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The Lillooet Prospector Mar 1, 1912

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 THE
TPRO
Vol. 1 No. 16
FRIDAY, MARCH 1, 1912
$2.00 Per Year
MASQUERADE SUCCESS
Tonight witnessed another
of Lillooets successful social
events when the first annual
masquerade was held in San-
tini's hall. The management of this affair was in the
hands of Dick Clarke and Ray
Powers, and they spared no
pains to make it eclipse any
former efforts in this line
that have ever been attempted here. The hall was crowd
ed to capacity, and the costumes were varied and multicolored, many of them being
exceptionally pretty and not
a few very original. The
new floor which was rushed
to completion for this' event,
proved a very ,c; tisfactoiy
improvement. The music
was furnisned by local talent
Six prizes wee offeied; the
one for the most originally
dressed lady being won by
Mrs. Dan Hurley. The prize
was a gold braclet. For the
best dressed lady a gold
fountain pen was offered and
Mrs. Dick Clarke succeeded
carrying away this honor.
Sandy Duguid, took home the
fountain pen offered for the
best dressed gentleman. For
the most comically dressed
lady|Virs. Ed Dougherty received a fountain pen. Joe
Russell, dressed to represent
a barrel was the hit of the
evening, and the razor offered for the most comically
dressed gentleman was handed to him. The gold broach
and cuff links offered to the
prize waltzers were given to
Mr. and Mrs. Ed Dougherty.
Among the visitors from outside points were George Pet-
rini, G. B. Rebagliati, R.
Hamilton, A. McKibben, H.
McKibben,L. Loring,Lytton;
Mr. and Mrs. G. Carson, W.
C. Mcgee of Pavilion, and
Stanley Parke from Cache
Creek. The door receipts
amounted to $57.00; expenses were $53,00; the balance, $4.00, being placed in
Mrs. Bell's hands to be held
over Until the second annual
masquerade to be given next
year.
WORK AT GOLD FALLS    ATTRACTING ATTENTION
Preparations for the season's work on the Gold Falls
Mining Company's property
on Cayoosh Creek about
four miles from town. At
present they are just com-
pleteing a 200 foot wing dam
which will divert the creek,
and give them enough oi the
old creek bed to give employment to quite a force of men
for nearly a year's time. The
ground which they intend
working is at the head of the
basin about three-quarters of
a mile above the falls. It has
been thoroughly prospected,
and the results were so satisfactory that Messrs. Mellott
and Johnson deem it
worthy of more extensive development. They will work
the ground this spring until
high water, when they will
put in the time installing a
pipe line from Enterprise
Cre^ek and preparing for the
working of the creek the entire  length  of  the   basin.
EW BUILDING
Paul Santini is having the
old warehouse next the Lillooet General Store torn down
and intends replacing it with
an entirely new store build-
in-, 22x40 in dimensions./ It
will be rented by Billy Page
who will move his pool tables
into the new room and he
now announces his intentions
of adding several new tables
in the near future. He will
still retain his lease on the
property that he is occupying
at present and will start a
refreshment parlor in these
old quarters as soon as the
new building is completed
and he can get located in the
same.
 o	
BORN-ToMr. and Mrs.
Mrs. Charles McCaffery, on
Tuesday, February 27th,
1912, a son.
Rev. Bromwich came in on
Friday's stage and will hold
services at Lillooet and Foster's Bar on Sunday.
In the Vancouver Sun of
recent date appears an interview of Mr. Ralph Cunningham, on the Bridge River
mines. Mr. Cunningham is
well known to the mining
fraternity and it will i e remembered that he spent considerable time in the district
sizing up the situation here.
In part Mr. Cunningham
says:
•'At the present time the
most promising property is
the Coronation group, owned
by Messrs. Dunsmuir, Perry
and associates, but in which,
I understand an interest i
retained by Mr.   Arthur ....
Noel, who formerly o\vn<
and opened up the mine.   At
the present time the Coron
tion    development is bein
pushed by Chas. Copp, wb i
has continued the drifts already started and who has
recently let a contract for a
cross-cut to tap the Counties;.;
vein at its intersection with
the Bend 'Or vein.
