BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Prospector Jan 30, 1914

Item Metadata

Download

Media
proslill-1.0212402.pdf
Metadata
JSON: proslill-1.0212402.json
JSON-LD: proslill-1.0212402-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): proslill-1.0212402-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: proslill-1.0212402-rdf.json
Turtle: proslill-1.0212402-turtle.txt
N-Triples: proslill-1.0212402-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: proslill-1.0212402-source.json
Full Text
proslill-1.0212402-fulltext.txt
Citation
proslill-1.0212402.ris

Full Text

Array THE PROSPECTOR
VOL. 3, NO. 15
ULLOOET,   B. C, FRIDAY,  JANUARY 30, 1914.
$2 PER YEAR
ITEMS ABOUT TOWN.
JUDICIAL QUARTERS.
POLICE COURT SUMMARY.
Birth—At Vancouver, B. C,
on January 15, to the wife of A.
W. A. Phair, a son.
This is proving a hard winter
for the railroad laborer.
Mr. W. H. Snellgrove has moved
his engineering party from Camp
2 to Camp 1.
Mr. M. R. Eagleson is confined
to the house with an attack of
rheumatism.
Good sleighing is reported on
the lower end of the road between
this town and Lytton.
Surveyors are at work on the
opposite side of the river, cutting up the old Hudson Bay flat
into small plots.
R. A. Nicholson paid the town
a visit this week. He reports
everything 0. K. on the eastern
end of the railroad line.
Mr. W. B. Anderson and H. E.
O'Neil, both experienced railway
men, have joined Mr. Rankin's
official staff.
Constable McLeod started for
the Kamloops jail, yesterday,
with a small detachment of Lillooet delinquents.
Contractors east of town claim
that railroad grading, as far the
20-Mile House, will be completed
by the 1st of April.
The Ashcroft mail auto had a
break-down last Monday, in
consequence of which the mail
did not reach Lillooet until Tuesday evening.
The first real loqch of winter
visited town this" week, the
coldest day being 2 below zero.
A little snow fell, but not sufficient to make good sleighing.
In spite of the cold weather
and high wind of the past few
days, none of the construction
work was tied up, as all the men
reported for duty.
These are the days when the
man with a political job looks
contented and happy, as he sits
by a warm fire and dreams of the
poor voter whose woodpile has
long since disappeared.
An important judgment in the
Burns' Lake murder case was
handed down in the Court of
Appeal last Tuesday, and unless
a further reprieve is granted
Mulverhill will be hanged at Kamloops today.
Mr. Mackey, asst.-supt. for P.
Welch, at Lillooet, was called to
Vancouver last week as a witness
in the Spadafora case, who were
suing the Canadian Northern
Railway for additional yardage
on their contract.
The false work of the railway
bridge across Fraser river will
reach the south bank in a very
short time, judging from the
rapid progress now being made.
It is a cold job, but the men at
work don't seem to be aware of it.
An epidemic of litigation seems
to be raging among the Chinese
residents of this town. Suits and
counter-suits, seizures, and suits
for false arrest, are some of the
items already posted on the next
County Court calendar.
The annual crop of Lillooet ice
is now being harvested. As he
has done for a great many years,
Tyhee Jimmy is still head muck-
a-muck of the job, and has all of
his pack-horses employed.
The  Bella   Coola   magistrate
holds  court  in the   constable's
kitchen.    A greater than he—
the late Chief Justice Begbie—
once administered justice in the
open air, sitting on one end of a
log and the clerk of the court on
the other.   In Lillooet—and not
many years ago—we had a magistrate who held court in his sawmill during working hours, and
never allowed court proceedings
to stop one revolution of the saw.
Being the head sawyer himself
the policeman and prisoner had
much difficulty in   approaching
him,  when,  above the noise of
the mill he would shout: "What's
the charge?" As usual, the reply
was "Drunk!"     "Five dollars,"
said the court, as the saw crashed
into a big log.   It is seldom the
prisoner offered any defense. The
weird aspect of the surroundings,
combined with the commanding
appearance   of   the   magistrate
with his sleeves rolled up, were
sufficient to deter him from passing comment on the proceedings.
