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The Prospector Oct 19, 1905

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 :V:
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VOL 7, NO. 43
LILLOOET, B. C,   OCT. 19, 1905
$i PER ANNUM
CLARKE   &   CO.,
CHEMISTS   AND   DRUGGISTS,
XilLIiOOET,     -    -     IB. a.
Special Attention to Fitting
Trusses and Spectacles.
St. «M m WmlS'W W 'M W W m W
t0^^g0^^^_W0S__f_WS-yl-»
SALMON HARVEST.
Tlie salmon harvest of li.
0. is of sufficient importance
to warrant every reasonable
effort that can be put forth
to secure a perpetual supply.
Tlie fact that these fish only
spawn once, and die on their
spawning beds in the shallow streams, increases the
.lunger of. depletion through
destructive fishing methods.
If during an}'* run, there is
not a sufficient supply of ova
deposited, there must be a
lean season 4 yrs later, when
the fish of that year return
to complete their life story.
Just now there is a regular
succession of '•*> lean years &
1 abundant year. Such conditions tend naturally to perpetuate themselves, for the
abundant year is marked by
the escape of a large number
of salmon to the spawning
beds. Great shoals of fry
make their way to the ocean
to return matured and so on.
i.ut injudicious or destructive fishing during an}' one
year might institute a quadrennial failure of the run,
and have a recognized year
of failure instead of plenty.
The first essential is a good
supply of ova, and second, a
safe journey to the sea.
CONTINUED NEXT PAGE.
OCTOBER
MON TUE WED TH UR FRI SAT SUN
1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31
PAPERS ON HEALTH.
PREPARED FOR THE PROSPECTOR
FROM THE FAMOUS WORKS
OF PROFESSOR KIRK,
EDINBURGH.
RIGHT OF WAY FOR RAILWAYS, ETC.
vrotiec is hereby given Unit all Crown lands
■^ along the located lines of any railway, power or tramway company, Incorporated under
authority of lhe Leg i.-l.i Hue of this I'rovinee,
ami having H width uf fifty [60] lett on each
side of said lines, are reserved for right of way
purposes for such railway, power or train way
eompany.
W. S. GORE,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands <fe Works.
Lands and 'Works Department,
VliitorJa, U.O., 3rd October, 1905.
COLD AND PREJUDICE.
There is an un reasonable .ear
of cold water treatment, tiiat is
sacrificing precious lives.
Let us take an example, a line
girl of live years, who has gob
a cold resulting in an inflamed
state of the throat and small
tubes leading to the lungs, with
a good deal of fever. The breast
is burning hob, and so is the skin
generally. She coughs a good
deal, and her breathing is not
what could be desired. If this
goes on from bad to worse, she
will die. If tortured with poultice? of mustard she will die, besides suffering from its effect ou
the skin ; If hot poultices are applied bebweeu the shoulders, and
cold cloths pressed over her chest
she will recover.
Here is another case, wliieli is
given up, bub the father simply
pub a hob bran poultice on the
back between the shoulders, and
repeatedly changed cold cloths
on the client, and the child was
quite well iu a few hours.
The, fl re .of inflammation, if allowed to burn on in the breast,
willdestroy life, but if cold cloths
are changed, and gently pressed
over the fire, ib will be extinguished, so to speak.
We have seen a child lying on
its mother's knees, dying ; the
breath getting shorter each moment.   Bub a bran poultice well
heated was placed on her back
between bhe shoulders, and when
that was on, cloths wrung out
of cold water were pressed one
after another over her breasb and
she was out of danger in bwo
hours.
If bhe cold clobhs are laid gently on, and pressed dowu to the
chest, and even dowu over tlie
bowels—either when there is heat
enough in the fevered body generally, or when the heat iu that
body is maintained by the hot
bare poultice—the relief instantly given to the suffering child is
generally sufficient to remove all
doubts as to this being the right
thing to do. The first cold clobh
may be only a handkerchief,—
wrung out of cold water, and
folded iu four. The second may
be a small hand towel. The first
will be hot in a few seconds, the
towel perhaps two minutes. It
may need changing twenty times
before the perfect ease of breathing shows bbab the fire has been
subdued.
