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Lillooet Prospector Jul 28, 1916

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Array 1:"
1
ULLOOET PROSPECTOR
g"
-
i    V-
•
£
VOL. & NO. 39
LILLOOET,  B. C,  FRIDAY,  JULY 28, 1916.
$2 PER YEAR
A WEEK FROM TODAY
One more week and we shall
have entered upon the third year
of a war which when viewed from
a proper distance and seen in its
true perspective will prove to be
something far more, far greater,
far better than any war with its
victories of arms.
Jaundiced writers and "thinkers" and poets have wailed about
the decline of morals, the low ebb
of religious life and the general
degeneracy cf the age. And
even as they mournfuliy drone
out their song of woe, the throb
of the British war drum is heard,
and from the remotest corners of
that vastest of the world's empires there comes a response, unanimous, instantaneous and determined. The "Lion" (the Sea
Lion) with one spring dealt the
enemy a stunning blow on the
waves. He has gathered himself
for one more spring at the throat
of his adversary on land.
Thus will the world be shown
that truth will triumph, perfidy
will perish. The insipid and hypocritical prating of an alliance
with "Gott"—unless ^hat alliance,
include a respect for those
"scraps of paper" on which our
yea means yea and our nay means
m.y—ha». Jieen once more shown
to be the product of a philosophy
at once diseased and poisonous.
In delivering his mighty blow,
the British Lion will be scratched
and wounded. We must-help.
Red Cross funds will provide it,
Lillooet must do its part, and
will. On August 4th, while we
are speech-making and shaking
hands in congratulation, we are
also intending to prepare to succour the wounded who have
"done their bit."
The ladies of Lillooet, by their
attendance at the meeting called
for last Sunday, showed that they
are alive to the needs of the
of the hour. They have organized various money-making schemes which it is believed will be
warmly supported on Friday
next.
Our town will be honoured by
the presence of Capt. J. T. Robinson and some "lads in khaki"
from Kamloops. This will be
surely a fitting and inspiring occasion for us to put our house in
order and see to it that Lillooet,
one of the oldest of the towns of
B.C., organizes a "League of
Lovely Ladies" or some association composed of the fair sex,
who will work for the great needs
of the hour. Every woman's
greatest efforts are required, for
John Bull in giving the knock-out
blow will bruise his knuckles.
But it will be knock-out blow,
Details of the programme will
appear on Friday, Aug. 4th, in
The Prospector of that date.
Afternoon, sales of work, etc.;
evening at 7 o'clock, concert,' etc.,
concluding with a first rate dance
in Santini's hall.
-W.T.B.
LOCAL   ITEMS   OF INTEREST
Wan ted-Strong boy to learn 1
the printing trade.   Apply at this
office.
Mr. H. Avison, provincial sanitary inspector, is registered at
the Excelsior hotel.
Mr. A. Williams, of Vancouver,
was in town this week and left
for Bridge River yesterday.
The Prospector and the Family
Herald and Weekly Star till the
end of the year for 75 cents.
Mr. B. J. Perry came down
from the Coronation mine on
Friday and left the next day for
the coast.
Mr. G. H. Barnard, Dominion
member of parliament from Victoria, paid a visit to the Seton
Lake fish hatchery this week.
Mr. C. Henderson, traveller
for Smith, Davidson & Wright,
Vancouver, was in Lillooet this
week and gave The Prospector a
call.
Mr. 0. Ferguson is in town
this week from the Wayside
mine, Bridge River. This is Mr.
Ferguson's first visit to Lillooet
in over two years.
Mr. C. D. Wray, who has been
a patient in the hospital for about
four months, is now improving
and was able to come down town
on Wednesday.
Among the successful candidates at the recent entrance examinations we notice the name
of Miss Dorothy Kinder, of the
Seton Lake school.
The Misses M. and E. Grant,
of Vancouver, are spending a
few days in town, the guests of
Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Bell. Miss
M. Grant taught in the Lillooet
public school a short time ago.
P. Santini and Co. have opened
a grocery store in the premises
next to the Excelsior hotel. Their
stock is all fresh and of the best
quality. Look up the new firm's
advertisement in this issue.
Mrs. J. N. Cran left on Saturday on a visit to friends in New
Westminster. She was accompanied by her sister, Miss Eleanor
Martin, who spent a short time
in Lillooet last week.
Political matters are still very
quiet in this district. Nominations will be held here next
Thursday. A.ug. 3rd, and between that date and election day,
Sept. 14, we will probably have
visits from both Premier Bowser
and Mr. Brewster.
