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The Prospector Mar 2, 1905

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Array „1JL"
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THE
Vol. 7, No. 10.
LILLOOET,   B. C.   MARCH 2,   1905.
a Year
a
A. G. REBAGLIATI,
GENERAL MERCHANT.
CAYOOSH   CREEK,
Some years ago a Chinaman of fered A. Iiicliey $2000
to stake a claim near where
Enterprise mine is now, as
anyone can run a Chinaman
away and appropriate his
claim. It was said to be held
by lessees, who were in arrear
but had spent considerable
money, so nothing was done
until Spokane men got it.
Cayoosh gold is worth $17
llr. Ames, dredge expert,
says surveyors have crossed
over to North Vancouver, &
commenced working toward
Squamish. On a Railway
Map exhibited, is a railroad
bridge across the Fraser at
Lillooet.
WHICH IS YOURS ?
Beer contains 5 per cent alcohol
Green's Nei'Viiva 17, Hood'a 18,
Fame's Celery 21, Ayers 26, &
Warner [Safe) 35. Coming up !
we get Hob tetter 44 and Scotcli
whisky 60.
APPOINTMENT
9th Feb. Constable Duncan
McGillivray, of Lytton, to he
Chief Licence Inspector, for West
Yale, in the place of Constable
J. F. Sayre.
CURRENT COnflENT
The Socialist papers opened a
a subscription for families of the
men slain by Nicholas the second
aud Last.
Busy times at Panama. 14
new steam shovels at work, each
equal to 500 men ; sewers being
dug, with a big tunnel under the
sea wall, to empty them ; streets
to be paved with vi trotted brick,
and then the country will be clean
and sweet. A vigorous campaign
is on, against mosquitoes, and
the only standing water left to
breed, are the fonts of holy water
in bhe church, which are full of
wigglers.
B   MUNNG -NOTES.   <|
British Columbia, from a
prospector's point of view,
is a most favorable country
for a poor man. Its mining-
laws are very liberal in the
terms, more than any other
in the empire. The capitalist also is amply protected,
and the very low rents for
hydraulic leases, make this
district a most favorable field
for mining investment.
LOCAL
Willie, run across and asR how
old Mrs. Brown is this morning.
(Willie, returns very soon and
reports :
Mrs. Brown says it is none
of your business how old she is!
McGillivray Creek is all
right. Indian miners, Major
and Miter, Dan and his father, and Miter's brother, have
a good wing dam below Brett
brothers' claim, and are getting lots of gold. A canoe
shaped nugget sold to Paul
Santini weighs $19.00 This
creex is only 30 miles away,
entering Anderson Lake on
die west side.
Hunters
If you load your own shells I can sell you
lend slightly hardened with alloy for bullets
at   9 cents a pound.
THE PROSPECTOR
E. Bell, the Indian agent, hae
a record on 100 inches of water
in the interests of the Indian village here. This water has sometimes muddied the town water
a little, and riled a citizen or 2
but this spring it is to be Humeri
and carried across the canon,
about a mile up. The lumber is
already on hand
H. W. Brainard says he can
raise figs and almonds here ; the
former are said to be a success
at Keren)os. They do not need
very much water or work, and
if you cannot sell, you can eat
them fresh, dried, pickled or preserved.
A Bridge Itiver Indian named
Bell, camping near 10-mile creek
was burned out Tuesday, 21st,
losing everything, including a
good rifle. His wife got her two
little children out, with scorched
clothing.
A gentleman interested in mining haw taken up a water right
north of here with a view of raising fruit on the benches near.
There is also talk of bringing water from Bridge River.
McDonald and McGillivray,
General   Merchants,
Clinton B.C.
