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Lillooet Prospector Jun 9, 1916

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4
LILLOOET PROSPECTOR
VOL. £ NO. 32
LILLOOET,  B. C, FRIDAY, JUNE 9, 1916.
$2 PER YEAR
EARL KITCHENER
DROWNED AT SEA
London, June 6th. — Earl Kitchener, minister of war, and the
members of his staff were drowned when the cruiser Hampshire,
registering 10,850 tons, was sunk
either by a mine or German submarine to the west of the Orkney
Islands.
Four boats were seen by observers on shore to leave the ship.
Heavy seas were running, but
patrol vessels immediately proceeded to the scene. At the same
time parties were sent along the
shore to search for bodies.
It was stated that Earl Kitchener was en route to Russia on a
special mission. It is believed it
related to a Russian offensive to
offset the pressure at Verdun and
the Trentino.
England is shocked too deeply
at this time to consider a successor to Earl Kitchener, but it is
believed the choice lies between
Sir John French and Sir William
Robertson.
PREMIER BOWSER ANNOUNCES
RECONSTRUCTION OF CABINET
Three important changes have
occurred in Premier Bowser's
cabinet.. Hon, William Manson,
who has been president of the
council, has been sworn in as
minister of agriculture. Mr
Ernest Miller, member for Grand
Forks, has been appointed president of the council, and Dr. A.
G. McGuire, of Vancouver, will
be the new provincial secretary.
The cabinet now stands as follows :
Premier and attorney-general
— Hon. W. J. Bowser.
Minister of lands—Hon. W. R.
Ross.
Minister ot mines and acting
minister of finance—Hon. Lorne
Campbell.
Provincial secretary and minister of education—Hon. A. G.
McGuire.
Minister of Agriculture-Hon.
Wm. Manson.
Minister of public works—Hon.
Thomas Taylor,
President of the council —Hon.
Ernest Miller.
Thus for the first time in many
years no representative of the
city of Victoria is now sitting in
the cabinet. There is still open
the permanent appointment of
minister of finance, and it is said
that some weeks ago Mr. Henry
Thomson, the member for Victoria, had the refusal of this
portfolio. Since then a number
of names have been suggested
for the vacancy. Apparently the
Premier has decided not to make
any appointment at present.
It is understood that F. W.
Welsh, a present candidate, will
retire in order to give Dr. McGuire a place on the Vancouver
Conservative ticket.
CONSERVATIVE MEETING
A general meeting of the West
Lillooet Conservative Association
will be held at Lillooet on Saturday, June 17th, at 8 p.m. All
members are requested to attend.
Fred. Parsons. Sec'y.
RICH ORE FROM
MOLYBDENITE MINE
Mr. J. B. Perkins was in town
this week from the Texas Creek
molybdenite mine and brought
with him several samples of very
rich ore. This property, which
is owned by Mr. Perkins and Mr.
A. Hautier, of Lytton, has been
bonded to United States capitalists for $300,000. Messrs. Perkins and Hautier have had a gang
of men at work for over two
months putting in trails and
opening up the mine and they
are delighted with the showings
so far. A letter was received
this Week from the bondholders,
stating that they would leave for
the mine at an eaHy date to make
an inspection. It is understood
that if these men find everything
satisfactory they will at once
commence operations on a big
scale.
Molybdenite is the ore which
produces molybdenum and ferro-
molybdenum is the product which
is now very much in demand by
the British government and the
governments of all other belligerents for the manufacture of big
gun linings.
Molybdenum is of such composition that when merged with
ordinary steel it forms an alloy
which is of great value, as it offers great resistance to the cor
rosive effects of the big blasts in
large cannon. It is used for
other purposes as well, notably
for tool steel, which cuts even
nickel chrome steel.
It is said that molybdenite
metal is now worth $3500 a ton,
and as assays of ore from the
Texas Creek mine run as high
as 45 per cent, it is easily seen
that this property is likely to become very valuable when properly opened up.
SHORT PORTAGE NOTES.