Many believe that it will kill a
child iu such a case to apply cold
to the chest. We knew a mother
whose child had died under treatment by heat only, and whose
second child was saved by proper
use of cold clot lis ; she went to
another woman whose child was
sick as hers had been, imploring
her just to fry the cooling cloth.
No, nothing would move her to
even touch the poor burning skin
with a. cool rag.
LILLOOET  DISTRICT.
COURTS of Revision and Appeal,
under the provisions of the "Assessment
Act," for the District of Lillooet, will be
held at:—
The Court House, Clinton,
Monday, 6th November, at 10 a. m.
The Court House, Lillooet,
Friday, lOih November, at 10 a. m.
F. SOUES.
Judge of Court of Revision and Appeal.
ported by the fact that in cases
of inflammation of the throat or
chesb, boo cold air is injurious bo
breathe. This is for the reason
that you would shut off a current of air from a fire. Ib is the
oxygen you wish to keep out;—•
when you pub cold cloths on the
chest, and keep changing them,
you do nob increase the supply
of oxygen, bub you extract bhe
surplus heat bhab has gathered
and is gathering there. You also
keep clear of all danger of a chill
by the strong hot poultice on the
back.
Mr. Smith-Curtis estimates that
the over-charge to British Columbians by the tariff lust year
was |900,000.00 —an enormous
bleeding for a population of ouly
1.30,000 souls. This he names a
monstrous grievance, calling for
immediate removal.
The Toronto Globe explains ib
as follows ;—
Tlie very nature of a miner's
life makes him extravagant, and
given to luxurv when lie can af-
ford it. He may be poor to-day,
Imt to-morrow he will be very
rich ; so the spending power, or
at least the spending habit of
miners is probably greater than
any other of the important occupations, lhe excellent stores of
British Columbia towns show a
taste for good things, and as the
tariff was framed to tax luxury
more heavily than poverty, this
may account for the larger sum.
This prejudice is perhaps sup-ireceived from British Columbia. The  Prospector.
_aat
The PROSPECTOR.
~wx_:__ii2e_zxj-_r.
Advertising Rates low as possible.
Basis or 30 cents per square Inch,
pek Month. Lank or Mining Notices
30 DAYS   ij.4, 60 DAYS   $6.
BY O. *W- ^_R__vEST*_E*iOIsrC3-
CONTINUED  FROM FIRST PAGE.
SALMON HARVEST.
The use of trap nets militates
against natural spawning. By
the old method a sufficient number escaped to perpetuate an abundant supply.
Such restrictions as are necessary must be secured by international co-operation. It is unreasonable to expect Canadians
to adhere exclusively to difficult
methods of fishing, while Americans on their side of the straits
are depleting the waters by using
traps. The same difficulty encountered on the great lakes is
present in Juan de Fuca straits,
and all reasonable efforts should
be made to secure the co-operation of the American authorities.
By the escape of a supply of fish
up the rivers and the protect i .m
of shallow streams from dams or
suits of hatchery operations,, but
would supply data, of considerable scientific value. There is yet
much for naturalists to discover
in the life of the Pacific salmon,
and the scientific as well as the
commercial value of investigating would justify a liberal expenditure for that purpose by both
Dominion and Province.
TORONTO GLOBE
LOCAL
Mr. Harry Gibbs   arrived
from Pemberton way.
A. McDonald, M. P. P. paid
a short visit to lillooet.
The weather has been very
cold for this early date, 12
degrees of frost already.
E. Santini will lose some
winter pears hy frost, liis
potato cellar is brim full.
D. Hurley's  new mansion
received its gray coat inside,
but owing to the unexpected
drop in temperature, it isn't
drying very fast,   so Mr. A.
.,   .    ,  ,      . •        ., ,   iMooney will not be able to
other  obstructions,   the supply J
complete the plastering work
in less than about a week,
when he will return to Ashcroft and attend to several
awaiting orders. For some
days he was assisting in carpenter work.
from year to year will be reasonably assured.
