencement,
north an chains- wos? 1 r,0 chain's- so th ana Works for a special timber licence      No. 40—Commencing at a post planted
Jo  cha ns   enst' 160 chains  to  nilnt of over  tlle  -following  described  lands   30 at the southwest corner which is mark-
40  chains,  east  Hit) cnains  to  point oi .        .*,.. ,-,... .a  wins!    s w    N«   jr   wi.ir.i-,   is*  nnt
commencement.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted
days after date.
ed W.E.S.,  S.W.,  No.   46,  which  is  one
north SO  chains; east 80  chains;  south
SO chains to point of commencement.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest cornor marked W.E.S.,
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted mile distant and in a southeasterly dint tho snnthpnst corner mnfkpfl WES at the southwest corner marked W.E.S., rection from West Lake adjoining Block
IV m isi whtph u'pSht *mll«dls" S*W. No. 1, which is on the southeast 110; thence north 160 chains; east 40
tant in a norther v direct on from Crown bank ot uPPer Campbell Lake, where chains; south 160 chains; west 40 chains
Mountain andi one m inorthto_vZ£ u cuts the C'P'R' Hne; thence east t0 '10lnt of commencement.
Salmon River- thence%vest SO chains following the C.P.R. line 100 chains; No. 47-Commenctng at a post planted
Salmon   kiwi,   thtmc.   v><.st   mi   chains  110rth SO chains; thence following shore at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
line of said lake to point of commence- S.W., No. 47, which is two miles north-
ment, containing 640 acres more or less, westerly from south end of West lake,
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted where  It  joins  the  line of Block  110;
o-nr   «„   14   w-hinv, io  oip-iit -miiou fii**,    at the southwest corner marked WE..S., thence north SO chains; east 80 chains;
tint Ir, n nnr'thlrlvdirection from Crown   S-W. No.  3, which is 20 chains distant south 80 chains; west SO chains to point
Mountain  an£f one mile  north   of  bank  '» a northerly direction from the south of commencement.
of  Unner  Salmon   Mver   thence  north  east COI'ner ot T-  L'   14s64 and  tnret" No. IS-Commencing at a post planted
sn   nE*   „™?   sn   chn'tns-   sooth   so  quarters of a mile fro mUpper Campbell at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
ehninv west 80 chainsI to point of com- Lake*   thence  east  S0  cnalns;   nonh   S0 S'E" No' 4S' which is two miles distant
men^pi-nent chains; west 80 chains; south SO chains and  in  a northwesterly direction  from
No  15-Commencing at a post planted to point of commencement. the south end of West Lake   where it
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,      No. 4-Commencing at a post planted joins Ine of Block 110; thence nortl   80
S.E. No. 15, which is eight and one-half at the southeast comer marked W.E.S., chains; west 80 chains, south SO chains,
miles distant from Crown mountain and S.E.  No.   4,  which  is  one  mile distant east  80  chains  to  point of commence-
15  chains  west of Island  Power Com- in   a   northerly   direction   from   Upper ment.
pany's lino near bank of Upper Salmon Campbell  Lake,   and   one  mile  east  of      No. 49—Commencing at a post planted
River;   thence   north   100   chains',   west T. L. 14S64, thence west 80 chains; north at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
64   chains;   south   100   chains;   east   64 80   chains;   oast   SO   chains;   south   SO s.W. No. 49, which is three and one-half
chains  to  point   of   commencement. chains  to  point  of  commencement. miles  distant  in   an  easterly   direction
No. 10—Commencing at a post, plant-      No. 5—Commencing at a post planted from centre of shore line of West Lake,
ed at the southeast corner marked W. at the southwest corner marked W.E.S., thence east 80 chains; north SO chains;
E. S., S.E. No. 16, which is nine miles S.W. No. 5, which Is one mile distant In west 80 chains; thence south SO chains
distant  in   a  northerly  direction   from a northerly direction from Upper Camp- to point of commencement.
Crown Mountain  and one and  one-half bell  Lake,  and  one mile  east of T.  L.      No  50—Commencing at a post planted
miles north of stake 12,  on  the Bank 14864; thence 80 chains north; 80 chains at th'e southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
of   the   Upper   Salmon   River;   thence east;   SO  chains  south;   80  chains  west gB  No  50  which is three and one-half
north 40 chains; west 160 chains', smith to point of commencement. mlles  distant   in  an  easterly' direction
40 chains',  east 160 chains  to point of      No. 6—Commencing at a post planted from the centre 0j S__0T<_ line on West
commencement. at the southeast corner marked W.E.S., j   ,      thence west  80  chains;  north  SO
No. 17—Commencing at a post planted S.E.   No.   6,   which   is   situated  on   the ohalns; eagt s0 eha)ns; south SO ehains
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S., north   shore  of Upper  Campbell   Lake, t        ,'..    f pommpneement
S. E. No. 17, which is nine and one-half on   the  C.P.R.    line;    thence    west  40 WJ?°__    „.__„"_.-".'
Our Store
HAS A FINE LINE OF HIGH
CLASS TOILET ARTICLES.
We have just imported a fine assortment of French and English Hair
Brushes.
SEE THE NEW-SHAPED
WHALEBONE BRUSH.
USE  BOWES'  BUTTERMILK
TOLIET   LOTION   FOR
CHAPPED HANDS.
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
Government Street, near Yates St.
VICTORIA, B. C.
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining men and
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
BANFF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
Banff's Most Popular $2 a Day Hotel.
Close to Station and Sulphur
Baths.
N. K. LUXTON, Proprietor.
PHOENIX.
BOND SIGN CO.
VANCOUVER
Signs
ELECTRIC
BOARD
METAL
BULLETIN
GLASS
COTTON
SHOW CARD
In up-to-date styles.   Estimate* and
designs tarnished.
SWEDISH
tat
miles  distant  in  a  northerly  direction chains; north 160 chains; east 40 chains;
from Crown Mountain and two and one- south 160 chains to point of commence*
half   miles   north   of   bank   of   Upper ment.
Salmon River;  thence west  80  chains;      No   - (.„___
north  80 chains;  east SO chains;  south at tlie southei
80 chains to point of commencement. g_____ No   7> which Is about four miles in
No. 18—Commencing at a post plant- n  northwesterly  direction   from   Crown
ed at the southwest corner marked W. Mountain; thence north 80 chains; west
E.  S., S.W.,  No.  IS, which  is nine and g0   cllains;   south   80   chains;   east   80
one-half miles  in a northerly  direction clm*n„  to  point  of commencement,
from Crown Mountain and two and one- c-nm-mnnclna* nt -, nost* nlnnted
half miles north of Upper Salmon River, No* S—Commencing at a post planted
No. 51—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E.  No.   61,  which  is  live  miles  from
,   ,        ,,,„,,.   the  south  end  of West  lake,  where  It
menclng at a post planted   , ,       ,    n       f B,    ,. n0   th th
ast corner marked_W.E.S.,   £„   clmlng.   west   s0   ohal'       south   s0
chains; east SO chains to point of com-
mencement.
Staked Dec. 15, 1907.
No. 62—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 52, which is six miles westerly
nail  miles  norm  UL   upper  s_h_.1i-.u-_1  iaiw.i,       .    ..        „m.t1,0„0t   enrnor   mirltprt   WW-*!       ' **"*   ""■   "-'   "''"-ll   IS   "I"   nines   "esiunj
thence east  SO chains north  SO chains;  SU ■«„   ?   whlrt 1, L mHo- distant  from the south end of West Lake where
west 80.chains; south 80 chains to point  S.B. No.  8, wloh  is JWe miles distant
in   a   northerly   direction   from   Crown
It joins line of Block 110; thence north
SO   chains;   west   SO   chains;   south   SO
0fNo lr-Commenoing at a post planted Mountam; thence noHh SO chains; west p           east 80 chains tQ     ,nt of com.
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S    £0   chains,   south   SO   cha ns     east   SO mencement.
S.W. No. 19, which is ten and one-half  dlg ^   ° ^^th^wm No. 53-Commenclng at a post planted
miles  distant  in  a  northerly  direction      n0   9—Commoneinc at a Post planted at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
from Crown Mountain and  three mijes  „fNt°-oJ„„,Vt0h3°t cn,-Lr 15 Wv'% S.W.  No.  63,  which   ls  six  miles  in  a
irom crown  axuuiiuhh mm   a„i__ „i*,«,o southwest corner marked W.E S.,   S.W.  No.  53,  which    s  six  miles  ln  a
northerly  and  westerly  from  post No. "^™£°«tnje,    ™ ^ ™        W.^a.   ^ ^^ sm]th  _m_
12,   on  bank   of  Uppe.   Salmon   Rivei, northerly   direction   horn   Crown   of  West  lake,   where  it   joins   line   of
he?£e.?orit«tn.0. w«   M nhnin.°to ™?nt Mountain; thence north 160 chains; west   Lot  110;  thence  north  80  chat
outh 80 chains; west 80 chains to point .Q   ^^i,   south   ]|j0   oh gagt   4Q   80   chalng.   south   s0   cha*ng.
Jomr,^   _. ™2ilv,.,w oi tno .nnthP-iqt chains to point of commencement. chains  to point  of  commencen
No. 20—Commencing at the southeast      Na 10_fcommencing at a pbst planted      No. 54-Commenclng at a pos
?mT'i?1^ ^„^ „;„'n»if mii'ps distant at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,   at the southeast corner market
,hlh   »   "a^;«nr    f    m   rrown S*E*. No. 10, which is two miles distal ~	
!L,„f»t„ 1,1 tn,«,-Z,\ ps nn, thwesterlv In a northerly direction from where tl
'"""''i; 19   Z%C hnnk  ofThe Un- C.P.R. line cuts the north shore of U
i^fi,   \L     iwn     north   80 P«    Campbell    Lake;    thence   west    I
Ti *_.l_*«_ s^ritlinJ \Z_h 80 chains- c'lalns; north SO chains; east 80 chain
chains; west 80 chains; south 80 chains, th 'on  .hnU.. tn nnlnt of commenc
east  SO  chains  to point  of  commence- ™"tn !,u cnains to point or commenc
thenceinorth 80 ehains; east_80 chains; g^t^thence nirthieo chainsi" west Lot 110;  thence north 80 chains;  east
south 80 chains; west 80 chains to point   )Q   ^^    south   ]60   ohahiai   east   40 80   chains;   south   SO   chains;   west   80
ot  commencement.               ._           ,.       ,   „,,nlr,= tn nni„, „■? nnmmpnnpmpn. chains  to point  of  commencement.
st planted
™iTint,r.m?rlteLfl^'v,«ni6lSiM dfsHnt  at "the" southeast" corner marked W.E.S., at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
which is ten and one-half miles distant           No        wMch )g tw(j ml]es ^^ SB  No_ B4> whlch ,s two and one.lmlf
wn,,nto<n Hfl ?h,p»^t ps northwesterly  In a northerly direction from where the miles  distant   in   an  easterly  direction
Mountain and three miles northwestern   CpR  ]ine ^ t)_6 ..0.,th sho_.e of Up_ from the north ena ot West laItC| thence
thence   west   80 west  80  chains',   north   80  chains;  east
SO chains; south SO chains to point of
nee- commencement.
ment. No. 55—Commencing at a post plantod
No. 11—Commencing at a post planted at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S., S.W. No. 55, which Is two and one-half
S.E., No. 11, which Is live and one-quar- miles  distant  westerly  from  the  north
ter   miles   distant   In   a   northerly   and end of West lake; thence east 100 chains;
westerly   direction   from   where   C.P.R. north 40 chains; west 40 chains; north
ffi-8OT»S$!S?£ZK  Wft^JSS?^ fiBS.WfJ ^a.nftrVonT^f02om^;^m^th   8°
g&V he^cethneo^n,S0OfehUafn^  %$_7\_  f^TtV^Z^ 8° °ha'nS Stakerl-D^e^e-r-i^' ,0°7-
chains; south 80 chains; east 80 chains  to jpojrU o^^commencement.
to point of commencement.
ment.
No. 21—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 21, which Is eleven and one-
half miles distant In a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and four
miles in a northwesterly direction from
MASSAGE
TURKISH BATHS.
VIBRATOR TREATMENT.
MR.   BJORNFELT,   SWEDISH
MASSEUR.
Special  Massage and  Hometreat-
ment by appointments.
Room 2, Vernon Block, Douglas
Street, Victoria.
Hours—11 to 12 a.m.   Phone 1629.
Deane's Hotel
PHOBNIX, B. C.
New. Modem hot water system. Blectrli
lighted. Tub aad shower baths and laundry in
connection.   The miners'home.
" DANNY " DEANE, Proprietor
         ROSSLAND
Hoffman House
ROSSLAND, B.C.
Rates (1.00 per day and up.   Cafe ia
Connection.
GREEN & SfUTH. Prop's.
NELSON.
HOTEL HUME
NELSON,   B. C,
Leading Hotel of the Kootonayi.
J. FRED HUME,       •       Proprietor.
Silver King Hotel,
NBL50N, B. C.
The home ol the Industrial Workers
olthe Kootenays.
W. E. n.Candllsh,
Proprietor
Royal Hotel
NELSON, B. C.
Tho Dost Family Hotel in the City.
$1.00 a day.
Mrs. Wm. Roberts,
ProprletreM
HOLLY TREES
Price* irom as ceats to $$.oo, Kcorduf
to mt Write for Ned end tree citato*
JAY & CO.
VICTORIA, B. C.
W. E. STMPSON.
Jan. 11. Thos. S. McPherson. Agent.
No. 22—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 22, which Is eleven and one-
half miles distant In a northerly dlrec-
VICTORTA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Nootka.
No. 2—Commencing nt a post planted
Staked Dec. 17, 1H07
No. 32—Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner marked W.E.S.,
N.W. No. 32, which Is six mlles distant
In a northerly direction from Crown
tlon 'from "crown Mountain'"^^"four Mountain, and one-half mlle south of at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
miles in _. northwesterly direction from Upper Salmon River, thence east SO s.E. No. 2. situate on the west Bank
StekS 1" or? the Banft of the Upper chains; south SO chains; west 80 chains, Upper Campbell Lake, where the C.P.R.
Salmon River; thence north 80 chains; north 80 chains to point of commence- line cuts same; thenco west SO chains;
east  SO  chains'   south   80  chains'  west  ment. north 120 chatns; east 40 chains; south
80' chains to point of commencement. No. 34—Commencing at a post planted   SO   chains;   east   40   chains;   south   40
CfV„,t n„^   T»tl,   mn. at t,le northeast corner No.  24, marked   chains   to   point   of   commencement,
staked Dec. 18tll, 1907. W.E.S., N.E. No. 34, which is three miles      Staked December  16th,  1907.
"I°"M flistnnt   in   n.   northerly   direction   from WILLIAM E. SIMPSON,
Pantage's
Theatre
JOHNSON STREET
VICTORIA, B. C.
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE
Matinees (any part of house) 10c
Evenings, Balcony  10c
Lower Floor  10c
Boxes    tOe
Matinees
Every Afternoon
at
3 O'CIock.
Night Performances
8 and 9.15
BEDDING
PLANTS
Cheap Prices.    Get our price list.
Johnston's Seed Store
City Market
VICTORIA
Victoria
FRUIT
and
Farm Lands
Write for "Home List" and
information.
R.   S.   DAY
and
BEAUMONT BOGGS
Realty Brokers.
POBT STBBET VICTOBIA.
THOMAS OATTZBAU.
Builder  end  arattal  OoateMtor.