The word "appeal" was seldom
heard in those days; the prisoner
knew much better.   Then again
there was another Lillooet Justice
of the Peace—an extremely conscientious man.     He   imagined
one day that he had committed
an  infraction   of the law,  and
forthwith placed himself under
arrest.   Court was opened at the
usual time, and in the police book
(which can now be seen at the
Lillooet jail) he duly inscribed the
charge against himself,  made a
long speech on the  enormity of
the offense,  and   fined himself
accordingly; the fine was promptly paid and the court adjourned
with as much formality as if the
proceedings were held on behalf
of someone   else.    Then   there
was another J. P. who had the
habit of sitting well back in his
chair and placing his feet on the
judicial table during court proceedings—but  that  is   another
story.    So that,  after all,  the
present judicial quarters of Bella
Coola are not very bad.   Justice
can be administered in a cabin
as well as a palace—and sometimes better.
THE HYACK FIRE BRIGADE.
TOO PREVIOUS.
The death occurred in Chilliwack in the first days of the year,
of F. Cawley, a resident of the
Fraser valley for nearly thirty
years. He was a pioneer of the
Skagit valley, the last to give up
faith in Ruby creek diggings, the
first owner of what is now the
Whitworth ranch, and for the
last twenty years a leading merchant of Chilliwack. He was
known for his directness, honesty
and generosity. He leaves many
friends.
The above, clipped from the
West Yale Review, struck Mr.
Cawley as a little previous. He
is yet quite alive and doing business in his old stand, and expects
to be there until his next demise,
which is yet somewhat in the
distant future, if Mr. Cawley has
anything to say in the matter.
The Liberals held a big powwow at Ashcroft last week, and
unfurled their political battle-flag.
As a consequence, many voters
in Lillooet district are smoking
big black cigars and, in some
cases, are assuming a belligerent
attitude.
Weather has been cold and
whisky scarce, and, as a consequence there has been a dearth
of business in police circles. The
constables are paying social calls
and the magistrate is taking a
much-needed rest. We append a
few items found on the police
blotter:
Mike Popovitch and Joe Rudan,
d.d., were assessed $10.
Jack Dempsey, vagrancy, was
sent into exile.
Donald Wright, John Engquist
and George McCartney, d. d.,
received a sentence of 15 days.
John Travers, d.d., was fined
$10, and Isaac Johnson received
15 days for a similar offense.
Tom Johnson, vagrancy, one
month hard labor.
Albert Dahl, ginning up a prisoner, $10.
John Krista, theft, 4 months.
Albert Doring, receiving stolen
goods, 4 months.
An Indian named Dan Willie
was fined $20 for being drunk
and $50 for supplying an interdict.
Another Indian named Alfred
Patrick got 20 days for being
drunk and 2 months for supplying an interdict.
An interdict named Frank was
asked if he had been intoxicated.
"Sure thing," said he. "Twenty
dollars," said the court. And it
was paid.
A jovial Indian named Scotty,
from Hat Creek, paid $10 for
sampling Lillooet whisky.
Joe Kelly, supplying an Indian
with liquor, 2 months hard labor.
The P.G.E. railway grade has
found its way through the Indian
reserve on Cayoosh creek, and,
as a result, the chief has received
several hundred dollars for a few
log huts on the right-of-way. He
is now industriously sawing up
these logs and re-selling them to
the company at the rate of $10
per cord. When the railroad
people finally settle up with old
Charley they will find that they
have not got very much the best
of him.	
A ruling is to be made by
Judge Mclnnes on the question
as to whether Mr. Patrick Welch,
the sub-contractor, or the Pacific
Great Eastern Railway, the contractors in chief, are liable to pay
compensation for accidents. The
matter came up in connection
with a claim for compensation
made by John Kevasef who received injuries in falling from a
handcar near Newport.
A convention of fruit-growers
of the province was held in Victoria a few days ago, when a
resolution was unanimously passed petitioning the Provincial government to use every effort to
persuade the Dominion and Imperial governments to the total
exclusion for the future of all
Orientals, and meantime to relieve a situation which is becoming intolerable.
It is said that the Liberal platform recently overhauled and repaired at Ashcroft, has had several new planks inserted in it,
taken from timber belonging to
the Lillooet district, an abundance
of which may be found along the
line of the P.G.E. A good sound
footing was all the Liberal party
needed; having secured this, we
may expect to hear results in a
very short time.
