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The Prospector Apr 27, 1900

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Array ^■^^^UJLa^J    O^&TU.
THE
PROSPECTOR.
Vol. 2, No. 42.
LILLOOET, B. C, FRIDAY, APRIL 27,   1900
$2.00 a year.
THE   WAR   IN   AFRICA
Bioemfontein 23.—Colonel Anderson's
corps of the first and second Canadian
regiments and the Strathcona Horse
weie engaged in the operations of General Pole-Carew and French. Anderson
undertook to drive the Boers from their
line of defence south Leeuw Kop. The
Canadians sustained a heavy fire.
London 25.—Lord Roberts telegraphs
that DeWetsdorp was occupied without
opposition. The Boers fled at night-
being alarmed at the rapidity of General
French's movements.
General Pole-Carew'e division reached
Roode Kop yesterday. The enemy was
driven back with heavy loss, leaving
tbeir dead on the ground.
Lord Roberts has begun the second
act in his campaign. He has suddenly
deployed an army of 40,000 men and 150
guns on the long front from Karra siding
to Wepener, a distance of seventy miles.
The Boers have no army on the spot
large enough to attack the British army
so deployed and the enemy can only escape nortward to Lady brand. The roads
are in a terrible condition, which accounts for the slow progress made by
the British columns.
London 26.—It is officially announced
that Wepener has been relieved, the enemy retiring last night and this morning
along the Ladybrand road. They numbered between 4,000 and 5,000.
Considerable results have been attained in tbe relief of Wepener and in clearing the south eastern corner of the Free
S' ate of Boers, but the Boer army, whatever its strength has still to be dealt
with.
The Boers have everywhere retired at
the first pressure of the British advance.
No attempt was made to pursue the
Boers retiring from Wepener and everything now depends upon the'progress of
General French's cavalry. It is now a
race between the Boers and the forces of
Generals French and Hamilton. The
relief of Wepener was accomplished by
Genera1 Brabant.
A Ghastly Jlurder.
A ghastly murder was perpetrated last
week, by Chinamen, on Chief of Police
Main, of Steveston. The deceased officer, in course of his duties, was searching for some stolen property among Jthe
Chinese quarters of Steveston, and as
the officer did not return fears were entertained for his welfare, and a search
was made, resulting in the finding of the
body on Wednesday afternoon. One of
the searchers, while walking along a log,
noticed some freshly turned earth. Poking with his stick he felt some resistance,
and calling to other members of the
party near, the earth was quickly removed, and there in a shallow grave,
covered with scarce six inches of loose
earth, the body of the unfortunate Chief
Main was discovered.
A terrible sight with many gaping
wounds in head and neck, evidently
made with some sharp and heavy instrument. Closer examination disclosed, too,
that the legs also had been hacked and
mutilated. In the grave with his master
was the body of the little dog, killed too
to destroy all trace.      ,
The scene of the ghastly find is but
100 yards from the Chinamen's shacks
and about two miles from Steveston.
The arrest of two of the Chinamen on
suspicion and the disappearance of the
of the third lent color to the suspicions
which the finding of  the  chief's  body
verified.
Search of the shacks discovered some of
the stolen tools Chief Main was looking
for when he met his death, no doubt at
the hands of the thieves.
Eight Chinese are now in the provincial jail at Westminster, charged with
the murder of Alexander Main, chief of
police of Steveston, or with being accessory to the crime. So bitter is the feeling in the town of Steveston against the
prisoners that during the night several
hundred Japanese surrounded the Steveston police station, intent upon lynch
ing the Chinese prisoners but the officers
managed to take the Chinese in safety to
Westminster, a distance of eight miles.
One of the prisoners, Chan Yee Chung,
has confessed to the murder, stating that
Yip Leek, high binder, had ordered the
assault upon Main, but that the murdered officer had first been struck on the
head from behind with a mattock wielded by a third Chinaman who fled, but
who has since been captured. The mattock, with its iron hook, was found near
the cabin, covered with blood, and a
long knife was also found, with traces of
blood upon its blade. From Chung's
confession, aided by evidence developed
by the detectives, it ie now believed that
when Chief Main attempted to arrest
the Chinese for the theft of the stolen
goods found in their shack, he was killed with the mattock and knife, being
repeatedly stabbed and chopped with
the hooked tool.
The Jim Jam Order.
We must congratulate the Jim Jam
order on tbe new addition to their ranks
in the person of our ex-M. P. P. We un-.
derstand that the initiation ceremony
was a most interesting one. After the
usual opening ceremonies in the society's
hall, a knock was heard at the door.
" Who seeks admittance? " said the secretary. •' A stranger," replied the Benes-
ehal. " Hath he any token?" asked the
secretary. "These are his tokens,"
said the seneschal. The seneschal then
produced two bottles of " Four Crown "
which having been opened and sampled
were pronounced satiafactory. The secretary then directed the admission of
the new member who was initiated.
The secretary made a most touching and
eloquent speech, in the course of which
he promised in the future.to abstain
from referring to churchyards or Chinamen, he also mentioned that although
liis yellow legs had been washed and repaired he had refrained from wearing
them. He wished not to revive the buried memories of the past in which the
yellow-legs bore a most prominent part.
After a speech by a venerable member
who hoped that in the present political
campaign, no mention should be made
of loans, the new Jim Jam delivered his
maiden speech. He expressed his extreme gratification at the delicate feeling displayed by the secretary, as to the
reference to loans, he felt that there
would be no necessity to mention them
in this contest as all appeared willing to
do their duty. He referred in scathing
terms to the rascally attempt which was
being made to deprive him of his vested
right to represent this district. The rest
of the night was then devoted to the
usual festivities;
OTTAWA'S   Bid   FIRE.