Tenders circa on Brick, Stone en
Frame, Alterations, Parquetry Floorlni
Offlce, Bank, Store end Saloon Ttttlan
Pile Drtvlnc, Wharrei and Dock Shed
constructed and repaired. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY n, 1908
NEW     WESTMINSTER,    LAND    DISTRICT.
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Eoman Z. Chandler, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
timber broker, intends to apply for a
special timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
at northwest corner of T. L. 1S187;
thence east SO chains along the north
line of T. It. 18187; thence north SO
chains along the west line of T. L.
12502; thence east SO chains along the
north line of T. L. 12502; thence nortli
80 chains along the west line of T. L.
12503; thence in a southwesterly course
along the line of the Capilano Water Reserve to place of commencement, and
containing 640 acres of land, more or
less.
December 23, 1907.
Jan 11. ROMAN Z. CHANDLER.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. W. C; tiience east 80 chains;
thence north SO chains; thence west SO
chains, more or less to River; thence
southerly SO chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more
or less
Staked December 7.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that I, George
French, prospector, of Skidegate, B.C.,
intend to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over 640
acres, bounded as follows:—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast
corner of Section 21, Township 4, Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Group;
thence running 80 chains north; thence
80 chains east; thence 80 chains south
to shore line; thence following shore
line to point of commencement, con
taining  640 acres.
Located  December  12th,   1907.
GEORGE FRENCH, Locator.
Jan. 4 John Simister, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that I, Benjamin Kromp, of Skidegate, B. C,
rancher, intend to apply for a licence
to prospect for coal and vetroleum over
640 acres of land bounded as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted near the
beach at the southeast corner of Section 20, Township 4, Graham Island,
Queen Charlotte Group; thence 80 chains
north; thence 80 chains east; thence SO
chains south and over and under water;
thence 80 chains west over and under
water to point of commencement; containing 640 acres, more or less.
Located  November  30th,   1907.
BENJAMIN KROMP, Locator.
Jan. 4 John Simister, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. Cor. of B. C. Dev. Co.'s Lot 50 and
marked the N. E. Cor.; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains', thence
north 80 chains, more or less, to south
boundary of lot 50; thence east 80
chains along said boundary to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or  less.
Staked December 6.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast. Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank of Kimsquit River, about 4
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H. Taylor's S. W. C.j thence east 80 chains',
thence north 80 chains; thence west SO
chains; thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Staked December  9.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Kimsquit River, about 1V_
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. E. C; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 ehains; thence east SO
chains; thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Staked December 10.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
40 chains east of the N. E. Cor. of B.
C. Dev. Co.'s Lot 50, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. W. Cor.; thence east 40
chains; thence north 160 chains; thence
40 chains to bank of Salmon River;
thence south 160 chains to point of commencement,  containing 640 acres.
Staked December 6.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast. Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
Intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank of Salmon River, about 2
miles north of the N. E. C. of Lot 50
and marked T. H. Taylor's S. W. C;
thence east SO chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west SO chains, more or
less, to bank of river; thence southerly
80 chains along bank of river to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Staked December li.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:-—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Kimsquit River, about 2%
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. E. C; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south SO chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Staked December 10.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains;  thence east 80
chains  to  point of  commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
10. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile distant in a northerly
direction from claim No. !), marked S.E.
Corner, Section 19, Township 36; thence
north SO chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
11. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile distant in a northerly
direction from claim No. 10, marked S.E.
Corner, Section 30, Township 36; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
12. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile distant in a northerly
direction from claim No. 11, marked S.E.
corner, Section 31, Township 36; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
T. S. McPHERSON.
Dec. 28 Per Geo. H. Jackson.
No. 34—Commencing at a post planted
10 chains east of the N.W. corner of
No. 32, being about 10 chains east of
Young's River and about three miles
north of Blanked Bluff, being the S.W.
corner; thence north 160 chains; thenco
east 40 chains; thence south 160 chains;
thence west 40 chains to point of commencement.
November   24th,   1907.
No. 35—Commencing at a post planted
at the S.E. corner, opposite No. 34 post,
being about 10 chains east of Young's
River, and about three miles north of
Blanket Bluff; thence north 160 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 160
chains; thence east 40 chains to point
of  commencement.
Nov.   24th,   1907.
No. 36*—Commencing at a post planted
at the S.E. corner about 10 chains east
of tlie N.E. corner, 34 and 45 chains
east of Young's River, being five miles
northerly from Blanket Bluff; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south SO chains; thenee east 80
chains   to   point  of  commencement.
November  24th,  1907.
GEORGE YOUNG,
Dec. 28 J. W. Radly, Agent.
COAST LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that F. S. Buck of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation lumberman,
intends to apply for a special timber
license over the following described
lands:
1. Commencing at a post planted on
Gilford Island, 40 chains in southerly direction from the N.E. corner of surveyed Lot 625 on north shore of lake;
thence north 80 chains more or less to
the south line of T. L. 7714; thence
east 80 chains; thence south'SO chains;
thence west SO chains to this post.
FRED.  S.  BUCK.
2. Commencing at a post planted
about about 40 chains south and SO
chains east of N. E. corner of surveyed
lot 625, thence north 80 chains; thence
east SO chains; thence south SO chains;
thence west SO  chains  to this post.
Staked Dec. lst.
Dec. 28 FRED. S. BUCK.
NOTICE is hereby given that I, James
Alfred Owens, prospector, Skidegate, B.
C, intend to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over 640
acres of land bounded as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted northeast corner, near the beach on south
shore of Skidegate Inlet, B.C.; Graham
Island, Queen Charlotte Group, supposed to be Section 5, Township 1;
thence running 80 chains south; thence
80 chains west; thence 80 chains north
to shore line; thence following shore line
to point of commencement; containing
640 acres, more or less.
Located  November  29th,   1907.
JAMES ALFRED OWENS,
Jan. 4 Locator.
NOTICE Is hereby given that I, Emily
Margaret Johnston, of Victoria, B.C., intend to apply for a licence to prospect
for coal and petroleum over 640 acres
of land bounded as follows:—Commencing at a post planted at the south-east
corner of section 33, township one (1),
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Group;
thence running SO chains north; thence
SO chains east; thence SO cliains south;
thence 80 chains west to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more
oi*  less
Located December  6th,  1907.
EMILY MARGARET JOHNSTON,
Locator.
Jan. 4. Christopher Johnson, Agent.
COAST  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range One.
TAKE NOTICE that F. S. Buck of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation lumberman,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:
No. 3. Commencing at a post planted
on Gilford Island, at the head of a lake,
and at N.E. end of said lake, and about
40 chains south and about 60 chains
east from N.E. corner of surveyed lot
625, thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north SO chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 2n, 1907.
No. 4. Commencing at a post planted
on Gilford Island, about 40 chains SuUth
and 130 chains east from N.E. corner
of surveyed lot 625, thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Staked December 3rd, 1907.
No. 5. Commencing at a post planted
on Gilford Island, about 40 chains south
and 210 chains east from N.E. corner of
surveyed lot 625, thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north SO chains to point
of commencement.
No. 6. Commencing at a post planted
on Gilford Island, at the S.E. corner
of T.L. 16806; thence west SO chains to
the S.W. of T. L. 15806, thence north 40
chains; thence west 20 chains; thence
south 80 chains (more or less) to north
shore of lake; thence east along shore
of lake 100 chains; thence north 40
chains (more or less) to point of commencement.
Staked December 2nd, 1907.
Dec. 28 F. S. BUCK.
NOTICE  TO  LOGGERS.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Superstructure of Swing Span.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
time for receiving tenders for the
Superstructure Metal for Swing Bridge,
North Arm, Fraser River, has been extended up to and including Friday, the
31st day of January, 1908.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., December 17th, 1907.
Dec. 28
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
Intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—■
Commencing at a post planted on the
wost bank of Salmon River, about 5
miles north of the N. E. C. of Lot 50
and markod T. H. Taylor's S. E. C;
thence wost 40 chains; thence north 40
chains; tbence east 40 chains; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence east 40
chains, more or less, to River; thence
southerly along river 160 chains to point
of commencement.
Staked  December 7.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over tho following described
lands:—■
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank of Kimsqult River, about 2
mlles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. W. C; thence east 80 chains;
thence north SO chains; thence west SO
chains to bank of river; thence south 80
chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Staked   December  9.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R- Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
Intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank of Kimsqult River, about 3
miles  north  of the N.  W.  C.  of B.  C.
DISTRICT   OF   RUPERT.
TAKE NOTICE that I, T. S. McPherson,  agent of Victoria,  B.C.,  intend  to
apply   for   special   timber   license   over
the following described lands:
1. Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles distant in a northwesterly
direction from the head of west arm of
Quatsino sound and marked N.E. Cor.
section 25, township 37, thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north SO chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Staked December Sth, 1907.
2. Commencing at a post planted
about 4 mlles and in a northwesterly
direction from the head of west arm,
Quatsino Sound, marked S.E. Cor. Section 36, Township 37, thence north SO
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south SO chains; thence east SO chains
to point of commencement.
Staked  December 6th,  1907.
3. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile In a westerly direction
Claim No. 2, marked N.E. Cor., Section
26, Township 37; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to point
of commencement.
Staked December 5th, 1907.
4. Commencing at a post planted
about one mlle in a westerly direction
from Claim No. 2, marked S. E. Cor.,
Section 35, Township 37; thence north
80 ohains; thence west 80 ohalns; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to  point of commencement.
Staked December 5th,  1907.
5. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile In a northwesterly direction from claim No. 4, marked N.E.
Corner, Section 34, Township 37; thence
south SO chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Commencing at a post planted one
mile distant in a northwesterly direction from claim No. 4, marked S. E.
Corner, Section 3, Township 36; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains  to  point  of  commencement.
Staked December 5th, 1907.
7. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile distant and in a northwest direction from claim No. 6, marked
S.E. corner, Section 9, Township 36;
thence north 80 chains; thence west '80
chains; thonce south SO chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 6th, 1907.
8. Commonclng at a post planted
about one mile In a northwesterly direction from claim No. 7, marked S. E.
rorner, section 17, township 36; thonce
north SO chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains', thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
9. Commencing at a post planted
about one mlle distant In a westerly
direction from claim No. 8, marked S. E.
Corner, Section 18, Township 36; thence
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast.   Range  2.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young,
of Victoria, B.C., Timber Cruiser, In
tends to apply for special timber licences over the following described
lands:
No. 26—Commencing at a post planted
at the S.E. corner, near Clyak River,
being 6 miles N.E. from the Junction
of Young and Clyak Rivers and opposite the N.E. corner of No. 16, thence
north 100 chains; thence west 64 chains;
thence south 100 chains; thence east 64
chains  to  point  of  commencement.
November   27th,   1907.
No. 27-—Commencing at a post planted
at the S.W. corner, opposite the N. W.
Corner of N. 17, being about 5 chains
east of Clyak River and about 7 miles
N.E. from the Junction of Young and
Clyak River, thence north 100 chains;
thence east 64 chains; thence south 100
chains; thenee west .64 chains to point
of commencement.
November 27th, 1907.
No. 28—Commencing at a post planted
on the river bank at the S.W. corner
and opposite tho N.W. corner of No.
27, being one-half mlle northerly from
Bever Rapids. Clyak River; thence north
100 chains; tnence east 64 chains; thence
south 100 chains; thence west 64 chains
to point of commencement.
November  27th,  1907.
No. 29—Commencing at a post planted
on the river bank at the S.E. corner
and opposite the N.E. corner of No.
26, being one-half mile south of Bever
Rapids, Clyak River; thence north 80
chains; thence west SO chains: thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
November 27th,  1907.
No. 30—Commencing at a post planted
on the bank at the S. E. corner and
opposite No. 28, being one-half mile
north of Bever Rapids, Clyak River,
thence north 100 chains; thence west 64
chains; thence south 100 chains; thence
east 64 chains to point of commencement.
November 27th,  1907.
No. 31—Commencing at a post planted
at the S. E. corner about 10 chains
west from the N.E. corner of No. 28,
on the river bank, about one and three-
quarter mlles north of Bever Rapids on
Clyak River; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains to
point of commencement.
November   27th,   1907.
No. 32—Commencing at a post planted
at the S. W. corner, about five (6)
chains east of Young's River, being
about nine and une-quarter miles from
Its junction with Clyak River, and opposite the N. W. corner of No. 26; thence
north 100 chains; thence east 64 chains;
thence south 100 chains; thence west
64 chains to point of commencement.
November 24th, 1907.
No. 33—Commencing at a post planted
at the S.E. corner about 5 chains east
of Young's River, being about nine and
one-quarter mlles from the junction of
Young and Clyak Rivers and opposite
No. '32: thence nortli 100 chains; thence
west 64 chains; thence south 100 chains;
thence east 64 chains to point of commencement.
November 24th, 1907.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that J. A. Johnson, of
Vancouver, cruiser, intends to apply for
a special timber licence over the following described lands:—
1. Commencing at a post planted on
the southwest corner of Leose No. 2;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thenee
west along south boundary of said lease
SO chains to point of commencement.
Dated  December  27th,   1907.
District of Rupert.
2. Commencing at a post planted on
the south bank of river running into
Beaver Cove, and on the west boundary
of Lease No. 2; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence nortli SO
chains; thence east 80 chains along bank
of said river to point of commencement.
Dated  December  27th,   1907.
District of Rupert.
3. Commencing at a post planted
about SO chains west of west boundary
of Lease No. 2, and on south bank of
a river running into Beaver Cove; thence
south 160 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east
40 chains along bank of said river to
point of commencement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
District of Rupert.
4. Commencing at a post planted
about the southeast corner of T. L. No.
11,696; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
District of Rupert.
6. Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains east of the south-east
corner of T. L. 11,395; thence east 160
chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
west 160 chains', thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
District of Rupert.
6. Commencing at a post planted
about 20 chains south of the southwest
corner of Lease No. 2; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point  of commencement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
Jan 4. J. A. JOHNSON.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Piles.
ALTERNATIVE sealed tenders, superscribed "Tender for Piles, Bridge,
North Arm, Fraser River," will be received by the Honourable the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works,
Victoria, B. C, up to and including
Tuesday, the 31st of December, 1907,
for furnishing and delivering at the
bridge site on the North Arm of the
Fraser River, on the line of the Cemetery Road, fir and cedar piles.
About six hundred (600) will be required, varying in length from twenty
(20) to forty-five (45) feet. They must
be straight, sound, and not less than
ten (10 inches at the. small end. No
butts will be accepted.
Further printed particulars can be obtained on application to the undersigned.
Tenderers must state the price per
lineal foot for piles delivered.
The successful tenderer will be furnished with a list giving the number
of piles required and the length of each.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certificate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, in
the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars ($250), which shall be forfeited
if the party tendering decline or neglect
to enter into contract when called upon
to do so, or fall to complete the work
contracted for. The cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful ten-
tenderers will be returned to them upon   the  execution  of  the  contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the form supplied, signed
with the actual signatures of the tenderers, and enclosed in the envelope furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 30 Public Works Engineer.
LAND REGISTRY ACT.
In the matter of an application for a
Duplicate   Certificate   of   Title   to
Lot 5 of Lot 7 of Section 10, (Map
280),   Esquimalt   District,   Victoria
City.
Notice is hereby given that it Is my
intention at the expiration of one month
from the first publication hereof to Issue
a Duplicate of the Certificate of Title
to said  lot,  issued  to  George A.  Cold-
well on the 6th day of June, 1899, and
numbered 6296C.
Land  Registry Offlce,  Victoria,  B.C.,
the 21st day of November, 1907.