At a meeting of Lillooet property owners held at the Excelsior Hotel last Saturday evening,
constable Baker was elected fire-
chief of the "Hyacks," and will
at once put that organization on
a proper footing. Following is a
list of the young bucks who
will have to give a good account
of themselves when the next fire
occurs in this town: J. H. Kriege,
George Carson, A.B. Greig, Peter
Sherwood, John Acker, Vincent
Keeley, A. P. Hughes, F. Clyde,
Albert Brett, F. E. Anderson,
William Lavelle, Ernest Bonner,
James Marr, Tom Hurley, Jack
Eagleson, and Moses Taylor.
It is a pretty good muster of
capable young men, but we hope
the little printing office won't
be the scene of any of their exploits. A bunch like that would
first pull our little shack down
and afterwards put it out. In
any case we would be out before
the fire was.
The Bonaparte valley,  which
runs in a northerly direction between Ashcroft on the Thompson
river, and within a few miles in
the vicinity of Clinton, is one of
the most fertile,  and could be
made the most productive in the
interior of B. C.; and it is this
environment to which the town
of Ashcroft must look largely for
support when the freighting industry to the north is a thing of
the past.   The adjacent valleys
of Cache Creek and Hat Creek
which enter that of the Bonaparte
at six and thirteen miles respectively, north of Ashcroft, afford
large resources  in the way of
agriculture, and are able to support large district municipalities,
with Ashcroft as the hub around
which they would revolve.   And
here is an opportunity for the
railroad builder. With the advent
of a railway connecting the C.N.
R. at Ashcroft with the P.G.E.
at or near Clinton, hundreds of
settlers could be induced to invest
in ten and twenty acre lots from
the present owners and  create
there such conditions as obtain in
the Okanagan valley.     We are
convinced  that the  Bonaparte,
Cache Creek and Hat Creek valleys, with the adjacent flats in
the immediate   vicinity  of  the
town,  are the only real asiets
that Ashcroft has to depend on,
but with proper care and handling
they are immense. —Journal.
Ranch property along the Lillooet-Lytton road is going up in
values. The prospect of the C.
P. R. R. coming up this valley
may have had some influence in
the value of land; in any case the
farmer is holding on to his property and will plant some big
crops this season.
LOST.
ABOUT SEPTEMBER FIFTEENTH
from the 132-Mile House, Cariboo road,
two bay geldings and one sorrel gelding
branded E on left shoulder. Thirty
dollars will be paid to the person deliv-
ing these horses at any of the company's
stations on the road,
IMPERIAL EXPRESS CO.,
j9 Ashcroft B. C.
Agents wanted to sell fruit,
shade and ornamental trees and
small fruit plants. Apply Royal
Nurseries Ltd., 710 Dominion
Bldg., Vancouver, British Columbia. THE PROSPECTOR
THE  PROSPECTOR.
Published in the interests of Lillooet District.
R. A. Hume, Manager.
JANUARY 30, 1914.
LAND PAYMENTS.
That British Columbia has an
asset of $13,000,000 in the shape
of money due from people who
have purchased land for which
they have thus far found it inconvenient to pay,  is a statement
which of late has been put forward quite freely as an alleviation of the  financial situation
with which the provincial treasury finds itself.   The statement
is literally true.   There is such
an amount due, but how much of
it will ultimately prove to be collectable is quite another question.
Speculators   who   have bought
land of which  they find themselves unable to dispose are not
likely to meet payments cheerfully or promptly.    Under the
circumstances   a   suggestion  is
made to clean the whole matter
up by giving purchasers a clear
title  to as much land as they
have already paid for and allow
the rest to revert to the crown.
Thus,  for  example,   suppose a
man has purchased a thousand
acres of wild land, on which he
has paid fifty cents an acre; he
would then become entitled to a
clear deed for fifty acres or one
hundred acres, according to whether it is ten dollar land or five
dollar land, and the transaction
would be considered closed.   It
would perhaps have to be optional
with   the    original   purchaser
whether he would accept such a
proposal or would continue to pay
interest on overdue instalments
of the purchase price,  together
with the wild land tax.   If he
prefers the latter alternative the
government might have no objection, as the willingness to pay
would be evidence of ability to
do so, and would afford a reasonable hope that the principal might
finally be forthcoming.   What is
desirable to  avoid  is  to  have
taxes,  interest and overdue in-
instalments pile up against the
land until the situation becomes
impossible and the legislature is
compelled to give relief at the
expense of the general public.