NEW CROP OF HOME GROWN AND IMPORTED
v GARDEN H FIELD H & >K FLOWER ;r SEEDS H
WHOLESALE    AND   RETAIL
RHODODENDRONS,     ROSES,    GREENHOUSE AND  HARDY   PLANTS   FOR   SPRING   PLANTINO
CUT FLOWERS,   FLORAL WORK.    FERTILIZERS, BER HIVES AND SUPPLIES,
EASTERN PRICES OR LESS. CATALOGUE FT7.E, NO AGENTS
T-EioTTSAiirns   ozf   fzeivxt   t^ieies
_A~_i~r:D     &■&-_* j-.2&_Ei2-TrT~j-.T,   trees
A wonderful revival of religion
is sweeping; over Wales liKe a
wild tire. At the present time
all Wales is on its knees every
night, aud hundreds of day
meetings are being held. The
people think and talk and dream
of nothing else. Temperance
and other religious meetings,
dated weeks before, are changed
by common consent into revival
meetings. Lecturers come to fill
engagements, but if they happen
to be ministers, they are pressed
to preach instead. Traveller!
gather at a station, but before
the tram arrives a young woman
begins to sing and a prayer ineet-
__,__*_.    ._ big follows.   Miners waiting for
!! WRITE TO THE PROSPECTOR I!h?-d^ ■iwl*.ta^ f-'^
HZEnSTIR.-Y-'S   HTJRSERIES
3010 ■W-ESSajl^'K; ROAD
TAKCOLTYBH/
FEBRUARY
MON TUE WED THUR FRI SAT SUN
12       3      4      5
8        7        8        9      10    11     12
13      14      15      16      17     18     19
20      21      22      23      24    25     26
27      28
MARCH
MON TUE WED THUR FRI SAT SUN
1    2   3  4  6
6  7   8    9  10  11  12
13  14  15   16  17  18  19
20  21  22   23  24  25  26
27  28  29   30  81
Bridge River
Ben Hamilton, George Gibson,
Mr. Shanz, David Coughlin and
others are working on the South
Fork, about a mile up, aud.are
doing well. Last summer, one
man near here made $800. A
nugget of $80 is reported.
The pay is all on the benches,
aud the benches all pay, so that
the South Fork can be worked
when other streams are useless
on account of high water.
A Lillooet man aud small party
were up here one time, and took
out five hundred in no time. $49
was the largest piece.
George Gibson and his friends
have a ditch which can be improved so as to do some hydraulic mining.
Some tine nuggets have beeu
taken out iu this section, and ib
is not nearly worked out yet.
An Indian named Jimmy Lake
found one worth over $100 ; and
Owen Williams 117, but a Chinaman holds the record at $500.00
A I he Prospector,
The PROSPECTOR'
■vr-__y__-\jcx_,'sr.
advertising rates low as possible,
Basis of 30 cents tir square Inch,
pek Month. Land or Mining Notices
3o DAYS   $4 60 DAYS  $6.
by o. *w. j$~._EJ,3s~tsT~sao~csrGh
LILLOOET,  B. C,   MAR. 2,  1905.
The Year Book of B. 0. may be seen
at this office; and a beautiful book it is.
One startling statement is that the best
guide in the country lives at Ashcroft,
and bis name iB Manson, no initials.
Some time before next year this ought
to be corrected. The year book is a fine
means of advertising tbia district, and
could be used to advantage. It states
that the Big Horn in Ashnola are pretty
well shot out : which will help Lillooet.
The appioaching extinction of Elk is
being helped along by that Convivial
Society of Elks, who pay big prices for
two certaiu teeth out of each animal.
NEW SCHOOL ACT.
T. B. BRANDON.
The Provincial Government is struggling with an Act, that if passed, will
tako a burden of $100,000 off the shoulders of the Government. *W ho will pay
thiB $100,000 ? The people of each district will be called on to support their
own schools, partially. To every rural
school the Government will grant $450 ;
the balance of the expense to be paid by
residents of the district or municipality.
Cities are to be dealt with in the same
manner.