S.  Y.  WOOTTON,
Nov. 23 Registrar-General.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that Roland D. Craig,
of Vancouver, occupation Forester, Intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted one (1)
mile south and 20 chains west from
the southwest corner of L. 222, West
Fork of Adams River; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains.
December   20th,   1907.
Jan. 4 ROLAND D. CRAIG.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that M. J. Kinney, of
Portland, Ore., occupation Lumberman,
Intends to apply for permission to lease
the  following  described   land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Rupert
District, where the said line Intersects
the shore lino of the east side of Marble
Bay; thence northerly following the
shore line a distance of about 200
chains to the northeast corner of lot
315.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907
M. J. KINNEY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that The Quatsino
Power and Puly Company, of Victoria,
B.C., occupation, A Pulp Company, Intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the nor'h line of Township 10, Marble
Cove, Rupert District, where the said
line Intersects the shore line on the
east side of Marble Bay; thence southerly following the shore line a distance
of about 120 chains to a point Intersecting the mouth of Marble Creek.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907.
THE QUATSINO POWER
&   PULP COMPANY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert. Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that Enoch A. White,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Lumberman, Intends to apply for permission to
lease the following described foreshore:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of an Indian Reserve
at the hend of Quatsino Narrows, ltupert
District, thence southerly following the
shore line a distance of about 100 chains
to a point Intersecting the mouth of
Marble Creek, Including small Island on
north   line  of  section   10.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Superstructure of Swing Span.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Superstructure Metal for
Swing Bridge, North Arm, Fraser
River," will be received by the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works, Victoria, B.C., up to and including Tuesday, the 31st of December,
1907, for manufacturing and delivering,
f. o. b., scow at Vancouver or New
Westminster, all the metal work required for the superstructure of a steel
swing span.
Drawings, specifications, condition of
contract and tender may be seen by
intending tenderers on and after Tuesday, the 26th of November, 1907, at
the office of the Public Works Engineer,
Lands and Works Department, and at
the offlce of the Provincial Timber In
spector, Court House, Vancouver, B.C.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certlflcate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner In
the sum of two hundred and fifty ($250)
dollars, which shall be forfeited if the
party tendering decline or neglect to
enter into contract when called upon
to do so. The cheques or certificates
of deposit of successful tenderers will
be returned to them upon the execution
of the contract.
The successful tenderer will be
called upon to furnish a bond, himself
and two securities, satisfactory to the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, In
the sum of $1,000 ench, or to furnish a
bond of a Guarantee Company satisfactory to the Honourable the Chief
Commissioner in the sum of $3,000 for
the due fulfilment of the work contracted for.
Upon the execution of the contract
and a satisfactory bond being supplied,
signed with the actual signatures of the
tenderers and enclosed In the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 30 Public Works Engineer.
DISTRICT  OF  CASSAIR.
TAKE NOTICE that The Hidden Creek
Mining  Co.,   of  Vancouver,   occupation,
, intends to apply for permission
to lease the following described land,
about 40 acres:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of Lot 479; thence following high water mark south and
west to the southeast corner of Lot 308;
thence east five chains; thence north
and east following a line parallel to
high water mark about 80 chains to a
point 5 chains south of point of commencement and thence to said point of
commencement.
Dated Nov. 25th, 1907.
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Dec. 7 Per J. Herrick MacGregor.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
and Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C., Timber Dealers, Intend to apply for the
rite to purchase the following described
lands in Kildalla Bay, Rivers Inlet; commencing at this post planted on the east
side of the Bay about one-third of a
mile from the point at the mouth of the
Bay, being the southwest corner post;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 90 chains to beach;
thence south along beach to point of
commencement; containing 40 acres,
more or less.
Staked Nov. 26,  1907.
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL.
Dec. 7 George Young, Agent. THE WEEK, SATURDAY JANUARY 25   1908.
SOME TOWEL TRUTHS.   Linen Items of Interest
'***%_&
HOW   AND   WHERE   TO   GET   TOWELS
THAT ARE BETTER—FOR THE SAME.
Is there any other household requisite that receives harder or more constant use and abuse
than a towel? Probably not. Towels are subjected to harder, and more continuous ill-use
than almost any other article around the home,
and, in the selection of these, quality should be
a foremost consideration. If nothing but the
regular visits to the laundry were to be considered, the strain on the fabric would be considerable, and the desirability of securing superior,
sound, well spun, well woven towels apparent.
When you are buying towels, don't, for a paltry
two or three cents, disregard the claims of guaranteed goodness and long life for good appearance but unqnokn quality. Let us supply you
with towels the quality of which we guarantee and
at prices little if any higher than trashy sorts are
sold for. You'll find our towel offerings represent
genuinely good values. Get the "good sorts." It
pays to buy the best, and pays to buy it here.
Shall we see you on our Second Floor Today?
Honeycomb Towels-Hard-wearing, Low-priced Styles.
These are serviceable, low-priced towels, made of soft finished cotton and are excellent values.
Their hard wearing qualities make them a very desirable towel for everyday use. Pure white,
with red stripes on each end.
Size 17x36, each ioc, per dozen 90c
Size 21x48, each 12c, per dozen $1.35
Size 18x36, each 15c, per dozen  $1.50
Size 20x45, each 12c, per dozen $1-35
Size 24x40, each 25c, per dozen $2.75
LINEN HUCK TOWELS.
These towels arc made of silky spun linen, delightful to touch. There is no more pleasant
towel to use. It is a bedroom towel par excellence. This is a towel style you should investigate. Some hemstitched and damask borders.
There is a great variety of sizes and prices, ranging from $1.75 per dozen, up to, each $1.25
UNION HUCK TOWELS.
These are made of a union of linen and cotton
and combine the good qualities of each material,
making a nice hand towel much in demand by
house and hotel keepers for bedroom use. We
have a great variety of this style, and at prices
that will please you in their fairness. Come in
ancl let us show you these.
FINE   TURKISH   TOWELS—A   FAVORITE
STYLE WITH MANY.
This favorite weave is well known and is appreciated by a tremendous following. We stock a
very, large and complete stock of this kind of
towel and offer you a superior quality towel at
a price we think will compare very favorably
with any towel offerings offered elsewhere.
Size 19x44, each   20c
Size 20x41; each   25c
Size 19x41, each   30c
Size 22x47, each   : 35c
Size 24x48, each   40c
Size 26x53, each   40c
Size 24x51, each 50c
Size 30x49, each   50c
Size 27x60, each   50c
Size 28x60, each   65c
Size 36x54, each   75c
Size 32x60, each $1.00
Do you know what a superior Linen Department we have? Many
people have no idea of the immense stock of linen goods carried by this
house. We number among the hosts of customers a great many Victoria
women but we want still more to know of the excellent things we have
here for them. We want every home keeper who delights in dainty table
linen to visit this department and ask to be shown some of the dainty
creations there. Ask! Don't be afraid, the salesmen delight in showing
each superior merchandize. We list here but a few pieces from the stock.
When reading or looking remember that these are superior quality and
carry, as well as the makers', our guarantee of quality and goodness.
Sideboard Covers, embroidered, 18
x 72, each.    Price  $2.50
Sideboard    Covers,    embroidered,
16x45,  each.    Price    $1.50
Tray  Cloths,   embroidered,   18x27,
Each    $i.oo
Tea   Cloths,   embroidered,   36x36.
Each    $2.00
All to match, same pattern.
Sideboard Covers, drawnwork, i8x
72.   Each  $2.50
Sideboard Covers, drawnwork, i8x
72, each.   Price $1.75
Tray   Cloths,   drawnwork,   20x30.
Each   $1.50
Tray   Cloths,   drawnwork,   18x27.
Each  $1.00
Tea    Cloths,    drawnwork,    36x36.
Each  $2.50
Tea    Cloths,    drawnwork,    30x30.
Each  $2.00
All above made to match.
Hemstitched and Embroidered Tea
Cloth, very fine, 45x45 iri'., each.
Price $9.00
Linen   D'Oylies,   4'/2   in.   round.
Dozen  90c
Linen D'Oylies, with lace edge, 9
in. round.    Each   50c
Linen D'Oylies, with lace edge, 8
xi2.    Each    75c
Sideboard Runners, 18x72 inches.
Each  $1-75
Tray or Tea Cloths, 18x27 inches.
Each  65c
Tray or Tea Cloths, 30x30 inches.
Each $1.25
Tray or Tea Cloths, 36x36 inches.
Each  $1-75
D'Oylies, $)_ in. diameter.
Each   ioc
D'Oylies, 9x12 in.    Each 25c
D'Oylies, 12x12 in.   Each 25c
D'Oylies, 18x18 in.   Each 50c
Nicely Embroidered D'Oylies, 12X
12 inches.   Each  65c
Nicely Embroidered D'Oylies, 18
xi8 inches.   Each $i.7S
Sideboard Covers, nicely embroidered, 12 in. by 45 in., at, each,
$1.50, and  $i.a5
Sideboard Covers, nicely embroidered, 14 iii. by 68 in., at, each,
$2.25 and  $1.75
Sideboard Covers, 16x45 in., cot-
tun, embroidered.   Each ...$1.50
EXCELLENT ORIENTAL RUG NEWS.
Chief among the excellent values in Oriental Rugs is our fine showing
of Mirzapore Rugs from India. This is a splendid rug, with wearing qualities unexcelled. The handsome design, the fine colorings, the rugged
surface combine to make it a most suitable rug for dining-room, library,
hall or hearth. Come in and let us show you these and other "Orientals."
You are protected in buying Oriental Rugs, ro any carpets or rugs, at this
store by our guarantee of quality and satisfaction. This store with its fine
record for honest merchandise, stands back of every rug or yard of carpet
sold here. We are ready to make good any misrepresentation or defect.
You're safe in trading here.
Mirzapore Rug, size 7 ft. 3 in. x 10
ft- 2 'n $35.00
Mirzapore Rug, size 8 ft. x 11 ft.
4 in $50.00
Mirzapore Rug, size 9 ft. 3 in. x 12
ft $60.00
Mirzapore Rug, size 10 ft. 2 in. x
13 ft. 2 in $65.00
Mirzapore Rug, size 10 ft. 5 in. x 14
ft $75-00
Mirzapore Rug, size 11 ft. 2 in. x
14 ft. 4 in $80.00
fKCTOTSW
•1   .'■'vM0Mt'.lM0T€t'''AND.CL0B*ru'RNISMtR'S-VltTORiX'.B:t.
oooooooooooooooooooooooooos
SPLENDID ADDRESS.
Continued from Page 5.
the department of finance, conditions
were, to say the least, not at all encouraging. The public accounts for
many years had been showing deficit
running from one-half to three-quarters of a million dollars, annually. In
addition to this, the situation was
further accentuated by an overdaft
at our bankers of many hundreds of
thousands of dollars, as well as many
thousands of dollars being required
to mee the curren expenditure on
public works. After the election in
1903, an early session of the legislature was called in November of that
year. The Finance Minister introduced a measure calling for a loan
of one million dollars, which would
bc retired in ten years, by payment
of one hundred thousand dollars annually with interest at the rate of 5
per cent. Strong indeed was the opposition to this measure, and many
and di erse were the contra propositions submitted by our friends in opposition. It was found, however, that
none of their suggestions were practical, and after a most strenuous debate covering many days, the measure finally became law, and no
sooner were the proceeds of this loan
available than they were immediately
absorbed in the payment of the overdraft and current accounts, left them
as a legacy by preceding governments. At the same session a change
was made in the assessment act, with
the object in view of making the assessment of the Province more effective and equitable. The result of
this resolution was to bring about an
equilibrium between revenue and expenditure, which, by the end of the
year, resulted in a small surplus.
From that time on surpluses have
been the order of the day, increasing
each year by hundreds of thousands
of dollars, until to-day our financial
condition is as satisfactory as any
other Province in the Dominion of
Canada.
Loan Is Repaid.
"During the past year, owing in a
great measure to the extraordinary
financial stringency, the Finance Minister was approached by the holders
of the loan of 1904, to which I havc
just referred, with a view of arranging, if possible, for the payment of
the whole or part of it at once rather
than in yearly instalments. The Finance Minister having a large deposit
at thc banks, on which a low rate of
interest was being paid to the Province, immediately consented to this
arrangement, and $500,000 of the loan
of 1904 was discharged. This repayment, together with the three preceding annual instalments of one hundred thousand dollars a year, reduced
this loan to $200,000, which, I am
pleased to inform this House, has
almost entirely been discharged quite
recently.
"In addition to this, wc are advised
in the speech from the throne that a
substantial surplus will be presented
by the Finance Minister during the
course of this session, in fact, I am
led to understand that the surplus at
the end of the financial year will
amount to somewhere in thc neighbourhood of one million dollars. It
is interesting to note, though in no
way remarkable, and I simply mention this matter in passing, that the
first surplus in the history of British
Columbia occurs coincident!)- with the
advent of the first Conservative administration.
Timber Policy.
"Without doubt, one of the greatest factors in bringing about this
changed condition of affairs has been
the Government's policy as regards
the timber areas of Britisli Columbia.
In the year 1905, when it was my
pleasure to speak to a similar resolution, 1 advised this House and this
Government that before any very
great activity could bc brought about
in the lumbering and sawmill industries, some security of title would be
necessary for the millmen to their
holdings of timber. Prior to 1905
the Land Act provided for the issuance of special timber licenses at the
rate of $115 east of the Cascade range
of mountains, and $140 west of the
same range, in areas of one mile, the
license being renewable from year tu
year, at thc discretion of thc Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works.
I pointed out that the millman was
in this position—while hc might hold
sufficient areas of timber to justify
him in making big expenditures in
plant, machinery and development, at
the same time upon making application for a renewal of the licenses he
found that his application was subject to the discretion of the Chief
Commisisoner of Lands and Works,
and he might find himself at any
time with a large and expensive plant
on his hands, and no raw material behind him to keep his plant in operation.
Land Act Amended.
"In 1905 thc Land Act in reference
tn timber was amended so that a license was renewable of course, subject to certain conditions and regulations, for a period of twenty-one
years. Almost immediately the effect
of tllis legislation was felt on thc
revenues  of  thc  Province.     Millmen
came to our Province from different
points in the United States and elsewhere, brought capital to our country, develoed our resources, feeling
confident that their title to their holdings should not be affected by any decision of the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works, or any member of
the Government, and the result today is that for thc year 1907 we havc
a revenue from this source alone of
not less than $1,250,000. Owing to
this increased revenue and to the increasing revenue from other sources,
the Government feels that they will
have sufficient revenue yearly, for
many years tu come, without further
alienation nf the timber lands of the
Province, and as a result an Ordcr-
in-Council was passed on the 241I1
day of December reserving from further alienation any more timber lands
of thc Province.
Approves of Withdrawal.
"I wish to congratulate thc Government for the course they have followed in this important question, Thc
preservation of our forests, and the
protection of our rivers and streams,
which are, in a great measure, dependent upon the preservation of the
forests, is one of the most vital importance to the future welfare of
British Columbia. 1 am sure the measure is in thc public interest, and will
bc appreciated indeed by thc whole
of the people of this Province, It is
estimated to-day that the area of 6,-
500.000 acres of limber land in this
Province is already held under timber licenses. This shnuld keep thc
industry sufficiently well supplied
with raw material for many years to
cnnic, and a proper preservation of
thc forests will also be greatly appreciated in years tn come, ll is a
pleasing factor tn note in the speech
from the Throne, that thc industries
of the Province of British Columbia
show a healthy and flourishing state
nf affairs.
Mining Industry.
