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The Prospector Feb 26, 1915

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Array : '
A
THE PROSPECTOR
i
VOL. S, NO. 18
LILLOOET, B. C., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1915.
$2 PER YEAR
Putting Lillooet on The Map
From Vancouver Province
Having made the first tour by passenger train of the section of the Pa-
cilic Great Eastern Railway from
Squamish :o Lillooet, more than a
score of the members of the Legislature returned to Victoria this morning. They had left the Howe fc'ound
terminal early Saturday morning, the
guests of tne company. Mr. J. W.
Stewart, president of the line, was
aboard, together with Mr. P. Welch,
contiactor; Mr. D'Arcy Tate, K. C,
vice-president, and other officials.
T:ie legislative party was led by
three cabinet ministers, Hon. W. .T
Bowser, Hon. Price Ellison and Hon.
Thomas Taylor. The guests also Included Hon. T. W. Paterson, whose
long term as lieutenant-governor of
British Columbia was concluded only
a few weeks ago. Dr. O. M. Jones,
who owns a fine ranch on the Fraser
just above Lillooet, was another distinguished guest. Still another was
Mr. J. G. G. Kerry, C. E.. a member
of the Ontario Railway Commission,
who was so delighted with the tour
that he declared last evening that after a railway experience of thirty
years he must say that not only was
the construction excellent but the line
afforded the most wonderful scenic
beauties he had ever witnessed.
Trip  Well Carried Out.
It is a proper tribute to the operating officials of the road, headed by
Mr. A. H. Sperry, general manager,
to say that the arrangements for the
inspection were carried out perfectly.
Before the party left Victoria by the
Princess Mary, each guest was presented with a programme which included the train schedule and station
timetable. This was so strictly adhered to that Lillooet was reached on
the minute, and the return was made
with the same precision.
Saturday's run of 120 miles wat
made in approximately eight and a
hal;' h.-urs, including stops. In a
few sections, ballasting of the track
ii still proceeding, but a speed of 25
to 30 miles an hour was attained in
many places, especially on the western en i. where the roadbed Is solid
rock, and the going remarkably
s-nroth. The features that particularly struck the visitors were trm magnificent scenery, which was unexpected by most of the guests, and the fine
forests of merchantable timber in the
roast valleys. Not only was the trip
through the splendid Cheakamus
Canyon a wonderful eye-opener, trut
the rugged, rock-ribbed snow-capped
iveal-s of the lake district close to
Lillooet were a revelation.
Attractive to Tourists.
For more than thirty miles the
railway skirts the snores or pierces
the cliffs along Anderson and Seaton
Lakes. The mountains are as noble
as any of the Cascades. The lakes,
like slender > ibbons of deep blue, lie
between, superb in the sparkle of the
glacier-reflected sunshine. It is a bit
i,f Switzerland outswissed, except that
the Indians of Lillooet are neither
half so numerous or a quarter so industrious in cultivating the pretty
slopes. Centuries ago Anderson and
Seaton Lakes were all one. Until one
i av half a mountain slid in, cut the
lake into two, arid lett a dam a mile
and a half in length. On this slide
now stands an Indian village of old
and picturesque but well kept houses.
These natives are superior to the
usual run of coast tribes, and make
an excellent living in fishing and
hunting. The lakes are approximately at 900 feet above sea level. They
are exceedingly deep. A railway surveyor recently ran a line down 720
feet, and was then unab'e to sound
bottom. It seems therefore fair to
assume that the bottom of Anderson
Lake at least ig in some places as low
us sea level. Trout, salmon and a
freshwater ling are the chief food
fishes in these lakes. Their waters
eventually empty into the Fraser just
below Lillooet, the creek joining the
eastern end of Seaton Lake with the
Fraser being only three or four miles
long. On its bank stands a well-
equipped hatchery, which was specially visited by Mr. J. P. Babcock, the
well known expert of the provincial
fisheries department, who was a
member of the party.
It was not yet sundown when the
visitors reached Lillooet, so they had
a fine chance of looking over this
picturesque old town and its delightful surroundings. There was no snow,
and the weather was like spring. It
is only once in half a dozen years
that the lakes freeze over, so mild is
the climate. The town, with a population of several hundred, nestles on
a bench of the hillside. The citizens
were glad of the legislators' visit, and
were not slow in showing it. Indeed
the enthusiasm of the welcome was
most pronounced. Some of the towns-
continued on Page 2
War Gleanings
A French torpedo boat has succeeded in sinking a submarine
which has been operating in the
vicinity of Boulonge.
The French have successfully
driven the Germans from the
heights of Xon and from Norroy,
and inflicted heavy losses.
The offer by the Toronto University of a base hospital for
overseas service has been accepted by the authorities.
Both Norway and the United
States have lost another ship
as a result of the German war on
merchant vessels.
Unfavorable weather is said to
be causing delay in the continuation of operations by the Allied
fleets against the forts of the
Dardanelles.
A German submarine made an
unsuccessful attempted to sink a
cross-channel passenger steamer.
The torpedo passed about thirty
yard ahead of the ship.
Mr. Bruce Ismay is credited
with the statement that shipping
losses are very light, that value
of cargo lost is only seven-tenths
of one per cent, of the total of
cargo insured.
London.—A despatch to the
''Daily News" from Copenhagen
says it is feared there that the
steamer Specia of Stockholm has
struck a mine and foundered,
steamer left Liveepool Jan 31 and
was last reported Feb. 2.
London, Feb.~23.-The Admiralty announced that the Irish
channel and the North channel
waters lying between England
Scotland and Ireland have been
restricted from Navigation from
today. The admiralty order restricting navigation in the North
Sea closes the Irish channel to all
ships of every nation and entirely
prohibits navigation of the area
from Feb. 23.