SCHOOL CONVENTION,
T. B. B.
The recent convention of School Trustees in Vancouver shows that Trustees
are beginning to take an active part in
the educational questions of the day.
The trustees represent the parents,
and why Bhouid they not formulate resolutions and ideas bearing on tbe school
curriculum. They contend that a large
number of pupils waste a portion of the
time iu the High Schools. How many
oi our young men aud women require
Latin or Greek iu the ordinary walks of
life ? Therefore give them that which
is needed; give them a practical education. Germany has awakened to this
idea, aud notice the wonderful strides
■he has made in the commercial world.
The most notable resolution to be submitted to the Minister of Education ia,
tbat the High Schools provide for three
different branches of study, vie.— Commercial, Science and Art. This will enable the student to enter at once into
the work necessary for his chosen avocation.
»K>«)K>«^^>K)~3«>:«
Wm.  CUMMING,
General Store and B.C. Express Agent
LILLOOET.
MINERS' OUTFITS A SPECIALTY.
o. a.. ~p~eh:a.i_R/,
$K General   Merchant. ^
Outfits   and Guides   furnished
EST      to   Hunting Parties.       Jg$
Groceries, Hardware,   Drugs, Photo
Supplies, Dry Coods, Etc.
LILLOOET    -    -     IB.    O.
Mr. Freeman, of Lenz &
Leiser, drove in with a load
of samples, on Monday from
Ashcroft. He says there are
signs of great activity in R.R
circles for construction this
summer.
A new paper born, at Ashcroft, called the Yale Review
for the object of advertising
Yale District. Call and see
a copy.
LYTTON   STAGE.
Leaves Railway at Lytton at 7 a. m.
Mondays, Tuesdays, Fridays, Saturdays
One hour at noon at Half-way House
Reach Lillooet 5 p. ra. Returning on
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Saturdays and
Sundays.   47 miles along the Fraser.
Beautiful  Scenery.
Special Trips  made.
Write to
P.    REBAGLIATI   &   CO.
Struck Ore
In our big tunnel. Mining experts say it
will grow bigger and better. Many large
i>old veins are just ahead, and will be cut in
rapid succession.    We own lhe 200 acres
WITHOTTT     DSBT
AT G0LDFIELD
The Camp of quick fortunes. We own ioo
acres with gold strikes all around. Gold
veins discovered.    Join now and
SELF IDIQ-
Every share of Golden Sun stock gives ownership in the Gold field ioo acres and Colorado
20o—total 300. Dividends declared on both
would be 2 dividends on I  investment.
$15 BUYS 1000   SHARES
$45 buys 3,300   $90   buys 6,600   Full paid
non assessable.  Buy before the prices
ADVANCE 500 PER CENT
ORDER AT ONCE  the cheapest and best
with ore in the mines and cash   in  treasury;
If over subscribed your money returned
Highest Commercial and Bank references.
Make all remittances payable to
THE GOLDEN SUN
Mining and Milling Co
204KITTRIDGE BLDG, DENVER, Colo
W. M. Brandon, an ex-teacher of the
Lillooet Public School, won a scholarship of forty dollars in the February examinations. This makes the second
scholarship he has won, within a year.
He is in law at present at Osgoode Hall,
Toronto.
E. Santini has been having
an awful time with some carbuncles, on his leg: the pain
kept him awake nights and
he was unable to work for
several days.
Mr. Mulholland has gone
to Vancouver, and may not
return for some time.
George Forbes had word
from Lac La Hache, that it
was 48 below zero. Do you
thiiiK you will ever go back,
Geo
The Prospector has great
pleasure in stating that the
infant child of Mrs. George
Hurley is alive and vvell, and
the report in last issue was.
fortunately, an error.
Mr. Walter Hunter, Grammar school teacher, Nanaimo
and once our teacher here,
is dead.
Mr. Donaghen had rather
severe handling by rheumatism. If you people don't
stop getting rheumatism, I
will have to change your ad
on last page, or take another
meaning out of the words.