The only parties who might possibly  conceive   themselves   aggrieved by   such  a  settlement
would be those who bought land
when the land was $2.50 and $5
per acre.    These would necessarily have to abide by the consequences of  the increased valuation which the government has
since imposed.   That is to say,
a man who had bought a thousand acres at $2.50 and paid $500
of the purchase price would be
entitled to only one hundred acres
instead  of two  hundred.     He
would still have the alternative
of paying up the full $2500 and
taking the thousand acres.   In
fact, he would probably make a
strong effort to raise the money,
and if he succeeded the provincial treasurer would acknowledge
his cheque, with thanks.
When announcing the abolition
of the poll tax a year ago, the
premier held out the hope, but
did not promise, that at the present session, fiscal burdens would
be further mitigated by doing
away with the tax on personal
property. The poll tax, in the
last year in which it was levied,
yielded a little over $360,000.
This amount would come in very
handy now, although it did not
seem very much in the days
when the provincial revenue was
upwards of twelve millions. To
drop the personal property tax
would mean a further reduction
in revenue of about $200,000. It
is safe to state that the annual
budget speech of Hon. Price Ellison will contain no announcement
that he will feel able to do without the money from this source.
The other changes which were
advocated in the report of the
tax commission will also probably
have to wait until good times
come again.
It is interesting and cheering
to note that members from lumbering and mining sections say
that conditions in these industries
have improved materially in the
past few months. Neither are
farmers kicking as much as usual.
When the price of produce gets
to shooting skyward, its the city
man who does the complaining,
not the farmer. Among those
who are clearing homesteads
there has been some apprehension that the government might
find find it necessary to stop
the road work upon which hundreds of them depend for ready
money, but this fear will no doubt
be allayed by the government's
announced intention to borrow
enough to continue vigorously
the policy of development.
Still another suggestion is put
forward by some members of the
legislature for dealing with the
problem of the $13,000,000 owing
to  the   province of   B. C.   for
land sold to private citizens. This
resolution is based on the supposition that the desirable thing to
do is to collect the money rather
than to regain possession of the
land.   If individual owners can
not now finance their holdings,
the inference is felt to be a fair
one that the property, if it reverted to the crown and were
again sold, would not fetch any
higher, if as high, a price as it
did before.     The crown, therefore, has no particular object to
gain by taking it out of the hands
of   the  present  possessors,   or
those of them who may be able
to pay up if given a little time.
For this  reason it is purposed
that the sum due should be spread
over a period of five years, the
arrears  of taxes  and   interest
being collected in 1914, and the
collection of the principal being
made in four equal annual instalments, with or without interest.
This would give everybody concerned a reasonable chance  to
pull through.   At the end of the
five-year period those who had
not by then paid in full could
receive title for the acreage for
which they had  actually paid.
This  scheme,   it  is contended,
would result in a large revenue
to the government, while at the
same time it would perhaps be
more welcome to those who still
think they have some chance to
realize a profit on their investment.
BROPHY BROS.
Gents'
Furnishings.
Boots ic Shoes. I
Shoe Repairing
Agents for House of Hobberlin
HOUSE
OP
HOBBERLIN
LIMITED
man
JOB PRINTING.
MMUMRflfiS&S9WU^^^^
mammmmhbmbbmwbmb———i ■—a—gai
WHEN     YOU     WANT
JOB PRINTING
THE   BETTER    KIND
Delivered    When    Promised
and Correct When Delivered
The Prospector,
Lillooet, B. C.
J
Water Notice
Application for a License to take and
use water, will be made under the
Water Act of British Columbia, as
follows:
1. The name of the applicant is Francis
Gott.
2. The address of the applicant is
Lillooet, B. C.
3. The name of the stream is Black
Hill Creek. The Stream has its source
near the mouth of Michelle creek, flows
in an Easterly direction, and empties
into the Fraser River about 10 miles
above the mouth of Bridge River.
4. The water is to be diverted from
the stream on the South side, about one
mile North of the Northern boundary
of Pre-emption No. 1758.
5. The purpose for which the water
will be used is irrigation.
6. The land on which the water is to
be used is described as follows:—P. R.
1768. ,.  , ,
7. The quantity of water applied for
is as follows:— One hundred miners'
inches.
8. This notice was posted on the
ground on the 25th day of November,
1913.
9. A copy of this notice and an application pursuant thereto and to the requirements of the "Water Act" will be
filed in the office of the Water Recorder
at Clinton. Objections may be filed
with the said Water Recorder, or with
the Comptroller of Water Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B. C.