From our own correspondent.
W. G. Duguid has installed a
complete irrigating system on his
ranch.
Mrs. Duguid and family arrived
from Lillooet last week.
Barney Rodenberg has got all
his crop in and is now busy putting the ground in shape for a
lawn in front of his house.
Frank Durban is building a
bridge across the creek to connect up his ranch.
Bert Durban is freighting on
the Bridge River road.
The Portage Indians celebrated
Victoria Day with sports of various kinds.
A few trout are being caught
in the creek, but very few in the
lakes.
CHURCH SERVICES.
The Revd. Archdeacon Pugh
will hold Divine services in St.
Mary's church, Lillooet, on. Sunday, June 11th, 1916. Early
Communion at 8 a.m.; morning
service at 11 a.m.; evening service at 7.30 p.m,
Kev. Father Rohr will celebrate
Mass in the church here next
Sunday at 10 o'clock.
Methodist: Sunday School at 11
Pastor—Rev. J. R. Butler
Everybody cordially invited.
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I Local Items of Interest]
Messrs. F. Kinder and Grant
White are in town from Bridge
River.
Mrs. Smith and Mrs. P. LeMare are visiting relatives in the
Okanagan.
Mr. H. Graham, Indian agent,
and Mrs, Graham, of Lytton,
were visitors in Lillooet this
week.
The jury in the sensational
MacDonald-Godsen perjury case
being tried at Victoria, failed to
agree on a verdict.
The tea cosy made by Mrs. S.
C. Mearon has brought $10 to the
Red Cross Fund. Mrs. Coleman
was the lucky winner.
Repairs are being made to the
kitchen in the rear of the Excelsior hotel, recently damaged by
fire. C. Baldwin has charge of
the work.
Mrs. C. Phair left for Vancouver yesterday on a visit to her
son, Pte. Bert Phair, of the 102nd
battalion, who expects to leave
for overseas on Sunday.
Pte. J. Carmichael, of the 102nd
battalion, who has been spending
a few days in town before leaving for England, left yesterday
morning for the coast.
Mr. P. Gilboe of Spence's Bridge
was in town this week. He
left on Tuesday morning to inspect some mining property that
he owns in the Pemberton District.
Mr. A. Lineham, of Vancouver,
and party, who have been hunting grizzly bear in the Bridge
River district during the past
week, left for the coast yesterday.
Mr. A. B. Williams, provincial
game warden, was in Lillooet on
Wednesday. He left yesterday
on a trip to the head of Cayoosh
creek in company with Howard
Reid. the local game warden.
Messrs. James Dickey, sr. and
jr., have donated a fine three-
year-old colt to the local branch
of the Canadian Patriotic Fund,
and the animal will be raffled i.s
soon as a sufficient number of
tickets have been sold.
Jim McAdam, prospector, politician and rancher, was in town
this week from his ranch near
the Fountain. Jim had the misfortune to lose a leg a short time
ago and cannot climb the mountains with the same agility as in
days of yore. His power of
speech has, however, not been
impaired to any extent.
Mr. and Mrs. Hautier, Mrs.
A. Focault. Mrs. Dudley and Mr,
Madora motored over from Lytton on Saturday and spent the
afternoon visiting friends here.
Mr. Hautier was on business in
connection with the Texas Creek
molybdenite mine and took back
some samples of ore from that
very promising property.
Rev. J. R. Butler, who has
been pastor of the Methodist
church here for the past year,
has been transferred to Mission
City, and will leave on Thursday
next for his new field of labour.
Rev. Frank Bushnell has been
appointed to take Mr. Butler's
place here, but it is rumored that
he has joined the army and may
not come.
A big two days' celebration
will be held in Liliooet on July
1st and 3rd. A meeting was held
on Wednesday evening, when
committees were named and other business transacted. The programme will consist of horse
races, athletic sports, children's
races, etc., and an Indian band
of 15 pieces will be in attendance.
The P. G. E. railway will run an
excursion from Vancouver, and
we are assured of a big crowd.