"At the present time the
Coronation group has $151,-
000 worth of ore in sight
which will be largely increased when the objects for
which the new tunnel are being have been accomplished.
Numerous other veins have
been exposed on the property
which in the course of time
will be exploited.
"There is a ten-stamp mill
on the property, on which
the cost of transportation
alone was $8,000. It was
taken over the trail from
Seton lake, a distance of fifty
miles, part of the trail being
over Mission mountain at an
elevation of 3200 feet above
the lake. From Lillooet to
the commencement of the
trail it was taken by boat.
The mill has been thoroughly
tested and makes an excellent saving of free gold
values.
"There is an abundance of
timber in the camp while in
the matter of water for power Bridge River is probably
not excelled by any other
camp in the province.
"Geologically the mineral
bearing area consists of a
broad dyke of diorite extend
ing, as at present known,
about twelve miles in a north
westerly and southeasterly
direction, and carrying numerous veins of free milling
quartz. The veins are true
fissures of great length striking in the same direction as
the dyke. The veins are remarkable for their lateral
length and uniform width.
The vein filling is an easily
fractured quartz carrying
free gold and the veins are
true assure, the vein walls of
thio district being characterized by a selvige of soft tal-
cofce material making a line
of separation between the
quart and coi nt y rock well
ue ii * an-, t i -, iistin-
gu ed A u b i' of very
i .. ... ade shvut b ■ ,■ b .en
i|   bj i    -ent,
ana many th us n, s of dol-
) rsh< ve been t in
the course of . feet of
v*     .."
Speaking i f h     J.   n, he
said,   "The 3   of the
Lorn also we; . og 'eat ex-
pense in -trail over
i (    trail a five ■  mill
which has I n or] ed off
and on as ore wa: b wed
in the course of development.
This mine is being steadily
developed and the ore is being stored until the proper
machinery can be brought in
to save the concentrates.
"An old mill man from Cal
ifornia who was working at
the Lorn last summer demonstrated the feasibility of
saving these concentrates by
means of a blanket. A short
mill run was made, the free
gold boing caught on the
plates and the concentrates
being retained by blankets.
From the clean-up of the
plates nearly $8,000 was obtained, while the concentrates saved assayed from $150
to $586 per ton. The Lorn
company will put in concentrating machinery and a com
pressor as soon as the wagon
road is completed." The      Prospector
THE PROSPECTOR
Permanently camped at Lillooet, B.C
Sending out samples every Friday
afternoon to    be   assayed  by   the
public at large.
Yearly,   $2.00  in advance.     Single
copies, five cents.
Advertising J rates   on   application
FRIDAY,  MARCH 1,   1912
Lillooet's Appropriation
The appropriation set aside
by the recent legislature for
Lillooet district amounts to
$128,000, which is considerable more than has been
given to this district before,
but is, however, none too
much, for there is any
amount of building and improving of roads and trails
that is needed. This appropriation assures the completion of the Bridge river
wagon road to the mines this
year and will close up another link in the chain of development that is now going
on to put that section to the
front, as it justly deserves to
be. The completion of this
road means renewed activity
in that promising section,
for all that the majority of
the mine owners are now or
have been holding back for
is better transportation facilities to put in additional
machinery that they may develop their holdings on a more
extensive basis. Taking in
heavy machinery 75 miles by
pack horses at twenty cents
a pound is not a proposition
that appeals very strongly to
the investor and has had not
a little to do with keeping
the district in the background. Another road that
will undoubtedly receive attention this year is the one
between Lytton and Lillooet.
It is understood that there
will be considerable improving done along this road
which at present is the principal route into .this camp.
Another item in the appropriations that is of especial
interest locally is a $500 subsidy for a steamboat on Anderson lake.
That this district is at
last receiving deserved attention at the hands of men
of influence in the province,
as well as by the press at
large, is evidenced by the
speech of the premier in regard to the railway policy
which he explained to the
legislature on February 22.