"In the mining    industry    the    increase in tonnage and receipts is quite
noticeable.     However,   owing  to  the
failing   prices   of   the   metal   market,
especially as regards copper, and the
labour troubles in the Boundary country,   which,   at   one   time   threatened
a protracted strike, and the shutting
down   of   several   of   the   mines   and
smelters  in that  country,  the output
of the mines there were, for the last
two months nf 1907 considerably curtailed.    Fortunately, however, the latter   trouble   has   been   adjusted,   and
there is every evidence uf an increase
in the price nf metals including cupper,  silver  and lead.    The actual receipts from the metalliferous and non-
metalliferous  mines  uf  the  Province
for thc year is approximately, $30,-
000,000.    This is an increase nf,  approximately,   $4,500,000   over   the   receipts nf 1906.   It is particularly gratifying  t"  note  an  increase  in  tonnage and receipts from lhe coal mines
nf thc   Province  the  increase  in  this
connection alone amounting tn about
$3,000,000 and  it   is  anticipated  that
llic   next   year's   output   nf   coal   will
be far more largely  increased, owing
in the doubling nf the capacity nf the
Crow's Xest mines and thc active op-
eration nf thc C?  P.  R. collieries at
Hosmer,  B.C., which give every indication nf a steadily increasing output.
Lumbering and Milling.
"In  the  lumbering and  milling industries, ihe conditions have not been
as favourable as they might be, owing tn the financial stringency which
has greatly affected every part nf this
Continued on Page 12. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 25, 1908.
TOUCH AND GO.
Continued from Page 2.
here, an order there, scrutinising, considering, and instructing, the closeness of his attention wandered at
times and an unmistakable frown of
anxiety crossed his face. The incident of a minute before had started
him on an unpleasant train of thought
and it was not easy to drive it from
his mind. For, if Major Vesey was a
veteran in experience, he had learned
the veteran's lesson that nigger-fighting is a tougher busines than it seems
and that silly talk among the youngsters does not help to lighten the
task. These schoolboys, he reflected,
came out there endowed for the most
part with a natural courage which
seldom failed them at a pinch; but
that courage needed nursing—ay,
and careful nursing, too. Like any
other attribute of youth, it lay upon
the surface, to be displayed instantly
—at a word; and at another word to
be as readily wiped out of sight and
out of existence. It had not yet become part and parcel of their being;
it had yet to be grafted there firmly
and enduringly by the rough hand of
hardship. Major Vesey knew this
well enough; and he knew also that,
as in a cricket-match, the most difficult thing on earth is "to stop the
rot," when it has once set in. It may
not matter much on a cricket-field—
it means life or death in face of an
assegai; and this little, dapper officer could remember dead men by the
score who were dead only because the
"rot set in" and there was nobody to
stop it. For that reason he said
something under his breath about
Carstairs, and that "something" referred to Mr. Carstairs' tongue.
And, in truth, that wagging tongue
—just like most wagging tongues-
had, as usual, managed to accomplish
its evil work. Not, mind you, that
Carstairs reilly meant it. Oh, dear
me, no! For at bottom, as the regiment was quite ready to admit, Carstairs was not a bad sort. He had
"points"—a generous nature, for instance, and a kindly heart; but, as the
regiment was equally ready to admit,
"the beggar was inflated." A small
vanity might be reckoned his weakest spot, and that weak spot had been
rubbed up this evening very roughly
indeed. The suggestion that, atfer
all, he was not such a big man as he
pretended to be, that his fighting "record" was at best a poor affair, and
that, seriously considered, he came
remarkably near to being a sham—
for such was the drift of Drake's sudden outburst—had nettled him beyond endurance; and, without pausing to think, his temper holding the
upper hand, he had blurted out an
angry and heedless reply.
On the listeners, taken collectively,
the remark had left little or no impression. Unimaginative, they hardly
realized its full import. Besides, they
were too tired to-night to care. No
quarter, indeed! Sheer murder! Well,
it would be soon enough to think of
that in the morning; and, having
made up their minds to this, they
rolled themselves in their blankets
and presently fell asleep.
But the human disposition is not
always cast in one mould—hardly
ever, if the truth be told—and the
differences engendered by nature are
as a rule only emphasised by habit,
and made more marked through the
strengthening force of time. A peculiarity, or a sensibility, grafted on
us in that earliest start of life is all
too apt to remain where it is, and it
is but seldom that a man's environment will help him much to foster a
virtue or to conquer a weakness. For
the most part, it will help him wholeheartedly the other way; and this had
been the case with Francis Drake.
Instinctively timid, it had not been
his good fortune as yet to experience
that rougher side of existence which
goes to thc making of a man. A too-
anxious mother had interfered in the
first place; some trilling delicacy, a
matter of really small account, had
given its casting vote for a tutor instead nf a public school; and, that
Francis Drake's misfortune might be
the more complete, it so happened
that his sister Eileen ,a girl some
twelve  months   older   than   himself,
was living at home. Now, God forbid that one should ever utter a single syllable against the chastening influence of a woman! God forbid that
one should write down here even the
shadow of a suggestion against that
dearest place on earth—our home!
And yet, in the soberest judgment, it
is always clear that there are times
when evil may spring from good,
when the helping hand shall only hinder, and when—through thc accident
of inopportunity—the kindest effort
shall lead to our undoing. At any
rate, so far as Francis Drake was concerned, this had proved to be true.
The timidity of his nature, his sensitiveness his delicate, almost effeminate spirit, had thriven in the hothouse
in which it grew; and his sister's character, reacting on his own, had left
it, like hers, gentle—indeed, lovable—
but wholly destitute of that spontaneous pluck, that strenuous energy,
which belongs of right to manhood.
A public school, in its rough-and-
ready fashion, could have cured all
this with both comfort and satisfaction to itself, had the chance been afforded; and the regiment, who were
willing enough to act as deputy,
found themselves in similar predicament, for "Miss Frances" had only
joined three weeks before, and there
had been no time to do anything with
him. And thus it came about that
now, whilst the outward evidence of
slumber sounded aggressively all
around him, he was still lying wide
awake.
And yet Drake was far from being
a coward. That distinction between
timidity and cowardice, that broad
division which separates the sense of
fear from the weakness of yielding to
it, stood for him, as it stands for most
of us, a saving clause; and when
marching orders had reached him
three days before he had not been
long in steadying himself. For an
instant, it is true, his throat had
tightened painfully; the fluttering of
his heart had sounded in his ears like
the beating of a drum, and he had
looked around hurriedly lest the
others, too, should have heard it. But
that was impossible; they had drowned all else in their frenzied cheering,
in their wild "Hurrah!" and in that
moment of shame the hot blood had
rushed back into the boy's face, and
he had set his teeth and stiffened his
courage.
Then, with the effort made, that
first gripping of the resolution taken,
there ensued an inevitable reaction.
While the cheering lasted, while that
rousing "Hurrah!" still rang in his
ears, it was well enough with Francis
Drake. The exhilaration of the moment, the picture of the flushed, excited faces around him, the contagion of enthusiasm, struck a chord, and
his whole nature responded instantly.
But later on, in tlie calm of afterthought, the glamour of it melted
away. A sense of despondency stole
over him by degrees, a sense of unreality in the glory, a sense of vivid
reality in the danger. And when the
others left him one by one, some to
see to the packing of their kit, some
to write letters home, some to drink
success to the regiment, the black
cloud settled on him more surely,
more persistently, than before. He
could still hear thein shouting—toasting each other, toasting H19 future.
But thc future! The future might mean
death, and the life was gone out of
the shout. Now, as it seemed to him,
it was only the echo of a shout—no
more than that; and in that period of
loneliness, of overmastering depres
sion, it was all a mockery of joy.
And during that three days' march
bad grew steadily worse. The heat
of tlie sun, thc over-fatigue, and more
particularly the constant strain of
watching, had exacted their sure toll
from nerves already tense to the
breaking-point. As some nne had
hinted, in an uncautious moment, "one
never can tell where these black beggars may bc—a hundred miles awny
or skulking in tlie grass at your elbow;
nne can never tell." Which, as a matter of fact, is thc truth, and ,1 truth
unfortunately overheard by Francis
Drake. It had set him thinking again;
it had started all the old fancies
afresh—those fancies which could so
readily picture the worst aspect of
any horror;  it had shaken a  resolu
tion already wavering, and it had left
him weaker and more fearful than
ever before.
At such a moment it is that the
helpfulness of a stronger nature may
change the whole current of affairs—
a word perhaps, a look of encouragement, may suffice; the merest suggestion of personal confidence, any
trifle indeed—so delicate is the bal
ance of a man's mind between firm
ness and infirmity of purpose. And
it is not always through his own
merit or fault that he shall fail or
succeed. Toppling on the brink, h
may go over with a crash, or through
some happy fortune steady himself
ere it be too late, and stand firmly
facing the danger. This has come to
most, on occasions; it had come
now to Francis Drake. He was toppling on the brink, and as he stood
there some one had given him a push
from behind. No quarter, murder
from start to finish, and howling dem
ons hacking at the square with their
knives! Carstairs had spoken heedlessly indeed; but he had upset the
balance, and Francis Drake was
writhing now in a very agony of tor
ture. The others were asleep; there
could be no sleep for him.
"Young unl"
Drake started at the sound. Outside all was still save for the hardly
audible tread of the sentries, ancl
within the tent not one of his companions stirred. Had he been dreaming? No; there it was again: "Young
un!"
And the boy raised himself on his
elbow.
"Is that you, Carstairs?" he asked.
"Yes. I heard you tossing about, and
I—I thought"—Carstairs spoke in a
very low tone—"1 thought that perhaps something that I said this evening might have fright—I mean disturbed you. You know, young un, 1
was only chaffing. The fact is that
this business to-morrow is a regular
one-man show, with Tommy Atkins
playing the star part. There wont
be any real fighting at all. We'll just
sail through the beggars as a liner
sails through a fishing-boat if they
come in collision. 1 was only chaffing, young un."
Drake gazed a moment at the recumbent figure; then suddenly a lump
rose in his throat.
"1—1 know that," he said; then
added, simply: "Thank you, Carstairs."
"That's all right, old man; that's
all right"; and with a sigh of relief,
Carstairs turned over on the other
side, his eyes slowly closed and presently he had forgotten the "young
un" and the niggers and all else that
belongs to the land of the living.
But it was the first wink of sleep
he had had that night. A pricking
conscience—that best and surest recipe for wakefulness—had worked on
him with its usual effect, and had kept
him restless and unsettled; those
careless words, spoken vaingloriously
but without any thought of evil intent, had recoiled with wondrous
promptness on his own head. Strange
to thc terrors born of a too lively imagination, happily unconscious of the
paralysing fear which in certain natures may underlie anticipation, he
had recked little enough of his
thoughtless remarks at the moment
when they were uttered. They had
burst from him unrestrained in a
spasm of iritability. Then suddenly
he had noticed the change which came
over Francis Drake; suddenly he saw
the boy shrink back again within the
shadow; suddenly he realised the
harm that he had done. Then would
hc have recalled it all; then, when it
was too late, when the mischief was
beyond repair. It was the old, old
story of unavailing regret, of a futile
repentance, and it kept him tossing
about in a fever. However—and now
he metaphorically patted himself on
thc back—it was all right again. He
had managed to straighten things up
a bit. The young tin knew now that
lie had only been talking rot; and so,
with a respite at last from that troublesome conscience, with a grateful
sense nf a good deed done, the just
man fell into that calm and peaceful
slumber which is by right of heritage
the sleep of the just.
Yet it is not thus easily that the
past is to he obliterated.   The accom
plished fact can never be wiped out;
its effect may be modified, that is all.
In this case so much, and no more,
had been achieved. The kindliness of
Carstairs' action had touched the
boy's heart, but it was powerless to
erase from his mind that picture so
firmly embedded there. Like the mark
of a lead-pencil, it could fade beneath
the rubber, and yet remain. The
cheery encouragement had done
something— indeed much—but it had
not done enough. Something more
was needed, some stronger touch than
this, to make the weak man strong.
And so, when the day dawned at
last, when the regiment fell in and
the march began afresh, Francis
Drake trudged alongside his company
in limp and lifeless fashion. At starting he had straightened his back and
squared his shoulders, for the timid
are prone to some show of bravado;
but the effect had been short-lived.
He could ont sustain it. His pale
face spoke to that, and the heavy
lines beneath his eyes.
"Ah, Drake!"—Major Vesey was
passing along the column—"you look
washed out, my boy. Had a bad
night, eh?"
"Yes, sir. The—the'heat, I think."
"Humph!" And the Major's critical glance added its own emphasis.
"It is trying," he said, presently, "but
the morning air'll soon pull you together." Then, as he moved forward,
he grumbled again something about
somebody's "dashed infernal tongue."
But now there were matters of
greater moment to think of. The
head of the column was passing out
of the open and had just commenced
filing through a wood. Military formation was no longer possible. Entering in single file, beating down the
undergrowth which lay thick across
the track, the men followed one another into the shadow.
"Slowly, my lads," said Major Vesey, as he watched them disappearing
one by one. "Slowly, there! And—
keep a good lookout in front."
A good lookout! Ah, yes; but could
it be done? When the trees stood
studded so closely that in places a
man could hardly squeeze between
them, when the undergrowth clutched
at one's leg and sometimes held it
fast, and when the gloom around
them was darker than the twilight,
could it be done? Perhaps—perhaps
not.
But they got along somehow, hacking a path as best they could, stumbling at times, struggling up again,
and pantingly plodding onwards. And
soon they were half-way through the
wood.
"Call this nothink?" said one of
the men. "Blest if I can see a bloom-
in' thing."
"Blest if I can either," chimed in
one of the others. "Why, old Ukim-
bo hisself might be marchin' alongside."
And Drake, who was close at hand,
had been thinking the very same
thing. To realise the full risk they
ran needed no veteran's experience.
The uncertain foothold; the impossibility of seeing a dozen yards away;
the hopelessness of combining in case
of attack, of even using their weapons
at all in the denseness of that foliage,
were all apparent to the least-seasoned subaltern. A rat in a trap stood
a better chance; at least he has room
to turn about. And it was in just
such a place as this, the boy remembered, that thc Highlanders were cut
to pieces two years ago. Not a man
escaped; not one of them was left
to tell the tale. Though there was
evidence enough in all conscience, the
clearest evidence in those horribly
mangled bodies, in the cruel things
that had been done to them, in the—
Crash! Bang! What was that?
The sound reverberated through
thc wood like a clap of thunder, and
Drake stood rooted to the spot. So,
then, it had come at last! It had
come to thein as it had come to the
Highlanders, and    No; somebody
was laughing—laughing and joking
and helping to haul somebody else
up from the ground. One of them
had tripped and fallen, and exploded
his rifle. Oh, was that all? He might
have shot some one, of course, careless beggar. But never mind; they
wcre only half-way through the wood.
Push along.
This last injunction came from a
sergeant.
"Push along, there!"
And the Die-hards moved forward
again—for an hour, maybe an hour
and a half; and then a shout went up.
The gloom had lightened unexpectedly, and the rays of sunshine were
stealing in. Before them the trees
were thinning and the path had turned less toilsome; a short three hundred yards ahead and they could almost see the plain. There was good
reason, then, for that cheery shout.
With a sigh of relief, Francis Drake
gazed upon the welcome sight. During all this time the nervous strain
had been growing more and more unbearable, lt had mastered him with
a slow and steady persistence; it had
shaken him so that he was ready to
start at the rattle of his own accoutrements, at the sound of a neighbour's
cough, at the snapping of a twig beneath his fet; his own sigh, even, had
struck his ear strangely and had filled
him with a mortal fear.
But it was all right now. He could
see the rays of sunshine; he could
almost see the open space beyond.