Ottawa, April 26.—Fifteen thousand
people are homeless in Ottawa and Hull
tonight, 3,000 dwellings and buildings
destroyed, twenty million dollars in
property has gone up in smoke. The
fire broke out in Hull and fanned by a
sixty mile an hour gale made a clean
sweep including Eddy's splendid works.
The fire then crossed to Booth's in Ottawa, wiped out the Ghaudiere district
around the Canadian Pacific station and
travelled west and southeriv a mile and
half. Montreal and Brockville sent fire
fighters, while men from Peterboro, Toronto, Hamilton and other places were
sent.
Among the buildings destroyed are
Eddy's paper mill, match factory, wood
yard and other buildings of the company,
McKay milling company on Victoria island ; power house of the Ottawa Electric company; Victoria foundry; Canadian Pacific freight sheds at Ghaudiere;
Union station; J. R. Booth's residence;
W. A. Duck's residence; a large amount
of lumber at St. Louis dam belonging to
Booth; Shepherd Morse & Go., and
other firms was burneu. Rochesterville,
Mechanicsville and Hintonburgh were
wiped out.	
LOCAL  NEWS.
Cameron   &   Hurler's   stage   was in
town Thursday on a special trip.
A political meeting will be held in Lil
looet on Monday evening, May 7th.
Chief Justice MeColl, Mrs. M^ Coll and
two sons visited Lillooet Thursday. The
chief justice is holding the spring assize
through the interior.
A novel "A Woman in the VVild, Wild
West," by David Dalziel a local author,
arrived at The Prospector office this
week. It will be on sale shortly at the
bookstore.
There are a few copies of Clive-Phillips
Woolley's poem " Our Testamen," in
memory of the dead at Modder river,
are for sale at the post office store.
Price twenty-five cents. The proceeds
go to the Canadian patriotic fund.
Mr. R. T. Ward arrived in town yesterday afternoon from Ashcroft and the
Horsefly. He is here finishing up the
business of taking the stamp mill to McGillivray creek. The Anderson Lake
Mining company will now complete all
the work of putting the plant in working shape, and the tramway will be completed at once. Mr. Ward will remain
in town for a few days.
Mr. Archie McDonald returned from
Clinton this week and announces that he
will not be a candidate for East Lillooet
at the coming elections. Having been
numerously requested to become a candidate he acceded to the request, on the
understanding that no objections would
be offered to his being a non-resident,
having no interests in the districts, &c.
Recently such objections cropped up,
and even if confident of tbe support of
the majority of the electors, has decided
to leave the field to others.
Arthur F. Noel made a trip to Lytton
Wednesday and on his return left for
the Bend'or mines.
THE   BEND'OR   fllNES.
Wm. Halymore is at work prospecting
placer ground on the South Fork and
we learn that he has some good ground.
W. J. Abercrombie has his residence
feuced in and will proceed to make nice
surroundings. The house will be enlarged shortly.
The Lorne mine is working away
steadily and cleanups of the arrastra are
being made once a week, the results being very satisfactory,
The new blacksmith shop of Uren &
Mitchell, near the butcher shop, is being rapidly built and will be ready for
occupancy in a very short time. The
building is 24 x 40 feet with basement.
Fred Richardson came down from
Cadwallader Monday evening and will
remain in town several days. Work on
the Alhambra is going ahead and the
property improving as work proceeds.
It is the intention to put a small stamp
mill at work shortly.
The British Columbia Express company's stages leaving Ashcroft Mondays
and Fridays will connect with steamer
Charlotte at Soda creek, that steamer
having commenced her regular runs for
the season. Service leaving Ashcroft
on Fridays will be run to Quesnelle, and
way points only, until further notice.
A very neat and correct sketch map of
tl.e South Fork ot Bridge river and Cadwallader creek, showing the claims on
which gold bearing ledges have been
discovered, has been issued by Arthur
F. Noel of Lillooet. Everyone should
have one of these maps showing the correct position of the mineral claims in
the rich Bridge river district. The price
of the map is f 1. Mr. S. Gibbs was the
draughtsman oi this creditable work.
Hon. Joseph Martin held political
meetings at Lytton and Ashcroft last
week and occupied the platform until
about the arrival of the train each evening not giving the opposition speakers a
chance to reply. Mr. D. Murphy, the
independent candidate for West Yale,
held the Mailing gang down easily when
he got at them. Mr. Murphy's election
is certain. Hon. George Washington
Beebe will after June 9th put in his time
chasing potato bugs and meditating on
the government ownership of railways,
at his cabin near Agassiz.
The sad news of the death by blood-
poisoning of Mrs. Charles Haddock at
Ashcroft, was received in town this
week. She had been ill for some time
and was taken serijusly last Siturday
expiring Sunday afternoon. Besides her
husband and two children, her parents
Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Glencross and two
brothers reside in Ashcroft to mourn her
demise. The deceased was about twenty-
two years of age and had resided in British Columbia the greater p'ortion of her
life. The many friends of the deceased
and bereaved family in Lillooet will regret to learn of her death.
The Bend'Or Mines Ltd., held an adjourned general annual meeting at Vancouver laBt week, when the following
board of directors for the ensuing year
was selected: Messrs. J. J. Lang, Robt.
Hamilton, R. B. Skinner, J. M. Mackinnon and W. R. R >bertson. Mr. W.
T. Stein, O. A., was reappointed auditor
for the company. Of the 404,000 shares
of the company's stock issued, 314,915
shares were represented.
