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The Prospector Jan 16, 1914

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 THE PROSPECTOR
V< ^L. 3, NO. 13
LILLOOET,   B. C, FRIDAY,  JANUARY 16, 1914.
[    $2 PER YEAR
FATAL ACCIDENT.
ITEMS ABOUT TOWN.
Through the collapse of a trap-
tunnel on theP.G.E. construction
line, two miles east of this town,
John Hiltmen, a young Finlander,
met his death on Friday Jast.   In
partnership with several others,
Hiltmen had a sub-contract, and
was engaged in drifting a tunnel
through the loose gravel on the
opposite side of the river.   With
a companion he had just entered
the excavation when one of the
roof-caps broke, filling the tunnel
with debris, and smothering him.
His companion had a most miraculous escape from death, the
falling material having submerged him to the shoulders^ and it
was only by the most strenuous
exertion that he kept his head
free.   He was virtually encased
in the fallen timber, sand and
gravel.   With a will his companions went to  the rescue,   but,
despite their exertions, an hour
elapsed before the lifeless body
of Hiltmen was reached. Coroner
Phair held an inquest over the remains, a  verdict of  accidental
death being found.  Hiltmen was
but ^6 years of age,  and is said
to have been a steady and efficient
man in his line of work.
He was buried in the Lillooet
cemetery on Saturday last, at 3
p. m., a large number of railroad
men attending the funeral.
GAMBLING AND ITS RESULTS
ON THE LYTTON ROAD.
When a man goes into a poker
game with money JA his pocket
and when he comes out with no
money in his pocket, he has but
one man to blame, and, as a general thing, he does not hesitate
to recognize who that person is.
It is a fact beyond any pread-
venture that no man can "beat
the game" in the end. Men may
have phenomenal runs of luck, or
they may "break even," but the
associations of the gaming table
are such that there can be no
possible question as to what the
ultimate result will be. There
is just one way in which a man
can beat a gambling proposition,
and that is by quitting. Incidentally it is better to quit ahead of
the particular game at issue, and
therein lies the principal danger.
This is reasoning on the cold,
business side of the question, the
mere sordid matter of dollars and
cents, leaving aside for the moment the more weighty considerations of morality.
The local House held its opening session yesterday.
J. B. Bryson, of Pavilion, was
in Lillooet this week.
Mr. A. McQueen made a business trip to Ashcroft this week.
Mr. R. A. Nicholson, contractor, arrived in town on Wednesday.
Mr. W. Mclntyre left on Monday for Merritt, where has been
called on business affairs.
Pretty quiet in police court
business this week—just a few
plain drunks.
Fine timbers are being turned
out of the Fountain mill for the
preliminary work on the railway
bridge, just below town.
Mr. Kellet arrived in Lillooet
today from Vancouver. He is
looking after Mr. Rankin's work
during the latter's absence.
Mr. Rankin is starting a new
camp directly across the river
from Lillooet. This will be called
Camp 8.
Mr. H. J. Keary left for the
coast Sunday morning, on a short
trip. Accompanying him is his
daughter, who will enter one of
the educational institutions.
Chief Constable Forsyth came
over from* Clinton on Monday
last. Official business caused him
to extend his trip as far as Gun
creek, on Bridge river. He left
town yesterday morning.
J. K. More, the road superintendent for this district, drove
in from Clinton a few days ago,
via Pavilion mountain. He reported good sleighing as far as
the 17-Mile House.
ONLY A CAYUSE.
A STAY OF EXECUTION.
Davis and Clark, who were
sentenced by Mr. Justice Morrison to be hanged at New Westminster on 15th inst., have been
granted a stay of execution till
March 6. The grounds upon
which attorneys for Clark and
Davis sought the reprieve is that
the court of appeal has reserved
their decision in the appeal from
their conviction. There are one
or two points upon which the
court had disagreed and these
may not be decided before the
day of execution. Recently the
necessary preparations for the
double hanging had begun at the
provincial jail at New Westminster.       	
Word was received in town today, that P. Welch had almost
entirely recovered from his recent illness.
Travelers from the Pemberton
country state that there is but
four inches of snow in that region
and that railroad work is progressing in a very satisfactory
manner.
Dr. Kilburger, eyesight soecial-
ist, representing the Toric Optical
Co., of Vancouver, will te at the
Excelsior Hotel on Monday and
Tuesday, Jan. 19th and 20th.
See notice on 4th page.
Some miscreant broke into the
premises of Thos. Craddock, at
the head of Anderson lake, and
stole tools, blankets and other
goods to the value of about $50.
