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Lillooet Prospector Jun 30, 1916

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 i
LILLOOET PROSPECTOR
VOL. fa NO. 35
LILLOOET,  B. C, FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 1916.
$2 PER YEAR
TRIED TO SHORTCHANGED EDITOR
Mr. J. P. McConnell, of Vancouver, editor of J.P's Weekly
and late editor of The Sun, was
in Lillooet this week and created
considerable excitement in this
peaceful town by having a restaurant keeper arrested and convicted on the charge of stealing
$4.25.
Mr. McConnell and his business
Eartner, Mr. W. H. Carswell,
ad been on a fishing trip in the
vicinity of D'Arcy, and being unable to get to Vancouver by the
P.G.E. railway, decided to come
to Lillooet and go home by way
of Lytton. They arrived in town
on Wednesday afternoon, weary,
footsore and without even the
price of a small glass of beer, being towed down Seton Lake by
Barney Rorenberg. Fortunately
they were well known here and
had no trouble getting money at
the bank to tide them over until
they got back to Vancouver. Mr.
Carswell gave the editor a $5 bill
and together they hied themselves to a nearby restaurant
kept by one Jack, a chinaman.
After partaking of spring chicken
and various other Lillooet delicacies, Mr. McConnell, whose bill
amounted to 75 cents, gave the
Chinaman the aforesaid $5, and
at the same time ordered a cup
of tea. Jack evidently decided
that he had an easy victim to deal
with, and when requested to return the change, tendered J. P.
two bits, claiming he had only received $1.00. The price of newspaper stock has gone up about
fifty per cent, and every little bit
helps during these hard times, so
the fiery editor immediately called
to his assistance Constable Bourne
and swore out a summons charging the resturant keeper with trying to flim-flam him or words to
that effect.
Jack appeared in court yes ter
day morning at 10 o'clock before
Stipendiary Magistrate Dunlop
and pleaded not guilty. After
hearing the evidence of Messrs.
McConnell, Carswell and Penny,
who was also in the restaurant at
the time the trouble arose, Mr. S.
Gibbs, who defended the accused,
decided to change the plea of not
guilty to one of guilty, and asked
for the leniency of the Court. The
magistrate sentenced the Chinaman to two months in jail and
also ordered him to return the
$4.25 change to its rightful owner. In default of this last request
Jack will have to spend another
couple of months at the expense
of the province.
Being well satisfied with his
day's work, and after asking the
boys to step up and have something, Mr. McConnell and Mr.
Carswell left for Lytton by automobile, taking with them about
80 fine trout, which they caught
rear D'Arcy.
IMPROVING TELEPHONE SYSTEM
The Bridge River telephone line
is being put in first-class condition and on a metallic system between here and the Mission to
prevent induction from the P. G,
E. line, which has caused considerable annoyance in the past.
Mr. C. H. Bruneau has charge
of the work, three men being
employed. It will require several months to complete the job. A
new phone has been installed at
the hatchery.
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S Local Items of Interest J
Mrs. Tony Viera. of Bridge
River, is visiting friends in town.
Fred Olsen has taken over the
restaurant next to D. Hurley's
store.
Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Hautier, of
Lytton, are registered at the
Excelsior hotel.
Sunday hours will be observed
at the Government telegraph office tomorrow.
Mr. H. Abel, of Kaslo, was a
visitor in town during the week
and registered at the Victoria
hotel.
Messrs. W. Terry and G. Cooper Draphle, of Vancouver, were
among the delayed passengers
on Monday's P.G.E. train. They
arrived in town on Wednesday
by boat from the head of Anderson Lake.
Mr. Alf. Smith, well known in
Lillooet, Ashcroft and district as
the driver of the old Ashcroft
mail stage, was in town U.st week
repairing the telephone lines, but
left for the prairies Saturday,
where he will engage in ranching south of Calgasy.
Rev. Father Rohr, who has
been visiting the Indian reserves
in this district during the past
month, left for Mission City on
Wednesday. It is rumored that
Father Rohr will leave shortly for
the front.