FRANCIS GOTT,
d26 Applicant.
Water Notice
Application for a Licence to take and
use Water will be made under the
"Water Act" of British Columbia,
as follows:--
1. The name of the applicant is Francis
Gott.
2. The address of the applicant is
Lillooet, B. C.
3. The name of the stream is an unnamed stream. The stream has its
source about 150 yards North of the
Northern boundary of P. R. No. 1758,
flows in a Southerly direction, and sinks
on P. R. 1758, near Western boundary
of said pre-emption.
4. The water is to be diverted from
the stream on the South side, about
150 yards from the Northern boundary
of P. R. No. 1758.
5. The purpose for which the water
will be used is irrigation.
6. The land on which the water is to
be used is described as follows: Preemption No. 1758.
7. The quantity of water applied for
is as follows: Thirty miners' inches.
8. This notice was posted on the
ground on the 25th day of November,
1913.
9. A copy of this notice and an application pursuant thereto and to the requirements of the "Water Act" will be
filed in the office of the Water Recorder
at Clinton. Objections may be filed
with the said Water Recorder or with
the omptroller of Water Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B. C.
FRANCIS  GOTT,
d26 Applicant. 1
THE PROSPECTOR
HOTEL VICTORIA.
Fifty-five well-furnished rooms. Hot and cold baths
Excellent table. First class bar. Large sample room
HEADQUARTERS FOR TOURISTS, MINERS and COMMERCIAL MEN
Two autos on request from Lytton or Ashcroft
Headquarters for Lytton-Lillooet stage line. Stage
meets Seton Lake boat. Rigs furnished on demand.
RATES: $1.50 per day and up. By month $35 and up. Meals, 21 for $9.00
_____
EXCELSIOR HOTEL
W.   J.   Abercrombie,   Proprietor
A First-Class Table.
WINES, LIQUORS, AND THE BEST OF CIGARS
STEAMER   BRITANNIA
REGULAR Trips up Seton Lake every
Day.
Convenient for all passengers to Mission,
Bridge River, Short Portage, Anderson Lake,
McGillvray Creek and the Pemberton country
Leaves, 8.00 a. m.    Arrives at Mission, 10 a. m.     Arrives
Short Portage, 11 o'clock
Returning Leaves Short Portage, 12 p. m.     Leaves Mission
12:45 p. m.    Arrives, 3:00 p. m.
LEST YOU FORGET
Lillooet to Lytton
IN EASE AND COMFORT
by AUTO STAGE
Experienced Driver.
Reasonable Charges.
Apply WALTER C. KEEBLE, - LYTTON, B. C.
i»»i»#*L.aii*ii..
J.M. Matkirjion, BROKER, Vancouver, B.C
Suite 5 Williams Bldg. 413 Granville St.
Lillooet Ranches and Fruit Lands a Specialty.    Correspondence Solicited.
Timber Lands,  Ranch Lands.
Coast Lands and Real Estate.
Water Notice
For a Licence to Store or Pen
Back Water.
NOTICE is hereby given that Western
Canadian Ranching Co., of Gang Ranch,
will apply for a licence to store or pen
back six hundred acre-feet of water
from Gaspard Creek, a stream flowing
in an Easterly direction and emptying
into Fraser River. The water will be
stored in a reservoir of 600 acre-feet
capacity, to be built about 40 chains
East of Lot 57, G. I, Lillooet District,
on Little Gaspard Creek, and will be
used for irrigation purposes as authorized by Water Record No. 147, on the
land described as Sec. 123, East 1-2 4,
East 1-2 9, 10, ll, J 2, Southerly 363
acres of 13, Southerly 317 acres of 14,
West 1-2 of 15, all in Township Ten (10)
Lillooet District.
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 15th day of December, )913.
The application will be filed in the
office of the Water Recorder at Clinton,
B.C.
Objections may be filed with the said
Water Recorder, or with the Comptroller of Water Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B. C.
Western Canadian Ranching Co.
Applicant.
By F. J. Fulton, Agent.      d26
Drainage, Dyking and Irrigation
Act, 1913.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN IN
accordance with Section 9 of the above-
mentioned Act, that one month after
date hereof a petition signed by a majority in value of the owners of the
lands described therein will be presented to the Lieutenant-Governor in Council for the constitution of the said lands
as a Dyking and Drainage District
under the said Act, and for the appointment of Robert Kerr Houlgate, Joseph
W. MacFarland and Stanley Burke, all
of Vancouver, B. C, as Commissioners
for the carrying out of the works mentioned in said Petition.