In following the route of the
Pacific Great Eastern railway he spoke at length on
the resources to be   found
here and gave a conservative
yet farsighted review of our
possibilities, many of the
facts being set forth from
personal observation. Lack
of space prevents us from
publishing that part of the
speech referring to Lillooet
in full, but below we give a
few of the most striking
statements:
"With respect to the Pemberton Meadows, they are already
receiving considerable deserved
attention as a valuable agricultural region. Farming operations
have been under way there during past years, attended with
such a measure of success as to
plainly show that here again with
the provision of additional facilities of transportation the people
of British Col imbia will be enabled to develop farming lands
which give every promise of being a splendidiand valusb'e addition to our agricultural area, and
provide satisfactorily for large
argumentation of our population.
' 'Then as we move along there
is the Lillooet district and honorable gentlemen here must know
something of what great potentialities are to be found there.
There is no doubt whatever of
the wonderful productiveness of
the soil of the Lillooet section
and as to the fruits that are
grown there, it is the opinion of
the best experts and most experienced judges that it is of the
finest quality and most excellent
flavor, I have visited this district in the course of my travels
through the interior of our province and can speak from personal
knowledge of the excellent crops
of the Lillooet apples and the
general classes of fruit which
one would look to as likely to
thrive in this particular zone,
which is part and jparcel of the
world-famous dry belt of British
Columbia.
"Then, as to the mineral country, Lillooet has for many years
enjoyed the reputation of being
of some considerable importance.
Some years ago you all recollect
that there was a tremendous excitement in Lillooet because of
the discovery of some lode mines
where there promised to be an
abundance of very rich ore of
free milling quality.   On thia excitement there followed many disappointments   and considerable
loss with the result that Lillooet,
like many another mining camp
in its early history, had to suffer
from the effects  of an injured
reputation, but I would be the
last man in British ^Columbia to
say that Lillooet aa   a mining
camp is done and that there   is
absolutely nothing in sight there
for the miners of   the future.
On the contrary I am pleased to
be able to tell the House   that
from reports we have received
from government engineers and
others, the sections of the Lillooet district now being prospected or in course of development
give promise of excellent results
in the near future.     Heretofore,
because of the indifferent transportation, it has been almost impossible to provide mining mach
inery at a cost which is not prohibitive, but once this mining
machinery is able to be brought
into the conn try at a moderate
cost we will soon see there the
rapid development of many a
promising property. I am satisfied that the early completion of
the Vancouver & Howe Sound
road will be coincident with the
flowering up of a new life in that
section of the province, and that
it will presently spring into prominence as worthy of a high place
in the mineral zone of British
Columbia."
He then takes up the possibilities of the Fraser river through
this district as a gold-dredging
proposition, and closes his review
of this district by saying that
"from reports that I have had
sent me by independent explorers
and miners from all these sources
I am satisfied that there is a
wonderful future assured for Lillooet district; both as a placer
gold-dredging proposition and as
a lode-mining center."
Now that'we are assured
of railway transportation,
putting us in touch with the
world, it would be advisable
to consider our possibilities
from a business point of view
The first thing to be done is
to shake off the lethargy induced by forced inaction anch
to prepare ourselves for vigorous effort to become the
banner district of the province.
We have a mining division
second to none though dormant as regards base ore,
the wealth, extent of which
without exaggerating, will
prove a surprise to the mining investor. As the day is
now at hand when we shall
see Lillooet stocks and shares
listed on all mining exchanges, and quoted in all papers.
Now that we are to take our
rightful place as a leading
portion of the province we
must do our share individually and not leave it to be
done by someone else, or
sneer at the man who is attempting something, as we
have been rather prone to do
hithertofore.
All prospectors and others
holding claims must see to it
now that the time has arrived, that their showings
appear to the best advantage
I would earnestly impress on
everyone the importance of
having a good trail to the ore
bodies on all claims. Don't
expect the government to
cut a trail up every mountain side. It is up to you to
do something. There is
nothing harder to an arriving expert than to have
to fight brush and scramble
up a hillside "to see what you
have to sell.    A ledge well
uncovered and a good trail
are evidences of good faith
on your part. Don't be
afraid of doing too much.
Every foot of tunnel driven
will pay a hundred times
over. Remember on these
concentrating propositions
there is no danger of the
lead pinching out and ore always assays better underground. These large ore
bodies, with their steady dividends-are of especial interest to the investors. See to
it then, that your claims show
to their best advantage.