NOTICE
To Miners   & Stockmen:
When making application for claims,
or lands in this district, make sure your
advertisement is legal. A real valuable
claim, one worth jumping, is sometimes lost
on a quibble or question of form. Have
the advertisement in the paper printed in
the district your land is in ; not in the
Family Herald or any other paper printed
outside thc district.
Fir Seeds wanted,
For export, seeds of Douglas Fir and cedar
I will pay for clean seed Jl.&o for fir and $2
for cedar per pound.
The seed can be secured by gathering the
cones from the trees, and spreading them on
a tight floor, or on sheets; or on paper in a
dry room. In a few days thc cones will open
and the seeds drop out by stirring them occasionally.
Then clean the seed by using a sieve, or by
pouring from one dish into another, in n light
breeze, to separate light seed and dirt.
Advise as soon its possible, the quantity
you have, and I will send directions about
shipping. See my advertisement in this paper
M.J. Henry,
3010 WESTIW'R ROAD
Vancouver.
J. DUNLOP,
<3--E_2_TJ-_.-B,J-.--_i STOBB,
LILLOOET.
CLARKE &C0.,
CHEMISTS & DRUGGISTS,
LILLOOET.
Paul Santini,
GENERAL MERCHANT,
LILLOOET.
EVERYTHING for MINERS
Hotel Victoria,
ULLOOET,
MARK R. EAGLESON, PROPRIETOR
Headqnarters of
BIO- C_kA_.__v__::____ -_-ZWT2_TT-__.__~_.t3
Wire for Outfits, guides
Etc.   Cost  Reasonable.
Every Attention to Travellers and Commercials.
Large Sample Rooms.
Headquarters of Ashcroft and Lyttow
Stages. Special rates for families SPENDING   SEASONS.
Rooms,   Table, Liquors and
Stabling,   All   Excellent
Here is a list of papers which yon may
see at our office j Victoria Times, Htdley
Gazette, Scientific American, Winnipeg
Free Press, Montreal Weekly Witness, and
the Family Herald of course The Vancouver
World and News Advertiser, Kamloops Wa-
wa, Ashcroft Journal, Seattle P. I. Herald
of Revelstoke, Ft Steele Prospector.
CAYOOSH   CREEK,
STRANGE NOISES I SCIENTISTS
TO   INVESTIGATE.
Is Cayoosh Creek haunted or have we
a muBical mountain. A few nights ago
a resident preparing to retire, was slanted to hear the usual quiet of this region
dispelled by a quartet of eingers accompanied by a banjo; the leading voice
appearing to be that of a female. Thinking perhaps a party of ladies and gentle-
were out serenading, he went to Ihe
door, wheu the music immediately ceased. Seeing no one, he thought he waa
mistaken; but to his surprise, it again
sounded oil closing tbe door. But it invariably stopped on investigation, and
then resumed. This was repeated many
times, and enquiry has failed to establish
the identity of tho ghostly Hingere.
Can nny one offer an explanation ?
A The   Prospector.
LOCAL GEOLOGY:
David Dalziel, whose writings
fare well known here, always had
la taste for geology, and has been
[studying conditions in the val-
(ley of the Thompson. As these
fare similar in the Fraser, his late
I article iu the Yale Review is given
as follows.:—
There are evidences of a much
larger river having flowed down
the Thompson valley at some
very distant period of the
world's history. The Thompson river of to-day at its highest
is a mere rivulet con-pared with
the great body that once made
its way over the sands and pebbles that compose the hills and
benches of this ancient valley.
We find great heaps of gravel
plastered up against the original
mountain sides as though placed
there by some mighty rushing
torrent that carried everything
before it and deposited its debris
iu the great earth-fissures that
lay in its path. Those gravel
and sedimentary formations are
gradually crumbling away by
the action of wind and rain ;
they are crumbling away slowly
but surely, so that in the course
of time the original mountain
sides will again be exposed to
the elements, as they undoubtedly were many ages ago.