Price Ellison, for 19 years representative of the Vernon district in the provincial legislature,
again received the nomination
from the Conservatives of the
North Okanagan at a large and
enthusiastic convention on Monday. He secured a straight majority on the first ballot and the
figures were Ellison 54, Keary 19,
Kidston 13. The nomination was
made unanimous.
News of a runaway accident at
Whitly Camp, England, which
resulted in severe injuries to Will
Keary, son of Mr. and Mrs. W.
H. Keary, of New Westminster,
and nephew of Mr. Harry Keary,
of Lillooet, was received last
week. Young Keary was handling a wagon and team, when the
horses bolted, and he jumped.
Unfortunately the wagon overturned on him, resulting in a dislocated jaw and other injuries.
Mr. W. W. Bell, Quesnel, is
registered at the Excelsior hotel.
Mrs. Maude Stark, of Vancouver came to Lillooet on Wednesday evening and registered at
the Victoria hotel.
Messrs. S. A. F. Wiancke and
S. H. Hopkins are in town from
Victoria.
Messrs. W. Adams and W. Mclntyre made a successful canvassing trip on behalf of the Red
Cross Fund on Wednesday.
It is rumored that Mr. Gaskell,
the Liberal candidate in Fort
George, has retired, leaving the
field to Hon. W. R. Ross and the
Socialist, Mclnnis.
Mr. J. K. More, road superintendent, is in town, andvr?ports
that the crops in the upper end of
the-district are in fine condition.
Rain has interfered to a considerable extent with the haying
operations.
A meeting will be held in Lillooet on Friday, Aug. 4, at 7.30
o'clock, at Santini's hall, to appoint a committee to look after
the interests of returned soldiers
in this district. A full attendance
is requested.
We have received definite information that W. Baker, a
former constable in Lillooet, who
left for the front at the commencement of the war, has been
killed in action. A report was
circula ed some time ago that
Baker had been killed, but was
afterwards denied.
CHURCH SERVICES.
The Rev'd Archdeacon Pugh
will hold Divine services in St.
Mary's church, Lillooet, on Sunday, July 30th.
Early Communion at 8 a.m.
Morning service at 11 a.m.
Evening service at 7:30 p.m.
RETURNS WAR PROFITS
F. W. Baillie, manager of the
Canadian Cartridge Company,
Hamilton, Ont., has returned to
the Government $750,000, the
firm's profits on war orders to
date. It was announced th 'tthe
firm made a million cases at cost.
The money returned is to be used
for patriotic purposes.
H0£ IN OTTAWA
Ottawa, July 26.—The present
hot wave, which is the most prolonged experienced by Ottawa
for many years, continues. Today the thermometer touched 98
in the shade.
The farmer, an Irishman, found
his hired man fast asleep in the
sun on a soft bed of newly cut
hay. With a stern smile the
farmer said: "Slape on an' be
durned, ye terrier. While ye
slape ye've got a job, but when
ye wake up ye'll be out of
wurruk."
LAST ELECTION
Election returns in Lillooet
riding in 1912 were: A. McDonald, 200; Stuart Henderson, 81; spoiled ballots, 5.
This year-What?
NOT ALLOWED TO LAND
London, July25.—Thos. Hughes Kelley, of New York, treasurer of the Irish Relief Fund, his
wife and his assistant, Joseph
Smith, were refused permission
today to land in England or to
cross England to take a Dutch
steamer back to the United States
from Falmouth.
No definite reason is given except that their presence here is
not approved.
There is no disposition on the
part of the government to hold
up the fund contributed by persons in the United States for relief in Ireland, but certain individuals will not be permitted to
enter Ireland.
New York, July 25.—Eugene
Hughes Kelley, as treasurer of
the Irish Relief Fund, was en
route to Dublin with $50,000, representing the second installment
of the $75,000 fund raised in this
country for the relief of persons
who had suffered through the
recent revolt.
CASEMENTS EXECUTION
The execution of Roger Casement has been set for Aug. 3 in
Pentonville Prison, according to
the Daily Mail.
Efforts to* save his life have
not been abandoned.
HARVESTERS IN DEMAND
F. H. Auld, acting deputy-
minister of the Saskatchewan
department of agriculture, was
in Vancouver this week and stated that that province would require 20,000 men for the reaping
and taking care of the big harvest. Last year Saskathewan
harvested 6.800,000 acres of
wheat alone, but this year's crop
will probably be rather less than
that-auout 6,000,000 acres. The
quality, however, is as good as
has ever been grown there. The
wages will run about $35 to $40 a
month, with board. Arrangements have been made for lowered rates and Mr. Auld expects
that about 500 men will apply in
British Columbia.