Preparations have been completed for the big two-days' celebration in Lillooet tomorrow and
Monday and a big crowd is expected. A number of the finest
race horses in the province are in
training here and there will be
some hot contests. The P. G. E.
railway will run a daylight excursion from Vancouver, leaving
Squamish at 1.00 p.m. on Saturday and arriving here at 7.00
o'clock in the evening. The
train will go through to Clinton,
and returning will leave here for
Squamish on Sunday morning at
10.18 a.m. Tickets are good up
the middle of next month.
PROGRAMME
DOMINION   DAY   uuu
LILLOOET, B. C, JULY 1st and 3rd, 1916
SATURDAY, JULY 1st e
Bridge River Stakes, half mile and repeat
(all horses to be bred in the district),   $50.00
Gents' Saddle Horse Race, half mile  10.00
Cowboy Race, half mile    10.00
Klootchmans' Race, half mile dash  10.00
Ladies' Race, half mile  10.00
Turning Stakes, Cowboy  15.00
Field Sports
Children's Races	
Indian Children's Races	
100 Yards Dash, open  10.00
200 Yards Dash      10.00
$20.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
7.00
$20.00
10.00
5.00
5.00
MONDAY, JULY 3rd
Pony Race, half mile dash  (141-2 hands
and under)    $15.00 $7.00
Lillooet Stakes, half mile and repeat (free-
for-all)      75.00 35.00
Indian Saddle Horse Race      10.00 5.00
Klootchman's Race, quarter-mile dash ....     10.00 5.00
Bucking Contest        20.00 Boots
Obstacle Race      10.00 5.00
Consolation Race, half mile      15.00 7.00
Field Sports
Three-legged Race    $3.00 $2.00
Sack Race      3.00 2.00
Klootchman's Foot Race      3.00 2.00
Chinese Race..      3.00 2.00
Married Men's Race      3.00 2.00
Old Men's Race (over 50)      3.00 2.00
Ladies'Race Box Soap 2.00
Egg and Spoon Race for Ladies Pr. Boots 2.00
Baseball Match      Brass Band Each Day Dance
GOD SAVE THE KING.
P. G. E. TRAIN
WILL BEJN TONIGHT
The citizens of Lillooet have
been without a train service since
last Friday. Monday's train was
held up by a slide on the P.G.E.
line about 70 miles from here,
and every effort is being made to
have the damage done repaired
as quickly as possible. The railway officials announce that they
will have a train right through
to Clinton tonight. All the railway companies operating in B.C.
have had more or less trouble
from slides and floods during the
past couple of weeks.
But our main kick is in regard
to the mail service. When we
had a mail three times a week from
Lytton everyone was satisfied,
but since the Thursday mail was
taken off the people have had to
put up with a great deal of annoyance, as the service given by
the P.G.E. Ry. Co. has been far
from satisfactory. A protest was
sent to the post-office authorities
some time ago, asking to have
the Thursday mail stage from
Lytton restored, but nothing was
done. As far as knowing what
is happening in the outside world
the people of Lillooet might as
well be out on the deep blue sea
on an ocean liner with the wireless apparatus out of commission.
The last Vancouvers newspapers
to arrive by mail were the issues
of Thursday, June 22nd.
ENTRANCE EXAMS.
Mr. A. Buchanan, teacher of
the Foster Bar school, is registered at the Victoria hotel. Mr.
Buchanan is conducting entrance
examinations for high school.
The three candidates who wrestled with the scholastic problems
presented by the provincial board
were Dorothy Kinder, Seton Lake;
Kitchener Bell, Lillooet, and Tom
Hambrook, Pavilion.
SCHOOLS CLOSE
All the schools in this locality
closed this week for the summer
holidays. Miss Wiegand, who
had charge of the school in Lillooet since Christmas, has decided not to come back after the
holidays, and a new teacher will
have to be found. Mr. Fournier,
of the Seton Lake school, will
again be in charge at the commencement of the fall term. Miss
Wiegand's pupils are enjoying a
picnic today.
COMMENCE DEVELOPMENT WORK
Mr. J. B. Perkins, who has
been in Lytton for the few days,
arrived in town last night and he
and his partner, Mr. A. Hautier,
are leaving at once for their mining property on Texas Creek. Mr.
Perkins went to Lytton to meet
one of the bondholders of the
property and arrangements were
made to commence development
work on a large scale. The provincial government is sending a
mining engineer to inspect the
mine and if found satisfactory a
good road will be built to Lillooet
this summer. Molybdenite metal
is in great demand all over the
world just now, and Messrs.