Paris, Feb 23.-The following
official communication was issued
this evening: "The day has been
comparatively quiet except in the
Campagne district, where the
fighting continues violently.
"We have taken more trenches
in the region of Beausejour and
have maintained our gain of the
previous day.
"To the northwest of Verdun,
in the region of the forest of
Forges, our batteries blew up an
ammunition store.
"It is confirmed that the Germans suffered very heavy losses
in the complete repulses of the
attack at Bois Bouchet on the 21.
"In Alsace an attempt by the
Germans to debouch from the
portion of the village of Stoseies-
er still occupied by the enemy,
was immediately stopped by our
fire."     	
Mammook Solicks
The following four gallant Pemberton
Meadows men have answerd the call:
R. Casement, engineers, now at Salisbury plains with the first contingent.
W. E. Blakeway, B.C. Horse, formerly well known as the Pemberton—
Lillooet mail contractor, now at Victoria.
E. Coleman, engineers, who has been
sent to Ottawa on Special service.
R. Reed, engineers, just sworn in.
Good luck to all of them! When the
war is o'er we will be glad to see them
back again.
TRAIN SERVIGE.
Mixed trains carrying passengers and
freight will leave Lillooet for the South
at 7 p.m. on Mondays, Wednesdays and
Fridays and arrive from the South at
6 a.m. on Tuesdays, Thursdays and
Saturdays.
For further information apply to the
agent.
A. H. SPERRY,
General Manager.
The Station Site
To The Editor:
Sir,
I do not know who is responsible for selecting the site for our
railway station.
It is my opinion that a very
grave mistake is being made if it
is the intention to build a permanent station at the present
site. The present location is a
pot-hole, and it wilt be almost impossible for trains to start either
East or West, if the stop, There
is a good site for a station at the
present siding.
Yours respectfully,
J. S. BELL.
General   News  of Lillooet
District
Mr. P. Le Mare, distrist forester, relumed this week from his
tour of inspection.
The road near the eight mile hill
Lytton is in a dangerous condition, the bank having slipped
through the cribbing.
A fire occurred here this week which
totally destroyed the country villa of
Messrs Brett and Clyde. Origin of the
fire is unknown. Everything in the
villa V/as destroyed.
Mr. W. Mitchell, of Notch Hill,
was here this week looking after
the Company's Fruit Lands in
the Lillooet district; he left for
Notch Hill this morning by way
of Lytton.
Mr. G. N. Deaver of Vernon,
B.C. arrived in town this week
on his way to the 15-mile ranch.
Mr. Deaver has been appointed
manager of the 15-mile ranch,
Ashcroft road; we welcome him
into our midst and wish him every
success in his undertaking.
There's quite a number of, the Doless
& Seemore firm in town these days.
Mr. A. B. Greig, who has been
on a visit to the coast cities, returned last Saturday. Mr. Owen
who managed the Bank of B.N.
A. during Mr. Greig's absence,
returned to Vancouver by way of
the Pacific Great Eastern Railway, last Sunday.
Methodist Church —Preacher :
Rev. R. D. Hall.
Services : Sunday School at 11
Preaching service 7.30 p.m.
Provide Means for Shipping
Minerals and Fruit
NOTICE
Tenders will he received up to March
31st by the undersigned for the purchase of the Government Camp buildings at Hanceville bridge situated at
Hanceville, B.C. and erected during the
autumn of 1914.
The lowest or any tender may not
necessarily be accepted.
JAMES K. MORE,
Road Superintendent
NOTICE
Tenders will be received up to March
31st by the undersigned for the purchase and removal of the lumber in the
Old Hanceville bridge situated at Hanceville, B.C.
The lowest or any tender may not
necessarily be accepted.
JAMES K. MORE,
Road Superintendent
Memorable to the people of Lillooet
town and district will be the afternoon of February 20, 1915, marked by
the arrival over the newly spiked-
down rails of the P. G. E. of the excursion train bearing many members
of the Legisla/ture of British Columbia led hy three of the six cabinet
ministers. With little information beyond the fact that the party was to
arrive and sipend the night at Lilloott
the citizens had made preparation for
a reception.
About 5 o'clock the train reachel
Lillooet bridge and waiting autos carried the visitors to town, where an
hour or so was spent in renewing old
acquaintances and making new. In the
evening a well attended public meeting was held which was addressed by
Hon. W. J. Bowser, Hon. Thomas Taylor and several of the members, including Mr. A. MacBonald, member
for Lillooet, Mr. C. Phair, government
a.gent, a pioneer of 40 years, who has
.inst been superannuated, occupied the
chair.
Introducing Hon. Mr. Bowser, who
was first called on to apeak, Mr. Phair
Pfavo ihe ministers and members a
welcome to Lillooet. The country was
indebted to the government for the
rwllway which was at last bringing
Lillooet and Cariboo in touch wtrh the
rest of the province. He was glad the
members ha.1 com<\ It would give
them an insight into the district
Timber and Fruit.
From Squamish to Pemberton, remarked Mr. Phair in the course of
a brief address, the railway passed
through millions of feet of good
timber. At Pemberton the railway
touches but a corner of a splendid
agricultural area, where two or
three crops of hay could annually
be cut. From Pemberton to Lillooet there was much fine fruit land,
while at Lillooet they had the garden
of Pritish Columbia for fruit find farm
produce. The climate was ideal, for
they had at least 3-00 sunny days in
every R8:">. This gave their fruit 1'ts
spleindld color. The fruit bo thought
was not equalled in the province.