SOMETIMES
Sometimes I long for a lazy isle,
Ten thousand miles from home,
Where the warm sun  shines ard the
blue skies smile
And the milk-white breakers foam -
A coral island, bravely set
In the midst of the Southern sea,
Away from the hurry and noise and fret
Forever surrounding me!
For I tire of labor and care and fight,
And I weary of plan and scheme,
And ever and ever  my  thoughts take
flight
To the island of my dream;
And I fancy drowsing the whole day long
In a hammock that gently swings-
Away   from    the    clamorous,   toiling
throng,
Away from the swirl of things!
And yet I know in a little while,
When the first glad hours were spent,
I'd sicken and tire of my lazy isle
And cease to be content!
I'd hear the call of the world's great
game -
The battle with gold and men—
And I'd sail once more, with a heart of
flame,
Back to the game again!
—Berton Braley. THE LILLOOET PROSPECTOR
CLASS LEGISLA1I0N IN
B.C. PROHIBITION
ACT
Measure Would Mean One Law
for the Rich and Another
for the Poor.
As the details of the Prohibition Act, on which the electors
will give a referendum vote on
Sept. 14, are being brought out,
the measure is becoming unpopular with fair minded men
because of the fact that the Act
covers "class legislation" of the
most pronounced type.
It is one of the principles of
true and stable government that
general laws should treat all citizens—whether workingman or
employer, whether rich or poor-
alike. This principle is violated
in a glaring manner by the Prohibition Act, and for that reason,
the measure is being condemned
by the working class in particular
and fair minded electors in general.
While many clauses of the Act
are of the "class legislation"
type, the most glaring instance
is that which is contained in
Clause 57, the section which provides for the uncontrolled, unrestricted and unlimited importation of liquor from outside the
province. This clause reads as
follows:
"Nothing in this Act shall be
construed to interfere
(a) With the right of any person to import from without the
province liquor for bona fide
use in his private dwelling
house."
This clause is a direct blow at
the workingman, the mainstay of
the prosperity of thjb province,
and the man of moderate means,
whose earnings are insufficient to
allow him to save money to any
considerable amount.
It is legislation which- says to
the man who has money at his
disposal, "You may import all
the liquor you wart, ordering it
by the quart, gallon, case or barrel-, so long as you send outside
the province for it." To the
workingman or man of moderate
means, who is accustomed to buy
his beer or other beverage by the
glass or bottle, it says in emphatic terms, "No, you can't do that
any longer. If yoil want to get
liquor in small quantity and buy
it in your home town, as you have
been accustomed to do, you must
go to the doctor and get a prescription, paying his fee, and
then get the prescription filled at
the drug store."
Is not this one law for the rich
and another for the poor, or man
of moderate means; one law for
the workingman and another for
the employer? And what, in the
name of justice, is that but "class
legislation?"
As far as the principles of prohibition are concerned, the man
who would be hit by this class
legislation is asking the question
as to why prohibitionists think
there is any more danger to be
feared from the consumption of
liquor which is bought by the
quart, case, gallon or barrel outside the province, than there is
from its consumption when
bought, locally, by the single
glass or bottle. This question is
a hard one for the prohibitionists
to answer, as the act sent to the
electors with their approval provides for the purchase of just as
much liquor as was previously the
case, so long as it is secured from
a drug store or imported from
points outside the province.
An illustration of the manner
in which even men of means view
the Act is shown by the words of
a prominent Vancouver financial
man, when he said : "If I voted
for the Prohibition Act, I'd do it
with the knowledge that I could
get just as much liquor as I
wanted anyhow, for I can afford
to send away for it. But I can't
vote for a measure which is so
unfair as to give privileges which
are denied to the workingman
just because he isn't as well fixed
as I am." —Advt.
WATER NOTICE
DIVERSION MSB USE
Take notice that Charles Fredstrom,
whose address is 14-Mile Creek, Pavilion
P.O., B.C., will apply for a licence to
taka and use 100 acre-feet of water out
of Sallus creek, also known as 14-Mile
creek, which flows in a westerly direction and drains into Fraser river on I.R.
No. 3, Lillooet district. The waterwill
be diverted from the stream at a point
about 900 yards east of the south-east
corner of lot No. 3622 (P.R. No. 2X9)
Lillooet district, and will be used for irrigation purpose upon the land described as lot No. 3622 (P.R. No. 2269). Lillooet district
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 12th day of June, 1916.
A copy of this notice and an applica
tion pursuant thereto and to the "water
Act, 1914," will be filed in the office of
the Water Recorder at Clinton, B.C.