At the time of the last glacial
period , there were no gravel
benches in the Thompson and
Fraser valleys—there was nothing but deep, rocky, earth-crust
fissures intercepted at intervals
by great cross rents and huge
rock obstructions. When the
great thaw came, the floods increased daily for many decades
und the waters took the most
natural courses to the sea.
They flowed into these earth-
fissures and filled thein with
sand and gravel and boulders,
even to the height of the present
highest benches. The waters
would flow over one obstruction
after another, always filling up
the intervening fissure to the
very top of the barrier.
After this was accomplished
there would be a great, wide,
shallow river, flowing over a
perfectly level gravel bed. The
river would then be many miles
wide iu places, aud perhaps a
hundred times larger than it is
at present. As the waters gradually subsided they would seek
out narrowe'i" channels; they
would flow througli those wide,
level beds like a serpent winding
backwards and forwards, always
seeking out the softest spots
and places easiest worn away ;
they would creep near the origin
al   mountain   on one side and
miles away from it on the other.
As time went by, they would
come to flow over the obstructions in one spot continually :
they would thus gradually eat
awuy the barriers, and the great
intervening beds of gravel would
lie washed away slowly to make
a permanent channel for the river. This narrow channel would
be deepened at such a pace that
the difference would scarcely be
noticed in a thousand years.
And thus one bench after another would be left high and dry
to stand or crumble down into
the mysterious ages to come.
The feet have been swept away
from every bench in the Tnonip-
son valley ; some of them may
stand for centuries, others may
slide iu ab any moment; it will
all depend on the nature of the
foundation upon which they
have been deposited. If the or
iginal underlying rock is smooth
and sloping toward the center,
there is practically nothing to
hold the great overlying mass
of gravel in its place. Where
it has been plastered up against
the steep side of the original
mountain, there is nothing to
prevent the great body from
tumbling over at any moment
into the river below. Landslides
of this kind have actually occurred in this valley. If we fill a
ravine with sand and gravel,
and then cut a deep ditch
through the center of it, what
..ill happen ? The two sides
will slide in, leaving a sloping-
face and a level bench at the top.
I contend that this is exactly
what has happened in the
Thompson valley.
DAVID   DALZIEL.
IFOCXET   2DXJ-J_-_XX<-3
1905
FROM 15 CUP.   OFFICE   DIARIES
1, 2 & 3 DAYS TO A PAGE.
WHITTAKEK'S &  THE CANADIAN
ALMANAC FULL OF INFORMATION
At   Smith   Bros'
book: store
Vernon and Kamloops
BX STAGE.
BRITISH COLUMBIA EXPRESS
Clinton and way points,
MONDAY - WEDNESDAY - FRIDAY
ALL CARIBOO POINTS MONDAY
150 • MILE MONDAY AND FKIDAY
LILLOOET  MONDAY AND FRIDAY
Garden    Seeds,
FLOWERS & VEGETABLES,
5, 10, 15 and 20 cents per package,
according to size and quality.
SEND YOUR ORDER NOW
Before the Choicest GO!!
R. D. GUMMING        RIGHT HOUSE
ASHCROFT.
APOLOGY.
I regret having* published in
last week's issue, the article
signed Al Magoozlum, as 1 consider there was nothing- in Mr.
Laidle,y's discourse to call forth
the criticism.
Editor.
Tilings are moving at Birkenhead and
Owl Creek: over 100,000 feet of lumber
have been sawed, and ia about 6 weeks
when this ia planed and Mr. Forrester
the contractor arrives, construction of
the hatchery will commence. As thero
is an Indian reservation about 3 miles
away, tbere is no trouble in securing
help. At times there are 30 or 40 Indians at work, and horses or bull teams.