Ib is quite possible to supplement nature's efforts by the use
of hatcheries. There is au impression at the coast that the
hatcheries do not render much
aid, and tins has promoted the
controversy as to the merits of
Dominion or Provincial control.
Whatever tbe authority, that
work will require careful supervision. It is known that salmon
do not spawn until the processes
of disintegration have set in and
thab the ova require the continuous agitation of shallow rapids
nud that the fry will die if returned too early fo salt water, or retained too long in fresh. These
various features of the life history of the British Columbia salmon increase the difficulty of operating hatcheries.
The marking of a number of
fry each year, wonld nob only
afford a means of estimating re-
Miss Spcllman and sister
departed on Tuesday, greatly
improved in health. Some
young pianists will miss her
instruction.
Mr. Abercrombie has quite
a band of beef cattle now, in
reserve for thanxgiving and
Xmas market.
A visitor to Westminster
Fair remarks that William
Cumming, Jr., formerly of
Lillooet, produced the most
attractive window display in
the Royal city during Fair
time.   Mr. Gumming is Hied-
H_5_*C__.~^***3U
tata-m.
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Paul Santini,
GEXERAL MERCHANT,
LILLOOET.     -
EVERYTHING, for MINERS
HENRY'S    NURSERIES.
EXTRA LARUE STOOK OF
FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TKEES, FOR FALL
PLANTING. LARGE S;0CK OF HOME GROWN
AND  IMPORTED PULPS.
si;Runs, roses, rhododendrons, SMALL FRUIT, GREENHOUSE AND
HARDY FLOWEUING PLANTS. GAKDEX, FIELD,
AND FLOW:*_R SEEDS IN SEASON. CUT FLOWERS
AND DESIGNS FOR BALLS, WEDDINGS, . HUROH
DECORATIONS. AND FUNERALS. FERTILIZERS
AND BEE SUPPLIES,   BgBT    CATALOGUE FREE.
I have appointed  Mr.  John   Dunlop,
to accept Local Orders.
IM!.   J.   HI 'B-IT-R'Y
3010 WESTMINSTER   ROAD,
"V^^COTT V_H2~R., ~B. O.
J. Dunlop, - Lillooet.!
a-_HIsr__B_R;A.I~j
rUNERS' SUPPLIES,
Furs, Baskets, &   Curios, j
J AGEHT for HB. J. HENRY'S j
Home-grown or Imported j'
^w       NURSERY STOCK.      j'
itating  an  early visit to his
parents here.
School Inspector Qordon
was in town, and departed
well satisfied that Lillooet's
young idea will be properly
directed.
Litigation has been going on
for a length of time between Jno.
Marshall and \Y. E. lbeft concerning uiiuiug matters.
Two en ter prising prospector***
nre fitting up tbe litlle oil Prospector office ior a Bachelor Hull.
They can subsist on printer's |»i
for it while.
No newa is Good news ! The
dredge keeps digging and saying
nothing, but it is getting batter
management than previously in
its short and eventful history. The Prospector.
THE   PRESENT   ALASKA    BOUNDARY
DISPUTE OF LONG STANDING.
How the Dlnpute Originally Ai one-What
!■ the Const?—Detenuinatinn uf the
Line   Is   a  Legal   Question—Law   and
' Vsags—The Area ln Dispute—Canada's
Chief Contention Is loi- an Outlet to
the Sea.
Neither Canada nor the United
States can claim to bo an original
party to the Alaskan dispute wnich
is at last to go to a sort of arbitration. Uncle Sam bought his share
of the contention from Kussia; Canada received its portion as a legacy
which ~Jii.i.-;h Columbia had inherited from British Governments'.
Uow the Dispute Arose.
The boundary dispute takes us a
long way buck. One hundred and
bi-vty-two years ago a Hussian explorer named Behring accomplished a
feat to which we now owe the present problem. He led an expedition
to the north-eastern extremity of
(Siberia, crossed a narrow strait,
which he named the Behring Strait,
and reached the Continent of America at the north-westerly extremity.-
This new country he named Al-ak-
shuk, or "mainland," and that word
lias been corrupted into Alaska.