Dated this 16th day of December, A.
D. 1913.
Bowser, Reid & Wallbridge,
Solicitors for the said
proposed Commissioners.
Headquarters for Mining Men
Free Bus Meets All
Boats and Trains
Commercial Hotel
L. H. Clement, Prop
S   Guest Comfort is My Motto
Corner Hastings and
Cambie Streets
Vancouver, B. C.
American and European Plan
GRASSIE
Pioneer Watchmaker
and Jeweler
318 Cambie St.      Vancouver, B.C.
Orders by Mail Attended to.
Fine Watch Repairing a Specialty
P. GARIGAN
General
Merchandise
Miners'
Supplies
Etc., Etc., Etc.
Pavilion, - B. C.
Lillooet Auto Car Co.
J. H. Kriege. C. B. Clear
Bxpert Machinists
and Fitters.
Being equipped with all facilities
for the prompt repair of automobiles, bicycles, etc., we are now
in a position to execute the most
intricate orders. No job too
small or too large to receive our
prompt attention.
WO HING
GENERAL
MERCHANT
NEW STOCK OF
FALL GOODS!
FIRST-CLASS QUALITY.
REASONABLE  PRICES.
Groceries,
Hardware,
Clothing,
Footwear,
Dry Goods,
Camp Supplies,
Fancy Goods,
Notions.
Lillooet, B. C.
[pH55E5H5H5H5H5H5E5H53
G.   M. DOWNTON
LILLOOET, B. C.
B. C. Land Surveyor!
Surveys handled in all
parts of the Lillooet District.      Mineral Claim
Uj   Surveying a specialty.      Z
[°5EH5H5H5H5E5H5H5HSH555s]
Saddle Horses
Pack Horses,
Single and Double Rigs
for Hire.
LIGHT OR HEAVY
FREIGHTING.
James T. Farmer.
CONTRACTORS BUILDER
LILLOOET,   B. C.
Hunting Parties Furnished.
STEPHEN & J. RETASKET.
FEED STABLE
Horses and Rigs for Hire
Light and Heavy Draying
Express Delivery
EMMET DARCY,  Prop.
Bus Meets all Regular Boats
at Seaton Lake THE PROSPECTOR
CLINTON AFFAIRS.
Mr. J. E. N. Smith paid a short
visit to the 70-Mile House last
week.
Miss Annie McDonald is visiting friends in Victoria during her
father's stay during the session.
The projected sale of the Clinton school property to Anthony
S. Ulrich, of Ashcroft, has not
yet been completed.
Snow has fallen quite heavily
of late. There is now good
sleighing from the 20-Mile House
up.
Little George Boyd who has
been quite ill for the past week,
is now well on the way to recovery.
Miss Pocock, who has been
staying with Mrs. Lunn for the
last two months, left for Ashcroft
last week.
Now that the snow has come
to stay, the heavy motor trucks
are missed from the road. The
mail is being carried by the Inland Express Company on automobiles.
Dr. Edgelowe is making a
medical inspection of the schools
of the district; he left a short
time ago for Big Bar, to visit the
school there.
Mr. James A. Robertson is
building a house for renting purposes on his land adjoining the j
townsite. The scarcity of houses
has been felt in Clinton for some
time, and it would not be difficult
to fill quite a number should they
be built.
McDonald & McGillivray, Ltd.,
are putting on an addition to
their main store building. The
addition is in the shape of a large
room for the accommodation of
the new manager, R. Fraser.
The staff of the store is now up
to six members.
During the last few days or so,
Clintonians have daily beheld
three of Clinton's citizens, "with
steps mournful and slow," apparently "taking the air" on the
main and side streets, usually in
the vicinity of the noon hour.
This was not an act of pennance
on their part, as may have been
imagined, but purely and simply
an act of duty. They were our
newly-elected firemen, fireguards,
etc., carrying out their duties of
inspecting the various stoves,
chimneys, roofs, kitchens, etc.,
in the protection of Clinton of
that demon called fire. The
guards performed their duties in
a thorough and conscientious
manner, and were quite satisfied
with matters as they found them.
Now that sleighing has apparently come for the time being,
government teams are busy hauling oats from Ashcroft.
Bill Sprague kept a general
store at Croyden Four Corners.