The P. G. E. railway officials
announced last night that the
train service northward on Tuesdays and Saturdays and southward on Wednesdays and Mondays between Squamish and
Lillooet has been discontinued.
The other trains will run as
usual. Work on the P. G. E.
railway construction from Clinton
to Fort George has also been
stopped and hundred of men have
been thrown out of employment.
Mr. Brewster seems to have stirred up considerable trouble when
he issued his famous writ against
Premier Bowser, and if he thinks
he has aided the Liberal cause in
Lillooet district by his actions he
is very badly mistaken.
BRIDGE RIVER NOTES
From our own correspondent.
The road crew have cleared the
road to the Pioneer and on their
return intend to improve it considerably.
The people of Bridge River
hove a kick coming about the
state of the telephone line, It
would have cost no more to repair it two months ago than it
will some time in the future.
Mr. and Mrs. Morton of Tyaughton are on a bear hunting
trip to Gun lake.
Fishing is good in several lakes,
bear are reported plentiful, the
deer have stood the winter well,
but grouse seem scarce. Bridge
River is a veritable sportsman's
paradise.  .
C. P. Dam is setting up a power
drill on South Fork.
D. C. Paxton arrived at the
Wayside mine a few days ago to
start operations. When his mill
starts it will be the fourth one in
operation on Bridge River.
Johnson and Anderson of Tyaughton creek purchased a team
recently. They are real busy on
their ranch.
Grant White expects to have
his sawmill running at an early
date.
Bobb and Coldwell have imported a stump puller and intend
to clear considerable acreage.
Charlie Keary, who has leased
the Big Horn ranch, brought in
several head of cattle recently
and is now in a position to supply
beef to the mines.
P. Lewis' car is making a trip
to the mines this week.
W. Cox and his crew are busy
widening the switchbacks on
Mission mountain. This is an
improvement much appreciated
by the freighters.
John Mikkelsen, of Cariboo
road, trapped three bear, 105
beaver, 24 marten, 1 otter, 27
mink, 73 linx, 50 weasel and 7
fisher last winter. He cleaned
up over $1600 dollars. THE  LILLOOET  PROSPECTOR
The Lillooet Prospector
Published in the Interest of Lillooet District.
W. E. Morrison, Editor and Proprietor
JUNE 9, 1916.
THE PROHIBITION ACT.
Now that the referendum
bill has become an act, the
full text of which is before
us, we are able to form an
opinion as to its merits. It
consists of 62 clauses and is J
considered by prohibitionists
one of the best of its class, on
the continent. The bill passed as drafted by the prohibitionists with one or two exceptions which do not touch
the merits of the act itself.
One is in regard to a further
extention of time for the act
to come into operation, and
the other is in regard to wine
for Sacramental purposes.
Though the bill had the support of both parties, the prohibitionists themselves must
shoulder all responsibility for
any defect, since they would
permit of no alteration.
Taking a comprehensive
view of the whole measure,
two conclusions strike us
forcibly, viz.: (1) That it carries with it its own death
warrant and will be killed at
the polls. (2) Should it escape death at the polls it will
create such unsettled, bitter
and degrading conditions
among us as to wreck our
moral and material progress.
The demand for temperance legislation consists of
three factors, the drunkard,
the youth, and the dipsomaniac. If we had no drunkards,
as in central or southern
Europe, we would need no
temperance movement. But
because we have drunkards
the anxiety of the parent in
regard to his child appeals to
society for protective legislation. And as the drunkard
sometimes merges into the
dipsomaniac, who is said to
have an' 'irresistable craving"
for liquor, the appeal for
protective legislation is
stronger and prohibition is
invoked to place temptation
beyond his reach. The bill
before us does not meet the
requirements in any sense,
but on the contrary, in some
respects it affords better opportunities for increasing and
perpetuating the evil.