They were so nearly out of the wood
—thank God for that! His breathing
came more regularly as the thought
was realised; his step trod more firmly, more elastically, on the turf; the
colour crept back into his cheeks; and
in a moment of renewed confidence
he gazed around. In that moment
his heart stood still! Peering at him
through thc bushes, not a dozen yards
away, he saw two gleaming eyes—
eyes set in a hideous black face—the
yes, the face that he had dreamt of so
often 1
"Lookl"
He never knew that he had cried
out. lie was conscious that something had hurtled through the air,
and that the man nearest him had
fallen with a groan; but he was only
conscious of this vaguely; his whole
attention was fixed upon that hideous
face; and as he looked a dozen others
appeared beside it, and presently thc
bush was alive with men.
Drake stared at them in an instant,
stunned and stupefied. Then suddenly the truth came home, to him, the
recollection of the Highlanders who
had gone before; aud in a whirlwind
of irresistible panic he turned to run.
"Mr. Drake!" A hand lay upon his
shoulder.. "Mr. Drake, the enemy is
—in front!"
Checked by the words, the boy
stopped, and, looking towards the
speaker, met the firm gaze of Major
Vesey.
"Come along," said the elder man,
taking the other by the arm and turning him round. "Come along, and—
we'll put the fear of God into these
black fellows!—Steady there, lads!
Steady there!"
Major Vesey had watched the
drama as a critic watches, played in
a dozen seconds. He had noted the
period of hesitation, the sudden wave
of terror, the shameful climax to it
all; yet, filled with that sympathy
which is born of ripe experience, he
had made allowances, he had held
forth a helping hand. And in that instant he knew that he had not held
it forth in vain.
"Come along!" he cried again, this
time with rising enthusiasm. "Come
along!"
And there was no need for him to
glance back over his shoulder. Already Drake was at his side. The
enemy is in front! That was enough;
that, and the contagious example of
a brave man. And together they rushed forward into a storm of flying assegais, into a crowd of shrieking,
naked savages, into a pandemonium
upon earth.
* * *}* * * * *
"Where's the Major?"
The Die-hards, such as were left of
them, had formed in the open. There
were still sounds of movement rustling through the wood, but never the
sign of a black figure to be seen. The
bayonet had worked too busily for
them during that last half-hour, and
the game was up. But it was a sadly
diminished square that stood facing
the scene of battle, a set of worn,
weary, panting men, labouring for
their breath and thanking Heaven
that they were alive.
"Where's tlie Major?"   Carstairs re- THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANMARY 25, 1908.
peated the question, and glanced anxiously at the rest. But the answer
came from the wood.
The war-cry had burst forth anew;
the bush ccraked and swayed before
an oncoming mass; the assegais were
flying ouce again; and in that moment a man carrying another man
on his shoulders staggered through
the trees. A race for life or death,
and not a yard to spare!
"Quick, there, with the Maxims!
Let 'em have it, boys!"
A steady rattle of bullets, a sharp
singing in the air, a pattering amongst
the trees, and that oncoming mass
halted—rushed forward again—halted
a second time—then wavered and
fled; whilst the man with his burden
had been drawing nearer, and nearer,
till at last he stood within the square.
"Why, good heavens, it—it's the
Major!" Tenderly they lifted him to
the ground. "Are you much hurt, sir?"
"No, no; only a broken leg. But if
it hadn't been for Drake"	
Drake! In the excitement he had
slipped aside unnoticed. Relieved of
his burden, he had thrown himself
upon the grass without a word, his
legs still shaking from their effort,
and his heart thumping like a sledgehammer. But it was to thump harder
now—-yes, much, much harder—hard
enough to crack his ribs I tell you,
when that rousing cheer went up
upon the veldt. It rang from every
throat in one great chorus—the testimony they paid—and it carried far
and wide. It reached the flying savages as they ran, and made them scurry for their lives as though the Evil
One were behind; it reached the animals hiding in their lairs, and made
them wonder what was coming next;
it reached the Young Un's soul, and
will remain there a memory the sweetest memory, for ever.
At The Street   ^
Corner h
**f%s&
By Tlie LOUNQBR
One time or another a great deal
lis written about the American yellow
press.    I  do not remember a better
I illustration   of  the  contrast  between
j English and American methods than
1 is afforded by the recent proceedings
in connection with thc opening of the
Druce vault.   In the illustrated Daily
Graphic just to hand full particulars
are given and there are a number of
{exceedingly interesting sketches which
1 show how extremely careful the auth-
[orities were to preserve the sanctity
[of the tomb and to render it impos-
|sible for curiosity mongers to intrude.
It has taken ten years to obtain the
I necessary consent to open the vault.
[The first consent necessary was that
of the Druce family who own it; then
lthe Home Secretary had to be won
over; then application had to be made
I before the Chancellor of thc Diocese
if London, Dr. Tristram.    The case
[was argued before this important but
little heard of Court in the Nave of
1 St.  Paul's   Cathedral  at  the  foot  of
Thorwaldsen's   statue   of   Channing.
Mr.  Duckwerts,  probably  the  ablest
counsel  in practice today, conducted
the case,  and the necessary permission was  given.    The  illustration  of
I this. scene    is   very   interesting.    It
lis so incongruous with one's ordin-
lary   ideas   of  a   Court   to  see   some
[twenty   important   gentlemen   seated
tin a Cathedral to listen to and adjudi-
Icate upon such an application. Coun-
Isel wore their robes and wigs as in
ICourt,  and  as  the   Home   Secretary
Iliad   already  given   his  consent,   thc
(proceedings were rather of the "pro-
Iforma" order, but none the less necessary before the matter could pro-
beed further.
Then the carpenters got to work,
lind built a large shed, 33 feet long,
and 15 feet wide over the vault; there
Ivas not even a window through which
anyone might pry, but electric light
Ivas installed for the occasion. Only
twelve persons were admitted and
fhese were barristers, surveyors and
doctors appointed by the respective
[interests  involved.    Two  grave  dig
gers were employed, and when they
had exhumed the coffin they were
turned out to make room for two
undertakers who opened it. On the
day of the opening all the employees
at the Cemetery were given a holiday
and were strictly excluded from the
grounds, being replaced by policemen.
Within four hours of the completion
of the examination everything was restored as before.
Now as to the press, there were two
reporters present, one for thc Associated Press and one for the Central
News. They were sworn not to publish one word except after their statements had been censored and approved by the various representatives
present. This was clone before they
left the grounds, the only intelligence
which leaked out to the hundreds of
pressmen who were waiting near the
gates was that, the coffin contained a
body. This was indicated by a wave
of the hand on the part of thc reporters.
The censors' reports were not allowed to contain one word descriptive of the contents of the coffin except that it contained the body of
"an old man with a beard." The
Associated Press and Central News
undertook in advance that they would
not at any time supplement the censored report, and this undertaking
has been strictly observed.
One shudders to think how many
columns the American Press would
havc devoted to gruesome details of
such an event, and no one can read
the account furnished by the London
papers without realizing that we have
much to be thankful for in the attitude of our Government and our
Press towards a strict observance of
the amenities of decency.
Although 1 can hardly claim to be
a press man, or at any rate to rank
with the distinguished representatives
of the fourth estate who graced the
opening of the Empress Hotel with
their presence, I did a little lounging on my own account on the auspicious occasion.
First, as to the Hotel. It has only
one fault; it is just half large enough.
I am satisfied that inside of a year
the C.P.R. will have let a contract to
Gribble & Skeene to duplicate it. 1
say this advisedly, for it is very easy
to see that a Hotel which today has
less accommodation than the Vancouver Hotel will not begin to deal
with the enormous tourist traffic
whicli will be attracted to Victoria.
Apart from the through traffic there
will be crowds from the South who
will come by water to Victoria and
these may fairly be added to the
East ancl.West traflic, which now
makes its home at the Vancouver
Hotel,
The appointments and fittings of
the Empress are superb, and are not
excelled for comfort ancl luxury in
any Hotel in the West and by hardly
any in the East. The opening ceremony was unique, the Press men gave
the affair a great send-off, undoubtedly thc C.P.R. know how to do things,
ancl they know well how to select
their officials. It would be easier to
Hnd another President in succession
to Sir Thomas Shaughnessy than to
find another George Ham. He gave
thc boys a good time and didn't they
enpoy themselves? Congratulations to
all concerned, ancl above all to Victoria in possessing a hostelry whicli
will be its greatest drawing card and
which will benefit the City quite as
much as the C.P.R.
1 am sorry that the Mayor has seen
fit to veto boxing matches although
I havc no doubt that hc did so from
perfectly conscientious motives. His
reason hardly appeals to me, viz., that
it is a matter for the police commissioners and must stand over until
they have been appointed. My own
view is that it is a matter which can
be taken care of by Chief Langley
as well as by any body of police commissioners and which might have
safely been left in his hands.
1 know that tliere is a large section
of the community opposed to boxing in any form, but I am also convinced that under proper control there
is no more beneficial form of athletic
training and nothing which furnishes
a better entertainment. Thc Anglo-
Saxon  race  has  been  taught  to de
pend on its fists, the Latin races and
the American people, to say nothing
of the Oriental races, decline upon
knives and revolvers. There are
times when a man must defend himself with something, and it is infinitely better that he should be trained
to do so without resorting to deadly
weapons. These two aspects of the
fistic game commend it to me, and explain why 1 regret that it should be
discouraged in Victoria.
0(£i
TC*c£Z_*.
"How does Mrs. Henpeckle treat
her husband?"
"Like a piece of human upholstery."—Exchange.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District  of  Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that James Purdy
Nelson, of Bellingham, Wash., U.S.A.,
occupation broker, intends to apply
for a special timber license over the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted
about 30 chains distant ancl in a southerly direction from the northwest corner of Lease No. 222; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains.
JAMES PURDY NELSON.
Dec. 24, 1907.
You can always      *—_      ^-^    It tastes different
tell an M. B. cigar [yY9    fj.     than others.
Union Made.
Havana Filler.
Cigar
Two Sizes.
Sold Everywhere.
Made by S. A. Bantly, Victoria, B. C.
KOKSAILAH MINERAL CLAIM.
Situated in the Victoria Mining
Division of Helmcken District, on
Koksailah Mountain, west of and adjoining "The Bluebell" mineral claim.
Take Notice, that I, Lars Nicholas
Anderson, of Victoria, B.C., . Free
Miner's Certificate No. B17380, intend
60 days from the date hereof, ot apply
to the Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of
the above claim.
And further take notice that action
under Section 37, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated at Victoria this 23rd day of
January, A.D. 1908.
LARS NICHOLAS ANDERSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICB that James Hastle, of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James H.
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Contractor, intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following do-
scribed lands:
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the northeast corner post; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement.
June 14, 1907.
JAMBS HASTIE,
Jan 11. James H. McLauchlan.
NBW     WESTMINSTER     LAND     DISTRICT.
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICB that Roman Z. Chandler, of Vancouver, B. C, ocupation
Broker, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
ten chains south of the southeast corner of D. L. 1413; thence north 160
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 160 chains; thence west 40 chains
to place of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
December 23, 1907.
Jan 11. ROMAN Z. CHANDLER.
VICTORIA   LAND  DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICB that James Hastle of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Contractor, intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the southeast corner post; thence north
SO chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east SO chains
to point of commencement.
June  11,  1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan. 11. James H. McLauchlan.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle, of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James H.
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, contractor, Intend to apply for a special
licence over the following described
lands:
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's
Bight on a small unnamed creek, being
the northeast corner post; thence west
SO chains; thence south SO chains; thence
cast 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement.
June 12, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan. 11. James H. McLauchlan.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastie, of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James
H, McLauchlan, of Victoria. B. C, Contractor, intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the northwest corner post; thence south
160 chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 160 chains', thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
June 13, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan 11. James H. McLauchlan.
He Knew
"What is it, my children," exclaimed the speaker, "that causes
men to ignore the ties of home, neglect their families, stay out
until after midnight, and get up with a bad headache in the morning?" "I know," shouted a little wideawake in the room. "Well,
my little fellow, tell the others what it is." "Politics!" Unlike
Politics, there's no bad headache after Lemp's Beer—no unpleasant after effects, because Lemp's is not charged with carbonic
acid gas as some beers are. Tt never causes biliousness, because
it is properly aged before bting placed upon the market. Purity
and wholesomencss are inseparably linked in a bottle of "Lemp's."
At all bars, hotels and cafes. If your dealer cannot supply ynu
for home use, kindly telephone.
PITHER   &   LEISER
Wholesale Distributors.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that William Rose, of
Ingersol, Ont., Merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted about
two miles south of Refuge Bay, on the
west coast of Porcher Island and at the
northwest corner of lot 1282, Cassiar
district; thence east SO chains', thence
north 20 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south following coast llne to
point of commencement, containing 160
acres.
WILLIAM ROSS.
Jan 11. A. O. Noake, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that Francis Joseph
Alma Green, of Quatsino, B. C, occupation Prospector, intends to apply for
a special timber licence over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 192, at the
Narrows, Quatsino Sound, thence east
about 35 chains to northeast corner of
Lot 192; thence north about 120 chains
to the southern boundary of the Indian
reserve; thence west to the shore of
Narrows; thence south along the shore
to point of commencement; 640 acres,
more or less.
Jan 11
FRANCIS JOSEPH ALMA GREEN.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
and Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C., timber dealers, intend to apply for the
right to purchase the following described lands In Kildalla Bay, Rivers
Inlet:—Commencing at a post planted
on the east side of the bay, about one-
third of a mile from the point at the
mouth of the bay, being the southwest
corner post; thence east 20 chains;
thence north 20 chains', thence west 20
chains to beach; thence south along
beach to point of commencement; containing 40 acres, more or less.
Staked November 25th, 1907.
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL,
Jan. 11 George Young, Agent.
4, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
5. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
4, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of  commencement,   and   containing  640
I acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
6. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
4, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chalna to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
6. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
3, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
7. Commencing at a post planted at
northeast corner of T. L. 16186, Section
3, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
hains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec.  17,  1907.
8. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16194, Section
2, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence soutli 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres,  more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
9. Commencing at a post planted at
northeast corner of T. L. 16194, Section
2, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres,  more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
10. Commencing nt a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 1G19G, Section
1, Township 33; thence east 40 chalna;
thence north 160 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
ol' commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
FRANK KELLY.
Jan 1S. George H. Jackson, Agent,
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Frank Kelly,
of Victoria, B.C., timber cruiser, intend
to apply for a special timber license
over the following described lands:
1. Commencing at a post planted at
southeast corner of Section 29, Township 32, Rupert District; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement, ancl containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
2. Commencing at post planted about
one-half mile west of southeast corner
of Section 32, Township 32; thence west
40 chains; thence north 160 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thenco south 160
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated Dec.  16,  1907.
3. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16196. Section
5, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence cast 40
chains; thenco south 160 chains tn point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
4. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16196, Soction
Most
Particular
Smokers
Experience little or no difficulty
in finding a cigar or blend o'f
smoking mixture that fits their
taste.
Our Manila or Havana
Cigars can't be beaten.
Wc carry a most complete line of smokers'
sundries.
The Army        r%.    , .
&&?&, Richardson
Phone 345 to
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 25, 1908.
NEW
WESTMINSTER
TRICT.
LAND    DIS-
Distrlct of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Roman __. Chandler, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
timber broker, intends to apply for a
special timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
at northwest corner of T. L. 18187;
thence east 80 chains along the north
line of T. h. 18187; thence north 80
chains along the west line of T. L.
12502; thence east 80 chains along the
north ling of T. L. 12502; thence north
80 chain^along the west line of T. L.