Snow is nearly gone. The hatchery is
right on the survey of the railway.
George Hurley will arrive here in
a few days lo open the Excelsior Hotel.
A. Minty of Ashcroft is here to fill
the place of Constable Carter
Recent rains washed out a part of
the road across the river, and J. Arthur
and T. Hairisare repairing it
William L. Dickey was hereon Saturday
John Marshall came home
An Indian woman panned out $4
in several hou'S the other day, working
a remnant of China Charlie's claim
A eoodly number of lovers of young
people turned out to see tbe election of
ollicers for the Literary Society at tbe
school on Friday last. It is really remarkable, how well the usages of parliament were imitated, with but few
suggestions from the able aud ei.ttius-
iaslic teacher. An advantage in leaching
or raising children in a quiet place, is
the absenceof excitement or distracting
influence. Mr. Gibbs with his chalk,
and Mr. Rowbottom with his songs, entertained old and young, in addition to
the regular program
cli]~tto~i~t.
Your correspondent is still in Poverty
Row in regard to gossip. The dreadful
condition ol the roads, caused by the
melting snow, may be a good excuse; at
anv rate, travel is a good deal retarded
thereby, Besides, as the saying (.oes,
it rained cats and do^e the other day,
and none can say that Mr. Jupiter Plu-
vius is a road mender.—He may give his
.ervices gratis, Blill he is worse than a
Chinaman.
The Prospector is eagerly looked for,
by the Clintonites, and the few who are
not yet subscribers, will sootier or later
fall in line, and support tLe utwspaper
of iheir district.
Dr. Sanson returned to Clinton from
L.i:ooet on Thursday and he reports tha
trip as being something awful,
Leonard McCarthy of the 137 was in
town thia week.
Mrs. Ulrich and family left for the 132
yesterday, after visiting friends in Ashcroft and here.
Mrs. Doherty and family are in town,
staying with Mrs. Eagleson and Mrs.
Peters.
Mr. Rowlands from Ashcroft paid the
burgh a visit.
There is a show for Clinton to get a
skating rink : altho' the floor of McDonald and McGillivray has just been painted, we want a good curling and skating
rink.
Mr. Anderson, the local blacksm'th,
is again back from the east, afler an absence of 4 weeks, aud ib at work at the
old stand.
Clement Smith has been sick all week
and little Campbell Sanson had a nasty
accident; on his way to school he fell
and cut his hands badly on some broken,
glass.
SO YEARS*
EXPERIENCE
ATENTS
Trace Marks
Designs
Copyrights &.c.
Anyone sending n sl-etch End description mny
nulckly ascertain our opinion free whether an
Invention la probably patentable. Communion.
tlOi.sstr.otly confidential. Handbook on Patents
sent free. Oldest agency for seenriup patents.
Patents taken tnroueh Slunn A Co. reoely*
fpt_i.ilnotice, wiftioutcharee, lathe
Scientific American,
A handsomely Illustrated weekly. Lnrsest elf.
ctilntlon of any scientific Journal. Terms, |3 a
yu.ir i four months, ?_. Sold by all newsdealers.
MUNN&Go,8353™1^ New York
Brauch OPBee. 025 F BU Wasblniftou. D.C The Prospector.
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TO THE FRONT
While    Investigating,
or investing,
LILLOOET
must isrorr   ibie forgot
~MI~~~ST_E3_3-
No District affords greater
Opportunities for Prospector or Capitalist. Gold
is found everywhere. A
trip into this region will
convince you !
CLIMATE.
Climate cannot
be beat for Consumption or for
Rheumatism.
From 20 to 30 wealthy
Sportsmen, English, American and German, come
here each year to hunt
Grizzly, Big Horn, Caribou
or Mountain Goat. Here
are the best guides.
e:
This is Magnificent! One
may be swayed to ecstasies over Italian or Swiss
Scenery; but let him see
our panorama, and lesser
scenes fade f

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