There are two forms of
prohibition: the ideal and the
actual. The ideal prohibits
and it is this ideal prohibition
that has awakened the enthusiasm of thousands of
fond fathers and mothers
throughout the province, who
looked forward with joyous
hearts to the day when prohibition would remove all
danger of their sons' falling
by the wayside and becoming
drunkards and possibly dipsomaniacs. But, oh, what a
rude awakening from their
cherished dreams these fathers and mothers experience
when they find that prohibition does not prohibit, that it
is a misnomer for legislation
which increases immeasurably the evil opportunities of
falling by the wayside not
only by drink but by other demoralizing evils which this
legislation has called into existence.
Heretofore the father or
mother could locate the danger spot in the community—
the bar—and exercise his or
her influence by at least
warning their sons against
the danger of frequenting
that place. But now the
danger spots are everywhere.
Every private dwelling house
can have it in bottles or barrels or hogsheads, can have
it in the cellar, or the attic,
or the kitchen, or the parlor,
or anywhere in the home, and
the neighbour's son, through
the intercourse natural among
boys, will soon learn where
to find it. The opportunities
for acquiring the habit are
increased a hundredfold. The
only remedy now in sight is
the conversion of the whole
community to the total abstinence pledge, and we
imagine we hear the reply to
this request, as they say in
Rome: "Non possumus" a
cushla machree.
But the funny part is this
that the man living in a private dwelling house must send
outside the province for his
liquor, and so must all government vendors, while liquor
manufactured here must also be
sent outside the province for sale.
This means that we can buy the
liquor manufactured at our door
only by sending to some point outside the province for it, which
means extra cost in freight, duty
and handling, and, of course,
dearer liquor. This may be too
dear for the poor man, who will be
induced to resort to illicit distilling, or some of the many means
usually adopted to evade the law.
There is no other province in
Canada in which British connection is so strong as in British
Columbia, and this probably be
cause Englishmen are here in
great numbers and great wealth.
To them the act will appear stupid
and un-British. A man. say, is
suspected of violating the law
and haled to court. It is not
necessary to prove anything
against him ; he must prove that
he is not guilty of the offense.
This is so un-British that in our
opinion, though we are no lawyer,
the act would be disallowed by
the Privy Council. But it is the
clauses 48 to 51 inclusive that
will set the Englishman's hair on
end and make him wonder what
has become of Magna Carta, the
great bulwark of English liberty,
when a constable can stop him on
the street while he is running to
catch a car which connects with
the next boat to Europe and say,
I must search yourself and your
valise, as I am of opinion you
have liquor in contravention of
our law. He searches and finds
no liquor, but the man searched
may have to wait for the next
boat a week or two hence. This
constable may enter a man's
premises and with nothing to warrant his conduct but his own
suspicion break through a man's
door, break open and search boxes
or anything he may think likely
to contain liquor. It seems to us
that these few last straws will
surely break the camel's back.
The British spirit of liberty is too
strong in this province to permit
of such violent departures from
the traditions of British freedom.
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When in Vancouver
Stop at
The Burrard Hotel
(One Block East of New C.P.R. Depot)
American and European Plan
Under New Management
I J. McGillivary,
Proprietor
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Headquarters for Mining Men
Commercial
Hotel——.
Chas. Mason, Mgr.
Quests  Comfort
is    My   Motto
Corner Hastings and
Cambie Streets
Vancouver, B. C.
EUROPEAN PLAN
Castle Hotel
W. S. Dickson & Robt. F. Leighton
Proprietors
High-class in
Every Respect
Choicest Wines, Liquors
and Cigars
Granville Street
Opposite Orpheum Theatre
and Hotel Vancouver
Vancouver
WE WANT YOUR HIDE
SHIP YOUR HIDES
AND FURS TO
THE McMULLEN HIDE & FUR CO.
956-958-960 Powell St., Vancouver, B.C.