There were thousands of acres
which will be irrigated to grow fruit.
Water was all that was needed. They
had all the fish they needed in the
lakes and streams, and in the mountains they had grizzlies, bighorn and
scat. Tt was sure to attract many tourists.
Their mining resources had not
been developed because transportation
had been lacking to s-et machinery in.
They had an excellent water suroply
and fine climate, tbe winters in general mild, the absence of mosquitoes
and flies. Tt was a.n attractive place
for settlers.
An Unusual Visit.
Mr. Bowser expressed his pleasure
at once again addressing a. Lillooet
audience—the last time was on the
eve of the second iast election campaign. He had visited Lillooet several times since and prided himself
on his warm personal friendships—
some of them of many years standing.
Today the members of the Legislature were guests of the P. G. E. on
the occasion of this inspection trip
over the first section of the line to
be completed. He felt it was particularly fortunate that twenty-five members of the Legislature had come on
this visit. He had always been interested in Lillooet—lie had visited the
government fish hatchery at Seaton
Lake, as the fisheries branch was under his department. He felt that the
greatest future was in store for Lillooet on account of its undeveloped
wealth. As a minister of the crown
he had occasion to visit all parts of
the province. Each had its own peculiar advantages. Lillocet within its
own borders had many and varied
and valuable resources. Last fall he
had traversed much of this district
and th? Chilcoten and Cariboo, when
he saw conditions for himself. The
long drive for stock from Chilcoten
to Ashcroft had handicapped the cattle men. With the P. G. E. built into
Lillooet that was done away with. It
should give a great impetus to the
industry and he knew of no better
opening for cattle than this part of
the province.
Its Wonderful Fruit.
The Lillooet was noted too for its
minerals. Formerly, machinery could
not be got in, but the railway removed that difficulty. He referred to
the terse and Interesting remarks of
the chairman in describing the Lillooet and paid 'a compliment to the
long service of the pioneer, who was
now being superannuated after thirty-seven years' service. He had been
glad to bring so many members and
introduce them to the great capabilities of Lillooet with its valuable na-
continued on Page 4 THE PROSPECTOR
THE   PROSPECTOR.
I'ubiished   in  the interest of   Lillooet  District.
A. E. Ludwig, Manager.
FEB. 26.   1915.
Putting Lillooet on the Map
(From page one)
peop e ha ! been waiting thirty or
luiiy years for a railway. It was a
very comforting anj satisfying sight
when a iocou.otive followed by real
Pullman coaches came around the
I end. It meant that at last Lillooet
was on tne railway map, and the occasion merited a salute that was not
siuw in being bestowed. Tne motor
roads were in fair shape even if the
g,adei looked soir.ewnat dangerous,
.. 1 t:ie yLs.toi's saw much Pleasing
terr.tory before dark.
The iouP-nys intention for the
present is to put on an accommoda-
i n train for passengers and freight
packages, going up from Squamish
one day and returning next day, leaving Lill oet in the morning. Then in
tie spring, as the demand for service
Mows, a c.aily passenger service is ex-
i ected to be inaugurated. A special
week-end sportsman's train out of
;-'[u.iii:h, say un Fridays, and return.ng Mondays, is also contempla*-
e        when   the   trout-t'is.iing     season
< pen.; a few weeks from now. Lillooet
. ,; rs are saij to break out of their
winter shells about May 1, whic.i
t-houui also afiord some temptation
10 Vancouver hunters. Many of trie
l.,.t _ui_SS .n the country live in the
lo   n   of  Liilooet.
Leaving oquani.su the ra.l iuus North,
i.uii a, _u_nt uiig.e awards the easi
imu il is worth noticing L.iaiL it is ai-
l.iost paialiei with the Canadian Pa-
LLi- iuuivvay in the north and south
l .ii_ciu ui tua,,: line between Hope and
j... noli, .-ioout 60 miies separate tae
. ,u ...ico ui railway whlcn cross the
^uScaues at about the same angle.
..,. ii gets over the divide, the Paci-
j._  ~. *...*. _.a_l_rn ssviiigs to the easi-
...... a.:.d at Lillooet the two railways
...c .-. it'hin 4o miles of each other. En-
i lose-u ui this great square with Van-
lu-.ei- en the s'Juth, Lillooet on the
l.u-..    t:-e  i'.   G.   L.  Railway  on the
l-_i Lnu ihe C. P. K. on the east is
a -iJ.rict t^s large as Wales and with
; ^ many mountains and a great maw
i ui_ wKts. Harrison is the largest
i..k<j, with Linouet a close; second—
i uli fine Ijodies of water thirty miles
or more in length and backed by
:■. Un lid mountain ranges.
it is interesting to note that there
;3 -  duuu pack  trail through  by way
• . in. we iu>:es, so t.-.at it would be
r.-aconubly easy for tho enterprising
1.inner or fisherman to make a trip
i eiland and join t. e railway in the
\ioiniuV  of Pemberton.  Indeed  it was
.. ih.s loate that many of the early
settlers of the district got in and ouit.
Viiiic are of course literally hun-
u eds of other smaller lakes scattered
.) er ihe district. There is no better
fishing anywhere than what they af-
i'f rd.
Tapping the Cariboo.
But  while  the  Pacific Great East-
< rn is incidentally opening up a fine
V m_ and fishing country, this is by
no n-eans an/ chief feature of its designed  usefulness.   In the  picturesque
.stria: t:aversed on Saturday by the
1< g;slative party the P. G. E. has pen-
t trcted and left behinl the heavy
; . <. ; tain wo: k of the Ccast and Cas-
i "e ranges and is already out on the
' oa-1 plstenu", with open country sim-
o that around Kamloops and
v?-r;:rn. At Lillooet the bridge across
the 1 - raser is about ready for the
i i'Js.