Constable McLeod has the case
in hand.
John Hill, the stationman who
was in the trap-tunnel with John
Hiltmen when the latter was
killed last Friday, was only res-
cused after 30 minutes of the
most heroic work on the part of
his friends. He happened to be
under a big timber at the end of
the tunnel.
For the first time in her life
Mrs. Mark Eagleson has been
seriously ill, with grippe. At
her request, no report was made
of her indisposition. The people
of Lillooet are now pleased to
learn that she has almost entirely
recovered.
The local member for this district, Mr. A. McDonald, arrived
from Clinton last Saturday. He
was busy with some of his constituents listening to various complaints, notably the North Fork
road grievance. He proceeded
to Victoria this week to attend
the opening session of the House.
The unusually mild weather is
stirring up the ranchers along
the road, making them think of
spring. We noticed the plow in
action on the Rosebank farm. It
is to be hoped the fruit buds will
not be unseasonably advanced, as
they would be liable to injury
should we have a cold snap.
Speaking of fruit reminds us
that there are some very fine
orchards on the road. At the
Grange there is a fine large bearing orchard of choice varieties
that bring the owners handsome
returns every year. At the 20-
Mile Mr. W. Kane has also an
extensive orchard which he is
yearly increasing. The Half-Way
and 24-Mile ranches have not
gone in much for tree-planting.
At the Rosebank there is also a
large planting—mostly apples.
In reading the news of the
province one notes with satisfaction what the government is
doing to foster the fruit business
—in other parts. Here, in Lillooet,
we have a climate and soil unsurpassed for growing all kinds of
semi-tropical fruit. Wherever
our fruit has been shown in competition with that from other districts Lillooet—as far as quality
goes—has always been in the
front But, in putting up fruit,
either for sale or exhibition, the
packing counts for nearly as much
as the quality of the article, and
we can never hope to get our
own till we can put our apples
up in an attractive form. For
several years past the provincial
government has been holding
packing schools in the different
fruit-growing districts of the province. The government supplies
the instructors and bears the expense, a nominal fee being charged so as to keep out all who are
not really interested. Now, why
is it that our district is so systematically neglected? How is it
that in other districts the government is loaning them money,
establishing demonstration farms
to educate them in the most scientific and up-to-date methods
of caring for their orchards,
teaching them how to keep their
trees clean and healthy, and that
our district has never even had
an official visit from a member
of the Horticultural Board? It
seems to us that the gentlemen
who represent us at Victoria do
not realize what our district
needs. The member for Lillooet
seems to think his duty is ended
if he can get a good appropriation
for roads. After the railway is
built what good will the roads be
if the farmers have nothing to
haul. The member for Yale has
been making a spectacular trip
half way round the hemisphere,
trying to get easy money for
lower country ranchers. If he
would busy himself in doing
something that would draw attention to the district he represents he would be more appreciated by the people who elected
him.
Rev. W. H. Mayers will hold
services in the English church,
Lillooet, on Sunday next. Holy
communion at 8 a. m.; morning
service at 11; evening service at
7:30 o'clock.
The ordinary Indian cayuse is
not much of a plug to look at,
but, for his weight, he can out-
pull some better-looking animals
driven by the white man.   Some
heavy loads of square timber have
been passing through town during the past week,  hauled by
Indians from the Fountain reserve, and their cayuses seem to
accomplish the work in a most
satisfactory  manner.      Besides
being a good worker, the little
cayuse is a grateful, and, in a
measure, an accomplished plug.
If you do not believe this, watch
him at his noon meal while hitched to a wagon.   In his case there
is often an absence of the customary nosebag full of grain-an
armful of hay is thrown him.
Upon receipt of this he will wag
both ears with gratitude, varying
the performance by wagging one
ear and not wagging the other
one.   Give him a second dose of
hay and you will see him bend
his foreleg, and wag his tail and
both ears in unison.   In these
performance? he very much resembles  the  Mexican burro—a
descendant of that much-maligned animal that is said to have
passed   through   the  gates   of
old  Jerusalem with our Saviour
on   his   back.    But   that  was
some  time  before the Lillooet
cayuse came into existence.
Gassie Thompson, the present
mayor of Anderson lake, was a
business visitor in town this
week.
WILL COME TO LILLOOET.