Behring was followed by fur hunters,
who found abundance of sea otter,
seal, and beaver. After these came
the great Russian-American Fur
Company, the officers of which for
•B3 years wore the lords of tho North
at that part of the world.
Meanwhile the British had invaded
the district from the east, and were
exploring and occupying the country
through C e agency of the Northwest Trading Company, whose operations extended from tho Arctic
Ocean to the Gulf of California, lt
soon *_e:nm_ necessary for Great
Britain and Russia to fix the limits
of their respective territories, which
they attempted to do by the Treaty
Of 1825. 'Ihis treaty is the basis of
the present controversy. Its alleged
inaccuracies and ambiguities have
kept the boundary question unsettled
duiing more than three-quarters of a
ventury. in 1867 when thc United
States bought Alnska from Kussia
for $7,i_00,0(.0, tho Russian side of
the controversy passed over to the
Republic, and the same year saw the
liirth of the Dominion of Canada,
whi.h eventually took over the Biitish side of thc case.
What Is tho Coast ?
Many interesting points have bee*
raised in connection with this partio.
tllar treaty, but the most important,
so far ns the boundary is concerned,
is "What constitutes the coast of tho
the ocean?" Under article 111. the
boundary line was to follow tho
summit of the mountains situated
parallel to the coast. By article IV.
it was provided that wherever the
mountains were more than "ten
leagues (30 miles) from the coast
the boundary shall follow the windings of the coast, but never exceeding ten leagues therefrom. Now several questions arise in this connection. Does the coast constitute th«
outer fi inge if islands or does it begin with the mainland? If it is confined to the mainland, does the coast
follow all the bays and inlets to
their head even when that would curry the boundary far beyond the
range' of mountains? If it does,
some very remarkable i*esulta are
obtained. The Lynn Canal, which
at its widest outlet is only four
miles and three-quarters wide, would
cairy the boundary 70 miles inland,
und then 30 miles beyond tidal wat-
_..'_! '
.... w.
EXCELSIOR HOTEL,  LILLOOET.
By George Hurley.
C A PHAIR
General   Merchant
Outfits and Guides   Furnished to Hunting Parties!
Groceries,   Hardware,    Photo  Supplies,
Dry Goods, Drugs,   Etc.
LILLOOET
BIG GA1E !
Arthur H. Martley -        Henry Schwartz
_E_ruisrT_E]^.s &_ auiDEs.
Our terms fire equitable.
We have a complete outfit.
We give you a guarantee.
Blenheim,
LILLOOET,
April, '05
AS/'a\/A,AS/a\/ASAsASA,A,/a\/a- /a\
1   HERE AND THERE |
Lillooet is a big District, — a.
tree-mentions district, extending
from the big timber whicli is being taken up on tiie Cheakanius
iu the west to the timber limits
already ttikeii up on Iliu Columbia, in tlie east. Over ninety
Timber Licences were renewed in
September, to Bowman Lumber
Co. for limits ou Cayenne creek,
in the Adams River region of the
Lillooet District, and above Canoe creek.
icDonald and icGillivray, Ltd.
Clinton  B. C.
IMPORTERS OF
:. General   Merchandise.
NOTICE.
Notice is herehy given ~hsl 60 days afler
date I shall apply 10 the Chief Commissioner
of Lands-and Works to purchase 120 acres
of pasture land situated in Lillooet District,
as follows :—
Commencing at the south-wast corner of
Lot 654, Croup 1, thence soulh 20 chains,
ihence east 60 chains, thence north 20 chains,
thence west 60 chains, to point of commencement. A. M. liUSHNEl.L.
•Clinton. H. C ., Sejt. i_., 1505.
NJOTiCE
Nolice is hereby given lhat sixty days after
date I intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands ami Works for permission to
purchase 40 acres' of meadow land described
as follows, seven miles from Alkali Lake ;
Long Johnnie's Ind X Res. Commencing
at a post marked Ind X Ues N VV coiner,
thence north 20 chains, thence west 20 chains,
ihence soulh 20 chains, ihence east 20 chains.