There the line strikes east to Clln-
• - v.-hich will lie reached by mld-
s miner, nnd then swinging northward
t'urugh t-,e beautiful Lac la Hache
Valley the line traverses the higher
!: n s cf central and northern Cari-
'co   With a vevr few exceptions, and
DECLINE SUBSTITUTES
short ones at that, the construction
Is easy going enough, through open
rolling country. Chief Engineer J.
Callaorhan is looking forward, he told
the visitors, to laying the last rail into
l'ort George by New Year. Certainly
the eons*,ruction engineers expect to
have the line ballasted and ready for
attual operation by next spring, little
more than a year from now.
The company is liy no means waiting to finish the line from end to end
I efore trying to get some revenue
out of it. Mr. Sperry told Hon. Mr.
Bowser on Saturday that the accommodation trains pint on as soon as the
line was in Pemberton had been paying operation expenses since the start.
Now the operating department con-
terrtplates immediately putting on a
freight and passenger service between
I.'l'poet an l the coast and expect from
this tn have a very'fair business from
the start.
Enjoyed a Fine View.
Late Saturday the visitors took in
the beauties cf Lillooet. Standing on
ihe banks of the Fraser, with a splendid vista of ranching country stretching noi th and east across tne river,
they were able to some extent at least
to realize the importance of the line
from the viewpoint of the people of
Liilooet. This settlement is not only a
local centre, but virtually the gateway of Western Cariboo. Hundreds of
thousands of acres of rich land lie
tributary to it up and down the river
arid on boUi sides. Immediately north
of the town is the rich mining district
of Bridge River, which flows into the
Fraser from the west side. But north
of thai; the country flattens out and
thousands of cattle are supported on
the Chilcotin plains, whose neighborhood centre is the village of Hanceville.
V./fX of the Frassr the country is
mere thickly settled and the hillsides
are dotted with wonderfully fine
-anches. The people of all this district
have hern pulling hard for a railway
for its sdvenit means that they will he
able to drive their caiitle in to either
Lillocet or Clinton within a few hours
and ly the same hour next day they
w ii, be delivered at Vancouver or
VIi to- in off the train.
Mr, C. E. Tisrlall made a very careful survey of the whole Cariboo situation abouit three ivears ago and ho
Is a great believer in the theory that
a tremendous local trade can be worker! un rUottg this line He thinks thait
the effect en Vancouver's commerce
is; going to be very marked within a
rhori time after the completion of the
line Mr. Bowser is very mu h impressed on the fruit question. He spent five
weeks of a summer some four years
ago on Seaton Lake. He is never tired
of talking of tve salubrious climate
«n1 magnificent fruit he found there.
The Lillooet is a little nearer to Vancouver than the Okanagan, and the
attorney-general, talking as a farmer,
!hin'-R the people of the older fruit
section will have to lock to their laurel'? if they wish to kefva up with the
natural advantages possessed by Lillooet.
Fine Day for a Trip.
Saturday was one of those rare dc(.s
if iaie winter when the woods are all
a-sparkie with snow and frost and the
air has even enough tingle to quicken
the pulses of indolent legislators.
ija.;sing through bquamish they got a
fleeting glance of the new yards and
shops being erected for the company.
The suddenness with which the line
plunges into the mountain country is
amazing.
Less than an hour from the wharf
the visitors were traversing the canyon of the Cheakamus, a stream half
as large again as the Capilano and always full of trout. At a dizzy height,
;he railway clings to the canyon wall
and shoulders around the cliffs whose
edges have been blasted away just
enough to give the rails a track hold.
Up the stream the train makes a pretty steady climb ait a grade whose
maximum is 2.2 per cent. The curvature is moderate and the train made
surprisingly good time over this section.
The summit at Alpha Lake, 2100
feet above sea level was passed In mid-
I'orenoon. From here to Pemberton,
which Is 52 miles from Squamish, the
.'unning is on an easy downgrade for
the altitude of the "Meadows" is only
a trifle over 700 feet. Green River
Falls and the picturesque Soo River
had been passed already. At Pemberton the sluggish Lillooet is crossed.
The country is so level that from the
car windows the head of Lillooet Lake
nearly three miles to the south could
bo seen.
Afternoon saw the ascent of the Birkenhead River and later the crossing
of the Blackwater, the railway taking
the water grade of both these valleys
for a considerable distance. Wonderfully diversified scenery greeted the
visitors along Anderson Lake, whose
shore was first touched eighty-seven
miles away from Sqtfamish. The
difficulties of building along these
shores, in construction which veny
closely resembles the Canadian Pacific in the Fraser Canyon, can be appreciated. There are many bridges and
tinnels. One of the former crosses the
mouth of McGillivray Creek, which
•■•winns away to the north and leads
to auite a notable grizzly bear and
sheep country. Archie MacDonald,
M. L. A. for Lillooet, told the visitors
that thirty years ago he spent a season mining at McGillivray. The first
p-old he found was a nugget worth
$20 He spent the whole year there
hut never found another lump'of gold
such as that picked up the first day.
besides those already mentioned,
the following members of the Legislature were on the trip: J. A. Fraser,
S. A. Cawley, H. E. Forster, M. Man-
son, W. J. Manson, F. J. Mackenzie,
A. MacDonald, Neil F. Mackay, J. R.
Jackson, R. H. Pooley, Hon. D. M.