Benjamin Siakeley, the man
accused of the killing of Archy
Thievarge, in the Bridge river
country some years ago, will very
likely appear in Lillooet, shortly,
to stand a preliminary trial for
that crime. Being arrested at
Libby, Montana, last November,
he has put up a stubborn fight
against extradition, but word
now comes that U. S. courts will
hand him over to the Canadian
authorities.
On the 10th of this month the
thermometer registered 45, and
Mr. Wm. Adams, thinking spring
had arrived, grabbed a spade and
started in to dig up his garden.
Good weather still prevails, and,
as a consequence, the Adams garden is ready for seeding.
In spite of lower prices which
prevailed for metals during the
year just closed, the aggregate
value of ore produced by metal-
iferous mines of Kootenay and
Boundary amounted to over $14,-
000,000. 	
If you are bothered with headaches, squint or cross-eye, or the
glasses you now wear are unsatisfactory, consult Dr. Kilburger,
specialist, who will be at the Excelsior Hotel on the 19th and 20th
inst.
After being shut down for ten
years the Nickle-Plate mine in
Rossland is to be opened up, and
$100,000 has been set aside for
exploratory work on the property.
Mr. Mackay, asst.-supt. for P.
Welch, was called home last week
on account of the sickness of his
wife. He lives at Sumas, Wash.
All kinds of fresh fruit at the
Dupras candy and lemonade parlor. Likewise, the very finest
brands of cigars by the box. THE PROSPECTOR
THE  PROSPECTOR.
Published in the interests of Lillooet District.
R. A. Hume, Manager.
JANUARY 16. 1914.
FOREST FIRE PROTECTION.
It must be apparent to all that
by far the most important problem with which the forest branch
of the provincial government is
concerned, is that of fire protection.   The damage caused by fire
in years gone by, even in the district of Lillooet, has been tremendous; the  results are   still
with   us,   and  the  fire-burned
areas   with  their  charred  and
blackened stubs, present a scene
of ruin and desolation where once
all was bright and prosperous.
In  referring to this subject, a
brief resume of the work performed in Lillooet district, by the
forestry branch, in the interests
of protecting our forests of timber
from fire and, incidentally, protecting other sources of wealth
so intimately connected with the
forestry department, might be of
interest to those who have the future of this district at heart.   In
1913the forest branch dealt with26
fires which are worth mentioning,
and may be classified as follows:
Fires less than 1-4 acre 9
"   less than 10  acres 15
"   more than 10 acres  2
26
There were numerous small
fires extinguished by the wardens
of which no report has been made.
Causes given for tlie above fires
are:
Unknown    3
Campers  13
Railway  construction    3
Fires started before season    2
Smokers      4
Indians      1
The total burned area is within
480 acres, destroying about 35,-
000 feet of merchantable timber,
a great amount of second-growth,
some fencing, and a small area
of feed range. The weather conditions, however, during the time
usually dangerous for fire, were
fairly wet and cold; which, together with the thorough system
of patrol kept up by the fire
wardens, were undoubtedly responsible for keeping the record
so low. Besides, the favorable
attitude of the general public toward fire protection has been a
great help; the Indians, too, are
learning that carelessness with
fire must stop, and have been
more careful than in former
years.
The preservation of the forests
of this province will undoubtedly
receive more attention than in
the past. During the year just
closed, the greatest forest revenue ever paid into any provincial treasury in the history of the
Dominion has been received by
British Columbia. The revenue
from forest sources was nearly
$3,000,000, and the value of forest products exceeded that of all
previous years, amounting to ap-
proximately $30,000,000.
Of late years British Columbia
Indians have been very successful in real estate transfers. The
Metlakatlah's w«re the first to
make a successful deal with the
Grand Trunk Pacific, a few years
ago, then followed the Songhees
deal with the city of Victoria for
a very large sum. Kitsilano Indians in the city of Vancouver
got the money fever and sold out
their rancherie for about $12,000
each, and now the Squamish
natives in North Vancouver have
just received $175,000 from the
Pacific Great Eastern Development Company. As a consequence
rancheries along this end of the
P.G.E. line are becoming very
valuable in the estimation of
their various occupants, and in
some cases the white settler is
known to base his approximate
wealth in proportion to the distance between his pre-emption
and the nearest Indian reserve.
In former days this system of
computation would not work out
so advantageously to the land
owner—it would be of the reverse
order. But times have changed,
and in real estate transactions
the red man sits on the high
pinnacle of finance once occupied
by the white.