We pay Highest Prices and give Prompt Returns
Please mention the Prospector when patronizing the above firm* THE   LILLOOET  PROSPECTOR
m BIG GAME ATH0ME
THU3 camera brings the features ot
big game and their haunts to our
firesides All along the Rocky
Mountains strange wild beasts roau in
abundance. Many of them are not familiar to the human eye at all, but
there are others with which every
sportsman is acquainted. Perhaps there
is no place in the Dominion so Interesting from the point of view of the
hunter as the Canadian Pacific Rockies
with their majestic snow-capped peaks,
46 of which are over 11,000 feet high.
At Banff there is a big National Park
where nobody may intrude ln pursuit
of game, for a wise Government has decided that big game must not be hunted Indiscriminately, and has ,4wtltuted
laws for their protection. But outside
the preserve tbe hunter is free to enjoy
his sport, and there is plenty of it to
be had: the grizzly bear, mountain
goat, wild mountain sheep and lynx
take up their abode in large numbers
in these parts. In the open seasons
many a party sets out with guides and
ponies from Banff. The spring is the
best time to hunt the grlzzlj bear
when bis fur is still thick after the
winter's sleep Often it 1p difficult to
bag him but his skin Is a trophj of
which any hunter may be proud. It is
a pretty sight to watch a wild goat as
he stands on some cliff seemingly admiring tho pieturesqueness of the landscape that. Her beneath hlo>    While ln
pursuit of the Rocky Mountain goat the
hunter has to take some serious risks;
he has to ascend precipltious crags
hanging on almost by the skin of his
teeth. The goat can dash along from
rock to rock with the same graceful
ease and velocity as that displayed by
a bird travelling from twig to twig on
some adjacent fir tree. But it Is the
danger and excitement of the chase
that gives the hunter the greates'. delight It is as difficult to shoov the
bighorn or wild mountain sheep. After
feasting himself on the lowlands in the
grej early morning the bighorr. ascend* to tht fastnesses of the mountains    It ir almost as Impossible task
for the hunter to get within range, and
if ever he does get there he must not
make the least noise or show himself,
for the bighorn is both timid and
observant, and when he is startled ones
there is little chance of again coming
into close quarters with him. The
bighorn's flesh is pronounced by epicures to be most delicious and his
horns make very beautiful ornaments.
In its cosy coat of 'soft ashy grey fur
the lynx seems to be like a cat and he
certainly Is of the cat family He is
rather pretty, and though not such a
prize trophy for the sportsman as some
of- the bigger forest ne'shbours, he is
always welcome to a rifle bullet
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oral Representative
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V/ATER NOTICE
BIVEBSION  AND TXSE
TRY THE PROSPECTOR
FOR    JOB    PRINTING
Take notice that Maude Haylmore,
F.M.C. 95792b., whose address is Lillooet, B.C., will apply for a licence to
take and use 100 miners inches of waste
water from the Lorne Mines, which
flows southerly and drains into Cadwallader creek about one half mile below
South Fork of Cadwallader creek. The
water will be diverted from the stream
at a point about 300 feet southerly below
Lorne mill, and will be used for mining
purpose upon the mine described as Gold
Channel Bench Lease.
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 28th day of April, 1916.
A copy of this notice and an application pursuant thereto and to the "Water
Act, 1914," will be filed in the office of
the Water Recorder at Clinton, B.C.
Objections may be filed with the said
water Recorder or with the Comptroller
of water rights. Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C., within thirty days after
the the first appearance of this notice in
a local newspaper.
Maude Haylmore, Applicant.
By Will Haylmore, Agent,
F.M.C. 95737B.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is June 2, 1916.
NOTICE
Strayed on my premises last winter
ore bay mare, blind in left eye, branded S on left shoulder. Will be sold in
30 days to pay feed bill and advertisement fee. Owner can have same by
proving property and paying expenses.
M. BOYD,
70-Mile House, B.C.
June 2nd, 1916. 32-4
SAMUEL GIBBS
NOTARY PUBLIC
Lands, Mines, Insurance and Collections
Mining business in all branches
a specialty.   Farms for
sale or lease.
Lillooet,  - British Columbia
AN ADVERTISEMENT IN THE
PROSPECTOR PAYS.