Alkali Lake, JOHN HANES.
Oct/6th,'05.
NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that 60 clays from
date I shall apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands antl Works to purchase 160 acres
of pasture land situated in Lillooel District as
follows,—
Commencing al the north-east corner of Lot
652, Group 1, thence north 40 chains, thence
wesl 40 chains, ihence south 40 chains; thence
east 40 chains to point of commencement.
1'avilion, LOUISE HOEY
September 2nd, lQ,o5.
NOTICE
Notice i« hereby given that 60 days from
date I shall apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works to purchase 80 acres of
pasture land in Lillooet District, situated as
follows:—
Commencing at  the south-west corner of
H. H. O'Halloran's application, thence soulh
40 chains, Ihence east 20 chains, thence north
40 chains, thence west 20 chains to poinl of
commencement.
Pavilion, B. C. D. MURPHY,
August 17th, 1905.
NOTICE.
I hereby give notice that sixty days after
dale I intend lo apply to the Honourable, the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works, for
permission to purchase forty acres of pasture
land, more or less, starling fiom the southwest
corner post of Lot 800, Lillooet District , -
thence west 20 chains, ihence north 20 clviins,
ihence east 20 chains, thence south 20 chains
to point of commencement.
ALAN S. WATSON,
Lac La Uache, Sept. 24th, '00.
A good manv fine homes are
being established in the farming
sections in East Lillooet. Mr.
Allan Baker is building at Loon
Lake. An English parly 1ms
lieeu dealing for some swamp
lands suitable for hay producing
at Green Lake, near the 70-niik*
House. Capt. Watson is erecting
a beautiful home at the 108.
lhe class of people coining in
to East Lillooet now are not at
all like the man that came out
to the Northwest from Muskoka,
with oue suit of clothes, uud ;i
two-dollar bill. Stayed six weeks
& never changed either of them !
Cuiniuings' Holler Mill is now
iu operation at Pavilion, and
wheat can be ground nt a moment's notice«for customers who
come from a distance.
James Grinder received a. sentence of six mouths, at Vernon
assize court.
Mr. Joseph Watkinson of Foster's Bar, son.e time ago secured samples of Uranium ore, and
specimens' of Tin, which prove
interesting and instructive to
prospectors passing through,—
who might wish to be on the
lookout for indications ot such
minerals.
One of the Indian women who
have been engaged in picking decayed eggs out of the spawn at
the hatchery, was asked, "What
are you doing uow-a-days ?"
Shu proudly responded,
" Fis-kculture!" 1ri o      I—' c /"*> -.""' 1-"**-, c i .'"*■•* P* /"*\' H
I IO      II UOpGULUii
FIRST SUBMARINE.
•ol* SurTlvnr of   first   Vessel of  tbe Sort
Ever Made.
Mr. W. A. Alexander is tho sole
Burvivoi- of the first submarine to be
successfully operated in Lime of war,
and ought therein-'-- to be a person
of interest at the present moment,
When submarines seem expected to
ploy so great a role in modern naval
warfare. The first submarine was a
most primitive boat, hand-driven,
unci constructed out ol a cylinder
boiler 25 feet long. As a member of
lhe artillery it fell to Mr. Alexander's lot to build the submarine, and
he did it, without, of course, having
any experience to guide him. Mr.
Alexander, a white-haired, gentle old
man, would not. give anybody the impression that he would show daredevil courage enough to go down in
a boat that had already three time:,
drowned its crew of nine men. Mr.
Alexander was only prevented by a
mere chance from going out on tho
last occasion when the Confederat<j
submarine disappeared with the Federal cruiser she destroyed. There
was no means of replenishing the
air supply, and once when a test was
Boing made as to how long the boat
could remain under water a candle
would not burn more than twenty-
ifive minutes, so rapidly did the
breathing of tho nine men of the
crew exhaust the oxygen. It gives
some idea of the nature of these men
that they remained below tho surface of the water somo two hours
after tho candle went out.—St.
James' Gazette.
Conll* Corps C_>nimB»der.