12503; thence in a southwesterly course
along the line of the Capilano Water Reserve to place of commencement, and
containing 640 acres of land, more or
December 23, 1907.
Jan 11. ROMAN Z. CHANDLER.
NOTICE is hereby given that I, George
French, prospector, of Skidegate, B.C.,
Intend to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over 640
acres, bounded as follows:—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast
corner of Section 21, Township 4, Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Group;
thence running 80 chains north; thence
80 chains east; thence 80 chains south
to shore line; thence following shore
line to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located  December   12th.   1907.
GEORGE FRENCH,  Locator.
Jan. 4 John Simister, Agent.
NOTICE Is hereby given that I, Benjamin Kromp, of Skidegate, B. C,
rancher, intend to apply for a licence
to prospect for coal and vetroleum over
640 acres of land bounded as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted near the
beach at the southeast corner of Section 20, Township 4, Graham Island,
Queen Charlotte Group; thence 80 chains
north; thence 80 chains east; thence 80
chains south and over and under water;
thence 80 chains west over and under
water to point of commencement; con
taining 640 acres, more or less.
Located  November  30th,   1907.
BENJAMIN KROMP, Locator.
Jan. 4 John Simister, Agent.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. W. C; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains, more or less to River; thence
southerly 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more
or less
Staked December 7.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast. Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank of Kimsquit River, about 4
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H. Taylor's S. W. C; thence east 80 ehains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Staked December  9.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. Cor. of B. C. Dev. Co.'s Lot 50 and
marked the N. E. Cor.; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains, more or less, to south
boundary of lot 50; thence east SO
chains along said boundary to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Staked December 6.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Kimsquit River, about 1%
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 61, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. E. C.j thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Staked December 10.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Kimsquit River, about 2%
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. E. C; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to point
of commeneement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Staked December 10.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
north 80 chains; thence west 80 ehains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains  to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
10. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile distant in a northerly
direction from claim No. 9, marked S.E.
Corner, Section 19, Township 36; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
■ 11. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile distant in a northerly
direction from claim No. 10, marked S.E.
Corner, Section 30, Township 36; thence
north 80 chains', thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
12. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile distant ln a northerly
direction from claim No. 11, marked S.E.
corner, Section 31, Township 36; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
T. S. McPHERSON.
Dec. 28 Per Geo. H. Jackson.
COAST LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that F. S. Buck of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation lumberman,
intends to apply for a special timber
license over the following described
lands:
1. Commencing at a post planted on
Gilford Island, 40 chains in southerly direction from the N.E. corner of surveyed Lot 625 on north shore of lake;
thence north 80 chains more or less to
the south line of T. L. 7714; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to this post.
FRED.  S. BUCK.
2. Commencing at a post planted
about about 40 chains south and 80
chains east of N. E. corner of surveyed
lot 625, thence north 80 chains; thence
east SO chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to this post.
Staked Dec. lst.
Dec. 28 FRED. S. BUCK.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
40 chains east of the N. E. Cor. of B.
C. Dev. Co.'s Lot 50, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. W. Cor.; thence east 40
chains; thence north 160 chains; thence
40 chains to bank of Salmon River;
thence south 160 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Staked December 6.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast. Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank of Salmon River, about 2
miles north of the N. E. C. of Lot 50
and marked T. H. Taylor's S. W. C;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains, more or
less, to bank of river; thence southerly
80 chains along bank of river to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Staked December 6.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent,
NOTICE is hereby given that I, James
Alfred Owens, prospector, Skidegate, B.
C, intend to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over 640
acres of land bounded as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted northeast corner, near the beach on south
shore of Skidegate Inlet, B.C.; Graham
Island, Queen Charlotte Group, supposed to be Section 6, Township 1;
thence running 80 chains south; thence
80 chains west; thence 80 chains north
to shore line; thence following shore line
to point of commencement; containing
640 acres, more or less.
Located  November  29th,   1907.
JAMES ALFRED OWENS,
Jan. 4 Locator,
NOTICE is hereby given that I, Emily
Margaret Johnston, of Victoria, B.C., intend to apply for a licence to prospect
for coal and petroleum over 640 acres
of land bounded as follows:—Commencing at a post planted at the south-east
corner of section 33, township one (1),
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Group;
thence running 80 chains north; thence
SO chains east; thence SO chains south;
thence 80 chains west to point of commencement,  containing 640 acres, more
01'   16 S S
Located December  6th,  1907.
EMILY MARGARET JOHNSTON,
Locator.
Jan. 4. Christopher Johnson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast. Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
Intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Salmon River, about 5
miles north of the N. E. C. of Lot 50
and marked T. H. Taylor's S. E. C
thence west 40 chains; thence north 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 40 chains',
thence north 40 chains; thence east 40
chains, more or less, to River; thence
southerly along river 160 chains to point
of commencement.
Staked December 7.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
Intends to apply for a special timber
licence over ■ the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank of Kimsqult River, about 2
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. W. C; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to bank of river; thence south 80
chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Staked  December  9.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
Intends to apply for a speclnl timber
licence over the following described
lands!—
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank nf Kimsqult River, about 3
mlles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
DISTRICT   OF   RUPERT.
TAKE NOTICE that I, T. S. McPherson,  agent of Victoria,  B.C.,  intend to
apply  for  special  timber  license over
the following described lands:
1. Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles distant in a northwesterly
direction from the head of west arm of
Quatsino sound and marked N.E. Cor.
section 25, township 37, thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north SO chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Staked December Sth, 1907.
2. Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles and in a northwesterly
direction from the head of west arm,
Quatsino Round, marked S.E. Cor. Section 36. Township 37, thence north 80
chains; thenee west 80 chains; thence
south SO chains; thence east SO chains
to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th,  1907.
3. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile in a westerly direction
Claim No. 2, marked N.E. Cor., Section
26, Township 37; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thenco north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to point
of commencement.
Staked December Sth, 1907.
4. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile in a westerly direction
from Claim No. 2, marked S. E. Cor.,
Section 35, Township 37; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th,  1907.
5. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile ln a northwesterly direction from claim No. 4, marked N.E.
Corner, Section 34, Township 37; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Commencing at a post planted one
mile distant in a northwesterly direction from claim No. 4, marked S. E.
Corner, Section 3, Township 36; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains  to point of  commencement.
Staked December Bth, 1907.
7. Commencing at a post planted
about one mile distant and In a northwest direction from claim No. 6, marked
S.E. corner, Section 9, Township 36;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 6th, 1907.
8. Commencing at a post planted
about ono mile In a northwesterly direction from claim No. 7, marked S. E.
corner, section 17, township 36; thence
north SO chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 6th,  1907.
9. Commencing at a post planted
about one mlle distant ln a westerly
direction from claim No. 8, marked S. E.
Corner, Section 18, Township 36; thence
COAST LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range One.
TAKE NOTICE that F. S. Buck of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation lumberman,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:
No. 3. Commencing at a post planted
on Gilford Island, at the head of a lake,
and at N.B. end of said lake, and about
40 chains south and about 50 chains
east from N.E. corner of surveyed lot
625, thence east 80 chains; thenee south
SO chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 2n, 1907.
No. 4. Commencing at a post planted
on Gilford Island, about 40 chains south
and 130 chains east from N.E. corner
of surveyed lot 626, thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to  point of commencement.
Staked December 3rd, 1907.
No. 5. Commencing at a post planted
on Gilford Island, about 40 chains south
and 210 chains east from N.E. corner of
surveyed lot 625, thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 6. Commencing at a post planted
on Gilford Island, at the S.E. corner
of T.L. 16806; thence west 80 chains to
the S.W. of T. L. 15806, thence north 40
chains; thence west 20 chains; thence
south 80 chains (more or less) to north
shore of lake; thence east along shore
of lake 100 chains; thence north 40
chains (more or less) to point of commencement.
Staked December 2nd, 1907.
Dec. 28 F. S. BUCK.
No. 34—Commencing at a post planted
10 chains east of the N.W. corner of
No. 32, being about 10 chains east of
Young's River and about three miles
north of Blanked Bluff, being the S.W.
corner; thence north 160 ehains; thence
east 40 chains; thence south 160 chains;
thence west 40 chains to point of commencement.
November  24th,   1907.
No. 35—Commencing at a post planted
at the S.E. corner, opposite No. 34 post,
being about 10 chains east of Young's
River, and about three miles north of
Blanket Bluff; thence north 160 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 160
chains; thence east 40 chains to point
of commencement.
Nov.   24th,   1907.
No. 36—-Commencing at a post planted
at the S.B. corner about 10 chains east
of the N.E. corner, 34 and 46 chains
east of Young's River, being five miles
northerly from Blanket Bluff; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains  to  point of commencement.
November 24th,  1907.
GEORGE YOUNG,
Dec. 28 J. W. Radly, Agent.
NOTICE   TO  LOGGERS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
nm.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Superstructure of Swing Span.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
time for receiving tenders for the
Superstructure Metal for Swing Bridge,
North Arm, Fraser River, has been extended up to and including Friday, the
31st day of January, 1908.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., December 17th, 1907.
Dec. 28
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast. Range  2.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young,
of Victoria, B.C., Timber Cruiser, in
tends to apply for special timber licences over the following described
lands:
No. 26--Commencing at a post planted
at the S.E. corner, near Clyak River,
being 6 miles N.E. from the Junction
of Young and Clyak Rivers and opposite the N.E. corner of No. 16, thence
north 100 chains; thence west 64 chains;
thence south 100 chains; thence east 64
chains  to  point of commencement.
November   27th,   1907.
No. 27—Commencing at a post planted
at the S.W. corner, opposite the N. W.
Corner of N. 17, being about B chains
east of Clyak River and about 7 miles
N.E. from the Junction of Young and
Clynk River, thence north 100 chains;
thence east 64 chains; thence south 100
chains; thenee west 64 chains to point
of commencement.
November 27th, 1907.
No. 28—Commencing at a ppst planted
on the river bank at the S.W. corner
and opposite the N.W. corner of No.
27, being one-half mlle northerly from
Bever Rapids. Clyak River; thence north
100 chains; thence east 64 chains; thence
south 100 chains; thence west 64 chains
to point of commencement.
November 27th, 1907.
No. 29—Commencing at a post planted
on the river bank at the S.E. corner
and opposite the N.E. corner of No.
26, being one-half mile south of Bever
Rapids, Clyak River; thenco north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
November 27th,  1907.
No. 30—Commencing at a post planted
on the bank at the S. B. corner and
opposite No. 28, being one-half mlle
north of Bever Rapids, Clyak River,
thence north 100 chains; thence west 64
chains; thence south 100 chains; thence
east 64 chains to point of commencement.
November 27th, 1907.
No. 31—Commencing at a post planted
at the S. E. corner about 10 chains
west from the N.E. corner of No. 28,
on the river bank, about one and three-
quarter miles north of Bever Rapids on
Clyak River; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains to
pnlnt  of  commencement.
November  27th,   1907.
No. 32—Commencing at a post planted
at the S. W. corner, about five (6)
chains east of Young's River, being
about nine and one-quarter miles from
Its Junction with Clyak River, and opposite the N. W. corner of No. 2B; thenco
north 100 chains; thence east 64 chains;
thence south 100 chains; thence west
64 chains to point of commencement.
November 24th, 1907.
No. 33—Commencing at a post planted
at the S.B. corner about 6 chains east
of Young's River, being about nine and
one-quarter miles from the Junction of
Young and Clyak Rivers and opposite
No. 32: thence north 100 chains; thence
west 64 chains; thence south 100 chains;
thence east 64 chains to point of commencement.
November 24th, 1907.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that J. A. Johnson, of
Vancouver, cruiser, Intends to apply for
a special timber licence over the following described lands:—
1. Commencing at a post planted on
the southwest corner of Leose No. 2;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west along south boundary of said lease
80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated  December   27th,   1907.
District of Rupert.
2. Commencing at a post planted on
the south bank of river running Into
Beaver Cove, and on the west boundary
of Lease No. 2; thence south 80 chains;
thence west SO chains; thence north SO
chains; thence east 80 chains along bank
of said river to point of commencement.
Dated  December  27th,   1907.
District of Rupert.
S. Commencing at a post planted
about 80 chains west of west boundary
of Lease No. 2, and on south bank of
a river running Into Beaver Cove; thence
south 160 chains; thence west 40 chatns;
thence north 160 chains; thence east
40 chatns along bank of said river to
point of commencement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
District of Rupert.
4. Commencing at a post planted
about the southeast corner of T. L. No.
11,696; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
District of Rupert.
5. Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains east of the south-east
corner of T. L. 11,395; thence east 160
chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
west 160 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
District of Rupert.
6. Commencing at a post planted
about 20 chains south of the southwest
corner of Lease No. 2; thence west SO
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
Jan 4. J. A. JOHNSON.
ALTERNATIVE sealed tenders, superscribed "Tender for Piles, Bridge,
North Arm, Fraser River," wiU be received by the Honourable the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works,
Victoria, B. C, up to aud including
Tuesday, the 31st of December, 1907,
for furnishing and delivering at the
bridge site on the North Arm of the
Fraser River, on the line of the Cemetery Road, fir and cedar piles.
About six hundred (600) will be required, varying in length from twenty
(20) to forty-five (46) feet. They must
be straight, sound, and not less than
ten (10 inches at the small end. No
butts will be accepted.
Further printed particulars can be obtained on application to the undersigned.
Tenderers must state the price per
lineal foot for piles delivered.
The successful tenderer will be furnished with a list giving the number
of piles required and the length of each.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certlflcate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, ln
the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars ($260), which shall be forfeited
if the party tendering decline or neglect
to enter Into contract when called upon
to do so, or fall to complete the work
contracted for. The cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful ten-
tenderers will be returned to them upon  the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the form supplied, signed
with the actual signatures of the tenderers, and enclosed ln the envelope furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 30 Public Works Engineer.
LAND REGISTRY ACT.
In the matter of an application for a
Duplicate   Certificate   of   Title   to
Lot 5 of Lot 7 of Section 10,  (Map
280),   Esquimalt   District,   Victoria
City.
Notice is hereby given that lt ls my
Intention at the expiration of one month
from the first publication hereof to Issue
a Duplicate of the Certificate of Title
to said lot, Issued to George A. Cold-
well on the 6th day of June, 1899, and
numbered 6296C.
Land Registry  Office,  Victoria,  B.C.,
the 21st day of November, 1907.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Nov. 23 Registrar-General.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that Roland D. Craig,
of Vancouver, occupation Forester, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted one (1)
mile south and 20 chains west from
the southwest corner of L. 222, West
Fork of Adams River; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains.
December   20th,   1907.
Jan. 4 ROLAND D. CRAIG.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that M. J. Kinney, of
Portland, Ore., occupation Lumberman,
intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Rupert
District, where the said line intersects
the shore line of the east side of Marble
Bay; thence northerly following the
shore line a distance of about 200
chatns to the northeast corner of lot
31B.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907
M. J. KINNEY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that The Quatsino
Power and Puly Company, of Victoria,
B.C., occupation, A Pulp Company, Intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Marble
Cove, Rupert District, where the said
line intersects the shore line on the
east side of Marble Bay; thence southerly following the shore line a distance
of about 120 chains to a point Intersecting the mouth of Marble Creek.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907.
THE QUATSINO POWER
&  PULP  COMPANY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert. Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICB that Enoch A. White,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Lumberman, intends to apply for permission to
lease the following described foreshore:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of an Tndlan Reserve
at the head of Quatsino Narrows, Rupert
District, thence southerly following the
shore line a distance of about 160 chains
to a point Intersecting the mouth of
Marble Creek. Including small island on
north   line  of  section   10.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
Superstructure of Swing Span.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Superstructure Metal for
Swing Bridge, North Arm, Fraser
River," will be received by the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works, Victoria, B.C., up to and Including Tuesday, the 31st of December,
1907, for manufacturing and delivering,
f. o. b., scow at Vancouver or New
Westminster, all the metal work required for the superstructure of a steel
swing span.