WATER NOTICE
USE AND  STORAGE
Take notice that Anthony Bishop, whose
address is Gang Ranch P.O., B.C.,. will
apply for a licence to take and use 100
acre-feet of water and to store 100 acre-
feet of water out of China lake at a
point known as the "Dam", also known
as Little Churn Creek, which flows southeast and drains into Fraser river about
1 mile from the south-east corner of P.
R. No. 2477, Lillooet district. The storage-dam will be located at 100 yds. south
of the S.W. cor. of lot 3900. The
capacity of the reservoir is in excess of
the present requirements for lot 225,
and it will flood about 50 acres of land.
The water will be diverted from the
stream at a point about at the "Dam"
at E map 4618 and will be used for irrigation purpose upon the land described
as P.R. No. 3032, Lillooet district.
The notice was posted on the ground
on the I2th day of April. 1916.
A copy of this notice and an application pursuant thereto and to the "water
act, 1914" will be filed in the office of
Water Recorder at Clinton, British
Columbia. Objections to the application may be filed with the said Water
Recorder or with the Comptroller of
Water Rights, Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C.. within thirty days after
the first appearance of this notice in a
local newspaper.
ANTHONY BISHOP, Applicant.
By H. P. HORAN, Agent.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is May 19, 1916.
WATER NOTICE
USE AND STORAGE
P. G. E. RY. TIME TABLE
Trains leave Squamish for Lillooet on
Tuesdays and Saturdays, returning on
Wednesdays and Mondays, leaving Lillooet at 7 a.m.
Trains leave Squamish for Clinton on
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, returning on Tuesdays, Thursdays and
Saturdays, and passing through Lillooet
at 10.18 a.m.
Special week-end tickets from Vancouver to Lillooet, good from Saturday
until Monday, $8.15.
CAPITAL Privately Procured for any
legitimate business; stock companies
incorporated; bonds and stock placed
on commission. Securities Bonding
Co., 811 Rogers Bldg., Vancouver, B.C.
Take notice that Anthony Bishop,
whose address is Empire Valley, B.C.,
will apply for a licence to take and use
320 acre feet of water and to store 320
acre feet of water out of Grinder, which
flows east and drains into Fraser river
about 1 mite from the S.E. corner of P.
R. No. 2477, Lillooet district. The
storage-dam will be located at 100 yards
south of the S.W. corner of Lot No.
3900. The capacity of the reservoir to
be created is about 320 acre feet, and it
will flood about 100 by 50 yards of land.
The water will be diverted from the
stream at a point about 11-4 miles east
of the east boundary of lot No. 2271,
Lillooet district 8nd will be used for irrigation purpose upon the land described
as lot No. 312, Lillooet district.
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 10th day of January, 1916.
A copy of this notice and an application pursuant thereto and to the ' 'Water Act, 1914." will be filed in the
office of the Water Recorder at
Clinton, B.C.
Objections may be filed with the said
Water Recorder, or with the Comptroller of Water Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C., within thirty days
after the first appearance of this notice
in a local newspaper.
ANTHONY BISHOP, Applicant.
By H. P. HORAN, Agent.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is May 19, 1916.
LAND LEASE NOTICES
EIEX.OOET LAMB DIBTBICT
distbiot or EIEDOOET
Take notice that The Marquess of
Exeter of Bridge Creek, B. C, occupation Rancher, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted 20
chains south of the N. W. corner of section 2957, thence 40 chains east, thence
40- chains south, thence 40 chains west,
thence 40 chains north to point of commencement.
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 8th day of March, 1916.
The Marquess of Exeter, applicant.
Per William Henry Buse, Agent.
22—March 31, 1916. THE  LILLOOET  PROSPECTOR
MINING IN BRIDGE RIVER
By E. A.  Haggen,  Editor Mining and
Engineering Record.
The important mineral areas of
Bridge River in the Lillooet district have now been mapped by
the Geological Survey. The mineralized belt occupies the western
flank of the Bendor mountains.