Objections may be filed with the said
water Recorder or with the Comptroller
of water rights. Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, K C, within thirty days after
the the first appearance of this notice in
a local newspaper.
Charles Fredstrom, Applicant.
By H. P. Horan, Agent.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is July 7, 1916.
WATER NOTICE
DIVERSION and use
Take notice that I, H. Graham,whose
address is Indian Agent, Lytton, B.C.,
will apply for a licence to take and use
twenty-five (25) inches of water out of
Young John (Indian name), also known
as Young John, which flows westerly
and drains into—all disappears. The
water will be diverted from the stream
at a point about at the east boundary
line of the Anderson Late I.R. No. 1,
and will be used for irrigation and domestic purpose upon the Anderson Lake
I. R. No. 1, described as Anderson Lake
Indian Reserve No. 1.
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 20th day of June. 1916.
A copy of this notice and an application pursuant thereto and to the ' 'Water Act, 1914." will be filed in the
office of the Water Recorder at
Ashcroft, B.C.
Objections may be filed with the said
Water Recorder, or with the Comptroller of Water Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C., within thirty days
after the first appearance of this notice
in a local newspaper.
H. GRAHAM, Applicant,
Indian Agent.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is June 23. 1916.
Notice of Reserve.
WATER NOTICE
DIVERSION S.1TD USE
MINERAL ACT
Form F.
Certificate of Improvements
NOTICE
"Gold Level," "Summit" and "Silver
Leaf No. 1" mining claims, situate in
the Lillooet Mining Division of Lillooet District. Where located: on
Montezuma Mountain, on the South
Fork of McGillivray Creek.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Sidney Jef-
ferd, Free Miner's Certificate No. 5356c,
intend, sixty days from the date hereof,
to apply to the Mining Recorder for a
Certificate of Improvements, for the
purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of
the above claims.
And further take notice that action,
under section 37, must be commenced
before the issue of such (Jettificate of
Improvement.
Dated this 23rd day of June, A.D.
1916. SIDNEY JEFFERI .
36-Juiy 7, 1916.
Take notice that I, H. Graham, whose
address is Indian Agent, Lytton, B.C.,
will apply for a licence to take and use
five (5) inches of water out of a spring,
also known as on west of Cayoosh Creek
I.R. No. 2, which flows easterly and
drains into-all sinks. The waterwill
be diverted from the stream at a point
about- carried down its natural course
onto Reserve, and wiH be used for domestic and irrigation purposes upon the
Cayoosh Creek I.R. No 2, described as
Cayoosh Creek Indian Reserve No. 2.
The notice was posted on the ground
on the 20th day of June, 1916.
A copy of this notice and an application pursuant thereto and to the "water
act, 1914" will be filed in the office of
Water Recorder at Ashcroft, British
Columbia. Objections to the application may be filed with the baid Water
Recorder or with the Comptroller of
Water Rights, Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C., within thirty days after
the first appearance of this notice in a
local newspaper.
H. GRAHAM, Applicant,
Indian Agent
The date of the first publication of
this notice is June 23, 1916.
Form F.
Certificate of Improvements
NOTICE OF APPLICATION.
Sunset. East Pacific and Clifton
Mineral Claims.     Situate  in   the
Lillooet Mining Division of  Lillooet
District.   Where located, on Cadwallader Creek, Bridge River,
Take notice that we. Andrew Ferguson,   Free   Miners    Certificate    No.
99335B,   and Adolphus Williams, Free
Miners Certificate No.  B5171,  intend,
sixty days from date hereof, to apply to
the Mining Recorder for a Certificate of
Improvements for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of the above
claims.
And further take notice that action,
under section 85, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated this 21st day of June, 1916.
Andrew Ferguson.
Adolphus Williams.
June 30.
WATER NOTICE
USE AtfD  STOIi'-GE
Take notice that Golden Beloud,
whose address is Pavilion, B.C., will
apply for a licence to take and u-e fifty
acre feet and to store fifty acre feet of
water out of Eighteen Mile creek, Lillooet district, also known as Tiffin
creek, which flows westerly and drains
into Fraser river on lot 3634. The storage dam will be located at the south
end of an unnamed lake. The capacity
of the reservoir to be created is about
forty acre feet, and it will flood about
four acres of land. The water will be
diverted from the creek at a point about
half a mile east of the south-west corner of lot 887, and will be used f#r irrigating purpose upon the land described
as lot 3626.
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 5th day of July, 1916.
A copy of this notice and an application pursuant thereto and to the "Water
Act, 1914," will be filed in the office of
the Water Recorder at Clinton, B.« .