Perkins and Hautier are receiving
letters every day asking for information about their property. THE  LILLOOET  PROSPECTOR
The Lillooet Prospector
Published in the Interest of Lillooet District.
W. E. Morrison, Editor and Proprietor
JUNE 30. 1916.
THE WEATHER.
This is a subject so familiar that scarcely a day passes
without some comment on its
merits or demerits by all of
us. Weather is only one feature of climatic conditions
and we associate climate with
the most important things of
life. We associate climate
with crops, with industry
and with health, all of which
are subject to the influence
of weather. And, notwithstanding its importance to
our existence, it seems that
science has been slow in giving us anything practical.
But it is coming.
Within the last few months
"Fosters' Weekly Report"
held out a strong hope that
in a very short time it would
be possible to give a forecast
of the weather two weeks in
advance with as much certainty as a forecast for one
day can be given now. This
is surely great news, and of
greater importance to the
world than one can imagine
at first blush. A little
thought and the reader will
understand the great importance to every one, though
greater to some than to others, to know from day to day
the sort of weather he is going to have for two weeks in
advance. Should the Foster
prediction prove correct, and
we are almost sure it will,
then we shall forgive science
for being so long "under the
weather."
Climatology is an interesting but complicated study.
For a long time it has endeavoured to find a connecting link between the "Sun
Spots" and our weather, and
the search is still on.   It has,
however, enlightened us on
many things.   For instance:
Health resorts with a temperature from 50° to 70° improve
the delicate, who increase in
weight, increase  in  vigour
both in mind and body, and
become less liable to disease,
while  a  strong   individual
under the  same conditions
loses  strength  and  suffers
from various degrees of lassitude.   A corresponding intensity of cold acts in the reverse manner in each case.
It gives useful warning when
it tells us that cold with wind
and damp should be avoided
by the aged, the delicate, the
gouty and the rheumatic. A
resort with moderate heat is
the best for the aged and
those weakened by illness. In
warm moist air strength is
lost and intestinal troubles
occur.    As  the altitude is
raised circulation and respiration are quickened and this
gives an impetus to the growth and blood-forming organs
of children and young people
whose development is not
yet complete. The benefits
are said to continue "for a
considerable time after a return to lower ground.'' The
people of Lillooet do not half
realize what a blessing they
enjoy in such a healthy
climate.
Space prevents us from going much  further into the
question  of  health  as  influenced by weather, but we
shall note one feature which
may interest prohibition controversialists.    For a long
time it was the opinion of
many that the drunken habits of northern Europe were
due in a measure to the cold
climate.   While cold is partly the cause, it is not the sole
cause.   Climatology informs
us that the habit is intensified by moisture in the atmosphere.    The  conditions
most favourable   for   predisposing the  human taste
for strong drink are a combination   of   cold,    damp,
cloudy, murky weather. Such
a combination is common in
northern latitudes and thus
it is that countries like North
Russia, Scandinavia;   Great
Britain and Ireland are the
most drunken countries in
the world.   Here we see a
physiological cause which can
no more be argued away than
the physiological distinction
between the sexes, and until
temperance people recognize
this fact they can never have
anything approaching a sensible and satisfactory temperance system.    We may
return to this subject again.
•••<•••• «•«•«•«• ••«.••••• ••■
When yoii come  to Vancouver
Fash ion=Cr aft
VISIT THE
SHOP OF
AND SEE THE NEW STYLES IN
Spring and Summer Suits
Whether you buy or not, we
will be pleased to show you
THOS.  FOSTER & CO., LTD.
r?v 514 Granville Street
•••«•«•.••-••*•..•.••«••••.• •*•••.••••..**••.. •-••••»•
I
When in Vancouver
Stop  at
The Burrard Hotel
(One Block East of New C.P.Ri Depot)
American and European Plan
Under New Management
J. McGillivary,
Proprietor
v
Headquarters for Mining Men
On this date many years
ago the editor of The Prospector was born. Cigar
dealers and others will please
make a note of this.
Three-quarters of a million
horses have been purchased
for the Allies, principally in
the United States. It is expected that British buyers
will purchase 20,000 artillery
and transport horses of 1,200
lbs. and up this summer in
Canada.