The annual report covering the operations of the company from its inceptioti,
October 1st, 1898, to Jan. 31st, 1900, had
been received at the last meeting. At
the meeting last week a report from the
mine manager, Mr. George H. Gillespie,
was read causing general satisfaction
among the shareholders of the company.
F. M. Robertson, E3q., Vancouver B.C.,
" Dear Sir: I have pleasure in reporting as follows:
Ran 10 stamps 12 days, 17 hours, 55
mins; crushed 19.5 tons of ore per day
(24 hours); the ore crushed during run
being as under—230 tons from lower
tunnel, 20 tons from upper workings,
250 tons total rock crushed, yielding 416
ounces avoirdupois.
I consider that this result is especially
gratifying when we take into consideration the fact that thiB ore waB derived
mainly from development work, the
whole run being composed of rock which
was mined in ordinary course of operations, not specially selected ore, but a
fair average of the largest part of ore in
this mine. The cleanup is certainly only
a protend of what we may expect for the
future. The development work done in
the lower tunnel alone giving us a continuous chute of ore 200 feet in length,
and is being continuously extended both
in easterly and westerly directions. The
west breast alone shows 30 inches of
quartz aud has every appearance that we
are running into a good body of ore. I
might also point out that this run has
been almost entirely composed of lower
tunnel rock, thus clearly showing thai
our richest ore is in our lower levels.
This in itself ought to be a pleasing feature of the run.
A result as above taken with fact of
the large quantity of ore in sight of same
character as that put through the mill
during the run should give every person
concerned confidence in the future of the
Bend'Or Mines, Ltd."
The mill started up as soon as frost
was out and for the broken period of
March, 12 days 17 hours and 55 minutes,
there were treated 250 ton ore, which it
will be noticed by the manager's report
was not picked rock, but juBt as it was
raised in development work. The yield
of 416 ounces avoirdupois from the amalgam plates, returned in retorted gold
380.26 ounces troy, which when smelted
returned 372.17 ounces troy of refined
gold, at $16.66 per ounce, amounting to
$6,200.35 for the fractional run, making
an average yield of $24.80 per ton for the
250 tonB milled.
The tailings which are being saved for
future treatment, when assayed showed
an average value of $6.80 per ton, making the total return of $31.60 per ton of
ore. Of the values shown by the tailings
$2.72 were in free gold, which amount
went over the amalgamating tables. The
percentage will be greatly reduced by
subsequent runs as the amalgamator was
new to the ore. THE PROSPECTOR, LILLOOET, B. C, FRIDAY, APRIL 27,1900.
THE PROSPECTOR.
Published every Friday.
SUBSCRIPTION |2.00
Payable in advance.
RIC. A. FRASER, EDITOR AND PROPRIETOR.
FRIDAY, APRIL 27, 1900.
To the Electors of the
West Biding of Lillooet Electoral District.
Gentlemen: At the request of a number of
Influential voters I have decided to seek the
honor of representing your important district
in he Provincial Legislative Assembly.
I am as many of you are doubtless aware,
interested to a largeexenl in mineral property
in the district. I am therefore desirous that
its resources should be developed, and consequently will be sure, if elected, to endeavor to
obtain as large appropriations as possible for
he making of roads and trails. I am convinced
that in the immediate future there will be a
large influx of capital into he tProvince, and
I shall use every effor to encourage the investment of money here. I have shown my faith
In the district by investing my own money, and
indirectly I have been largely the means of the
development of some of the best properties. As
the future advancement of Lillooet and the
farming community in the surrounding country
is solely dependent on the mining industry: it
is to your interest to be represented by some
one who is directly interested in mining.
Though not a permanent resident of the district, I am continually visiting the various mining camps and am therefore, well able to judge
of the country's requirements. The fact that
my residence is more or less in Vancouver and
Victoria should rather be in your favor than
otherwise as I am continually in touch with
prominent business men from all parts of the
Province and capitalists who visit the coast
cities.
I am in favor of a very liberal expenditure of
money for opening up the whole country so
that the world at large can see what great
natural resources we have and I will, if elected,
advocate the borrowing of money for this purpose to the fullest extent. I am of the opinion
that roads to open up Bridge River, the Empire
Valley, Pemberton Meadows and Anderson
Lake districts and the improvements of roads
and trails generally, are an absolute necessity
With regard to the eight hour law: I consider
that for an honest eight hours work underground, any man is entitled' to a full days
wage, but under certain circumstances and
conditions I see no reason why men should not
be free to work extra time provided they were
compensated accordingly.
With regard to Alien Act: I may say that I
have always opposed it even before it was passed
in the house, and from my personal observation
in Atlin last fall my opinion is that it was a
grevious mistake.
I am opposed to the employment of Oriental
labor in mines.
I consider it was a mistake to withdraw the
subsidy given to physicians to induce them to
reside in outlying districts in the province.
The improvement of the laws pertaining to
quartz and placer mining shall always receive
my most careful consideration and attention.
It is my intention, if elected to visit every part
of the riding at least once a year in order to as
certain the needs of my constituents so that I
shall bein a position to urge their claims on
the government.
It is my intention, if possible, to call on each
elector in order to explain my views more
fully.
Trusting that you /will show your confidence
in me by placing me at the head of the poll.
I have the honor to be, your obedient servant
ROBERT  B.  8KINNER.
The date of the elections having now
been definitely fixed, it is well for every,
one to carefully consider how he will
cast his vote. So far as is known there
will only be two candidates in this con*
stituency, Mr. A. W. Smith and Mr. R.