Objections to the application may be
filed with the said Water Recorder or
with the Comptroller of Water Rights,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.,
within thirty days after the first appearance of this notice in a local newspaper.
Golden Beloud, applicant.
By Samuel Gibbs, agent.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is the 7th day of July, 1916.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
all vacant Crown lands in Lillooet Land
District, included within the following
described boundaries, are reserved from
any alienation, except by preemption
entry under the provisions of the Land
Act, as a Commonage, for the depasturing of stock:—
Commencing at a point on the east
bank of the Fraser river where the
same intersects the 52nd parallel of latitude, being due east of the north-east
corner of the fractional N.W. 1-4 section 36, township 48, Lillooet District,
being also the south-west corner of lot
7966. Cariboo District; thence eastalong
the said 52nd parallel to the north-west
corner section 34, township 46; thence
south to the south-west corner section
22, township 46; thence east to the
north-west corner section 13, township
46; thence south to the south-west
corner section 1, township 46; thence
east to the north-east corner section 36,
township 76; thence south to the southeast corner section 1, township 76; thence
east to the north-east corner section 31,
township 43; thence south-east to the
north-east corner of lot 1677; thence
due east to a point due north of the
north-east corner of lot 2499; thence
south to the north-east corner of lot
2499; thence south-easterly to the northeast corner of lot 1685; thence south to
the south-east corner of lot 1258; thence
south-east to the north-east corner of
lot 471; thence south to the south-east
corner of lot 471; thence south-west to
the south-east corner of lot 384; thence
west to the south-west corner of lot 384,
thence south-west to the south-east
correr of lot 1717; thence west to the
south-west corner of lot 1709; thence
north-westerly to the south-west coiner
of lot 1736; thence north to the southeast corner of lot 1746; thence west to
the south-west corner of lot 1746; thence
north to the south-east corner of lot
1747; thence west to a point due north
of the north-east corner of lot 381; thence
south to the north-east corner of lot 381;
thence south to the south-east corner of
lot 380; thence West to the Four Mile
creek; thence north-westerly along the'
easterly boundary of Yalakom Game
Reserve to a point due south of the
south-west corner of lot 1199; thence
north to the south-west corner of lot
1199; thence due west 141-2 miles;
thence due north 7 miles; thence due
west to a point due south of the southwest corner of lot 2226; thence north
13 1-2 miles, more or less, to the southwest corner of lot 2226; thence northeasterly along Big creek to its junction
with the Chilcotin river; thence southeasterly along the south bank of the
Chilcotin river to its junction with the
Fraser river; thence northerly along the
east bank of the Fraser river to the
point of commencement, all the said
lands being within the boundaries of
Lillooet Land District.
R. A. RENWICK.
Deputy Min'ster of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., July 5th, 1916.        37
Notice of Reserve.
LAND LEASE NOTICES
LILLOOBT LAHD DISTBICT
DIBTBICT 07 LILLOOBT I
Take notice that John Bishop, of
Churn Creek, British Columbia, occupation rancher, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described
land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner of lot 847, thence
west 40 chains, thence south 40 chains,
thence east 40 chains, thence north 40
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 160 acres more or less.
John Bishop, Applicant.
By Geo. Bishop, Agent.
34-May 26, 1916.
LAND LEASE NOTICES
LILLOOET LAND DIBTBICT
DISTBICT OF LILLOOET
• Take notice that John Bishop, of
Churn Creek, British Columbia, occupation rancher, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described
land-
Commencing at a post planted at a
point due south of south-west corner of
lot 842, and on the north boundary of
lot 1197, thence west 80 chains, thence
north 40 chains to southern boundary of
lot 311, thence east to south-east corner
of lot 311, thence north 40 chains to
north-east corner of lot 311, thence east
to west boundary of lot 842, thence south
80 chains to point of commencement.
John Bishop, Applicant.
By Geo. Bishop, Agent.
34-May 26, 1916.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
all vacant Crown lands in Range 3,
Coast District, and in Cariboo and Lillooet Land Districts, included within
the following described boundaries are
reserved from any alienation, except by
pre-emption entry under the provisions
of the Land Act, as a Commonage for
the depasturing of stock:—
Commencing as a point on the west
bank of the Fraser river, where same
intersects the 52nd parallel of latitude,
being the north-east corner of the fractional N.W. 1-4 section 36, township48,
Lillooet District; thence southerly along
the west bank of the Fraser river to the
Chilcotin river; thence north-westerly
along the north bank of the Chilcotin
river to Big creek; thence south-westerly along Big creek to the south-west
corner of lot 2226; thence due south
131-2 miles; thence due west to Taseko
river; thence northerly along Taseko
river to the 52nd parallel; thence west
along the 52nd parallel to a point due
south of the south-east corner of lot
568, range 3, Coast District; thence due
north to a point due west of tbe northwest corner of lot 4750, Caritoo District; thence due east to a point 25 miles
east of the north-west corner of lot
4750; thence due south 20 miles; thence
due east to the west bank of the Fraser
river; thence southerly along the west
bank of the Fraser to the point of commencement; said lands being within the
boundaries of Range 3, Coast District,
Cariboo and Lillooet Land Districts.
R. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., July 5th, 1916.       37 THE  LILLOOET  PROSPECTOR
The Lillooet Prospector
Published in the Interest of Lillooet District.
W. E. Morrison, Editor and Proprietor
JULY 28, 1916.
RETURNED SOLDIERS.
We Canadians are absolutely unanimous about one
thing in this war-that justice and reparation must be
secured for those who have
suffered. The men who have
volunteered to fight for us,
while we have stayed safely
at home, these men, coming
back shattered and torn, or
with health in any way impaired by their service, must
nave reparation, and from us.
It is the first word of justice, and there is no Canadian
worthy of the name who will
not agree to it with all his
heart. Our head as well as
our heart, however, must be
employed to devise a form of
reparation that will really repair— that will as far as possible make up to these men
what they have lost.
From the beginning of the
war it was recognized that a
man offering his body, to defend our cause should have
compensation for any injury
his body might suffer in the
carrying out of that task. A
scale of pensions was adopted both for disabled soldiers
and for their dependants, in
proportion to the degree of
disability. A revised scale,
involving a large increase of
expenditure, was lately
agreed to by a parliamentary
committee and is already in
force.
A pension alone, however,
wil! not restore the injured
man to his place as an active
and useful member of the
community ; and that has got
to be done, by some means or
other, both in the community's interest and in his own.
A very few of the injured
will be found so totally helpless that this restoration is
impossible. On the other
hand, a large majority, in
spite of their injuries, will
still be fit for their former
work. But between these
two classes will be many men
with injuries either handicapping them seriously in
their old occupations or barring them out altogether.
Such men must not be condemned to perpetual useless-
ness. They would not thank
us for that. They are not of
the backboneless kind, or they
would hardly have thrown
themselves into the war.i
They did not enlist to be coddled or spoon-fed, and they
will not want to be coddled
and spoon-fed now. Having
recovered their strength, they
will naturally expect to use
it.   The question simply is—
How?
To begin with, their disability can often be lessened
by what is called "functional
re-education." By special
exercises, the muscles mutil
ated by wounds and operations, and weakened by
compulsory disuse, can recover some of their strength
and become once more accustomed to exertion. Then,
by "vocational re-education",
the men can be enabled to
return to their original trade;
or, when that is impossible
or undesirable, they can be
helped to fit themselves for
another occupation. There
is no intention to provide reeducation for men who do
not need it.
The parliamentary committee decided that the cost not
only of pensions and artificial
limbs, but also of this vocational training, should be
paic[ by the Dominion Government.
The Military Hospitals and
Convalescent Homes Commission, with Sir James
Lougheed at its head, has
already given a great deal of
consideration to the matter,
and has taken steps to organize the training required in
many parts of the country.
The complete establishment
of the system may be expected very soon; for the
Government, by order-in-
council, has just adopted a
report of the Military Hospitals Commission, ot which
we are enabled to give this
summary:
The report begins by explaining that the Commission aims at
benefiting not only disabled mem
bers of the Canadian Expedition
ary Force but also disabled Reservists of the British and Allied
armies who were bona fide residents of Canada when the war
broke out.
The Commission has received
the assurance of the active cooperation of the provinces and
various municipalities in carrying
out such a policy. Technical
schools, agricultural colleges and
other public institutions have
agreed to received disabled men
for training, and many offers
have also been received from
private commercial establishments to provide training and
subsequent employmen t when the
men have become proficient.
The training will be free to the
men in all cases. If there is any
charge it will be paid by the
Dominion Government.
The Commission has prepared
a scale under which a small sum
for personal expenses will be
granted to the men undergoing
training, while provision on a
sliding scale is made for married
men and their dependants, and
for those unmarried men who
may have persons legally dependent upon them.
The President of the Military
Hospitals Commission asks us to
say that any further information
desired by our readers will be
gladly given on application to the
Secretary, at 22 Vittoria street,
Ottawa.
172nd Battalion.