In the Black water, a section of this district, with it's
acres of iron ore less than
five miles from the proposed
survey of the Pacific Great
Eastern railroad, its large
copper-gold deposits running
from-$3 to $50 a ton, but unlimited in tonnage, and all
the surrounding country with
its copper stained mountains
and iron cappings. There is
one thing you may rest assured, the croppings and extent of same compare favorably with the Boundary and
the rest of the Kootnays and
until the Kootnay's got their
railroad they were as silent
as this district has been.
Up the Fraser river you
will see low grade ore of
mammoth proportions traceable across country to Tyaughton Creek, a tributary
of Bridge river, where there
are nine claims all running
consecutively on one vast
dyke of ore, lowest assay for
gold was $12 and nearly up
to $50.
Go where you will in the
district. Ground Hog Mountain on the North Fork, with
its well defined concentrating ledge running as high as
six ounces in gold.
Seton Lake, with its iron
ore running from $14 to $180
in gold, a granite and quart-
zite lead.
McGillvary Creek, with its
sixty odd claims staked last
fall, all high grade silver.
The Anderson Lake mines,
now awaiting compressor,
machine drills and cyanide
plant to become one of the
best properties in the pro
vince. All are within easy
reach of the line of the Pacific Great Eastern railway.
This Lillooet of ours, which
means the land of flowers,
the advent of the railroad
will change this to Lillooet,
the land of gold.
Haylmore The    Prospector
CLINTON NOTES
Rev. Downie returned on
Thursday from the 150-mile house
and the."115" where he holds
•ervices once a month.
J. Wardell took over the Clinton Hotel on Tuesday, with J.
Smith as manager and Mrs. Henderson has full charge of the
housekeeping.
Frank Place drove the Dog
Creek stage in Monday, reporting that Dixon, the driver, had a
narrow escape going out the
week before. The horses became
unmanageable and with the icy
roads the stage upset, throwing
Dixon out and he was found unconscious. He is reported as getting along well now.
T. Barton, road superintendent
is in Victoria attending a convention in matters relating to the
road.
Mrs. E. Dougherty, Maiden
Creek, gave a dance last Thursday (it being her birthday) Quite
a number from Clinton and vicinity attended and all speak of
having a jolly, good time.
Had a little excitement here a
few evenings ago. Mrs. Marshall
raffled off a handsome quilt
which she had made. The
chances were from live cents to
$1.50. Phil Brennan, the lucky
one captured the prize,
PAVILION  BRIEFS
Mr. and Mrs. George Carson
drove into Lillooet today to attend the masquerade.
Arthur Ritchie, employed at
the Carson ranch, had the misfortune recently to have a sleigh
upset with him, badly spraining
his ankle in the accident.
Miss Mills, who for some time
past has been visiting' at the
Stewart ranch, has accepted a
position in }he dining room of the
Clinton Hotel.
Alford Smith is hauling hay
to Clinton from the Carson ranch
Walter Mcgee was a visitor to
Lillooet last Friday.
There is at present close to a
foot and a half of snow on Pavilion mountain, there being a recent fall of three inches.
All the cattle in this vicinity
are reported as coming through
the winter in fine condition.
AFTER INDIANS
It is reported that the two outlawed Indians that have been at
large from Clinton for some time
have been heard of in the vicinity of Big Bar and that there is
at present a party headed by the
Clinton constable out in search of
them.
On Wednesday evening the
new Baillie store in Lytton was
tho scene of a very enjoyable
dance which was well attended.
Hill & Burnett
CIVIL ENGINEERS and B. C. LAND
SURVEYORS
New   Westminster
Represented in Lillooet by
W. Haylmore
If you want freight hauled from Lyt+on to Lillooet
just  bear it in mind that
McCaffery & McKibben
have the two best outfits
on the road and can give
you quick service and
guaranteed      satisfaction
Address Chas. McCaffery at   Lilloo t
or   Hazen   McK bben at Lytton to
make arrangements
Lillooet General Store
W.J.PAGE   -   Proprietor
"1
—miUn VTTm* w.3Mi n.nam
A newly-bought stock of
staple and fancy groceries
An excellent line of dry
goods, clothing, furnishings, etc. Call and see us.