The gold-quartz deposits are confined mainly to the Cadwallader
diorite, which is favourable to
regular and persistent fault fissures. The gold era is evidently
more extensive than has been so
far proved by prospecting, as
float of the Cadwallader diorite
is described by C. VV. Drysdale
as having been found on the
northwest end of the Bendor
mountains, above timber line, and
on the eastern limb of the series
of Yalakom Valley.
The mineral resources of Bridge
River are not confined to gold.
Silver, copper, antimony, chrom-
ite, magnesite, talc, pumice and
lignite deposits have been discovered. A shipment of antimony
has been made from Gun Creek
and forwarded to Chicago, but it
is considered that the great distance from the P. G. E. railway
and the high cost of transportation prevent the profitable mining of any other minerals than
gold at present.
There are nineteen lode gold
properties being developed in the
district. Five silver-copper deposits are under development.and
four antimony deposits have been
taken up. Four placer gold
properties are also being operated. Seven other properties
outside the Bridge River map
area are under development.
Among the new discoveries in
the Bridge River district are
diamondiferous chromite and
magnesite. The chromite is similar to that of the celebrated Olivine mountain, on the Tulameen
river, in the Similkameen mining
division. An analysis shows it to
contain 48.72 per cent, of chromium oxide, f he discovery of the
fact that it carries diamonds is
due to R. A. A. Johnston, mineralogist of the geological survey at
Ottawa. The diamonds are of
microscopic character, similar to
those previously reported from
the Tulameen and Scottie creek
at Ashcroft. Mr. Drysdale suggests the area covered by the
Shulops volcanic rocks is worth
prospecting as a possible source
of diamonds of commercial value,
and for platinum, so that it is
possible we may yet have diamond
fields in British Columbia.
The discovery of magnesite in
the Bridge River area is particularly interesting, as heretofore no
deposits of economic value have
been found on the North American continent outside California
and the Atlin district of British
Columbia. The mineral is in
great demand for industrial purposes, as the manufacture of carbonic acid gas for aerated and
chemical works, and the magnes-
ian residuum is used as a refractory in metallurgical works. Da-
posits of the mineral are found
at Liza lake and in the Shulops
mountains. A test made by the
mines branch showed this magnesite stood a heat test of 1700
deg. Cent. It contains 43.42 per
cent, magnesium oxide, 47.28 per
cent, carbonic acid gas, and 7.46
per cent, silica, the other ingredients being in nominal amounts,
with water as low as a tenth- of
one per cent.
The antimony deposits are high-
grade, carrying from 40 per cent,
to 60 per cent, antimony and being free from arsenic, zinc and
lead.     Gold is present in quanti
ties from a trace to $12 per ton.
The antimony deposits extend to
great length, stretching from
McGillivray mountain to Tyaughton lake, and northward.
The principal locations are the
Reliance and Stibnite groups.
The Reliance consists of four
claims, located on the southern
side of Bridge River valley, opposite Gun creek. Ore was mined for shipment last fall from an
open cut 10 feet deep and 60 feet
long, occurring in fissure vein.
The ore contained gold values up
to $10.40 per ton.
On the Stibnite group a tunnel
has been driven 85 feet and has
developed several lenses of good
ore. Several tons were mined
for shipment. This ore showed
the highest gold values, running
up to $12 per ton.
Mr. Drysdale considers the
only way in which this antimony
can be profitably worked is by the
installation of small plants on the
ground to produce crude antimony or antimony metal.
PLEDGED.
Let bugles blare and banners blow,
For King and country call, and ho!
The sullen challenge of the foe,
With his dark deeds of wanton woe.
The columns of the British hosts
Come down on continents and coasts,
Converging where the pennant soars,
Where glory rings and battle roars.
The Lusitania victims' cries
Still on the waves and winds arise,
And Belgium's dark and tragic fate
For vengeance calls to Heaven's gate.
Debts for a hundred deeds abhorr'd
Fall due by Britain's blazing sword,
And these, on land and sea, the play
Of that great blade, shall proudly pay.
For every hamlet hears the beat
Of valiant hearts and marching feet.