Capt. J. T. Robinson of the
172nd Battalion, will be in
Lillooet on Aug. 4th and will
be pleased to meet all men of
military age who are desirous of joining this Battalion
for overseas service.
When you come  to Vancouver
SoT Fashion-Craft
AND SEE THE NEW STYLES IN
Summer Suits
Whether you buy or not, we
will be pleased to show you
THOS.   FOSTER &  CO., LTD.   |
514 Granville Street
..•..•..•..•..•^#»«..«..»..«»*..«..»~*..«^»..«..«^*..i
!
When in Vancouver
Stop  at
The Burrard Hotel
(One Block East of New C.P.R. Depot)
American and European Plan     I
Under New Management
! J. McGillivary,
Proprietor
Headquarters for Mining Men
Commercial
Hotel    m
Chas. Mason, Mgr.
Quests  Comfort
is   My   Motto
Corner Hastings and
Cambie Streets
Vancouver, B. C.
EUROPEAN PLAN
Castle Hotel
W. S. Dickson & Robt. F. Leighton
Proprietors
High-class in
Every Respect
Choicest Wines, Liquors
and Cigars
Granville Street
Opposite Orpheum Theatre
and Hotel Vancouver
Vancouver
WE WANT YOUR HIDE
SHIP YOUR HIDES
AND FURS TO
THE McMULLEN HIDE & FUR CO.
956-958-960 Powell St., Vancouver, B.C.
We pay Highest Prices and give Prompt Returns
Please mention the Prospector when patronizing the above firms THE  LILLOOET  PROSPECTOR
FERNIE STRIKE DECLARED OFF
Fernie. July 25. -The strike effective here since yesterday
morning has been declared off,
and operations will be resumed at
the mines and coke ovens here
tomorrow morning. The decision
was reached after a stormy mass
meeting. The miners' officials
finally, in spite of considerable
opposition, gained control of the
situation and persuaded the men
to continue working while their
executive could meet the operators in joint conference.
The miners at Fernie quit work
Monday morning, presumably on
account of the operators refusing
to grant the 10 per cent, war
bonus, although they expressed
willingness to grant their previous offer of five per cent., with
additional 21-2 per cent, effective
April 1st next, on the condition
the men agree to the extension
of the present agreement until
the termination of the war. The
men advanced no excuse for
quitting.
IN THE ORCHARD
P. G. E. RY. TIME TABLE
Trains leave Squamish for Clinton on
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, returning on Tuesdays, Thursdays and
Saturdays, and passing through Lillooet
at 10.18 a.m.
When you eee a nest of caterpillars, destroy it at once; tomorrow may find them distributed
over several trees, making spraying necessary.
Watch carefully for signs of
pests or diseases. A few days
often gives a foothold and causes
unlimited loss.
Watch the newly planted trees
and remove all unnecessary
growth as soon as you can determine which branches are
wanted.
Many orchards are producing
three crops—viz., wood, fruit
and weeds. Fortunate is the
man whose soil will stand this
treatment.
The extent of winter injury is
just becoming apparent. As soon
as the full extent can be ascertained, remove the destroyed
portion.	
STUMPING WITH SALTPETRE
Freight and
Express Service
w. W. JONES
Has commenced a weekly Service from Mission to the Bridge
River mines, carrying Express
and Freight.
For Rates, etc., apply to
J. R. McINTYRE
Postmaster,     -     Lillooet.
..,.%...:•*-.-
CAPITAL Privately Procured for any
legitimate business; stock companies
incorporated; bonds an<i stock placed
on commission. Securities Bonding
Co., 811 Rogers Bldg., Vancouver,B.C.
SAMUEL GIBBS
NOTARY PUBLIC
Lands, Mines, Insurance and Collection*
Mining business in all branches
a specialty.   Farms for
sale or lease.
Lillooet,  - British Columbia
WATER NOTICE
DIVERSION AND USE
The following is a way of get
ting rid of stumps without using
blasting-powder or heavy pulling
devices. It is vouched for by an
old-timer who has spent many
years farming in B.C.
Bore a 2-inch hole in the stump
and fill with saturated solution of
saltpetre, refill in a month or so,
and again later if the stump is
a very large one. In extra large
stumps two or more holes maybe
necessary; these holes should extend nearly to the bottom of the
stump.
The effect the saltpetre has on
the stumps is to make them burn
more easily. The method is at
best slow, expensive and not
practical on a large scale, but
works very well in the case of
one or two stumps which have
been left in a field. The presence
of pitch in the wood prevents the
proper spreading of the solution,
but it has been found to work
very satisfactory in old, porous
or dry stumps.