One day he set off for New York
to buy a lot of goods. The goods
were shipped immediately; and
as Bill had lingered in New York
sight-seeing, they reached Croyden Four Corners before him.
The goods in an enormous packing-case were driven to the general store by the local teamster.
Mrs. Sprague came out to see
what had arrived and, with a
shriek, tottered and fell.
"Oh, what's the matter," cried
the hired girl.
Mrs. Sprague, her eyes blinded with tears, pointed to the
packing case, whereon was stenciled in large black letters;
BILL INSIDE.
FATAL ACCIDENT.
An accident occurred on the
P.G.E. line of construction, about
a mile and a half east of town,
on 22nd inst., whereby Andrew
Olsen lost his life. He had
only just been employed, and was
working under a steep bank
when a rolling rock struck him
in the head, fracturing the skull.
He was immediately conveyed to
the Lillooet hospital, where he
remained in an unconscious condition until his death, which occurred the same evening. Mr.
Olsen was 52 years of age, and a
native of Sweden. He was buried
in the Lillooet cemetery on 24th
inst.	
THE PARCEL POST.
The mail' carrier who holds the
contract for transporting mail
between Stites and Elk City,
Idaho, is confronted by the problem of how to haul three carloads of ore in a light wagon.
He received a notice last week
from three mines in the Elk
river country, informing him that
the mines would ship three carloads of concentrates this month
by parcel post to the smelter at
Butte. An inspector was sent
from Spokane to look into the
matter.
"What in the world am I going
to do?" said the contractor. "It
will take me a year to haul the
ore."
The inspector assured him that
a requisition would be obtained
from the department authorizing
him to employ freight wagons to
haul the ore,
The inspectors were informed
that the mines in the Elk river
country expected to ship all their
concentrates by parcel post in the
future, instead of by freight. The
rate by parcel post is 54 cents for
the maximum fifty pounds or
$1.08 a hundred. The previous
arrangement cost the mines much
more than $1.08. The carrier
will haul as many of the fifty-
pound packages as he can handle
on his one trip a day until he is
relieved by freighters.
The Pacific Great Eastern debenture issue of $7,520,000 was
heavily over-subscribed in London the other day, and is now at
1 3-4 premium.
BANK OF BRITISH NORTH AMERICA
Established 1836
CAPITAL RESERVE, $7,750,000
n
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT-One dollar opened on account.
Interest added half yearly.
A CURRENT ACCOUNT provides a safe and convenient
way of paying your bills, as each cheque returns to
you as a rec eipt.
COLLECTIONS promptly attended to.
MONEY ORDERS, Drafts, Travelers' Cheques and Telegraph Transfers issued, payable all over the world.
Our Manager will gladly give you full particulars of our
arrangements for Banking by Mail if you
will call on him, or write.
A.B. GREIG,   Manager
Lillooet Branch
Ufesnora
OF CANADA
When will You Save if
you don't Save NOW ?
Though your salary or income
will no doubt increase, so will
your expenses—and many find
that the latter more than keep
pace with the former. Now is the
time to start a Reserve Fund—
and the Savings Department of
the Union Bank of Canada is
the place to keep it.
Deposit the extra you have on
hand now — you can open an
account with any sum, down to
onedollar—and draw interest on it.
LILLOOET BRANCH.
A. P. HUGHES,
MANAGER.
Some time ago an Alabama
lady kindly undertook to advise
one of her colored maids as to
certain rules of propriety that
always should be observed by
young women to whom attentions are paid by gentlemen
friends. One evening the lady,
wondering whether her seeds of
advice had fallen upon rocky
I ground, stationed herself in a
I rocker near the kitchen door,
where she was entertained by the
following dialogue:
"Ah say, Mary, would yo' jes's
soon "
"Look yere, Jim Jackson, don'
yo' git fresh wif me! Mah name's
Miss Smith—not Mary. Ah don'
'low only mah best an' most
pa'tic'lar friends to call me Mary.
"Ah beg yo' pahdon, Miss
Smith. But, say, Miss Smith,
would yo' jes's soon shift to de
oder knee? This yere one's
tired."	
The appeal of Clarke and Davis,
convicted for the murder of constable Archibald in Vancouver
some months ago, and sentenced
to be hanged, was denied by the
court of appeals, in Victoria. Two
of the judges dissented from the
decision, the question at point
being the propriety of the judge's
omission to comment upon the
written confession of Clarke to
the effect that Davis did the
shooting. Both men will be
hanged at the provincial jail,
New Westminster, on March 6.