SAMUEL GIBBS
NOTARY PUBLIC
Lands, Mines, Insurance and Collections
Mining business in all branches
a specialty.   Farms for
Bale or lease.
Lillooet,  - British Columbia
WANTED
Two or three years old cow, to come
fresh in a month or two. Apply at
Prospector Office.
WANTED
Commercial
Hotel——.
Chas. Mason, Mgr,
Quests Comfort
is    My   Motto
Corner Hastings and
Cambie Streets
Vancouver, B. C.
EUROPEAN PLAN
Castle Hotel
W. S. Dickson & Robt. F. Leighton
Proprietors
High-class in
Every Respect
Choicest Wines, Liquors
and Cigars
Granville Street
Opposite Orpheum Theatre
and Hotel Vancouver
Vancouver
>> .
About 20 acres,
cleared, with water.
Office.
cleared   or  easily
Apply Prospector
FOR SALE
. 1 Cook Stove, new, with all pipe necessary, $10: 1 Broadaxe, new, $3; 1 Adz,
new, $1.50; I Sledge and Wedge, $3: 1
Double-blade Axe, $1; 1 Crosscut Saw;
1 Rifle, $8; 1 Shot Gun, $8; 1 Auger, 1
Brace and Bit, 2 planes.   Apply at
Prospector Office.
WE WANT YOUR HIDE
1
SHIP YOUR HIDES
AND FURS TO
THE McMULLEN HIDE & FUR CO.
956-958-960 Powell St., Vancouver, B.C.
We pay Highest Prices and give Prompt Returns
Please mention the Prospector when patronizing the above firms THE  LILLOOET  PROSPECTOR
IMPRESSIONS OF A PROSPECTOR
To the Editor:
I have always had a hankering
to try my luck in the hills of Lillooet, but kept putting it off until
a letter from my prospecting
friend, Malcolm Munroe, decided
me. The trip out from the metropolis was anything uut a swift
one. The limited (to speed) left
Squamish at 1.30 p.m. and rushed into the main depot at Lillooet
at 10 p.m., not so bad considering the distance is somewhere
about 120 miles. It would have
been the height of folly to have
rushed along at a high rate of
speed. We'd have missed all
that grand and rugged scenery.
On June 5th we outfitted at the
city's department store, owned
and operated by Mr. Phair, who
gave us some valuable suggestions re ways and means of getting over the country en route of
our proposed trip. Mr. Phair,
having spent most of his life in
these parts and being fond of
hunting, knows the country like
a book. The following day we
hit the hills—some hills, believe
me, when you've got a pack on
your back. We took the right
bank of Cayoosh creek and crossed that stream at the now abandoned Ample works. This mine,
along with the Golden Cash two
and a half miles further up ~the
creek, has been idle since 1896. A
pot of money has been expended
in machinery, piping, tools, buildings, etc., and they are just as
they were left twenty years ago,
except for the had of time. Before coming to Deer Creek we
passed through an extensive flat,
The soil is rich, easy to clear and
there is enough of it to support
many families. Mr. Phair, of
Lillooet, I understand, owns a
pre-emption here, and tlie time is
not far distant when all the available land on these creeks will be
settled up. With a patch of bottom land to grow hay, etc., and
the hills as a range, there is no
reason why stock raising should
not become one of the mam industries of these parts.
Mr. Perkins passed our camp
at the head of Deer creek on the
way to his mining property at the
head of Cottonwood. He is one
of the lucky few who have found
molybdenite in large quantities.
His is an exceptionally rich proposition and will make him a
mint of money. He richly deserves it, for a harder working
man is not to be found in the
country, and although getting on
in years there are few young men
who can follow his trail day after
day over the mountains. His is
not the only rich proposition by
any means. There are hundreds
of claims, both placer and quartz,
staked along the creeks and on
the mountains awaiting only the
hand of man to develop them.
Capital and good trails are a
crying need in this part of the
province. It would be a good investment for the Government to
open trails and let capital and
those in search of land see what
lies in store for them. It would
bring business to the P.G.E. and
eventually revenue to the Government. When in operation the
mining population will afford an
excellent market for all farm products raised in the adjacent
valleys.