Eberts, Wm. Manson, Wm. Hunter,
Dr. McGuire, H. H. Watson, C. E. Tis-
dall, H B. Thomson, Henry Behnsen
and J. H. Schotield. Others in the
partv were Mr. J. Callaghan, chief engineer of the P. G. E.; R. D. Thomas,
secretary-treasurer of the company;
George S. MacDonald, chief clerk, Victoria; A. McQueen, right-of-way
agent; J. Arbuthnot, Captain H. J. S.
Musl-ett. D. O. Lewis, F. C. Gamble,
W. Ct'llin Captain S. B. Johnson. E.
O. S. Scholefleld, H. Cleasby, T. Fell,
George A. Fraser, Price Ellison jr.,
and   A.   J.   Ellison.
The train was in charge of A, W.
Lnedke, superintendent; J. G. Giles,
mpptpr mechanic; Mr. Bazley, en-
p-'neer; W. McKlvor, fireman; H. A.
Retfke, conductor; J. Johnson, and
H. Hull, bra^emen; F. E. Orton, sleep-
in™ car conductor; P. Simpson, dining
rar   conductor;   A.   Chanson,   chef.
CKERS
LILLOOET, B. C.
BLACKSMITHS
HORSESHOEING
A SPECIALTY.
Heavy and Light Wagons
Repaired at Moderate Cost,
!   Headquarters for Mining Men
Fred McElroy Mgr.
Guests Comfort
l &   My   Motto
CoiT.er Hastings and
Cambie Streets
Vancouver, B. C.
EUROPEAN PLAN
GRASSIE
Pioneer Watchmaker
and Jeweler
'318 Cambie St.      Vancouver, B.C.
j Orders by Mail Attended to.
j Fine Watcl  Repairing a Specialty
i
FEED STABLE
Horses and Rigs for Hire
Light and Heavy Draying
Express Delivery
EMMET DARCY,  Prop.
Bus Meets all Regular Boats
at Seaton Lake
c. A. PHAIR
Lillooet, B. C.
General
Merchant
Hardware,
Fishing Tackle,
S. W. Paints,
Eastman Kodaks,
Glass,
Dry Goods
Mens' Furnishings,
Stationery,
Photo Supplies,
Na-Dru-Co. Drugs,
SingerSewingMachine
Edison Phonographs
Moore Lights.
Groceries,
We are now paying special
attention to our GROCERY
DEPARTMENT, and having made some careful buys
we can give better value,
and prices second to none.
It will pay you to give us a
trial. As our prices will be
the lowest good goods can
be sold for,   we will sell for
CASH
only!
Lillooet
Nurseries
We have the finest fruit
trees in British Columbia
Apples grown locally and
acclimatized.
Pears,   peaches, cheeries,
plums, small fruits, also
strawberries,   and   ornamental shrubs, &c. &c.
Everything in
Nursery
Stock
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A. W. A. PHAIR
Lillooet, B.C. THE PROSPECTOR
Land Lease Notices
Job Printing
of every description can
be obtained
from our Job
Department.
Delivered When Promised and Correct When
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Lillooet
Prospector
Jobbing
Department.
Lillooet land district
District of Clinton
Take notice that Allan S. B. Baker,
of Loon Lake, occupation rancher, intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south west corner of lot 97 District of
Lillooet, thence south 20 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence north 20 chains,
thence west 40 chains to point of commencement, 80 acres more or less.
Allan Selby Blake Baker.
10- Dec. 12, 1914.
LILLOOET LAND  DISTRICT
DISTRICT OF LILLOOET
Take notice that Willian Grinder of
Big Bar, occupation farmer, intends
to apply for permission to lease the
following described land.
Commencing at a post planted at
the S.E. corner of Lot 393, thence south
8 i chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence east 8 chains,
to point of commencement, 640 acres
more or less.
7—Nov. 25, 1914        WILLIAM GRINDER
Lillooet land district
District of Lillooet
Take notice that The B.C. Cattle Company Ltd.
of Canoe Creek, occupation Stock Raising, intends
to apply for permission to lease the followmit described land
Commencing at a post planted about one hundred and forty chains east, thence about thirty
chains south of   the south east   corner  of   lot
028 Li.looet District and running thence 80
chains east, thence 80 chains, north, thence 80
chains west, thence 80 chains south to point of
commencement, 640 acres more or less.
British Columbia Cattle Company ltd.
Aug i5, 1914 Lincoln Calhoun Hannon, agent,
Water Notice
Diversion and Use
Land Lease Notices
Lillooet  Land District
District   of   Cariboo
Take notice that Herman J. Rossi, of
Mound Ranch, Clinton B.C. occupation
Rancher and Investments, intends to
apply for permission to lease the following described lands
i ommencing at a post planted on the
southwest corner of Lot 159, thence
running wes*. one quater mile to the
northwest corner of lot 158, thence one
quarter mile north, thence one quarter
mile east, thence one quarter mile south
to point of commencement, forty acres
more or less. Guy Waters,
agent for Herman J. Rossie
8-Dec. 9, 1914
LILLOOET LAND DISTRICT
DISTRICT OP LILLOOET
Take notice that I, Robert Henry Carson, Agent
for The Empiie Valley Development Company
Limited of Vancouver, occupation broker, intends
to apply for permission to lease the following
described lands
Commencing at a post planted 20 chains south
and 20 chains west of the S.W. corner of lot 935,
thence south 60 chains, thence west 20 chains,
thence north 60 chains, thence east 20 chains to
initial post, containing 120 acres more or less.
Empire Vallfy Development Company Ltd.,
Robert Henry Carson, Agent,
4—October 24th. 1914.