The total mineral production of
the province for the calendar
year 1913 will be slightly less
than $30,000,000, according to
estimates recently prepared by
the Department of Mines. There
has been a marked increase in
the output of the Kootenay district, and many mines have resumed work after a long period
of idleness. In the Similkameen
district the Hedley Gold Mining
company paid dividends for the
year 1913 of 30 per cent., for
1912 30 per cent., 1911 25 per
cent, and 11 per cent, in 1910,
the year in which the present
company took over the mine, a
total of 96 per cent, in four years
and have a handsome surplus in
the treasury besides which the
company's original properties
have been greatly added to by
purchase of other claims out of
the profits.
In Lillooet district, in spite of
her rugged mountains, there are
many acres of virgin land that
can be used for agriculture and
for the cultivation of her greatest asset—fruit. Speaking locally, we have a district which is
situated in such a position as to
include land in both the dry and
wet belts. We need people to
settle on these areas, but first we
need the assistance of the capitalist in putting this land in shape
for settlement, by irrigational
projects, clearing or draining,
after which the settler can convert the land into truck gardens,
fruit farms or ranches, which, in
consequence, must mean villages
and towns. Capital could be invested to no Defter advantage
than in developing these resources. With transportation facilities now almost at our doors, we
shall be able to contribute largely
to the ever-increasing demands
for agricultural and horticultural
products on the coast.
^W^WWWWW^^^WA^^^Wi^W
Since the establishment of the
public school system in 1872, the
school year ending June 30, 1913,
was probably the most successful
year in the history of education
in th4s province. The total enrolment of all the colleges and
schools was 57,608, an increase
of 7,538 over that of the previous
year.
HOUSC
PP.
HOeBERLlN
LIMITED
BROPHY BROS.
Gents'
Furnishings.
Boots & Shoes.
TO 1   ShoeRepairing
Agents for House of Hobberlin
•A^^^^*^^*^^*^^*^^*^**^**^^^^^*^^*^^AAA**»
BANK OF BRITISH NORTH AMERICA
Established 1836
Head Office,   -   •   Montreal
Savings  Department
Accounts opened  for  sums of One Dollar and  upward.
Current Accounts
Issue cheques an 1 have paid cheques returned for receipts
  •
Collections made in all parts of the World
Travelers' Cheques issued, payable anywhere
A General Banking Business conducted
A. B. GREIG,   Manager      -    -     Lillooet Branch
Water Notice
For a Licence to Stcre or Pen
Back Water.
NOTICE is hereby given that Western Canadian Ranching Co., of Gang
Ranch, will apply for a licence to store
or pen back sixteen hundred acre-feet
of water from Gaspard Creek, a stream
flowing in an Easterly direction and
emptying into Fraser River. The water
will be stored in a reservoir of 1000 acre
feet capacity, built about 20 miles from
mouth of said creek, will be used for
irrigation purposes as authorized by
Water Record No. 171, on the land
described as Township Ten (10), Lillooet
District. %.i
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 15th day of December, 1913. The
application will be filed in the office of
the Water Recorder at Clinton. %£
Objections may be filed with the said
Water Recorder or with the Comptroller of Water Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B. C.
Western Canadian Ranching Co.
Applicant.
By F. J. Fulton, Agent. d26
Water Notice
—♦—
Application for a License to take and
use water, will be made under the
Water Act of British Columbia, as
follows:
1. The name of the applicant is Francis
Gott.
2. The address of the applicant is
Lillooet, B. C.
3. The name of the stream is Black
Hill Creek. The Stream has its source
near the mouth of Michelle creek, flows
in an Easterly direction, and empties
into the Fraser River about 10 miles
above the mouth of Bridge River.
4. The water is to be diverted from
the stream on the South side, about one
mile North of the Northern boundary
of Pre-emption No. 1758.
5. The purpose for which the water
will be used is irrigation.
6. The land on which the water is to
be used is described as follows:—P. R.
1758.
7. The quantity of water applied for
is as follows:— One hundred miners'
inches.
8. This notice was posted on the
ground on the 25th day of November,
1913.
9. A copy of this notice and an application pursuant thereto and to the requirements of the "Water Act" will be
filed in the office of the Water Recorder
at Clinton. Objections may be filed
with the said Water Recorder, or with
the Comptroller of Water Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B. C.
FRANCIS GOTT,
d26 Applicant.
Water Notice
Applicationgfor a Licence to take and
use Water will be made under the
"Water Act" of British Columbia,
as follows:—
1. The name of the applicant is Francis
Gott.
2. The address of the applicant is
Lillooet, B. C.