We had rather an exciting trip
down Cottonwood side of the divide. We built a sleigh and
chose a snow-slide for the descent. Everything went well at
the start, then she got away and
landed head-on in some,logs. We
got her clear, however, but on
coming to another steep pitch
away she went again with disastrous
results to some of the contents of the
grub sack, beans, etc., being scattered
all over the hill-side. After straightening things up once more, we finally got
to our camping ground without further
mishap.
This is the paradise of the sportsman.
Game of all kinds is plentiful and some
fine bear skins can be got at the head
of the creek. As fine a bunch of spruce
as I ever saw is located below the forks
and the land in the flats would grow fine
hay. If there was a trail up Cottonwood it would only be a matter of about
eight hours from Lillooet to the head of
the creek. Wild potatoes, celery and
all kinds of berries grow in abundance
on these hills during the summer months,
and the creeks are alive with trout.
That, combined with the fine climate,
make it an ideal spot for an outir.g.
We pulled up stakes at 3 a.m. on the
I6th inst. and after getting outside of a
feed of beans, bacon and bannocks,
loaded on our packs and muled our
weary way over the divide once more,
and by the time we reached Cayoosh
creek I was staggering like a hayseed
with a tide on. One needs good legs
and wind to negotiate these hills, particularly with a pack. On our return I
visited the old grist-mill that stands on
the Marshall estate and was built and
operated by that gentleman (now deceased). Looking over the books which
still lie on the desk is like reading the
history of the district. Some accounts
date back as far as 1876. It was also
used as a store in the early days and
supplied the miners and settlers with
provisions. Mr. Craig's hotel is located
near the mill. You don't pay for style
here, but for solid comfort and plenty
of clean, well cooked food.
Chas. Stewart.
WATER NOTICE
»»«..>.■»■■>■■»..»«.»*.>■.»■■«..«..•.■»».».
The Family
Herald
and
Weekly
Star and
Lillooet
Prospector
until Jan.
1st, 1917,
for
$1.00
WAR NEWS
No Excuse to be Without Reliable Up-to-Date News
From Battle Front.
We have pleasure in announcing an
arrangement completed with that great
family paper The Family Herald and
Weekly Star of Montreal by which we
can offer The Prospector and The Family Herald and Weekly Star for the balance of 1916 or until Jan. 1st, 1917, for
the small sum of $1.00.
The Family Herald and Weekly Star
is noted for.its reliable war news summaries each week and is replete with
most interesting stories from the bat-
tlefront. The Family Herald and
Weekly Star is a family paper all Canada is proud of, and when combined
with The Prospector, our readers are
supplied with all the local news and
news of the world. In addition to the
newB the reader receives in The Family
Herald each week a magazine section
equivalent to several of the best monthly magazines printed. The agricultural
section is another feature of that great
weekly which is keenly appreciated and
is alone worth many times the subscription price. We now offer the two
papers for only $1.00 until 1st of January, 1917. Present readers of The
Prospector may have The Family
Herald and Weekly Star for the balance
of 1916 for only Forty cents.
WATER NOTICE
DIVERSION AND  USE
Take notice that I, H. Graham, whose
address is Indian Agent, Lytton, B.C.,
will apply for a licence to take and use
twenty-five (25) inches of water out of
Young John (Indian name), also known
as Young John, which flows westerly
and drains into—all disappears. The
water will be diverted from the stream
at a point about at the east boundary
line of the Anderson Lake I.R. No. 1,
and will be used for irrigation and domestic purpose upon the Anderson Lake
I. R. No. 1, described as Anderson Lake
Indian Reserve No. 1.
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 20th day of June. 1916.
A copy.of this notice and an application pursuant thereto and to the "Water Act, 1914." will be filed in the
office of the Water Recorder at
Ashcroft, B.C.
Objections may be filed with the said
Water Recorder, or with the Comptroller of Water Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C., within thirty days
after the first appearance of this notice
in a local newspaper.
H. GRAHAM, Applicant,
Indian Agent.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is June 23, 1916.
DIVERSION AND  USE
Take notice that Maude Haylmore,
F.M.C. 95792b., whose address is Lillooet, B.C., will apply for a licence to
take and use 100 miners inches of waste
water from the Lorne Mines, which
flows southerly and drains into Cadwallader creek about one half mile below
South Fork of Cadwallader creek. The
water will be diverted from the stream
at a point about 300 feet southerly below
Lorne mill, and will be used for mining
purpose upon the mine described as Gold
Channel Bench Lease.