B. Skinner. The platform of both candidates as published in tbeir addresses,
are very niueh alike, neither of them
are supporters of the Martin government, Mr. Skinner being a conservative
and Mr. Smith claiming that party also.
In these cirJiimBtances what the electors
have to conaider is, which of these two
men is likely to do most for the interests
of the diBtrict.   Mr. Smith has been the
representative for a number of years,
and during a great part of that time he
was a supporter of and had a large influence with the then government. Did
he when he had that influence, exert
himself to obtain roads to Bridge river,
Pemberton and Empire Valley? There
is no question that he did not, in fact he
always threw cold water on the proposal
to make a road to Bridge river section.
Has Mr. Smith always expressed confidence in the future of quartz mining in
this section? He certainly has not. In
fact the stagnation of the last two years
has been largely due to him. How can
we expect outsiders to invest in quartz
properties, when the representative of
the district does not believe in its future.
Mr. Smith would like Lillooet to continue the Chinese village it has been in
the past. He could then continue his
business of buying gold from the Chinese who extract the gold by rockers.
Capitalists when they come from the
east and elsewhere are very likely to
seek introductions to the representatives
of the various constituencies. The members representing the Kootenays, tbe
Boundary country, will certainly say all
they can in favor of their section and
all of them, no doubt if asked, will be
most eager to dispose of mining claims
in which they have invested considerable sums in development work. How
much can Mr. Smith show that he has
invested in developing claims? Mr.
Smith's dealings in quartz claims have
been limited to passing off " wild cats "
on too credulous purchasers, and he in
that way has done incalculable harm.
He cannot show a single case in which
he has made an attempt to open up a
claim.
Mr. Skinner on the contrary has not
only spent his own money in developing
claims, but has induced others to do so.
It was he that was the means of opening
the McGillivray creek property on Anderson lake. He is personally interested
in the development of Bridge river and
will of course do all in his power to induce capital to come in. The objection
that he does not reside here is a puerile
one. Which of the two gentlemen is
likely to do most good to the district.
Mr. Skinner rustling round Vancouver
and Victoria making mining deals or Mr.
Smith playing solo for drinks and running to his office now and then to buy a
little gold dust from a Chinaman. What
good does Mr. Smith's residence here do
Lillooet? He buys the bulk of his supplies at the coaet and does not patroniz
the local stores. Mr. Smith's sole
achievement in the legislative line was
to introduce some few clauses about
gambling in saloons into one of the acts.
He was careful so to word them that hi*
favorite amusement of playing cards for
drinks should not be interfered with,
that is certainly a record for fifteen
years representation, it is time we send
some one to the local house who will be
more than a silent member.
A bill ia pending at Washington to
provide for the coining of half-cent or
five-mill copper coins. It is asserted by
the representative who introduced the
bill that there is a greatdetnand for such
coins, especially in cities where bargain
counters flourish. In some of the western citief, notably Chicago, some firms
have issued half-cents, which are advertisements and money at one and the
same time, and are said to have become
very numerous.
It is proposed to have a British Columbia building erected at the Winnipeg Industrial exhibition grounds, and to be
entirely of British Columbia lumber,
and filled with British Columbia exhibits. It is understood the dominion government will assist financially in the
matter, and the Canadian Pacific railway will carry material for the building
free of cost.
LYTT03ST.
Anthony & Robson,
(Successors to A. Stevenson.
Business established 1863.
POST OFFICE   STORIES.
General Jlerchandise and
Miners Supplies.
FORWARDING AGENTS.
UREN &
MITCHELL
GENERAL BLACKSMITHING
AND HORSESHOEING.
CLINTON, B. C. Branch at Lillooet.
Manufacturers of all kind of
MINER'S SUPPLIES, PICKS, DRILLS, Etc.
None but the best material used. Miners or
prospectors sending in orders will receive
prompt attention and satisfaction guaranteed.
A.. TJFJFOTblD,
OPTICIAN.
VANCOUVER,
-   B.C.
Dealer in Watches, Diamonds, Jewelry and
Optical goods. Our repair department is unez
celled for fine work. Leave your orders with
he postmaster who will have it attended o as
well as if vou came nersonally.
R.F.Anderson &C»
NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C.
General Hardware,
Paints, Oils  and Varnishes,
Stoves, Enameled Iron
and Tinware.
Miners Steel, Picks, Shovels, etc., Wire Cafcle
and Russel Wire Fencing.
Mainland Cigar
FACTORY.
t
IF YOU WANT TO ENJOY A GOOD
CIGAR ASK FOR THE
British Lion
Mainland
Pioneer
Hotel
LLILOOET, B. C.
OR
And be sure that each Cigar is branded, other-/
wise they are not genuine.
They are not.only made of the Choicest Tobacco but are of home manufacture, and
should be patronized by all good citizens.
WM. TIETJEN,
Manufacture*.
123 Water Street, VANCOUVER. B. C
SEAM LAKE
MILL
Lillooet, B. C.
Have in stock all kinds of
Dried Lumber, Finishing
Lumber and Mouldings.
All orders will receive
prompt attention. Write for
prices or apply at the yard.
W. F. Allen Proprietor.
z   ^
^   ^   ^   ^   m
7K   tK   7k.   7k   7k
First Class Hotel in every respect.     Accommodation
for Eighty Guests.    Large Annex comfortably furnished^     Commercial travelers and others
receive every attention by staying at the
Pioneer Hotel.   Large sample room.
iJ£   ^   ^   ^   iu   >$»   ^
7K    7k    7k    7K    7k\    7k    7k
WELL   STOCKED   BAR.' EXCELLENT   iUlBINE,
Headquarters tor the B. Cr Express Stages
-r>,
Hotel Victoria,
riilliliOOBT, B. OS-
This hotel being new and thoroughly finished throughout U the only first
class hotel in Lillooet. Persons calling at Lillooet will receive every attention by
stopping at the Hotel Victoria. Good stabling in connection with tbe hotel. Headquarters for the Lillooet-Lytton stage.