LILLOOET LAND DISTRICT
DISTRICT OF LILLOOET
Take notice that Antonio Boitano of
Spring House, occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described lands
Commencing at a post planted at the
Southwest corner of Lot 1093, thence
south 47.54 chains to a junction with
the northern boundary of Lot 1958,
thence east 8925 chains to a junction
with western boundary of lot 19.66,
thence north 47.54 chains to a junction
with southeast corner of lot 1093, thence
west 79.805 chains to point of commencement, 360 acres more or less.
8—Nov 28, 1914 Antonio Boitino
Take notice that H. Graham, whose
address is, Indian Agent, Lytton, B.C.,
will apply for a licence to take and use
100 inches of water out of 14-mile creek
also known as 14-mile creek, which
flows into the Fraser river about 14
miles from Lillooet. The water will be
diverted from the stream at a point
about 1 mille from its mouth and will be
used for irrigation purposes upon the
lands described as Fountain Reserve
No 2.
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 9th day of November, 1914.
A copy of this notice and an application    pursuant   thereto    and    to   the
"Water Act 1914" will be filed in the
office of  the  Water Recorder at Clin
ton, B.C.
Objections may be filed with the said
Water Recorder or with the Comptroller of Water Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoia, B. C.
H.   GRAHAM,
Indian Agent for Fountain Reserve
Indians.
This notice was first published in the
Lillooet Prospector or the 13th day of
November, 1914.
TRY THE PROSPECTOR
FOR    JOB     PRINTING
Water Notice
For a Licence to take and use Water
NOTICE is hereby given that the
Pacific Great Eastern Railway
Company of Victoria, B.C. will apply
for a licence to take and use 100,000
Imp. Gallons of water per day out of a
spring which rises about 200 feet north
of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway
right of way in the vicinity of tee west
boundary of Lots 1598 and 1597, Lillooet
District, and empties by seepage in a
southerly direction into the Portage
River about three-fourths of a mile
from Seaton Lake. The water will be
taken from a well about 200 feet north
of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway
Right-of-way and will be used for Railway and Station purposes on the land
described as the Right of way of the
Pacific Great Eastern Railway.
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 16th day of December 1914.
The application will be filed in the office of the water Recorder at Clinton,
B.C.
Objections may be filed with the said
Water Recorder or with the Comptroller
of water rights, Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C.
The Pacific Great Eastern Railway,
Applicant.
by (Sgd-) C R. Crysdale - Agent.
This notice first appeared in the Lillooet "Prospector" or the 25th day of
December 1914.
EXCELSIOR HOTEL
W.   J.   Abercrombie,   Proprietor
A First-Class Table.
WINES, LIQUORS, AND THE BEST OF CIGARS
J. M. Mackinnon, BROKER, Vancouver, B.C
Suite 5 Williams Bldg.
413 Granville St.
Lillooet Ranches and Fruit Lands a Specialty.    Correspondence Solicited.
Timber Lands,     Ranch  Lands.
Coast Lands and Real Estate.
Water Notice
Diversion and Use
Take notice that Alfred Ernest Simms
whose address is Big Bar will apply
for a licence to take and use thirty
inches of water out of Big Bar creek
which flows to south west and drains
into the Fraser river about six miles
from southwest corner of P. R. 1759.
The water will be diverted at a point
about 60 chains N.E. of S.W. corner of
P.R 1759, and will be used for irrigation
purposes upon the land described as
pre-emption record 2233, Lillooet District.
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 1st day of February, 1915.
A copy of this notice and an application pursuant thereto and to the re-
quiren.ents of the "Water Act" will be
filed in the office of the Water Recorder
at Clinton, B.C.
Objections may be filed with the said
water Recorder or with the Comptroller
of water rights. Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C.
Alfred Ernest Simms, Applicant
Henry George Coldwell, agent
This notice first appeared in the Prospector of February 12, 1915.
Subscribe for the Prospector
WATER NOTICE
Diversion and Use
Notice is hereby given that Pacific
Great Eastern Railway G ompany of
Victoria, B.C. will apply for a licence
to take and use One-tenth cubic feet
per second of water out of Eleven Mile
Creek which flows in a North-Westerly
direction through Lot 2661, Lillooet District, and empties into Fraser River
near West boundary Lot 2661. The
water will be diverted approximately
Five hundred feet above P.G.E. Railway and will be used for Railway purposes on the land described as P.G.E.
Rly. right of way.
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 25th day of January, 1915.
The application will be filed in the
office of the Water Recorder at Clinton, B.C.
Objections may be filed with the said
Water Recorder or with the Comptroller of Water Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Pacific Great Eastern Railway
Company, Applicant,
by (Sgd.) C R. Crysdale, Agent.
This notice first appeared in the Prospector of February 5, 1915.
F. PYMAN
LILLOOET
Watchmaker & Jeweler
Optical Work a Specialty.
All Work Guaranteed
Give Me A Trial.
SAMUEL  GIBBS ,
NOTARY PUBLIC >
Lands, Mines, Insurance and Collections
Mining business in all branches
a specialty.   Farms for
sale or lease.
Lillooet,  - British Columbia
CLINTON LAND DISTRICT
DISTRICT OF CLINTON
Take notice that Allan Selly Blake Baker, of
Loon Lake, occupation Rancher, intends to apply
for permission to lease the following described
lands
Commencing at a post planted about one and
one half miles west of the S.W. corner of lot 120
Lillooet, thence north 20 chains, thence east 40
chains, thence south 20 chains, thence west 40
chains,to point of commencement, 80 acres more
or less.
Nov. 18, 1914. Allen Selly Blake Baker
Subscribe for the Prospector
and obtain the local news.