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 28th day of April, 1916.
A copy of this notice and an application pursuant thereto and to the "Water
Act, 1914," will be filed in the office of
the Water Recorder at Clinton, B.C.
Objections may be filed with the said
water Recorder or with the Comptroller
of water rights. Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C., within thirty days after
the the first appearance of this notice in
a local newspaper.
Maude Haylmore, Applicant.
By Will Haylmore, Agent,
F.M.C. 95737b.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is June 2, 1916.
WATER NOTICE
DIVERSION AND USE
Take notice that I, H. Graham, whose
address is Indian Agent, Lytton, B.C.,
will apply for a licence to take and use
five (5) inches of water out of a spring,
also known as on west of Cayoosh Creek
I.R. No. 2, which flows easterly and
drains into- all sinks. The water will
be diverted from the stream at a point
about- carried down its natural course
onto Reserve, and will be used for domestic and irrigation purposes upon the
Cayoosh Creek I.R. No 2, described as
Cayoosh Creek Indian Reserve No. 2.
The notice was posted on the ground
on the 20th day of June, 1916.
A copy of this notice and an application pursuant thereto and to the "water
act, 1914" will be filed in the office of
Water Recorder at Ashcroft, British
Columbia. Objections to the application may be filed with the said Water
Recorder or with the Comptroller of
Water Rights, Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C., within thirty days after
the first appearance of this notice in a
local newspaper.
H. GRAHAM, Applicant,
Indian Agent
The date of the first publication of
this notice is June 23, 1916.
LAND LEASE NOTICES
LILLOOET LAND DISTBIOT
DISTBIOT OT LILLOOET
Take notice that John Bishop, of
Churn Creek, British Columbia, occupation rancher, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described
land:.
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner of lot 847, thence
west 40 chains, thence couth 40 chains,
thence east 40 chains, thence north 40
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 160 acres more or less.
John Bishop, Applicant.
By Geo. Bishop, Agent.
34- May 26, 1916.
.#w»..»w«m> ..»w^-p. ■.|m>h|'«I"«"I"»'«"»<.|.hii|ii|.i a ■ .§■
LILLOOBT LAND DISTBIOT
DIBTBICT Or LILLOOET
Take notice that John Bishop, of
Churn Creek, British Columbia, occupation rancher, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described
land:
Commencing at a post planted at a
point due south of south-west corner of
lot 842, and on the north boundary of
lot 1197, thence west 80 chains, thence
north 40 chains to southern boundary of
lot 311, thence east to south-east corner
of lot 311, thence north 40 chains to
north-east corner of lot 311, thence east
to west boundary of lot 842, thence south
80 chains to point of commencement.
John Bishop, Applicant.
By Geo. Bishop, Agent.
34-May 26, 1916.
WATER NOTICE
DIVERSION AND USE
Take notice that Maude Haylmore,
F.M.C. 95792b., whose address is Lillooet, B.C., will apply for a licence to
take and use 100 miners inches of water
out of Cadwallader creek, which flows
westerly and drains into the South Fork
of Bridge River about half a mile south
west of Lorne Mines. The water will
be diverted from the stream at a point
about one thousand feet west of Coronation Mines mill, and will be used for
mining purpose upon the mine described
aa Gold Channel Bench Lease.
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 9th day of May, 1916.
A copy of this notice and an application pursuant thereto and to the "Water
Act, 1914," will be filed in the office of
the Water Recorder at Clinton, B.C.
Objections to the application may be
filed with the said Water Recorder or
with the Comptroller of Water Rights,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.,
within thirty days after the first appearance of this notice in a local newspaper.
Maude Haylmore, Applicant.
By Will Haylmore, Agent,
F.M.C. 95737B.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is the 2nd day of June, 1916.