0   9   9   9   9   9    CHARGES   MODERATE.     ••••••'
alex. Mcdonald,
Proprietor.
EXCELSIOR;   HOUSE.
2?2Z.Ji.&2G2il, & BEXili,  PBOP8.
LILLOOET, - ... B.C.
The Bar is supplied with the best Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
LYTTON STAGE LINE.
Stage leaves Lytton every Monday and Friday morning
for Lillooet, returning next day.    Special trips made.
If you contemplate a trip into Lillooet district, write ub for information.
CAMERON & HURLEY     -:-    Lytton and Lillooet, B C.
R.&W. CUMMING
Flour Milling Produce and
General Merchandise.
F-A-VXIiIOlSr, 13. G.
ATRONIZE   HOME  INDUSTRY AND BUY PAVILION ROLLER FLOUR
Flour and Offal sold at mill and delivered at reasonable rates.
**>     -^     "»,     GrJE25T:E3I&.A.Ij  8TOBB,     -*-     "^     *■*.'",
Post Oflice and Telegraph Office in connection.   Freight teams plying one* a
week between Lillooet and Ashcroft.
W. CUMMING, Agent, Lillooet B. C.
WM. B. BAILEY & CO.
Storage & Forwarding Agts
ASHCROFT, b. c.
Consign your goods to our care.     We settle railway charge* and forward to
destination without delay.   Correspondence solicited. W. B. BAILEY A CO
■\ THE PROSPECTOR, LILLOOET, B. C, FRIDAY, APRIL 20,1900.
3
THE   BATTLE  OF   LIFE.
In infancy, in manhood, in secret or in ibow.
We take up arms in conflict, and Nature i« our
foe.
We stand in battle order and wave our swords
on high,
But  tbe   Phanton   strikes   too   deadly-his
weapons are too nigh.
The epidemic passes—'tis the common dread of
all.
Her poisoned arrows strike us in an instant
and we tall.
We 'shout a great hosanna as in battle, loud
endlong,
But still the fiend advances with a mystery
deep and strong.
The battle rages loudly, tbe battle rages long-
Man's story is recorded both in history and in
song.
Mow helpless were Our fathers, how deadly was
the foe!
Yet bravely fought those fathers in years of
tong ago.
Jxiuder grows the battle, fiercer grows the
fight;
As man grows wise in wisdom, he waxes wise
In might.
Defiance strong and fearless is increasing by
degrees—
But man wants yet the genius to be master of
disease.
There is weeping, there is wailing, as we battle
with the foe;
Our <ranks are thinned by^thousanda and replenished as we go.
Yet onward is the war-cry, as one by one we
fall;
W« bow#before our raptors—we bow both great
and small.
No choice is made by Nature in the harvest of
the field;
She wields her scythe in anger and each human
stalk must yield.
The highest and the lowest, and the mighty
and the mean,
Ateve'tide after harvest in the fallen ranks
are seen.
Jn savagry, in culture, in colors black or white;
Jn pedantry, in ignorance, in the wrong and in
the right;
In penury,in opulence, in humility or fame,
We join our-hands in battle and our causes arc
the same.
Jn selfishness, in charity, in innocence or
crime,
We stand in batte order and serve our spoken
time.
In vigor and in weakness, in youth or hoary
age.
We fall before-our captors—we fall before their
rage.
In trouble and misfortune, in merriment or
mirth,
We weave the web we fight for- weave it from
our birth.
Iu sunshine and in darkness we labor o'er our
loom—
We weave the web we love 'best, weave it to our
doom.
We fan before our captors—we fall to rise no
more.
We recognize our weakness, and throw our
weapons o'er.
We make a grim confession as our banners we
letgo—
We cannot win the battle, though invisible the
foe.
—DAVID DALZIEL.
The above is copied from the Victoria
Colonist and is the production of a local
author.
MILL
Lillooet, B. C.
Have in stock all kinds of
Dried Lumber, Finishing
Lumber and Mouldings.
All orders will receive
prompt attention. Write for
prices or apply at the yard.
To the Electors of the
West Riding of Lillooet Electoral District.
Boers Atav Save Mar Trouble.
A firm in Liverpool, being delighted
at the idea thatone of its employees was
called upon to join ihe reserves, at once
volunteered to pay half bis wages to his
wife in his absence, says the Post. At
the end of the month the woman appeared, and the money was at once given her.
" What?" she said* '• Four pounds?"
" Yes," replied the senior partner,
" that is exactly half; sorry you are not
satisfied."
"It isn't that I'm noi satisfied. Why,
for i ears he has told me he only got six-
teen shillings altogether, and—and—if
jflpthe Boers don't kill him I will."
At the recent fur sale of the Hudson's
Bay company held in London, Eng., a
silver fox skin was sold for the enormous
price of 5E580 or f 2,822. This is said to be
the iaigest price ever paid for a single
fox skin.
Mainland Cigar
FACTORY.
IF YOU WANT TO ENJOY A GOOD
CIGAR ASK FOR THE
British Lion
Mainland
OB
And be sure that each Cigar is branded, otherwise they are not genuine.
They are not only made of the Choicest Tobacco but are of home   manufacture,   and
shonld be patronized by all good citizens.
WM. TIKTJKN,
Manvpactubbb.