Drawings, specifications, condition of
contract and tender may be seen by
intending tenderers on and after Tuesday, the 26th of November, 1907, at
the offlce of the Public Works Engineer,
Lands and Works Department, and at
tlie offlce of the Provincial Timber In
spector, Court House, Vancouver, B.C.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certificate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner ln
the sum of two hundred and fifty ($260)
dollars, which shall be forfeited if the
party tendering decline or neglect to
enter Into contract when called upon
to do so. The cheques or certificates
of deposit of successful tenderers will
be returned to them upon the execution
of the contract.
The successful tenderer will be
called upon to furnish a bond, himself
and two securities, satisfactory to the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, ln
the sum of $1,000 each, or to furnish a
bond of a Guarantee Company satisfactory to the Honourable the Chief
Commissioner in the sum of $3,000 for
the due fulfilment of the work contracted for.
Upon the execution of the contract
and a satisfactory bond being supplied,
signed with the actual signatures of the
tenderers and enclosed in the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 30 Public Works Engineer.
DISTRICT  OF CASSAIR.
TAKE NOTICE that The Hidden Creek
Mining Co.,  of Vancouver,  occupation,
 , intends to apply for permission
to lease the following described land,
about 40 acres:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of Lot 479; thenee following high water mark south and
wost to the southeast corner of Lot S08;
thence east five chains; thence north
and east following a line parallel to
high water mark about 80 chains to a
point 6 chains south of point of commencement and thence to said point of
commencement.
Dated Nov. 25th, 1907.
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Dec. 7 Per J. Herrick MacGregor.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
and Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C., Timber Dealers, Intend to apply for the
rite to purchase the following described
lands ln Kildalla Bay, Rivers Inlet; commencing at this post planted on the east
side of the Bay about one-third of a
mile from the point at the mouth of the
Bay, being the southwest corner post;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 90 chains to beach;
thence south along beach to point of
commencement; containing 40 acres,
more or less.
Staked Nov.  26, 1907.
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL.
Dec. 7 George Young, Agent. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 25, 1908.
ir
The Uncongenial Pump.
"That famous temperance reformer, the late Francis Murphy," said a
Pittsburg man, "had many an odd
adventure in the course of his very
useful life.
"He once told me of a case where
a drinking man with a neat joke got
for the moment a little the beter of
him in an argument.
"The man was a clubman, a bon
vivant, famous for his wine cellar,
and Mr. Murphy read him a strong
lecture on the drink evil.
"But the bon vivant only smiled,
shook his head ancl said:
"'Well, Mr. Murphy, I have seen
many a pleasant party round a table,
but 1 have never seen one round a
pump.'"
chase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of lot 1293, M. S.
McLeod, one-half mlle west of Jap Inlet Porcher Island, thence south 20
chains; thenee west 80 chains; thence
north 20 chains', thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 160 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
Jan. 18 J. J. TEMPLETON.
A Fine Point.
"It's the little things that count,"
remarked the man with mouse-colored whiskers.
"How now?"
"Once I wrote a book and called it
"How to  Grow Beautiful.'"
"Well?"
"We didn't sell a copy. After some
cogitation I changed the title to 'How
to Remain Beautiful,' and the ladies
swamped us with orders. You've got
to study woman nature if you want
to get rich."
His Remedy.
A pompous city official'upon reaching his home one evening, found the
street blockaded and a heap of earth
piled against his doorstep. Observing
a workman wielding his shovel in a
near-by ditch, he accosted a passing
policeman and complained that the
laborer was trespassing upon private
property.
"Vvhat do yez mean by trowin'
dirrt on th' gintlcman's steps?" demanded the officer, pompously.
"Sure, an' there's no other place
t' throw it, 'd ye mind!" replied the
workman, indifferently.
"Well, thin, in that case, yez lied
better dig another hole and trow il
in there."
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Buffling-
ton Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation Gentleman, intends to apply for
a special timber licence over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted twenty
chains north of the northeast corner of
section 12, thence forty chains north,
one hundred aad twenty chains west,
forty chains scuth and one hundred and
twenty chains east to point of commencement.
Dated  21st December,  1907.
FRANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
Jan 18 R. W. Wilkinson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 1—Commencing at a post
planted 80 chains west of southwest
corner of Timber Limit No. 3193, thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south SO chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th Dec, 1907.
THOMAS MILER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD,
Jan 18
Southeast Corner,   situated    about    40 mouth of Evelyn River; thence east 120
chains north and 40 chains east of Lot chains;  tl.ence south 40 chains; thence
325, N.E. Cor.; thence 40 chains north; west 80 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence 40 chains west; thence 40 chains thence west 40 chains; thence north 80
south;  thence  60 chains east to point chains to point of commencement,
of commencemnent, containing 240 acres. Nov.  9th,  1907.
Dated  November   15,   1907.
De. 14 MARK BRENNAN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Kathleen Lake.
TAKE NOTICE that Enoch A. White,
of   Victoria,   B.C.,   lumborman,   intends
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
on the south bank of the Sheemahantz
River, five chains west of the mouth
of Marvel Creek, being the southeast
corner, thence west 64 chains', thence
north 100 chains; thence east 64 chains;
tbence   south   100   chains   to   point   of
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation, Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 2—Commencing at a post
planted 80 chains west of southwest corner of Timber Limit No. 13193; thence
north 80 chatns; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan 18
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruiser, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 3—Commencing at a post
planted 80 chains west of southwest corner of Timber Limit No. 13193; thence
east 160 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence west 60 chains; thence north 40
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th December, 1907,
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 5—Commencing at a post
planted 40 chains west of the northwest corner of Timber Limit No. 18544,
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains; thenee
west 40 chains to point of commencement.
Located 8th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan 18
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICB that Frank Bufflngton
Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Gentleman, Intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of section 21, thence
eighty chains east, eighty chains south,
eighty chains west and eighty chains
north  to  point of commencement.
Dated 21st December, 1907.
FRANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
Jan 18 R. W. Wilkinson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Bufflngton
Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Gentleman, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described   lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of section 20, thence
eighty chains west, eighty chains south,
eighty chains east and eighty chains
north to place of commencement.
Dated  21st December,  1907.
FRANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
Jan 18 R. W. Wilkinson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described  lands:
Claim No. 6—Commencing at a post
planted 40 chains west and 10 chains
south of the southwest corner of timber limit No. 18546, thenee west 40
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence
west SO chains; thence south about 60
chains; thence easterly along shore 120
chains; thence north about 60 chains to
point of commencement.
Located 9th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan. 18
to  apply   for  a   special  timber  license commencement.
over the following described  lands: Nov. Sth, 1907.
8. Commencing at a post planted at -N". 3—Commencing at a post planted
the southwest corner of T. L. 16,381, on 10 chains east of the southeast corner
Kathleen Lake, marked "E. A. W.'s N.W. of T, L. 14065, and about one and one-
corner post to Claim No. 8"; thence half miles west of the Neechantz River
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains; being the northeast corner poat; thence
thence north SO chains; thence west 80 south 100 chains', thence west 64 chains;
chains  to  commencement. thence north 100 chains; thenco west 64
Staked November 30th,  1907. chains to point of commencement.
District of Rupert, Kathleen Lake. - GM0RGE Y0™G & ARTHUR BELL,
thence east 80 chains-; thence south 80
chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains distant and ln an easterly direction from east bank of Quatham River, about ten and one-half miles
east of Ramsy Arm; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains.
21st December,  1907.
MAX. J. CAMERON,
Jan 18 L. W. Kingsley, Agent.
1. Commencing at a post planted at
the southeast corner of T. L. 13.046, on
Kathleen Lake, marked "E. A. W.'s S.W.
corner post to Claim No. 1"; thence
east 40 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 140 chains; thence south
20 chains to T. L. 13,045; thence following north line of T. L. 13,045 east
and south to commencement.
Staked November 30th,  1907.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Dec. 21 T. D. Harris, Agent.
Dec. 14
George Young, Agent.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
(c) Commencing at a post planted at
the northeast corner of P. R. 1,746, on
Marble Creek, marked "E. A. W.'s N.W.
corner post to Claim C"; thence south
40 chains; thence east 40 chains; thenee  Dec 14
south 40 chains; thence east 20 chains; 	
thence north  40 chains;  thence east 40   NBW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Harry McMIcken
Keefer of Vancouver, occupation Broker,
intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on tho
N. E. Coast of Savary Island and about
25 chains from the easterly end of the
Island, thence west 20 chains to low
water mark; thence south 400 chains
along low water mark; thence east 20
chains to high water mark; thence north
400 chains to point of commencement,
and containing eight hundred acres,
more or less.
Dated Dec.  2nd,  1907.
HARRY  McMICKENKEEFER.
chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
east 20 chains; thence north SO chains;
thence west 120 chains to commencement.
Staked December Sth, 1907.
Dated Victoria, B.C., Dec.  10th,  1907.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
(d) Commencing at a post planted at
the   northwest   corner  of   Lot   192,   on
Quatsino Narrows, marked  "E,
S. W. corner post to Claim D,
District of New Westminster,
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick Patrick Rogers of Vancouver, occupation
carpenter, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
S.  W.  corner of  Lot  1347,  G.  I.,  New
Westminster   district;    thence   west 20
A. W.'s  chains;  thence north  20 chains;  thenee
thence east 20 chains; thence south 20 ehains
east about  30  chains  to  T.   L.   14,467;   to  point  of  commencement,   containing
thence   north   80   chains;   thence   east  40 acres more or less.
about 80 chains to Marble Creek; thence      Dated  November  26th,   1907.
north and west along shore  to  Indian FREDERICK PATRICK ROGERS.
Reserve;  thence  south  and west along   Dec.14
line of Indian Reserve to Quatsino Nar- 	
rows;   thenoe   following   shore  of   said SKEENA   LAND   DISTRICT,
narrows   southwesterly   to   commence- District of Coast,
ment. NOTICE is nereDy given that thirty
Dated Victoria, December 10th, 1907.      days  after  date  I  intend  to  apply  to
ENOCH A. WHITE. the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
Dec. 21 Thomas D. Harris, Agent,   and   Works   for   a   special   license   to
**""-*%:._*. TIMBER MAPS %
posted up to date every day
ueuaanmytsimiwm^
VICTORIA, B.C
CHANCEI.Y     CHAMBERS.
.PRINTING
SZ LANGLEY   STREET.
DRAUGHTING
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that William Croteau
of Aldermere, B.C., occupation Farmer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner; thence north 20 chains
to McClure Lake; thence along McClure
Lake in an east southerly direction 43
chains, more or less; thence west 40
chains to place of beginning and making 40 acres more or less, and known
as the southwest fractional quarter sec
tion of 36, township 5, Range 5.
Dated November 20, 1907.
Jan. 18 WILLIAM CROTBAU.
Complete    set of Maps showing alt
TIMBER   LICENCES
and other Lands   taken  up in British Columbia.
Blue   Prints  can be   obtained at short no)
LICENCE TO AN EXTRA-PROVINCIAL
COMPANY.
"Companies Act, 1897."
Canada:
Province of British Columbia.
No.  417
prospect for eoal upon the following
described land, situate on Graham
Island, Queen Charlotte Group, in the
Province of British Columbia.
Commencing at a post marked M. B.'s
S. W. Corner post, placed at the S. W.
enrner of section 24, township 10, thence
east 40 chains; thence north 40 chains;
THIS  is  to  certify  that  "The  New  thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
Zealand Insurance Company" is authorised and licensed to carry on business
within the Province of British Columbia, and to carry out or effect all or any
of the objects of the Company to which
the legislative authority of the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The  head   offlce  of  the  Company   Is
chatns to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
Dated November 27th, 10.30 a.m., 1907.
MURRAY BROWN.
Dec. 21 J. E. Doyen, Agent.
SKEENA LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Oresby
Woakes of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Civil Engineer, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land—on Porcher Island:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 1292, about 2
miles distant and in a southeasterly direction from Jap Bay; thence north 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing
160  acres,  more or  less.
Dated Dec. 20th, 1907.
Jan 18 ARTHUR WOAKES.
SKEENA LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that W. N. Campbell
of Victoria, occupation Civil Engineer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase  the  following described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of. lot 1294, (J.R.
Cody) one mile west of Jap Inlet, Porcher Island, thence north 40 chains',
thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east 40 chains, containing 160 acres.
Dated Dec. 16th, 1907.
W. N. CAMPBELL,
Jan IS J. J. Templeton, Agent.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that J. J. Templeton
of   Victoria,   occupation   surveyor,   Intends  to  apply for permission  to  pur-
SKEBNA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Jennie Croteau
of Aldermere, B.C., occupation housewife, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner; thenca north 40 chs.;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence west 40 chains to place
of beginning and known as the northwest quarter section of 30, Tp. 6, Rge.
5,   and   containing  160   acres,   more   or
Dated  23rd of November,  1907.
Jan. 18 WILLIAM CROTEAU.
LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
Private Bills.
The time limited by the rules of_ the
house for the presentation of petitions
for leave to introduce private bills expires on Monday, 27 January, 1908.
Bills must be presented to the house
by Thursday, 6th February, 1908.
Reports on bills will not be received
after Thursday, 13th February,  1908.
Copies of the bill, petition and notices must be deposited with the undersigned, and the house fees paid, not
later than Wednesday, 8th January,
1908.
Dated this 2nd day of December,
1907.
THORNTON FELL,
Clerk of the Legislative Assembly.
TAKE NOTICE that M. Brennan, of
Ootso Lake, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to lease the
following  described  land:
Commencing at a post marked M. B.
DISTRICT OT  CASSIAR.
TAKE    NOTICE    that    The    Hidden
situate at the City of Auckland, ln tho Creek Mining Co., or Vancouver, occu-
Colony of New Zealand. pation,  , intends to apply for per-
The  amount  of  the  capital   of  the mission to lease the following described
Company is one million pounds, divided land, about 3 acres:
into ten thousand shares of one nun- Commencing at a post planted at the
dred pounds each. south east corner post of Lot 479; thence
The  head  offlce  of  the  Company  in north  one chain;   thence southwesterly
this Province Is situate at Victoria, and parallel to high water mark, about 30
James  Hill   Lawson,   merchant,   whose chains  to  west  boundary of  Lot  479;
address is Victoria ,B.C, is the attorney thence south about one chain forty links
for the Company. to high water mark and thence along
Given   under  my  hand   and   seal   of high water mark to point of commence-
offlee at  Victoria,   Province  of  British ment.
Columbia, this 28th day of November
one thousand nine hundred and seven.
(L. S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has been established and licensed are:
To carry on the business of fire and
marine Insurance in al! its branches or
such of those branches as the Company shall from time to time determine,
and to do all such other things as aro
incidental or conducive to the attainment of those objects.
Dec. 14.
Dated Nov. 25th, 1907.
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Dec. 7 Per J. Herrick MacGregor.
NBW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Max. J. Cameron,
of Vancouver, Merchant, Intends to apply for a special timber licence over
the following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
about f> miles from Ramsay Arm, on the
main Quatham River, S. W. corner;
thence east SO chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south SO chains to point of commencement.
20th December, 1907.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
about 6 miles from Ramsay Arm, on thc
main Quatham River; S. E. Corner;
thence 160 chains N; 40 chains W.; 160
chains south; 40 chains east to point of
commencement.