3. The name of the stream is an unnamed stream. The stream has its
source about 150 yards North of the
Northern boundary of P. R. No. 1758,
flows in a Southerly direction, and sinks
on P. R. 1758, near Western boundary
of said pre-emption.
4. The water is to be diverted from
the stream on the South side, about
150 yards from the Northern boundary
of P. R. No. 1758.
5. The purpose for which the water
will be used is irrigation.
6. The land on which the water is to
be used is described as follows: Preemption No. 1758.
7. The quantity of water applied for
is as follows: Thirty miners' inches.
8. This notice was posted on the
ground on the 25th day of November,
1913.
9. A copy of this notice and an application pursuant thereto and to the requirements of the "Water Act" will be
filed in the office of the Water Recorder
at Clinton. Objections may be filed
with the said Water Recorder or with
the Comptroller of Water Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B. C.
FRANCIS GOTT,
d26 Applicant.
WATER ACT.
Notice  of Filing of Petition for
Approval of Undertaking.
NOTICE is hereby given, pursuant to
Sections 75, 89 ar.d 90 of the Water Act,
that the Nairn Falls Power Company,
Limited, has filed with the Comptroller
of Water Rights petition for the approval of the Honorable the Minister of
Lands, of the undertaking of the said
Company for the utilization of water
from Green River, Lillooet District,
under Grant of Water Right for power
purposes numbered 123.
A copy of said petition and the plans
and exhibits for the approval of the
undertaking as required by Section 89,
is on file in the office ot the Water
Recorder at Vancouver, at New Westminster, and at Clinton.
Dated at Vancouver, B.C., this 27th
day of November, 1913.
The Nairn Falls Power Co., Ltd.
d5 A. McEvoy, Secretary. THE PROSPECTOR
HOTEL VICTORIA.
II II III! ■■!! ■ ■ I !■ !■ 11 MMmmmmmwmM.■——^1^———————^— 1^I
Fifty-five well-furnished rooms. Hot and cold baths
Excellent table. First class bar. Large sample room
HEADQUARTERS FOR TOURISTS, MINERS and COMMERCIAL MEN
Two autos on request from Lytton or Ashcroft
Headquarters for Lytton-Lillooet stage line. Stage
meets Seton Lake boat. Rigs furnished on demand.
RATES: $1.50 per day and up. By month $35 and up. Meals, 21 for $9.00
Lillooet, B. C.
EXCELSIOR HOTEL
W.   J.   Abercrombie,   Proprietor
A First-Class Table.
WINES, LIQUORS, AND THE BEST OF CIGARS
STEAMER   BRITANNIA
R
EGULAR Trips up Seton Lake every
Day.
Convenient for all passengers to Mission,
Bridge River, Short Portage, Anderson Lake,
McGillvray Creek and the Pemberton country
Leaves, 8.00 a. m.    Arrives at Mission, 10 a. m.     Arrives
Short Portage, 11 o'clock
Returning Leaves Short Portage, 12 p. m.     Leaves Mission
12:45 p. m.    Arrives, 3:00 p. m.
LEST YOU FORGET
Lillooet to Lytton
IN EASE AND COMFORT
by AUTO STAGE.
Experienced Driver.
Reasonable Charges.
Apply WALTER C. KEEBLE, ■ LYTTON, B. C.
Water Notice
For a Licence to Store or t*en
Back Water.
J.M. Mackinnon, BROKER, Vancouver, B.C
Suite 5 Williams Bldg. 413 Granville St.
Lillooet Ranches and Fruit Lands a Specialty.    Correspondence Solicited.
Timber Lands,  Ranch Lands.
Coast Lands and Real Estate.
NOTICE is hereby given that Western
Canadian Ranching Co., of Gang Ranch,
will apply for a licence to store or pen
back six hundred acre-feet of water
from Gaspard Creek, a stream flowing
in an Easterly direction and emptying
into Fraser River. The water will be
stored in a reservoir of 600 acre-feet
capacity, to be built about 40 chains
East of Lot 57, G. I, Lillooet District,
on Little Gaspard Creek, and will be
used for irrigation purposes as authorized by Water Record No. 147, on the
land described as Sec. 123, East 1-2 4,
East 1-2 9, 10, 11, 12, Southerly 363
acres of 13, Southerly 317 acres of 14,
West 1-2 of 15, all in Township Ten (10)
Lillooet District.
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 15th day of December, 1913.
The application will be filed in the
office of the Water Recorder at Clinton,
B.C.
Objections may be filed with the said
Water Recorder, or with the Comptroller of Water Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B. C.
Western Canadian Ranching Co.