12$ Water Street. VANCOUVER, B. C
Gentlemen: As the present condition of af
fairs in the province can not last long it will be
necessary to appeal to the country by a general
election and I again come before you, for the
fifth time, to ask you for your suffrages, and if
you do me the honor to elect me to represent you
in the Legislative Assembly, I shallconsider it
ray duty to use my utmost endeavors to forward
your interests in every possible way, and those
of the whole province.
The most urgent requirements of tbe district
at the present time are the construction of
roads to the Bridge River, McGillivray Creek
and Blaekwater mining sections, and roads that
will give better and more convenient outlets to
the farmers of Pemberton Meadows, Watson
Bar creek, Empire Valley and Chilcotin
agricultural sections, and if elected I will do all
I possibly can to have these roads constructed
as soon as possible.
I believe that the district is on the eve of
great prosperity, and I am in favor of tbe Judicious expenditure of money in the construction
of roads and trails so as to give easy access to
all parts of the district, thus bringing its rich
mining and agricultural resources within easy
reach of the miners and agriculturalists. Such
a policy I am certain would result in a large
increase in the population and expansion of
the revenue as would justify any government
in the expenditure.
I do not think it would be in the best interest of the province for the government to
assume the expense of constructing and operating railroads.
In order to encourage the more rapid development of the placer mining industry of the
province, I think that holders of leases of hydraulic mining ground should be able to obtain
a crown grant of their holdings on terms similar to those granted to holders of mineral
claims.
I think that some arrangement should be
made with the Dominion government so that
rich mining ground, now held as Indian reserves, can be mined by white men.
I think that in order to protect white labor,
the Dominion government should increase the
tax on Chinese coming into the country, and
that Japanese should pay the same tax as is
paid by the Chinese.
I believe that eight hours should be a day's,
work in all underground metalliferous mines,
and that neither Chinese nor Japanese should
be allowed to work in such mines.
I think the act known as the Alien Act, and
the Liquor License Act, 1899, should be repealed.
The amendment made to the Placer Mining
Act, under the supervision of Hon. Jos. Martin
during the session of 1899, which has virtually
allowed the Chinese all over the province to
mine on all crown lands during the past year
without paying for a free miner's certificate,
should be amended.
In order that those who meet with accidents
in the mines or are sick from other causes should
be able to obtain medical aid with the least
possible delay. I think that the government
should give such a subsidy as will induce a
physician to reside permanently in the district.
. I do not think the policy of the present gov*
ernment is such as will promote the best interests of the province, and is not in accordance
with the well understood wishes of a majority
of the people.
I shall endeavor to see you before the election takes place and explain my views on the
various topics more fully to you personally,
and at public meetings.
I have the honor to be gentlemen, your obedient servant
A. W. SMITH.
Canadian
Pacific
Railway.
Soo Pacific Line
THE WM. HAMILTON MANUFACTURING SO. Limited.
MINING
MACHINERY.
PETERBOROUGH, ONTARIO.
GAJSTAJDA^
For information regarding
tickets to and from all points
in
Canada, United
States and Europe
and tickets to
China, Japan, Honolulu, and Australia,
apply for information to
H. E. Leslie,
Agent Ashcroft.
or to E. J. Coyle,
Asst. Geu. Pass. Agent,
Vancouver, B. C.
J. M, Mackinnon
Mining Properties
Handed
Properties Bondeo
Vancouver B. 0
F. B. KEBAGLIATI,
Horse Shoeing.
General Blacksmith
Work done at reasonable prices.
LlZ-TTOlsT, B.O.
THE BOOK OF THE TEAR.
"Tbe Bow-legged Ghost and Other Stories/
With an Intro*
duction by
Am eric*.'!
greatest poet,
James Whit-
comb Riley. An
illustrated vol.
ume of original
hu mo roue
sketches, verse,
facetious paragraphs and colloquies. A book
that will not
disappoint the
reader, as it
enters a new
and heretofore
unexplored
Held of humor.'
A book to be
nad aloud and
enjoyed among
.......  ..
h
Couldn't Laugh,'
Books," "Selling Locks of fcair," "No Woman, No
lad " "Society Actresses," ate., etc. Thia first
edition bound la cloth, printed on extra fine
paper, and absolutely the beat humorous book published. -Wmrfk $3.50, mailed postpaid for $1.00.
Order at once. Send for our new special illaa-
trated catalogue mailed free. Gives you the lowest prices on all good books.  Address all orders to
THE WERNER COMPANY.
NMttws h4 HsaiftMjam*. Akron, Onto.
(Tat Wkm CwaptiT to thofwcMr itHsM*.}—ttM   ,
roar friends. Contains'Tb* Bow-legged Ghost,"
'When Boa Sang Vint Bast, 'TOeVatt Who
Bouldn't Laugh,^ "Possible Titles  of  Future
CARIBOO & LILLOOET
STAGE TRAVEL.
Clinton and way points—Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
All points in Cariboo—Monday.
LILLOOET DIRECT—Monday and Friday.
Forks of Quesnelle and way points—Monday.
Until further notice a special coach, carrying passengers, mails and express, will leave Ashcroft for 150-Mile House, and way points, on Fridays. If business offers tnis coach will also run
through to Qnesnelle.
Through and return tickets at reduced rates.    Special conveyances furnished.
BRITISH COLUMBIA EXPRESS COMPANY,
Head Office:   ASHOBOFT, B. C.
iisrow
Don't Forget the Ashcroft Tailor
WHEN YOU WANT A NEW SUIT.