PROVINCIAL AND GENERAL NEWS
Take notice that Joseph Copeland,
whose address is Lillooet, B.C., will apply for a licence to take and use 20
miners inches of water out of a spring,
rising about 50 yards south of south line
of lot 1137, group 1, and 1-2 mile east
of S.W. corner of lot 1137, group 1,
which flows north-easterly and drains
into sinks about on lot 3, group 1, The
water will be diverted from the stream
at a point about half a mile east of S.
W. corner of lot 1137, group 1, and will
be used for irrigation purpose upon the
land described as lot 1137, group 1.
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 20th day of July, 1916.
A copy of this notice and an application pursuant thereto and to the '' Water
Act, 1914," will be filed in the office of
the Water Recorder at ^Clinton, B.C.
Objections to the app ication may be
filed with the said Water Recorder or
with the Comptroller of Water Rights,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.,
within thirty days after the first appearance of this notice in a local newspaper.
Joseph Copeland, Applicant.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is 28th day of July, 1916.
LAND LEASE NOTICES
Peter Johnson of New Westminster, formerly accountant for
the Shull Lumber Co. in Burnaby,
was sentenced last week to two
years' imprisonment on some
fourteen charges of forgery.
The business section of Court-
enay was swept by fire last Friday night. Practically every
business house on one side of the
street was wiped out in the
flames, which were fanned by a
stiff breeze.
LILLOOET USD LISTBICT
DISTRICT OF LAC LA HACHE
Take notice that I, W. H. Buse, as
agent for the Marquess of Exeter, of
Bridge Creek, B.C., occupation rancher,
intend to apply for permission to lease
the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
20 chains south of the N.W. corner of
section 2957, thence 40 chains east,
thence 40 chains south, thence 40 chains
west, thence 40 chains north to point of
commencement.
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 20th day of June, 1916.
William Henry Buse, Applicant.
36-July 7th, 1916.
LILLOOET LAND DISTBIOT
DISTBIOT OT LILLOOBT
Take notice that Delina Clara Noel,
of Lillooet, B.C., occupation married
woman, intends to apply for permission
to lease the following described lands:
-Commencing at a post planted one
half mile north-east of north-east corner of lot 687, Lorne Mines Group, Bridge
River, marked south-west corner post,
thence north twenty chains, thence east
twenty chains, thenee south twency
chains, thence west twenty chains to
point of commencement, containing 40
acres more or less.
Delina Clara Noel,
38- July 10th. 1916. Applicant.
C. A. PHAIR
General Merchant    -   -   Lillooet
Hardware Groceries
Men's Furnishings Crockery
Miners Supplies Shoes
Fishing Tackle Guns
Na-Dru-Co. Drugs Tents
Bicycles Furniture
Dry Goods
Stationery
Grain
Ammunition
Harness
Lumber, etc.
Agent for
Eastman   Kodaks,   Edison  Phonographs,   Moore
Lights, Singer Sewing Machines,   Bapco  Paints
TERMS CASH
Hours:  7 a.m. to 8 p.m.      Saturday, 7 a.m. to 9 p.m.
■
I
1 ,
WO HING
Dry Goods, Gents' Furnishings
Groceries, Confectionery,
Footwear, Hardware, etc.
LILLOOBT,
B.C
Excelsior Hotel
Alex. C. Phair, Proprietor
The  Comiort   of   our   Guests  is  our  First  Consideration.
Full Stock of Wines, Liquors and Cigars
Automobile   Meets   All   Trains
^.^.*^^^^»^M^^.■»^»^^«■4^»^^<^^^^^^»^?^»«!^«^^<^<»^•»^^«^^»^!,^^^^«"^^»l'^'^l^{'^»l'^'^^^'^^»^'^^^^'   ■
[victoria hotel
y Well  Furnished  Rooms.     Hot  and Cold Baths.
J. Excellent Table.   First-class Bar. Sample Rooms.
V HEADQUARTERS   FOR   TOURISTS,   MINERS   and   COMMERCIAL   MEN
J Automobiles for  Hire at Any Hour
I P. LEWIS, -    - Proprietor
I
P. SANTINI & CO.
New and complete stock of Groceries just arrived
We buy by the car, saving our customers freights.
Flour for 1 week, $4.25..   Sugar $9.75      E. Z. Sealers
. Try our Great West Tea, 3 lbs, for $1.00	
Special Prices for Ranchers, Mines and Camps.
No. 1 Bacon, 28c. per lb.      No. 1 Shamrock Hams, 27c. per lb.
Bacon, Hams and Cheese at Special prices.

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