SAMUEL GIBBS
NOTARY PUBLIC
Lands, Mines-, Insurance and Collections
Mining business in all branches
a specialty.   Farms for
sale  or lease.
Lillooet,   - British Columbia
ACKERS & SHERWOOD,
LILLOOET, B. C.
1
BLACKSMITHS
HORSESHOEING
A SPECIALTY.
Heavy and Light Wagons |
Repaired at Moderate Cost,  \
}  and all Work Guaranteed.
WATER ACT.
Notice  of  Application  for the
Approval of Works.
A party of hunters with a string
of dogs, started out for the North
Fork the other day, in quest of
cougar.
TAKE NOTICE that the Shuswap
& Lillooet Fruitlands, Limited, will
apply to the Comptroller of Water
Rights for the approval of the plans of
the works to be constructed for the
utilization of the water from Fourteen
Mile Creek, which the applicant is by
Water Right No. 533 authorized to take,
store, and use for irrigation purposes.
The plans and particulars required by
subsection (1) of section 70 of the
"Water Act" as amended have been
filed with the Comptroller of Water
Rights at Victoria and with the Water
Recorder at Clinton, B. C.
Objections to the application may be
filed with the Comptroller of Water
Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Dated at Notch Hill this 30th day of
December, 1913.
The Shuswap & Lillooet
Fruitlands, Limited.
Walter S. Mitchell,
Managing Director,
j9 Agent for the Applicant.
Water Notice.
Application for a Licence to take and
use Water will be made under the
"Water Act" of British Columbia,
as follows: —
1. The name of the applicant is
Western    anadian Ranching Company.
2. The address of the applicant is
Gang Ranch, B. C.
3. The stream is unnamed, has its
source in the hills, and flows in a southerly direction, and empties into Kelly
Lake.
The water is to be diverted from the
stream on the N. E. side of Lot 9, G. I,
Lillooet.
5. The purpose for which the water
will be used is irrigation.
6. The land on which the water is to
be used is described as follows: Lot 9,
Group One, Lillooet District.
7. The quantity of water applied for
is as follows: One hundred miners'
inches.
8. This notice was posted on the
ground on the 24th day of December,
1913.
9. A copy of this notice and an application pursuant thereto and to the requirements of the "Water Act" will be
filed in the office of the Water Recorder
at Clinton. Objections may be filed
with the said Water Recorder, or with
the Comptroller of Water Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B. C.
Western Canadian Ranching Co.,
Applicant.
j9 By F. J. Fulton, Agent.
Water Notice
Application for a Licence to take and
use Water will be made under the
"Water Act" of British Columbia,
as follows:—
1. The name of the applicant is Francis
Gott.
2. The address of the applicant is
Lillooet, B. C.
3. The name of the stream is an unnamed stream. The stream has its
source about 150 yards North of the
Northern boundary of P. R. No. 1758,
flows in a Southerly direction, and sinks
on P. R. 1758, near Western boundary
of said pre-emption.
4. The water is to be diverted from
the stream on the South side, about
150 yards from the Northern boundary
of P. R. No. 1758.
5. The purpose for which the water
will be used is irrigation.
6. The land on which the water is to
be used is described as follows: Preemption No. 1758.
7. The quantity of water applied for
is as follows: Thirty miners' inches.
8. This notice was posted on the
ground on the 25th day of November,
1913.
9. A copy of this notice and an application pursuant thereto and to the requirements of the "Water Act" will be
filed in the office of the Water Recorder
at Clinton. Objections may be filed
with the said Water Recorder or with
the comptroller of Water Rights, Par-
liam nt Buildings, Victoria, B. C.
FRANCIS GOTT,
d28 Applicant.
LOST.
ABOUT SEPTEMBER FIFTEENTH
from the 132-Mile House, Cariboo road,
two bay geldings and one sorrel gelding
branded E on left shoulder. Thirty
dollars will be paid to the person deliv-
ing these horses at any of the company's
stations on the road.
IMPERIAL EXPRESS CO.,
j9 Ashcroft B. C.
Agents wanted to sell fruit,
shade and ornamental trees and
small fruit plants. Apply Royal
Nurseries Ltd., 710 Dominion
Bldg., Vancouver, British Columbia.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.proslill.1-0212402/manifest

Comment

Related Items