December 20th, 1907.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about one chain distant and In an easterly direction from Quathnm River,
ahout seven miles east of Ramsay Arm,
thence west SO chains: thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south SO chnins.
20th December, 1907.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about nne chain distant and in an easterly direction from Quatham River,
about seven miles oast of Ramsay Arm,
thence east SO chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west JO chains; thence
snuth 80 chains.
21st December,  1907.
No. 5—Commencing at a post planted
——~—-————~~~~~~~~~——~— about 40 chains distant nnd In an east-
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT   erly direction  frnm  cast hank nf Qua-
B.C.
Timber Maps
of All Districts
VANCOUVER MAP and BLUE-PRINT CO.
Suite 20-21 Crowe and Wilson
Chambers.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
and Arthur Bell of Victoria, B.C., Timber Dealers, intend to apply for special
license over the following described
lands on the Sheemahantz River, Rivers
Inlet:
tham River, about eight and one-half
miles cast of Ramsay Arm; thenco wost
SO chains; thonco north SO chains; thonco
oast SO chains; thonco smith 80 chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 6*—Commencing at a pnst plantod
nhout 40 chains distant and In an east-
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted erly  direction  frnm  east bank  of Qua*
on the south  bank of the Sheemahantz tham   Rivor.   ahout   nine   and   one-half
River at the northwest corner, being one miles east of Ramsay Arm: thonce west
mile  east  and  10  chains  south  of  the 80   chains;    thence    north    80  chains;
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that Ed. Brown, of
Vancouver, B.C., Cruiser, Intends to apply for a special timber license over the
following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
on south shore of Burke Channel, about
one mile west of Lot No. 241A; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains to shore line of
Burke Channel; thence west along shore
line 80 chains more or less, to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated December 16, 1907.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
on south shore of Burke Channel, about
three miles west of Lot No.241 A; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 160 chains;
thence north 40 chains more or less, to
shore line of Burke Chanel; thence west
along shore line 160 chains more or less
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile south of Lot No. 241A,
on bank of Newcomb River, Burke Channel, thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains', thence south 80 chains;
thence east SO chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 16th,  1907.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile south of lot No. 241A,
Burke Channel, adjoining post of claim
No. 3; thence north 80 chains; thence
east SO chains', thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 5—Commencing at a post planted
about 2 miles south of Lot No. 241A,
Burke Channel, and one mile south of
corner post of claim No. 3 and 4; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles south of lot No. 241A,
Burke Channel, and two miles south of
S. W. corner of Claim No. 5; thence
west 40 chains; thence north 160 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 160
chains to point of commencement and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 17th,  1907.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
about four and one-half miles south
of lot No. 241A, Burke Channel; on a
bank of a small river about one-half
mile east of claim No. 6; thence north
80 chains; thonce east 80 chains; thence
south SO chains; thence west SO chains
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated December 17th,  1907.
No. 8—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles east of claim No. 7, on
north bank of unnamed river, emptying
Into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel, thence north 80 chains; thence west
SO chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 610 acres more or
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 9—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile south of Claim No. 8,
on north bank of small river emptying
Into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel; thence south 40 chains; thence west
160 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 160 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted
about one mlle east of claim No, 9,
on north bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel; thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 11—Commencing at a post planted
about one mlle east of Claim No. 9, ancl
adjoining corner post of claim No. 10
on north bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke channel; thence west 80 chains: thence south
SO chains; thence east SO chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or
less.
Dated December 17, 1907.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted
about 20 chains west of Claims No. 9
and 10, on south bank of small river
emptying Into Koeye Lake, south of
Burko Channel, thonce north 160 chains;
thonco oast 40 chains; thenco south 160
chains; thence wost 40 chains to point
nf enmtnencemont, containing 640 acres
mnro nr less.
Dated  December 17.  1907.
No. 13—Commencing at a post plantod
about one and one-half miles south nf
the head nf Koeye Lake, smith nf Burlce
Channel, thence cast 80 chains; thence
nnrth SO chnins; thence wost 80 chains
to shore line of Koeye Lake; thence
south along shoro line SO chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres moro or less.
Dated   December   ISth.   1907.
No. II—Commencing at a post plantod
ahout one and nno-half mlles south of
tho head nf Koeye Lake, south nf Burke
Channel, thenco oast so chains; thence
south 80 chains; thonco wost 80 chains
to shore of Koeye Lake, thence north
along shore 80 chains to point of commencement, nnd containing 640 acres.
Dated December ISth, 1907.
No. 15—Commencing at a post planted about one-half milo oast from the
foot of Koeye Lake, on tho north shore
of said lnke: thonco north 80 chains;
thence enst SO chains; thence sonth 80
chains: tn shore nf Koeye Lake; thonce
west along shore of said lake 80 chains
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acros, mere nr loss.
Dated December 18th, 1907.
No. 16—Commencing at a post plnnted
abmit twn miles south of Lot 2*11 A.
Rurlte Channel, and about nne milo smith
of cornor post of claims Nn. 3 and 4;
thonco north SO chains; thonce wost SO
chains: thonco south SO chains; thence
oast 80 cliains to pnlnt nf commencement, containing 6*10 acros. more or less.
Dated December uth, 1907.
No. 17—Commonclng at a post planted
abnut two miles snuth of Lnt No. 2*11 A.
Burke Channel, and ono mile south of
corner post of claims No, 3 and 4; thonce
oast SO chains; thonco south 80 chains!
thence west SO chains: thonco north 80
chains to point nf commencement, and
containing 6*10 acros more or loss.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
Jan. 18 ED. BROWN. m.
THE WEEK, SATURDAY JANUARY 52, 1908,
SPLENDID ADDRESS.
Continued from Page 7.
continent, fortunately in a less degree in British Columbia than elsewhere. The demand for the product of our mills in the praiie country and abroad has greatly fallen off.
However, the air seems to have cleared, the financial panic seems to have
been about exhausted, and thc mill-
men of the interior are making preparations for a very largely increased output for the coming season.
While dealing with the lumber industry, I would like to make a few suggestions in connection therewith.
Coming, as I do, from a constituency
where the operations in this direction
are very extensive, I have naturally
fallen very much in contact with the
operators who are engaged in this industry. The regulations under which
the industry is governed, provides for
a survey being made of the lands held
under special licenses before any timber can be removed.
Makes Suggestions.
"Now, in the staking of timber limits, like the staking of mineral claims,
which in their initial staking, do not
require any survey, it is found that
many mistakes have occurred in descriptions, and so on, of these holdings. In many instances a claim
which is supposed to cover a mile of
country is found, on a survey being
made, to contain much less, and often, too, it is found that in the case
of adjoining claims that a small strip
of timber will remain unlocated,
standing between different locations.
Now, if it were possible to arrange
by regulation that the fractions so
found could be added as a part of
one or the other of the original locations, subject to the payment of whatever should be considered reasonable
by the government from the license
holders, this land could be acquired,
and thc timber cut therefrom; 1 am
convinced that it would have a most
splendid result in the prevention of
forest fires. It is a well known fact
that fires originate very often in old
slashings that have been cut over and
denuded of all available timber, and
if these small strips separating licenses are to be reserved, they will,
undoubtedly, fall a prey to ■ forest
fires, which at certain seasons of the
year are so common. Another feature of thc act which has been called
to my attention i sthe severe application of the act as regards the renewal
of timber licenses. Owing to the reserve which has been placed upon
timber lands, it is now a regulation
that immediately a license lapses or is
not renewed by payment of fee on the
very day upon which it lapses, that
the property immediately falls into
possession of the Crown, ancl the original holder has no further interest
in it. It might bc possible that the
original owner had paid many thousands of dollars for his right to this
land, and through an error, probably
of a junior clerk in his office, the
application for renewal, and the necessary fees had not been forwarded
to the department. It would occur
to me that a case of this kind would
certainly be entitled to some consideration, and I would suggest that
thc act be so amended as to give the
timber holders some little concession
in the way of grade covering a period
of, say of thirty clays, ancl subject to
a payment if necessary of some further fee, in order that his holdings
would not bc forfeited in such a way.
I am sure that a measure of this nature would be most generously appreciated by thc millmen and others, ancl
I cannot see where any harm can befall the government in following thc
course as I have outlined.
Agriculture and Horticulture.
"It is witli pleasure wc have to record, as the speech from thc throne
indicates, a year of great activity of
agriculture and horticulture. It is very
gratifying to note that our fruit displays, in thc able hands of Mr.
Palmer, our commissioner of freight
rates, and Mr. Burrell, a fruit grower
of the Boundary country, arc attracting so much attention at the different exhibitions in the Old Country, where they arc being, at the pre-
ent time, displayed. It is gratifying
learn that a number of prizes for
fruit has again fallen to the Province
of British Columbia, in competition
with   the  whole  world.
Civil Service  Reform.
Reference is made in the speech tc
the introduction of a measure applying to the civil service and the establishment of a superannuation fund
for those engaged in the civil service
of the Province. While the service
ancl the officials connected therewith
are second to none on this continent.
I feel convinced all will agree with
me that a reform in the system of appointments by a provision for qualifying examinations before a board of
examiners, will have a tendency co
further extend the standard of efficiency in this direction, to keep pace
with the requirements and growing
development of the province. The
feature of establishment of a superannuation fund must, I am sure, appeal to us all, and especially to those
who are associated with thc service.
While the bill is not before us, and
I am not acquainted with its provis-
sions, I would suppose that an allowance is made from the general revenues of the country for a nucleus for
this fund which will be further augmented ancl supplemented by further
yearly or monthly allowances from
the salaries of civil servants of the
Province. As an old civil servant of
the Province, I heartily approve of
legislation in this direction, and extend my thanks to the provincial secretary for his attention to this important  question.
Change in Fiscal Year.
A change in the fiscal year, outlined in the speech, from June 30, as
at present, to April, will, I am convinced, be found a move in the right
direction, especially in the department
of public works. Under the present
system the public works of the Province are generally delayed very materially through the fact that the
fiscal year does not begin until July
1, and, as a consequence, the appropriations voted by the different sessions held, as a rule, in the early
months of the year, are not available
at the time of year when a great deal
of valuable work could well be undertaken, besides which the change will
have the advantage of making our
fiscal year correspond with that of
Ottawa.
Question of Surveys.
The question of surveys in the
Province is one which has often been
under discussion in this legislature,
ancl is one too, of utmost importance
to the Province. The cost entailed
in a system of extensive surveys in
a Province presenting the extraordinary physical conditions of British Columbia must be enormous, but it is
fortunate, indeed, that the expanding
revenues of the Province appear to
make it possible, in the near future,
to make considerable progress in this
direction to keep pace with what is
anticipated will shortly be a very active development, especially in the
northern part of the Province.
Presents the Address.
I have, therefore, Mr. Speaker,
much pleasure in moving the following  resolutions:
Mr. Taylor moved, seconded by
Mr. Schofield:
That a humble address be presented
to his honour the lieutenant-governor,
t'o thank his honour for his gracious
speech at the opening of the present
session, ancl further to assure his
honour that:
1. We are pleased to be congratulated on the prosperity which during the past year has prevailed in
nearly all lines of trade ancl industry
in this Province.
2. Wc shall peruse with great interest thc report ancl recommendations of the commission on irrigation, thc appointment of which was
authorized last session, ancl we shall
carefully consider any legislation introduced to secure a more equitable
and efficient system of distribution of
water for irrigation purposes.
3. We think thc large increase in
immigration, with the consequent demand for land under pre-emptions,
warrants his honour's government in
asking that a larger sum than usual
be placed in the estimates for an extension of our provincial surveys.
5. We shall carefully consider any
measure  laid before us with  a view
Angell
Engraving Co.
PHOTO-BNORAVERS
and DESIQNERS
ln All Branches
518 Hastings St.
Vancouver, B. C.
to the restriction of the immigration
of undesirable persons.
5. The construction of railways
would doubtless be encouraged and
expedited by a measure exempting
from taxation for a period of ten
years from time of completion certain
railways  already authorized.
6. We are pleased to be informed
that there will be submitted to us the
report of the honourable the first
minister touching his mission to London as a representative of his honour's
government, to lay before the Imperial government the fact of the refusal of the Federal government to
entertain British Columbia's claim for
more adequate and equitable treatment in the matter of provincial subsidies.
7. We consider a more efficient
service in the conduct of our public
business would be effected by a measure regulating the civil service ancl
creating a superannuation fund.
8. We agree with his honour that
the necessity of our youth going
abroad to perfect themselves in the
arts ancl sciences would be largely
obviated by the establishment of a
provincial university.
9. We deem it advisable for the
more convenient prosecution of public
works under appropriation by the
legislature, and with the object of
securing uniformity between the federal ancl provincial systems in the
method of accounting and in the collection of statistics, that the commencement of the financial year
should be changed from July to April.
10. We are pleased to be informed
that the finances of the Province are
in excellent condition, and that this
has enabled his honour's government
to effect a large reduction in the public debt, while still being able to show
a substantial surplus over the actual
expenditure.
11. Measures submitted to us designed to secure to the Province the
full benefits that should accrue to the
treasury from the utilization of the
resources of the Province, will have
our earnest support,
12. We learn with pleasure that
the public accounts for the past financial year, ancl the estimates for the
coming year, will be laid before us,
and that the estimates have been
framed with clue regard to economy,
while providing for the outlay necessary to meet the requirements of the
public service in a province the scene
of important industrial  development.
13. We agree with his honour in
thinking that on account of the increase in the demands for public
works and buildings, ancl the development taking place in the northern
parts of the Province, it is advisable
to create the office of minister of
public works.
15. We join his honour in hoping
that our deliberations will result in
promoting the welfare of the people
of the Province.
The North Ward youngsters havc
started the season with a win from
Nanaimo in a hard match. This is a
strong combination, and if kept together will make any team of their
age in the Province go some to win.
Thc Victoria West intermediates
were fortunate in making a draw at
Ladysmith on Saturday, but it is expected that they will be able to make
thc necessary goals to win in the
match in this city.
A "Ross" Limerick.
Miss Myrtle Sorella Pctrina De Moss
To find out good, values is never at loss;
She will read these Ad Rhymes
In the "Week," "Col." and "Times,"
To get these grand bargains of Dixi H. Ross.
TEA, the famous "Dixi" blend, per lb 35c, 50c and $1.00
COFFEE, the famous "Dixi" blend, per lb 30c, 40c and 50c
DANISH RYE BISCUITS
The very latest delicacy, per box      60c
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
INDEPENDENT GROCERS, 1316 GOVERNMENT ST.
■0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
The
Poodle
Dog
Grill
Yates Street
Victoria, B. C, is
The only real
Grill in British
Columbia—the
only plaoe
where you can
actually obtain
your choice of
meats and all
the delicacies of
te  season.
SMITH & SHAUGHNESSY
Proprietors
Yates Street, Victoria, B. C.
00000000000000000000000000c
When You Know
Where To Go
for your work, you find that well
made clothes cost no more than
most poorly made ones. We employ only the most thoroughly
trained union operators. We use
only the best materials and
charge only living prices.
SCOTLAND WOOLEN MILLS
39 Johnson Street,
VICTORIA.
538 Hastings Street,
VANCOUVER.
SHREWD
HOUSEHOLDERS
Soon see the great advantage,
both to health and pocket-book,
that there is in installing a good
GAS RADIATOR
Which will heat the whole room
in a few minutes. No dirt, no
bother. Saves health, money,
time and temper. Let us show
you our choice new heaters. All
prices.
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, Ltd.
CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.pwv.1-0344030/manifest

Comment

Related Items