WATER NOTICE
DIVERSION AND USE
Take notice that Maude Haylmore,
F.M.C. 95792b., whose address is Lillooet, B.C., will apply for a licence to
take and use 100 miners inches of water
out of Blackbird Creek, also known as
Coughlan creek, which flows southerly
and drains into Cadwallader creek about
one half mile above South Fork of Cadwallader creek. The water will be diverted from the stream at a point about
2000 feet southerly from south-west
corner of Lot 1176, and will be used for
mining purpose upon the mine described
as Gold Channel Bench Lease.
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 28th dav of April, 1916.
A copy of this notice and an application pursuant thereto and to the "Water
Act, 1914," will be filed in the office of
the Water Recorder at Clinton, B.C.
Objections to the application may be
filed with the said Water Recorder or
with the Comptroller of Water Rights,
Parliament Buildings,  Victoria,  B.C.,
within thirty days after the first appearance of this notice in a local newspaper.
Maude Haylmore, Applicant.
By Will Haylmore, Agent,
F.M.C. 95737b.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is 2nd day of June, 1916.
NOTICE
Strayed on my premises last winter
one bay mare, blind in left eye, branded S on left shoulder. Will be sold in
30 days to pay feed bill and advertisement fee. Owner can have same by
proving property and paying expenses.
M. BOYD,
70-Mile House, B.C.
June 2nd, 1»16. 82-4
FAT CATTLE WANTED
A few head of fat cattle, young stock
preferred. Address Wm. Munro,
Manager Jones Farm, Lillooet, B.C.
CAPITAL Privately Procured for any
legitimate business; stock companies
incorporated; bonds ar-4 stock placed
on commission. Securities Bonding
Co., 811 Rogers Bldg., Vancouver, B.C. THE  LILLOOET  PROSPECTOR
POLITICAL NOTES
William Sloan, ex-M.P., will be
the Liberal standard bearer in
Nanaimo at the approaching provincial elections.
The Conservatives of the Cow-
ichan district pledged their support to Captain W. H. Haywood
as their candidate at a well-attended meeting held at Duncans
last Saturday.
Minister of Lands, Hon. W. R.
Ross, on June 24 received by an
unanimous vote the nomination
for candidate in the interests of
the Conservative party in the
riding of Fort George. His nomination was proposed by A. G.
Hamilton, who was formerly in
the field, but retired in favor of
Mr. Ross.
Sir Robert L. Borden was 62
years of age on June 26. He was
born at Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia,
in 1854.
Fourteen seats are now without representation in the House
of Commons, Ottawa. Ten of the
seats were held by Conservatives
and four by Liberals.
Sir Robert Borden and Hon.
Frank Cochrane, minister of railways, were in New York this
week in connection with the appointment of a commission to enquire into Canadian railways.
CAN IT
Writing on "Winter Storage,"
The Prospector of June 16th said :
' The food question has become
an all-important one, and how to
get the largest yield from the
soil for labour and expenditure,
and also how to care for that
yield till the last ounce is consumed, are questions now of the
very deepest concern.
If you've any surplus fruit, can it.
If you've any surplus meat, can it.
Do not waste a single pound,
Do not let it lie around,
Putrifying on the ground.
Can it.
Nature in her wisdom says, "Can it."
All her lessons have one note—"Can
it."
Every piece of coal and wood
That's employed to cook your food
Is the "bottled sunlight" good.
Can it.
Some of those who're blest with wit,
can it.
Some who sing sweet melody, can it.
While the singers live, let's haste
Records make for every taste.
Music is too good to waste.
Can it.
If you're feeling full of cheer, spread
it.
If you're nursing any hate, dread it.
There are always those who need
All the kindness you can breed.
It can't hurt to stamp out greed.
Can it?
    -W.T.B.
WAVE
Wave, flag of Canada ! wave far
O'er the Lorlei land of the evening star,
Like a rose caressed on  the billowy
breast
Of  the  beating  heart  of  the   golden
west.
In glory wave, in grand unrest,
O'er canyon, cave and mountain crest,
And soar and shine, a heaven-sent sign,
On peak and plain and purple pine.
Wave in the roaring storm and the hush,
When the sunset meets the rival blush
Of tlie prairie's pride,  on  the great
divide,
And the proud Pacific rolls deep-dyed
On battle field and stormy steep
Of furnace-flames that roar and sweep,
In splendor poise, above the boys,
Whose bayonets are Terror's toys.
Fling far thy folds above the brave,
And proudly o'er the hero's grave.