I have Juet received direct from Scotland the best selection of Tweeds, Worsteds, Serges,
Panting; in the Interior. Satisfaction guaranteed.
THOMAS McCOSH, Merchant Tailor, Ashcroft, B. C.
Canadian Pacific Navigation Company.
Pap A lac Ira Steamers for Skagway and Alaska points leave Victoria every Wednesday
rwf Hld9Rd.   evening and Vancouver every Thursday at 1 p.m.
Steamers for B. C. Northern Points leave Victoria and Vancouver weekly.   Regular steamers
for all British Columbia points.   Particulars on application. C. 8. BAXTER, O. P. A.
THE LZEIj
Corner of Hastings and Granville Street*.
WM.
VANCOUVER, B. Q
\ :fi&o:f
BAILEY
HOTEL.
Silverthorn Bros. Props.
LYTTON,
B. C.
First-class in every respect.
Choice Wines,  Liquors
and Cigars. Sample
room  tree.
J B CHERRY,
A. B. TKIM. COLL., DUBLIN.
BARRISTER. SOLICITOR, NOTARY PUBLIC
Lillooet, B. C!
HALFWAY HOUSE
Lillooet-Lytton Wagon Road.
CHAS. McGILLIVRAY   Proprietor.
First-class accommoda
tion for travelers.  Choice
liquors and cigars.
Headquarterafor stage.    Stable in connection.
SAHUEL GIBBS,
Notary Public, Accountant and
Mining Broker
Reports on Mining Properties.
LILLOOET and BRIDGE RIVER, B. C,
UCXKSKD CONVBYAKCBB. THE PROSPECTOR, LILLOOET, B. C, FRIDAY, APRIL 27,1900.
LOCAL  NEWS.
Dr. Sanson left the first of the week
for Clinton and will be abeent about ten
days. 	
Mrs. Connors left Tuesday morning for
the Bend'Or mines where her husband
is employed.
A. Richey returned to the Big Horn
ranch the first of the week after a several days visit to town.
L. G. Burns, constable, returned this
week from a trip up the river and to
Clinton collecting taxes.
Major Burnet and party returned from
McGillivray creek Saturday where they
had been surveying mineral claims.
Bertie Phair after a couple of weeks
visit with his parents left Tuesday morning for Victoria to continue his studies.
Miss M. Abercrombie, sister of W. J.
Abercrombie, arrived in town last Friday evening from Vancouver and will
reside here in future.
T. S. Brett and family moved this week
to McGillivray creek where they will reside, Mr. Brett being employed by the
Anderson Lake Mining company.
James McKivor and his son William
left Wedneeday morning for Cadwallader where they will do some work on
their mineral claims in that section.
Colonel G. T. Rives, superintendent of
the Toronto & Lillooet Gold Reefs on
Cayoosh creek, Mrs. Rives and Mrs. J.
P. Forde spent Tuesday and Wednesday
in town.
Mrs. Cumming returned home from
Vancouver Monday evening after an absence of a couple weeks visiting her eon
William who is attending business college there.
George Doherty foreman for the Anderson Lake Mining company left the first
of the week with a few men to get the
mine in good shape for active work in a
few weeks time.    .
Mr. Burwell of the firm of Garden,
Hermon & Burwell, civil engineers, Vancouver, arrived in town by Fridays stage
and has been engaged the past week
down the river surveying.
John Mitchell who has been in charge
of the blacksmith shop here for the past
few months left for Clinton the first of
the week, Mr. James Uren taking
charge of the Lillooet shop.
0. A. Harthorne who has spent the
past few months at the coast and sound
cities returned Monday evening to town
and left Wedneeday morning for Cadwallader to continue work on his claims.
E. J. Taylor was down lrom Cadwallader this week for supplies and material
for the Woodchuck arrastra, which will
be in working shape shortly. The property is looking first class and the owners
will make a good cleanup.
Strathcona Horse.
Lord Strathcona's request for fifty
more troops for his contingent in South
Africa, to take the placee of those killed
or wounded, has already been acted upon and arrangements are about completed for the required number to sail
from Halifax on the new Allan liner
Tunisian, sailing from Halifax for Liverpool April 22. All necessary equipment
is ready. The men will be selected from
western Canadians.
Dominion Elections.
The Vancouver World, last week, contains the following despatch from the
federal capital:
Ottawa, April 10.—(Special)—The general elections take place about the middle of June. Word has gone forth to the
'iberal organizers all over the country to
perfect their plans as speedily as possible. Hon. James Sutherland has
charge of tbe work at Ottawa and keeps
three trained men here constantly with
him to carry out his instructions.
Premier Martin will seek election in
the city of Victoria. A report to this ef-
ect was published in tbe Colonist last
week and again this week. Who his
running mates will be outside of Hon.
Mr. Yates, who has already announced
himself, will probably be decided at a
convention.
How Luck Runs in Mining.
" At first sight it would seem that the
like good luck might tall to any man,
but the realty rune much the other way.
Tbe man of quick intelligence, of judgment and decision is not the man who
ordinarily achieves this sudden wealth.
It is the man who is too stupid to know
the ris'iB he is taking, and it is tbe reckless man who plunges wildly and misses
no desperate chance, who seem favorites
of the god of chance. Nor do all good
luck stories have pleasant endings. Often after the ' pile' is made, accident,
disease or death eteps in to prevent its
legitimate enjoyment. One man dropped dead when at the weighing of the
first cleanup he found himself a rich
man. There was something wrong with
his heart. He had the physical strength
to make the fight against bad food and
water, to endure the back-breaking toil
of developing and working out, and all
the strain of the uncertainty that went
before. The supreme moment of success was more than he could stand, and
the useof the gold passed from him with
it acquirement. A certain James Meade
lay down with typoid fever in an outlying camp just as he was starting for
home with the accummulations of the
year, and he and bis bag of dust entered
Dawson together on a litter. It took six
men to bring him in—and he paid each
man $15 a day. Once in Dawson Meade
began to grow better, and when his sailing day came he walked to the boat. He
reached the wharf and fell dead as he
was about to go aboard."—Ainslee'B
Magazine.