Lillooet General Store
W. J. PAGE   -   Proprietor
Excelsior  Hotel
GEORGE HURLEY, Prop.
First Class Table and Good
Liquors and Cigars.
LILLOOET,
B. C.
— J   DUNLOP  =—
Store near Seton Lake
General Merchant
Large Assortment of Goods Always on Hand
Dry Goods, Groceries,   Hardware,
Boots and Shoes, Clothing,
Miner's Supplies
Outfitter for Camp or Trail
A.   G.   REBAGLIATI
General Merchant
and
Forwarding Agent
MINERS   SUPPLIES   A   SPECIALTY
Ship Goods To Lillooet in my Care
Prompt   Attention   Guaranteed
A.   G.   REBAGLIATI
LYTTON        - - B. C.
CAR BUSY
Walter Keeble's new car on
the Lytton-Lillooet road is proving popplar with the travelling
public and this week made two
trips being loaded to its full capacity both times. On the first
trip the passengers were Charles
M. Johnson, Walter C. Keeble.
F. B. Rebagliati with A. D. Scott
at the wheel. The car was decorated wiih Lillooet and Lytton pen
nants and made quite a striking
appearance as it pulled into town
Mr. Keeble will run the car as
frepuently as the traffic will justify at present, and will operate
.daily trips between the two points
as soon as the travel will warrant such a service.
FOR SALE-Baled hay. As
good as any to be found in B. C.
for only $16.00 a ton. A. E.
Ruddock, Lytton, B. C.
Subscribe for the Prospector.
ELLING OUT
Lillooet General Store
WiJ.P'GE,Prop.
In Onler to Dispose of Stock on
Hand as Rapidly as Possible we
O'er the Following Cas* Prices
GROCERIES
1400 lbs Beans 4 c lb
'. sey Cream, per case 4.60
indeerMilk, per case 6.05
Lipton's Tea, per lb. 4Cc
Victoria Cross Tea, per lb 35c
Rajah Ceylon Tea, per lb 25c
Star Brand Coffee per lb
35c or 3 for $1.00
Brown Berry Coffee, per lb.
35c or 3 for $1.09
Magic Baking Powder, per can
20c or 6 for $1.00
B. & K. Rolled Oats at
35c or 3 for $1.00
Vinegar, per qt bottle 25c
Rice, per lb 6c
Sago, per lb 8c
Tapioca, per lb 8c
FURNISHINGS
Buck Brand Overalls per pr.   85c
Buck Brand Overalls (bib)
per pair 75c
Smocks, each 75c
Shirts, from 75c to $100
Regular $3.50 Sweater for    2.75
Socks, per pair 15c and up
Ali Other Goods in Stock will be
Sold at Correspondingly Low
Prices    Terms Cash The     Prospector
WATER NOTICE
I, Moses Foster, of Fourteen
Mile Creek, by occupation a farmer, give notice that I intend on
the 20th day of March next, at
eltven o'clock in the forenoon,
to apply to the Water Commissioner at his office at Clinton, B.
C, for a license to take ,and use
four cubic feet of water per second from Fourteen Mile Creek, a
tributary of Fraser river, to be
diverted at a point about 1-2
mile above Lot No. 1589.
The water will be used on Lot
1589 for irrigation purposes.
Signature: Moses Foster
Dated this 31st day of January.
1912.
LIQUOR ACT, 1910    *
(Section 35)
NOTICE is hereby given that,
on the 20th day of March next,
application will be made to the
Superintendent of Provincial
Police for the grant of a licence
for the sale of liquor by retail in
and upon the premises known as
Clinton Hotel situate at Clinton,
B. C, upon the lands described
as Lot 1, Group 5.
Dated this 20th day of February, 1912.
James Wardell
LIQUOR ACT, iwu
(Section 35)
NOTICE is hereby given that
on the first day of Apriljaext, application will be made to the Superintendent of Provincial Police
for the grant of a licence for the
sale of liquor by retail in and upon the premises known as the
D nninion Hotel situate at Clin-
to ■, B. C, upon the lands described as Lot 37, Township of
Clinton.