Water Notice
Diversion and Use
Take notice that George Ingram Wilson whose address is P.O. Box 620, 530
Seymour Street, Vancouver, will apply
for a licence to take and use three cubic feet per second of water out of
Dickey creek, which flows easterly and
drains into the Fraser river about one
mile south of the mouth of Bridge river
and from lot 1313 Lillooet D. The water
is to be diverted from the stream at a
point about the northwest corner of lot
1303, Group 1, Lillooet District, and will
be used for domestic and irrigation purposes upon the land described as lot
1303 Group I, Lillooet District.
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 26th of December, 1914
A copy of this notice and an application pursuant thereto and to the "water
act, 1914" will be filed in the office of
Water Recorder at Clinton, British
Columbia. Objections to the application may be filed with the said Water
Recorder or with the Comptroller of
Water Rights, Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C., within thirty days after
the first appearance of this notice in a
local newspaper.
This notice was fiirst published in the
Prospector on the 22th day of January,
1915.
George Ingram Wilson, applicant
D. S. Wallbridge, agent.
Saddle Horses
Pack Horses,
Single and Double Rigs
for Hire.
LIGHT OR HEAVY
FREIGHTING,
Hunting Parties Furnished.
STEPHEN & J. RETASKET. THE PROSPECTOR
Provide Means for Shipping
Minerals and Fruit
(From page one)
tural resources. From what they had
seen they could go back and say that
one place at any rate would have
no bread line, would need no relief.
Lillooet was prosperous. They now
also knew what the district could do.
No fruit, In his opinion, could excel
i-.it grown in Lillooet, and ho was
• ot saying that men ly because he
was  speaking to  a   Lillooet  audience.
Some of the members of the Housa
represented districts which grew excellent fruit. But no district had tlie
fine color and with it the superior
flavor as well, Pe ich s a'id melons
of choice quality were grown in Lillooet and the grapes of the district
were famous. Walnuts and tobacco
were also grown. But in the past it
had been impossible to get to market
Lytton,   the     nearest   railwaj      point,
vas forty-seven miles away, and a
wagon haul of that distance was hard
on fruit. Now witii the accession of
the P. G. B. their products could be
shipped over night and next morning
would be in Vancouver, the greatest
market on the coast. Th:y had the
sun, the soil and the water, which
should assure success for production.
Mr. Bowser said he was not that
right giing to take any credit for the
government having inaugurated the
building of the P. G. E. railway—any
other government might have done
'.he san-e thin?. It certainly would
open up a great country. From the
rcenic standpoint t'.ie line was un-
iqualle.l on any transcontinental
route. That would attract tourists
and   especially  as  it   was so  close  to
he coast cili.s. The big game, too,
v. as an attraction which wo.ild bring
many visitors. The government had
now two lots of elk which they had
Imported and were breed.ng to trj
and restock the country. Likely the
first lot would be liberated in Lillooet,
w'.iere elk had once been plentiful.
With these as well as the bear, goat
and mountain sheep it would attract
tourists, when trey could step out of
rhcir Pullman right in Lillooet, the
heart of the big game country.
He hoped there would be no differences between th? people and ;h:
! ail-way company over freight rates or
o her matters, lie cou'd tay the men
of t'"e company were anx'ous to deal
lairiy with the people. Therefore his
edvice was for .hem to e.et on as well
a; possible. If difficulties arose they
eouid always come to hU confrere, the
minister of railways.
• _   the govern■
ment would  deal with th?m.
Concluding, the minister said he-
thought it was good for t?e'r distri f
to have the members of !he Legislature tee for themselves its possibilities. The administration" cf the country's affairs was best carried out by
getting acquainted with the people
v.r.6 their wants. Tha'; was why the
members of the government vls'ted
different  parts oi  the  province when
Water Notice
Diversion and Use
Take notice that H. Graham, Indian
agent, whose address is Lytton. B.C.
will apply for a licence to take and use
100 incnes of water out of Fountain
creek, also known as Fountain creek,
which fiows in a northerly direction and
drains into the Fraser river about eight
miles from Lillooet. The water is to be
diverted from the stream at a point
about one mile from its mouth, and
will be used for domestic and irrigation
purpose upon the land described as Indian improved land adjoining the S.W.
corner of lot 3217
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 9th day of November, 1914.
A copy of this notice and an application    pursuant    thereto    and    to   the
"Water Act 1914" will be filed in the
office of  the  Water Recorder at Clin
ton, B.C.
Objections may be filed with the said
Water Recorder or with the Comptroller of Water Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoia, B. C.
H.   GRAHAM,
Indian Agent for Fountain Reserve
Indians.
This notice was first published in the
Lillooet Prospector or the 13th day of
November, 19 J 4.
they cou'd Ho hopei to see great
changes when next he visited them
and he hoped __30 that wouiG not be
lon_
Bridge Across Cayoosh Creek
Hon. Mr. Taylor caid h? would advise the people to get their minds
rra.1e up <n what they wanted, out
no; to make any mistake as to th.-
location of the bridge across Cayoosh
creek which would give them access
Lo the railway, He had asked for the
data on which to have the materia!
ordere- for the bridge and work
would go en as scon as hs got it. Two
years ago S.v ftkhard McBride had
prorrtscd them they would have the
• • . >,p La year ths railway was nut
finished ar.d other public work hi)
been gene en with. Mr. Taylor paid a
g-reaj ccmpiirr.ent to the c te t-nd Intel igence rhown by M?. MacDonald,
their member, in looking after .he
r.e d=i of the district. He was a very
practical man and an excellent representative. The speaker concluded
his. rema: ks with a compliment to the
people for t'tdv hospitality on the
visit of tha members !0 their district
They had ail been much surprised and
Impressed with the extent i nd ro-
.ources cf the district and i;.n many
opportunities. He himself hid visited
every part of the province    ar._ uonc
k~. -~^xu -^exj^wti'.'..~: =^» v.T—^^w
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CAPITAL AND RESERVE,  $8,000,000
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Interest added half yearly.