Wave wide and leap where the mighty
sleep,
And rise and dip on dome and deep.
— A. Martley.
VANCOUVER CHAMBER OF MINES
WANTS SAMPLES OF IRON ORES
The approaching Vancouver Exhibition is makinsr a special display this
year of the iron ores of this province,
and stress will be laid on their suitability
for the manufacture of iron and steel.
The Vancouver Chamber of Mines,
through its representative. Mr. James
Ashworth, on the board of directors of
the Exhibition, is doing its best to make
the display as comprehensive and attractive as possible, and worthy of the
great resources of those raw materials
it is the good fortune of British Columbia to possess.
During the Exhibition week a lecture
by some prominent mining man or
metallurgist will be delivered each afternoon on some' mining or kindred subject, and special attention will be given
to the manufacture of iron and steel
from British Columbia iron ores.
The Chamber of Mines is a non-profit
earning institution and bureau of information, organized to foster legitimate mining, whose services and advice
is free to mine owners, miners and
prospectors alike. It invites the cooperation of all parties interested in
mining, will be pleased to have such
people visit its exhibit and library when
in the city, and in order to make its end
of the Exhibition as educational and attractive as possible, requests mine owners and prospectors to send samples of
their ores and particulars of their properties, especially iron ores. Samples
to be addressed : John Cunliffe. Secretary, Vancouver Chamber of Mines,
543 Hastings street W., Vancouver,B.C.
Form F.
Certificate of Improvements
NOTICE OF APPLICATION.
Sunset. East Pacific and Clifton
Mineral Claims. Situate in the
Lillooet Mining Division of Lillooet
District. Where located, on Cadwallader Creek, Bridge River,
Take notice that we. Andrew Ferguson, Free Miners Certificate No.
99335b, and Adolphus Williams, Free
Miners Certificate No. B5171, intend,
sixty days from date hereof, to apply to
the Mining Recorder for a Certificate of
Improvements for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of the above
claims.
And further take notice that action,
under section 85, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated this 21st day of June, 1916.
Andrew Ferguson.
35 Adolphus Willians.
P. G. E. RY. TIME TABLE
Trains leave Squamish for Clinton on
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, returning on Tuesdays, Thursdays and
Saturdays, and passing through Lillooet
at 10.18 a.m.
New York
Life
Insurance
Company
Protect your
Family by
Insuring your
Life in the
Strongest
Life Insurance
Company
in the world
W. E. Morrison
ocal Representative
Prospector Office
R ^vv^vvvSSSXXSW^rerereK E3
C. A. PHAIR
General Merchant    -
Hardware Groceries
Men's Furnishings Crockery
Miners Supplies Shoes
Fishing Tackle Guns
Na-Dru-Co. Drugs Tents
Bicycles Furniture
Lillooet
Dry Goods
Stationery
Grain
Ammunition
Harness
Lumber, etc.
Agent for
Eastman   Kodaks,   Edison  Phonographs,   Moore
I  Lights, Singer Sewing Machines,   Bapco  Paints
TERMS CASH
Hours:  7 a.m. to 8 p.m.      Saturday, 7 a.m. to 9 p.m.
• >».•••••••••••••
WO HING
Dry Goods, Gents' Furnishings
Groceries, Confectionery,
Footwear, Hardware, etc.
LILLOOBT, = - B.C.
Excelsior Hotel
Alex. C. Phair, Proprietor
The  Comlort   of   our   Guests  is  our  First   Consideration.
Full Stock of Wines, Liquors and Cigars
Automobile   Meets   AH   Trains
i
i
VICTORIA HOTEL J
Well Furnished Rooms.     Hot  and Cold Baths.
Excellent Table.   First-class Bar. Sample Rooms.
I   HEADQUARTERS   FOR   TOURISTS,   MINERS   and   COMMERCIAL   MEN   .
J
j Automobiles for  Hire at Any Hour
j     — =z:	
] P. LEWIS, -    - Proprietor   I
f
"S
Singer Sewing Machines
If you want a high-class Sewing Machine at a
moderate price, call at the  Prospector Office.     Easy     <■<
terms or big reduction for cash.
SEE  OUR  SAMPLE MACHINES
t  W. E. Morrison,   -   Prospector Office
L*>

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