LYTTOIST.
Anthony & Robson,
(Successors to A. Stevenson.
Business established 1863.
POSTOFFICE   STOEB.
General rierchandise and
Miners Supplies.
FORWARDING AGENTS.
UREN&
MITCHELL
GENERAL BLACKSMITHING
AND HORSESHOEING.
CLINTON, B. C. Branch at Lillooet.
Manufacturers of all kind of
MINER'S SUPPLIES, PICKS, DRILLS, Etc.
None but the best material used. Miners or
prospectors sending in orders will receive
prompt attention and satisfaction guaranteed.
To the Electors of the
West Riding of Lillooet Electoral District.
Gentlemen: At the request of a number of
influential voters I have decided to seek the
honor of representing your important district
in he Provincial Legislative Assembly.
I am as many of you are doubtless aware,
interested to a large exenl in mineral prop erty
in the district. I am therefore desirous that
its resources should be developed, and consequently will be sure, if elected, to endeavor to
obtain as large appropriations as possible for
lie making of roads and trails. I am convinced
that in the immediate future there will be a
large influx of capital into he tProvince, and
I shall use every effor to encourage the investment of money here. I have shown my faith
in the district by investing my own money, and
indirectly I have been largely the means of the
development of some of the best properties. As
the future advancement of Lillooet and the
farming community in the surrounding country
is solely dependent on the mining industry: it
is to your interest to be represented by some
one who is directly interested in mining.
Though not a permanent resident of the district, I am continually visiting the various mining camps and am therefore, well able to judge
of the country's requirements. The fact that
my residence is more or less in Vancouver and
Victoria should rather be in your favor than
otherwise as'l am continually in touch with
prominent businessmen from all parts of the
Province and capitalists who visit the coast
cities.
I am in favor of a very liberal expenditure of
money for opening up the whole country so
that the world at large can see what great
natural resources we have and I will, if elected,
advocate the borrowing of money for this purpose to the fullest extent. I am of the opinion
that roads to open up Bridge River, the Empire
Valley, Pemberton Meadows and Anderson
Lake districts and the improvements of roads
and trails generally, are an absolute necessity
Willi regard to the eight hour law: I consider
that for an honest eight hours work underground, any man is entitled to a full days
wage, but under certain circumstances and
conditions I see no reason why men should not
be free to work extra time provided they were
compensated accordingly.
With regard to Alien Act: I may say that I
ha ve always opposed i t even before it was passed
in the house, and from my personal observation
in Atlin lust fall iny opinion is that it was a
grevious mistake.
I am opposed to the employment of Oriental
labor in mines.
I consider itwasa mistake to withdraw the
subsidy given to physicians to induce them to
reside in outlying districts in the'province.
The improvement of the laws pertaining to
quartz and placer mining shall always receive
my most careful consideration and attention.
It is my intention, if elected to visit every part
of the riding at least once a year in order lo as
certain the needs of my constituents so that I
shall bein a position to urge their claims on
the government.
It is my intention, if possible, to call on each
elector in order to explain my views more
fully.
Trusting that you will show your confidence
in me by plating me at the head of the poll.
I have the honor to be, your obedient servant
ROBERT  B.  SKINNER.
cZ.X3L. BRETT.
Post Office Store.
Book, Stationery, Soaps,
Fancy Goods, Tobacco, etc
CANDIES, FRUITS, NUT?
LILLOOET, B. C
Established 1886.
Incorporated 1895
Inland Cigar Manufacturing Co.
OF B.C., LTD.
Our Specialties:
INTERIOR
LA MORENA
Mclennan, mgfeeleyi Co., Ltd.
Wholesale and Retail Hardware.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Mining Supplies.     Blacksmith Supplies     Mill Supplies
Railroad Supplies.   Contractors' and Lumber Supplies..
Agents for The Giant Powder Co., San Francisco.
Paul Santini
GENERAL MERCHANT
LTLLOOET, B. 0.
Carries a full stock of all kinds of Groceries, Dry Good,
Boots and Shoes, Hardware, etc.
MINERS' OUTFITS A SPECIALTY.
LILLOOET AND BRIDGE RIVER STORES.
J, DUNLOP.
GhEZLSriEIR/.A-L     Is&J&JEoGXZA-liTrL?.
Miners Supplies."
/*»
IiIIjIiOOET, *B. G.
Branch Store at Bridge River where a
full stock of General Merchandise and Min
ers Outfits are on hand.
J. Dunlop, General Merchant, Lillooet, B.C
C. A. PHAIR
General Merchandise
Miners' Supplies a specialty.
TERMS CASH.
LILLOOET, B C
THE FEDERAL LIFE ASSURANCE
COMPANY.
Our guaranteed security plan ia a popular and profitable policy to tbe assured.
It will pay you to see our rates and different plans before taking out a policy.
WM. HOLDEN, Inspector, Vancouver. THOS. McADAM, Provincial Manager.
2CJiL.2»!LX-002?a, 23 G.
John Hawley
fllNINQ BROKER.
V-AJiTCOTrV-IER/    -    -    -    B.C.
First class mining properties handled.
1^_ "•-..

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