-Arthur Martley.
WATER NOTICE
diversion and use
Take notice that Maude Haylmore,
F.M.C. 95792b., whose address is Lillooet, B.C., will apply for a licence to
take and use 100 miners inches of water
out of Cadwallader creek, which flows
westerly and drains into the South Fork
of Bridge River about half a mile south
west of Lorne Mines. The water will
be diverted from the stream at a point
about one thousand feet west of Coronation Mines mill, and will be used for
mining purpose upon the mine described
i a Gold Channel Bench Lease.
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 9th day of May, 1916.
A copy of this notice and an application pursuant thereto and to the "Water
Act, 1914," will be filed in the office of
the Water Recorder at Clinton, B.C.
Objections to the application may be
filed with the said Water Recorder or
with.the Comptroller of Water Rights,
Parliament buildings,   Victoria, B.C.,
within thirty days after the first appearance of this notice in a local newspaper.
Maude Haylmore, Applicant.
By Will Haylmore, Agent,
F.M.C. 95737B.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is the 2nd day of June, 1916.
WATER NOTICE
diversion and use
Take notice that Maude Haylmore,
F.M.C. 95792b., whose address is Lillooet, B.C., will apply for a licence to
take and use 100 miners inches of water
out of Blackbird Creek, also known as
Coughlan creek, which flows southerly
and drains into Cadwallader creek about
one half mile above South Fork of Cadwallader creek. The water will be diverted from the stream at a point about
2000 feet southerly from south-west
corner of Lot 1176, and will be used for
mining purpose upon the mine described
as Gold Channel Bench Lease.
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 28th day of April, 1916.
A copy of this notice and an application pursuant thereto and to the "Water
Act, 1914," will be filed in the office of
the Water Recorder at Clinton, B.C.
Objections to the application may be
filed with the said Water Recorder or
with the Comptroller of Water Rights,
Parliament Buildings,  Victoria, B.C.,
within thirty days after the first appearance of this notice in a local newspaper.
Mauds Haylmore, Applicant.
By Will Haylmore, Agent,
F.M.C. 95737B.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is 2nd day of June, 1916.
i
i
C. A. PHAIR
General Merchant
Hardware
Men's Furnishings
Miners Supplies
Fishing Tackle
Na-Dru-Co. Drugs
Bicycles
Groceries
Crockery
Shoes
Guns
Tents
Furniture
Lillooet
■
Dry Goods
Stationery
Grain
Ammunition
Harness
Lumber, etc.
Agent for
Eastman   Kodaks,   Edison  Phonographs,   Moore
Lights, Singer Sewing Machines,   Bapco  Paints
TERMS CASH
Hours:  7 a.m. to 8 p.m.       Saturday,  7 a.m. to 9 p.m.
i   ^Ht.^M|.l»H««.t|.H..tl^M|.l|m«>«|.fHttl».|H|»»»'l'»
>•#•«••••••••••••••••••••••••«.*« ..«..*»•«•„
*>******•*
WO HING
Dry Goods, Gents' Furnishings
Groceries, Confectionery,
Footwear, Hardware, etc.
LILLOOET,
B.C.
Excelsior Hotel
Alex. C. Phair, Proprietor
The  Comiort   of   our   Guests  is  our   First  Consideration.
Full Stock of Wines, Liquors and Cigars
Automobile   Meets   All   Trains
| VICTORIA HOTEL
Well Furnished Rooms.     Hot  and Cold Baths.
Excellent Table.   First-class Bar. Sample Rooms.
HEADQUARTERS   FOR   TOURISTS,   MINERS-and   COMMERCIAL   MEN   ,
Automobiles for  Hire at Any Hour
f P. LEWIS, -    - Proprietor
i
Singer Sewing Machines
If you want a high-class Sewing Machine at a
moderate price, call at the Prospector Office. Easy
terms or big reduction for cash.
SEE  OUR  SAMPLE MACHINES
W. E. Morrison,   -   Prospector Office

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