Applicant.
By F. J. Fulton, Agent.      d26
P. GARIGAN
General
Merchandise
Miners'
Supplies
Etc., Etc., Etc.
Pavilion, - B. C.
Drainage, Dyking and Irrigation
Act, 1913.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN IN
accordance with Section 9 of the above-
mentioned Act, that one month after
date hereof a petition signed by a majority in value of the owners of the
lands described therein will be presented to the Lieutenant-Governor in Council for the constitution of the said lands
as a Dyking and Drainage District
under the said Act, and for the appointment of Robert Kerr Houlgate, Joseph
W. MacFarland and Stanley Burke, all
of Vancouver, B. C, as Commissioners
for the carrying out of the works mentioned in said Petition.
Dated this 16th day of December, A.
D. 1913.
Bowser, Reid & Wallbridge,
Solicitors for the said
proposed Commissioners.
Headquarters for Mining Men
Free Bus Meets All
Boats and Trains
Commercial Hotel
L. H. Clement, Prop
Guest Comfort is My Motto
Corner Hastings and
Cambie Streets
Vancouver, B. C.
American and European Plan
GRASSIE
Pioneer Watchmaker
and Jeweler
318 Cambie St.      Vancouver, B.C.
Orders by Mail Attended to.
Fine Watch Repairing a Specialty
Lillooet Auto Car Co.
J. H. Kriege. C. B. Clear
Expert Machinists
and Fitters.
Being equipped with all facilities
for the prompt repair of automobiles, bicycles, etc., we are now
in a position to execute the most
intricate orders. No job too
small or too large to receive our
prompt attention.
WO HING
GENERAL
MERCHANT
• NEW STOCK OF
FALL GOODS!
FIRST-CLASS QUALITY.
REASONABLE   PRICES.
Groceries,
Hardware,
Slothing,
Footwear,
Dry Goods,
Camp Supplies,
Fancy Goods,
Notions.
Lillooet, B. C.
G.   M. DOWNTON
LILLOOET, B. C.
B. C. Land Surveyor j
Surveys handled in all
parts of the J ,illooet Dis- }{]
trict.      Mineral Claim uj
uj   Surveying a specialty. Rj
0l5HH5H5E5ESH5H5H5H5HS5Sj!]
Saddle Horses
Pack Horses,
Single and Double Rigs
for Hire.
LIGHT OR HEAVY
FREIGHTING.
James T. Farmer.
CONTRACTOR & BUILDER
LILLOOET,   B. C.
Hunting Parties Furnished.
STEPHEN & J. RETASKET.
FEED STABLE
Horses and Rigs for Hire
Light and Heavy Draying
Express Delivery
EMMET DARCV, Prop.
Bus Meets all Regular Boats
at Seaton Lake THE PROSPECTOR
JOTTINGS AROUND CLINTON
THE CLINTON BALL.
From our Regular Correspondent.
It has been more than once remarked that action of some sort
will shortly have to be taken with
the town's domestic water supply for the coming spring and
summer.     Clinton's   supply of
water for irrigation and domestic
purposes is taken from two open
creeks.   At present these creeks
contain   perfectly   pure   water,
there being   nothing to poison
them;   but,   when   construction
camps commence their operations
in the spring, Clinton will be at
their mercy as far as pure water
is concerned.   Besides the ordinary interference with the creeks
as a result of the building of the
line, who is to prevent them from
being turned into more or less
garbage dumps and public baths?
It is most assuredly within the
bounds of possibility that a certain amount   of refuse from ai
construction camp will find its j
way into the creek; and it is also
highly probable that some of the I
men will find it a very convenient
place   to  wash  themselves   in.
This appears to be a matter that
deserves the attention of citizens
of this town. In fact, it is stated
that one of the P.G.E. engineers,
when in conversation over the
right-of-way    through   Clinton,
mentioned the   fact   that construction    would    not   tend to
freshen the drinking water; only,
he put the matter slightly more
pointedly.
For the first time this winter
the thermometer has touched the
zero point, going a few points
below last week. Up to now the
weather has been extremely mild
and altogether unlike the usual
winters in this part of the province. Even the oldest of old-
timers cannot recall its equal
during the last fifty years. All
hope of a cold snap had been
practically given up; some even
went so far as to remark that the
earth had shifted on its axis, or
that we were steadily approaching nearer the sun, and other
equally remarkable explanations
of the phenomenon. Nevertheless
a cold snap of a kind is here, and
a little more snow having fallen,
the sleighing is good.