A CURRENT ACCOUNT provides a safe and convenient
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MONEY ORDERS, Drafts, Travelers' Cheques and Telegraph Transfers issued, payable all over the world.
Our. Manager will gladly give you full particulars of our
arrangements for Banking by Mail if you
will call on him, or write.
f A. B. GREIG,   Manager      -    -     Lillooet Branch
had better natural resources, now to
a great extent lying- dormant. The
government had given roads and railways—it was up to the people to do
the rest and hs knew he wa: speaking
to men who knew what their chtr <•
needed.
Brief speeches,, expressive of'th<Mr
appreciation at the kind and enthusiastic reception a"d entertainment
given by Lillocet peop'e to the party
were given by various members,
among- whom were Messrs. C. E. Tis-
dall, William Manscn, H. B. Thompson. Ft. H 1 oo ry, M. Mcnso", J K
Jackson, J. A: Fraser an:l J. H Schu-
fic'cl All spoke cf he favorable Impressions of the. trip, the railway, the
scenery, t"e district and what they
had seen of its products. A numh'r
of them bought boxes if beautiful
i'.ppies to take home with them.
Water Notice
Daily Province, Vancouver, B. C.
For a Licence to take and use Water
NOTICE is hereby given that the Pacific Great Eastern Railway Company of Victoria, B.C. will apply for
a licence to take and use 100,000 Imp.
Gallons of water per day out of an unnamed creek which flows in a Southerly
direction through Lot 100, Lillooet District, and Indian Reserve No. 1, and
empties into Anderson creek about one-
half mile from Anderson Lake. The
water will be diverted at a point about
900 feet north of the right of way of
the Pacific Great Eastern Railway and
will be used for railway and station
purposes on the land described as the
Right of Way of the Pacific Great
Eastern Railway.
This notice was posted on the ground
on the I6th day of December I9K.
The application will be filed at the
office of the Water Recorder at Clinton,
B.C.
Objections may be filed with the said
Water Recorder, or with the Comptroller of Water Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
The Pacific Great Eastern Railway
Company, Applicant.
by (Sgd.) C. R. Crysdale, Agent.
This notice was first published in the
Prospector on the 25th day of December 1914.
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Land Lease Notices
Date of first issue of these notices-
February 12.
Lillooet land district
District of Lillooet
Take notice that Henry Higgingbottom of Empire Valley, occupation
stock raiser, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
South west corner of lot 934, thence
west 20 chains, thence north 20 chains,
thence east 20 chains, thence south 20
chains to point of commencement, 40
acres more or less.
Jan. 21, 1915 H. Higgingbottom
Lillooet land district
District of Lillooet
Take notice that Henry Higgingbottom of Empire Valley, occupation stock
raiser, intends to apply for permission
to lease the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
South west cornei of lot 934, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 20 chains,
thence west 40 chains, thence north 20
chains to point of commencement, 80
acres more or less.
Jan. 21, 1915. H. Higgingbottom
Water Notice
For a Licence to take and use Water
Take notice that The Shuswap &
Lillooet Fruitlands Limited, whose address is Notch Hill, B.C., will apply for
a licence to take ten (10) cubic feet
per second of water out of Currey Creek
also known as Fourteen-mile creek,
which flows westerly and drains ipto
the Fraser river about fourteen miles
north of the town of Lillooet. The
water will be diverted from the stream
at two points about, quarter mile on
each Fork of said creek, above the
forlts of said creek, said forks being
distant about one and one quarter miles
above the south-east corner of lot 1589,
Group 1, Lillooet District, and will be
used for irrigation purpose upon the
land described as Lots 888, 1002, 1590, &
Pre-emption Record No. 2353, Group I
Lillooet District.
This notice was posted on the ground
on the I4th day of January, 1915.
A copy of this notice and an application pursuant thereto and to the requirements of the "Water Act " will
be filed in the office of the. Water Recorder at Clinton. B.C.
Objections may be filed with the said
Water Recorder, or with the Comptroller of Water Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B. C, within thirty days
after the first appearance of this n»-
fice in a local newspaper.
The Shuswap & Lillooet Fruitlands
Limited, applicant.
Walter S. Mitchell, agent
This notice first appeared in The Prospector on the 15th of January, 1915.
LILLOOET LAND DISTRICT
DISTRICT OF LILLOOET
Take notice that R. C. Cotton of
Riske Creek, occupation rancher, intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described lands :
Commencing at a post planted at the
North west corner of lot 537 Lillooet
District, thence south 80 chains, thece
west 40 chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 40 chains to point of com-
•mencement, 320 acres more or less
Jan. 23. 1915. Robert Cecil Cotton
Lillooet Land District District of
Lillooet
Take notice that Sarah Hurst, of
Matlock Bank, Derbyshire, England,
occupation widow intends to apply for
permission to lease the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted 40
chains west of the North west corner
of lot .116, thence south 40 chains,
thence east 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to point
of commencement, 160 acres more or
less. Sarah Hurst, applicant
Jan 30, 1915. Henry Koster, agent
Lillooet Land  District District of
Lillooet
Take [notice that Clifford Allwood of
Lethbridge, Alta. occupation Florist, intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
North east corner of lot 116, thence
north 80 chains, chence east 80 chains,
thence south 80 chains, thence west 80
chains to point of commencement, 640
acres more or less.
Clifford Allwood, applicant
Jan. 30, 1915. Henry Koster, agent
.

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