Major C-. II. G. Mockler, 30th Burma Infantry, at present attached to
tho intelligence branch at Simla.
whose appointment to command the
new Coolie Corps, now being raised
for service in Somaliland, was announced in The Times of 8th September, i.s one of the officers who
came under prominent notice during
the operations of tho allies in China
in 1900. Referring to the appointment, The Englishman ca.vs: '-Owing,
in the first instance, to his extraordinary gift of languages, Major
Mockler was appointed chief of police at Tientsin. At that time tha
settlement was overrun not only by
ruffians of every nationality, but was
garrisoned by troops belonging to
various armies, large numbers of
whom had got quite out of hand owing to the excesses they had been
permitted to indulge in on landing.
Major (then Captain) Mocklor organized a police force, and presently
law-breakers found that they got a
very short shrift. For a few weeks
tho chief of polii j went in danger of
his lifo. One attempt of assassination nearly succeeded, but in the
course of a month or two, while tho
rest of northern China was still in
an uproar, Tienstin became a model
town. The officers of the foreign
powers found some difficulty in believing that the terrible chief of
police was a mere captain in the
Indian army."
A Matter of Fact ling.
There are prosaic men and women,
and there are matter of fact dogs.
For purely business purposes they
are often  the best.
We once owned an excellent retrieving spaniel of thu simple order of
mind, without a grain of humor.
This dog accompanied us unasked
when we wanted to shoot a bullfinch
in the garden to stuff. The gun went
off, and  the poor bullfinch dropped,
Now, this dog had been used, when
the gun was fired, to go and look
for a dead or wounded rabbit. So
instead of looking under the app)9
tree, he disappeared into the hedge,
and in a few minutes he returned
with a rabbit in his mouth! So much
for '-he value of a matter ol (act
doft. '-London Spectator.
I
So don't forget the old folks, hoys—Ow y've
iioL forgotten .vou:
Tlioupli ye.irs  liave passed since yon  were
heme,  tlip old [hearts still are true:
And   write  l hem   now   and   tLion  to   bring
the light into their eyoj.
And mnlco the world  glow  < ne amain nnd
bluer gleam the skhH
-Will  T_  Hale.
telegraphers
need"ed"I
Annually, to fill the new positions created by
Railroad and Telegraph companies. We.
want YOUNG MEN and LADIES of good
habits, to   kearn   Telegraphy
AND     R. r. ACCOUNTING.
We furnish 75 per cent of the operators and
Station Agents in America. Our six schools
are the largest exclusive Telegraph Schools in
THE WOULD'. Established 20 years and
endorsed by all leading kailway Officials.
We execute a $200 Bond lo eve.ry student,
to furnish him or her a position paying fiom
$40 to $5o a mouth in States east of the
Rocky Mountains, or from $75 to $100 per
month in States west of the Rockies,—
IMMEDIATELY    ON  GRADUATION
Students can enter tit any time. No vacations. For full particulars regarding any of
our schools, write direct to our executive
office at Cincinnati, O.    Catalogue free.
THE  MORSE   SCHOOL
OF TELEGRAPHY .
Cincinnati, Ohio. Buffalo, N. Y.
Atlanta, Ga. LaCrosse, Wit.
Texarkana, Tex.       S:in Francisco, Cal.
RITiSH COLOMBIA EXPRESS
Clinton and way  points,
MONDAY - WEDNESDAY - FRIDAY
ALL CARTB0O POINTS MONDAY
150 - MILE MONDAY AND FRIDAY
ULLOOET   MONDAY AND FRIDAY
IP
**        is for
dimming,
General Store,
Agent for the 11 X
Miners   Supplies,
Sic.   Lillooet,
Drop -iii
fe C- *
REBAGLIATI
GO via  LYTTON
Leaves
Railway at Lytton
Mondays, Tuesdays,Friday.., Saturdays,
at 7 a.  in.     One hour at noon at   Half-way   House,
Reach Lillooet 5 p. m.  47 miles of Glorious Scenery along the Eraser River.
Returning Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Saturdays & Sundays.
Special Trips  made  by arrangement.
R. REBAGLIATI & Co.
LYTTON.