Dated this 29th day of February, 1912.
S. E. Marwick
Applicant
Lillooet Meat Market
Fresh Killed Beef, Pork & Mutton
Large and small orders
given our personal attention. Satisfaction
guaranteed	
Fresh    Vegetables    in    Sw'son
M.CJ1 jUW'''*4fV. .vti« 1WW»<Kr\'tt*>« 4
H. S. KEARY
Proprietor
BERT DURBAN
CITY TRANSFER
General  Hauling,
Freighting,
Etc.
FOUR HORSE TEAM
Roy McDonald
POOL  ROOMS
Six Tables
Cigars and Tobaccos
Smokers cupplies
ASHCROFT   -   - C
Rill & Burnett
CIVIL ENGINEERS and B. C. LAND
SURVEYORS
New   Westminster
Represented in Lillooet by
W. Haylmore
Subscribe for the Prospector
1
BUY WHERE THE CiiOWu liUYS
— C. A. PI
General Merchant        Manufacturers Agent
For  Twenty-five Years  Lillooets Leading Store
Complete up-to-date Stock in all Departments
Carefully Bought at Right Prices
Spring Stock
Our Spring Stock of General Merchandise is now arriving. We will have the finest range of New Felt Hats, Prospector'!, Miner's and Surveyor's Shoes, and Dry Goods, ever
shown in Lillooet. We will also carry our usual large stock
of Groceries, Hardware, Drugs, Etc.
The flnly Store that can give satisfactiom on orders
from the smallest to the largest.  Our Cash Price
is the Lowest Good Goods can be Sold For
We Lead, Others Follow
C. A. PHAIR
The Store of Satisfied Customers
Mail Orders Receive our Careful Attention
LILLOOET  BOYS
When in LYTTON go to the
Durham Barber Shop
First-class Shave or Haircut
Two doors west of the Harrison stage
Office
'SAMUEL GIBBS
Notary Public
WO   HING
GENERAL MERCHANT
Lillooet   -   B. C.
Outfitters for Prospectors, Trappers,
Miners, Ranchers,
Etc. Our goods are
the best and prices
are right
Chinese Goods
Lillooet
B. C.
Lands,  Mines, Insurance and
Collections
Mining business in  ali branches a
specialty.    Farms,   Fruitlands   ar.d
Residential properties for sale-.
R. C. Stephenson
Blacksmith and
Expert   Horse-
shoer
All Work Promptly
Executed
LILLOOET    -    -   B. C.
Lytton-Lillooet
Stage Line
Regular Stage leaves Lytton Tuesdays and Saturdays at 7 a. m.
Regular Stage leaves Lillooet Wednesdays and Sun
days at 7 a. m.
Wire or write for Special Stage or
Desired Information
LEE HARRISON  -  Lytton, 1?. C.
NRK.M/:tKMM**t KWMtt--
JAMES MURPHY, R A.
BARRISTER, SOLICITOR
ASHCROFT s    .-      -    B. C
F. C. PORTER
i
Harness Maker    Saddler j
Carrying All Lines. Horse j
Blankets. Repairing of j
all Description a Speciality    ]
Ashcroft      -    -     B. C. :
Subscribe for
, The   Prospector
and get all the home news
Livery and
Feed Stables
Horses and Rigs for Hire.
Express Delivery
Light and Heavy Draying.
Ed. DOUGHERTY
Proprietor
Liliooet
B. C.
A GOOD i'LACE TO PATRONISE
Hotel Victoria
Fifty-five well-furnished rooms. Hot and cold baths
Excellent table. First class bar. Large sample room
HEADQUARTERS FOR TOURISTS, MINERS and COMMERCIAL MEN
Two autos on request from Lytton or Ashcroft
Headquarters for Lytton-Lillooet stage line. Stage
meets Seton Lake boat. Rigs furnished on demand.
RATES: $1.50 per day and up. By month $35 and up. Meals, 21 for $9.00
M. R. EAGLESON, Prop.
LILLOOET B.C.

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