School commenced on Monday,
with Mr. C. Elliott in charge.
Mr. Elliott, who was recently
teaching at Port Essington, is an
Ontario man of wide school experience; besides receiving knowledge from the teacher, some of
the boys have received a few
"gentle taps" as a reminder that
Christmas merrymaking is over
for the present and something
more serious on foot.
Miss Cole and Mr. F. Beecher
were recent passengers for the
coast. It is understood that Miss
Cole and Mr. Beecher are shortly
to be married, and, after a short
trip to the Sound cities, will return to Chilcoten to take up their
residence.
Among the visitors in this week
for the ball, are Miss "Tottie"
and Jim Boyd from the 70-Mile
House; Miss Pearl Whitley and
Messrs. Ray Thompson, Phillip
Brennan and R. Price from the
North Bonaparte; Mr. and Mrs.
Eddie Dougherty, C. Dougherty,
and Mr. English, also from the
Bonaparte, besides many others.
All sorts and conditions of
cookings have been going on in
Clinton's cook-stoves for the past
few days. Pies, cakes, sandwiches, etc., have been the order
of the day. It takes a good deal
to sustain the merry dancers at
the annual ball for two days.
James Stewart, of Chilcoten,
has been a visitor in Clinton for
the last few days.
The Thirty-Seventh Annual
Clinton Ball was rolled away for
this year. This ball has always
been the most popular event in
Clinton's year, and it also deserves to be popular—this last
one in particular. A great many
preparations were made, fine
suppers provided, and all that
was possible for a success was
done; the committee, which was
'a large one, worked hard and
well. At 9 o'clock Thurseay
night the ball commenced to roll
in the shape of a "Grand March"
—thirty-nine couples in dazzling
array, all sorts and conditions of
costumes. Then commenced the
hard task of judging the best and
prettiest amongst the ladies and
the handsomest among the men,
for they all appeared to be pretty
and handsome. Mrs. LeBourdais
judged the ladies and Jack Clea-
ton the gentlemen. Both judges
were commended for their decisions, which were certainly hard
to arrive at. The lucky ones were
as follows:—Ladies, 1st prize for
best dressed lady, Miss "Tottie"
Boyd, as "Fairy Queen." Second
—Most original, Miss Daisy Bell
as "Old Dutch Cleaner." Third
—Best sustained character, Mrs.
G. Haller, as "Squaw." In the
gentlemen's contest Archie Mc-
Dougall, as "Indian Chief," carried off the first prize. Cline
Dexter, as "Mephistophoeles,"
took second, and Tom Patten took
third for the most original char-
ter-a "Boby."
An order-in-council has just
been passed amending the regulations governing the granting of
licences and permits to cut timber
on Dominion lands in certain
parts of this province. The amendment provides for the withdrawals from timber berths held
under the licences of land required for waterpowerpurposes. The
condition of such withdrawal is
that the lease of the waterpower
will pay the licences of the berth
the value of all timber of ten inches and over in diameter at the
stump. The Minister of the Interior will fix the value of the
timber in case of dispute. The
new regulation is said to be in
accordance with the government's new waterpower policy.
Agents wanted to sell fruit,
shade and ornamental trees and
small fruit plants. Apply Royal
Nurseries Ltd., 710 Dominion
Bldg., Vancouver, British Columbia.
SCHOOL   MEETING.
A public meeting was held at
the 21-Mile House, Pavilion, on
9th inst., for the purpose of
starting a public school in
that vicinity. Mr. C. A. Shaw
was appointed temporary secretary to take the minutes of the
meeting, and Mr. McAlpine occupied the chair. It being made
clear that there is more than a
sufficient number of children near
Pavilion to justify the establishment of a district school, it was
decided to apply to the educational department for the necessary school articles. Mr. J. B.
Tiffin received a vote of thanks
for his generous offer of a plot of
ground for the above purpose.
There died at Chilliwack, last
week, the first white woman on
the Douglas-Lillooet trail—Mrs.
Jane Macdonald, aged 80 years.
She was the wife of the late W.
R. Macdonald, and with him kept
a road-house a short distance out
of Fort Douglas in 1860. The
couple came to British Columbia
in 1859. Two sons and two
daughters survive. These are
Boswell, of the Canadian Customs
department, Chicago; Alfred, of
Chilliwack, and Mrs. Footer, of
Strathcona.	
North of Newport 15 miles of
steel have been laid, and a great
deal of grading is finished between that port and Lillooet. On
the 170 miles now under contract
5000 men are engaged, and it is
said by those who are in a position to know that trains will be
operated between Vancouver and
this town in less than six months
from this date.