COKE   by  LYTTON
SHIP by LYTTON
NEWS-ADV ERTISER,
MOST RELIABLE COAST WEEKLY
WILL COST
with  the PROSPECTOR,
$1.50 a YEAR   CASH   WITH ORDER
VANCOUVER, B. 0.
is the western metropolis of Canada
and
THE NEWS-ADVERTISER
Is the newspaper that you should read
if you want to keep abreast of the
times.
Subscription price, Daily, $5.00;
Weekly, $1.00 a year. Send us 2oc for
the Daily for a month and see for yourself   what   we   are. ,
P. O. Box 812. Vancouver, D. C.
'AS/As7iS/A\A,7isA\/A\/.SA ,ASA,/As
DO  YEARS"
EXPERIENCF
A. G. REBAGLIATI,
LYTTOl-T,
GENERAL MERCHANT.
X U1
COPYRIGHTS <_~.C.
Anyone tending n eltcloh and description may
onlokly asncrtiiln our opinion .'reo whether bu
Intention In prohn'.ily patentable. Cortimnnlcn-
tloiisstrictt vcniiilileutlul- Handbook on Patent*
sent fiea. Oldest apenej' for seourliia patents.
Patents taken tnronyli Muitu & Co. receive
Ipf.tal notice, without ctinrKO, iu the
Scientific Jfttericatt.
A handsomely Illustrated weekly. J.arcest, elr-
culutlou of unv solOiltlliU journal. Tonus, 'i'i a
vonrj four months, $1. Soidbyall newsdealers.
Mra&Co.33""5^ New York
Branch OflBco. '''25 F Vi. Wa3t.lu1_K.11, V.i..
It isn't
AN EASTMAN
It Isn't
A KODAK !
ASK  FOR
C-iLT ALO O-XJ-HI
At   Smith   Bros'
Kamloops and Vernon
BOOK STOBB
NOTICE
I'hereby give notice that 30 days after date
I shall apply lo the Honorable the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission
to lease So acres, more or less, of meadow
land, stalling at a post about 8 miles South-
West of Lot 195, thence South 40 chains,
thence Wesl 20 chains, tlience North 40
chains, thence East 20 chains toi point of
commencement.
Lac La Hache,       ALAN S. WATSON.
Sept. nth, 1900.
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that sixty days afler
d;ite I intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to
purchase 80 ncres more or less pasture land,
commencing at a post at the nortli end of Lot
70, Lillooet District, thence south 20 chains,
thence east 40 chains, thence west 20 chains,
thence north, 40 chains to point of commencement. AUGUSTINE BQ1TANO.
Alkali Lake, Sept. 18, 1905.
NOTICE
I hereby give nolice thnt 30 days after date
1 intend to apply to the Honorable the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to lease 40 acres of meadow land,
more or lesn, starting at a post ahout 7 miles
south of C.inim Lake Rancherie, thence east
20 chains, thence south 20 chains, ihence west
20 chains, thence north 20 chains to point of
commencement.
Lac La Hache, ALAN S. WATSON
Aug. 26th, '05.
SIDNEY WILUAMS,
_B_B,0~VX2_TCXJ>_.Xj
_E__A~_tsr ZDISTTIR/V* 33 Y'Oie,
QUESNELLE, B. C.
I mi&e a trip through Lillooet District
every summer.
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that I shall 30 days
from date apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for permission to lease
160 acres of land situated in Lillooet District
commencing at a post placed on the west side
of the Brigade trail, about 4 miles northwest
from Lot 786, thence west So chains, south
20 chains, east 80 chains, north 20 chains, to
the initial post.
Clinton, B. C. ALLAN  BAKER.
Sept. 14,   'o5.
Every man owes it to himself and his
family to master a trade or profession.
Eijad the display advertisement of tho
s:x Morse Schools, of Telegraphy, iti this
issue and learn how easily a young man
or lady may learn telegiaphy and be assured a position.
A little Sunlight Soap will clean
cut glass and other articles until
they shine and sparkle. Sunlight
Soap will wash other tilings than
Clothes. *£
I
1   I

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