OF CANADA
Bank by Mail and
Save Long Drives
Mail us the cheques or cash
you receive, with your Pass-book,
which we will return with the
Deposit credited. Then you can
pay your bills by cheques, which
we will honor, or if you want the
cash yourself, send us a cheque in
your own favor and we will
forward the money by return mail.
Drop in and talk to the Manager
about it.
LILLOOET BRANCH.
A. P. HUGHES, -        MANAGER.
DR. KILBURGER,
Eyesight
SPECIALIST,
REPRESENTING-
TheToricOpticalCo.
Eye Examiners and Makers of Quality Glasses, 131 Hastings
Street, West, Vancouver, B. C, will be in Lillooet MONDAY
and TUESDAY, January 19th and 20th, and will be pleased to
have persons with defective eyesight call and consult him.
Eyeglasses, Spectacles and Artificial Eyes fitted at a reasonable
charge.    Satisfaction guaranteed absolutely on all work done.
AT THE EXCELSIOR HOTEL.   HOURS-9 a. m. to 6 p. m.
Water Notice.
, Application   for a Licence to take and*
use Water  will  be made under the
"Water Act" of British Columbia,
as follows:
1. The   name   of   the   applicant   is
j Western Canadian Ranching Company.
2. The address of the applicant is
Gang Ranch, B. C.
3. The stream is unnamed, has its
source in the hills, and flows in a southerly direction, and empties into Kelly
Lake.
The water is to be diverted from the
stream on the N. E. side of Lot 9, G. I,
Lillooet.
5. The purpose for which the water
will be used is irrigation.
6. The land on which the water is to
be used is described as follows: Lot 9,
Group One, Lillooet District.
7. The quantity of water applied for
is as follows: One hundred miners'
inches.
8. This notice was posted on the
ground on the 24th day of December,
1913.
9. A copy of this notice and an application pursuant thereto and to the requirements of the "Water Act" will be
tiled in ihe office of the Water Recorder
at Clinton. Objections may be filed
with the said Water Recorder, or with
the Comptroller of Water Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B. C.
Western Canadian Ranching Co.,
Applicant.
j9 By F. J. Fulton, Agent.
WATER ACT.
Notice  of  Application  for the
Approval of Works.
TAKE  NOTICE that  the   Shuswap
I &   Lillooet  Fruitlands,    Limited,   will
J apply  to   the   Comptroller  of   Water
| Rights for the approval of the plans of
the works to be  constructed   for the
I utilization of the water from Fourteen
I Mile Creek, which  the  applicant is by
I Water Right No. 533 authorized to take,
j store, and  use  for irrigation purposes.
The plans and particulars required by
subsection   (1)   of   section   70 of  the
"Water  Act" as  amended have been
filed with the    Comptroller of Water
Rights at Victoria  and with the Water
Recorder at Clinton, B.    .
Objections to the application may be
filed with  the   Comptroller of Water
Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Dated at Notch Hill  this both day of
December, 1913.
The Shuswap & Lillooet
Fruitlands,  Limited.
Walter S. Mitchell,
Managing Director,
j9 Agent for the Applicant.
LOST.
ABOUT SEPTEMBER FIFTEENTH
from the 132-Mile House, Cariboo read,
two bay geldings and one sorrel gelding
branded E on left shoulder. Thirty
dollars will be paid to the person deliv-
ing these horses at any of tha company's
stations on the road,
. IMPERIAL EXPRESS CO.,
j9  Ashcroft B. C.
SAMUEL GIBBS
NOTARY public
Lands, Mines, Insurance and Collections
Mining business in all branches
a specialty.   Farms for
sale  or  lease.
Lillooet,   - British Columbia
NOTICE.
The Anderson Lake Miming and
Milling Company, Ltd., Head
Office. Lillooet, B. C.
THE ANNUAL General Meeting of
the shareholders of the Anderson Lake
Mining & Milling Co., Limited, will be
held in the head office of the Company
at Lillooet, B. C, on Monday evening,
the 26th day of January, 1914, at the
hour of 8 o'clock.
Dated January 5, 1914.
SAMUEL GIBBS, See.
in    (<
ACKERS & SHERWOOD,
LILLOOET, B. C.
BLACKSMITHS
HORSE-SHOEING
A SPECIALTY.
Heavy and Light Wagons
Repaired at Moderate Cost,
and all Work Guaranteed.

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